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  1. An Analysis of the Last Clinical Encounter before Outpatient Mortality among Children with HIV Infection and Exposure in Lilongwe, Malawi.

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    Chris A Rees

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV contributes to nearly 20% of all deaths in children under five years of age in Malawi. Expanded coverage of antiretroviral therapy has allowed children to access treatment on an outpatient basis. Little is known about characteristics of the final outpatient encounter prior to mortality in the outpatient setting.This retrospective cohort study assessed clinical factors associated with mortality among HIV-exposed infants and HIV-infected children less than 18 years of age at the Baylor College of Medicine Abbott Fund Children's Center of Excellence in Lilongwe, Malawi. We compared clinical indicators documented from the final outpatient encounter for patients who died in the outpatient setting versus those who were alive after their penultimate clinical encounter.Of the 8,546 patients who were attended to over a 10-year period at the Baylor Center of Excellence, 851 had died (10%. Of children who died, 392 (46% were directly admitted to the hospital after their last clinical encounter and died as inpatients. Of the remaining 459 who died as outpatients after their last visit, 53.5% had a World Health Organization (WHO stage IV condition at their last visit, and 25% had a WHO stage III condition. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that poor nutritional status, female gender, shorter time as a patient, more clinical encounters in the prior month, if last visit was an unscheduled sick visit, and if the patient had lost weight since their prior visit independently predicted increased mortality in the outpatient setting after the final clinical encounter.Clinical indicators may assist in identifying children with HIV who have increased risk of mortality in the outpatient setting. Recognizing these indicators may aid in identifying HIV-infected children who require a higher level of care or closer follow-up.

  2. Integration of outpatient infectious diseases clinic pharmacy services and specialty pharmacy services for patients with HIV infection.

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    Gilbert, Elise M; Gerzenshtein, Lana

    2016-06-01

    The integration of specialty pharmacy services and existing outpatient clinical pharmacy services within an infectious diseases (ID) clinic to optimize the care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is described. The management of HIV-infected patients is a highly specialized area of practice, often requiring use of complex medication regimens for reduction of HIV-associated morbidity and mortality prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections, and prevention of HIV transmission. To maximize the effectiveness and safety of treatment with antiretroviral agents and associated pharmacotherapies, an interdisciplinary team is often involved in patient care. At Chicago-based Northwestern Medicine (NM), the outpatient ID clinic has long worked with an interdisciplinary care team including physicians, clinical pharmacists, nurses, and social workers to care for patients with HIV infection. In April 2014, specialty pharmacy services for patients with HIV infection were added to the NM ID clinic's care model to help maintain continuity of care and enhance patient follow-up. The care model includes well-defined roles for clinical pharmacists, pharmacy residents and students on rotation, and licensed pharmacy technicians. Specialty pharmacy services, including medication education, prescription fulfillment, assistance with medication access (e.g., navigation of financial assistance programs, completion of prior-authorization requests), and treatment monitoring, allow for closed-loop medication management of the HIV-infected patient population. Integration of specialty pharmacy services with the interdisciplinary care provided in the outpatient NM ID clinic has enhanced continuity of care for patients with HIV infection in terms of prescription filling, medication counseling, and adherence monitoring. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Trends of HIV-1, HIV-2 and dual infection in women attending outpatient clinics in Senegal, 1990–2009

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    Heitzinger, K; Sow, P S; Badiane, N M Dia; Gottlieb, G S; N’Doye, I; Toure, M; Kiviat, N B; Hawes, S E

    2013-01-01

    Summary We assessed trends in the relative prevalences of HIV-1, HIV-2 and dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infection in 10,321 women attending outpatient clinics in Senegal between 1990 and 2009. The relative prevalence of HIV-1 (defined as the proportion of seropositive subjects having HIV-1) rose sharply from 38% in 1990 until 1993 (P Senegal. From 1993 to 2009, the relative prevalence of HIV-1 increased at a slower rate, while the relative prevalences of HIV-2 and dual infection decreased. These results confirm trends in HIV prevalence observed in other West African populations and provide a critical update on HIV transmission risk among women in Senegal. PMID:23104745

  4. Sociodemographic profile and predictors of outpatient clinic attendance among HIV-positive patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in Selangor, Malaysia

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    Abdulrahman SA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surajudeen Abiola Abdulrahman,1,2 Lekhraj Rampal,1 Norlijah Othman,3 Faisal Ibrahim,1 Kadir Shahar Hayati,1 Anuradha P Radhakrishnan4 1Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, 2Department of Public Health Medicine, Penang Medical College, George Town, Penang, 3Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, 4Infectious Disease Clinic, Hospital Sungai Buloh, Sungai Buloh, Selangor, MalaysiaBackground: Inconsistent literature evidence suggests that sociodemographic, economic, and system- and patient-related factors are associated with clinic attendance among the HIV-positive population receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART around the world. We examined the factors that predict outpatient clinic attendance among a cohort of HIV-positive patients initiating ART in Selangor, Malaysia.Patients and methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed secondary data on outpatient clinic attendance and sociodemographic, economic, psychosocial, and patient-related factors among 242 adult Malaysian patients initiating ART in Selangor, Malaysia. Study cohort was enrolled in a parent randomized controlled trial (RCT in Hospital Sungai Buloh Malaysia between January and December 2014, during which peer counseling, medication, and clinic appointment reminders were provided to the intervention group through short message service (SMS and telephone calls for 24 consecutive weeks. Data on outpatient clinic attendance were extracted from the hospital electronic medical records system, while other patient-level data were extracted from pre-validated Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG adherence questionnaires in which primary data were collected. Outpatient clinic attendance was categorized into binary outcome – regular attendee and defaulter categories – based on the number of missed scheduled outpatient clinic appointments within a 6-month

  5. A nurse- and pharmacist-led treatment advice clinic for patients attending an HIV outpatient clinic.

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    Griffiths, C; Miles, K; Aldam, D; Cornforth, D; Minton, J; Edwards, S; Williams, I

    2007-05-01

    This paper is a report of a study to map care pathways, examine the approach of different treatment advisors and explore the acceptability of a nurse- and pharmacist-led treatment advice clinic in order to aid decision-making for the future development and evaluation of the clinic. High levels of adherence to antiretroviral drugs are a prerequisite for a successful and durable virological and immunological response to HIV. Treatment guidelines acknowledge that adherence is a process, not a single event, and that adherence support must be integrated into clinical follow-up for all patients receiving these drugs. Data were collected between September 2004 and January 2005 through 17 consultation observations and 10 patient interviews in a specialist treatment advice clinic located within a central London HIV outpatient clinic providing care for over 2200 patients, of whom more than 1300 are taking highly active antiretroviral therapy. The nurses and pharmacist had similar consultation approaches, although follow-up care varied in extent. Benefits of the clinic approach included permitting patients to observe real tablets, tailoring regimens to lifestyles and telephone follow-up. These factors, particularly telephone support, were perceived by patients to assist with adherence. The role of telephone support, perceived to assist with initial adherence, requires further investigation. Future work is also needed to explore the health economics of this approach and to determine the actual impact of the clinic on clinical and adherence outcomes.

  6. Malignancies in HIV/AIDS patients attending an outpatient clinic in Vitória, State of Espírito Santo, Brazil

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    Lauro Ferreira da Silva Pinto Neto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study investigated cancer prevalence and associated factors among HIV-infected individuals attending an AIDS outpatient clinic in Vitória, State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. METHODS: A sectional study was conducted among HIV infected adults attending an AIDS outpatient clinic in Vitória, State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Demographic, epidemiological and clinical data were abstracted from medical records, including cancer diagnoses; nadir and current CD4 cell count, HIV viral load, time on antiretroviral treatment (ART, type of ART and smoking status. RESULTS: A total of 730 (91.3% patients were included in the study. Median age was 44.0 [interquartile range (IQR: 35-50.3] years; median time since HIV diagnosis was 5.5 years (IQR: 2-10; 60% were male; and 59% were white. Thirty (4.1% cases of cancer were identified of which 16 (53% were AIDS defining cancers and 14 (47% were non-AIDS defining malignancies. Patients diagnosed with cancer presented higher chance of being tobacco users [OR 2.2 (95% CI: 1.04-6.24]; having nadir CD4 ≤200 cells/mm³ [OR 3.0 (95% CI: 1.19-7.81] and higher lethality [OR 13,3 (95% CI: 4,57-38,72]. CONCLUSIONS: These results corroborate the importance of screening for and prevention of non-AIDS defining cancers focus in HIV-infected population, as these cancers presented with similar frequency as AIDS defining cancers.

  7. Evaluation of outpatients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis in a high HIV prevalence setting in Ethiopia: clinical, diagnostic and epidemiological characteristics.

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    Bruchfeld, Judith; Aderaye, Getachew; Palme, Ingela Berggren; Bjorvatn, Bjarne; Britton, Sven; Feleke, Yewenhareg; Källenius, Gunilla; Lindquist, Lars

    2002-01-01

    In a setting with a high prevalence of HIV we studied (i) the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and HIV; (ii) clinical and epidemiological characteristics of PTB; and (iii) the usefulness of standard procedures for diagnosing PTB. Of 509 consecutive outpatients evaluated on clinical suspicion of PTB in Addis Ababa, 33.0% were culture-verified as having PTB. PTB patients, non-TB patients and controls were HIV-1-positive in 57.1%, 38.5% and 8.3% of cases, respectively. Predictors for culture-verified PTB were age infection. Diagnosis of PTB based on clinical symptoms, sputum microscopy for acid-fast bacilli and chest radiography was sensitive (86.7%) but unspecific (64.1%). In HIV-positive patients both sensitivity and specificity were significantly lower (p infections are often misinterpreted as smear-negative PTB. HIV screening is therefore warranted not only in cases of verified TB but also as part of the diagnostic work-up in patients with respiratory symptoms suggestive of PTB. Also, increased awareness of, and improved diagnostic tools for, HIV-related pulmonary infections other than PTB are required, together with algorithms for patients with suspected PTB.

  8. Behavioral and clinical characteristics of people receiving medical care for HIV infection in an outpatient facility in Sicily, Italy

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    Di Carlo P

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Paola Di Carlo,1 Giuliana Guadagnino,1 Palmira Immordino,1 Giovanni Mazzola,2 Pietro Colletti,2 Ilenia Alongi,1 Lucia Adamoli,1 Francesco Vitale,1 Alessandra Casuccio1 1Department of Sciences for Health Promotion and Mother-Child Care “G D’Alessandro”, University of Palermo, 2Department of Medicinal Clinics and Emerging Diseases, “Paolo Giaccone” Polyclinic University Hospital, Palermo, Italy Aim: The authors examined a cohort of HIV-positive outpatients at the AIDS Center of Palermo University in Italy in order to identify factors related to the frequency of their visits to the outpatient facility for health care services.Methods: Two hundred and twenty-four HIV-infected subjects were enrolled in the study. Demographic and HIV disease characteristics were recorded and assessed with the number of days accessed to our outpatients unit in univariate and multivariate analyses. The potential relationship with immunological status was also analyzed stratifying the patients into groups according to their CD4+ T-cell counts (≥500 vs <500/mm3, and ≥200 vs <200/mm3.Results: Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that duration of antiretroviral therapy <5 years and hypertension were significantly associated with a CD4+ T-cell count of <500/mm3, whereas geographic origin (Africa was associated with a CD4+ T-cell count of <200/mm3. Mean number of days the patients sought access to day-care services for laboratory tests was negatively associated with CD4+ T-cell count.Conclusion: Patients with low CD4+ T-cell counts showed higher use of health care services, demonstrating how early HIV diagnosis can help to reduce health care costs. The CD4+ T-cell cut-off of 200 cells emphasizes the importance of identifying and managing HIV infection among hard-to-reach groups like vulnerable migrants. In our sample, the illegal status of immigrants does not influence the management of their HIV/AIDS condition, but the lack of European health card

  9. Vaccination coverage in a cohort of HIV-infected patients receiving care at an AIDS outpatient clinic in Espírito Santo, Brazil

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    Lauro Ferreira da Silva Pinto Neto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study assessed the immunization status of human immune deficiency virus (HIV-infected patients receiving care at an outpatient clinic in Brazil. The sociodemographic characteristics, CD4 count and HIV viral load of 281 out of 612 adult outpatients were analyzed. A total of 331 patients were excluded because of no availability of vaccination cards. Chi-square or Fisher's exact test were used. Immunization coverage was higher for diphtheria/tetanus (59.79% and hepatitis B (56.7%, and lowest for hepatitis A (6.8% and for meningococcal group C (6%. Only 11.74% of the patients had received the influenza virus vaccine yearly since their HIV-infection diagnosis. No vaccination against influenza (p < 0.034 or hepatitis B (p < 0.029 were associated with CD4 counts <500 cells/mL; no vaccination against flu or pneumococcus were associated with detectable HIV viral load (p < 0.049 and p < 0.002, respectively. Immunization coverage is still very low among HIV-infected adults in this setting despite recommendations and high infection-related mortality.

  10. The cost of antiretroviral treatment service for patients with HIV/AIDS in a central outpatient clinic in Vietnam

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    Nguyen LT

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Long Thanh Nguyen,1 Bach Xuan Tran,2 Cuong Tuan Tran,1 Huong Thi Le,1 Son Van Tran1 1Authority of HIV/AIDS Control, Ministry of Health, Hanoi, Vietnam; 2Institute for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam Introduction: Antiretroviral treatment (ART services are estimated to account for 30% of the total resources needed for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS control and prevention in Vietnam during the 2011–2020 timeframe. With international funding decreasing, determining the total cost of HIV/AIDS treatment is necessary in order to develop a master plan for the transition of ART services delivery and management. We analyzed the costs of HIV/AIDS treatment paid by both HIV programs and patients in a central outpatient clinic, and we explored factors associated with the capacity of patients to pay for this service. Methods: Patients (n=315 receiving ART in the Department of Infectious Diseases at Bach Mai Hospital, Hanoi, Vietnam, were interviewed. Patient records and expenses were reviewed. Results: The total cost of ART per patient was US$611 (75% from health care providers, 25% from patients or their families. The cost of a second-line regimen was found to be 2.7 times higher than the first-line regimen cost. Most outpatients (73.3% were able to completely pay for all of their ART expenses. Capacity to pay for ART was influenced by five factors, including marital status, distance from house to clinic, patient's monthly income, household economic condition, and health insurance status. Most of the patients (84.8% would have been willing to pay for health insurance if a copayment scheme for ART were to be introduced. Conclusion: This study provides evidence on payment capacity of HIV/AIDS patients in Vietnam and supplies information on ART costs from both provider and patient perspectives. In particular, results from this study suggest that earlier access to ART

  11. Health and mood among HIV-positive outpatients attending an ART Clinic of a University Hospital.

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    Costa, Dilar; Mendes, Aida; Abreu, Wilson

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate how individuals at different stages of infection with HIV perceive their health status and its association with mood states. With the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in 1996, the quality of life of people living with HIV has improved. However, the literature emphasises the negative effects of the disease on the mental health of individuals suffering from this condition and the high incidence of depression among infected individuals. Although people diagnosed and living with HIV are overwhelmed by emotions, we found that various emotional manifestations are understudied within this group of patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in an outpatient unit of a University Hospital (antiretroviral therapy clinic), with a consecutive sample composed of 152 patients. Data were collected through a questionnaire used to assess the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, the Short Form (36) Health Survey, and the Profile of Mood States scale. The health status negatively affects the role at the emotional and mental health dimensions. The participants showing a worse health condition than in the previous year had higher levels of tension/anxiety, depression/dejection, fatigue/inertia and confusion/bewilderment. The stage of disease and the profile of mood state emerged as independent phenomena. The results of this study indicate that nurses worldwide should be aware of the emotional aspects (negative emotions strongly impact health) related to the subjective perception of a worsening health status, regardless of the stage of the disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Clinical presentation and opportunistic infections in HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients in Guinea-Bissau

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    Sørensen, Allan; Jespersen, Sanne; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2016-01-01

    HIV-2 is prevalent. In this study, we aimed to characterize the clinical presentations among HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, newly diagnosed HIV patients attending the HIV outpatient clinic at Hospital Nacional Sim~ao Mendes in Guinea......-Bissau were enrolled. Demographical and clinical data were collected and compared between HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. Results: A total of 169 patients (76% HIV-1, 17% HIV-2 and 6% HIV 1/2) were included in the study between 21 March 2012 and 14 December 2012. HIV-1 seropositive...... antigen. Conclusion: HIV-1 and HIV-1/2 seropositive patients have lower CD4 cell counts than HIV-2 seropositive patients when diagnosed with HIV with only minor clinical and demographic differences among groups. Few patients were diagnosed with TB and cryptococcal disease was not found to be a major...

  13. Low HIV-testing rates and awareness of HIV infection among high-risk heterosexual STI clinic attendees in The Netherlands

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    van der Bij, Akke K.; Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Fennema, Han S. A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Since 1999, HIV testing is routinely offered to all attendees of the sexually transmitted infections (STI) outpatient clinic in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. This study evaluates whether this more active HIV-testing policy increased uptake of HIV testing and awareness of an HIV-positive

  14. Validation of the International HIV Dementia Scale as a Screening Tool for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders in a German-Speaking HIV Outpatient Clinic.

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    Victor Marin-Webb

    Full Text Available HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND are widely present among people living with HIV. Especially its milder forms, asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI and mild neurocognitive disorder (MND, remain highly prevalent worldwide. Diagnosing these conditions is subject to a time and resource consuming neuropsychological assessment. Selecting patients at a higher risk of cognitive impairment by using a simple but effective screening tool helps to organise access to further neuropsychological diagnosis. The International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS has until now been a well-established screening tool in African and American countries, however these populations' demographics defer significantly from ours, so using the same parameters could be ineffective.To calculate the prevalence of this condition among people attending an HIV outpatient clinic in Berlin and to validate the use of the IHDS as a screening tool for HAND in a German-speaking population.We screened 480 HIV-infected patients using the IHDS, 89% of them were on a stable antiretroviral treatment. Ninety of them completed a standardised neuropsychological battery of tests and a specific cognitive complaints questionnaire. The same procedure was applied to a control group of 30 HIV-negative participants. HAND diagnosis was established according to the Frascati criteria.The overall prevalence of HAND in our cohort was 43% (20% ANI, 17% MND and 6% HIV-associated dementia. The optimal cut-off on the IHDS for detecting HAND cases was set at 11 and achieved both a sensitivity and a specificity of 80%. When specifically screening for the more severe form of HAND, HIV-associated dementia, a cut-off value of 10 offered an increase in both sensitivity (94% and specificity (86%. The Youden Index for diagnostic accuracy was 0.6 and 0.8, respectively.The prevalence of HAND was comparable to the reported by recent studies performed in countries with a similar economic development. The study

  15. Validation of the International HIV Dementia Scale as a Screening Tool for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders in a German-Speaking HIV Outpatient Clinic.

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    Marin-Webb, Victor; Jessen, Heiko; Kopp, Ute; Jessen, Arne B; Hahn, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are widely present among people living with HIV. Especially its milder forms, asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI) and mild neurocognitive disorder (MND), remain highly prevalent worldwide. Diagnosing these conditions is subject to a time and resource consuming neuropsychological assessment. Selecting patients at a higher risk of cognitive impairment by using a simple but effective screening tool helps to organise access to further neuropsychological diagnosis. The International HIV Dementia Scale (IHDS) has until now been a well-established screening tool in African and American countries, however these populations' demographics defer significantly from ours, so using the same parameters could be ineffective. To calculate the prevalence of this condition among people attending an HIV outpatient clinic in Berlin and to validate the use of the IHDS as a screening tool for HAND in a German-speaking population. We screened 480 HIV-infected patients using the IHDS, 89% of them were on a stable antiretroviral treatment. Ninety of them completed a standardised neuropsychological battery of tests and a specific cognitive complaints questionnaire. The same procedure was applied to a control group of 30 HIV-negative participants. HAND diagnosis was established according to the Frascati criteria. The overall prevalence of HAND in our cohort was 43% (20% ANI, 17% MND and 6% HIV-associated dementia). The optimal cut-off on the IHDS for detecting HAND cases was set at 11 and achieved both a sensitivity and a specificity of 80%. When specifically screening for the more severe form of HAND, HIV-associated dementia, a cut-off value of 10 offered an increase in both sensitivity (94%) and specificity (86%). The Youden Index for diagnostic accuracy was 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. The prevalence of HAND was comparable to the reported by recent studies performed in countries with a similar economic development. The study confirms

  16. Practices in security and confidentiality of HIV/AIDS patients' information: A national survey among staff at HIV outpatient clinics in Vietnam.

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    Nguyen Khac Hai

    Full Text Available Breach of confidentiality or invasion of privacy from the collection and use of medical records, particularly those of patients with HIV/AIDS or other diseases sensitive to stigmatization, should be prevented by all related stakeholders in healthcare settings. The main focus of this study was to assess practices regarding security and confidentiality of HIV-related information among staff at HIV outpatient clinics (HIV-OPCs in Vietnam.A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at all 312 HIV-OPCs across the country using an online survey technique.In general, the staff practices for securing and protecting patient information were at acceptable levels. Most staff had proper measures and practices for maintaining data security; however, the protection of patient confidentiality, particularly for data access, sharing, and transfer still required improvement. Most HIV-OPC staff had good or moderate knowledge and positive perceptions towards security and confidentiality issues. Staff who were not trained in the practice of security measures differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 3.74; 95%CI: 1.44-9.67; staff needing improved knowledge levels differed significantly from those with good (OR: 5.20; 95%CI: 2.39-11.32 and moderate knowledge levels (OR: 5.10; 95%CI: 2.36-11.00; and staff needing improved perception levels differed significantly from those with good (i.e., with 100% proper practices and moderate perception levels (OR: 5.67; 95%CI: 2.93-10.95. Staff who were not trained in the protection of data confidentiality differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 2.18; 95%CI: 1.29-3.65.Training is an important factor to help raise the levels of proper practices regarding confidentiality and security, to improve knowledge and raise awareness about change among staff. The operation and management of HIV treatment and care in Vietnam are currently transitioning from separate healthcare clinics (HIV-OPC into units

  17. Practices in security and confidentiality of HIV/AIDS patients' information: A national survey among staff at HIV outpatient clinics in Vietnam.

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    Khac Hai, Nguyen; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Jittamala, Podjanee; Thi Thu Huong, Phan; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit

    2017-01-01

    Breach of confidentiality or invasion of privacy from the collection and use of medical records, particularly those of patients with HIV/AIDS or other diseases sensitive to stigmatization, should be prevented by all related stakeholders in healthcare settings. The main focus of this study was to assess practices regarding security and confidentiality of HIV-related information among staff at HIV outpatient clinics (HIV-OPCs) in Vietnam. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at all 312 HIV-OPCs across the country using an online survey technique. In general, the staff practices for securing and protecting patient information were at acceptable levels. Most staff had proper measures and practices for maintaining data security; however, the protection of patient confidentiality, particularly for data access, sharing, and transfer still required improvement. Most HIV-OPC staff had good or moderate knowledge and positive perceptions towards security and confidentiality issues. Staff who were not trained in the practice of security measures differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 3.74; 95%CI: 1.44-9.67); staff needing improved knowledge levels differed significantly from those with good (OR: 5.20; 95%CI: 2.39-11.32) and moderate knowledge levels (OR: 5.10; 95%CI: 2.36-11.00); and staff needing improved perception levels differed significantly from those with good (i.e., with 100% proper practices) and moderate perception levels (OR: 5.67; 95%CI: 2.93-10.95). Staff who were not trained in the protection of data confidentiality differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 2.18; 95%CI: 1.29-3.65). Training is an important factor to help raise the levels of proper practices regarding confidentiality and security, to improve knowledge and raise awareness about change among staff. The operation and management of HIV treatment and care in Vietnam are currently transitioning from separate healthcare clinics (HIV-OPC) into units integrated

  18. Practices in security and confidentiality of HIV/AIDS patients’ information: A national survey among staff at HIV outpatient clinics in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khac Hai, Nguyen; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Jittamala, Podjanee; Thi Thu Huong, Phan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Breach of confidentiality or invasion of privacy from the collection and use of medical records, particularly those of patients with HIV/AIDS or other diseases sensitive to stigmatization, should be prevented by all related stakeholders in healthcare settings. The main focus of this study was to assess practices regarding security and confidentiality of HIV-related information among staff at HIV outpatient clinics (HIV-OPCs) in Vietnam. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at all 312 HIV-OPCs across the country using an online survey technique. Results In general, the staff practices for securing and protecting patient information were at acceptable levels. Most staff had proper measures and practices for maintaining data security; however, the protection of patient confidentiality, particularly for data access, sharing, and transfer still required improvement. Most HIV-OPC staff had good or moderate knowledge and positive perceptions towards security and confidentiality issues. Staff who were not trained in the practice of security measures differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 3.74; 95%CI: 1.44–9.67); staff needing improved knowledge levels differed significantly from those with good (OR: 5.20; 95%CI: 2.39–11.32) and moderate knowledge levels (OR: 5.10; 95%CI: 2.36–11.00); and staff needing improved perception levels differed significantly from those with good (i.e., with 100% proper practices) and moderate perception levels (OR: 5.67; 95%CI: 2.93–10.95). Staff who were not trained in the protection of data confidentiality differed significantly from those who were trained (OR: 2.18; 95%CI: 1.29–3.65). Conclusions Training is an important factor to help raise the levels of proper practices regarding confidentiality and security, to improve knowledge and raise awareness about change among staff. The operation and management of HIV treatment and care in Vietnam are currently transitioning from separate

  19. Treatment outcomes of a Stage 1 cognitive-behavioral trial to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in western Kenya

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    Papas, Rebecca K.; Sidle, John E.; Gakinya, Benson N.; Baliddawa, Joyce B.; Martino, Steve; Mwaniki, Michael M.; Songole, Rogers; Omolo, Otieno E.; Kamanda, Allan M.; Ayuku, David O.; Ojwang, Claris; Owino-Ong’or, Willis D.; Harrington, Magdalena; Bryant, Kendall J.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Justice, Amy C.; Hogan, Joseph W.; Maisto, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Dual epidemics of HIV and alcohol use disorders, and a dearth of professional resources for behavioral treatment in sub-Saharan Africa, suggest the need for development of culturally relevant and feasible interventions. The purpose of this study was to test the preliminary efficacy of a culturally adapted 6-session gender-stratified group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention delivered by paraprofessionals to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in Eldoret, Kenya. Design Randomized clinical trial comparing CBT against a usual care assessment only control Setting A large HIV outpatient clinic in Eldoret, Kenya, part of the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare collaboration Participants 75 HIV-infected outpatients who were antiretroviral (ARV)-initiated or ARV-eligible and who reported hazardous or binge drinking Measurements Percent drinking days (PDD) and mean drinks per drinking days (DDD) measured continuously using the Timeline Followback Findings There were 299 ineligible and 102 eligible outpatients with 12 refusals. Effect sizes of the change in alcohol use since baseline between the two conditions at the 30-day follow-up were large (d=.95, p=.0002, mean difference=24.93 (95% CI: 12.43, 37.43) PDD; d=.76, p=.002, mean difference=2.88 (95% CI: 1.05, 4.70) DDD). Randomized participants attended 93% of the 6 CBT sessions offered. Reported alcohol abstinence at the 90-day follow-up was 69.4% (CBT) and 37.5% (usual care). Paraprofessional counselors achieved independent ratings of adherence and competence equivalent to college-educated therapists in the U.S. Treatment effect sizes were comparable to alcohol intervention studies conducted in the U.S. Conclusions Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be successfully adapted to group paraprofessional delivery in Kenya and may be effective in reducing alcohol use among HIV-infected Kenyan outpatients. PMID:21631622

  20. Behavioral and Other Characteristics Associated with HIV Viral Load in an Outpatient Clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul L Sacamano

    Full Text Available Persons living with HIV (PLWH who are engaged in care, yet not virally suppressed, represent a risk for transmission and opportunity for risk reduction interventions. This study describes characteristics of an outpatient clinic cohort of PLWH by laboratory confirmed viral suppression status and examines associations with demographics and sexual and drug use behaviors gathered through questionnaire. From a sample of 500 clinic patients, 438 were prescribed antiretroviral treatment (ART and 62 were not. Among the 438 on ART, 72 (16.4% were not virally suppressed at the most recent lab draw. Compared to individuals with a suppressed viral load, those that were unsuppressed were more likely to: be black (79.2% vs. 64.2%; p = 0.014; earn below $25,000/year (88.9% vs. 65.0%; p < 0.001; be of a younger age (47.8 vs. 50.0 mean years; p = 0.009; be on opiate substitution (14.1% vs. 6.3%; p = 0.023; and acknowledge poly-substance (38.9% vs. 24.4%; p = 0.012 and excessive alcohol use (13.9% vs. 6.0%; p = 0.019. Conversely, a smaller proportion of those with an unsuppressed viral load had multiple sex partners in the previous 30 days (39.8% vs. 58.5%; p = 0.003. In multivariable regression of those on ART, the prevalence of an unsuppressed viral load was 3% lower with each increasing year of age (aPR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95, 0.99 and 47% lower with income over $25,000/year (aPR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.70. In a separate analysis of all 500 subjects, ART was less frequently prescribed to blacks compared to whites, heterosexuals, those with lower education and income, and persons with active substance use. Findings confirm that a large proportion of PLWH and engaged in care were not virally suppressed and continued behaviors that risk transmission, indicating the need for screening, prevention counseling and access to ancillary services to lower the incidence of HIV infections.

  1. Frequency and determinants of consistent STI/HIV testing among men who have sex with men testing at STI outpatient clinics in the Netherlands: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Maartje; Heijne, Janneke C M; Hogewoning, Arjan A; van Aar, Fleur

    2017-09-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at highest risk for STIs and HIV infections in the Netherlands. However, official guidelines on STI testing among MSM are lacking. They are advised to test for STIs at least every six months, but their testing behaviour is not well known. This study aimed to get insight into the proportion and determinants of consistent 6-monthly STI testing among MSM testing at STI outpatient clinics in the Netherlands. This study included longitudinal surveillance data of STI consultations among MSM from all 26 STI outpatient clinics in the Netherlands between 1 June 2014 and 31 December 2015. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants of consistent 6-monthly testing compared with single testing and inconsistent testing. Determinants of time between consultations among men with multiple consultations were analysed using a Cox Prentice-Williams-Peterson gap-time model. A total of 34 605 STI consultations of 18 634 MSM were included. 8966 (48.1%) men had more than one consultation, and 3516 (18.9%) men tested consistently 6-monthly. Indicators of high sexual risk behaviour, including having a history of STI, being HIV positive and having more than 10 sex partners, were positively associated with both being a consistent tester and returning to the STI clinic sooner. Men who were notified by a partner or who reported STI symptoms were also more likely to return to the STI clinic sooner, but were less likely to be consistent testers, identifying a group of event-driven testers. The proportion of consistent 6-monthly testers among MSM visiting Dutch STI outpatient clinics was low. Testing behaviour was associated with sexual risk behaviour, but exact motives to test consistently remain unclear. Evidence-based testing guidelines are needed to achieve optimal reductions in STI transmission in the future. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  2. Depression, alcohol use, and intimate partner violence among outpatients in rural Uganda: vulnerabilities for HIV, STIs and high risk sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiene, Susan M; Lule, Haruna; Sileo, Katelyn M; Silmi, Kazi Priyanka; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2017-01-19

    Intimate partner violence (IPV), alcohol use, and depression are key vulnerabilities for HIV in Uganda, and taken together may have a synergistic effect on risk. Our objective was to investigate the associations between depression, IPV, and alcohol use and HIV-risk indicators among a sample of outpatients in rural Uganda, and the effect of co-occurrence of these factors on HIV-risk indicators. In a structured interview we collected data on high-risk sexual behavior, depression symptoms, emotional and physical IPV, and alcohol use, as well as a blood sample for HIV and syphilis tests and a urine sample for chlamydia and gonorrhea tests from 325 male and female outpatients receiving provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC) at a public hospital outpatient clinic in rural Uganda. We used logistic regression and generalized linear modeling to test independent associations between depression, IPV, and alcohol use and HIV-risk indicators, as well as the effect of co-occurrence on HIV-risk indicators. Twelve percent of men and 15% of women had two or more of the following conditions: depression, IPV, and alcohol use; another 29% of men and 33% of women had 1 condition. Each condition was independently associated with HIV risk behavior for men and women, and for women, depression was associated with testing positive for HIV or a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Men with one condition (AOR 2.32, 95% CI 1.95-2.77) and two or more conditions (AOR 12.77, 95% CI 7.97-20.47) reported more high risk sex acts compared to those with no potential co-occurring conditions. For men, experiencing two or more conditions increased risky sex more than one alone (χ 2 24.68, p risk for risky sex (AOR 2.18, 95% CI 1.64-2.91). We also found preliminary evidence suggesting synergistic effects between depression and emotional IPV and between alcohol use and depression. This study demonstrates the co-occurrence of depression, IPV, and alcohol use in men and women in an

  3. Structure and quality of outpatient care for people living with an HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, Esther A. N.; Smit, Colette; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Reiss, Peter; Kroon, Frank P.; Brinkman, Kees; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Policy-makers and clinicians are faced with a gap of evidence to guide policy on standards for HIV outpatient care. Ongoing debates include which settings of care improve health outcomes, and how many HIV-infected patients a health-care provider should treat to gain and maintain expertise. In this

  4. Enhancing patient safety with an electronic results checking system in a large HIV outpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, D B; Uthayakumar, N; Ferrand, R A; Edwards, S G; Miller, R; Benn, P

    2013-08-01

    To establish whether an automated electronic tracker system for reporting blood results would expedite clinician review of abnormal results in HIV-positive outpatients and to pilot the use of this system in routine clinical practice. An outpatient service in central London providing specialist HIV-related care to 3900 HIV positive patients. A comparison of the time taken from sampling to identification and clinician review of abnormal blood results for biochemical tests between the original paper-based checking system and an automated electronic system during a 3-week pilot. Of 513 patients undergoing one or more blood tests, 296 (57%) had one or more biochemical abnormalities identified by electronic checking system. Out of 371 biochemical abnormalities, 307 (82.7%) were identified simultaneously by the paper-based system. Of the 307, 33 (10.7%) were classified as urgent, 130 (42.3%) as non-urgent and 144 (46.9%) as not clinically significant. The median interval between sampling and receipt of results was 1 (interquartile range 1-2) vs 4 days ( interquartile range 3-5), P interquartile range 1-4) vs 3 days (interquartile range 3-6), Pinterquartile range 1-4) vs 10 days ( interquartile range 9-12), P=0.136, for electronic and paper-based systems respectively. Seven (11%) of the missing paper-based system results were classified as urgent. The electronic system missed three abnormalities as a result of a software processing error which was subsequently corrected. The electronic tracker system allows faster identification of biochemical abnormalities and allowed faster review of these results by clinicians. The pilot study allowed for a software error to be identified and corrected before full implementation. The system has since integrated successfully into routine clinical practice.

  5. Participation in HIV research: the importance of clinic contact factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Catherine A; Gill, M John

    2008-08-01

    Recruiting minority populations living with HIV to many types of clinic-based HIV research is a concern. This study examined an expanded range of predictors of HIV research participation (clinic contact, clinical, and personal characteristics) to investigate observed ethnocultural differences in HIV research participation. Research participation was defined as participation in any of diagnostic, pathogenesis, drug trial or survey research. Logistic regression modeling was used to predict research participation of 657 eligible patients (93% of the patient population) who began care between January 1997 and the end of September 2003 at a regional outpatient HIV care program in Calgary, Canada. Approximately one third (32%) were non-white, including 18% Aboriginal, 9% black, 4% Asian, and 1% Hispanic individuals. Twenty-nine percent (187/657) of the patients participated in at least one study of any kind. Multivariate analysis indicated that the strongest predictors of any research participation (including diagnostic, pathogenesis, drug trial, or survey studies) are clinical (including nadir CD4 count [odds ratio {OR} = 0.132, p percentage of appointments kept [OR = 1.022, p service use shown by these groups that may influence research participation. To attract under researched populations, attention should shift from the "who" of research participation to the "how" of clinical interactions.

  6. Quality of life of elderly people living with HIV/AIDS in outpatient follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano de Souza Caliari

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze factors related to the quality of life of elderly people living with HIV/AIDS. Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out with people aged 50 years or more in a specialized outpatient clinic. The data collection was by means of an interview. For the analysis of data and characterization of the sample, descriptive statistics and comparison tests were used. The project met the ethical requirements. Results: Participants were 81 users aged 50 to 75 years, mean age was 57.8 (± 6.1 years, 71.6% of whom were men. There was a statistically significant relationship with the quality of life, the following variables: gender, children, occupation, religion, diagnosis time, HIV exposure, adverse effects, treatment interruption, viral load counts, hospitalization, dependence for daily activities and use of drugs. Conclusion: The results suggest that the quality of life deficit is related not only to physical changes, but to the anguish and stigma related to HIV/AIDS.

  7. Factors affecting acceptance of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling services among outpatient clients in selected health facilities in Harar Town, Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurahman S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sami Abdurahman,1 Berhanu Seyoum,2 Lemessa Oljira,2 Fitsum Weldegebreal2 1Harari Regional Health Bureau, 2Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical Sciences, Harar, Ethiopia Purpose: To improve the slow uptake of HIV counseling and testing, the World Health Organization (WHO and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS have developed draft guidelines on provider-initiated testing and counseling (PITC. Both in low- and high-income countries, mainly from outpatient clinics and tuberculosis settings, indicates that the direct offer of HIV testing by health providers can result in significant improvements in test uptake. In Ethiopia, there were limited numbers of studies conducted regarding PITC in outpatient clinics. Therefore, in this study, we have assessed the factors affecting the acceptance of PITC among outpatient clients in selected health facilities in Harar, Harari Region State, Ethiopia. Materials and methods: Institutional-based, cross-sectional quantitative and qualitative studies were conducted from February 12–30, 2011 in selected health facilities in Harar town, Harari Region State, Ethiopia. The study participants were recruited from the selected health facilities of Harar using a systematic random sampling technique. The collected data were double entered into a data entry file using Epi Info version 3.5.1. The data were transferred to SPSS software version 16 and analyzed according to the different variables. Results: A total of 362 (70.6% clients accepted PITC, and only 39.4% of clients had heard of PITC in the outpatient department service. Age, occupation, marital status, anyone who wanted to check their HIV status, and the importance of PITC were the variables that showed significant associations with the acceptance of PITC upon bivariate and multivariate analyses. The main reasons given for not accepting the tests were self-trust, not being at risk for HIV, not being ready, needing to consult their

  8. Care of HIV-infected adults at Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Part I. Clinical management and costs of outpatient care. Objective. To provide a detailed breakdown of clinical presentations and management of outpatients with HIV. and associated costs, in order to inform clinical practice, health service planning and projections of the costs of HIV care in South Africa Setting.

  9. Does provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling lead to higher HIV testing rate and HIV case finding in Rwandan clinics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; van Santen, Daniëla; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Lammers, Judith; Mugisha, Veronicah; Bagiruwigize, Emmanuel; de Naeyer, Ludwig; Asiimwe, Anita; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2016-01-01

    Provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) is promoted as a means to increase HIV case finding. We assessed the effectiveness of PITC to increase HIV testing rate and HIV case finding among outpatients in Rwandan health facilities (HF). PITC was introduced in six HFs in 2009-2010. HIV

  10. Pneumococcal pneumonia: clinical features, diagnosis and management in HIV-infected and HIV noninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Giordano; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Mura, Maria Stella

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we focus on the clinical features, diagnosis and management of pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, with particular attention to the most recent advances in this area. Classical clinical features are found in young adults, whereas atypical forms occur in immunocompromised patients including HIV-infected individuals. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is more frequently observed in HIV-infected and also in low-risk patients, according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Pneumococcal pneumonia diagnostic process includes physical examination, radiologic findings and microbiologic diagnosis. However, etiologic diagnosis using traditional culture methods is difficult to obtain. In this setting, urinary antigen test, which recognizes Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall C-polysaccharide, increases the probability of etiologic diagnosis. A correct management approach is crucial in reducing pneumococcal pneumonia mortality. The use of the PSI helps clinicians in deciding between inpatient and outpatient management in immunocompetent individuals, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)-American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines. Recent findings support PSI utility also in HIV-infected patients. Recently, efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine in reducing pneumococcal disease incidence has been evidenced in both HIV-infected and noninfected individuals. Rapid diagnosis and correct management together with implementation of preventive measures are crucial in order to reduce pneumococcal pneumonia related incidence and mortality in HIV-infected and noninfected patients.

  11. Interactive "Video Doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Gilbert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide "prevention with positives" in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based assessment and counseling for risky behaviors.We conducted a parallel groups randomized controlled trial (December 2003-September 2006 at 5 San Francisco area outpatient HIV clinics. Eligible patients (HIV-positive English-speaking adults completed an in-depth computerized risk assessment. Participants reporting substance use or sexual risks (n = 476 were randomized in stratified blocks. The intervention group received tailored risk-reduction counseling from a "Video Doctor" via laptop computer and a printed Educational Worksheet; providers received a Cueing Sheet on reported risks. Compared with control, fewer intervention participants reported continuing illicit drug use (RR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.689, 0.957, p = 0.014 at 3 months; and RR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.540, 0.785, p<0.001 at 6 months and unprotected sex (RR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.773, 0.993, p = 0.039 at 3 months; and RR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.686, 0.941, p = 0.007 at 6 months. Intervention participants reported fewer mean days of ongoing illicit drug use (-4.0 days vs. -1.3 days, p = 0.346, at 3 months; and -4.7 days vs. -0.7 days, p = 0.130, at 6 months than did controls, and had fewer casual sex partners at (-2.3 vs. -1.4, p = 0.461, at 3 months; and -2.7 vs. -0.6, p = 0.042, at 6 months.The Positive Choice intervention achieved significant cessation of illicit drug use and unprotected sex at the group-level, and modest individual-level reductions in days of ongoing drug use and number of casual sex partners compared with the

  12. The association between symptoms of mental disorders and health risk behaviours in Vietnamese HIV positive outpatients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Truc T; Jones, Mairwen K; Harris, Lynne M; Heard, Robert C

    2017-03-14

    A high prevalence of symptoms of mental disorders (SOMD) has been found among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV). Additionally, SOMD may impact on the prevalence of high-risk health behaviours (HRB). This study investigates the relationship between SOMD and HRB in a large sample of Vietnamese HIV positive outpatients. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 400 outpatients at two HIV/AIDS clinics in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, selected using a systematic sampling technique. Validated scales were used to measure SOMD, specifically symptoms of depression, anxiety, alcohol use disorder (AUD), substance use disorder (SUD) and HIV associated dementia (HAD). Participants completed a self-report questionnaire assessing HRB during the preceding 12 months including unsafe sexual practices and illicit drug use. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between SOMD and HRB. The majority of participants (63.5%) were male and the median age was 34.0 years. Unsafe sexual practices and illicit drug use were reported by 13.8 and 5.5% of participants. The prevalences of HAD, depression, AUD, anxiety and SUD symptoms were 39.8, 36.5, 13.3 10.5, 3.3% respectively. There was no association between SOMD and HRB either with or without adjusting for correlates of HRB, except between symptoms of SUD and illicit drug use. PLHIV who had symptoms of SUD were more likely to use illicit drugs (adjusted Odds Ratio 81.14, 95% CI 12.55-524.47). While the prevalence of SOMD among HIV positive outpatients was high, most SOMD were not associated with increased HRB. Only illicit drug use was predicted by symptoms of SUD. Screening PLHIV for symptoms of SUD may be useful for detecting people likely to be engaging in illicit drug use to reduce the risk of secondary disease transmission.

  13. The association between symptoms of mental disorders and health risk behaviours in Vietnamese HIV positive outpatients: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truc T. Thai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high prevalence of symptoms of mental disorders (SOMD has been found among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV. Additionally, SOMD may impact on the prevalence of high-risk health behaviours (HRB. This study investigates the relationship between SOMD and HRB in a large sample of Vietnamese HIV positive outpatients. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 400 outpatients at two HIV/AIDS clinics in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, selected using a systematic sampling technique. Validated scales were used to measure SOMD, specifically symptoms of depression, anxiety, alcohol use disorder (AUD, substance use disorder (SUD and HIV associated dementia (HAD. Participants completed a self-report questionnaire assessing HRB during the preceding 12 months including unsafe sexual practices and illicit drug use. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between SOMD and HRB. Results The majority of participants (63.5% were male and the median age was 34.0 years. Unsafe sexual practices and illicit drug use were reported by 13.8 and 5.5% of participants. The prevalences of HAD, depression, AUD, anxiety and SUD symptoms were 39.8, 36.5, 13.3 10.5, 3.3% respectively. There was no association between SOMD and HRB either with or without adjusting for correlates of HRB, except between symptoms of SUD and illicit drug use. PLHIV who had symptoms of SUD were more likely to use illicit drugs (adjusted Odds Ratio 81.14, 95% CI 12.55–524.47. Conclusions While the prevalence of SOMD among HIV positive outpatients was high, most SOMD were not associated with increased HRB. Only illicit drug use was predicted by symptoms of SUD. Screening PLHIV for symptoms of SUD may be useful for detecting people likely to be engaging in illicit drug use to reduce the risk of secondary disease transmission.

  14. [Gdansk HIV-AIDS project, yesterday, today and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, W

    1995-09-01

    Medical care project for HIV positive and AIDS patients in Gdańsk voivodship was established in 1988 in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases of Gdańsk Medical University. The aim of this modern and multidirectional program was to provide full medical care for HIV/AIDS patients and introduce effective prophylaxis against spread of HIV infection. According to the project-clinical ward, outpatient clinic for HIV positive and AIDS patients, diagnostic and laboratory units, were established. Close cooperation including specialistic and general medical care, was set with detoxication ward, rehabilitation centers for drug addicts, prison medical services and the Korczak Orphanage. Education of medical staff and some social groups was provided (teachers, teenagers of secondary schools, journalists, police employees). Clinical ward for HIV positive patients who are in need of inpatient medical care is localized in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases of Gdańsk Medical University. The ward has 16 double - bed Melcer's boxes which are used for other HIV/AIDS patients according to present needs. Free beds are used for HIV negative patients. HIV/AIDS Outpatient Clinic is localized in Venerologic Outpatient Unit. This was because of some psychological, social, professional and organization aspects. Outpatient Clinic staff is responsible for first patients' examination. Serological diagnostics of HIV infection is follow up for everyone (anonymous testing is possible); testing for STD is available also. Diagnostic laboratory base for clinical ward and other units are the laboratories of Gdańsk Voivodship Hospital for Infectious Diseases. Clinic for Infectious Diseases supervises all co-operating units. These are the following: 10-beds detoxication ward for drug addicts in Psychiatric - Neurological Hospital "Srebrzysko", 70-80 places in rehabilitation centers for drug addicts in Zapowiednik and Smazyno, remand prison ward for HIV positive patients (this is the first ward

  15. Suicide risk and alcohol and drug abuse in outpatients with HIV infection and Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Patrícia M; Passos, Sonia R; Calvet, Guilherme A; Hökerberg, Yara H; Lessa, José L; Andrade, Carlos A de

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate psychiatric comorbidities in outpatients receiving care for HIV and Chagas disease at Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas (IPEC), Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 125 patients referred to an outpatient psychiatric clinic from February to December 2010. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used. Factors associated with more frequent mental disorders were estimated by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) by multiple logistic regression. Seventy-six (60.8%) patients with HIV, 40 (32%) patients with Chagas disease, and nine (7.2%) patients with human T-lymphotropic virus were interviewed. The majority were women (64%), with up to 8 years of formal education (56%), and unemployed (81.6%). The median age was 49 years. Suicide risk (n=71) (56%), agoraphobia (n=65) (52%), major depressive episode (n=56) (44.8%), and alcohol/drug abuse (n=43) (34.4%) predominated, the latter being directly associated with lower family income (OR = 2.64; 95%CI 1.03-6.75) and HIV infection (OR = 5.24; 95%CI 1.56-17.61). Suicide risk was associated with non-white skin color (OR = 2.21; 95%CI 1.03-4.75), unemployment (OR = 2.72; 95%CI 1.01-7.34), and diagnosis of major depression (OR = 3.34; 95%CI 1.54-7.44). Measures targeting adverse socioeconomic conditions and psychiatric and psychological monitoring and care should be encouraged in this population, considering the association with abuse of alcohol/other psychoactive drugs and suicide risk.

  16. Psychoactive substances, alcohol and tobacco consumption in HIV-infected outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Jean-Marc; Peyriere, Hélène; Makinson, Alain; Peries, Marianne; Nagot, Nicolas; Donnadieu-Rigole, Hélène; Reynes, Jacques

    2018-06-01

    To assess the alcohol consumption, tobacco addiction and psychoactive substance use (PSU) of people living with HIV (PLHIV). Cross-sectional study in an HIV outpatient unit. Autoquestionnaire systematically proposed to all patients during their usual clinical care visit during a 6-months period, for alcohol (AUDIT test), tobacco (Short Fagerstrom Test) and PSU (ASSIST V3.0 test). Of 1334 distributed questionnaires, 1018 PLHIV responded: 76.8% were men [528 patients were MSM), and the median age was 49 years (interquartile range: 42-46). A prevalence of excessive alcohol drinking was found in 22% [95% confidence interval (CI) 19.5-24.7%] and 44.6% (CI 41.5-47.7%) were current smokers, with high dependence in 29.1% (CI 24.9-33.7%). The prevalence of PSU was 37.8% (CI 34.8-41%) in the past 3 months: cannabis 27.7%, poppers 16.4%, cocaine 8.9%, psychotropic medications 7.1%, gamma-hydroxybutyrate/gamma-butyrolactone (GHB/GBL) 4.7%, stimulants 3.1%, synthetic cathinones 2.7%, hallucinogens 1.5%. In the past 3 months, PSU was more prevalent in MSM than in non-MSM patients (46 versus 30%, P poppers) 31.0 versus 1.1%, GHB/GBL 7.8 versus 0.8%, stimulants 5.0 versus 1.1%, synthetic cathinones 4.9 versus 0.3%, and hallucinogens 2.3 versus 0.5%. Given the high prevalence of PSU and other addictions (alcohol and smoking) among PLHIV, and particularly among MSM, a systematic screening of PSU and other addictions should be part of routine clinical care.

  17. Modeling the impact of integrating HIV and outpatient health services on patient waiting times in an urban health clinic in Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarang Deo

    Full Text Available Rapid scale up of HIV treatment programs in sub-Saharan Africa has refueled the long-standing health policy debate regarding the merits and drawbacks of vertical and integrated system. Recent pilots of integrating outpatient and HIV services have shown an improvement in some patient outcomes but deterioration in waiting times, which can lead to worse health outcomes in the long run.A pilot intervention involving integration of outpatient and HIV services in an urban primary care facility in Lusaka, Zambia was studied. Data on waiting time of patients during two seven-day periods before and six months after the integration were collected using a time and motion study. Statistical tests were conducted to investigate whether the two observation periods differed in operational details such as staffing, patient arrival rates, mix of patients etc. A discrete event simulation model was constructed to facilitate a fair comparison of waiting times before and after integration. The simulation model was also used to develop alternative configurations of integration and to estimate the resulting waiting times.Comparison of raw data showed that waiting times increased by 32% and 36% after integration for OPD and ART patients respectively (p<0.01. Using simulation modeling, we found that a large portion of this increase could be explained by changes in operational conditions before and after integration such as reduced staff availability (p<0.01 and longer breaks between consecutive patients (p<0.05. Controlling for these differences, integration of services, per se, would have resulted in a significant decrease in waiting times for OPD and a moderate decrease for HIV services.Integrating health services has the potential of reducing waiting times due to more efficient use of resources. However, one needs to ensure that other operational factors such as staff availability are not adversely affected due to integration.

  18. e-Consultation Improves Efficacy in Thoracic Surgery Outpatient Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria M; Gómez, Maria Teresa; Rodríguez, María; Jiménez López, Marcelo F; Aranda, Jose L; Bollo de Miguel, Elena; Diez, Florentino; Hernández Hernández, Jesús; Varela, Gonzalo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is analysing the impact of the systematic versus occasional videoconferencing discussion of patients with two respiratory referral units along 6 years of time over the efficiency of the in-person outpatient clinics of a thoracic surgery service. Retrospective and comparative study of the evaluated patients through videoconferencing and in-person first visits during two equivalents periods of time: Group A (occasional discussion of cases) between 2008-2010 and Group B (weekly regular discussion) 2011-2013. Data were obtained from two prospective and electronic data bases. The number of cases discussed using e-consultation, in-person outpatient clinics evaluation and finally operated on under general anaesthesia in each period of time are presented. For efficiency criteria, the index: number of operated on cases/number of first visit outpatient clinic patients is created. Non-parametric Wilcoxon test is used for comparison. The mean number of patients evaluated at the outpatient clinics/year on group A was 563 versus 464 on group B. The median number of cases discussed using videoconferencing/year was 42 for group A versus 136 for group B. The mean number of operated cases/first visit at the outpatient clinics was 0.7 versus 0.87 in group B (P=.04). The systematic regular discussion of cases using videoconferencing has a positive impact on the efficacy of the outpatient clinics of a Thoracic Surgery Service measured in terms of operated cases/first outpatient clinics visit. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Suicide risk and alcohol and drug abuse in outpatients with HIV infection and Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. Guimarães

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate psychiatric comorbidities in outpatients receiving care for HIV and Chagas disease at Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas (IPEC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 125 patients referred to an outpatient psychiatric clinic from February to December 2010. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI was used. Factors associated with more frequent mental disorders were estimated by odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI by multiple logistic regression. Results: Seventy-six (60.8% patients with HIV, 40 (32% patients with Chagas disease, and nine (7.2% patients with human T-lymphotropic virus were interviewed. The majority were women (64%, with up to 8 years of formal education (56%, and unemployed (81.6%. The median age was 49 years. Suicide risk (n=71 (56%, agoraphobia (n=65 (52%, major depressive episode (n=56 (44.8%, and alcohol/drug abuse (n=43 (34.4% predominated, the latter being directly associated with lower family income (OR = 2.64; 95%CI 1.03-6.75 and HIV infection (OR = 5.24; 95%CI 1.56-17.61. Suicide risk was associated with non-white skin color (OR = 2.21; 95%CI 1.03-4.75, unemployment (OR = 2.72; 95%CI 1.01-7.34, and diagnosis of major depression (OR = 3.34; 95%CI 1.54-7.44. Conclusion: Measures targeting adverse socioeconomic conditions and psychiatric and psychological monitoring and care should be encouraged in this population, considering the association with abuse of alcohol/other psychoactive drugs and suicide risk.

  20. Very poor agreement between routine outpatient clinic office and ambulatory blood pressure: time to improve an old hospital outpatient clinic routine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Mark; Poulsen, Per L; Christensen, Kent L

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the agreement between elevated outpatient clinic office blood pressure (OC-OBP) as measured in the daily routine in our University Hospital Cardiology Outpatient Clinic and subsequent awake ambulatory blood pressure (AABP). In all patients referred for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring from our Cardiology Outpatient Clinic, we identified OC-OBP and changes in medication in the period from 1 January 2014 to 15 September 2015. The AABP was used as a reference measurement for the OC-OBP. A total of 183 patients were included in the study. Their mean age was 62.1±14.0 years and 49% were women. The mean systolic OC-OBP was 166.8±17.9 mmHg and the difference between the mean systolic OC-OBP and AABP was 28.0±19.5 mmHg (Pclinic agrees poorly with AABP and may lead to unnecessary treatment and pharmacologically induced symptomatic hypotension, particularly in elderly patients. The results of this study urgently call for alternative solutions to routine OC-OBP in hospital outpatient clinics.

  1. Clinical implications of aging with HIV infection: perspectives and the future medical care agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldi, Giovanni; Palella, Frank J

    2017-06-01

    : The increasing number of aging HIV-infected (HIV+) persons comprises a unique population at risk for illnesses and syndromes traditionally associated with the elderly. As a result, similar to the current need for primary care providers to manage chronic noninfectious comorbidities among aging persons with well controlled HIV infection, HIV clinical care will need to routinely involve geriatric medicine in a new HIV-geriatric discipline. The objective of this article is to provide a conceptual framework in which HIV and geriatric management considerations for healthcare professionals caring for HIV+ persons are integrated. The provision of contemporary HIV clinical care extends well beyond the achievement of HIV virologic suppression and antiretroviral therapy management and includes a need for careful characterization of geriatric syndromes based upon functional capacity and extent of disability. Screening for geriatric syndromes is both a multidisciplinary and multidimensional process, designed to evaluate an older person's functional ability, physical health, cognition, overall mental health, and socio-environmental circumstances. Although routine incorporation of geriatric assessment into clinical trials involving HIV+ persons is feasible, a current challenge is the availability of a consensus clinical definition of frailty or vulnerability. To maximize the efficiency, value, and convenience of outpatient care visits for older HIV+ persons, these visits should include encounters with multiple providers, including primary care clinicians, social workers, and geriatricians. Challenges may exist in the routine provision of these assessments to older HIV+ persons, but clearly such cross-disciplinary collaboration will not only markedly enhance the care of aging HIV+ persons but may also constitute a model of successful healthcare management that can be applied to all aging persons with changing healthcare needs.

  2. Factors associated with HIV-1 virological failure in an outpatient clinic for HIV-infected people in Haiphong, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huong, D T M; Bannister, W; Phong, P T

    2011-01-01

    starting ART, 23% had detectable HIV-1 viral load (= 400 copies/mL). Patients who had developed a World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage 4 condition at the time of initiation of ART were more likely to experience virological failure than those in stages 1-3, odds ratio (OR): 5.20 (95% confidence...

  3. Trends in Decline of Antiretroviral Resistance among ARV-Experienced Patients in the HIV Outpatient Study: 1999–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Buchacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Little is known about temporal trends in frequencies of clinically relevant ARV resistance mutations in HIV strains from U.S. patients undergoing genotypic testing (GT in routine HIV care. Methods. We analyzed cumulative frequency of HIV resistance among patients in the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS who, during 1999–2008 and while prescribed antiretrovirals, underwent GT with plasma HIV RNA >1,000 copies/mL. Exposure ≥4 months to each of three major antiretroviral classes (NRTI, NNRTI and PI was defined as triple-class exposure (TCE. Results. 906 patients contributed 1,570 GT results. The annual frequency of any major resistance mutations decreased during 1999–2008 (88% to 79%, P=0.05. Resistance to PIs decreased among PI-exposed patients (71% to 46%, P=0.010 as exposure to ritonavir-boosted PIs increased (6% to 81%, P<0.001. Non-significant declines were observed in resistance to NRTIs among NRTI-exposed (82% to 67%, and triple-class-resistance among TCE patients (66% to 41%, but not to NNRTIs among NNRTI-exposed. Conclusions. HIV resistance was common but declined in HIV isolates from subgroups of ARV-experienced HOPS patients during 1999–2008. Resistance to PIs among PI-exposed patients decreased, possibly due to increased representation of patients whose only PI exposures were to boosted PIs.

  4. Systematic cultural adaptation of cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Sidle, John E; Martino, Steve; Baliddawa, Joyce B; Songole, Rogers; Omolo, Otieno E; Gakinya, Benson N; Mwaniki, Michael M; Adina, Japheth O; Nafula, Tobista; Owino-Ong'or, Willis D; Bryant, Kendall J; Carroll, Kathleen M; Goulet, Joseph L; Justice, Amy C; Maisto, Stephen A

    2010-06-01

    Two-thirds of those with HIV worldwide live in sub-Saharan Africa. Alcohol use is associated with the HIV epidemic through risky sex and suboptimal ARV adherence. In western Kenya, hazardous drinking was reported by HIV (53%) and general medicine (68%) outpatients. Cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) has demonstrated strong efficacy to reduce alcohol use. This article reports on a systematic cultural adaptation and pilot feasibility study of group paraprofessional-delivered CBT to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in Eldoret, Kenya. Following adaptation and counselor training, five pilot groups were run (n = 27). Overall attendance was 77%. Percent days abstinent from alcohol (PDA) before session 1 was 52-100% (women) and 21-36% (men), and by session 6 was 96-100% (women) and 89-100% (men). PDA effect sizes (Cohen's d) between first and last CBT session were 2.32 (women) and 2.64 (men). Participants reported treatment satisfaction. Results indicate feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy for CBT in Kenya.

  5. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic

  6. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University, Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic.

  7. Ethnic diversity outpatient clinic in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahhan, Nordin; Meijssen, Dominique; Chegary, Malika; Bosman, Diederik; Wolf, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Background: The health status of chronic sick ethnic minority children in the Netherlands is unequal compared with indigenous Dutch children. In order to optimize the health care for these children a specific patient-oriented clinic in ethnic-cultural diversity: the Mosaic Outpatient Clinic (MOC)

  8. Prevalence of and risk factors for MRSA colonization in HIV-positive outpatients in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyaw Win

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst there have been studies on the risks and outcomes of MRSA colonization and infections in HIV-positive patients, local data is limited on the risk factors for MRSA colonization among these patients. We undertook this study in a tertiary HIV care centre to document the risk factors for colonization and to determine the prevalence of MRSA colonization among HIV-positive outpatients in Singapore. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which factors associated with MRSA positivity among patients with HIV infection were evaluated. A set of standardized questionnaire and data collection forms were available to interview all recruited patients. Following the interview, trained nurses collected swabs from the anterior nares/axilla/groin (NAG, throat and peri-anal regions. Information on demographics, clinical history, laboratory results and hospitalization history were retrieved from medical records. Results MRSA was detected in swab cultures from at least 1 site in 15 patients (5.1%. Inclusion of throat and/or peri-anal swabs increased the sensitivity of NAG screening by 20%. Predictors for MRSA colonization among HIV-positive patients were age, history of pneumonia, lymphoma, presence of a percutaneous device within the past 12 months, history of household members hospitalized more than two times within the past 12 months, and a most recent CD4 count less than 200. Conclusions This study highlights that a proportion of MRSA carriers would have been undetected without multiple-site screening cultures. This study could shed insight into identifying patients at risk of MRSA colonization upon hospital visit and this may suggest that a risk factor-based approach for MRSA surveillance focusing on high risk populations could be considered.

  9. The International Classification of Function Disability and Health (ICF) in adults visiting the HIV outpatient clinic at a regional hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van As, Melissa; Myezwa, Hellen; Stewart, Aimee; Maleka, Douglas; Musenge, Eustasius

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, 16.6% of South Africans between 15 and 49 years of age were HIV positive. The advent of anti-retroviral therapy has led to improved longevity, CD4 counts and clinical well-being of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Physical impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions of PLWHA have profound effects on the Health-related Quality of Life and functional abilities of those with the disease, and understanding thereof may assist in the formulation of rehabilitation protocols, health care interventions as well as vocational and legislative policies. The International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) is a standardised tool, endorsed by the World Health Assembly for international use, which aims to classify functioning and disability. It is structured to assess body functions and structure, functional activities and associated personal and environmental factors.This study aimed to develop a profile of the level of functional activity, using the ICF Checklist, of an urban cohort of 45 South African individuals who are HIV positive attending an outpatient clinic at the Helen Joseph Memorial Hospital, Gauteng, South Africa. The results showed a high prevalence of physical impairments, participation restrictions and selective activity limitations and that environmental factors influence their level of ability. Specific impairments where patients had problems were mental functions (69% (n=31), sensory and pain -- 71% (n=32), digestive and metabolic functions 45% (n=20) and neuromuscular 27% (n=12). Activity limitations included major life areas' 58% (n=26), interpersonal relationships 56% (n=25), mobility 40% (n=18) and general tasks and demands 38% (n=17). Limitations in mobility were significantly associated with problems of sensory functions (p=0.05), pain (p=0.006), neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related functions (p=0.006), muscle power (p=0.006) as well as energy and drive functions (p=0.001). The study identifies

  10. Animal-assisted therapy at an outpatient pain management clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl D; Constantin, Janet M; Kunkel, Frank A; Breuer, Paula; Hanlon, Raymond B

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of brief therapy dog visits to an outpatient pain management facility compared with time spent in a waiting room. The design of this study is open-label. Setting.  This study was conducted in a university tertiary care adult chronic pain outpatient clinic. The subjects of this study include outpatients, adults accompanying outpatients to their appointments, and clinic staff. Intervention.  Participants were able to spend clinic waiting time with a certified therapy dog instead of waiting in the outpatient waiting area. When the therapy dog was not available, individuals remained in the waiting area. Self-reported pain, fatigue, and emotional distress were recorded using 11-point numeric rating scales before and after the therapy dog visit or waiting room time. Two hundred ninety-five therapy dog visits (235 with patients, 34 family/friends, and 26 staff) and 96 waiting room surveys (83 from patients, 6 family/friends, and 7 staff) were completed over a 2-month study period. Significant improvements were reported for pain, mood, and other measures of distress among patients after the therapy dog visit but not the waiting room control, with clinically meaningful pain relief (decrease ≥2 points) in 23% after the therapy dog visit and 4% in the waiting room control. Significant improvements were likewise seen after therapy dog visits for family/friends and staff. Therapy dog visits in an outpatient setting can provide significant reduction in pain and emotional distress for chronic pain patients. Therapy dog visits can also significantly improve emotional distress and feelings of well-being in family and friends accompanying patients to appointments and clinic staff. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Enhancing outpatient clinics management software by reducing patients’ waiting time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Almomani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA gives great attention to improving the quality of services provided by health care sectors including outpatient clinics. One of the main drawbacks in outpatient clinics is long waiting time for patients—which affects the level of patient satisfaction and the quality of services. This article addresses this problem by studying the Outpatient Management Software (OMS and proposing solutions to reduce waiting times. Many hospitals around the world apply solutions to overcome the problem of long waiting times in outpatient clinics such as hospitals in the USA, China, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan. These clinics have succeeded in reducing wait times by 15%, 78%, 60% and 50%, respectively. Such solutions depend mainly on adding more human resources or changing some business or management policies. The solutions presented in this article reduce waiting times by enhancing the software used to manage outpatient clinics services. Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been used to understand current OMS and examine level of patient’s satisfaction. Five main problems that may cause high or unmeasured waiting time have been identified: appointment type, ticket numbering, doctor late arrival, early arriving patient and patients’ distribution list. These problems have been mapped to the corresponding OMS components. Solutions to the above problems have been introduced and evaluated analytically or by simulation experiments. Evaluation of the results shows a reduction in patient waiting time. When late doctor arrival issues are solved, this can reduce the clinic service time by up to 20%. However, solutions for early arriving patients reduces 53.3% of vital time, 20% of the clinic time and overall 30.3% of the total waiting time. Finally, well patient-distribution lists make improvements by 54.2%. Improvements introduced to the patients’ waiting time will consequently affect patients’ satisfaction and improve

  12. 42 CFR 440.20 - Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.20 Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services. (a) Outpatient hospital... services that are not generally furnished by most hospitals in the State. (b) Rural health clinic services... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital services and rural health...

  13. Impact of Diabetes E-Consults on Outpatient Clinic Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Brian; Parikh, Pratik J; Gallimore, Jennie; Harrell, Stephen; Burke, Brian

    2015-08-01

    An e-consult is an electronic communication system between clinicians, usually a primary care physician (PCP) and a medical or surgical specialist, regarding general or patient-specific, low complexity questions that would not need an in-person consultation. The objectives of this study were to understand and quantify the impact of the e-consult initiative on outpatient clinic workflow and outcomes. We collected data from 5 different Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient clinics and interviewed several physicians and staff members. We then developed a simulation model for a primary care team at an outpatient clinic. A detailed experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of factors, such as e-consult demand, view-alert notification arrivals, walk-in patient arrivals, and PCP unavailability, on e-consult cycle time. Statistical tests indicated that 4 factors related to outpatient clinic workflow were significant, and levels within each of the 4 significant factors resulted in statistically different e-consult cycle times. The arrival rate of electronic notifications, along with patient walk-ins, had a considerable effect on cycle time. Splitting the workload of an unavailable PCP among the other PCPs, instead of the current practice of allocating it to a single PCP, increases the system's ability to handle a much larger e-consult demand. The full potential of e-consults can only be realized if the workflow at the outpatient clinics is designed or modified to support this initiative. This study furthers our understanding of how e-consult systems can be analyzed and alternative workflows tested using statistical and simulation modeling to improve care delivery and outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Assessing Nutrient Intake and Nutrient Status of HIV Seropositive Patients Attending Clinic at Chulaimbo Sub-District Hospital, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha Christine Onyango

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nutritional status is an important determinant of HIV outcomes. Objective. To assess the nutrient intake and nutrient status of HIV seropositive patients attending an AIDS outpatient clinic, to improve the nutritional management of HIV-infected patients. Design. Prospective cohort study. Setting. Comprehensive care clinic in Chulaimbo Sub-District Hospital, Kenya. Subjects. 497 HIV sero-positive adults attending the clinic. Main Outcome Measures. Evaluation of nutrient intake using 24-hour recall, food frequency checklist, and nutrient status using biochemical assessment indicators (haemoglobin, creatinine, serum glutamate pyruvate (SGPT and mean corpuscular volume (MCV. Results. Among the 497 patients recruited (M : F sex ratio: 1.4, mean age: 39 years ± 10.5 y, Generally there was inadequate nutrient intake reported among the HIV patients, except iron (10.49 ± 3.49 mg. All the biochemical assessment indicators were within normal range except for haemoglobin 11.2 g/dL (11.4 ± 2.60 male and 11.2 ± 4.25 female. Conclusions. Given its high frequency, malnutrition should be prevented, detected, monitored, and treated from the early stages of HIV infection among patients attending AIDS clinics in order to improve survival and quality of life.

  15. The potential of telehealth for 'business as usual' in outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Karen; Kerr, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    A six-month pilot study was conducted to ascertain the value of using high-definition videoconferencing equipment in an outpatients' setting. The videoconferencing equipment, which included digital biometric equipment, was installed in the outpatient clinics of a remote health service in New Zealand. Use of the equipment was evaluated using action research techniques. Clinicians were interviewed about their assessment of the equipment's usefulness. Patients and their carers completed questionnaires about their clinic experience. During the pilot trial, 109 patients were seen in 25 clinics of six different specialities. Questionnaire results showed that patients and their companions had a good user experience, similar to a face-to-face appointment. Clinicians found that the large screen, sense of proximity, video clarity and definition, and lack of sound/picture lag worked well for certain types of outpatients' clinics, e.g. methadone maintenance clinics. The need for process changes made it difficult to turn telehealth into business as usual in an environment built for face-to-face appointments. We conclude that videoconference equipment has potential to become integral to outpatients' clinics.

  16. 42 CFR 447.321 - Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital and clinic services... SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Outpatient Hospital and Clinic Services § 447.321 Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits...

  17. Prevalence and predictors of Lymphogranuloma venereum in a high risk population attending a STD outpatients clinic in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foschi, Claudio; Marangoni, Antonella; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Nardini, Paola; Compri, Monica; Bellavista, Sara; Filippini, Andrea; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Cevenini, Roberto

    2014-04-09

    We evaluated LGV prevalence and predictors in a high risk population attending a STI Outpatients Clinic in the North of Italy. A total of 108 patients (99 MSM and 9 women), with a history of unsafe anal sexual intercourses, were enrolled. Anorectal swabs and urine samples were tested for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) DNA detection by Versant CT/GC DNA 1.0 Assay (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Terrytown, USA). RFLP analysis was used for CT molecular typing. L2 CT genotype was identified in 13/108 (12%) rectal swabs. All LGV cases were from MSM, declaring high-risk sexual behaviour and complaining anorectal symptoms. Patients first attending the STI Outpatient Clinic received a significant earlier LGV diagnosis than those first seeking care from general practitioners or gastroenterologists (P = 0.0046). LGV prevalence and characteristics found in our population are in agreement with international reports. Statistical analysis showed that LGV positive patients were older (P = 0.0008) and presented more STIs (P = 0.0023) than LGV negative ones, in particular due to syphilis (P < 0.001), HIV (P < 0.001) and HBV (P = 0.001).Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that HIV and syphilis infections are strong risk factors for LGV presence (respectively, P = 0.001 and P = 0.010). Even if our results do not provide sufficient evidence to recommend routine screening of anorectal swabs in high-risk population, they strongly suggest to perform CT NAAT tests and genotyping on rectal specimens in presence of ulcerative proctitis in HIV and/or syphilis-positive MSM. In this context, CT DNA detection by Versant CT/GC DNA 1.0 Assay, followed by RFLP analysis for molecular typing demonstrated to be an excellent diagnostic algorithm for LGV identification.

  18. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Overview Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV/ ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Last Reviewed: August 25, 2017 ...

  19. Use of simulation to solve outpatient clinic problems: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Sai Hong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for outpatient services has led to overcrowded clinics, long waiting times for patients, and extended staff working hours in outpatient clinics. Simulation tools have been used to ameliorate deficiencies in the appointment system, resource allocation, and patient flow management that are the root causes of these problems. Integrated studies that considered these three factors together produced better results than attempts to resolve individual causes. While simulation has proved to be an effective problem-solving tool for outpatient clinic management, there is still room for improvement. This paper reviews studies over the past 50 years that have applied management simulation to resolve outpatient clinic problems.

  20. Sexual behaviour of men that consulted in medical outpatient clinics in Western Switzerland from 2005-2006: risk levels unknown to doctors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubois-Arber Françoise

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine male outpatient attenders' sexual behaviours, expectations and experience of talking about their sexuality and sexual health needs with a doctor. Methods A survey was conducted among all male patients aged 18-70, recruited from the two main medical outpatient clinics in Lausanne, Switzerland, in 2005-2006. The anonymous self-administered questionnaire included questions on sexual behaviour, HIV/STI information needs, expectations and experiences regarding discussion of sexual matters with a doctor. Results The response rate was 53.0% (N = 1452. The mean age was 37.7 years. Overall, 13.4% of patients were defined as at STI risk - i.e. having not consistently used condoms with casual partners in the last 6 months, or with a paid partner during the last intercourse - regarding their sexual behaviour in the last year. 90.9% would have liked their physician to ask them questions concerning their sexual life; only 61.4% had ever had such a discussion. The multivariate analysis showed that patients at risk tended to have the following characteristics: recruited from the HIV testing clinic, lived alone, declared no religion, had a low level of education, felt uninformed about HIV/AIDS, were younger, had had concurrent sexual partners in the last 12 months. However they were not more likely to have discussed sexual matters with their doctor than patients not at risk. Conclusion Recording the sexual history and advice on the prevention of the risks of STI should become routine practice for primary health care doctors.

  1. Audit of Referrals to an Ophthalmic Outpatient Clinic of a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the referral pattern and assess the quality and accuracy of referral letters to the ophthalmic outpatient clinic of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu. Methods: This study is a prospective cross-sectional survey of all new ophthalmic referrals to the ophthalmic outpatient clinic at University of ...

  2. VCT clinic HIV burden and its link with HIV care clinic at the University of Gondar hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemie Getahun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT is an important component of any HIV/AIDS control and prevention activities. VCT makes people aware of their HIV serostatus and enables early identification of those who need care. It is an important link to HIV care and support. The main aim of this study is to describe the HIV burden at VCT and define the relationship between the VCT Center and the HIV Chronic Care Clinic of the University of Gondar (UoG Hospital. Methods It is a record based descriptive study undertaken by using data collected by health professionals at the VCT center and the HIV chronic care clinic of the UoG Hospital. Patient data collected from 2005/06 to 2008/09 was investigated. Analysis was carried out using the SPSS version 16.0. Results A total of 19,168 people were tested for HIV and a prevalence of 25.4% was obtained. 4298 HIV positive people were referred to the HIV chronic care clinic but only 27% actually registered at the clinic. Chi-square analyses showed residence, age and time of VCT visit showed significant relations with hospital care attendance. Conclusion The overall HIV prevalence is high. The data obtained at the HIV care clinic regarding patients’ clinical conditions at acceptance were incomplete. Improvements are required on the link between VCT and HIV care and documentation of data.

  3. Clinical audit of COPD in outpatient respiratory clinics in Spain: the EPOCONSUL study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calle Rubio M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myriam Calle Rubio,1–3 Bernardino Alcázar Navarrete,4 Joan B Soriano,5 Juan J Soler-Cataluña,6 José Miguel Rodríguez González-Moro,7 Manuel E Fuentes Ferrer,2,3,8 José Luis López-Campos9 On behalf of the EPOCONSUL Study 1Pulmonary Department, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, 2Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Complutense of Madrid, 3Research Institute of Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC, Madrid, 4Pulmonary Department, Hospital de Alta Resolución de Noja, Granada, 5Research Institute of Hospital University La Princesa (IISP, University Autónoma of Madrid, 6Pulmonary Department, Hospital de Arnau de Villanova, Valencia, 7Pulmonary Department, Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, 8UGC of Preventive Medicine and Research Institute of Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, 9Pulmonary Department, Hospital University Virgen del Rocio, Institute of Biomedicine of Sevilla (IBiS, Sevilla, Spain Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD outpatients account for a large burden of usual care by respirologists. EPOCONSUL is the first national clinical audit conducted in Spain on the medical care for COPD patients delivered in outpatient respiratory clinics. We aimed to evaluate the clinical interventions and the degree of adherence to recommendations in outpatients of current COPD clinical practice guidelines.Methodology: This is an observational study with prospective recruitment (May 2014–May 2015 of patients with a COPD diagnosis as seen in outpatient respiratory clinics. The information collected was historical in nature as for the clinical data of the last and previous consultations, and the information concerning hospital resources was concurrent.Results: A total of 17,893 clinical records of COPD patients in outpatient respiratory clinics from 59 Spanish hospitals were evaluated. Of the 5,726 patients selected, 4,508 (78.7% were eligible. Overall, 12.1% of COPD patients

  4. [Impact of HIV infection in hospital environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Avilés, P; López Benito, I; Berbegal Serra, J

    1998-12-01

    Retrospective study to review the admissions at the Hospital Marina Alta due to infection for HIV or its complications and look for risk factors. Clinical charts of patients admitted at the hospital from 1989 to 1996 were analyzed. From 11,932 admissions, 199 (1.7%) were due to patients with infection from HIV, resulting in the 2.4% of the total stay. The medium stays were higher (8.6 +/- 7.4 vs 6 +/- 4.5) more re-admissions (42.7% vs 25.5%) and higher mortality (11% vs 7.8%). The parasitic infestations of the nervous central system and cardiovascular were the most numerous number of admissions and also the longer stays. Throughout the years we saw a increase in the patients at the outpatient clinic with HIV infection and a paradogic decrease in the inpatient admissions, and also a decrease in the media stay and total stays. There is a decrease in the admissions at the inpatient level in contrast with a increment of the prevalence in the outpatients with HIV infection. The improved treatments, the experience of the physicians, the use of the Day Hospital and the use of the service of Home Care Hospitalization allows to keep more patients with less admissions and more outpatient visits.

  5. Patient satisfaction with health care services provided at HIV clinics at Amana and Muhimbili hospitals in Dar es Salaam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagashe, G A B; Rwebangila, F

    2011-08-01

    Since the establishment of free HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania a lot of research has been done to assess how health care providers discharge their duties in these clinics. Little research however has been done regarding satisfaction of HIV patients with free health care services provided. To determine satisfaction of HIV patients with health care services provided at the HIV clinics and specifically, to determine patients' satisfaction with the general physical environment of the clinic and with services offered by doctors, nurses, laboratory, and pharmacy. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) and Amana hospital. A total of 375 patients attending outpatient HIV clinics were selected randomly and interviewed using a questionnaire, after obtaining a verbal consent. Data collected was analyzed using Epi-info program version 6. Patients at Amana Hospital clinic were either very satisfied (44.3%) or satisfied (55.7%) and none were unsatisfied, while at MNH clinic 1.1% patients were very satisfied while (94.7%) were satisfied and (4.2%) were unsatisfied with health care services provided. Lack of privacy when consulting with doctors and the dispenser contributed to patients' unsatisfaction with the services. Most of the participants were satisfied with the services provided at the two clinics. However at MNH, a few patients were unsatisfied due to lack of privacy during consultation with doctors and with the pharmacy services.

  6. Comparison of student learning in the out-patient clinic and ward round.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M H; Dent, J A

    1994-05-01

    In undergraduate medical education there is a trend away from ward-based teaching towards out-patient and community-based teaching. To study the potential effects of this altered emphasis on student learning, a pilot group of final-year medical students at the University of Dundee was asked to keep individual structured log-books. These contained details of patients seen during their 3-week orthopaedic attachment in both a ward and out-patient setting. A comparison of perceived learning in the two settings showed that students learned more from attending an out-patient clinic than a ward round, but did not make full use of the learning potential of either. The setting did not particularly influence the balance of learning as categorized here but only the ward round supplied experience of surgical complications. The amount of learning taking place in an out-patient clinic was influenced by student ability, measured by examination performance, but not by clinic work-load. The implications of increased use of out-patient clinics and the advantages and disadvantages of the approach employed are discussed. It is concluded that in the situation studied student learning in the outpatient setting is as good as or superior to the ward setting but should not totally replace it.

  7. Epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS in a region of Southern Brazil where the subtype C of HIV-1 infection predominates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenti, Sandra Aparecida; Galato Júnior, João; Silveira, Elizângela da Silva; Oenning, Roberto Teixeira; Simões, Priscyla Waleska Targino de Azevedo; Moreira, Jeverson; Fochesato, Celine Maria; Brígido, Luís Fernando de Macedo; Rodrigues, Rosângela; Romão, Pedro Roosevelt Torres

    2011-01-01

    Southern Brazil has the highest prevalence rate of AIDS in the country and is the only region in the Americas where HIV-1 subtype C prevails. We evaluated the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS in the South region of Santa Catarina, Brazil. All pregnant women with HIV infection attending the obstetric outpatient clinic of Criciúma, State of Santa Catarina, in 2007 (n = 46) were invited to participate. Data of 36 eligible participants were obtained through a standardized questionnaire. The great majority were young, with a steady partner, low family income, low education level and referring early first sexual intercourse. Many reported use of illicit non-injecting drugs (55.5%) and unprotected sex with partners that were HIV-positive (57.7%), injecting drug user (22.2%), male inmate (19.4%), truck driver (13.8%), with history of sexually transmitted disease (11.1%) or men who have sex with men (MSM) (2.8%). Most (66.7%) of the participants had their HIV diagnosis done during the pregnancy, 7 (19.4%) had a previous history of HIV mother-to-child transmission. Therapy based on highly active antiretroviral therapy (94%) was initiated at 19.3 weeks on average and 33% showed irregular antiretroviral adherence. These results confirm previous data on HIV epidemiology in Brazil and suggest that the women partners' sexual behavior and unprotected sexual intercourse are important aspects of HIV epidemic. Additional efforts in education, prophylaxis and medication adherence are needed.

  8. Benchmarking Outpatient Rehabilitation Clinics Using Functional Status Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalo, Pedro L; Resnik, Linda J; Silver, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    To utilize functional status (FS) outcomes to benchmark outpatient therapy clinics. Outpatient therapy data from clinics using Focus on Therapeutic Outcomes (FOTO) assessments. Retrospective analysis of 538 clinics, involving 2,040 therapists and 90,392 patients admitted July 2006-June 2008. FS at discharge was modeled using hierarchical regression methods with patients nested within therapists within clinics. Separate models were estimated for all patients, for those with lumbar, and for those with shoulder impairments. All models risk-adjusted for intake FS, age, gender, onset, surgery count, functional comorbidity index, fear-avoidance level, and payer type. Inverse probability weighting adjusted for censoring. Functional status was captured using computer adaptive testing at intake and at discharge. Clinic and therapist effects explained 11.6 percent of variation in FS. Clinics ranked in the lowest quartile had significantly different outcomes than those in the highest quartile (p < .01). Clinics ranked similarly in lumbar and shoulder impairments (correlation = 0.54), but some clinics ranked in the highest quintile for one condition and in the lowest for the other. Benchmarking models based on validated FS measures clearly separated high-quality from low-quality clinics, and they could be used to inform value-based-payment policies. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  9. Breadth versus volume: Neurology outpatient clinic cases in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Blood, Angela D; Park, Yoon Soo; Brorson, James R; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-06-01

    This study examined how volume in certain patient case types and breadth across patient case types in the outpatient clinic setting are related to Neurology Clerkship student performance. Case logs from the outpatient clinic experience of 486 students from The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, USA, participating in the 4week Neurology Clerkship from July 2008 to June 2013 were reviewed. A total of 12,381 patient encounters were logged and then classified into 13 diagnostic categories. How volume of cases within categories and the breadth of cases across categories relate to the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology and a Neurology Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination was analyzed. Volume of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.290, pNeurology (r=.231, p=.017), however was not significantly correlated with any component of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Volume of cases correlated with higher performance on measures of specialty knowledge and clinical skill. Fewer relationships emerged correlating breadth of cases and performance on the same measures. This study provides guidance to educators who must decide how much emphasis to place on volume versus breadth of cases in outpatient clinic learning experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Classification and clinical features of headache patients: an outpatient clinic study from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jiying; Fan, Xiaoping; Li, Xuelian; Ran, Li; Tan, Ge; Chen, Lixue; Wang, Kuiyun; Liu, Bowen

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze and classify the clinical features of headache in neurological outpatients. A cross-sectional study was conducted consecutively from March to May 2010 for headache among general neurological outpatients attending the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University. Personal interviews were carried out and a questionnaire was used to collect medical records. Diagnosis of headache was according to the International classification of headache disorders, 2nd edition (ICHD-II). Headache patients accounted for 19.5% of the general neurology clinic outpatients. A total of 843 (50.1%) patients were defined as having primary headache, 454 (27%) secondary headache, and 386 (23%) headache not otherwise specified (headache NOS). For primary headache, 401 (23.8%) had migraine, 399 (23.7%) tension-type headache (TTH), 8 (0.5%) cluster headache and 35 (2.1%) other headache types. Overall, migraine patients suffered (1) more severe headache intensity, (2) longer than 6 years of headache history and (3) more common analgesic medications use than TTH ones (p headaches than migraine patients, and typically headache frequency exceeded 15 days/month (p headache patients were defined as chronic daily headache. Almost 20% of outpatient visits to the general neurology department were of headache patients, predominantly primary headache of migraine and TTH. In outpatient headaches, more attention should be given to headache intensity and duration of headache history for migraine patients, while more attention to headache frequency should be given for the TTH ones.

  11. Treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic v. standard out-patient treatment in the early course of bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Hvenegaard, Anne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about whether treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic improves long-term prognosis for patients discharged from initial psychiatric hospital admissions for bipolar disorder. AIMS: To assess the effect of treatment in a specialised out-patient mood...... disorder clinic v. standard decentralised psychiatric treatment among patients discharged from one of their first three psychiatric hospital admissions for bipolar disorder. METHOD: Patients discharged from their first, second or third hospital admission with a single manic episode or bipolar disorder were...... randomised to treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic or standard care (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00253071). The primary outcome measure was readmission to hospital, which was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients with mania/bipolar disorder...

  12. Feasibility of nurse-led antidepressant medication management of depression in an HIV clinic in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julie L; Almond, Maria L G; Ringo, Edward J; Shangali, Wahida H; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2012-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest HIV prevalence worldwide and depression is highly prevalent among those infected. The negative impact of depression on HIV outcomes highlights the need to identify and treat it in this population. A model for doing this in lower-resourced settings involves task-shifting depression treatment to primary care; however, HIV-infected individuals are often treated in a parallel HIV specialty setting. We adapted a model of task-shifting, measurement-based care (MBC), for an HIV clinic setting and tested its feasibility in Tanzania. MBC involves measuring depressive symptoms at meaningful intervals and adjusting antidepressant medication treatment based on the measure of illness. Twenty adults presenting for care at an outpatient HIV clinic in Tanzania were enrolled and followed by a nurse care manager who measured depressive symptoms at baseline and every 4 weeks for 12 weeks. An algorithm-based decision-support tool was utilized by the care manager to recommend individualized antidepressant medication doses to participants' HIV providers at each visit. Retention was high and fidelity of the care manager to the MBC protocol was exceptional. Follow through of antidepressant prescription dosing recommendations by the prescriber was low. Limited availability of antidepressants was also noted. Despite challenges, baseline depression scores decreased over the 12-week period. Overall, the model of algorithm-based nursing support of prescription decisions was feasible. Future studies should address implementation issues of medication supply and dosing. Further task-shifting to relatively more abundant and lower-skilled health workers, such as nurses' aides, warrants examination.

  13. Quality of outpatient clinical notes: a stakeholder definition derived through qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Janice L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no empirically-grounded criteria or tools to define or benchmark the quality of outpatient clinical documentation. Outpatient clinical notes document care, communicate treatment plans and support patient safety, medical education, medico-legal investigations and reimbursement. Accurately describing and assessing quality of clinical documentation is a necessary improvement in an increasingly team-based healthcare delivery system. In this paper we describe the quality of outpatient clinical notes from the perspective of multiple stakeholders. Methods Using purposeful sampling for maximum diversity, we conducted focus groups and individual interviews with clinicians, nursing and ancillary staff, patients, and healthcare administrators at six federal health care facilities between 2009 and 2011. All sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed and qualitatively analyzed using open, axial and selective coding. Results The 163 participants included 61 clinicians, 52 nurse/ancillary staff, 31 patients and 19 administrative staff. Three organizing themes emerged: 1 characteristics of quality in clinical notes, 2 desired elements within the clinical notes and 3 system supports to improve the quality of clinical notes. We identified 11 codes to describe characteristics of clinical notes, 20 codes to describe desired elements in quality clinical notes and 11 codes to describe clinical system elements that support quality when writing clinical notes. While there was substantial overlap between the aspects of quality described by the four stakeholder groups, only clinicians and administrators identified ease of translation into billing codes as an important characteristic of a quality note. Only patients rated prioritization of their medical problems as an aspect of quality. Nurses included care and education delivered to the patient, information added by the patient, interdisciplinary information, and infection alerts as important

  14. Quality of outpatient clinical notes: a stakeholder definition derived through qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Janice L; Stephens, Mark B; Pangaro, Louis N; Gimbel, Ronald W

    2012-11-19

    There are no empirically-grounded criteria or tools to define or benchmark the quality of outpatient clinical documentation. Outpatient clinical notes document care, communicate treatment plans and support patient safety, medical education, medico-legal investigations and reimbursement. Accurately describing and assessing quality of clinical documentation is a necessary improvement in an increasingly team-based healthcare delivery system. In this paper we describe the quality of outpatient clinical notes from the perspective of multiple stakeholders. Using purposeful sampling for maximum diversity, we conducted focus groups and individual interviews with clinicians, nursing and ancillary staff, patients, and healthcare administrators at six federal health care facilities between 2009 and 2011. All sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed and qualitatively analyzed using open, axial and selective coding. The 163 participants included 61 clinicians, 52 nurse/ancillary staff, 31 patients and 19 administrative staff. Three organizing themes emerged: 1) characteristics of quality in clinical notes, 2) desired elements within the clinical notes and 3) system supports to improve the quality of clinical notes. We identified 11 codes to describe characteristics of clinical notes, 20 codes to describe desired elements in quality clinical notes and 11 codes to describe clinical system elements that support quality when writing clinical notes. While there was substantial overlap between the aspects of quality described by the four stakeholder groups, only clinicians and administrators identified ease of translation into billing codes as an important characteristic of a quality note. Only patients rated prioritization of their medical problems as an aspect of quality. Nurses included care and education delivered to the patient, information added by the patient, interdisciplinary information, and infection alerts as important content. Perspectives of these four stakeholder

  15. Nosocomial HIV-transmission in an outpatient clinic detected by epidemiologicaland phylogenetic analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, T.L.; Jørgensen, L.B.; H, Permin

    1999-01-01

    .9% respectively. In addition, GP harboured HIV RNA with a foscarnet resistance mutation further lendingsupport to virus from the foscarnet-treated FDL being the source of the infection. Interestingly, GP experienced increases inimmunoglobulin production after contracting the HIV-infection, and decreases after...... antiretroviral-induced viral suppression. Aclinical procedure which, under stressful conditions, could lead to breaches in infection control measures was identified. The source ofthe infection was most likely a contaminated multidose vial. CONCLUSION: Through epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses acase...

  16. Rates and Covariates of Recent Sexual and Physical Violence Against HIV-Infected Outpatient Drinkers in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Gakinya, Benson N; Mwaniki, Michael M; Lee, Hana; Kiarie, Stella W; Martino, Steve; Loxley, Michelle P; Keter, Alfred K; Klein, Debra A; Sidle, John E; Baliddawa, Joyce B; Maisto, Stephen A

    2017-08-01

    Victimization from physical and sexual violence presents global health challenges. Partner violence is higher in Kenya than Africa. Violence against drinkers and HIV-infected individuals is typically elevated, so dual vulnerabilities may further augment risk. Understanding violence risks can improve interventions. Participants were 614 HIV-infected outpatient drinkers in western Kenya enrolled in a randomized trial to reduce alcohol use. At baseline, past 90-day partner physical and sexual violence were examined descriptively and in gender-stratified regression models. We hypothesized higher reported violence against women than men, and positive violence association with HIV stigma and alcohol use across gender. Women reported significantly more current sexual (26.3 vs. 5.7%) and physical (38.9 vs. 24.8%) victimization than men. Rates were generally higher than Kenyan lifetime national averages. In both regression models, HIV stigma and alcohol-related sexual expectations were significantly associated with violence while alcohol use was not. For women, higher violence risk was also conferred by childhood violence, past-year transactional sex, and younger age. HIV-infected Kenyan drinkers, particularly women, endorse high current violence due to multiple risk factors. Findings have implications for HIV interventions. Longitudinal research is needed to understand development of risk.

  17. Does an interdisciplinary outpatient atrial fibrillation (AF) clinic affect the number of acute AF admissions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydensberg, Vivi Skibdal; Brandes, Axel

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate the impact of a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF-clinic) on the number of acute hospitalizations for atrial fibrillation compared with usual outpatient care for this condition before the establishment of the AF-clinic....... BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend a structured outpatient clinic follow-up in multidisciplinary teams for patients with atrial fibrillation due to fewer hospitalizations and death. However the evidence base is weak. DESIGN: The study is a retrospective cohort study including a total of 129 patients from...... the cardiac outpatient clinic at a large Danish University Hospital. The study population consisted of two groups: a usual care group before a dedicated AF-clinic was established (n=73) and the AF-clinic group (n=56). The primary endpoint was acute hospitalization for AF. METHODS: Cox regression was used...

  18. Outpatient HIV care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, E.A.N.

    2017-01-01

    HIV is now, as a result of cART, a treatable condition. Sadly, as reflected by the large number of annual HIV-related deaths and new infections, managing HIV infection and curbing the epidemic has proven extremely challenging. To achieve world without HIV and AIDS, we need to ensure that all

  19. Social support and delays seeking care after HIV diagnosis, North Carolina, 2000–2006

    OpenAIRE

    McCoy, Sandra I.; Strauss, Ronald P.; MacDonald, Pia D. M.; Leone, Peter A.; Eron, Joseph J.; Miller, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Many adults in the United States enter primary care late in the course of HIV infection, countering the clinical benefits of timely HIV services and missing opportunities for risk reduction. Our objective was to determine if perceived social support was associated with delay entering care after an HIV diagnosis. Two hundred sixteen patients receiving primary care at a large, university-based HIV outpatient clinic in North Carolina were included in the study. Dimensions of functional social su...

  20. The impact of outpatient clinical teaching on students' academic performance in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Bahaeldin A; Elfaki, Omer A; Khan, Muhammed A

    2017-01-01

    Clinical teaching at outpatient settings is an essential part of undergraduate medical students' training. The increasing number of students in many medical schools and short hospital stays makes inpatient teaching alone insufficient to provide students with the required clinical skills. To make up this shortfall, outpatient clinical teaching has been implemented by our Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King Khalid University, KSA, throughout the academic year 2015-2016. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of clinical teaching at outpatient settings on the academic performance of our students. In this comparative retrospective study, the effects of outpatient clinical teaching of obstetrics and gynecology on the academic performance of student was assessed through an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). During their course on obstetrics and gynecology, 58 students had their clinical teaching both at inpatient and outpatient settings and constituted "study group". The remaining 52 students had clinical teaching only at inpatient settings and were considered "control group". Students in both groups sat for OSCE at the end of week 8 of the gynecology course. Students in both groups sat for OSCE at the end of week 8 of the gynecology course. Four stations were used for assessment: obstetric history, gynecological history, obstetric physical examination of pregnant women, and gynecological procedure station. Twenty marks were allocated for each station giving a total score of 80. The OSCE scores for study group were compared with those of the control group using Student's t -test; p performance in OSCE. There is evidence of remarkable improvement in the mastery of clinical skills as manifested in the students' scores in physical examination and procedures stations. These results will encourage us to have clinical teaching in other disciplines at outpatient settings.

  1. Telephone reminders reduced the non-attendance rate in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Maja Haunstrup; Ainsworth, Mark Andrew

    2015-01-01

    in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic like ours. METHODS: This was a comparative intervention study with a historical control group in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic. The study lasted six months. Patients with a scheduled appointment in the first three-month period received no reminder (control group, n = 2......,705). Patients in the following three-month period were reminded by telephone one weekday in advance of their appointment, when possible (intervention group, n = 2,479). Non-attending patients in the intervention group received a questionnaire. Based on the results, a financial cost-benefit analysis was made......-attendees. The most common explanation for non-attendance in the intervention group was forgetfulness (39%). The reminder telephone call was cost-effective. CONCLUSION: In this outpatient clinic, telephone reminders were cost-effective and significantly reduced the non-attendance rate by 43%....

  2. Acceptability of Mobile Phone Technology for Medication Adherence Interventions among HIV-Positive Patients at an Urban Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher W T; Himelhoch, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone technology is increasingly used to overcome traditional barriers limiting access to care. The goal of this study was to evaluate access and willingness to use smart and mobile phone technology for promoting adherence among people attending an urban HIV clinic. One hundred consecutive HIV-positive patients attending an urban HIV outpatient clinic were surveyed. The questionnaire evaluated access to and utilization of mobile phones and willingness to use them to enhance adherence to HIV medication. The survey also included the CASE adherence index as a measure of adherence. The average age was 46.4 (SD = 9.2). The majority of participants were males (63%), black (93%), and Hispanic (11.4%) and reported earning less than $10,000 per year (67.3%). Most identified themselves as being current smokers (57%). The vast majority reported currently taking HAART (83.5%). Approximately half of the participants reported some difficulty with adherence (CASE mobile phone. Among owners of mobile phones 47.4% reported currently owning more than one device. Over a quarter reported owning a smartphone. About 60% used their phones for texting and 1/3 used their phone to search the Internet. Nearly 70% reported that they would use a mobile device to help with HIV adherence. Those who reported being very likely or likely to use a mobile device to improve adherence were significantly more likely to use their phone daily (P = 0.03) and use their phone for text messages (P = 0.002). The vast majority of patients in an urban HIV clinic own mobile phones and would use them to enhance adherence interventions to HIV medication.

  3. Assessing Antiretroviral Use During Gaps in HIV Primary Care Using Multisite Medicaid Claims and Clinical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Anne K; Fleishman, John A; Voss, Cindy C; Keruly, Jeanne C; Nijhawan, Ank E; Agwu, Allison L; Aberg, Judith A; Rutstein, Richard M; Moore, Richard D; Gebo, Kelly A

    2017-09-01

    Some individuals who appear poorly retained by clinic visit-based retention measures are using antiretroviral therapy (ART) and maintaining viral suppression. We examined whether individuals with a gap in HIV primary care (≥180 days between HIV outpatient clinic visits) obtained ART during that gap after 180 days. HIV Research Network data from 5 sites and Medicaid Analytic Extract eligibility and pharmacy data were combined. Factors associated with having both an HIV primary care gap and a new (ie, nonrefill) ART prescription during a gap were evaluated with multinomial logistic regression. Of 6892 HIV Research Network patients, 6196 (90%) were linked to Medicaid data, and 4275 had any Medicaid ART prescription. Over half (54%) had occasional gaps in HIV primary care. Women, older people, and those with suppressed viral load were less likely to have a gap. Among those with occasional gaps (n = 2282), 51% received a new ART prescription in a gap. Viral load suppression before gap was associated with receiving a new ART prescription in a gap (odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval: 1.57 to 2.32), as was number of days in a gap (odds ratio = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.02 to 1.05), and the proportion of months in the gap enrolled in Medicaid. Medicaid-insured individuals commonly receive ART during gaps in HIV primary care, but almost half do not. Retention measures based on visit frequency data that do not incorporate receipt of ART and/or viral suppression may misclassify individuals who remain suppressed on ART as not retained.

  4. Determinants of completion of advance directives: a cross-sectional comparison of 649 outpatients from private practices versus 2158 outpatients from a university clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirstinger, Jochen; Bleyer, Bernhard; Blum, Christian; Rechenmacher, Michael; Wiese, Christoph H; Gruber, Hans

    2017-12-21

    To compare outpatients from private practices and outpatients from a university clinic regarding the determinants of completion of advance directives (AD) in order to generalise results of studies from one setting to the other. Five determinants of completion of AD were studied: familiarity with AD, source of information about AD, prior experiences with own life-threatening diseases or family members in need of care and motives in favour and against completion of AD. Observational cross-sectional study. Private practices and a university clinic in Germany in 2012. 649 outpatients from private practices and 2158 outpatients from 10 departments of a university clinic. Completion of AD, familiarity with AD, sources of information about AD (consultation), prior experiences (with own life-threatening disease and family members in need of care), motives in favour of or against completion of AD, sociodemographic data. Determinants of completion of AD did not differ between outpatients from private practices versus university clinic outpatients. Prior experience with severe disease led to a significantly higher rate of completion of AD (33%/36% with vs 24%/24% without prior experience). Participants with completion of AD had more often received legal than medical consultation before completion, but participants without completion of AD are rather aiming for medical consultation. The motives in favour of or against completion of AD indicated inconsistent patterns. Determinants of completion of AD are comparable in outpatients from private practices and outpatients from a university clinic. Generalisations from university clinic samples towards a broader context thus seem to be legitimate. Only one-third of patients with prior experience with own life-threatening diseases or family members in need of care had completed an AD as expression of their autonomous volition. The participants' motives for or against completion of AD indicate that ADs are considered a kind of

  5. Inpatient versus Outpatient Management of TIA or Minor Stroke: Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shahram; Leon Guerrero, Christopher R; Burger, Kathleen M; Rothrock, John F

    2017-06-01

    The management of patients with acute transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke is highly variable. Whether hospitalization of such patients significantly improves short-term clinical outcome is unknown. We assessed the short-term clinical outcome associated with inpatient versus outpatient management of patients with TIA or minor stroke. We evaluated a consecutive series of patients with acute TIA or minor ischemic stroke (NIH Stroke Scale score ≤ 3) presenting to a single emergency department (ED). We randomized patients to either hospital-based or outpatient-based management. All patients underwent interview and examination 7-10 days following the index event. This study included 100 patients, 41 with TIA and 59 with minor stroke. Nineteen (46%) of the TIA patients and 29 (49%) of the minor stroke patients randomized to hospital management, and the remaining 22 TIA patients and 30 minor stroke patients randomized to outpatient-based management. In the patients with a minor stroke, neurologic worsening occurred in 6 out of 29 (21%) in the inpatient arm compared with 3 out of 30 (10%) in the outpatient arm ( p = 0.3). In none of these cases was acute interventional therapy or need for urgent admission considered medically appropriate. In the patients with a TIA, recurrence of a TIA occurred in 2 out of 19 (11%) in the inpatient arm compared with 2 out of 22 (9%) in the outpatient arm ( p = 1). None of the patients with a TIA randomized to the inpatient arm experienced a stroke compared with 1 out of 22 in the outpatient arm ( p = 1). There were no deaths in either group. Routine hospitalization of all patients with TIA or minor ischemic stroke may not positively affect short-term clinical outcome.

  6. Inpatient versus Outpatient Management of TIA or Minor Stroke: Clinical Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shahram; Leon Guerrero, Christopher R.; Burger, Kathleen M.; Rothrock, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Background The management of patients with acute transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke is highly variable. Whether hospitalization of such patients significantly improves short-term clinical outcome is unknown. We assessed the short-term clinical outcome associated with inpatient versus outpatient management of patients with TIA or minor stroke. Methods We evaluated a consecutive series of patients with acute TIA or minor ischemic stroke (NIH Stroke Scale score ≤ 3) presenting to a single emergency department (ED). We randomized patients to either hospital-based or outpatient-based management. All patients underwent interview and examination 7–10 days following the index event. Results This study included 100 patients, 41 with TIA and 59 with minor stroke. Nineteen (46%) of the TIA patients and 29 (49%) of the minor stroke patients randomized to hospital management, and the remaining 22 TIA patients and 30 minor stroke patients randomized to outpatient-based management. In the patients with a minor stroke, neurologic worsening occurred in 6 out of 29 (21%) in the inpatient arm compared with 3 out of 30 (10%) in the outpatient arm (p = 0.3). In none of these cases was acute interventional therapy or need for urgent admission considered medically appropriate. In the patients with a TIA, recurrence of a TIA occurred in 2 out of 19 (11%) in the inpatient arm compared with 2 out of 22 (9%) in the outpatient arm (p = 1). None of the patients with a TIA randomized to the inpatient arm experienced a stroke compared with 1 out of 22 in the outpatient arm (p = 1). There were no deaths in either group. Conclusion Routine hospitalization of all patients with TIA or minor ischemic stroke may not positively affect short-term clinical outcome. PMID:28702120

  7. Characteristics of adults with anxiety or depression treated at an internet clinic: comparison with a national survey and an outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; Kemp, Alice; Robinson, Emma

    2010-05-28

    There is concern that people seeking treatment over the Internet for anxiety or depressive disorders may not resemble the general population or have less severe disorders than patients attending outpatient clinics or cases identified in community surveys. Thus the response to treatment in Internet based trials might not generalize. We reviewed the characteristics of applicants to an Australian Internet-based treatment clinic for anxiety and depression, and compared this sample with people from a national epidemiological survey and a sample of patients at a specialist outpatient anxiety and depression clinic. Participants included 774 volunteers to an Internet clinic, 454 patients at a specialist anxiety disorders outpatient clinic, and 627 cases identified in a national epidemiological survey. Main measures included demographic characteristics, and severity of symptoms as measured by the Kessler 10-Item scale (K-10), the 12-item World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Schedule second edition (WHODAS-II), the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ), the Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ), the Automatic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ), the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) and the Social Phobia Scale (SPS). The severity of symptoms of participants attending the two clinics was similar, and both clinic samples were more severe than cases in the epidemiological survey. The Internet clinic and national samples were older and comprised more females than those attending the outpatient clinic. The Internet clinic sample were more likely to be married than the other samples. The Internet clinic and outpatient clinic samples had higher levels of educational qualifications than the national sample, but employment status was similar across groups. The Internet clinic sample have disorders as severe as those attending an outpatient clinic, but with demographic characteristics more consistent with the national sample. These data indicate that the benefits of Internet

  8. Characteristics of adults with anxiety or depression treated at an internet clinic: comparison with a national survey and an outpatient clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolai Titov

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is concern that people seeking treatment over the Internet for anxiety or depressive disorders may not resemble the general population or have less severe disorders than patients attending outpatient clinics or cases identified in community surveys. Thus the response to treatment in Internet based trials might not generalize.We reviewed the characteristics of applicants to an Australian Internet-based treatment clinic for anxiety and depression, and compared this sample with people from a national epidemiological survey and a sample of patients at a specialist outpatient anxiety and depression clinic. Participants included 774 volunteers to an Internet clinic, 454 patients at a specialist anxiety disorders outpatient clinic, and 627 cases identified in a national epidemiological survey. Main measures included demographic characteristics, and severity of symptoms as measured by the Kessler 10-Item scale (K-10, the 12-item World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Schedule second edition (WHODAS-II, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ, the Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ, the Automatic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ, the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS and the Social Phobia Scale (SPS.The severity of symptoms of participants attending the two clinics was similar, and both clinic samples were more severe than cases in the epidemiological survey. The Internet clinic and national samples were older and comprised more females than those attending the outpatient clinic. The Internet clinic sample were more likely to be married than the other samples. The Internet clinic and outpatient clinic samples had higher levels of educational qualifications than the national sample, but employment status was similar across groups.The Internet clinic sample have disorders as severe as those attending an outpatient clinic, but with demographic characteristics more consistent with the national sample. These data indicate that the benefits

  9. CLINICAL DESCRIPTION AND DIAGNOSIS OF HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Suryono Suryono; Nasronudin Nasronudin

    2014-01-01

    Infections ofHIV/AIDS currently has become very serious problems for the world health. In the country the first case ofHIV/AIDS was discovered in Bali in 1987, in its progress has not the meaning but after 1985 HIV transmission increased considerably. The complex problem that the living and the increasing number ofcases should indeed, medical practitioners understand more the clinical and how to diagnose infections ofHIV/AIDS. A snapshot ofthe clinical HIV infection/aids can be seen fro...

  10. The impact of HIV clinical pharmacists on HIV treatment outcomes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saberi P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Parya Saberi1, Betty J Dong2, Mallory O Johnson1, Ruth M Greenblatt2, Jennifer M Cocohoba21Department of Medicine, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USAObjective: Due to the rapid proliferation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV treatment options, there is a need for health care providers with knowledge of antiretroviral therapy intricacies. In a HIV multidisciplinary care team, the HIV pharmacist is well-equipped to provide this expertise. We conducted a systematic review to assess the impact of HIV pharmacists on HIV clinical outcomes.Methods: We searched six electronic databases from January 1, 1980 to June 1, 2011 and included all quantitative studies that examined pharmacist's roles in the clinical care of HIV-positive adults. Primary outcomes were antiretroviral adherence, viral load, and CD4+ cell count and secondary outcomes included health care utilization parameters, antiretroviral modifications, and other descriptive variables.Results: Thirty-two publications were included. Despite methodological limitation, the involvement of HIV pharmacists was associated with statistically significant adherence improvements and positive impact on viral suppression in the majority of studies.Conclusion: This systematic review provides evidence of the beneficial impact of HIV pharmacists on HIV treatment outcomes and offers suggestions for future research.Keywords: pharmacist, HIV/AIDS, clinical, adherence, impact

  11. HTLV-1 and HIV-1 co-infection: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Isache

    2016-01-01

    HTLV and HIV share the same routes of transmission and the same tropism for T-lymphocytes. Co-infection occurs probably more frequently than we are aware, since testing for HTLV is not routinely performed in outpatient HIV clinics.

  12. Depressive Symptoms, Disclosure, HIV-Related Stigma, and Coping Following HIV Testing Among Outpatients in Uganda: A Daily Process Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiene, Susan M; Dove, Meredith; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2018-05-01

    As efforts to end the HIV epidemic accelerate there is emphasis on reaching those living with undiagnosed HIV infection. Newly diagnosed individuals face a number of psychosocial challenges, yet we know little about depressive symptoms in the weeks immediately following diagnosis and how disclosure, coping, and other factors may affect short and longer-term depressive symptoms. Purposively sampled Ugandan outpatients completed structured interviews immediately prior to testing for HIV, daily for 28 days after receiving their test results, and at 3 and 6 months post-test. The sample included a total of 244 participants: 20 who tested HIV positive at baseline and who provided 342 daily data points, and 224 who tested HIV negative at baseline and who provided 4388 daily data points. We used linear mixed effects modeling to examine changes in depressive symptom scores over the 28 day daily interview period and predictors of depressive symptom scores and changes over time. Results from the mixed modeling revealed that while those diagnosed with HIV showed initially high depressive symptoms following diagnosis, their symptoms decreased significantly and on average fell below the cutoff for possible depression approximately 15 days after diagnosis. Among those who tested HIV-negative, on average their depressive symptoms were below the cutoff for possible depression and did not change over time. Among those diagnosed with HIV, disclosure, especially to a partner, on a particular day was associated with higher depressive symptoms that day. However, those who disclosed to their partner during the 28 days after diagnosis had significantly lower depression scores by the end of the 28 days as well as lower depression scores 3 and 6 months after diagnosis than did those who did not disclose to their partner during the 28 days after diagnosis. Scoring higher on HIV-related stigma on a particular day was associated with higher depressive symptoms that day and engaging

  13. Exploring the Unmet Needs of the Patient in the Outpatient Respiratory Medical Clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone Birgitte; Brinkkjær, Ulf; Larsen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Developing a theoretical framework explaining patients’ behaviour and actions related to unmet needs during interactions with health care professionals in hospital-based outpatient respiratory medical clinics. Background. The outpatient respiratory medical clinic plays a prominent role in many...... patients’ lives regarding treatment and counselling increasing the need for a better understanding of patients’ perspective to the counselling of the health care professionals. Design. The study is exploratory and based on Charmaz’s interpretation of grounded theory. Methods. The study included 65 field...... observations with a sample of 43 patients, 11 doctors, and 11 nurses, as well as 30 interviews with patients, conducted through theoretical sampling from three outpatient respiratory medical clinics in Denmark. Findings. The patients’ efforts to share their significant stories triggered predominantly...

  14. Access to oral health care for HIV patients in Nigeria: Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the knowledge of attending physicians on oral manifestations of HIV infection and their attitude and practice towards dental referral for HIV patients. Method: A self-administered questionnaire survey of attending physicians in outpatient clinics of two teaching hospitals in Lagos and the National hospital, ...

  15. CLINICAL DESCRIPTION AND DIAGNOSIS OF HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryono Suryono

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections ofHIV/AIDS currently has become very serious problems for the world health. In the country the first case ofHIV/AIDS was discovered in Bali in 1987, in its progress has not the meaning but after 1985 HIV transmission increased considerably. The complex problem that the living and the increasing number ofcases should indeed, medical practitioners understand more the clinical and how to diagnose infections ofHIV/AIDS. A snapshot ofthe clinical HIV infection/aids can be seen from grievances and a disease that often accompanies it, a complaint which is found at HIV/AIDS sufferers in the form of suds retroviral acute: fever, weight loss, diarrhea chronic, disphagi, limpadenopati, infections in the skin respiratory disorders and nervous breakdown center. While a disease that often been gained by those with HIV / AIDS as candidiasis, tuberculosis, pneumonia bakterialis, toksoplasmosis and pneumonia pneumocystic carinii. Diagnose HIV infection created based on clinical symptoms which includes major symptoms and symptoms of minor, and the result ofthe examination ofthe laboratory.

  16. Characteristics of the first 1000 headaches in an outpatient headache clinic registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Ángel L; Rojo, Esther; Herrero, Sonia; Neri, María J; Bautista, Lourdes; Peñas, María L; Cortijo, Elisa; Mulero, Patricia; Fernández, Rosa

    2011-02-01

    To analyze the incidence and characteristics of the first 1000 headaches in an outpatient clinic. Headache is a common cause of medical consultation, both in primary care and in specialist neurology outpatient clinics. The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICHD-II), enables headaches to be classified in a precise and reproducible manner. In January 2008, an outpatient headache clinic was set up in Hospital Clínico Universitario, a tertiary hospital in Valladolid, Spain. Headaches were classified prospectively in accordance with ICHD-II criteria. In each case we recorded age and sex, duration of headache, ancillary tests required, and previous symptomatic or prophylactic therapies. In January 2010, the registry included 1000 headaches in 682 patients. The women/men ratio was 2.46/1 and the mean age of the patients was 43.19 ± 17.1 years (range: 14-94 years). Patients were referred from primary care (53.4%), general neurology clinics (36.6%), and other specialist clinics (9%). The headaches were grouped (ICHD-II classification) as follows: group 1 (Migraine), 51.4%; group 2 (Tension-type headache), 16%; group 3 (Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias), 2.6%; group 4 (Other primary headaches) and group 13 (Cranial neuralgias), 3.4%. The diagnostic criteria of chronic migraine were satisfied in 8.5% of migraines. Regarding secondary headaches, 1.1% of all cases were included in group 5 (Headaches attributed to trauma) and 8.3% in group 8 (Headaches attributed to a substance or its withdrawal). Only 3.4% of headaches were classified in group 14 (Unspecified or not elsewhere classified), and 5.2% were included in the groups listed in the ICHD-II research appendix. This registry outlines the characteristics of patients seen in an outpatient headache clinic in a tertiary hospital; our results are similar to those previously reported for this type of outpatient clinic. Migraine was the most common diagnosis. Most headaches can be classified using

  17. Diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups and outpatient clinics: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J E; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2014-08-07

    In recent years, most Dutch general practitioners started working under the umbrella of diabetes care groups, responsible for the organisation and coordination of diabetes care. The quality management of these new organisations receives growing interest, although its association with quality of diabetes care is yet unclear. The best way to measure quality management is unknown and it has not yet been studied at the level of outpatient clinics or care groups. We aimed to assess quality management of type 2 diabetes care in care groups and outpatient clinics. Quality management was measured with online questionnaires, containing six domains (see below). They were divided into 28 subdomains, with 59 (care groups) and 57 (outpatient clinics) questions respectively. The mean score of the domains reflects the overall score (0-100%) of an organisation. Two quality managers of all Dutch care groups and outpatient clinics were invited to fill out the questionnaire.Sixty care groups (response rate 61.9%) showed a mean score of 59.6% (CI 57.1-62.1%). The average score in 52 outpatient clinics (response rate 50.0%) was 61.9% (CI 57.5-66.8%).Mean scores on the six domains for care groups and outpatient clinics respectively were: 'organisation of care' 71.9% (CI 68.8-74.9%), 76.8% (CI 72.8-80.7%); 'multidisciplinary teamwork' 67.1% (CI 62.4-71.9%), 71.5% (CI 65.3-77.8%); 'patient centeredness' 46.7% (CI 42.6-50.7%), 62.5% (CI 57.7-67.2%); 'performance management' 63.3% (CI 61.2-65.3%), 50.9% (CI 44.2-57.5%); 'quality improvement policy' 52.6% (CI 49.2-56.1%), 50.9% (CI 44.6-57.3%); and 'management strategies' 56.0% (CI 51.4-60.7%), 59.0% (CI 52.8-65.2%). On subdomains, care groups scored highest on 'care program' (83.3%) and 'measured outcomes' (98.3%) and lowest on 'patient safety' (15.1%) and 'patient involvement' (17.7%). Outpatient clinics scored high on the presence of a 'diabetic foot team' (81.6%) and the support in 'self-management' (81.0%) and low on 'patient

  18. Cancer clinical trials in persons with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    The era of modern HIV therapeutics is well underway. The cancer and infectious disease epidemiology of HIV disease has markedly altered as populations are availed to the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ARV). The types of cancers occurring among those with HIV infection has broadened but the case burden in absolute numbers is very low relative to the background population. There are fewer incident cases of the AIDS-defining cancers (aggressive B-cell lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, and cervical cancer). There is an increased risk for certain non-AIDS-defining cancers, but these occur somewhat sporadically relative to clinical trial enrollment. The changing epidemiology of cancer in HIV poses challenges as well as opportunities for participation of persons with HIV in cancer therapy clinical trials. There are excellent examples of cancer trials that inform cancer therapy for patients with HIV infection. Examples include those from HIV-specific trials and from trials mainly focused on the background population that included patients with HIV infection. Interpretation of clinical trials to guide therapy for those with HIV infection and cancer largely depends on data that does not include HIV-infected patients. The ability to extend clinical trial findings to populations not included in clinical trials remains problematic for a variety of populations, including those with HIV or AIDS. Careful prioritization of studies designed to bridge this gap is needed. However, there are published studies that serve as excellent examples bridging these gaps and the portfolio of cancer therapy trials underway will inform HIV and cancer better than at any time in the past.

  19. Demand, capacity, and access of the outpatient clinic: A framework for analysis and improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bussel, Erik Martijn; van der Voort, Marc Boudewijn Victor Rouppe; Wessel, Ronald N; van Merode, Godefridus G

    2018-06-01

    While theoretical frameworks for optimization of the outpatient processes are abundant, practical step-by-step analyses to give leads for improvement, to forecast capacity, and to support decision making are sparse. This article demonstrates how to evaluate and optimize the triad of demand, (future) capacity, and access time of the outpatient clinic using a structured six-step method. All individual logistical patient data of an orthopaedic outpatient clinic of one complete year were analysed using a 6-step method to evaluate demand, supply, and access time. Trends in the data were retrospectively analysed and evaluated for potential improvements. A model for decision making was tested. Both the analysis of the method and actual results were considered as main outcomes. More than 25 000 appointments were analysed. The 6-step method showed to be sufficient to result in valuable insights and leads for improvement. While the overall match between demand and capacity was considered adequate, the variability in capacity was much higher than in demand, thereby leading to delays in access time. Holidays and subsequent weeks showed to be of great influence for demand, capacity, and access time. Using the six-step method, several unfavourable characteristics of the outpatient clinic were revealed and a better match between demand, supply, and access time could have been reached with only minor adjustments. Last, a clinic specific prediction and decision model for demand and capacity was made using the 6-step method. The 6-step analysis can successfully be applied to redesign and improve the outpatient health care process. The results of the analysis showed that national holidays and variability in demand and capacity have a big influence on the outpatient clinic. Using the 6-step method, practical improvements in outpatient logistics were easily found and leads for future decision making were contrived. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice

  20. Evaluation of a hand hygiene campaign in outpatient health care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukanich, Kate Stenske; Kaur, Ramandeep; Freeman, Lisa C; Powell, Douglas A

    2013-03-01

    To improve hand hygiene in two outpatient health care clinics through the introduction of a gel sanitizer and an informational poster. In this interventional study, health care workers at two outpatient clinics were observed for frequency of hand hygiene (attempts versus opportunities). Gel sanitizer and informational posters were introduced together as an intervention. Direct observation of the frequency of hand hygiene was performed during baseline, intervention, and follow-up. A poststudy survey of health care workers was also distributed and collected. In both clinics, the frequency of hand hygiene was poor at baseline (11% and 21%) but improved significantly after intervention (36% and 54%) and was maintained through the follow-up period (32% and 51%). Throughout the study, postcontact hand hygiene was observed significantly more often than precontact hand hygiene. In both clinics, health care workers reported a preference for soap and water; yet observations showed that when the intervention made gel sanitizer available, sanitizer use predominated. Fifty percent of the surveyed health care workers considered the introduction of gel sanitizer to be an effective motivating tool for improving hand hygiene. Hand hygiene performance by health care workers in outpatient clinics may be improved through promoting the use of gel sanitizer and using informational posters. Compared with surveys, direct observation by trained observers may provide more accurate information about worker preferences for hand hygiene tools.

  1. Attitudes toward suicidal behaviour among professionals at mental health outpatient clinics in Stavropol, Russia and Oslo, Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Norheim, Astrid Berge; Grimholt, Tine K.; Loskutova, Ekaterina; Ekeberg, Oivind

    2016-01-01

    Background Attitudes toward suicidal behaviour can be essential regarding whether patients seek or are offered help. Patients with suicidal behaviour are increasingly treated by mental health outpatient clinics. Our aim was to study attitudes among professionals at outpatient clinics in Stavropol, Russia and Oslo, Norway. Methods Three hundred and forty-eight (82?%) professionals anonymously completed a questionnaire about attitudes. Professionals at outpatient clinics in Stavropol (n?=?119; ...

  2. HIV in East London: ethnicity, gender and risk. Design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukutu Cecilia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While men who have sex with men remain the group at greatest risk of acquiring HIV infection in the UK, the number of new diagnoses among heterosexuals has risen steadily over the last five years. In the UK, three-quarters of heterosexual men and women diagnosed with HIV in 2004 probably acquired their infection in Africa. This changing epidemiological pattern is particularly pronounced in East London because of its ethnically diverse population. Design and methods The objective of the study was to examine the social, economic and behavioural characteristics of patients with HIV infection currently receiving treatment and care in hospitals in East London. The research focused on ethnicity, gender, sexuality, education, employment, housing, HIV treatment, stigma, discrimination, religion, migration and sexual risk behaviour. People diagnosed with HIV infection attending outpatient treatment clinics at St Bartholomew's, the Royal London, Whipp's Cross, Homerton, Newham and Barking hospitals (all in East London over a 4–6 month period were invited to participate in the study in 2004–2005. Those who agreed to participate completed a confidential, self-administered pen-and-paper questionnaire. During the study period, 2680 patients with HIV attended the outpatient clinics in the six participating hospitals, of whom 2299 were eligible for the study and 1687 completed a questionnaire. The response rate was 73% of eligible patients and 63% of all patients attending the clinics during the survey period. Discussion A clinic-based study has allowed us to survey nearly 1700 patients with HIV from diverse backgrounds receiving treatment and care in East London. The data collected in this study will provide valuable information for the planning and delivery of appropriate clinical care, social support and health promotion for people living with HIV not only in East London but in other parts of the capital as well as elsewhere in the UK.

  3. The paediatric change laboratory: optimising postgraduate learning in the outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Mads; Musaeus, Peter; Nøhr, Susanne Backman

    2016-02-02

    This study aimed to analyse and redesign the outpatient clinic in a paediatric department. The study was a joint collaboration with the doctors of the department (paediatric residents and specialists) using the Change Laboratory intervention method as a means to model and implement change in the outpatient clinic. This study was motivated by a perceived failure to integrate the activities of the outpatient clinic, patient care and training of residents. The ultimate goal of the intervention was to create improved care for patients through resident learning and development. We combined the Change Laboratory intervention with an already established innovative process for residents, 3-h meetings. The Change Laboratory intervention method consists of a well-defined theory (Cultural-historical activity theory) and concrete actions where participants construct a new theoretical model of the activity, which in this case was paediatric doctors' workplace learning modelled in order to improve medical social practice. The notion of expansive learning was used during the intervention in conjunction with thematic analysis of data in order to fuel the process of analysis and intervention. The activity system of the outpatient clinic can meaningfully be analysed in terms of the objects of patient care and training residents. The Change Laboratory sessions resulted in a joint action plan for the outpatient clinic structured around three themes: (1) Before: Preparation, expectations, and introduction; (2) During: Structural context and resources; (3) After: Follow-up and feedback. The participants found the Change Laboratory method to be a successful way of sharing reflections on how to optimise the organisation of work and training with patient care in mind. The Change Laboratory approach outlined in this study succeeded to change practices and to help medical doctors redesigning their work. Participating doctors must be motivated to uncover inherent contradictions in their

  4. Quality of COPD care in hospital outpatient clinics in Denmark: The KOLIBRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, P.; Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Munch, E.

    2009-01-01

    of the hospital records one year apart before and after the educational programme for the participating doctors and nurses. A total of 941 patient records were included in the first audit and 927 in the second. The indicators of quality of care comprised amongst others referral to pulmonary rehabilitation......Background: We studied the quality of care for COPD patients in 22 hospital-based outpatient clinics in Denmark and evaluated if participation by the staff in an educational programme could improve the quality of care and adherence to the COPD guidelines. Methods: We performed two audits...... by focusing on a more systematic approach to the patient assessment by education of the staff of the outpatient clinics. A repeated and continuous education and discussion with the clinical staff is probably essential to reach an acceptable level of the quality of care for outpatients with COPD....

  5. Vaccination status of people living with HIV/AIDS in outpatient care in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmara Holanda da Cunha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy has increased the survival of patients with HIV/AIDS, thus necessitating health promotion practice with immunization. Vaccines are critical components for protecting people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA. The purpose of study was to analyze the vaccination status of PLWHA in outpatient care in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Cross-sectional study performed from June 2014 to June 2015. The screening was done with patients in antiretroviral therapy, 420 patients underwent screening, but only 99 met the inclusion criteria. Data were collected for interviews using forms to characterize sociodemographic, clinical and vaccination situations. Only 14 patients had complete vaccination schedules. The most used vaccines were hepatitis B, influenza vaccine and 23-valent pneumococcal. There was no difference between men and women regarding the proportion of PLWHA with full vaccination schedule or between sex, skin color, marital status, sexual orientation, religion or occupational status. There was no difference between having or not having a complete vaccination schedule and age, years of education, family income or number of hospitalizations. CD4+ T-cells count of patients with incomplete immunization was lower than patients with complete immunization. Health education strategies can be done individually or in groups to explain the importance of vaccination and to remind about doses to be administered. Most patients did not have proper adherence to vaccination schedules, especially due to lack of guidance. Results implied that education in health is important for vaccination adhesion, knowledge of adverse events and continuation of schemes.

  6. Adding psychologist's intervention to physicians' advice to problem drinkers in the outpatient clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmen, M. J.; Schippers, G. M.; Wollersheim, H.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: To test the effectiveness of a brief psychological intervention for problem drinking among outpatients in a hospital setting. METHODS: Over a period of 3 years physicians screened patients who visited an outpatient clinic for general internal medicine for problem drinking. Of the 4728 patients

  7. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with

  8. Treatment outcomes of a stage 1 cognitive-behavioral trial to reduce alcohol use among human immunodeficiency virus-infected out-patients in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Sidle, John E; Gakinya, Benson N; Baliddawa, Joyce B; Martino, Steve; Mwaniki, Michael M; Songole, Rogers; Omolo, Otieno E; Kamanda, Allan M; Ayuku, David O; Ojwang, Claris; Owino-Ong'or, Willis D; Harrington, Magdalena; Bryant, Kendall J; Carroll, Kathleen M; Justice, Amy C; Hogan, Joseph W; Maisto, Stephen A

    2011-12-01

    Dual epidemics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and alcohol use disorders, and a dearth of professional resources for behavioral treatment in sub-Saharan Africa, suggest the need for development of culturally relevant and feasible interventions. The purpose of this study was to test the preliminary efficacy of a culturally adapted six-session gender-stratified group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention delivered by paraprofessionals to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected out-patients in Eldoret, Kenya. Randomized clinical trial comparing CBT against a usual care assessment-only control. A large HIV out-patient clinic in Eldoret, Kenya, part of the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare collaboration. Seventy-five HIV-infected out-patients who were antiretroviral (ARV)-initiated or ARV-eligible and who reported hazardous or binge drinking. Percentage of drinking days (PDD) and mean drinks per drinking days (DDD) measured continuously using the Time line Follow back method. There were 299 ineligible and 102 eligible out-patients with 12 refusals. Effect sizes of the change in alcohol use since baseline between the two conditions at the 30-day follow-up were large [d=0.95, P=0.0002, mean difference=24.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 12.43, 37.43 PDD; d=0.76, P=0.002, mean difference=2.88, 95% CI: 1.05, 4.70 DDD]. Randomized participants attended 93% of the six CBT sessions offered. Reported alcohol abstinence at the 90-day follow-up was 69% (CBT) and 38% (usual care). Paraprofessional counselors achieved independent ratings of adherence and competence equivalent to college-educated therapists in the United States. Treatment effect sizes were comparable to alcohol intervention studies conducted in the United States. Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be adapted successfully to group paraprofessional delivery in Kenya and may be effective in reducing alcohol use among HIV-infected Kenyan out-patients. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011

  9. THE ATTITUDE TOWARDS TREATMENT OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: A SURVEY OF PATIENTS OF STATE OUTPATIENT CLINICS AND PRIVATE MEDICAL CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Semenova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the differences in views on treatment among patients with cardiovascular diseases in state and private outpatient clinics, as well as the motivation for choosing one of these outpatient clinics.Material and methods. Anonymous and voluntary survey of cardiology patients (n=90 in 2 state (57.7% and 3 private outpatient clinics (42.2% was conducted in Saratov.Results. 33.3% of respondents were men; the median age was 65 years. Patients of state outpatient clinics were more likely to have retirement age (p=0.0008, low income (p=0.0006, history of hypertensive crises (p=0.0129 and chronic heart failure (p=0.0001. Patients of private outpatient clinics were more likely to have mental work (p=0.0001, higher education (p=0.0001, moderate income (p=0.0006. The difference in views on the disease and the attitude towards a doctor among patients of state and private clinics was shown.Conclusion. Patients of private outpatient clinics were more active, young, aimed at continuation of life. They are more likely to have higher education, mental work and moderate income. Patients of state outpatient clinics are "infatuated with their illness"; it is their “lifestyle”. Paternalistic model of communication with doctors is expressed in all the patients.

  10. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART.

  11. Clinical Profile and HIV/AIDS Prevalence of Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clinical features of HIV/AIDS and various malignancies are similar. Clinical profiles and HIV/AIDS prevalence in Nigerian cancer patients have been poorly documented. Aim: To identify the patterns of clinical presentations in patients with malignancies and to determine the prevalence of HIV infection in cancer ...

  12. Education research: case logs in the assessment of medical students in the neurology outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Brorson, James R; Amidei, Christina; Lukas, Rimas V

    2014-04-22

    Using outpatient neurology clinic case logs completed by medical students on neurology clerkships, we examined the impact of outpatient clinical encounter volume per student on outcomes of knowledge assessed by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Clinical Neurology Subject Examination and clinical skills assessed by the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Data from 394 medical students from July 2008 to June 2012, representing 9,791 patient encounters, were analyzed retrospectively. Pearson correlations were calculated examining the relationship between numbers of cases logged per student and performance on the NBME examination. Similarly, correlations between cases logged and performance on the OSCE, as well as on components of the OSCE (history, physical examination, clinical formulation), were evaluated. There was a correlation between the total number of cases logged per student and NBME examination scores (r = 0.142; p = 0.005) and OSCE scores (r = 0.136; p = 0.007). Total number of cases correlated with the clinical formulation component of the OSCE (r = 0.172; p = 0.001) but not the performance on history or physical examination components. The volume of cases logged by individual students in the outpatient clinic correlates with performance on measures of knowledge and clinical skill. In measurement of clinical skill, seeing a greater volume of patients in the outpatient clinic is related to improved clinical formulation on the OSCE. These findings may affect methods employed in assessment of medical students, residents, and fellows.

  13. The HIV prevalence among pregnant women in the Amsterdam region (1988-1991)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, P. J.; Mulder-Folkerts, D. K.; Boer, K.; Schutte, M. F.; van der Velde, W. j; Wong, F. J.; van den Hoek, A. J.; van Doornum, G. J.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the study was to monitor the HIV prevalence in the years 1988-1991 among pregnant women in the Amsterdam region, visitors to an abortion clinic and 3 outpatient infertility clinics. All women attending these clinics were asked to participate in the study on a voluntary basis and

  14. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Campbell, Mary S [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Mullins, James I [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Hughes, James P [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Wong, Kim G [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Raugi, Dana N [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Scrensen, Stefanie [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  15. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in HIV-Infected Patients: Female Sex and Smoking as Risk Factors in an Outpatient Cohort in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelisa Silva E Alves de Carvalho Santos

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS and associated factors in an outpatient cohort of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA followed between October 2009 and July 2011. We evaluated nausea and/or vomiting, dyspepsia, heartburn, diarrhea, constipation, and flatulence. The outcome variable was the presence of three or more GIS. Sociodemographic (sex, skin color, age, income, years of schooling, lifestyle (smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity level, clinical (antiretroviral therapy, time of HIV infection, CD4 lymphocyte count, viral load, and anthropometric (nutritional status and waist circumference variables were investigated. Data on sociodemographic and lifestyle variables were collected through a pre-tested and standardized questionnaire. CD4 count was determined by flow cytometry and viral load by branched DNA (bDNA assays for HIV-1. All variables were analyzed at a p<0.05 significance level. Among 290 patients, the incidence of three or more GIS was 28.8% (95% CI 23.17 to 33.84 and 74.48% presented at least one symptom. Female gender (IR 2.29, 95% CI 1.63 to 3.22 and smoking status (IR 1.93, 95% CI 1.30 to 2.88 were risk factors for the presence of three or more GIS after multivariate Poisson regression. A high incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms was found among PLWHA, and it was significantly associated with female sex and tobacco use. Those results reinforce the relevance of investigating the presence of GIS in PLWHA as it may affect treatment adherence.

  16. Predictors of outpatient mental health clinic follow-up after hospitalization among Medicaid-enrolled young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Leslie; Wissow, Lawrence S; Davis, Maryann; Abrams, Michael T; Dixon, Lisa B; Slade, Eric P

    2016-12-01

    To assess demographic and clinical predictors of outpatient mental health clinic follow-up after inpatient psychiatric hospitalization among Medicaid-enrolled young adults. Using logistic regression and administrative claims data from the Maryland public mental health system and Maryland Medicaid for young adults ages 18-26 who were enrolled in Medicaid (N = 1127), the likelihood of outpatient mental health follow-up within 30 days after inpatient psychiatric hospitalization was estimated . Only 51% of the young adults had any outpatient mental health follow-up visits within 30 days of discharge. Being black and having a co-occurring substance use disorder diagnosis were associated with a lower probability of having a follow-up visit (OR = 0.60, P young adults hospitalized for serious psychiatric conditions, half did not connect with an outpatient mental healthcare provider following their discharge. Outpatient transition supports may be especially needed for young adults who were not receiving outpatient services prior to being admitted for psychiatric inpatient care, as well as for young adults with substance use disorders and African Americans. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. HIV testing and clinical status upon admission to a specialized health care unit in Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Afonso Martins Abati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HIV-infected individuals upon admission to a reference health care center. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1999 and 2010 on 527 individuals with confirmed serological diagnosis of HIV infection who were enrolled in an outpatient health care service in Santarém, PA, Northern Brazil. Data were collected from medical records and included the reason for HIV testing, clinical status, and count of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes upon enrollment. The data were divided into three groups, according to the patient’s year of admission – P1 (1999-2002, P2 (2003-2006, and P3 (2007-2010 – for comparative analysis of the variables of interest. RESULTS In the study group, 62.0% of the patients were assigned to the P3 group. The reason for undergoing HIV testing differed between genders. In the male population, most tests were conducted because of the presence of symptoms suggesting infection. Among women, tests were the result of knowledge of the partner’s seropositive status in groups P1 and P2. Higher proportion of women undergoing testing because of symptoms of HIV/AIDS infection abolished the difference between genders in the most recent period. A higher percentage of patients enrolling at a more advanced stage of the disease was observed in P3. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increased awareness of the number of HIV/AIDS cases, these patients have identified their serological status late and were admitted to health care units with active disease. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Pará presents specificities in its progression that indicate the complex characteristics of the epidemic in the Northern region of Brazil and across the country.

  18. HIV testing and clinical status upon admission to a specialized health care unit in Pará, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abati, Paulo Afonso Martins; Segurado, Aluisio Cotrim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HIV-infected individuals upon admission to a reference health care center. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1999 and 2010 on 527 individuals with confirmed serological diagnosis of HIV infection who were enrolled in an outpatient health care service in Santarém, PA, Northern Brazil. Data were collected from medical records and included the reason for HIV testing, clinical status, and count of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes upon enrollment. The data were divided into three groups, according to the patient's year of admission - P1 (1999-2002), P2 (2003-2006), and P3 (2007-2010) - for comparative analysis of the variables of interest. RESULTS In the study group, 62.0% of the patients were assigned to the P3 group. The reason for undergoing HIV testing differed between genders. In the male population, most tests were conducted because of the presence of symptoms suggesting infection. Among women, tests were the result of knowledge of the partner's seropositive status in groups P1 and P2. Higher proportion of women undergoing testing because of symptoms of HIV/AIDS infection abolished the difference between genders in the most recent period. A higher percentage of patients enrolling at a more advanced stage of the disease was observed in P3. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increased awareness of the number of HIV/AIDS cases, these patients have identified their serological status late and were admitted to health care units with active disease. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Pará presents specificities in its progression that indicate the complex characteristics of the epidemic in the Northern region of Brazil and across the country.

  19. Internet use by parents of children attending a dedicated scoliosis outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph F; Devitt, Brian M; Lynch, Sam; Green, Connor J; Byrne, Damien P; Kiely, Patrick J

    2012-10-01

    No information exists on the level of internet use among parents of pediatric patients with scoliosis. The internet may represent a medium through which to provide information to augment the outpatient consultation. The aim of this research was to establish the prevalence of internet use amongst a cohort of parents attending a pediatric scoliosis outpatient clinic. A previously used questionnaire (Baker et al., Eur Spine J, 19:1776-1779, 2010) was distributed to parents attending a dedicated scoliosis outpatient clinic with their children. Demographic data and details about use of the internet were collected. Fifty-eight percent of respondents had used the internet to search for information on scoliosis, and 94 % were interested in a local internet provided information provision. A positive history of corrective surgery and possession of health insurance were independent positive predictors of internet use. As surgeons we need to be aware of our patients' use of the internet, and there is the opportunity to use this medium to provide additional education.

  20. Disparities in HIV clinic care across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffery V.; Laut, Kamilla Grønborg; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although advances in HIV medicine have yielded increasingly better treatment outcomes in recent years, HIV-positive people with access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) still face complex health challenges. The EuroSIDA Study Group surveyed its clinics to explore regional differences...... in clinic services. Methods: The EuroSIDA study is a prospective observational cohort study that began enrolling patients in 1994. In early 2014, we conducted a 59-item survey of the 98 then-active EuroSIDA clinics. The survey covered HIV clinical care and other aspects of patient care. The EuroSIDA East...... Europe study region (Belarus, Estonia, Lithuania, the Russian Federation and Ukraine) was compared to a "non-East Europe" study region comprised of all other EuroSIDA countries. Results: A larger proportion of clinics in the East Europe group reported deferring ART in asymptomatic patients until the CD4...

  1. Epidemiological and Clinical profile of HIV-infected patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Treatment and care services for HIV patients in Tanzania began 2004 with free access to anti-retroviral therapy (ART). More than 1000 HIV clinics have been established to-date. Each clinic is obliged to provide statistical and clinical feedback for further improvement. Broad objective: The objective of this study ...

  2. Clinical aspects of influenza A (H1N1 in HIV-infected individuals in São Paulo during the pandemic of 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Del Bianco

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical aspects of H1N1 among HIV coinfected patients seen at a reference center for AIDS treatment in São Paulo, Brazil. Design: Observational and prospective cohort study. METHODS: Descriptive study of clinical and laboratory investigation of HIV-infected patients with confirmed diagnosis of influenza A (H1N1 in 2009. We analyzed patients monitored in CRT/DST/AIDS, a specialized service for people living with HIV, located in São Paulo, Brazil. RESULTS: 108 individuals presented with symptoms of H1N1 infection at the CRT DST/AIDS in 2009. Eighteen patients (16.7% had confirmation of the diagnosis of influenza A. Among the confirmed cases, ten (55.6% were hospitalized and eight (44.4% were outpatients. Dyspnea was present in nine patients (50%, hemoptysis in three (16%. Six patients (60% required therapy with supplemental oxygen. All patients had good clinical outcomes and none died. CONCLUSIONS: In our hospital, the symptoms that led patients to seek medical care were similar to the common flu. Hospital admission and the early introduction of antibiotics associated with oseltamivir may have been the cause of the favorable outcome of our cases.

  3. HIV-related symptoms and patient clusters among Chileans living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, A X; Norr, K F; Pérez, C M; Levy, J A; Park, C G; Kim, M J

    2013-01-01

    Identifying both Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related and co-morbid symptoms experienced by people living with HIV (PLWH) who are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment is a major challenge for healthcare providers globally. Yet, little research to date has examined the symptoms of illness experienced by PLWH including patients living in Central and South American. To address this gap, this study was designed to identify symptoms of HIV by socio-demographic and/or clinical characteristics among Chilean patients living with the virus. A convenience sample of 209 Chilean PLWH was recruited from an outpatient clinic in Santiago, Chile. A structured interview was used to elicit socio-demographic information and HIV symptoms status. Additional clinical information was obtained through a review of the participants' medical records. Results show that patients' most commonly reported HIV-related symptoms were fear/worries (66%), anxiety (52%), gas/bloating (50%), and thirst (50%). Multivariate analysis revealed a positive association between the number of reported HIV-related symptoms and number of years living with HIV. Having completed college was negatively associated with number of symptoms. Latent class analysis indicated that PLWH in the sample who had completed college were two times more likely to experience a mild intensity of HIV-related symptoms than their lesser educated counterparts. Similarly, logistic regression revealed that college-educated PLWH were twice as likely to be classified in the subgroup reporting mild intensity of symptoms than those who lacked a college degree. Overall, the study's results reveal that many Chilean PLWH, even those with high CD4 counts and low or undetectable viral loads, are not symptom free. The findings point to the need for clinicians to tailor a plan of care for individuals living with HIV that is based on their symptomatology.

  4. Clinical Staging of HIV Infection as a Surrogate for CD4 Count in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    naive HIV-infected children. METHODS: Newly diagnosed HIV-infected children, antiretroviral-naïve attending a paediatric infectious diseases unit were enrolled. The clinical manifesta-tions, age, sex, and. WHO clinical stage of each patient were ...

  5. What characterizes the communication between patients with cancer and nurses in an outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prip, Anne

    predominantly are treated in outpatient clinics today, little is known about what constitutes communication when the encounters between patients and nurses are brief and takes place in outpatient settings. The aim of the study was to explore communication between nurses and patients with cancer undergoing...... chemotherapy in an outpatient clinic. Methods The study is based on ethnographic fieldwork that explored through multiple observations and adhoc interviews, the communicative practice between nurses and patients with cancer. A thematic analysis guided by Interpretive Description was carried out to identify...... characteristics and variations in the nurse-patient communication. Results We identified three themes: Communication on the run, reflects the nurses’ multitasking approach to communication; Treatment-centered communication illustrates how topics and issues related to the patient’s treatment guided conversations...

  6. Predictors of pregnancy and changes in pregnancy incidence among HIV-positive women accessing HIV clinical care at 13 large UK clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUNTINGTON, Susie E; THORNE, Claire; BANSI, Loveleen K; ANDERSON, Jane; NEWELL, Marie-Louise; TAYLOR, Graham P; PILLAY, Deenan; HILL, Teresa; TOOKEY, Pat A; SABIN, Caroline A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe predictors of pregnancy and changes in pregnancy incidence among HIV-positive women accessing HIV clinical care. Methods Data were obtained through the linkage of two separate studies; the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort study (UK CHIC), a cohort of adults attending 13 large HIV clinics, and the National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC), a national surveillance study of HIV-positive pregnant women. Pregnancy incidence was measured using the proportion of women in UK CHIC with a pregnancy reported to NSHPC. Generalised estimating equations were used to identify predictors of pregnancy and assess changes in pregnancy incidence in 2000-2009. Results The number of women accessing care at UK CHIC sites increased as did the number of pregnancies (from 72 to 230). Older women were less likely to have a pregnancy (adjusted Relative Rate (aRR) 0.44 per 10 year increment in age [95% CI [0.41-0.46], ppregnancy increased over the study period (aRR 1.05 [1.03-1.07], ppregnancy rate among women accessing HIV clinical care increased in 2000-2009. HIV-positive women with, or planning, a pregnancy require a high level of care and this is likely to continue and increase as more women of older age have pregnancies. PMID:22713479

  7. Observational study identifies non-attendance characteristics in two hospital outpatient clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blæhr, Emely; Søgaard, Rikke; Kristensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Non-attended hospital appointments are receiving increasing attention in times when rapid access and efficient service delivery at public hospitals are on the agenda. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of non-attendance in a Danish outpatient setting and its...... association with user-level and provider-level characteristics. METHODS: The study was based on appointments scheduled from June 2013 to March 2015 at an orthopaedic and a radiologic outpatient clinic. Data on outcomes of cancellation on the part of the user or the provider, and non-attendance without giving...

  8. Management of Newly Diagnosed Atrial Fibrillation in an Outpatient Clinic Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrysoee, Lars; Strömberg, Anna; Brandes, Axel

    2018-01-01

    fibrillation is not a fatal disease in itself was very important for patients. At the same time, visiting the clinic was overwhelming, information was difficult to understand, and patients found it difficult to be involved in decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that patients were uncertain......AIMS: To gain in-depth knowledge of patients' experiences of the consultation processes at a multidisciplinary atrial fibrillation outpatient clinic in a university hospital in Denmark. BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia associated with morbidity and mortality...... if not diagnosed and treated as recommended. Patients with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation preferably should be managed in an outpatient setting which includes medical examination, patient education and decision making on medical therapy. DESIGN: This is a qualitative study of 14 patients newly diagnosed...

  9. Dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease risk profiles of patients attending an HIV treatment clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou DT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Danai Tavonga Zhou,1,2 Vitaris Kodogo,1 Kudzai Fortunate Vongai Chokuona,1 Exnevia Gomo,1 Olav Oektedalen,3 Babill Stray-Pedersen21Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Avondale, Zimbabwe; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, University in Oslo, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: The chronic inflammation induced by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV contributes to increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD in HIV-infected individuals. HIV-infected patients generally benefit from being treated with antiretroviral drugs, but some antiretroviral agents have side effects, such as dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. There is general consensus that antiretroviral drugs induce a long-term risk of CHD, although the levels of that risk are somewhat controversial. The intention of this cross-sectional study was to describe the lipid profile and the long-term risk of CHD among HIV-positive outpatients at an HIV treatment clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe. Two hundred and fifteen patients were investigated (females n=165, mean age 39.8 years; males n=50; mean age 42.0 years. Thirty of the individuals were antiretroviral-naïve and 185 had been on antiretroviral therapy (ART for a mean 3.9±3.4 years. All participants had average lipid and glucose values within normal ranges, but there was a small difference between the ART and ART- for total cholesterol (TC and high-density lipoprotein (HDL.Those on a combination of D4T or ZDV/NVP/3TC and PI-based ART were on average oldest and had the highest TC levels. Framingham risk showed 1.4% prevalence of high CHD risk within the next ten years. After univariate analysis age, sex, TC/HDL ratio, HDL, economic earnings and systolic BP were associated with medium to high risk of CHD. After multivariate regression analysis and adjusting for age or sex only age, sex and economic earnings

  10. [Vitreoretinal outpatient surgery: clinical and financial considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creuzot-Garcher, C; Aubé, H; Candé, F; Dupont, G; Guillaubey, A; Malvitte, L; Arnavielle, S; Bron, A

    2008-11-01

    Vitreoretinal surgery has benefited from great advances opening the opportunity for outpatient management. We report on the 6-month experience of outpatient surgery for vitreoretinal diseases. From November 2007 to April 2008, 270 patients benefited from a vitreoretinal surgery, with 173 retinal detachments, 63 epiretinal membranes, and 34 other procedures. Only 8.5% (n=23) of the patients had to stay at the hospital one or two nights. The main reasons were the distance from the hospital and surgery on a single-eye patient. The questionnaire given after the surgery showed that almost all the patients were satisfied with the outpatient setting. In contrast, the financial results showed a loss of income of around 400,000 euros due to the low level of payment of outpatient surgery in France by the national health insurance system. Vitreoretinal surgery can be achieved in outpatient surgery with an improvement in the information given to the patients and the overall organization of the hospitalization. However, the current income provided with vitreoretinal outpatient surgery is highly disadvantageous in France, preventing this method from being generalized.

  11. Reporting and evaluation of HIV-related clinical endpoints in two multicenter international clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lifson, A; Rhame, F; Bellosa, W

    2006-01-01

    adjudication between reviewers before diagnostic certainty was assigned. CONCLUSION: Important requirements for HIV trials using clinical endpoints include objective definitions of "confirmed" and "probable," a formal reporting process with adequate information and supporting source documentation, evaluation......PURPOSE: The processes for reporting and review of progression of HIV disease clinical endpoints are described for two large phase III international clinical trials. METHOD: SILCAAT and ESPRIT are multicenter randomized HIV trials evaluating the impact of interleukin-2 on disease progression...... and death in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. We report definitions used for HIV progression of disease endpoints, procedures for site reporting of such events, processes for independent review of reported events by an Endpoint Review Committee (ERC), and the procedure...

  12. Frailty profile for geriatric patients in outpatient clinic of RSUP H. Adam Malik Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permatasari, T. D.; Sihombing, B.; Arianto, P.

    2018-03-01

    Frailty is a circumstance of increased vulnerability to bad resolution of homeostasis after a stressor occasion, which increases the risk of adverse outcomes. Early detection of frailty in elderly patients is a must but is rarely in the Geriatric Outpatient settings. We conducted a study to see the frailty profile for geriatric patients in the outpatient clinic of RSUP H. Adam Malik Medan. A cross-sectional research with a descriptive method was in the Geriatric Outpatient Clinic of Adam Malik Hospital from July-September 2016. The population of this study was patients from the Geriatric Outpatient Clinic, and sampling was by using consecutive methods. Samples were by questionnaires assessing (FRAIL Scale).This study was140 patients. Based on age, the age group of 81-90 years was dominantly frail (53.8%). Most of the subjects worked as government employees (109 subjects), and most of them were robust (42.2%). Based on income, both groups were dominated by robust (38.3% and 41.3%, respectively). Based on BMI, most were robust with underweight 33.5%, normoweight 37.8%, and obese 44.7%. Among the 140 patients, frailty was in the 27.1% of the subjects and the contributing factors were Age, Gender, and Obesity.

  13. Improving Patient Satisfaction in a Midsize Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustino, Nicholas J; Kochanski, Justin J

    2015-09-01

    The study of patient satisfaction is a rapidly emerging area of importance within health care. High levels of patient satisfaction are associated with exceptional physician-patient communication, superior patient compliance, reduced risk of medical malpractice, and economic benefit in the value-based purchasing era. To our knowledge, no previous reports have evaluated methods to improve the patient experience within the pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) outpatient clinic. Patient satisfaction was measured using returned Press-Ganey surveys at Blank Children's Hospital PHO outpatient clinic (UnityPoint Health). The aim of this study was to raise the overall patient satisfaction score to the 75th percentile and raise the care provider score (CP) to the 90th percentile nationally. After analyzing data from 2013, interventions were implemented in January 2014, including weekly review of returned surveys, review of goals and progress at monthly staff meetings, distribution of written materials addressing deficiencies, score transparency among providers, provider use of Web-based patient satisfaction training modules, devotion of additional efforts to address less satisfied demographics (new patient consultations), and more liberal use of service recovery techniques. In the PHO outpatient clinic, overall patient satisfaction improved from the 56th to 97th percentile. Care provider scores improved from the 70th to 99 th percentile. For new patients, overall satisfaction improved from the 27th to 92 nd percentile, and care provider scores improved from the 29th to 98 th percentile. Patient satisfaction was improved in a midsize PHO clinic by implementing provider- and staff-driven initiatives. A combination of minor behavioral changes among care providers and staff in conjunction with systems-related modifications drove improvement. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Ocular manifestations in HIV-AIDS patients in a Nigerian community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... on limited financial, medical and human resources.3,4 The first HIV ... acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) among the study population. Method: A ... medical outpatient centre and the eye clinic of the hospital. ..... Energy Information Administration: official energy statistics from the US Government.

  15. Evaluation of the integrated clinic model for HIV/AIDS services in Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, V; Nguyen, S T; Tieu, V T T; Nguyen, T T T; Duong, T H; Lyss, S; Oeltmann, J E

    2016-12-21

    Setting: Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Viet Nam. Objective: To evaluate a new integrated service model for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) care. Design: In HCMC, co-located services, including voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT), HIV treatment at out-patient clinics (OPC), and methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) for persons who inject drugs, have operated under different administrative structures. In the context of decreasing international financial support, integration of these services into one administrative structure with reduced staff occurred in seven districts in HCMC between October 2013 and June 2014. We used a pre-post study design to compare service-related outcomes from routinely collected data at health facilities 6 months before and 6 months after integration. Results: The proportion of HIV-infected persons linked from VCT to OPCs was unchanged or increased following integration. A higher percentage of patients eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART) were started on ART. The proportion of ART patients lost to follow-up remained unchanged. The proportions of MMT patients who tested positive for heroin or other substances decreased or were unchanged. Conclusions: VCT, OPC and MMT service delivery quality remained the same or improved during the 6 months following the integration. Expansion of the integrated model should be considered for HIV-related services.

  16. Identifying Symptom Patterns in People Living With HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Natalie L.; Azuero, Andres; Vance, David E.; Richman, Joshua S.; Moneyham, Linda D.; Raper, James L.; Heath, Sonya L.; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms guide disease management, and patients frequently report HIV-related symptoms, but HIV symptom patterns reported by patients have not been described in the era of improved antiretroviral treatment. The objectives of our study were to investigate the prevalence and burden of symptoms in people living with HIV and attending an outpatient clinic. The prevalence, burden, and bothersomeness of symptoms reported by patients in routine clinic visits during 2011 were assessed using the 20-item HIV Symptom Index. Principal component analysis was used to identify symptom clusters and relationships between groups using appropriate statistic techniques. Two main clusters were identified. The most prevalent and bothersome symptoms were muscle aches/joint pain, fatigue, and poor sleep. A third of patients had seven or more symptoms, including the most burdensome symptoms. Even with improved antiretroviral drug side-effect profiles, symptom prevalence and burden, independent of HIV viral load and CD4+ T cell count, are high. PMID:26790340

  17. [Preconception counseling: evaluation of an outpatient clinic at a university hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd, S. de; Wouters, M.G.A.J.; Mom-Boertjens, J.; Bos, K.L.; Steegers, E.A.P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of the outcomes from an outpatients' clinic for preconceptional counselling in the Netherlands and to assess its activities in terms of referrals, referral indications, supplementary investigations, treatment policy and a possible future pregnancy. DESIGN:

  18. Pure analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pure analgesics are only rarely used by Italian clinicians and this holds true also for rheumatologists. This work is concerned with an evaluation of the use of analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic during the period 1989-1999. Methods: The records of 1705 patients consecutively seen at the clinic were downloaded on a specifically built website. Results: 4469 visits were considered. In 260 of them (5.8%, analgesics were prescribed to 234 (13.7% patients. The number of patients with a prescription of analgesics steadily increased during the years 1989-1999. The diagnoses in patients assuming analgesics were: osteoarthritis (47.1%, inflammatory arthritis (24.2%, soft tissue rheumatisms (13.7%, nonspecific arthralgia/myalgia (7.5%, and connective tissue diseases (2.6%. Peripheral analgesics were used in 188 (82.5% patients and central analgesics were used in the remaining 40 patients (17.5%. Analgesic drugs were used mainly in degenerative joint conditions. The indications for analgesics in the 55 patients with inflammatory arthrits were: (a partial or total remission of arthritis; for this reason non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were no longer required in 18 patients; (b to increase the analgesic effect of NSAIDs in 23 patients; (c contraindications to NSAIDs in 14 patients (renal failure in 2 patients, gastritis in 10, allergy and bleeding in the remaining two. Conclusions: About 14% of our outpatients were treated with analgesics with an increasing trend in the examined period. The main indications for analgesics are degenerative conditions but they can be used also in selected patients with arthritis.

  19. Early repeated infections with Trichomonas vaginalis among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Patricia; Secor, W Evan; Leichliter, Jami S; Clark, Rebecca A; Schmidt, Norine; Curtin, Erink; Martin, David H

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine whether early repeated infections due to Trichomonas vaginalis among human immunuodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative women are reinfections, new infections, or cases of treatment failure. Women attending an HIV outpatient clinic and a family planning clinic in New Orleans, Louisiana, who had culture results positive for T. vaginalis were treated with 2 g of metronidazole under directly observed therapy. At 1 month, detailed sexual exposure and sexual partner treatment information was collected. Isolates from women who had clinical resistance (i.e., who tested positive for a third time after treatment at a higher dose) were tested for metronidazole susceptibility in vitro. Of 60 HIV-positive women with trichomoniasis, 11 (18.3%) were T. vaginalis positive 1 month after treatment. The 11 recurrences were classified as 3 probable reinfections (27%), 2 probable infections from a new sexual partner (18%), and 6 probable treatment failures (55%); 2 of the 6 patients who experienced probable treatment failure had isolates with mild resistance to metronidazole. Of 301 HIV-negative women, 24 (8.0%) were T. vaginalis positive 1 month after treatment. The 24 recurrences were classified as 2 probable reinfections (8%) and 22 probable treatment failures (92%); of the 22 patients who experienced probable treatment failure, 2 had strains with moderate resistance to metronidazole, and 1 had a strain with mild resistance to metronidazole. HIV-positive women were more likely to have sexual re-exposure than were HIV-negative women, although the rate of treatment failure was similar in both groups. High rates of treatment failure among both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women indicate that a 2-g dose of metronidazole may not be adequate for treatment of some women and that rescreening should be considered.

  20. The prevalence and clinical features of the night eating syndrome in psychiatric out-patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraçlı, Özge; Atasoy, Nuray; Akdemir, Asena; Güriz, Olga; Konuk, Numan; Sevinçer, Güzin Mukaddes; Ankaralı, Handan; Atik, Levent

    2015-02-01

    In this study we aimed to investigate the prevalance and clinical correlations of night eating syndrome (NES) in a sample of psychiatric outpatients. Four hundred thirthy three consecutive psychiatric out-patients older than 18years were evaluated in the outpatient clinics using clinical interview according to the DSM-IV with regard to psychiatric diagnosis. Participants were also screened for presence of NES utilizing both clinical interview and self report based on Night Eating Questionnaire (NEQ) instruments. Sociodemographic and clinical features such as age, gender, education level, socioeconomic level and body mass index (BMI) were also recorded. The Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ) and the Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90R) were administered. Based on the proposed diagnostic criteria of the NES via utilizing clinical interview method, 97 (32 male, 65 female) of the sample met diagnostic criteria for NES. The point prevalence of NES was 22.4%. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of age, gender, marital status, education and BMI. The patients with NES had higher NEQ, BSQ and SCL-90R subscale scores than patients without NES. Prevalance of depressive disorder, impulse control disorder, and nicotine dependency was higher among patients with NES. No differences were found with regard to the medication (antipsychotics, antidepressants and mood stabilizers). Night eating syndrome is prevalent among psychiatric outpatients and associated with depression, impulse control disorder, and nicotine dependency. Body dissatisfaction and higher symptom severity are also other risk factors for the development of NES. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Telephone reminders reduced the non-attendance rate in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Maja Haunstrup; Ainsworth, Mark Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Non-attendance is a global health-care problem. The aim of the present study was 1) to investigate if a telephone reminder could reduce the non-attendance rate, 2) to study reasons for non-attendance and 3) to evaluate if a permanent implementation would be economically advantageous in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic like ours. This was a comparative intervention study with a historical control group in a gastroenterology outpatient clinic. The study lasted six months. Patients with a scheduled appointment in the first three-month period received no reminder (control group, n = 2,705). Patients in the following three-month period were reminded by telephone one weekday in advance of their appointment, when possible (intervention group, n = 2,479). Non-attending patients in the intervention group received a questionnaire. Based on the results, a financial cost-benefit analysis was made. In the intervention group, 1,577 (64%) patients answered the reminder telephone call. The non-attendance rate was significantly lower in the intervention group (6.1%) than in the control group (10.5%) (p < 0.00001). Only 1.3% of the patients who answered the reminder turned out to be non-attendees. The most common explanation for non-attendance in the intervention group was forgetfulness (39%). The reminder telephone call was cost-effective. In this outpatient clinic, telephone reminders were cost-effective and significantly reduced the non-attendance rate by 43%.

  2. Care of HIV-infected adults at Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and associated costs, in order to inform clinical practice, health service ... Setting. The outpatient department of a public sector, academic hospital in Soweto, South Africa. Design. ... primary care leveL The average cost per consultation was. R112.03. ... HIV-related illness, care strategies and costs of HIVlAJDS care is ...

  3. Clinical way method in treatment of out-patients with ischemic heart disease after cardiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardosanidze S.L.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available 158 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD have been understudy during the period of 12 months in out-patient conditions. After completion of the primary examination all the patients of basic group (118 patients received clinical way method of treatment. Patients of the comparison group (40 patients after provided treatment were cared by their local therapeutists (cardiologists. The findings proved the fact that treatment of patients after cardiosurgery by clinical way method in out-patient conditions enabled to raise patient motivation to treatment, thereby assisting them to feel better, promoting normalization of arterial pressure data. The research results stated that clinical way method of treatment may be considered as rational and effective

  4. Interactive "Video doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, P; Ciccarone, D; Gansky, SA; Bangsberg, DR; Clanon, K; McPhee, SJ; Calderón, SH; Bogetz, A; Gerbert, B

    2008-01-01

    Background Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide “prevention with positives” in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based...

  5. Notes From the Field: Changes in the Attentional Capacity and Emotional State of Physicians After Working at Busy Outpatient Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Choi, Sun Mi; Park, Ju Hee; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2015-09-01

    To examine changes in the performance of physicians after working in busy outpatient clinics, we conducted a prospective study, involving full-time clinicians who held morning and afternoon outpatient clinics on the same day. The participants completed three measures of attention, the psychomotor vigilance task, two-back test, and trail-making test, and a measure of emotion, the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), before and after the two clinic sessions. The physicians saw a mean of 91.3 patients in the two outpatient clinics on the day of testing. Overall, performance in the attention test did not deteriorate after the two successive outpatient sessions. However, we observed an increased STAXI score in 24 (54.3%) participants and saw a significant overall increase in STAXI scores. Our results indicate that busy outpatient sessions may increase physicians' anger although their attentional capacity appears to be maintained. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Benzodiazepine use in medical out-patient clinics: a study from a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, M.J.; Ahmer, S.; Khan, F.; Qureshi, A.W.A.; Shehzad, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of Benzodiazepine use in the outpatient setting of general medicine clinics at a single tertiary care centre. Methods: The prospective prevalence study was conducted in the outpatient setting of Internal Medicine Clinics at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from November to December 2009. All subjects were interviewed after informed consent and variables were recorded on a specially-designed proforma. Apart from basic demographics and comorbid conditions, duration, frequency and route of benzodiazepine use, as well as the reason and who initiated it was noted. Chi-square test and t test was applied to see the association of socio demographic or clinical factors with the use of benzodiazepine. Results: Of the 355 patients, 129 (36.33%) reported using the drug. The majority (n=86; 24.2%) were taking it on a daily basis. The highest numbers of patients using the drug were suffering from cardiovascular problems, 32 (25%) followed by 22 (17%) from endocrinology. Diazepam equivalent dose was around 7.04+-4, with a inter-quartile range of 3-96 weeks. Alprazolam (9%) was the most frequently prescribed Benzodiazepine. Conclusion: Benzodiazepine use is alarmingly high in the outpatient clinics of General Internal Medicine Department. There is no implementation of law to prevent its hazardous sale. In this regard all concerned should work collectively for awareness and irrational drug sale and use. (author)

  7. Toshiba General Hospital PACS for routine in- and outpatient clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshimitsu, Akihiro; Okazaki, Nobuo; Kura, Hiroyuki; Nishihara, Eitaro; Tsubura, Shinichi

    1996-05-01

    The Toshiba General Hospital introduced a departmental RIS/PACS (Radiology Information System/Picture Archiving and Communication System) in the radiology department in May, 1993. It has been used routinely since that time. In order to provide efficient means for clinicians to find and read many images, the system has been expanded to the neurosurgery and urology clinics and wards since May, 1995, and five image referring workstations now provide digital images to clinicians. In this paper we discuss an algorithm for image migration, one of the key issues to accomplish the expansion to outpatient clinics successfully, and propose the WYWIWYG (what you want is what you get) image transfer logic. This is the logic used to transfer images that physicians require refer without increasing the traffic between the image server and referring workstations. We accomplish the WYWIWYG logic by prioritizing exams the physicians have not yet viewed and by finding historical exams according to the modality, anatomy, and marking. Clinicians gave us comments from their first use of the system and suggested that the PACS enables clinicians to review images more efficiently compared to a film-based system. Our experience suggests that it is a key to the effective application of PACS in outpatient clinics to incorporate consideration patterns of clinicians on the migration algorithm.

  8. Do "Virtual" and "Outpatient" Public Health Tuberculosis Clinics Perform Equally Well? A Program-Wide Evaluation in Alberta, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Long

    Full Text Available Meeting the challenge of tuberculosis (TB elimination will require adopting new models of delivering patient-centered care customized to diverse settings and contexts. In areas of low incidence with cases spread out across jurisdictions and large geographic areas, a "virtual" model is attractive. However, whether "virtual" clinics and telemedicine deliver the same outcomes as face-to-face encounters in general and within the sphere of public health in particular, is unknown. This evidence is generated here by analyzing outcomes between the "virtual" and "outpatient" public health TB clinics in Alberta, a province of Western Canada with a large geographic area and relatively small population.In response to the challenge of delivering equitable TB services over long distances and to hard to reach communities, Alberta established three public health clinics for the delivery of its program: two outpatient serving major metropolitan areas, and one virtual serving mainly rural areas. The virtual clinic receives paper-based or electronic referrals and generates directives which are acted upon by local providers. Clinics are staffed by dedicated public health nurses and university-based TB physicians. Performance of the two types of clinics is compared between the years 2008 and 2012 using 16 case management and treatment outcome indicators and 12 contact management indicators.In the outpatient and virtual clinics, respectively, 691 and 150 cases and their contacts were managed. Individually and together both types of clinics met most performance targets. Compared to outpatient clinics, virtual clinic performance was comparable, superior and inferior in 22, 3, and 3 indicators, respectively.Outpatient and virtual public health TB clinics perform equally well. In low incidence settings a combination of the two clinic types has the potential to address issues around equitable service delivery and declining expertise.

  9. Motivation to change drinking behavior: the differences between alcohol users from an outpatient gastroenterology clinic and a specialist alcohol treatment service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neliana Buzi Figlie

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: For some patients who have developed significant alcohol-related physical disease, total abstinence from alcohol may offer the best chance of survival. The aim of this study was to investigate motivation for treatment in two groups of alcohol users: outpatients from the gastroenterology clinic and outpatients from the specialist alcohol treatment service. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study, at a federally funded public teaching hospital. METHODS: The sample studied was 151 outpatients from the gastroenterology clinic and 175 from the specialist alcohol treatment service. The interview was conducted in the outpatient clinics at the first appointment, and consisted of demographic questions and scales for measuring quality of life, alcohol dependence, pattern of alcohol, motivation for treatment and consequences of alcohol consumption. RESULTS: The results suggested that outpatients from the gastroenterology clinic were less dependent on alcohol, had suffered fewer consequences from alcohol and had fewer emotional and mental health problems than did the outpatients from the alcohol treatment service. In relation to their stages of change, the gastroenterology outpatients presented high precontemplation scores at the beginning of treatment while outpatients of alcohol treatment service showed higher scores in contemplation, action and maintenance. CONCLUSION: The medical treatment may be a reason for the temporary alcohol abstinence behavior among the gastroenterology outpatients.

  10. Financial impact of surgical training on hospital economics: an income analysis of 1184 out-patient clinic consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J E F; Ravindra, P; Lepore, M; Armstrong, A; Bhangu, A; Maxwell-Armstrong, C A

    2013-01-01

    In many countries healthcare commissioning bodies (state or insurance-based) reimburse hospitals for their activity. The costs associated with post-graduate clinical training as part of this are poorly understood. This study quantified the financial revenue generated by surgical trainees in the out-patient clinic setting. A retrospective analysis of surgical out-patient ambulatory care appointments under 6 full-time equivalent Consultants (Attendings) in one hospital over 2 months. Clinic attendance lists were generated from the Patient Access System. Appointments were categorised as: 'new', 'review' or 'procedure' as per the Department of Health Payment by Results (PbR) Outpatient Tariff (Outpatient Treatment Function Code 104; Outpatient Procedure Code OPRSI1). During the study period 78 clinics offered 1184 appointments; 133 of these were not attended (11.2%). Of those attended 1029 had sufficient detail for analysis (98%). 261 (25.4%) patients were seen by a trainee. Applying PbR reimbursement criteria to these gave a projected annual income of £GBP 218,712 (€EU 266,527; $USD 353,657) generated by 6 surgical trainees (Residents). This is equivalent to approximately £GBP 36,452 (€EU 44,415; $USD 58,943) per trainee annually compared to £GBP 48,732 (€EU 59,378; $USD 78,800) per Consultant. This projected yearly income off-set 95% of the trainee's basic salary. Surgical trainees generated a quarter of the out-patient clinic activity related income in this study, with each trainee producing three-quarters of that generated by a Consultant. This offers considerable commercial value to hospitals. Although this must offset productivity differences and overall running costs, training bodies should ensure hospitals offer an appropriate return. In a competitive market hospitals could be invited to compete for trainees, with preference given to those providing excellence in training. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  11. [Changes in clinic-epidemiological characteristics of new cases of HIV-1 infection in Castellón (Spain), and its impact on delayed presentation (1987-2011)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mínguez-Gallego, Carlos; Vera-Remartinez, Enrique J; Albert-Coll, Monica; Roldán-Puchalt, M Concepción; Aguilar-Climent, Manuel; Rovira-Ferrando, Rosa E; Andrés-Soler, Jorge; Roig-Espert, Belén; Penadés-Vidal, María; Usó-Blasco, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    To describe the trend of the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of a cohort of HIV-1 infected patients in Castellón (Spain), and its impact on the delayed presentation. Data from HIV-1 infected outpatients presenting for care for the first time between 1987 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. There have been significant changes in the characteristics of the 1001 newly presented patients during the period studied. An increase in the mean age was observed (increasing from about 30 years before 1996, to approximately 35 after the 2000-2002 period), as well as an increase in the percentage of immigrants (de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Symptomatic HIV infection in infancy - clinical and laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in infancy - clinical and laboratory markers of infection. M P Meyer, Z Latief, C Haworlh, 5 Salie,. A van Dyk. Objective. To investigate the usefulness of immunological tests in the diagnosis of HIV infection in young symptomatic children « 15 months of age). Design. Tests were evaluated in HIV-infected (HIV antibody- and ...

  13. Trends in HIV seropositivity among young adults in the Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects for this descriptive study included a total of 2033 consecutively recruited young symptomatic persons referred from the outpatient clinic and wards for retroviral screening at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital for the period 1999-2003. HIV antibody test was carried out using the commercially available ...

  14. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding...... and knowledge of HIV led to short-term trials using surrogate outcomes such as viral load and CD4 count. This established a faster drug approval process that complimented the rapid need to evaluate and provide access to drugs based on short-term trials. However, no treatment has yet been found that eradicates...... the infection, so when treatment is started it is currently a lifelong commitment. Is it reasonable then that guidelines are based almost completely on short-term randomized trials and observational studies of surrogate markers, or is there still a need for trials with clinical outcomes?...

  15. Ethical issues in a stage 1 cognitive-behavioral therapy feasibility study and trial to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Gakinya, Benson N; Baliddawa, Joyce B; Martino, Steve; Bryant, Kendall J; Meslin, Eric M; Sidle, John E

    2012-07-01

    Epidemics of both HIV/AIDS and alcohol abuse in sub-Saharan Africa have spurred the conduct of local behavioral therapy trials for these problems, but the ethical issues involved in these trials have not been fully examined. In this paper, we discuss ethical issues that emerged during the conduct of a behavioral intervention adaptation and trial using cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected outpatients in Eldoret, Kenya. The study was performed within our multinational collaboration, the USAID-Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare Partnership. We discuss relevant ethical considerations and how we addressed them.

  16. Epidemiological composition, clinical and treatment characteristics of the patient cohort of the german competence network for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen K

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective As its central basis for research, the Competence Network for HIV/AIDS (KompNet established a nationwide cohort study on HIV-positive patients being in medical care in Germany. In this paper, we describe the epidemiological composition, and clinical as well as treatment characteristics of the KompNet cohort over time. Methods The KompNet cohort is an open, retrospective and prospective, multi-center, disease-specific and nationwide cohort study that started gathering data in June 2004. Semiannually, follow up visits of the patients are documented, covering a wide range of clinical and sociodemographic data. At enrolment and three years afterwards, an EDTA-sample is taken; a serum-sample is taken at every follow up. Results As of 20.10.2008, a total of 15,541 patients were enrolled by 44 documenting sites. In September 2007, the cohort size was reduced to ten outpatient clinics and fifteen private practitioners, covering a total of 9,410 patients. The documentation of these patients comprised 24,117 years of follow up-time since enrolment (mean: 2.6 years, 62,862 person years inclusive data documented retrospectively on course of HIV-infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART, mean: 6.7 years. Due to the short period of recruitment till now, rates of death (0.3%-0.8% and losses to follow up (1.1%-5.5% were low. 84.9% of patients were men. Main risk of transmission was sex between men (MSM: 62.9%. Mean age was 45 years. About two third of patients were classified as CDC-stage B or C. Therapy regimens of currently treated patients complied with recent guidelines. Trends of mean CD4 cell count/μl regarding the initial therapy and concerning the population under treatment reflected the developments and the changing standards of antiretroviral therapy over time. Conclusion The KompNet cohort covers about a quarter of all patients estimated as being under treatment in Germany. Its composition can be accounted approximately

  17. Routine monitoring and assessment of adults living with HIV: results of the British HIV Association (BHIVA) national audit 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, A; Curtis, H; Burns, F; Freedman, A

    2017-09-13

    The clinical care of people living with HIV changed fundamentally as a result of the development of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). HIV infection is now a long-term treatable condition. We report a national audit to assess adherence to British HIV Association guidelines for the routine investigation and monitoring of adult HIV-1-infected individuals. All UK sites known as providers of adult HIV outpatient services were invited to complete a case-note review and a brief survey of local clinic practices. Participating sites were asked to randomly select 50-100 adults, who attended for specialist HIV care during 2014 and/or 2015. Each site collected data electronically using a self-audit spreadsheet tool. This included demographic details (gender, ethnicity, HIV exposure, and age) and whether 22 standardised and pre-defined clinical audited outcomes had been recorded. Data were collected on 8258 adults from 123 sites, representing approximately 10% of people living with HIV reported in public health surveillance as attending UK HIV services. Sexual health screening was provided within 96.4% of HIV services, cervical cytology and influenza vaccination within 71.4% of HIV services. There was wide variation in resistance testing across sites. Only 44.9% of patients on ART had a documented 10-year CVD risk within the past three years and fracture risk had been assessed within the past three years for only 16.7% patients aged over 50 years. There was high participation in the national audit and good practice was identified in some areas. However improvements can be made in monitoring of cardiovascular risk, bone and sexual health.

  18. A conceptual model exploring the relationship between HIV stigma and implementing HIV clinical trials in rural communities of North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Sohini; Strauss, Ronald P; Miles, Margaret S; Roman-Isler, Malika; Banks, Bahby; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2010-01-01

    HIV/AIDS disproportionately affects minority groups in the United States, especially in the rural southeastern states. Poverty and lack of access to HIV care, including clinical trials, are prevalent in these areas and contribute to HIV stigma. This is the first study to develop a conceptual model exploring the relationship between HIV stigma and the implementation of HIV clinical trials in rural contexts to help improve participation in those trials. We conducted focus groups with HIV service providers and community leaders, and individual interviews with people living with HIV/AIDS in six counties in rural North Carolina. Themes related to stigma were elicited. We classified the themes into theoretical constructs and developed a conceptual model. HIV stigma themes were classified under the existing theoretical constructs of perceived, experienced, vicarious, and felt normative stigma. Two additional constructs emerged: causes of HIV stigma (e.g., low HIV knowledge and denial in the community) and consequences of HIV stigma (e.g., confidentiality concerns in clinical trials). The conceptual model illustrates that the causes of HIV stigma can give rise to perceived, experienced, and vicarious HIV stigma, and these types of stigma could lead to the consequences of HIV stigma that include felt normative stigma. Understanding HIV stigma in rural counties of North Carolina may not be generalizeable to other rural US southeastern states. The conceptual model emphasizes that HIV stigma--in its many forms--is a critical barrier to HIV clinical trial implementation in rural North Carolina.

  19. Provider-initiated HIV testing in rural Haiti: low rate of missed opportunities for diagnosis of HIV in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freedberg Kenneth A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As HIV treatment is scaled-up in resource-poor settings, the timely identification of persons with HIV infection remains an important challenge. Most people with HIV are unaware of their status, and those who are often present late in the course of their illness. Free-standing voluntary counseling and testing sites often have poor uptake of testing. We aimed to evaluate a 'provider-initiated' HIV testing strategy in a primary care clinic in rural resource-poor Haiti by reviewing the number of visits made to clinic before an HIV test was performed in those who were ultimately found to have HIV infection. In collaboration with the Haitian Ministry of Health, a non-governmental organization (Partners In Health scaled up HIV care in central Haiti by reinforcing primary care clinics, instituting provider-initiated HIV testing and by providing HIV treatment in the context of primary medical care, free of charge to patients. Among a cohort of people with HIV infection, we assessed retrospectively for delays in or 'missed opportunities' for diagnosis of HIV by the providers in one clinic. Of the first 117 patients diagnosed with HIV in one clinic, 100 (85% were diagnosed at the first medical encounter. Median delay in diagnosis for the remaining 17 was only 62 days (IQR 19 – 122; range 1 – 272. There was no statistical difference in CD4 cell count between those with and without a delay. 3787 HIV tests were performed in the period reviewed. Provider-initiated testing was associated with high volume uptake of HIV testing and minimal delay between first medical encounter and diagnosis of HIV infection. In scale up of HIV care, provider-initiated HIV testing at primary care clinics can be a successful strategy to identify patients with HIV infection.

  20. Viral and atypical bacterial infections in the outpatient pediatric cystic fibrosis clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Nielsen, Lars P; Schiotz, Peter Oluf

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory viral and atypical bacterial infections are associated with pulmonary exacerbations and hospitalisations in cystic fibrosis patients. We wanted to study the impact of such infections on children attending the outpatient clinic. METHODS: Seventy-five children were followed...

  1. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Westberg, Pharm.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic.Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified medical assistants. The impact of this training was measured through pre-initiation and post-implementation surveys, competency assessments and an audit. Results: The educational initiative was successfully designed and delivered to clinic nursing staff. Assessment of the initiative found that all nursing staff completing competency assessments successfully passed. Pre-initiation- and post-implementation- survey responses on the self-assessed ability to gather and document accurate medication lists did not show significant changes. Informal observations in the clinic indicated that this initiative changed the culture of the clinic, creating increased awareness of the importance of accurate medications and increased emphasis on medication reconciliation.Conclusions: The expertise of pharmacists can be utilized to educate nursing staff on the skills and abilities necessary to gather and document accurate medication lists. This study did not find measurable changes in the accuracy of medication lists in this clinic. Future research is needed to determine the best methods to train health professionals in medication reconciliation to ensure accurate medication lists in the outpatient setting.

  2. Multicenter European Prevalence Study of Neurocognitive Impairment and Associated Factors in HIV Positive Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haddow, Lewis J; Laverick, Rosanna; Daskalopoulou, Marina

    2018-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study in 448 HIV positive patients attending five European outpatient clinics to determine prevalence of and factors associated with neurocognitive impairment (NCI) using computerized and pen-and-paper neuropsychological tests. NCI was defined as a normalized Z scor...

  3. ANALYSIS OF HIV SUBTYPES AND CLINICAL STAGING OF HIV DISEASE/AIDS IN EAST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Ismail

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 known to cause Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS disease are divided into several subtypes (A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K and Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF. Different characteristics of subtype of the virus and its interaction with the host can affect the severity of the disease. This study was to analyze HIV-1 subtypes circulating in HIV/AIDS patients from the East Java region descriptively and to analyze its relationship with clinical stadiums of HIV/AIDS. Information from this research was expected to complement the data of mocular epidemiology of HIV in Indonesia. This study utilited blood plasma from patients who had been tested to be HIV positive who sected treatment to or were reffered to the Intermediate Care Unit of Infectious Disease (UPIPI Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya from various area representing the East Java regions. Plasma was separated from blood samples by centrifugation for use in the the molecular biology examination including RNA extraction, nested PCR using specific primer for HIV gp120 env gene region, DNA purifying, DNA sequencing, and homology and phylogenetic analysis. Based on the nucleotide sequence of the HIV gp120 env gene, it was found that the most dominant subtypes in East Java were in one group of Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF that is CRF01_AE, CRF33_01B and CRF34_01B which was also found in Southeast Asia. In the phylogenetic tree, most of HIV samples (30 samples are in the same branch with CRF01_AE, CRF33_01B and CRF34_01B, except for one sample (HIV40 which is in the same branch with subtype B. HIV subtypes are associated with clinical stadiums (disease severity since samples from different stages of HIV disease have the same subtype.

  4. Volunteer motivators for participating in HIV vaccine clinical trials in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaoke, Borna A; Mutua, Gaudensia N; Sajabi, Rose; Nyasani, Delvin; Mureithi, Marianne W; Anzala, Omu A

    2017-01-01

    1.5 million Kenyans are living with HIV/AIDS as per 2015 estimates. Though there is a notable decline in new HIV infections, continued effort is still needed to develop an efficacious, accessible and affordable HIV vaccine. HIV vaccine clinical trials bear risks, hence a need to understand volunteer motivators for enrolment, retention and follow-up. Understanding the factors that motivate volunteers to participate in a clinical trial can help to strategize, refine targeting and thus increase enrolment of volunteers in future HIV vaccine clinical trials. The health belief model classifies motivators into social benefits such as 'advancing research' and collaboration with science, and personal benefits such as health benefits and financial interests. A thematic analysis was carried out on data obtained from four HIV clinical trials conducted at KAVI-Institute of Clinical Research in Nairobi Kenya from 2009 to 2015. Responses were obtained from a Questionnaire administered to the volunteers during their screening visit at the research site. Of the 281 healthy, HIV-uninfected volunteers participating in this study; 38% were motivated by personal benefits including, 31% motivated by health benefits and 7% motivated by possible financial gains. In addition, 62% of the volunteers were motivated by social benefits with 20% of who were seeking to help their family/society/world while 42% were interested in advancing research. The majority of volunteers in the HIV vaccine trials at our site were motivated by social benefits, suggesting that altruism can be a major contributor to participation in HIV vaccine studies. Personal benefits were a secondary motivator for the volunteers. The motivators to volunteer in HIV clinical trials were similar across ages, education level and gender. Education on what is needed (including volunteer participation) to develop an efficacious vaccine could be the key to greater volunteer motivation to participate in HIV vaccine clinical trials.

  5. Volunteer motivators for participating in HIV vaccine clinical trials in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borna A Nyaoke

    Full Text Available 1.5 million Kenyans are living with HIV/AIDS as per 2015 estimates. Though there is a notable decline in new HIV infections, continued effort is still needed to develop an efficacious, accessible and affordable HIV vaccine. HIV vaccine clinical trials bear risks, hence a need to understand volunteer motivators for enrolment, retention and follow-up. Understanding the factors that motivate volunteers to participate in a clinical trial can help to strategize, refine targeting and thus increase enrolment of volunteers in future HIV vaccine clinical trials. The health belief model classifies motivators into social benefits such as 'advancing research' and collaboration with science, and personal benefits such as health benefits and financial interests.A thematic analysis was carried out on data obtained from four HIV clinical trials conducted at KAVI-Institute of Clinical Research in Nairobi Kenya from 2009 to 2015. Responses were obtained from a Questionnaire administered to the volunteers during their screening visit at the research site.Of the 281 healthy, HIV-uninfected volunteers participating in this study; 38% were motivated by personal benefits including, 31% motivated by health benefits and 7% motivated by possible financial gains. In addition, 62% of the volunteers were motivated by social benefits with 20% of who were seeking to help their family/society/world while 42% were interested in advancing research.The majority of volunteers in the HIV vaccine trials at our site were motivated by social benefits, suggesting that altruism can be a major contributor to participation in HIV vaccine studies. Personal benefits were a secondary motivator for the volunteers. The motivators to volunteer in HIV clinical trials were similar across ages, education level and gender. Education on what is needed (including volunteer participation to develop an efficacious vaccine could be the key to greater volunteer motivation to participate in HIV vaccine

  6. THE WAYS OF INCREASING OF QUALITY AND ACCESSIBILITY OF PEDIATRIC MEDICAL SERVICE IN OUT-PATIENT CLINICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Baranov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of dynamics of official statistics rates (population size, morbidity, disability, and mortality, and results of special scientific studies (morbidity, physical development, make it possible to show basic tendencies of children’s health state changes in modern conditions. The result of pediatrists from out-patient clinics survey, questioning of parents and adolescents (12–17 years old, on the problem of children’s health service, are presented. Questionnaire poll was held in regions of Central, Privolzhskiy, and Siberian Federal Districts. The complex analysis of obtained results show low quality level and accessibility of prophylactic and treatment medical service in children. This data became the basis of main directions of work of controlling and public health service in the field of increasing of quality and accessibility of pediatric medical service in out-patient clinics.Key words: children, medical service, out-patient clinics, quality, accessibility.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(4:5-9

  7. Validity of impedance-based predictions of total body water as measured by 2H dilution in African HIV/AIDS outpatients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diouf, Adama; Idohou Dossou, Nicole; Wade, Salimata; Gartner, Agnes; Sanon, Dominique Alexis; Bluck, Les; Wright, Antony

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of body composition are crucial in identifying HIV-infected patients at risk of malnutrition. No information is available on the validity of indirect body composition methods in African HIV-infected outpatients. Our aim was to test the validity of fifteen published equations, developed in whites, African-Americans and/or Africans who were or not HIV-infected, for predicting total body water (TBW) from bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in HIV-infected patients. The second aim was to develop specific predictive equations. Thirty-four HIV-infected patients without antiretroviral treatment and oedema at the beginning of the study (age 39 (SD 7) years, BMI 18.7 (SD 3.7) kg/m2, TBW 30.4 (SD 7.2 kg) were measured at inclusion then 3 and 6 months later. In the resulting eighty-eight measurements, we compared TBW values predicted from BIA to those measured by 2H dilution. Range of bias values was 0.1-4.3, and errors showed acceptable values (2.2-3.4 kg) for fourteen equations and a high value (10.4) for one equation. Two equations developed in non-HIV-infected subjects showed non-significant bias and could be used in African HIV-infected patients. In the other cases, poor agreement indicated a lack of validity. Specific equations developed from our sample showed a higher precision of TBW prediction when using resistance at 1000kHz (1.7kg) than at 50kHz (2.3kg), this latter precision being similar to that of the valid published equations (2.3 and 2.8kg). The valid published or developed predictive equations should be cross-validated in large independent samples of African HIV-infected patients. (Authors)

  8. Outpatient rehabilitation care process factors and clinical outcomes among patients discharged home following unilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Gerard P; Fritz, Julie M; Houck, L T C Kevin M; Hunter, Stephen J

    2015-05-01

    Research examining care process variables and their relationship to clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty has focused primarily on inpatient variables. Care process factors related to outpatient rehabilitation have not been adequately examined. We conducted a retrospective review of 321 patients evaluating outpatient care process variables including use of continuous passive motion, home health physical therapy, number of days from inpatient discharge to beginning outpatient physical therapy, and aspects of outpatient physical therapy (number of visits, length of stay) as possible predictors of pain and disability outcomes of outpatient physical therapy. Only the number of days between inpatient discharge and outpatient physical therapy predicted better outcomes, suggesting that this may be a target for improving outcomes after total knee arthroplasty for patients discharged directly home. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CD4 Cell Counts at HIV Diagnosis among HIV Outpatient Study Participants, 2000–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Buchacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unclear if CD4 cell counts at HIV diagnosis have improved over a 10-year period of expanded HIV testing in the USA. Methods. We studied HOPS participants diagnosed with HIV infection ≤6 months prior to entry into care during 2000–2009. We assessed the correlates of CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 at HIV diagnosis (late HIV diagnosis by logistic regression. Results. Of 1,203 eligible patients, 936 (78% had a CD4 count within 3 months after HIV diagnosis. Median CD4 count at HIV diagnosis was 299 cells/mm3 and did not significantly improve over time (P=0.13. Comparing periods 2000-2001 versus 2008-2009, respectively, 39% and 35% of patients had a late HIV diagnosis (P=0.34. Independent correlates of late HIV diagnosis were having an HIV risk other than being MSM, age ≥35 years at diagnosis, and being of nonwhite race/ethnicity. Conclusions. There is need for routine universal HIV testing to reduce the frequency of late HIV diagnosis and increase opportunity for patient- and potentially population-level benefits associated with early antiretroviral treatment.

  10. The Perilous Road from HIV Diagnosis in the Hospital to Viral Suppression in the Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasanti, Jonathan; Goswami, Neela D; Khoubian, Jonathan J; Pennisi, Eugene; Root, Christin; Ziemer, Dorothy; Armstrong, Wendy S; Del Rio, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The HIV care continuum has received considerable attention in recent years, however, few care continua focus on the population of patients who are diagnosed during an inpatient hospital admission. We aimed to describe the HIV care continuum for patients newly diagnosed during hospitalization through 24-month follow-up. A retrospective chart review of HIV patients diagnosed at Grady Memorial Hospital from 2011 to 2012 was performed and records were matched to Georgia Department of Public Health HIV/AIDS surveillance data. Descriptive statistics and statistical tests of independence were utilized. Ninety-four new diagnoses were confirmed during the 2-year study period. Median age was 43 years (interquartile range [IQR] 30-51), 77% were male, 72% were non-Hispanic Black, 31% were men who have sex with men (MSM), and 77% were uninsured. Median CD4 count at diagnosis was 134 cells/μL (IQR 30-307). Eighty-four percent received their diagnosis before hospital discharge, 68% linked to care by 90 days, 73% were retained for 12 months, 48% were virologically suppressed by 12 months, 58% were retained for 24 continuous months, and 38% achieved continuous viral suppression (VS) during the initial 24 months after diagnosis. Late diagnosis is a persistent problem in hospitalized patients. Despite relative success with linkage to care and 12-month retention in care, a minority of patients maintained retention and VS for 24 continuous months.

  11. Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Uptake in a Respiratory Outpatients Clinic

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rossiter, A

    2017-02-01

    Influenza is an acute viral respiratory illness that continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in Ireland. Despite well-established national and international guidelines1 and increased public awareness campaigns, vaccine uptake rates are well below target worldwide2. We performed an audit of influenza vaccine uptake at a Respiratory outpatient clinic in a tertiary referral centre. 54% (n=41) of patients received the annual vaccine, well below the target of 75% set by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).

  12. The implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy in HIV clinics: the experience from the TB/HIV in Rio (THRio) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durovni, Betina; Cavalcante, Solange C; Saraceni, Valeria; Vellozo, Vitoria; Israel, Giselle; King, Bonnie S; Cohn, Silvia; Efron, Anne; Pacheco, Antonio G; Moulton, Lawrence H; Chaisson, Richard E; Golub, Jonathan E

    2010-11-01

    The TB/HIV in Rio (THRio) study was launched in September 2005 to assess the impact of integrated tuberculosis (TB) and HIV treatment strategies in 29 HIV clinics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. THRio is a cluster-randomized trial (CRT) to determine whether routine screening for and treatment of latent TB in HIV clinic patients with access to antiretroviral therapy will reduce TB incidence at the clinic level. THRio is part of the Consortium to Respond Effectively to AIDS/TB Epidemic that is implementing research studies to assess the impact of bold, new public health paradigms for controlling the AIDS/TB epidemic. Twenty-nine public primary HIV clinics were randomly assigned a date to begin implementing TB screening procedures and provision of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) for TB/HIV coinfected patients. Final analysis of the CRT is expected in 2011. Starting at date of tuberculin skin test (TST)/IPT implementation at each clinic through August 2010, 1670 HIV-infected patients initiated IPT, of which 215 are still receiving treatment. Of the remaining 1455 patients, 1230 (85%) completed therapy and only 20 (1.2%) patients initiating IPT reported adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of therapy. IPT completion was higher among HIV-infected patients receiving HAART (87%) than those not yet receiving HAART (79%, P effort requires a package of activities including training, advocacy and reorganization of services.

  13. The effect of treatment with zidovudine with or without acyclovir on HIV p24 antigenaemia in patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Cooper, D A; Brun-Vézinet, F

    1992-01-01

    with AIDS, AIDS-related complex (ARC) or Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). DESIGN: Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of less than or equal to 6 months' therapy. SETTING: Samples were obtained from patients attending teaching hospital outpatient clinics in seven European countries and Australia....... SUBJECTS: One hundred and ninety-seven HIV-infected patients (60 with AIDS and 137 with ARC or KS). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum HIV p24-antigen levels measured using the Abbott HIV solid-phase enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: Of 76 ARC/KS patients who were initially HIV p24-antigen-positive, one out of 25...

  14. Person-centred care in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics: Conceptualization and initial development of a measurement instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Sidona-Valentina; Forslind, Kristina; Fridlund, Bengt; Samuelson, Karin; Svensson, Björn; Hagell, Peter

    2018-06-01

    Person-centred care (PCC) is considered a key component of effective illness management and high-quality care. However, the PCC concept is underdeveloped in outpatient care. In rheumatology, PCC is considered an unmet need and its further development and evaluation is of high priority. The aim of the present study was to conceptualize and operationalize PCC, in order to develop an instrument for measuring patient-perceived PCC in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics. A conceptual outpatient PCC framework was developed, based on the experiences of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), person-centredness principles and existing PCC frameworks. The resulting framework was operationalized into the PCC instrument for outpatient care in rheumatology (PCCoc/rheum), which was tested for acceptability and content validity among 50 individuals with RA attending a nurse-led outpatient clinic. The conceptual framework focuses on the meeting between the person with RA and the nurse, and comprises five interrelated domains: social environment, personalization, shared decision-making, empowerment and communication. Operationalization of the domains into a pool of items generated a preliminary PCCoc/rheum version, which was completed in a mean (standard deviation) of 5.3 (2.5) min. Respondents found items easy to understand (77%) and relevant (93%). The Content Validity Index of the PCCoc/rheum was 0.94 (item level range, 0.87-1.0). About 80% of respondents considered some items redundant. Based on these results, the PCCoc/rheum was revised into a 24-item questionnaire. A conceptual outpatient PCC framework and a 24-item questionnaire intended to measure PCC in nurse-led outpatient rheumatology clinics were developed. The extent to which the questionnaire represents a measurement instrument remains to be tested. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Westberg

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic. Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified medical assistants. The impact of this training was measured through pre-initiation and post-implementation surveys, competency assessments and an audit. Results: The educational initiative was successfully designed and delivered to clinic nursing staff. Assessment of the initiative found that all nursing staff completing competency assessments successfully passed. Pre-initiation- and post-implementation- survey responses on the self-assessed ability to gather and document accurate medication lists did not show significant changes. Informal observations in the clinic indicated that this initiative changed the culture of the clinic, creating increased awareness of the importance of accurate medications and increased emphasis on medication reconciliation. Conclusions: The expertise of pharmacists can be utilized to educate nursing staff on the skills and abilities necessary to gather and document accurate medication lists. This study did not find measurable changes in the accuracy of medication lists in this clinic. Future research is needed to determine the best methods to train health professionals in medication reconciliation to ensure accurate medication lists in the outpatient setting. Type: Original Research

  16. Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of HIV Infection/AIDS in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetagic, Sead; Porobić-Jahic, Humera; Piljic, Dilista; Custovic, Amer; Sabitovic, Damir; Zepic, Denis

    2015-02-01

    More than three decades after recognition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the United States, the pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has dramatically changed the global burden of disease. The main goal of this research is retrospective analysis of epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 28 HIV infected patients, who were diagnosed and treated at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases in University Clinical Center Tuzla in the period from 1996 until the end of 2013. Retrospective analysis was performed using the medical records of 28 HIV-infected persons. Two rapid tests were used for HIV testing: OraQuick Advance test, Vikia HIV1/2, Elisa combo test, HIV RNA test. AIDS disease was determined by using the criteria from WHO. Among a total of 28 HIV-infected persons, 23 (82.14%) were males and 5 (17.86%) were females, with the male: female ratio of 4,6:1. In terms of the transmission route, a large proportion of cases were infected through heterosexual contact 19 (67.86%). At the time of the first visit, 16 (57.15%) patients showed asymptomatic HIV infection, 4 (14.28%) HIV infection with symptoms other than the AIDS defining diseases, and 8 (28.57) had AIDS. At the time of first hospital visit, the CD4 + cells count ranged from 40 to 1795/µl (conducted in 19 patients), and mean value of CD4 + cells was 365,31/µl, and mean HIV RNA titer was 287 118 copies/ml³. Of 28 HIV-infected persons 39 cases of opportunistic diseases developed in 12 patients (42.9%). In terms of the frequency of opportunistic diseases, tuberculosis (12 cases, 42.9%). Among a total of 28 HIV-infected patients, 6 (21.4%) of them died. This study characterizes the epidemiological and clinical patterns of HIV-infected patients in Tuzla region of Bosnia and Herzegovina to accurately understand HIV infection/AIDS in our region, in the hope to contribute in the establishment of effective HIV guidelines in the Tuzla region of B&H in the future.

  17. [Psychopathology in families: an integral approach via the family outpatient clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, S C; Batelaan, N M; Wesseldijk, L W; Rozeboom, J; Middeldorp, C M

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders run in families. To bridge the gap between child and youth psychiatry and adult psychiatry, GGZ inGeest has started screening parents of new registered children for psychopathology - and if indicated - offers parents treatment in the same department as their children. To examine the feasibility and usefulness of this procedure, to investigate how many parents agree to screening, further diagnostics and treatment, and to find out how many parents have in fact suffered from recent psychiatric problems. Prior to the children's first appointment, the parents were asked to complete a questionnaire, the Adult Self Report (ASR), about their own problems. If these scores were (sub)clinical, parents were invited to participate in a telephonic interview. This consisted of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scales (CAARS). If the results indicate psychopathology, further psychiatric assessment and, if necessary, treatment is offered. The first response was 55.7% and, if indicated, most of the parents agreed on further diagnostics. On the ASR 2 out of 5 mothers (42.1%) and 1 out of 5 fathers (21.8%) reported problems that could point to a psychiatric disorder. According to the ASR, within this high-risk group 37% of the mothers met the criteria for an axis I diagnosis (less than one month earlier) compared to 70.6% of the fathers. A mood disorder was the primary diagnosis for women, whereas men most often suffered from an anxiety disorder. In total, 19.1% of the parents screened were suffering from recent psychopathology and 75% of this group agreed to receive mental health care (treatment at the family outpatient clinic or referred to another clinic). Implementation of the family outpatient clinic scheme is feasible. However, further efforts are needed in order to reach a larger group of parents, particularly fathers. The family outpatient clinic is useful because parents who suffer from psychopathology

  18. Impact of HIV exposure on health outcomes in HIV-negative infants born to HIV-positive mothers in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraleda, Cinta; de Deus, Nilsa; Serna-Bolea, Celia; Renom, Montse; Quintó, Llorenç; Macete, Eusebio; Menéndez, Clara; Naniche, Denise

    2014-02-01

    Up to 30% of infants may be HIV-exposed noninfected (ENI) in countries with high HIV prevalence, but the impact of maternal HIV on the child's health remains unclear. One hundred fifty-eight HIV ENI and 160 unexposed (UE) Mozambican infants were evaluated at 1, 3, 9, and 12 months postdelivery. At each visit, a questionnaire was administered, and HIV DNA polymerase chain reaction and hematologic and CD4/CD8 determinations were measured. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate differences in hematologic parameters and T-cell counts between the study groups. All outpatient visits and admissions were registered. ENI infants received cotrimoxazol prophylaxis (CTXP). Negative binomial regression models were estimated to compare incidence rates of outpatient visits and admissions. Hematocrit was lower in ENI than in UE infants at 1, 3, and 9 months of age (P = 0.024, 0.025, and 0.012, respectively). Percentage of CD4 T cells was 3% lower (95% confidence interval: 0.86 to 5.15; P = 0.006) and percentage of CD8 T cells 1.15 times higher (95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 1.25; P = 0.001) in ENI vs. UE infants. ENI infants had a lower weight-for-age Z score (P = 0.049) but reduced incidence of outpatient visits, overall (P = 0.042), diarrhea (P = 0.001), and respiratory conditions (P = 0.042). ENI children were more frequently anemic, had poorer nutritional status, and alterations in some immunologic profiles compared with UE children. CTXP may explain their reduced mild morbidity. These findings may reinforce continuation of CTXP and the need to understand the consequences of maternal HIV exposure in this vulnerable group of children.

  19. No-show at a forensic psychiatric outpatient clinic : risk factors and reasons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feitsma, W. Nathalie; Popping, Roel; Jansen, Danielle E. M. C.

    Nonattendance for and late cancellations of scheduled appointments, that is no-show, is a well-known phenomenon in psychiatric outpatient clinics. Research on the topic of no-show for initial and consecutive appointments in the field of forensic psychiatry is scarce. This study therefore aims to

  20. Clinical spectrum of paediatric HIV in Nnewi, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, E F

    2006-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is increasingly becoming a predominant cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in this part of the world. A descriptive, prospective study was carried out at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Southeast Nigeria, to ascertain the clinical features and probable modes of transmission of HIV infection in Children. Out of 128 HIV -infected children, 53.1% were males and 46.9% females, giving a male: female ratio 1.1:1. They were aged from 3 months to 16 years, with a mean of 4.78 (+/- 3.97) years. Those in the 1-5 year age bracket made up 47.7%. The presumed route of infection was mother-to-child in 79.7% and blood transfusion in 16.4%. Majority (82.0%) presented with WHO clinical stage 3 disease and 55.7% were severely immunosuppressed. The most frequent clinical features were recurrent/persistent fever, persistent cough,weight loss/failure to thrive and generalised lymphadenopathy. There was co-infection with tuberculosis in 15.6% of patients. Eighteen patients (14.0%) were lost to follow up. Six children (4.7%) died during the period under review. They all presented in WHO stage 3 and 4. A hundred percent of the dead children had severe weight loss, 83.3% had generalized lymphadenopathy and recurrent or persistent fever respectively. Fifty percent presented with diarrhea and oral thrush. There was no gender difference in mortality. Mortality was highest among infants. The high rate of vertical transmission of HIV reinforces the need for effective PMTCT interventions in reducing the incidence of HIV in children. A high index of suspicion and awareness of modes of presentation of HIV infection in children is needed for early diagnosis of those infected with HIV.

  1. Perception of sexuality and fertility in women living with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Maria; Aho, Inka; Thorsteinsson, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: As the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive population ages, issues concerning sexuality and fertility, among others, are becoming relevant. HIV is still surrounded by stigma and taboos, and there have been few studies conducted in industrialized settings concerning...... these questions. We therefore wanted to investigate the perception of sexuality and fertility in women living with HIV (WLWH) in an industrialized setting, using a questionnaire. METHODS: WLWH were recruited at their regular outpatient clinic visits, at the major Departments of Infectious Diseases in Denmark...... Finland) or from a national HIV cohort (in Denmark). Statistical analysis was performed using STATA, version 11. RESULTS: In total, 560 women were included in the study. The median age was 44 years. The majority were of white European origin, with fully suppressed HIV viral load, CD4 cell count >350 µ...

  2. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy in children with febrile urinary tract infection: a prospective randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasiri Kalmarzi R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Acute pyelonephritis may lead to permanent renal scarring. The standard recommendation for treatment of febrile children with urinary tract infection (UTI is hospitalization for intravenous antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of outpatient intravenous ceftriaxone and cefixime versus inpatient of the same regimen for children with febrile UTI.   "nMethods: In a randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of administration two days intravenous ceftriaxone followed by an oral cefixime for eight days (as outpatient group versus four days intravenous ceftriaxone followed by an oral cefixime for six days (as inpatient group, in 203 children (99 cases in outpatient group and 104 cases in inpatient group 3 months to 15 years of age with febrile UTI, in terms of short-term clinical outcomes (sterilization of the urine and defeverescence and long-term morbidity (incidence of reinfection and renal scarring documented by DMSA scintigraphy. "nResults: Repeat urine cultures were sterile within 48 hours in all children, mean time to defeverescence was 27.58 (SD=±12.62 and 31.44 (SD=±17.06 hours for children in outpatient and inpatient groups, respectively (P=0.067. Reinfection occurred in 9.1% of outpatient and 13.4% of inpatient group (P=0.326. Renal scarring developed in 11% of children of outpatient and 7.6% of children of inpatient group (P=0.884. There was no significant difference between the two groups in respect of renal scarring. "nConclusions: Outpatient ceftriaxone for two days followed by cefixime to complete a 10 days course can be recommended as a safe and effective treatment for children with febrile UTI.

  3. COPD, stage and treatment in a large outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claire Præst; Holm, Jakob; Nørgaard, Annette

    2017-01-01

    of exacerbations. Our aim was to describe COPD patient characteristics and compare roflumilast treatment eligible to non-eligible patients. An observational cross-section study was conducted. Patients were included from a large COPD outpatient clinic. Information regarding COPD patient characteristics...... was registered on a standardized form and lung function was measured. Patients were categorized according to the GOLD classification. Eligibility for roflumilast treatment was assessed and patient characteristics compared between groups. 547 patients were included. Most patients (54%) were in GOLD group D. 62...

  4. How to Integrate HIV and Sexual and Reproductive Health Services in Namibia, the Epako Clinic Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Zapata

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During the past two decades, HIV and Sexual and Reproductive Health services in Namibia have been provided in silos, with high fragmentation. As a consequence of this, quality and efficiency of services in Primary Health Care has been compromised.  Methods: We conducted an operational research (observational pre-post study in a public health facility in Namibia. A health facility assessment was conducted before and after the integration of health services. A person-centred integrated model was implemented to integrate all health services provided at the health facility in addition to HIV and Sexual and Reproductive Health services. Comprehensive services are provided by each health worker to the same patients over time (longitudinality, on a daily basis (accessibility and with a good external referral system (coordination. Prevalence rates of time flows and productivity were done.  Results: Integrated services improved accessibility, stigma and quality of antenatal care services by improving the provider-patient communication, reducing the time that patients stay in the clinic in 16% and reducing the waiting times in 14%. In addition, nurse productivity improved 85% and the expected time in the health facility was reduced 24% without compromising the uptake of TB, HIV, outpatient, antenatal care or first visit family planning services. Given the success on many indicators resulting from integration of services, the goal of this paper was to describe “how” health services have been integrated, the “process” followed and presenting some “results” from the integrated clinic.  Conclusions: Our study shows that HIV and SRH services can be effectively integrated by following the person-centred integrated model. Based on the Namibian experience on “how” to integrate health services and the “process” to achieve it, other African countries can replicate the model to move away from the silo approach and contribute to

  5. Impact of relational coordination on staff and patient outcomes in outpatient surgical clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittell, Jody Hoffer; Logan, Caroline; Cronenwett, Jack; Foster, Tina C; Freeman, Richard; Godfrey, Marjorie; Vidal, Dale Collins

    2018-01-05

    Pressures are increasing for clinicians to provide high-quality, efficient care, leading to increased concerns about staff burnout. This study asks whether staff well-being can be achieved in ways that are also beneficial for the patient's experience of care. It explores whether relational coordination can contribute to both staff well-being and patient satisfaction in outpatient surgical clinics where time constraints paired with high needs for information transfer increase both the need for and the challenge of achieving timely and accurate communication. We studied relational coordination among surgeons, nurses, residents, administrators, technicians, and secretaries in 11 outpatient surgical clinics. Data were combined from a staff and a patient survey to conduct a cross-sectional study. Data were analyzed using ordinary least squares and random effects regression models. Relational coordination among all workgroups was significantly associated with staff outcomes, including job satisfaction, work engagement, and burnout. Relational coordination was also significantly associated with patients' satisfaction with staff and their overall visit, though the association between relational coordination and patients' satisfaction with their providers did not reach statistical significance. Even when patient-staff interactions are relatively brief, as in outpatient settings, high levels of relational coordination among interdependent workgroups contribute to positive outcomes for both staff and patients, and low levels tend to have the opposite effect. Clinical leaders can increase the expectation of positive outcomes for both staff and their patients by implementing interventions to strengthen relational coordination.

  6. Factors associated with risk of depression and relevant predictors of screening for depression in clinical practice: a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected individuals in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot, M; Sodemann, M; Gabel, C; Holmskov, J; Laursen, T; Rodkjaer, L

    2015-08-01

    Depression and psychiatric disorders are frequent among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of depression and describe the psychiatric history of HIV-infected individuals in an out-patient clinic in Denmark and to identify factors of clinical importance that may be used to identify patients at risk of depression. In 2013, 212 HIV-infected patients were included in a questionnaire study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI-II score ≥ 20 were offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors associated with risk of depression. Symptoms of depression (BDI-II score ≥ 14) were observed in 75 patients (35%), and symptoms of moderate to major depression (BDI-II score ≥ 20) in 55 patients (26%). There was also a high prevalence of co-occurring mental illness. In a multivariate model, self-reported stress, self-reported perception that HIV infection affects all aspects of life, self-reported poor health, not being satisfied with one's current life situation, previous alcohol abuse, nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy and previously having sought help because of psychological problems were independently associated with risk of depression. Symptoms of depression and co-occurring mental illness are under-diagnosed and under-treated among HIV-infected individuals. We recommend that screening of depression should be conducted regularly to provide a full psychiatric profile to decrease the risk of depression and improve adherence and quality of life in this population. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  7. Risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation at initial HIV diagnosis in Durban, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul K Drain

    Full Text Available After observing persistently low CD4 counts at initial HIV diagnosis in South Africa, we sought to determine risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation among adults.We surveyed adults prior to HIV testing at four outpatient clinics in Durban from August 2010 to November 2011. All HIV-infected adults were offered CD4 testing, and late-stage HIV disease was defined as a CD4 count <100 cells/mm(3. We used multivariate regression models to determine the effects of sex, emotional health, social support, distance from clinic, employment, perceived barriers to receiving healthcare, and foregoing healthcare to use money for food, clothing, or housing ("competing needs to healthcare" on presentation with late-stage HIV disease.Among 3,669 adults screened, 830 were enrolled, newly-diagnosed with HIV and obtained a CD4 result. Among those, 279 (33.6% presented with late-stage HIV disease. In multivariate analyses, participants who lived ≥5 kilometers from the test site [adjusted odds ratio (AOR 2.8, 95% CI 1.7-4.7], reported competing needs to healthcare (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4, were male (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.3, worked outside the home (AOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, perceived health service delivery barriers (AOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, and/or had poor emotional health (AOR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-1.9 had higher odds of late-stage HIV disease presentation.Independent risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation were from diverse domains, including geographic, economic, demographic, social, and psychosocial. These findings can inform various interventions, such as mobile testing or financial assistance, to reduce the risk of presentation with late-stage HIV disease.

  8. Tuberculous abdominal abscess in an HIV-infected man: Neither infection previously diagnosed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Yao Kao

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old man had a 1-week history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain; the initial impression was that he had diverticulitis of the ascending colon with an intra-abdominal abscess. Signs of peritonitis mandated an immediate right hemicolectomy. The unusual location of the abscess and the patient’s unusual postoperative course suggested that he might also have a systemic disease. Testing for HIV infection was positive. After 2 weeks in hospital, he was treated as an outpatient for both tuberculosis and HIV with a favourable outcome. In Taiwan a pre-operative HIV test is not performed routinely, and the HIV seroprevalence in surgical patient populations is unknown. Surgeons should keep the possibility of HIV infection in mind in a patient with an unusual clinical course.

  9. How do Patients Experience Consultations in an Outpatient AF-clinic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrysøe, Lars

    Background / Introduction Studies indicates that patients with atrial fibrillation have a lower QoL compared to patients with other heart diseases. They meet some kind of neglect from the health society and some delay in treatment and care initiation. The interdisciplinary AF-outpatient clinic...... at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, was established marts 2012, and has in order to qualify patient treatment and care. The aim of the current project is to evaluate the clinic. Purpose / research questions How do patient and relatives experience consultations in AF-clinic? (Phase I) How do QoL develop...... over time? (Phase II) What economic consequences can be derived from the AF-clinic? (Phase III) Methods The first research question (Phase I) includes 14 patients, and will be answered by fieldwork and interviews. Afterwards, the ongoing Phase II includes 150 patients who reply the same questionnaire...

  10. Trends in HIV & syphilis prevalence and correlates of HIV infection: results from cross-sectional surveys among women attending ante-natal clinics in Northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumogola Yusufu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sentinel surveillance for HIV in ante-natal clinics (ANC remains the primary method for collecting timely trend data on HIV prevalence in most of sub-Saharan Africa. We describe prevalence of HIV and syphilis infection and trends over time in HIV prevalence among women attending ante-natal clinics (ANC in Magu district and Mwanza city, part of Mwanza region in Northern Tanzania. HIV prevalence from ANC surveys in 2000 and 2002 was 10.5% and 10.8% respectively. In previous rounds urban residence, residential mobility, the length of time sexually active before marriage, time since marriage and age of the partner were associated with HIV infection. Methods A third round of HIV sentinel surveillance was conducted at ante-natal clinics in Mwanza region, Tanzania during 2006. We interviewed women attending 27 ante-natal clinics. In 15 clinics we also anonymously tested women for syphilis and HIV infection and linked these results to the questionnaire data. Results HIV prevalence was 7.6% overall in 2006 and 7.4% at the 11 clinics used in previous rounds. Geographical variations in HIV prevalence, apparent in previous rounds, have largely disappeared but syphilis prevalence is still higher in rural clinics. HIV prevalence has declined in urban clinics and is stable in rural clinics. The correlates of HIV infection have changed over time. In this round older age, lower gravidity, remarriage, duration of marriage, sexual activity before marriage, long interval between last birth and pregnancy and child death were all associated with infection. Conclusions HIV prevalence trends concur with results from a community-based cohort in the region. Correlates of HIV infection have also changed and more proximate, individual level factors are now more important, in line with the changing epidemiology of infection in this population.

  11. Integrating HIV care and treatment into primary healthcare: Are clinics equipped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talitha Crowley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The demand for HIV care and treatment services is increasing rapidly and strategies to sustain long-term care should be employed. The decentralisation and integration of HIV care and treatment services into primary healthcare (PHC is vitally important in order to ensure optimal access to life-saving antiretroviral therapy and ongoing chronic care. Conversely, the PHC system is fraught with the current burden of disease. Setting: The study was conducted in PHC clinics in the uMgungundlovu district, Kwa-Zulu Natal.Aim: The objectives of the study were to assess whether PHC clinics were equipped to deliver integrated HIV services and to evaluate the availability of resources as well as support systems for HIV care and treatment in PHC clinics.Methods: A quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken in 20 randomly-selected, eligible clinics in the uMgungundlovu district, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. An evaluation instrument was completed through observations and review of the clinic data records. Criteria were based on the World Health Organization’s guide to indicators for antiretroviral programmes as well as South African HIV standards for PHC facilities.Results: None of the clinics were equipped adequately. Clinics with a higher patient load had poorer scores, whilst clinics providing antiretroviral therapy were better equipped in terms of human resources and infrastructure.Conclusion: HIV services are an essential part of primary healthcare and clinics need to be equipped adequately in order to render this service. It is unlikely that the over-burdened health system would be able to cope with an increased number of patients on antiretroviral therapy in the long term, whilst maintaining quality of services, without support being given to PHC clinics.

  12. Integrating HIV care and treatment into primary healthcare: Are clinics equipped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talitha Crowley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The demand for HIV care and treatment services is increasing rapidly and strategies to sustain long-term care should be employed. The decentralisation and integration of HIV care and treatment services into primary healthcare (PHC is vitally important in order to ensure optimal access to life-saving antiretroviral therapy and ongoing chronic care. Conversely, the PHC system is fraught with the current burden of disease. Setting: The study was conducted in PHC clinics in the uMgungundlovu district, Kwa-Zulu Natal. Aim: The objectives of the study were to assess whether PHC clinics were equipped to deliver integrated HIV services and to evaluate the availability of resources as well as support systems for HIV care and treatment in PHC clinics. Methods: A quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken in 20 randomly-selected, eligible clinics in the uMgungundlovu district, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. An evaluation instrument was completed through observations and review of the clinic data records. Criteria were based on the World Health Organization’s guide to indicators for antiretroviral programmes as well as South African HIV standards for PHC facilities. Results: None of the clinics were equipped adequately. Clinics with a higher patient load had poorer scores, whilst clinics providing antiretroviral therapy were better equipped in terms of human resources and infrastructure. Conclusion: HIV services are an essential part of primary healthcare and clinics need to be equipped adequately in order to render this service. It is unlikely that the over-burdened health system would be able to cope with an increased number of patients on antiretroviral therapy in the long term, whilst maintaining quality of services, without support being given to PHC clinics.

  13. Retention in HIV care depends on patients' perceptions of the clinic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessinger, Matthew H; Hennink, Monique M; Kaiser, Bonnie N; Mangal, Jed P; Gokhale, Runa H; Ruchin, Lauren; Moanna, Abeer; Rimland, David; Farber, Eugene W; Marconi, Vincent C

    2017-10-01

    Institutional barriers in HIV primary care settings can contribute substantially to disparities in retention in HIV treatment and HIV-related outcomes. This qualitative study compared the perceptions of clinic experiences of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in a Veterans Affairs HIV primary care clinic setting who were retained in care with the experiences of those who were not retained in care. Qualitative data from 25 in-depth interviews were analyzed to identify facilitators and barriers to retention in HIV care. Results showed that participants not retained in care experienced barriers to retention involving dissatisfaction with clinic wait times, low confidence in clinicians, and customer service concerns. For participants retained in care, patience with procedural issues, confidence in clinicians, and interpersonal connections were factors that enhanced retention despite the fact that these participants recognized the same barriers as those who were not retained in care. These findings can inform interventions aimed at improving retention in HIV care.

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of Antiseptic Hand Hygiene Methods in an Outpatient Surgery Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therattil, Paul J; Yueh, Janet H; Kordahi, Anthony M; Cherla, Deepa V; Lee, Edward S; Granick, Mark S

    2015-12-01

    Outpatient wound care plays an integral part in any plastic surgery practice. However, compliance with hand hygiene measures has shown to be low, due to skin irritation and lack of time. The objective of this trial was to determine whether single-use, long-acting antiseptics can be as effective as standard multiple-use hand hygiene methods in an outpatient surgical setting. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was performed in the authors' outpatient plastic surgery clinic at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ to compare the efficacy of an ethyl alcohol-based sanitizer (Avagard D Instant Hand Aniseptic, 3M Health Care, St. Paul, MN), a benzalkonium chloride-based sanitizer (Soft & Shield, Bioderm Technologies, Inc, Trenton, NJ, distributed by NAPP Technologies, Hackensack, NJ ), and soap and- water handwashing. Subjects included clinic personnel, who were followed throughout the course of a 3-hour clinic session with hourly hand bacterial counts taken. During the course of the trial, 95 subjects completed the clinic session utilizing 1 of the hand hygiene methods (36 ethyl alcohol-based sanitizer, 38 benzalkonium chloride-based sanitizer, and 21 soap-and-water handwashing). There was no difference between hand bacterial counts using the different methods at 4 hourly time points (P greater than 0.05). Hand bacterial counts increased significantly over the 3-hour clinic session with the ethyl alcohol-based sanitizer (9.24 to 21.90 CFU, P less than 0.05), benzalkonium chloride-based sanitizer (6.69 to 21.59 CFU, P less than 0.05), and soap-and-water handwashing (8.43 to 22.75 CFU, P less than 0.05). There does not appear to be any difference in efficacy between single-use, long-acting sanitizer, and standard multiple-use hand hygiene methods. Hand bacterial counts increased significantly over the course of the 3-hour clinic session regardless of the hand hygiene measure used. Hand condition of subjects was improved with the ethyl alcohol

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Improving Health Care to People with HIV in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Broughton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A 2010 evaluation found generally poor outcomes among HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in Nicaragua. We evaluated an intervention to improve HIV nursing services in hospital outpatient departments to improve patient treatment and retention in care. The intervention included improving patient tracking, extending clinic hours, caring for children of HIV+ mothers, ensuring medication availability, promoting self-help groups and family involvement, and coordinating multidisciplinary care. Methods. This pre/postintervention study examined opportunistic infections and clinical status of HIV patients before and after implementation of changes to the system of nursing care. Hospital expenditure data were collected by auditors and hospital teams tracked intervention expenses. Decision tree analysis determined incremental cost-effectiveness from the implementers’ perspective. Results. Opportunistic infections decreased by 24% (95% CI: 14%–34% and 11.3% of patients improved in CDC clinical stage. Average per-patient costs decreased by $133/patient/year (95% CI: $29–$249. The intervention, compared to business-as-usual strategy, saved money while improving outcomes. Conclusions. Improved efficiency of services can allow more ART-eligible patients to receive therapy. We recommended the intervention be implemented in all HIV service facilities in Nicaragua.

  16. Psychotropic prescribing in HIV : clinical: prescribing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may also be changes in the clinical picture in patients with psychiatric disorders ... tain selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and benzodiazepines (see .... treatment in HIV-posi- tive populations have received far more attention than.

  17. Discharge planning in a cardiology out-patient clinic: a clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Shirley; Khan, Barkat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to audit the active discharge (DC) planning process in a general cardiology clinic, by pre-assessing patients' medical notes and highlighting those suitable for potential DC to the clinic physician. The cardiology clinical nurse specialist (CNS) identified patients' for nine- to 12-month return visits one week prior to attendance. The previous consultation letter was accessed and information was documented by the CNS in the medical record. The key performance indicator (KPI) used was patient DCs for each clinic visit. The process was audited at three separate times to reflect recommended action carried out. The CNS pre-assessment and presence at the clinics significantly increased total DCs during the first period compared to usual care, 11 vs 34 per cent (p audit period, DCs fell (9 per cent) with a reduction in CNS pre-assessed DCs (10 per cent). Recommendations were implemented. The process was continued by clinic administration staff, colour coding all nine- to 12-month returns, resulted in a 19 per cent DC rate in 2012. CNS pre-assessment and highlighting DC suitability increased the number of patient DCs. As the CNS presence at the clinic reduced so did the rate of DC. Specific personnel need to be responsible for monitoring and reminding staff of the process; this does not always have to be medical or nursing. Implementing positive discharging procedures is aimed at improving quality, increasing efficiency and accessibility of services for patients. This audit describes a process to promote DC planning from cardiology outpatients.

  18. Internet health seeking behaviour of parents attending a general paediatric outpatient clinic: A cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebelefsky, Christian; Karner, Denise; Voitl, Jasmin; Klein, Frederic; Voitl, Peter; Böck, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Our aim was to examine the internet health seeking behaviour of parents attending a general paediatric outpatient clinic. For this purpose, the proportion of parents going online to obtain child health information, the most commonly used online resources, and factors having an influence on internet usage were identified. This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at a general paediatric outpatient clinic in Vienna, Austria. Data collection was done by means of an anonymous questionnaire containing 14 items. A total number of 500 questionnaires were collected. Among parents visiting the outpatient clinic, 94.4% use the internet to obtain child health information in general and 21% to be informed about the reason for consultation. Most commonly used online resources are Google (91.4%), websites run by doctors (84.8%), Wikipedia (84.7%), health portals (76.4%), the outpatient clinic's homepage (76.4%), as well as health forums and communities (61.9%). Younger parents (p = 0.022) and parents of younger children (p parents with different completed educational levels (mothers: p = 0.078; fathers: p = 0.388) do not differ in this behaviour. Important reasons for high internet use might be the inexperience of young parents regarding child health as well as the frequent infections, vaccinations, and preventive check-ups which are associated with young age of children. In contrast to former findings relating to health seekers in general, internet usage of parents is independent of their sex and educational level. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Outpatient invasive radiologic procedures - Diagnostic and therapeutic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dublin, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a ''how-to'' book for radiologists who are planning to, or considering whether to establish outpatient practice in response to DRGs. It provides practical, expert advice on both the administrative and clinical sides of outpatient radiology. It focuses on the essentials of clinical practice in the outpatient setting - and how it differs from inpatient practice

  20. Effects of an intervention aimed at improving nurse-patient communication in an oncology outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Mette Trøllund; Jensen, Mette Lund; Andersen, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    skills training program in nursing cancer care. Twenty-four nurses in an oncology outpatient clinic participated and were randomly assigned to the intervention program or a control group. A total of 413 patients treated in the clinic during 2 recruitment periods (before and after the communication skills...

  1. Seroprevalence and risk factors of syphilis among HIV/AIDS patients in Istanbul, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Özlem Altuntaş; Karaosmanoğlu, Hayat Kumbasar; Sayan, Murat; İnce, Emine Rahşan; Nazlıcan, Özcan

    2015-03-01

    Data on syphilis seroprevalence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients are unavailable in Turkey although they have common transmission routes. Our study is oriented towards the assessment of the seroprevalence of syphilis and the related risk factors in the HIV/AIDS patients followed in our outpatient clinic. Newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS cases (n = 308) who attended our outpatient clinic between January 2006 and April 2013 were included in the study. Patient characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, CD4+ T lymphocyte count, HIV RNA level, rapid plasma reagent (RPR) and Treponema pallidum hemagglutination (TPHA) test results were analyzed retrospectively. TPHA positivity was considered indicative of syphilis-causing T pallidum exposure. HIV infection was transmitted through heterosexual (n = 176) or homosexual (n =131) contact (266 male, 86.3%; age 38.3 ± 11.7 years; CD4+ T lymphocyte count, 330.6 ± 15.17/mm3). 50.7% of the patients attained only primary education. Out of the 245 cases, who were asked about the number of their sexual partners, 40 patients (26 women) lived in a monogamous relationship. Condom usage was not practiced (57.2%) or was only occasional (34.4% - particularly with their legal spouses and for contraception). Physical exam revealed no signs of syphilis or other STIs. TPHA (+/- RPR) positivity was determined in 40 patients (12.9%), indicating T pallidum exposure. All patients with positive syphilis serology were male (p= 0.0026). T pallidum exposure was determined in 21.3% of homosexual and 6.8% of heterosexual cases (p = 0.0003). Since sexual contact is the most common route of transmission for both infections, syphilis seroprevalence was relatively high in our HIV/AIDS patients. Male and homosexual HIV/AIDS patients constituted a group at the highest risk for syphilis.

  2. Using two on-going HIV studies to obtain clinical data from before, during and after pregnancy for HIV-positive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huntington Susie E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC is an observational study that collates data on HIV-positive adults accessing HIV clinical care at (currently 13 large clinics in the UK but does not collect pregnancy specific data. The National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC collates data on HIV-positive women receiving antenatal care from every maternity unit in the UK and Ireland. Both studies collate pseudonymised data and neither dataset contains unique patient identifiers. A methodology was developed to find and match records for women reported to both studies thereby obtaining clinical and treatment data on pregnant HIV-positive women not available from either dataset alone. Results Women in UK CHIC receiving HIV-clinical care in 1996–2009, were found in the NSHPC dataset by initially ‘linking’ records with identical date-of-birth, linked records were then accepted as a genuine ‘match’, if they had further matching fields including CD4 test date. In total, 2063 women were found in both datasets, representing 23.1% of HIV-positive women with a pregnancy in the UK (n = 8932. Clinical data was available in UK CHIC following most pregnancies (92.0%, 2471/2685 pregnancies starting before 2009. There was bias towards matching women with repeat pregnancies (35.9% (741/2063 of women found in both datasets had a repeat pregnancy compared to 21.9% (1502/6869 of women in NSHPC only and matching women HIV diagnosed before their first reported pregnancy (54.8% (1131/2063 compared to 47.7% (3278/6869, respectively. Conclusions Through the use of demographic data and clinical dates, records from two independent studies were successfully matched, providing data not available from either study alone.

  3. Is HIV-2- induced AIDS different from HIV-1-associated AIDS? Data from a West African clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Steele, Euridice; Awasana, Akum Aveika; Corrah, Tumani; Sabally, Saihou; van der Sande, Marianne; Jaye, Assan; Togun, Toyin; Sarge-Njie, Ramu; McConkey, Samuel J.; Whittle, Hilton; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2007-01-01

    Although AIDS is less frequent following HIV-2 than HIV-1 infection, it is unclear whether the clinical picture and clinical course of AIDS are similar in the two infections. To compare the pattern of AIDS-defining events, CD4 cell count at the time of AIDS diagnosis, survival from time of AIDS, and

  4. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding...... the infection, so when treatment is started it is currently a lifelong commitment. Is it reasonable then that guidelines are based almost completely on short-term randomized trials and observational studies of surrogate markers, or is there still a need for trials with clinical outcomes?...

  5. Perception of Antiretroviral Generic Medicines: One-Day Survey of HIV-Infected Patients and Their Physicians in France

    OpenAIRE

    Jacomet, Christine; Allavena, Clotilde; Peyrol, Fleur; Pereira, Bruno; Joubert, Laurence Morand; Bagheri, Haleh; Cotte, Laurent; Garaffo, Rodolphe; Gerbaud, Laurent; Dellamonica, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background In the interest of cost effectiveness, switching antiretroviral brand name medications to generics is recommended in France since 2013. The study objective was to evaluate the perception of generics per se and antiretroviral generics in HIV-infected patients and their hospital physicians Methods and Findings 556 out of 703 (79%) adult HIV+ outpatients and 116 physicians in 33 clinics were included in a multicentric cross-sectional survey performed in September 2013. Patients comple...

  6. TestMeEast: a campaign to increase HIV testing in hospitals and to reduce late diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, R; O'Connell, R; Lascar, M; Ferrand, R; Strachan, S; Matin, N; Bassnet, I; Orkin, C

    2016-01-01

    Late diagnosis occurs in almost half of those diagnosed in the UK (HIV Prevention England, 2013. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from HIV Prevention England: http://www.hivpreventionengland.org.uk/Campaigns-Current/National-HIV-Testing-Week ). Testing occurs mainly in sexual health and antenatal clinics despite recommendations to test more broadly [Ellis, S., & Curtis, H. (2012). HIV diagnoses and missed opportunities. Results of the British HIV association (BHIVA) National Audit 2010. Clinical Medicine, 12(5), 430-434]. We report the findings of an HIV-testing week campaign to offer testing to those who have blood tests as part of routine care within outpatient clinics and emergency departments of six London hospitals. The campaign target was to test 500 patients a day during the 2013 National HIV Testing Week (NHTW). Clinic staff and medical students were trained to offer routine HIV testing. Linkage to care was arranged for those who tested HIV-positive. During NHTW we tested 2402 of the planned 2500 test target. 2402/4317 (55.6% 95% CI 54.1-57.1%) of those who had routine blood tests were tested for HIV. There were eight HIV-positive tests; three were new diagnoses (all linked to care). The campaign hashtag #TestMeEast achieved a total Twitter "reach" of 238, 860 and the campaign had widespread news coverage. Our campaign showed that staff and students could be trained and mobilised to do thousands of routine HIV tests during a campaign.

  7. Creating an African HIV clinical research and prevention trials network: HIV prevalence, incidence and transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli Kamali

    Full Text Available HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner.

  8. Creating an African HIV Clinical Research and Prevention Trials Network: HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A.; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J.; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K.; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner. PMID:25602351

  9. Home-Based Care and Perceived Quality of Life Among People Living with HIV in Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Quyen Thi Tu; Brickley, Deborah Bain; Tieu, Van Thi Thu; Hills, Nancy K

    2018-03-31

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to examine the perceptions of quality of life among people living with HIV who received home-based care services administered through outpatient clinics in Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam. Data were collected from a sample of 180 consecutively selected participants (86 cases, 94 controls) at four outpatient clinics, all of whom were on antiretroviral therapy. Quality of life was evaluated using the WHOQOL-BREF instrument. In adjusted analysis, those who received home-based care services had a quality of life score 4.08 points higher (on a scale of 100) than those who did not receive home-based care services (CI 95%, 2.32-5.85; p < 0.001). The findings suggest that home-based care is associated with higher self-perceptions of quality of life among people living with HIV.

  10. Designing cyclic appointment schedules for outpatient clinics with scheduled and unscheduled patient arrivals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky; Zonderland, Maartje E.; Braaksma, Aleida; Vliegen, Ingrid M. H.; Boucherie, Richard J.; Litvak, Nelly; Hans, Erwin W.

    2014-01-01

    We present a methodology to design appointment systems for outpatient clinics and diagnostic facilities that offer both walk-in and scheduled service. The developed blueprint for the appointment schedule prescribes the number of appointments to plan per day and the moment on the day to schedule the

  11. Designing cyclic appointment schedules for outpatient clinics with scheduled and unscheduled patient arrivals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky; Zonderland, Maartje Elisabeth; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Litvak, Nelli; Hans, Elias W.

    2011-01-01

    We present a methodology to design appointment systems for outpatient clinics and diagnostic facilities that offer both walk-in and scheduled service. The developed blueprint for the appointment schedule prescribes the number of appointments to plan per day and the moment on the day to schedule the

  12. Variables influencing presenting symptoms of patients with eating disorders at psychiatric outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Chin-Hao; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Hsi-Chung

    2016-04-30

    Eating disorders (EDs) have been underdiagnosed in many clinical settings. This study investigates the influence of clinical characteristics on presenting symptoms of patients with EDs. Psychiatric outpatients, aged 18-45, were enrolled sequentially and received a two-phase survey for EDs in August 2010-January 2013. Their primary reasons for seeking psychiatric help were obtained at their first encounter with outpatient psychiatrists. Patients' clinical and demographic characteristics were compared according to presenting symptoms with or without eating/weight problems. Of 2140 patients, 348 (16.3%) were diagnosed with an ED (22.6% of women and 6.3% of men). The three most common reasons for seeking psychiatric help were eating/weight problems (46.0%), emotional problems (41.3%), and sleep disturbances (19.3%). The multivariate analyses suggest that when patients with EDs presented symptoms that were less related to eating/weight problems, they were significantly more likely to be those having diagnoses other than anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa and less severe degree of binge-eating. Further, patients with EDs who demonstrated more impulsive behaviors and poorer functioning were less likely to report their eating problems when visiting psychiatric clinics. Thus, ED should be assessed routinely in patients with complex psychopathology to facilitate comprehensive treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. (HIV) infection among pregnant women in an antenatal clinic in Port

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Women attending ante-natal clinic in Nigeria are routinely screened for HIV/AIDS. A retrospective study was conducted between 2000 and 2004 to investigate the prevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic in Braithwalte Memorial Hospital (BMH), Port ...

  14. Undertreatment of pain in HIV+ adults in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Nathaniel M; Chaiklang, Kanokporn; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai

    2013-06-01

    Chronic pain remains prevalent in HIV+ adults despite widespread antiretroviral use. Pain continues to be underrecognized and undertreated in this population. In Thailand, similar to the West, HIV care is transitioning toward chronic disease management. Despite the importance of pain management in chronic HIV, the prevalence of pain and adequacy of pain management is unknown in HIV+ adults in Thailand. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of chronic pain, the burden of inadequate analgesia, and risk factors for chronic pain in HIV+ adults in Thailand. A total of 254 HIV+ adults were recruited from an outpatient clinic in Thailand. Interviewers obtained information on demographics, clinical data, and pain characteristics. The burden of inadequate analgesia was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Risk factors were identified with logistic regression analysis. Frequent pain was reported by 27% of participants; 22% reported chronic pain. Pain was significantly associated with education less than primary school, a positive depression screen, and the number of years on combined antiretroviral therapy. Eighty-six percent of patients with frequent pain were inadequately treated. Of 34 patients with moderate or severe pain, none received adequate analgesia. Inadequate analgesia was a significant risk factor for poorer quality of life. Despite widespread antiretroviral use, pain remains common and undertreated in HIV+ adults in Thailand. Undertreated pain negatively impacts quality of life. It is imperative that policy makers and HIV caregivers address this treatment gap to advance the care of people living with HIV in Thailand. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intestinal parasitic infections in children presenting with diarrhoea in outpatient and inpatient settings in an informal settlement of Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbae, Cecilia Kathure; Nokes, David James; Mulinge, Erastus; Nyambura, Joyce; Waruru, Anthony; Kariuki, Samuel

    2013-05-27

    The distribution of and factors associated with intestinal parasitic infections are poorly defined in high risk vulnerable populations such as urban slums in tropical sub-Saharan Africa. In a cross sectional study, children aged 5 years and below who presented with diarrhoea were recruited from selected outpatient clinics in Mukuru informal settlement, and from Mbagathi District hospital, Nairobi, over a period of two years (2010-2011). Stool samples were examined for the presence of parasites using direct, formal-ether concentration method and the Modified Ziehl Neelsen staining technique. Overall, 541/2112 (25.6%) were positive for at least one intestinal parasite, with the common parasites being; Entamoeba histolytica, 225 (36.7%),Cryptosporidium spp. 187, (30.5%), Giardia lamblia, 98 (16%).The prevalence of intestinal parasites infection was higher among children from outpatient clinics 432/1577(27.4%) than among those admitted in hospital 109/535 (20.1%) p informal settlements' environment. Routine examinations of stool samples and treatment could benefit both the HIV infected and uninfected children in outpatient and inpatient settings.

  16. A Survey on Dementia Training Needs among Staff at Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Geri; Lawrence, Briana M.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major public health concern. Educating health-care providers about dementia warning signs, diagnosis, and management is paramount to fostering clinical competence and improving patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to describe and identify educational and training needs of staff at community-based outpatient clinics…

  17. Depressive Symptoms Mediate the Effect of HIV-Related Stigmatization on Medication Adherence Among HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzel, Luke D; Vanable, Peter A; Brown, Jennifer L; Bostwick, Rebecca A; Sweeney, Shannon M; Carey, Michael P

    2015-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that depressive symptoms would mediate the association of HIV-related stigma to medication adherence. We recruited HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM; N = 66; 66 % White, 23 % African-American) from an outpatient infectious disease clinic, and asked them to complete self-report measures. Mediational analyses showed that depressive symptoms fully mediated the association between HIV-related stigma and adherence. That is, stigma-related experiences were positively associated with depressive symptoms and negatively associated with adherence, and, in the final model, depressive symptoms remained a significant correlate of adherence while stigma did not. A test of the indirect effect of stigma on adherence through depressive symptoms was also significant (unstandardized b = -0.19; bootstrap 95 % CI -0.45 to -0.01). These results highlight the importance of treating depressive symptoms in interventions aiming to improve medication adherence among HIV-infected MSM.

  18. Progress of artificial pancreas devices towards clinical use: the first outpatient studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Steven J

    2015-04-01

    This article describes recent progress in the automated control of glycemia in type 1 diabetes with artificial pancreas devices that combine continuous glucose monitoring with automated decision-making and insulin delivery. After a gestation period of closely supervised feasibility studies in research centers, the last 2 years have seen publication of studies testing these devices in outpatient environments, and many more such studies are ongoing. The most basic form of automation, suspension of insulin delivery for actual or predicted hypoglycemia, has been shown to be effective and well tolerated, and a first-generation device has actually reached the market. Artificial pancreas devices that actively dose insulin fall into two categories, those that dose insulin alone and those that also use glucagon to prevent and treat hypoglycemia (bihormonal artificial pancreas). Initial outpatient clinical trials have shown that both strategies can improve glycemic management in comparison with patient-controlled insulin pump therapy, but only the bihormonal strategy has been tested without restrictions on exercise. Artificial pancreas technology has the potential to reduce acute and chronic complications of diabetes and mitigate the burden of diabetes self-management. Successful outpatient studies bring these technologies one step closer to availability for patients.

  19. Mental health problems and post-migration stress among multi-traumatized refugees attending outpatient clinics upon resettlement to Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, Dinu-Stefan; Heir, Trond; Hauff, Edvard; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Lien, Lars

    2012-08-01

    Refugees have often been exposed to multiple traumas making them prone to mental health problems later. The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence and symptom load of psychiatric disorders in refugees admitted to psychiatric outpatient clinics and to investigate the relationship between multiple exposure to traumatic events, the severity of traumatic symptoms and post-migration stressors. A clinical sample of 61 refugee outpatients from psychiatric clinics in Southern Norway was cross-sectionally examined using three structured clinical interviews (SCID-PTSD, SIDES and MINI) and self-report psychometric instruments (HSCL-25, IES-R). Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was diagnosed in 82% of the patients, while Disorders of Extreme Stress Not Otherwise Specified (DESNOS) was present in 16% of them. Comorbidity was considerable; 64% of the patients had both PTSD and major depression disorder (MDD) and 80% of those who had PTSD had three or more additional diagnoses. Multi-traumatized refugees in outpatient clinics have high prevalence of PTSD, DESNOS, comorbid depression and anxiety disorders. A more severe symptomatology was found in patients diagnosed with both PTSD and DESNOS, than in those diagnosed with only PTSD. Higher rates of unemployment, weak social network and weak social integration were also prevalent in these outpatients, and related to increased psychiatric comorbidity and severity of symptoms. Further research may clarify the existence of a cumulative relationship between pre-resettlement traumas and post-resettlement stressors in the mental health of refugees, which in turn may help to improve therapeutic interventions. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2012 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  20. The Value of Laboratory Tests in Diagnosing Secondary Osteoporosis at a Fracture and Osteoporosis Outpatient Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, Gijs; Hegeman, J. Han; van der Velde, Detlef; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; ten Duis, Henk J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: As more and more patients meeting the criteria for osteoporosis are referred to a fracture and osteoporosis outpatient clinic (FO clinic), the laboratory costs to screen for secondary osteoporosis also increases. This study was conducted to determine the value of screening on underlying

  1. HIV coreceptor phenotyping in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Andrew J; Swenson, Luke C; Harrigan, P Richard

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of CCR5 antagonists increases the options available for constructing antiretroviral regimens. However, this option is coupled with the caveat that patients should be tested for HIV coreceptor tropism prior to initiating CCR5 antagonist-based therapy. Failure to screen for CXCR4 usage increases the risk of using an ineffective drug, thus reducing the likelihood of viral suppression and increasing their risk for developing antiretroviral resistance. This review discusses current and future methods of determining HIV tropism, with a focus on their utility in the clinical setting for screening purposes. Some of these methods include recombinant phenotypic tests, such as the Monogram Trofile assay, as well as genotype-based predictors, heteroduplex tracking assays, and flow cytometry based methods. Currently, the best evidence supports the use of phenotypic methods, although other methods of screening for HIV coreceptor usage prior to the administration of CCR5 antagonists may reduce costs and increase turnaround time over phenotypic methods. The presence of low levels of X4 virus is a challenge to all assay methods, resulting in reduced sensitivity in clinical, patient-derived samples when compared to clonally derived samples. Gaining a better understanding of the output of these assays and correlating them with clinical progression and therapy response will provide some indication on how both genotype-based, and phenotypic assays for determining HIV coreceptor usage can be improved. In addition, leveraging new technologies capable of detecting low-level minority species may provide the most significant advances in ensuring that individuals with low levels of dual/mixed tropic virus are not inadvertently prescribed CCR5 antagonists.

  2. Provider training and experience for people living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackal, Julia M; Tynan, Anne-Marie; Handford, Curtis D; Rzeznikiewiz, Damian; Agha, Ayda; Glazier, Richard

    2011-06-15

    The complexity of HIV/AIDS raises challenges for the effective delivery of care. It is important to ensure that the expertise and experience of care providers is of high quality. Training and experience of HIV/AIDS providers may impact not only individual patient outcomes but increasingly on health care costs as well. The objective of this review is to assess the effects of provider training and experience on people living with HIV/AIDS on the following outcomes: immunological (ie. viral load, CD4 count), medical (ie. mortality, proportion on antiretrovirals), psychosocial (ie. quality of life measures) and economic outcomes (ie health care costs). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Dissertation Abstracts International (DAI), CINAHL, HealthStar, PsycInfo, PsycLit, Social Sciences Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts from January 1, 1980 through May 29, 2009.  Electronic searches were performed for abstracts from major international AIDS conferences. Reference lists from pertinent articles, books and review articles were retrieved and reviewed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials, cohort, case control, cross-sectional studies and controlled before and after designs that examined the qualifications/training and patient volume of HIV/AIDS care of providers caring for persons known to be infected with HIV/AIDS were included. At least two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for further information as required. Assessment of confounding factors was undertaken independently by two reviewers. A total of four studies (one randomized controlled trial, three non- randomized studies) involving 8488 people living with HIV/AIDS were included. The main findings of this review demonstrated a trend to improved outcomes when treated by a provider with more training/expertise in HIV/AIDS care in the outpatient (clinic) setting. Due to the heterogeneity of the included studies, we could not perform a

  3. Aggression Replacement Training for Violent Young Men in a Forensic Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornsveld, R.H.; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Muris, P.; Zwets, A.J.; Kanters, T.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Aggression Replacement Training (ART) were explored in a group of Dutch violent young men aged 16 to 21 years, who were obliged by the court to follow a treatment program in a forensic psychiatric outpatient clinic. To evaluate the training, patients completed a set of self-report

  4. Depression and Anxiety in a Cardiovascular Outpatient Clinic: A Descriptive Study

    OpenAIRE

    Baktash Bayani MD; Shakila Yousefi Msc; Mahtab Bayani MD; Maryam Shirmohammadi Msc; Abdollatif Alimoradi Msc; Homa Falsoleiman MD; Narges Yazdi Msc; Mohammad Arbabi MD

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Cardiac diseases are psycho-somatic disorders, and psychological aspects play an essential role in their initiation and exacerbation. The aim of this study was to gain appropriate knowledge in the epidemiology of co-morbid depression and anxiety disorder in cardiovascular outpatients.Method: This study is descriptive with a sample of patients attending a cardio-vascular clinic. 238 individuals were included in this study using a consecutive sampling method. The study instrument was...

  5. Religion, Spirituality, and HIV Clinical Outcomes: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, B R; Justice, A C; Fiellin, D A

    2018-06-01

    This systematic review evaluates the association between religion, spirituality and clinical outcomes in HIV-infected individuals. A systematic literature review was conducted for all English language articles published between 1980 and 2016 in relevant databases. Six hundred fourteen studies were evaluated. 15 met inclusion criteria. Ten (67%) studies reported a positive association between religion or spirituality and a clinical HIV outcome. Two (13%) studies failed to detect such an association; and two (13%) demonstrated a negative association. One study (7%) identified features of religiosity and spirituality that had both negative and positive associations with HIV clinical outcomes. Recognizing the religious or spiritual commitments of patients may serve as an important component of patient care. Further longitudinal studies and interventions might be required to further clarify the potential impact of religion and spirituality on HIV clinical outcomes.

  6. Cost analysis of one of the first outpatient wound clinics in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondas, A A L M; Schols, J M G; Halfens, R J G; Hull, H R; Stobberingh, E E; Evers, S M A A

    2015-09-01

    To perform, from an insurance perspective, a cost analysis of one of the outpatient community wound care clinics in the Netherlands, the Knowledge Centre in Wound Care (KCWC) at Venray. This study involved a cost analysis based on an observational cohort study with a one-year pre-admission and a one-year post-admission comparison of costs. Patients were included when they first consulted the outpatient wound care clinic. Participants were all insured by the same health insurance company, Coöperatie Volksgezondheidszorg (VGZ). A standard six-step procedure for performing cost studies was used to calculate the costs. Given the skewed cost data, non-parametric bootstrapping was used to test for statistical differences. There were 172 patients included in this study. The difference in costs related to wound care between the year before and the year after initial admission to the wound clinic amounted to an average reduction of €2621 (£1873) per patient in the base case analysis. The categories 'general practitioner', 'hospital care', 'mental health care' and 'transport' scored lower, indicating lower costs, in the year after admission to the wound clinic. In this study, only the reimbursement data of patients of one health insurance company, and specifically only those made under the 2006 Dutch Health Insurance Act, were available. Because of the observational design, definitive conclusions cannot be made regarding a demonstrated reduction of costs in the year post admission. Nevertheless, this study is a first attempt of a cost analysis of an equipped outpatient wound clinic as an innovative way of responding to the increasing number of chronic wounds in the Netherlands. The calculations show that savings in wound care are possible. A possible conflict of interest should be mentioned. First author AALM Rondas, PhD student at Maastricht University, is working at the KCWC wound clinic at Venray in the Netherlands as a physician. However, the research data were

  7. Anemia and growth failure among HIV-infected children in India: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shet Anita

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemia and poor nutrition have been previously described as independent risk factors for death among HIV-infected children. We sought to describe nutritional status, anemia burden and HIV disease correlates among infected children in India. Methods We analyzed retrospective data from 248 HIV-infected children aged 1–12 years attending three outpatient clinics in South India (2004–2006. Standard WHO definitions were used for anemia, HIV staging and growth parameters. Statistical analysis included chi square, t tests, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results The overall prevalence of anemia (defined as hemoglobin Conclusion The high prevalence and strong interrelationship of anemia and poor nutrition among HIV-infected children in India, particularly those living in rural areas underscores the need for incorporating targeted nutritional interventions during national scale up of care, support and treatment among HIV-infected children.

  8. HIV/STD pattern and its associated risk factors among male STD clinic attendees in China: a foci for HIV intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qian-Qiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies suggested a high prevalence of STDs including HIV among female sex workers and men who have sex with men in China, but little was known about the prevalence in male patients attending public STD clinics. The aim of this study was to investigate STD patterns and HIV prevalence among male STD clinic attendees in different areas in China and the associated risk factors. The feasibility of Provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC was evaluated as well. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at 46 public STD clinics in 4 provinces in China. Between July 2009 and September 2009, a total of 3243 eligible subjects were invited to participate in an interview with a structured-questionnaire for collecting socio-demographic characteristics and sexual behavioral information. They also were asked to provide venous blood samples for serological determinations of HIV and syphilis infection, and first void urine specimens for detecting Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections, Results Out of the 3243 eligible patients, 2951(91% men agreed to take part in the HIV and syphilis testing. The overall prevalence rate of HIV infection was 0.7% while the rates of syphilis, N. gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis infections were 10.7%, 4.3% and 6.9%, respectively, with the highest syphilis and N. gonorrhoeae rates in Jiangsu Province. Patients from Guangxi province, homosexual/bisexual practices and intravenous drug use were significantly associated with HIV infection in multivariate logistic regression analyses. Provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC was well accepted by attendees, with 91% of eligible attendees agreeing to undergo HIV testing and counseling. All HIV positive patients were properly managed accordingly. Conclusions A modest prevalence of HIV infection and substantial prevalence of other STD infections were found among male patients attending public STD clinics in China. The

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Single Outpatient Clinic in Panama City Exhibit Wide Genetic Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Almengor, Pedro; Domínguez, Amada; Vega, Silvio; Goodridge, Amador

    2014-01-01

    Understanding Mycobacterium tuberculosis biodiversity and transmission is significant for tuberculosis control. This short report aimed to determine the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates from an outpatient clinic in Panama City. A total of 62 M. tuberculosis isolates were genotyped by 12 loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and Spoligotyping. Forty-five (72.6%) of the isolates showed unique MIRU-VNTR genotypes, and 13 (21%) of the isolates were grouped into four clusters. Four isolates showed polyclonal MIRU-VNTR genotypes. The MIRU-VNTR Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index reached 0.988. The Spoligotyping analysis revealed 16 M. tuberculosis families, including Latin American-Mediterranean, Harlem, and Beijing. These findings suggest a wide genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis isolates at one outpatient clinic. A detailed molecular epidemiology survey is now warranted, especially following second massive immigration for local Panama Canal expansion activities. PMID:24865686

  10. HIV-1 Genetic Variability in Cuba and Implications for Transmission and Clinical Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Madeline; Machado, Liuber Y; Díaz, Héctor; Ruiz, Nancy; Romay, Dania; Silva, Eladio

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Serological and molecular HIV-1 studies in Cuba have shown very low prevalence of seropositivity, but an increasing genetic diversity attributable to introduction of many HIV-1 variants from different areas, exchange of such variants among HIV-positive people with several coinciding routes of infection and other epidemiologic risk factors in the seropositive population. The high HIV-1 genetic variability observed in Cuba has possible implications for transmission and clinical progression. OBJECTIVE Study genetic variability for the HIV-1 env, gag and pol structural genes in Cuba; determine the prevalence of B and non-B subtypes according to epidemiologic and behavioral variables and determine whether a relationship exists between genetic variability and transmissibility, and between genetic variability and clinical disease progression in people living with HIV/AIDS. METHODS Using two molecular assays (heteroduplex mobility assay and nucleic acid sequencing), structural genes were characterized in 590 people with HIV-1 (480 men and 110 women), accounting for 3.4% of seropositive individuals in Cuba as of December 31, 2013. Nonrandom sampling, proportional to HIV prevalence by province, was conducted. Relationships between molecular results and viral factors, host characteristics, and patients' clinical, epidemiologic and behavioral variables were studied for molecular epidemiology, transmission, and progression analyses. RESULTS Molecular analysis of the three HIV-1 structural genes classified 297 samples as subtype B (50.3%), 269 as non-B subtypes (45.6%) and 24 were not typeable. Subtype B prevailed overall and in men, mainly in those who have sex with men. Non-B subtypes were prevalent in women and heterosexual men, showing multiple circulating variants and recombinant forms. Sexual transmission was the predominant form of infection for all. B and non-B subtypes were encountered throughout Cuba. No association was found between subtypes and

  11. Comorbid psychiatric disorders in depressed outpatients: demographic and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, A John; Zimmerman, Mark; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Fava, Maurizio; Hollon, Steven D; Warden, Diane; Biggs, Melanie M; Shores-Wilson, Kathy; Shelton, Richard C; Luther, James F; Thomas, Brandi; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2005-07-01

    This study evaluated the clinical and sociodemographic features associated with various degrees of concurrent comorbidity in adult outpatients with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder (MDD). Outpatients enrolled in the STAR*D trial completed the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (PDSQ). An a priori 90% specificity threshold was set for PDSQ responses to ascertain the presence of 11 different concurrent DSM-IV Axis I disorders. Of 1376 outpatients, 38.2% had no concurrent comorbidities, while 25.6% suffered one, 16.1% suffered two, and 20.2% suffered three or more comorbid conditions. Altogether, 29.3% met threshold for social anxiety disorder, 20.8% for generalized anxiety disorder, 18.8% for posttraumatic stress disorder, 12.4% for bulimia, 11.9% for alcohol abuse/dependence, 13.4% for obsessive-compulsive disorder, 11.1% for panic disorder, 9.4% for agoraphobia, 7.3% for drug abuse/dependence, 3.7% for hypochondriasis, and 2.2% for somatoform disorder. Those with more concurrent Axis I conditions had earlier ages at first onset of MDD, longer histories of MDD, greater depressive symptom severity, more general medical comorbidity (even though they were younger than those with fewer comorbid conditions), poorer physical and mental function, health perceptions, and life satisfaction; and were more likely to be seen in primary care settings. Participants had to meet entry criteria for STAR*D. Ascertainment of comorbid conditions was not based on a structured interview. Concurrent Axis I conditions (most often anxiety disorders) are very common with MDD. Greater numbers of concurrent comorbid conditions were associated with increased severity, morbidity, and chronicity of their MDD.

  12. Correlation between HIV-1 genotype and clinical progression in HIV/AIDS patients in Surabaya, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachman, B. E.; Khairunisa, S. Q.; Witaningrum, A. M.; Yunifiar, M. Q.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    Several factors such as host and viral factors can affect the progression of HIV/AIDS. This study aims to identify the correlation viral factors, especially the HIV-1 subtype with HIV/AIDS progression. Inpatient HIV/AIDS during the period March to September 2017 and willing to participate are included in the study. Historical data of disease and treatment was taken by medical record. Blood samples were amplified, sequenced and undergone phylogenetic analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to estimate beta coefficient (β) and 95%CI of HIV/AIDS progression (measured by the CD4 change rate, ΔCD4 cell count/time span in months).This study has 17 samples. The HIV-1 subtype was dominated by CRF01_AE (81.8%) followed by subtype B (18.2%). There was significant correlation between subtype HIV-1 (p = 0.04) and body mass index (p = 0.038) with HIV/AIDS clinical stage. Many factors were assumed to be correlated with increased rate of CD4, but we only subtype HIV-1 had a significant correlation (p = 0.024) with it. From multivariate analysis, we also found that subtype HIV-1 had a significant correlation (β = 0.788, 95%CI: 17.5-38.6, p = 0.004).

  13. Operating Characteristics of a Tuberculosis Screening Tool for People Living with HIV in Out-Patient HIV Care and Treatment Services, Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Turinawe

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO 2010 guidelines for intensified tuberculosis (TB case finding (ICF among people living with HIV (PLHIV includes a recommendation that PLHIV receive routine TB screening. Since 2005, the Rwandan Ministry of Health has been using a five-question screening tool. Our study objective was to assess the operating characteristics of the tool designed to identify PLHIV with presumptive TB as measured against a composite reference standard, including bacteriologically confirmed TB.In a cross-sectional study, the TB screening tool was routinely administered at enrolment in outpatient HIV care and treatment services at seven public health facilities. From March to September 2011, study enrollees were examined for TB disease irrespective of TB screening outcome. The examination consisted of a chest radiograph (CXR, three sputum smears (SS, sputum culture (SC and polymerase chain reaction line-probe assay (Hain test. PLHIV were classified as having "laboratory-confirmed TB" with positive results on SS for acid-fast bacilli, SC on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, or a Hain test.Overall, 1,767 patients were enrolled and screened of which; 1,017 (57.6% were female, median age was 33 (IQR, 27-41, and median CD4+ cell count was 385 (IQR, 229-563 cells/mm3. Of the patients screened, 138 (7.8% were diagnosed with TB of which; 125 (90.5% were laboratory-confirmed pulmonary TB. Of 404 (22.9% patients who screened positive and 1,363 (77.1% who screened negative, 79 (19.5% and 59 (4.3%, respectively, were diagnosed with TB. For laboratory-confirmed TB, the tool had a sensitivity of 54.4% (95% CI 45.3-63.3, specificity of 79.5% (95% CI 77.5-81.5, PPV of 16.8% and NPV of 95.8%.TB prevalence among PLHIV newly enrolling into HIV care and treatment was 65 times greater than the overall population prevalence. However, the performance of the tool was poorer than the predicted performance of the WHO recommended TB screening questions.

  14. Antiretroviral effect of lovastatin on HIV-1-infected individuals without highly active antiretroviral therapy (The LIVE study: a phase-II randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoya Carlos J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy produces a significant decrease in HIV-1 replication and allows an increase in the CD4 T-cell count, leading to a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infections and mortality. However, the cost, side effects and complexity of antiretroviral regimens have underscored the immediate need for additional therapeutic approaches. Statins exert pleiotropic effects through a variety of mechanisms, among which there are several immunoregulatory effects, related and unrelated to their cholesterol-lowering activity that can be useful to control HIV-1 infection. Methods/design Randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled, single-center, phase-II clinical trial. One hundred and ten chronically HIV-1-infected patients, older than 18 years and naïve for antirretroviral therapy (i.e., without prior or current management with antiretroviral drugs will be enrolled at the outpatient services from the most important centres for health insurance care in Medellin-Colombia. The interventions will be lovastatin (40 mg/day, orally, for 12 months; 55 patients or placebo (55 patients. Our primary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on viral replication. The secondary aim will be to determine the effect of lovastatin on CD4+ T-cell count in peripheral blood. As tertiary aims we will explore differences in CD8+ T-cell count, expression of activation markers (CD38 and HLA-DR on CD4 and CD8 T cells, cholesterol metabolism, LFA-1/ICAM-1 function, Rho GTPases function and clinical evolution between treated and not treated HIV-1-infected individuals. Discussion Preliminary descriptive studies have suggested that statins (lovastatin may have anti HIV-1 activity and that their administration is safe, with the potential effect of controlling HIV-1 replication in chronically infected individuals who had not received antiretroviral medications. Considering that there is limited clinical data available on

  15. Inappropriate prescribing in outpatient healthcare: an evaluation of respiratory infection visits among veterans in teaching versus non-teaching primary care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Parente

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent study led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC revealed at least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions in the outpatient setting were inappropriate. In this study of all ages, among adult patients, results were similar to the overall population, with the majority of inappropriate prescribing relating to respiratory infections. We applied the same methodology to investigate rates of antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in outpatient primary care clinics at the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The results of our evaluation reflected comparable rates of inappropriate prescribing, but when stratified by teaching versus non-teaching primary care clinics, inappropriate prescribing was significantly higher in non-teaching clinics (17.6% vs 44.0%, p < .0001. Respiratory infection visits in non-teaching outpatient clinics may be a pragmatic target for antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  16. Effects of incarceration on HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M M; Ryan, J G; Briscoe, V S; Shadle, K M

    1996-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a critical problem among the incarcerated population, with rates as high as 17% being reported for prison systems in New York. The literature suggests that stressful living conditions and inherent defects in the immune system associated with HIV infection make prison populations more susceptible to a disproportionate decrease in their CD4 counts. To determine the effects of incarceration on HIV-infected individuals, the charts of 800 inmates were reviewed. Baseline (draw 1), 2- to 5-month (draw 2), and 6- to 12-month (draw 3) CD4 cell counts were obtained. Mean cell counts were calculated, and paired t-tests were used to identify differences. The group receiving antiretrovirals throughout showed no difference in mean CD4 cell count between draws 1 and 2 or between draws 1 and 3. The group not receiving HIV medications did not show a significant difference in CD4 cell counts between draws 1 and 2, but did show a significant difference between draws 1 and 3. For this group, the rate of decline in CD4 cells was greater than among an outpatient setting. The subsample of subjects initiating therapy prior to the second blood draw showed a significant increase in mean CD4 cell counts at draw 1 versus draw 2, but did not show a significant change when comparing draw 1 to draw 3. When examining subjects based on their antiviral status, the mean CD4 cell count at each of the draws was statistically associated with subjects' antiviral status. We conclude that incarceration causes a more rapid decrease in CD4 cells compared with an outpatient population, causing clinical significance on the normal course of HIV disease.

  17. Advancing Behavioral HIV Prevention: Adapting an Evidence-Based Intervention for People Living with HIV and Alcohol Use Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Armstrong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorders (AUDs are highly prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA and are associated with increased HIV risk behaviors, suboptimal treatment adherence, and greater risk for disease progression. We used the ADAPT-ITT strategy to adapt an evidence-based intervention (EBI, the Holistic Health Recovery Program (HHRP+, that focuses on secondary HIV prevention and antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and apply it to PLWHA with problematic drinking. Focus groups (FGs were conducted with PLWHA who consume alcohol and with treatment providers at the largest HIV primary care clinic in New Orleans, LA. Overall themes that emerged from the FGs included the following: (1 negative mood states contribute to heavy alcohol consumption in PLWHA; (2 high levels of psychosocial stress, paired with few adaptive coping strategies, perpetuate the use of harmful alcohol consumption in PLWHA; (3 local cultural norms are related to the permissiveness and pervasiveness of drinking and contribute to heavy alcohol use; (4 healthcare providers unanimously stated that outpatient options for AUD intervention are scarce, (5 misperceptions about the relationships between alcohol and HIV are common; (6 PLWHA are interested in learning about alcohol’s impact on ART and HIV disease progression. These data were used to design the adapted EBI.

  18. Depression in patients with HIV is under-diagnosed: a cross-sectional study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, L; Laursen, T; Balle, N

    2009-01-01

    and to detect factors of importance for the development of depression. Methods In 2005, a population of 205 HIV-positive patients was included in a questionnaire-based study. The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) was used to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI......Background International studies suggesting that 20-37% of HIV-positive patients have diagnosable depression may underestimate the prevalence of this condition. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression among HIV-positive patients in an out-patient clinic in Denmark...... score of 20 or above were offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Results Symptoms of depression (BDI>14) were observed in 77 (38%) patients and symptoms of major depression (BDI>/=20) in 53 (26%). Eighteen patients subsequently started treatment with anti-depressants. In a reduced...

  19. Clinically relevant potential drug-drug interactions among outpatients: A nationwide database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazbar, Janja; Locatelli, Igor; Horvat, Nejc; Kos, Mitja

    2018-06-01

    Adverse drug events due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs) represent a considerable public health burden, also in Slovenia. A better understanding of the most frequently occurring potential DDIs may enable safer pharmacotherapy and minimize drug-related problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of potential DDIs among outpatients in Slovenia. An analysis of potential DDIs was performed using health claims data on prescription drugs from a nationwide database. The Lexi-Interact Module was used as the reference source of interactions. The influence of patient-specific predictors on the risk of potential clinically relevant DDIs was evaluated using logistic regression model. The study population included 1,179,803 outpatients who received 15,811,979 prescriptions. The total number of potential DDI cases identified was 3,974,994, of which 15.6% were potentially clinically relevant. Altogether, 9.3% (N = 191,213) of the total population in Slovenia is exposed to clinically relevant potential DDIs, and the proportion is higher among women and the elderly. After adjustment for cofactors, higher number of medications and older age are associated with higher odds of clinically relevant potential DDIs. The burden of DDIs is highest with drug combinations that increase risk of bleeding, enhance CNS depression or anticholinergic effects or cause cardiovascular complications. The current study revealed that 1 in 10 individuals in the total Slovenian population is exposed to clinically relevant potential DDIs yearly. Taking into account the literature based conservative estimate that approximately 1% of potential DDIs result in negative health outcomes, roughly 1800 individuals in Slovenia experience an adverse health outcome each year as a result of clinically relevant potential interactions alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Integration of HIV and TB Services Results in Improved TB Treatment Outcomes and Earlier Prioritized ART Initiation in a Large Urban HIV Clinic in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Sabine M.; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Katabira, Catherine; Mbidde, Peter; Lange, Joep M. A.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Coutinho, Alex; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization recommends that treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected patients should be integrated with HIV care. In December 2008, a separate outdoor-integrated TB/HIV clinic was instituted for attendees of a large urban HIV clinic in Uganda. We sought to

  1. Feasibility of a real-time hand hygiene notification machine learning system in outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geilleit, R; Hen, Z Q; Chong, C Y; Loh, A P; Pang, N L; Peterson, G M; Ng, K C; Huis, A; de Korne, D F

    2018-04-09

    Various technologies have been developed to improve hand hygiene (HH) compliance in inpatient settings; however, little is known about the feasibility of machine learning technology for this purpose in outpatient clinics. To assess the effectiveness, user experiences, and costs of implementing a real-time HH notification machine learning system in outpatient clinics. In our mixed methods study, a multi-disciplinary team co-created an infrared guided sensor system to automatically notify clinicians to perform HH just before first patient contact. Notification technology effects were measured by comparing HH compliance at baseline (without notifications) with real-time auditory notifications that continued till HH was performed (intervention I) or notifications lasting 15 s (intervention II). User experiences were collected during daily briefings and semi-structured interviews. Costs of implementation of the system were calculated and compared to the current observational auditing programme. Average baseline HH performance before first patient contact was 53.8%. With real-time auditory notifications that continued till HH was performed, overall HH performance increased to 100% (P machine learning system were estimated to be 46% lower than the observational auditing programme. Machine learning technology that enables real-time HH notification provides a promising cost-effective approach to both improving and monitoring HH, and deserves further development in outpatient settings. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Simple and practical screening approach to identify HIV-infected individuals with depression or at risk of developing depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjær, Lotte Ørneborg; Gabel, Charlotte; Laursen, Tinne

    2016-01-01

    of depression. METHODS: The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) was used to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms among HIV-infected individuals attending two out-patient clinics in Denmark. HIV-infected individuals with a BDI-II score ≥ 20 were offered a clinical evaluation...... by a consultant psychiatrist. The BDI-II score was compared to the outcome of mental health history review, and to results obtained using the European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) two-item depression screening tool. RESULTS: A total of 501 HIV-infected individuals were included in the study. Symptoms of moderate....../major depression (BDI-II score ≥ 20) were observed in 111 patients (22%); 65 of these patients consulted a psychiatrist, of whom 71% were diagnosed with a co-existing disorder. The BDI-II score was compared to the outcome of a mental health history review, and to results obtained using the European AIDS Clinical...

  3. [The Outpatient Clinic for Adolescent Risk-taking and Self-harm behaviors (AtR!Sk) - A Pioneering Approach of Outpatient Early Detection and Intervention of Borderline Personality Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, Michael; Ghinea, Denisa; Fischer-Waldschmidt, Gloria; Resch, Franz

    2017-07-01

    The Outpatient Clinic for Adolescent Risk-taking and Self-harm behaviors (AtR!Sk) - A Pioneering Approach of Outpatient Early Detection and Intervention of Borderline Personality Disorder Self-harm and risk-taking behaviors are frequently occurring problems in adolescents' everyday life and commonly challenge the present child and adolescent health-care system. Those behaviors are typical features of borderline-personality disorder (BPD), a severe mental disorder that is associated with immense psychological strain, increased risk of mortality and poor psychosocial functioning. Despite controversy in the past, recent evidence shows that BPD is a valid and reliable diagnosis in adolescence. Consequently, specified and effective intervention programs for this age group are necessary. Instead, present health-care services for children and adolescents in Germany are usually characterized by long waiting periods for specialized outpatient treatments and unnecessary expanses of unnecessary long inpatient stays. Alternatively, and in order to prevent serious long-term consequences, new concepts - integrated in an ambulatory setting and close to patients' daily routines - should focus on early detection and treatment of adolescents at-risk presenting with borderline personality features. The specialist outpatient clinic AtR!Sk at the University Hospital Heidelberg ensures a low-threshold initial contact service, comprehensive and accurate diagnosis of BPD features, and rapidly "tailored" therapy for young people presenting with any types of risk-taking and self-harm behavior. AtR!Sk - as a pioneering approach in south Germany - provides evidence-based early detection and intervention for adolescent BPD.

  4. The cost of implementing rapid HIV testing in sexually transmitted disease clinics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggman, Ashley A; Feaster, Daniel J; Leff, Jared A; Golden, Matthew R; Castellon, Pedro C; Gooden, Lauren; Matheson, Tim; Colfax, Grant N; Metsch, Lisa R; Schackman, Bruce R

    2014-09-01

    Rapid HIV testing in high-risk populations can increase the number of persons who learn their HIV status and avoid spending clinic resources to locate persons identified as HIV infected. We determined the cost to sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics of point-of-care rapid HIV testing using data from 7 public clinics that participated in a randomized trial of rapid testing with and without brief patient-centered risk reduction counseling in 2010. Costs included counselor and trainer time, supplies, and clinic overhead. We applied national labor rates and test costs. We calculated median clinic start-up costs and mean cost per patient tested, and projected incremental annual costs of implementing universal rapid HIV testing compared with current testing practices. Criteria for offering rapid HIV testing and methods for delivering nonrapid test results varied among clinics before the trial. Rapid HIV testing cost an average of US $22/patient without brief risk reduction counseling and US $46/patient with counseling in these 7 clinics. Median start-up costs per clinic were US $1100 and US $16,100 without and with counseling, respectively. Estimated incremental annual costs per clinic of implementing universal rapid HIV testing varied by whether or not brief counseling is conducted and by current clinic testing practices, ranging from a savings of US $19,500 to a cost of US $40,700 without counseling and a cost of US $98,000 to US $153,900 with counseling. Universal rapid HIV testing in STD clinics with same-day results can be implemented at relatively low cost to STD clinics, if brief risk reduction counseling is not offered.

  5. Bloodstream Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among HIV patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast looks at bloodstream infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogens among outpatients infected with HIV in Southeast Asia. CDC health scientist Kimberly McCarthy discusses the study and why bloodstream infections occur in HIV-infected populations.

  6. A declining CD4 count and diagnosis of HIV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma: do prior clinical symptoms and laboratory abnormalities aid diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravindra K; Marks, Michael; Edwards, Simon G; Smith, Katie; Fletcher, Katie; Lee, Siow-Ming; Ramsay, Alan; Copas, Andrew J; Miller, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) among HIV-infected individuals remains unchanged since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Recent epidemiological data suggest that CD4 count decline over a year is associated with subsequent diagnosis of HL. In an era of economic austerity monitoring the efficacy of cART by CD4 counts may no longer be required where CD4 count>350 cells/µl and viral load is suppressed (HIV outpatient cohort whether a CD4 count decline prior to diagnosis of HL, whether any decline was greater than in patients without the diagnosis, and also whether other clinical or biochemical indices were reliably associated with the diagnosis. Twenty-nine patients with a diagnosis of HL were identified. Among 15 individuals on cART with viral load symptoms had been present for a median of three months (range one-12) before diagnosis of HL. The CD4 count decline in the 12 months prior to diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma among HIV-infected individuals with VLsymptoms and/or new palpable lymphadenopathy, suggesting that CD4 count monitoring if performed less frequently, or not at all, among those virologically suppressed individuals with CD4 counts >350 may not have delayed diagnosis.

  7. Conceptual framework for behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Swann, Edith M; Singh, Sagri; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Meissner, Helen I; Stansbury, James P

    2011-10-13

    HIV vaccine clinical research occurs within a context where biomedical science and social issues are interlinked. Previous HIV vaccine research has considered behavioral and social issues, but often treated them as independent of clinical research processes. Systematic attention to the intersection of behavioral and social issues within a defined clinical research framework is needed to address gaps, such as those related to participation in trials, completion of trials, and the overall research experience. Rigorous attention to these issues at project inception can inform trial design and conduct by matching research approaches to the context in which trials are to be conducted. Conducting behavioral and social sciences research concurrent with vaccine clinical research is important because it can help identify potential barriers to trial implementation, as well as ultimate acceptance and dissemination of trial results. We therefore propose a conceptual framework for behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research and use examples from the behavioral and social science literature to demonstrate how the model can facilitate identification of significant areas meriting additional exploration. Standardized use of the conceptual framework could improve HIV vaccine clinical research efficiency and relevance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Residents' perceived needs in communication skills training across in- and outpatient clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Sommer, Johanna; Hudelson, Patricia; Demaurex, Florence; Luthy, Christophe; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Nendaz, Mathieu; De Grave, Willem; Dolmans, Diana; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-05-01

    Residents' perceived needs in communication skills training are important to identify before designing context-specific training programmes, since learrners' perceived needs can influence the effectiveness of training. To explore residents' perceptions of their training needs and training experiences around communication skills, and whether these differ between residents training in inpatient and outpatient clinical settings. Four focus groups (FG) and a self-administered questionnaire were conducted with residents working in in- and outpatient medical service settings at a Swiss University Hospital. Focus groups explored residents' perceptions of their communication needs, their past training experiences and suggestions for future training programmes in communication skills. Transcripts were analysed in a thematic way using qualitative analytic approaches. All residents from both settings were asked to complete a questionnaire that queried their sociodemographics and amount of prior training in communication skills. In focus groups, outpatient residents felt that communication skills were especially useful in addressing chronic diseases and social issues. In contrast, inpatient residents emphasized the importance of good communication skills for dealing with family conflicts and end-of-life issues. Felt needs reflected residents' differing service priorities: outpatient residents saw the need for skills to structure the consultation and explore patients' perspectives in order to build therapeutic alliances, whereas inpatient residents wanted techniques to help them break bad news, provide information and increase their own well-being. The survey's overall response rate was 56%. Its data showed that outpatient residents received more training in communication skills and more of them than inpatient residents considered communication skills training to be useful (100% vs 74%). Outpatient residents' perceived needs in communication skills were more patient

  9. Acute HIV infection (AHI) in a specialized clinical setting: case-finding, description of virological, epidemiological and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammassari, Adriana; Abbate, Isabella; Orchi, Nicoletta; Pinnetti, Carmela; Rozera, Gabriella; Libertone, Raffaella; Pierro, Paola; Martini, Federico; Puro, Vincenzo; Girardi, Enrico; Antinori, Andrea; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of HIV infection during early stages is mandatory to catch up with the challenge of limiting HIV viral replication and reservoirs formation, as well as decreasing HIV transmissions by immediate cART initiation. Aims were to describe (a) virological characteristics of AHI identified, (b) epidemiological and clinical factors associated with being diagnosed with AHI. Cross-sectional, retrospective study. All individuals diagnosed with AHI according to Fiebig's staging between Jan 2013 and Mar 2014 at the INMI "L. Spallanzani" were included. Serum samples reactive to a fourth generation HIV-1/2 assay (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo, Abbott) were retested with another fourth generation assay (VIDAS DUO HIV Ultra, Biomérieux) and underwent confirmation with HIV-1 WB (New Lav I Bio-Rad) and/or with Geenius confirmatory assay (Bio-Rad). WHO criteria (two env products reactivity) were used to establish positivity of confirmatory assays. In case of clinically suspected AHI, HIV-1 RNA (Real time, Abbott) and p24 assay (VIDAS HIV P24 Bio-Rad) were also performed. Avidity test was carried out, on confirmed positive samples lacking p31 reactivity, to discriminate between recent (true Fiebig V phase) and late infections; to avoid possible misclassifications, clinical data were also used. Demographic, epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data are routinely, and anonymously recorded in the SENDIH and SIREA studies. During the study period, we observed 483 newly HIV diagnosed individuals, of whom 40 were identified as AHI (8.3%). Fiebig classification showed: 7 stage II/III, 13 stage IV, 20 stage V. Demographic, epidemiological, and clinical characteristics of patients are shown in the Table. Overall, the study population had a median S/Co ratio at fourth generation EIA (Architect) of 49.50 (IQR, 23.54-98.05): values were significantly lower in Fiebig II-IV than in Fiebig V (38.68 [IQR, 20.08-54.84] vs 75.72 [IQR, 42.66-249.80], p=0.01). Overall, median HIV-1 RNA was 5

  10. Clinical correlates of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joska, John A; Fincham, Dylan S; Stein, Dan J; Paul, Robert H; Seedat, Soraya

    2010-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) occurs globally and across different genetic clades of the virus. However, few studies have examined HAND in South Africa, despite the prevalence of HIV in this region of the world, and the predominance of clade C. The present study examined the relationship between a number of demographic and clinical variables in a sample of 536 patients attending HIV clinics in South Africa. HAND was present in 23.5% of the sample and was associated with older age, a low educational level among those with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol abuse among those with many months since diagnosis. These results suggest that HAND is common among patients in South Africa, and is associated with clinical variables such as PTSD and alcohol abuse. This underlines the impact of HIV on the nervous system and the importance of screening for co morbid mental health conditions.

  11. Cost analysis of a novel HIV testing strategy in community pharmacies and retail clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecher, Shirley Lee; Shrestha, Ram K; Botts, Linda W; Alvarez, Jorge; Moore, James H; Thomas, Vasavi; Weidle, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    To document the cost of implementing point-of-care (POC) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) rapid testing in busy community pharmacies and retail clinics. Providing HIV testing services in community pharmacies and retail clinics is an innovative way to expand HIV testing. The cost of implementing POC HIV rapid testing in a busy retail environment needs to be documented to provide program and policy leaders with adequate information for planning and budgeting. Cost analysis from a pilot project that provided confidential POC HIV rapid testing services in community pharmacies and retail clinics. The pharmacy sites were operated under several different ownership structures (for-profit, nonprofit, sole proprietorship, corporation, public, and private) in urban and rural areas. We included data from the initial six sites that participated in the project. We collected the time spent by pharmacy and retail clinic staff for pretest and posttest counseling in an activity log for time-in-motion for each interaction. Pharmacists and retail clinic staff. HIV rapid testing. The total cost was calculated to include costs of test kits, control kits, shipping, test supplies, training, reporting, program administration, and advertising. The six sites trained 22 staff to implement HIV testing. A total of 939 HIV rapid tests were conducted over a median time of 12 months, of which 17 were reactive. Median pretest counseling time was 2 minutes. Median posttest counseling time was 2 minutes for clients with a nonreactive test and 10 minutes for clients with a reactive test. The average cost per person tested was an estimated $47.21. When we considered only recurrent costs, the average cost per person tested was $32.17. Providing POC HIV rapid testing services required a modest amount of staff time and costs that are comparable to other services offered in these settings. HIV testing in pharmacies and retail clinics can provide an additional alternative venue for increasing the

  12. Cost and morbidity analysis of chest port insertion in adults: Outpatient clinic versus operating room placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, Claudio F; Ginesu, Giorgio C; Bellini, Alessandro; Cherchi, Giuseppe; Scanu, Antonio M; Cossu, Maria Laura; Fancellu, Alessandro; Porcu, Alberto

    2017-09-01

    Totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) represent a convenient way for the administration of medications or nutrients. Traditionally, chest ports have been positioned by surgeons in the operating room, however there has been a transition over the years to port insertion by interventional radiologists in the radiology suite. The optimal method for chest port placement is still under debate. Data on all adult patients undergoing isolated chest port placement at our institution in a 12-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The aim of this cohort study was to compare cost and morbidity for chest port insertion in two different settings: outpatient clinic and operating room. Between 2003 and 2015 a total of 527 chest ports were placed in adult patients. Of them, 262 procedures were performed in the operating room and 265 procedures were undertaken in the outpatient clinic. Patient characteristics were similar and there was no significant difference in early (port was 1270 Euros in the operating room versus 620 Euros in the outpatient clinic. Our results suggest that chest ports can be safely placed in most patients under local anesthesia in the office setting without fluoroscopy or ultrasound guidance. Future randomized controlled studies may evaluate if surgeons or interventional radiologists should routinely perform these procedures in a dedicated office setting and reserve more sophisticated facilities only for patients at high risk of technical failure.

  13. European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines for the clinical management and treatment of HIV-infected adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clumeck, N; Pozniak, A; Raffi, F

    2008-01-01

    A working group of the European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) have developed these guidelines for European clinicians to help them in the treatment of adults with HIV infection. This third version of the guidelines includes, as new topics, the assessment of patients at initial and subsequent clinic...... virological failure and the treatment of HIV during pregnancy. In Europe, there is a wide range of clinical practices in antiretroviral therapy depending on various factors such as drug registration, national policies, local availability, reimbursement and access to treatment. These can vary greatly from one...

  14. Viral linkage in HIV-1 seroconverters and their partners in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary S Campbell

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of viruses in HIV-1 transmission pairs will help identify biological determinants of infectiousness and evaluate candidate interventions to reduce transmission. Although HIV-1 sequencing is frequently used to substantiate linkage between newly HIV-1 infected individuals and their sexual partners in epidemiologic and forensic studies, viral sequencing is seldom applied in HIV-1 prevention trials. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00194519 was a prospective randomized placebo-controlled trial that enrolled serodiscordant heterosexual couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression in reducing HIV-1 transmission; as part of the study analysis, HIV-1 sequences were examined for genetic linkage between seroconverters and their enrolled partners.We obtained partial consensus HIV-1 env and gag sequences from blood plasma for 151 transmission pairs and performed deep sequencing of env in some cases. We analyzed sequences with phylogenetic techniques and developed a Bayesian algorithm to evaluate the probability of linkage. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between enrolled partners' sequences and a Bayesian posterior probability of ≥ 50%. Adjudicators classified each seroconversion, finding 108 (71.5% linked, 40 (26.5% unlinked, and 3 (2.0% indeterminate transmissions, with linkage determined by consensus env sequencing in 91 (84%. Male seroconverters had a higher frequency of unlinked transmissions than female seroconverters. The likelihood of transmission from the enrolled partner was related to time on study, with increasing numbers of unlinked transmissions occurring after longer observation periods. Finally, baseline viral load was found to be significantly higher among linked transmitters.In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner

  15. Solidarity outpatient clinics in Greece: a survey of a massive social movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evlampidou, Iro; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2018-03-06

    Until 2016, around 3 million persons had limited access to health care in Greece due to the economic crisis. We describe a massive solidarity movement of community clinics and pharmacies in Greece. We conducted a survey in 2014-15 and describe the characteristics of community clinics and pharmacies spontaneously established all over Greece after 2008. A characteristic of the 92 active solidarity clinics is autonomous collective functioning, free services, and funding from non-governmental sources. The largest clinics examined more than 500 uninsured or partly insured patients per month. Clinics covered a wide range of clinical and preventive services. Funding, availability of drugs, vaccines, medical material and their legal status were the main problems identified. The solidarity movement involved thousands of health professionals covering essential population needs. The community outpatient clinics were an outstanding example of solidarity and temporarily alleviated the health needs of a large part of the population. Copyright © 2018 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. correlation of who clinical staging with cd4 counts in adult hiv/aids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... AIDS and HIV/AIDS case definitions for surveillance. (African region) (12). Laboratory and radiological methods were carried out if they were required to make a clinical diagnosis. In the majority of the cases, the HIV clinical events were presumptive diagnosis and based on the WHO clinical staging for ...

  17. Failure to attend out-patient clinics: is it in our DNA?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roberts, Kinley

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: This paper aims to determine the reasons why patients miss clinic appointments and to ascertain patients\\' views on the implementation of reminder systems and penalty fees to reduce the rates of did not attend (DNAs). Overall, the paper seeks to establish novel ways to run a more efficient out-patient department (OPD) service to improve waiting times and access for patients to limited neurology resources. DESIGN\\/METHODOLOGY\\/APPROACH: A questionnaire-based study was approved by the audit committee and was offered to 204 out-patients attending the neurology clinics over a three-month period (July to September 2009). The patients\\' demographic details and non-attendance records were reviewed. The paper aimed to ascertain, from the patients\\' perspective, why people failed to attend clinic appointments. Each participant was asked their views on how they felt their public hospital service might reduce the number of DNAs at their neurology OPD. FINDINGS: A total of 204 patients took part. Participants had a mean age of 31 years (range 25-75 years) with a modal peak in the 26 to 35 age bracket. Almost 10 per cent of those surveyed admitted to missing a hospital out-patient appointment in the past. The most common reason was that they simply "forgot" (28 per cent). DNA rates by age range were proportionally similar to the overall age profile of attenders. Over 55 per cent said they would like a pre-appointment reminder via a mobile telephone text message, 19 per cent preferred a pre-appointment telephone call, and 19 per cent an e-mail. Of those surveyed, 47 per cent said they would be willing to pay a fee on booking that could be refunded on attending for their appointment. The majority of these felt Euro 20 was the most appropriate amount (39 per cent). The rate of acceptance for various fee amounts was uniform across age ranges. Over half (52 per cent) said that they would agree to a "buddy" system whereby the appointment reminder was sent to the patient

  18. [Role of outpatient heart failure clinics and primary care physicians in the tailored follow-up of heart failure patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maria, Renata; Misuraca, Gianfranco; Milli, Massimo; Filippi, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    Continuity of care is pivotal to appropriately manage patients affected by heart failure (HF). HF is a chronic disease with frequent exacerbations that requires long-term care at different complexity levels. The lack of adequate communication between hospital cardiologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) is the main pitfall in continuity of care for HF patients. To overcome this problem, all dedicated outpatient HF clinics should organize together with PCPs in the community educational and auditing initiatives, based on locally derived performance measures to assess the appropriateness and effectiveness of integrated care pathways. The primary task of PCPs is to follow up stable HF patients and focus assessment on patient empowerment, adjustment of drug therapy, assessment of clinical stability and the early identification of worsening signs and symptoms. The progress of information technology should help in achieving adequate communication between hospital professionals and PCPs; outpatient clinical records should in any case comply with qualitative standards of discharge summaries for all patients taken in charge by PCPs. Systematic assessment of shared care between hospital cardiologists and PCPs will be a main objective of the outpatient HF clinic network in the near future.

  19. Profile and analysis of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri J.E. Tarigan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic complications of diabetes mellitus have a significant role in increasing morbidity, mortality, disability, and health cost. In the outpatient setting, the availability of data regarding to the chronic complications of type 2 diabetes is useful for evaluation of prevention, education, and patient’s treatment. This study aimed to describe the characteristic of type 2 diabetes chronic complications in outpatient diabetes clinic.Methods: A cross-sectional study was done using 155 patients in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM, Jakarta in 2010. Secondary data were used from medical record based on history taking, physical examination, diabetic foot assessment, laboratory, neurologic, cardiology, opthalmology, ankle brachial index, and electrography of the patients. Characteristic profiles of the subjects, prevalence of the chronic complications, and its association with diabetes risk factors, such as glycemic control using HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes, and LDL cholesterol were analyzed using chi square test.Results: Among 155 subjects participated in the study, most of them were women (59% and elderly (46%. The prevalence of diabetes chronic complications was 69% from all subjects. These chronic complications included microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and mixed complications, with prevalence of 56%, 7% and 27% respectively. Microangiopathy included nephropathy (2%, retinopathy (7%, neuropathy (38% and mixed complications (53%. Macroangiopathy included coronary heart disease (46%, peripheral arterial disease (19%, stroke (18%, and mixed complication (17%. From the analysis, we found significant association between duration of diabetes and diabetic neuropathy (p = 0.003.Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes chronic complications in Outpatient Diabetes Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, mainly dominated by microvascular-related complications including nephropathy, retinopathy

  20. Trichomonas vaginalis Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing at an Urban HIV Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzny, Christina A; Burkholder, Greer A; Fry, Karen R; Austin, Erika L; Schwebke, Jane R

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the most common nonviral sexually transmitted infection. T. vaginalis nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) recently became available at the University of Alabama at Birmingham human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinic. The objective of this study was to determine the uptake of T. vaginalis NAAT testing among clinic providers during the first year of test availability in addition to T. vaginalis prevalence and predictors based on NAAT results. This was a retrospective review of HIV+ women and men ages ≥16 years at the University of Alabama at Birmingham HIV Clinic, including those receiving a T. vaginalis NAAT on a genitourinary specimen. Between August 2014 and August 2015, 3163 HIV+ patients were seen (768 women, 2395 men), of whom 861 (27.3%) received a T. vaginalis NAAT; 402 women (52.3%) and 459 men (19.2%). Among those with T. vaginalis NAAT results, 70 (17.4%) of 402 women and 12 (2.6%) of 459 men (9 men who have sex with women, 1 man who has sex with men, 2 unknown) tested positive. In adjusted analyses for women, age ≤40 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-6.96), current cocaine use (OR, 4.86; 95% CI, 1.57-15.06), and CD4 vaginalis NAAT. For those with a positive T. vaginalis NAAT, treatment was prescribed for 65 (92.9%) of 70 women and 10 (83.3%) of 12 men. Initial uptake of T. vaginalis NAAT testing was modest at this HIV clinic yet identified a high prevalence among women tested. Emphasis on the need for testing in HIV+ women is necessary.

  1. PHIRST Trial - pharmacist consults: prioritization of HIV-patients with a referral screening tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Catherine; Canneva, Arnaud; Chiasson, Charles-Olivier; Galarneau, Annie; Schnitzer, Mireille E; Sheehan, Nancy L; Wong, Alison Yj

    2017-11-01

    The role of pharmacists in HIV outpatient clinics has greatly increased in the past decades. Given the limited resources of the health system, the prioritization of pharmacist consults is now a main concern. This study aimed to create a scoring system allowing for standardized prioritization of pharmacist consults for patients living with HIV. Data was retrospectively collected from 200 HIV patients attending the Chronic Viral Illness Service at the McGill University Health Center. An expert panel consisting of four pharmacists working in the field of HIV prioritized each patient individually, after which a consensus was established and was considered as the gold standard. In order to create a scoring system, two different methods (Delphi, statistical) were used to assign a weight to each characteristic considered to be important in patient prioritization. A third method (equal weight to each characteristic) was also evaluated. The total score per patient for each method was then compared to the expert consensus in order to establish the score cut-offs to indicate the appropriate categories of delay in which to see the patient. All three systems failed to accurately prioritize patients into urgency categories ("less than 48 h", "less than 1 month", "less than 3 months", "no consult required") according to expert pharmacist consensus. The presence of high level interactions between patient characteristics, the limited number of patients and the low prevalence of some characteristics were hypothesized as the main causes for the results. Creating a prioritization tool for pharmacy consults in HIV outpatient clinics is a complex task and developing a decision tree algorithm may be a more appropriate approach in the future to take into account the importance of combinations of patient characteristic.

  2. Out-patient drug policy by clinical assessment rather than financial constraints? The gate-keeping function of the out-patient drug reimbursement system in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, Marja H.; Bonsel, Gouke J.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1991, the Dutch Price Reference System (DPRS) has aimed at a growth reduction of out-patient drug costs without loss of medical quality. New drugs are excluded unless they pass legally anchored clinical criteria, i.e. substitutability with accepted drugs (DPRS-list 1a, implies a reimbursement

  3. A clinical audit of provider-initiated HIV counselling and testing in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy reduces transmission of HIV and prolongs life. Expansion of HIV testing is therefore pivotal in overcoming the HIV pandemic. Provider-initiated counselling and testing (PICT) at first clinical contact is one way of increasing the number of individuals tested. Our impression is ...

  4. Religious and spiritual coping in people living with HIV/Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Mourão Pinho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: evaluate the religiosity and the religious/spiritual coping of people living with HIV/Aids. Method: descriptive, cross-sectional study with quantitative approach, conducted in a reference HIV/Aids outpatient clinic in a university hospital of Recife-PE, Brazil, from June to November 2015. At total of 52 people living with HIV/Aids (PLWHA participated in the research, which employed own questionnaire, the Duke University Religion Index (DUREL, and the Religious/Spiritual Coping Scale (RCOPE. Results: the sample presented high indices of organizational religiosity (4.23±1.66, non-organizational religiosity (4.63±1.50, and intrinsic religiosity (13.13±2.84. Positive RCOPE was used in high mean scores (3.66±0.88, and negative RCOPE had low use (2.12 ± 0.74. In total, use of RCOPE was high (3.77±0.74, having predominated the positive RCOPE (NegRCOPE/PosRCOPE ratio=0.65±0.46. Conclusion: it is evident the importance of encouraging religious activity and RCOPE strategies, seen in the past as inappropriate interventions in clinical practice.

  5. Health insurance and use of medical services by men infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, M H; Chang, S W; Buchbinder, S P; Hessol, N A; O'Malley, P; Doll, L S

    1995-01-01

    Among 178 HIV-infected men from the San Francisco City Clinic Cohort (SFCCC), we examined the association between health insurance and use of outpatient services and treatment. For men with private insurance, we also assessed the frequency of avoiding the use of health insurance. Men without private insurance reported fewer outpatient visits than men with fee-for-service or managed-care plans. Use of zidovudine for eligible men was similar for those with fee-for-service plans (74%), managed-care plans (77%), or no insurance (61%). Use of Pneumocytstis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis was similar for those with fee-for-service (93%) and managed-care plans (83%) but lower for those with no insurance (63%). Of 149 men with private insurance, 31 (21%) reported that they had avoided using their health insurance for medical expenses in the previous year. In multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of avoiding the use of insurance were working for a small company and living outside the San Francisco Bay Area. Having private insurance resulted in higher use of outpatient services, but the type of private insurance did not appear to affect the use of service or treatment. Fears of loss of coverage and confidentiality may negate some benefits of health insurance for HIV-infected persons.

  6. HIV-associated anal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Newsom-Davis, T; Bower, M

    2010-01-01

    HIV-associated anal carcinoma, a non-AIDS-defining cancer, is a human papillomavirus-associated malignancy with a spectrum of preinvasive changes. The standardized incidence ratio for anal cancer in patients with HIV/AIDS is 20-50. Algorithms for anal cancer screening include anal cytology followed by high-resolution anoscopy for those with abnormal findings. Outpatient topical treatments for anal intraepithelial neoplasia include infrared coagulation therapy, trichloroacetic acid, and imiqui...

  7. Knowledge, attitudes and personal beliefs about HIV and AIDS among mentally ill patients in Soweto, Johannesburg

    OpenAIRE

    G Jonsson; M Y H Moosa; F Y Jeenah

    2011-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the study was to determine knowledge, attitudes and personal beliefs regarding HIV and AIDS in a group of mentally ill patients attending outpatient clinics in Soweto, Johannesburg. Method. All patients attending four randomly chosen clinics in Soweto were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire after obtaining informed written consent. The 63-item questionnaire, developed from others specifically for this study, included questions on socio-demographic and c...

  8. A comparison of the clinical features of depression in HIV-positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS with prevalence 2 to 3 times higher than the general population. It's still questionable whether HIV related depression is clinically different from depression in HIV-negative populations, a fact that could have treatment implications.This study ...

  9. Clinical and immunological status of a newly diagnosed HIV positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and the immune status of newly HIV diagnosed patients, in Marrakech city and its neighboring area, in Morocco. Methods: We performed a retrospective study on 235 patients who have been previously confirmed for HIV infection, and underwent a CD4 T cells using flow cytometry ...

  10. Knowledge and disclosure of HIV status among adolescents and young adults attending an adolescent HIV clinic in Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenu, Ernest; Obo-Akwa, Adjoa; Nuamah, Gladys B; Brefo, Anita; Sam, Miriam; Lartey, Margaret

    2014-11-26

    In Ghana it is estimated that 1.2% of HIV infections occur in young people aged 15-24 but the representation in our clinics is small. Adherence to treatment, appointment keeping and knowledge of HIV status remains a challenge. Disclosure has been shown to result in better adherence to therapy, good clinical outcomes, psychological adjustment and reduction in the risk of HIV transmission when the young person becomes sexually active. A baseline study was conducted to ascertain if adolescents and young adults knew their HIV status and their knowledge on HIV. Informed consent and assent were obtained from willing participants. Self-administered questionnaires on general knowledge of HIV, HIV treatment and disclosure were collected and analyzed. Thirty-four young persons participated in the study. The mean age was 16.9±SD 2.5 and 62% (21/32) were female. All of them were still in school. Eighty-five percent were aware that young people their age could fall sick, 91% had heard of HIV, 70% knew someone with HIV and 45% thought that adolescents were not at risk of HIV. On modes of HIV transmission, 66.7% knew HIV was transmitted through sex and 63.6% knew about mother to child transmission. Fifty three percent (18/34) knew their HIV status, 50% (17/34) were on antiretroviral and 35% (6/17) of them admitted to missing ARV doses. One person who said he was HIV negative and another who did not know his status were both on ARVs. Disclosure of HIV status to adolescents and young people is dependent on a complex mix of factors and most practitioners recommend an age and developmentally appropriate disclosure. Thus it is highly individualized. The knowledge and awareness of HIV was 91% compared to 97% of adults in the most recent Ghana Demographic and Health Survey however only about two thirds had acceptable in depth knowledge on HIV. Only half knew their HIV status which was not the best considering their ages. There is the need to strengthen education to young persons with

  11. Early detection and successful treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy in outpatients without the complete classic triad of symptoms who attended a psycho-oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Hideki; Ishida, Mayumi; Tanahashi, Iori; Takahashi, Takao; Ikebuchi, Kenji; Taji, Yoshitada; Kato, Hisashi; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2018-02-26

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder caused by a thiamine deficiency. Although WE has been recognized in cancer patients, it can be overlooked because many patients do not exhibit symptoms that are typical of WE, such as delirium, ataxia, or ocular palsy. Furthermore, outpatients with WE who intermittently present at psycho-oncology clinics have not been described as far as we can ascertain. This report describes two patients who did not exhibit the complete classic triad of symptoms among a series with cancer and WE, and who attended a psycho-oncology outpatient clinic. Result Case 1, a 76-year-old woman with pancreatic cancer and liver metastasis, periodically attended a psycho-oncology outpatient clinic. She presented with delirium and ataxia as well as appetite loss that had persisted for 8 weeks. We suspected WE, which was confirmed by low serum thiamine levels and the disappearance of delirium after thiamine administration. Case 2, a 79-year-old man with advanced stomach cancer, was referred to a psycho-oncology outpatient clinic with depression that had persisted for about 1 month. He also had appetite loss that had persisted for several weeks. He became delirious during the first visit to the outpatient clinic. Our initial suspicion of WE was confirmed by low serum thiamine levels and the disappearance of delirium after thiamine administration. The key indicator of a diagnosis of WE in both patients was appetite loss. Significance of results This report emphasizes awareness of WE in the outpatient setting, even when patients do not exhibit the classical triad of WE. Appetite loss might be the key to a diagnosis of WE in the absence of other causes of delirium.

  12. Knowledge of HIV Testing Guidelines Among US Internal Medicine Residents: A Decade After the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Routine HIV Testing Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandachi, Dima; Dang, Bich N; Wilson Dib, Rita; Friedman, Harvey; Giordano, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Ten years after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended universal HIV screening, rates remain low. Internal medicine residents are the front-line medical providers for large groups of patients. We evaluated the knowledge of internal medicine residents about HIV testing guidelines and examined adherence to universal HIV testing in an outpatient setting. A cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents at four residency programs in Chicago was conducted from January to March 2016. Aggregate data on HIV screening were collected from 35 federally qualified community health centers in the Chicago area after inclusion of an HIV testing best practice alert in patients' electronic medical records. Of the 192 residents surveyed, 130 (68%) completed the survey. Only 58% were aware of universal HIV screening and 49% were aware that Illinois law allows for an opt-out HIV testing strategy. Most of the residents (64%) ordered no more than 10 HIV tests in 6 months. The most frequently reported barriers to HIV testing were deferral because of urgent care issues, lack of time, and the perception that patients were uncomfortable discussing HIV testing. From July 2015 to February 2016, the average HIV testing adherence rate in the 35 health centers was 18.2%. More effort is needed to change HIV testing practices among internal medicine residents so that they will adopt this approach in their future clinical practice. Improving knowledge about HIV testing and addressing other HIV testing barriers are essential for such a successful change.

  13. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PROFILE OF SPUTUM POSITIVE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS AMONG HIV SEROPOSITIVE AND HIV SERONEGATIVE PATIENTS- A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Govind Kamat

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The global impact of the converging dual epidemics of TB and HIV is one of the major public health challenges. The increasing rate of HIV infection in many countries has had an impact on TB epidemiology. As the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis is increasing among HIV seropositive patients with a wide range of immune status and clinical presentations, the present study was undertaken to assess the clinical and laboratory profile of sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis among HIV seropositive and HIV seronegative patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present one year cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Medicine, KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belgaum on 104 patients with sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients during the period of January 2009 to December 2009. Routine investigations such as blood group, haemogram that is haemoglobin, total count, differential count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, sputum smears for AFB and chest x-ray were done. RESULTS Seroprevalence of HIV among pulmonary tuberculosis patients was 23.08%. On examination anaemia, undernourishment, lymphadenopathy and the presence of opportunistic infections like oral candidiasis, herpes zoster stain and genital lesions were more predominant among HIV seropositives compared to HIV seronegatives. Mean Hb and TLC were significantly low among HIV seropositives compared to HIV seronegatives. Chest x-ray showed varied presentation. Upper zone infiltration, cavitation and fibrosis were more commonly involved among HIV seronegatives compared to HIV seropositives. CONCLUSION HIV seropositive PTB patients commonly present with fever, weight loss and loss of appetite, while cough with expectoration, haemoptysis, breathlessness were more common with HIV seronegative patients. Cavitation, fibrosis and fibrocavitary lesions were predominantly seen among HIV seronegatives, while infiltration and miliary mottling was

  14. Task-technology fit of video telehealth for nurses in an outpatient clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G; Finkelstein, Stanley M

    2014-07-01

    Incorporating telehealth into outpatient care delivery supports management of consumer health between clinic visits. Task-technology fit is a framework for understanding how technology helps and/or hinders a person during work processes. Evaluating the task-technology fit of video telehealth for personnel working in a pediatric outpatient clinic and providing care between clinic visits ensures the information provided matches the information needed to support work processes. The workflow of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) care coordination provided via telephone and video telehealth was described and measured using a mixed-methods workflow analysis protocol that incorporated cognitive ethnography and time-motion study. Qualitative and quantitative results were merged and analyzed within the task-technology fit framework to determine the workflow fit of video telehealth for APRN care coordination. Incorporating video telehealth into APRN care coordination workflow provided visual information unavailable during telephone interactions. Despite additional tasks and interactions needed to obtain the visual information, APRN workflow efficiency, as measured by time, was not significantly changed. Analyzed within the task-technology fit framework, the increased visual information afforded by video telehealth supported the assessment and diagnostic information needs of the APRN. Telehealth must provide the right information to the right clinician at the right time. Evaluating task-technology fit using a mixed-methods protocol ensured rigorous analysis of fit within work processes and identified workflows that benefit most from the technology.

  15. Five-year mortality after acute poisoning treated in ambulances, an emergency outpatient clinic and hospitals in Oslo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Cathrine; Bjornaas, Mari A; Sandvik, Leiv; Ekeberg, Oivind; Jacobsen, Dag; Hovda, Knut E

    2013-08-21

    The long-term mortality after prehospital treatment for acute poisoning has not been studied previously. Thus, we aimed to estimate the five-year mortality and examine the causes of death and predictors of death for all acutely poisoned patients treated in ambulances, the emergency outpatient clinic, and hospitals in Oslo during 2003-2004. A prospective cohort study included all adults (≥16 years; n=2045, median age=35 years, male=58%) who were discharged after treatment for acute poisoning in ambulances, the emergency outpatient clinic, and the four hospitals in Oslo during one year. The patients were observed until the end of 2008. Standardized mortality rates (SMRs) were calculated and multivariate Cox regression analysis was applied. The study comprised 2045 patients; 686 treated in ambulances, 646 treated in the outpatient clinic, and 713 treated in hospitals. After five years, 285 (14%) patients had died (four within one week). The SMRs after ambulance, outpatient, and hospital treatment were 12 (CI 9-14), 10 (CI 8-12), and 6 (CI 5-7), respectively. The overall SMR was 9 (CI 8-10), while the SMR after opioid poisoning was 27 (CI 21-32). The most frequent cause of death was accidents (38%). In the regression analysis, opioids as the main toxic agents (HR 2.3, CI 1.6-3.0), older age (HR 1.6, CI 1.5-1.7), and male sex (HR 1.4, CI 1.1-1.9) predicted death, whereas the treatment level did not predict death. The patients had high mortality compared with the general population. Those treated in hospital had the lowest mortality. Opioids were the major predictor of death.

  16. Reasons for attending a general emergency outpatient clinic versus a regular general practitioner - a survey among immigrant and native walk-in patients in Oslo, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruud, Sven Eirik; Hjortdahl, Per; Natvig, Bård

    2017-03-01

    To explore reasons for attending a general emergency outpatient clinic versus a regular general practitioner (RGP). Cross-sectional study using a multilingual anonymous questionnaire. Native and immigrant walk-in patients attending a general emergency outpatient clinic in Oslo (Monday-Friday, 08:00-23:00) during 2 weeks in September 2009. We included 1022 walk-in patients: 565 native Norwegians (55%) and 457 immigrants (45%). Patients' reasons for attending an emergency outpatient clinic versus their RGP. Among patients reporting an RGP affiliation, 49% tried to contact their RGP before this emergency encounter: 44% of native Norwegian and 58% of immigrant respondents. Immigrants from Africa [odds ratio (OR) = 2.55 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-4.46)] and Asia [OR = 2.32 (95% CI: 1.42-3.78)] were more likely to contact their RGP before attending the general emergency outpatient clinic compared with native Norwegians. The most frequent reason for attending the emergency clinic was difficulty making an immediate appointment with their RGP. A frequent reason for not contacting an RGP was lack of access: 21% of the native Norwegians versus 4% of the immigrants claimed their RGP was in another district/municipality, and 31% of the immigrants reported a lack of affiliation with the RGP scheme. Access to primary care provided by an RGP affects patients' use of emergency health care services. To facilitate continuity of health care, policymakers should emphasize initiatives to improve access to primary health care services. KEY POINTS Access to immediate primary health care provided by a regular general practitioner (RGP) can reduce patients' use of emergency health care services. The main reason for attending a general emergency outpatient clinic was difficulty obtaining an immediate appointment with an RGP. A frequent reason for native Norwegians attending a general emergency outpatient clinic during the daytime is having an RGP outside Oslo. Lack of

  17. The usefulness of a mobile device-based system for patient-reported outcomes in a spine outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Choi, Yunhee; Shin, HyunJeong; Woo, Ji Won; Kim, Sung-Mi; Lee, Hyuk-Joon

    2016-07-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are typically collected using a paper form, but this format is cumbersome to incorporate into outpatient clinic visits as well as in research. Therefore, we developed a mobile device-based system (mobile system) for spinal PRO. We hypothesized that this system may improve the quality of care in an outpatient clinic. This study aimed to analyze the patient-reported efficacy of a mobile system through a survey of patients' responses compared with a paper system. A prospective observational study was carried out. Surveys were conducted for 103 patients who had experience using both the paper and electronic systems in the outpatient clinic. Patient-reported positive response score (PRS) was the outcome measure. The survey included the characteristics of the patients (sex, age, use of smartphone, familiarity with smartphone applications, proficiency of typing with mobile device, site of pain, and education level) and eight questions in four domains: (1) efficacy in the waiting room, (2) efficacy during the clinic visit, (3) overall satisfaction, and (4) opinion about the use of this system. The response to each question was scored from 1 to 5 (1, negative; 5, positive response). The patient-reported PRS was calculated by adding the scores of the 8 questions and converting the total range to 0-100 (60, neutral). The mean PRS of the 8 questions was 79.8 (95% CI, 76.7-83.9). The mean PRS was 78.9 (75.6-82.2) at the waiting room and was 80.5 (77.1-83.9) during the clinic. The PRS for overall satisfaction and use of this system were 83.3 (79.6-87.0) and 77.1 (71.9-82.3), respectively. The use of smartphones and the proficiency of typing were independently significant predictors of PRS with an R(2) value of 0.325. The mobile device-based system improved the patient-reported efficacy in spine outpatient clinics. However, various factors such as the use of smartphones need to be considered when developing and applying mobile systems. Copyright

  18. Characteristics of Adults with Anxiety or Depression Treated at an Internet Clinic: Comparison with a National Survey and an Outpatient Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; Kemp, Alice; Robinson, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Background There is concern that people seeking treatment over the Internet for anxiety or depressive disorders may not resemble the general population or have less severe disorders than patients attending outpatient clinics or cases identified in community surveys. Thus the response to treatment in Internet based trials might not generalize. Methodology We reviewed the characteristics of applicants to an Australian Internet-based treatment clinic for anxiety and depression, and compared this...

  19. The Reasons Of Patients With Headache Chosing The Neurosurgery Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Murat Şen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the preference causes of the patients who were admitted to the neurosurgery clinic with complaints of headache for admission in this clinic. METHODS: The study population has been selected from brain surgery department outpatient clinic. One hundred patients with complaints of headache were enrolled in this study. RESULTS: Questioned the reasons for choosing the neurosurgical and most preferred cause of including word for brain surgery of the brain named (n=54, 54%. Patients were questioned about the information of the neurology and demostrated that there was not any knowledge about neurology (n=66, 66%. CONCLUSION: Headache causes loss of the financial and workforce. Preferences in the wrong departments of the patients, as a result of misdiagnosis and inadequate treatment, increasing the number of hospital admissions. This shows that how important names and introduction of the departments

  20. STD Clinic Patients' Awareness of Non-AIDS Complications of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, José Guillermo; Granovsky, Inna; Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Participants were recruited from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Florida and were assessed regarding the knowledge and awareness of non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Questionnaires were administered before and after a brief information session on non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Participants included men (n = 46) and women (n = 51). Prior to the information session, at baseline, only 34% of the participants were worried about HIV infection. Most participants (82%) agreed that HIV could be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), while only 38% were aware that HIV-associated conditions cannot be easily treated with ART. After the information session, almost all participants reported they were concerned regarding the risk of HIV infection. High-risk patients may have limited knowledge about the consequences of HIV infection beyond the traditional AIDS-associated conditions. Increased awareness of these less known consequences of HIV infection may decrease the potential for complacency regarding acquiring HIV infection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Fuzzy logic-based approach to detecting a passive RFID tag in an outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Daiki; Yih, Yuehwern

    2011-06-01

    This study is motivated by the observations on the data collected by radio frequency identification (RFID) readers in a pilot study, which was used to investigate the feasibility of implementing an RFID-based monitoring system in an outpatient eye clinic. The raw RFID data collected from RFID readers contain noise and missing reads, which prevent us from determining the tag location. In this paper, fuzzy logic-based algorithms are proposed to interpret the raw RFID data to extract accurate information. The proposed algorithms determine the location of an RFID tag by evaluating its possibility of presence and absence. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithms, numerical experiments are conducted using the data observed in the outpatient eye clinic. Experiments results showed that the proposed algorithms outperform existing static smoothing method in terms of minimizing both false positives and false negatives. Furthermore, the proposed algorithms are applied to a set of simulated data to show the robustness of the proposed algorithms at various levels of RFID reader reliability.

  2. Outpatient Management of Children With World Health Organization Chest Indrawing Pneumonia: Implementation Risks and Proposed Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Eric D; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah

    2017-10-16

    This Viewpoints article details our recommendation for the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines to consider additional referral or daily monitoring criteria for children with chest indrawing pneumonia in low-resource settings. We review chest indrawing physiology in children and relate this to the risk of adverse pneumonia outcomes. We believe there is sufficient evidence to support referring or daily monitoring of children with chest indrawing pneumonia and signs of severe respiratory distress, oxygen saturation <93% (when not at high altitude), moderate malnutrition, or an unknown human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status in an HIV-endemic setting. Pulse oximetry screening should be routine and performed at the earliest point in the patient care pathway as possible. If outpatient clinics lack capacity to conduct pulse oximetry, nutritional assessment, or HIV testing, then we recommend considering referral to complete the evaluation. When referral is not possible, careful daily monitoring should be performed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  3. Scale-up, retention and HIV/STI prevalence trends among female sex workers attending VICITS clinics in Guatemala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Morales-Miranda

    Full Text Available Since 2007, Guatemala integrated STI clinical service with an HIV prevention model into four existing public health clinics to prevent HIV infection, known as the VICITS strategy. We present the first assessment of VICITS scale-up, retention, HIV and STI prevalence trends, and risk factors associated with HIV infection among Female Sex Workers (FSW attending VICITS clinics in Guatemala.Demographic, behavioral and clinical data were collected using a standardized form. Data was analyzed by year and health center. HIV and STI prevalence were estimated from routine visits. Retention was estimated as the percent of new users attending VICITS clinics who returned for at least one follow-up visit to any VICITS clinic within 12 months. Separate multivariate logistic regression models were conducted to investigate factors associated with HIV infection and program retention.During 2007-2011 5,682 FSW visited a VICITS clinic for the first-time. HIV prevalence varied from 0.4% to 5.8%, and chlamydia prevalence from 0% to 14.3%, across sites. Attending the Puerto Barrios clinic, having a current syphilis infection, working primarily on the street, and using the telephone or internet to contact clients were associated with HIV infection. The number of FSW accessing VICITS annually increased from 556 to 2,557 (361% during the period. In 2011 retention varied across locations from 7.7% to 42.7%. Factors negatively impacting retention included current HIV diagnosis, having practiced sex work in another country, being born in Honduras, and attending Marco Antonio Foundation or Quetzaltenango clinic sites. Systematic time trends did not emerge, however 2008 and 2010 were characterized by reduced retention.Our data show local differences in HIV prevalence and clinic attendance that can be used to prioritize prevention activities targeting FSW in Guatemala. VICITS achieved rapid scale-up; however, a better understanding of the causes of low return rates is urgently

  4. Scale-up, retention and HIV/STI prevalence trends among female sex workers attending VICITS clinics in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Miranda, Sonia; Jacobson, Jerry O; Loya-Montiel, Itzel; Mendizabal-Burastero, Ricardo; Galindo-Arandi, César; Flores, Carlos; Chen, Sanny Y

    2014-01-01

    Since 2007, Guatemala integrated STI clinical service with an HIV prevention model into four existing public health clinics to prevent HIV infection, known as the VICITS strategy. We present the first assessment of VICITS scale-up, retention, HIV and STI prevalence trends, and risk factors associated with HIV infection among Female Sex Workers (FSW) attending VICITS clinics in Guatemala. Demographic, behavioral and clinical data were collected using a standardized form. Data was analyzed by year and health center. HIV and STI prevalence were estimated from routine visits. Retention was estimated as the percent of new users attending VICITS clinics who returned for at least one follow-up visit to any VICITS clinic within 12 months. Separate multivariate logistic regression models were conducted to investigate factors associated with HIV infection and program retention. During 2007-2011 5,682 FSW visited a VICITS clinic for the first-time. HIV prevalence varied from 0.4% to 5.8%, and chlamydia prevalence from 0% to 14.3%, across sites. Attending the Puerto Barrios clinic, having a current syphilis infection, working primarily on the street, and using the telephone or internet to contact clients were associated with HIV infection. The number of FSW accessing VICITS annually increased from 556 to 2,557 (361%) during the period. In 2011 retention varied across locations from 7.7% to 42.7%. Factors negatively impacting retention included current HIV diagnosis, having practiced sex work in another country, being born in Honduras, and attending Marco Antonio Foundation or Quetzaltenango clinic sites. Systematic time trends did not emerge, however 2008 and 2010 were characterized by reduced retention. Our data show local differences in HIV prevalence and clinic attendance that can be used to prioritize prevention activities targeting FSW in Guatemala. VICITS achieved rapid scale-up; however, a better understanding of the causes of low return rates is urgently needed.

  5. A new paradigm for HIV care: ethical and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noring, S; Dubler, N N; Birkhead, G; Agins, B

    2001-05-01

    Although dramatic advances in clinical treatment have greatly improved the lives of many people with HIV/AIDS, many other patients do not have information about or access to these treatments because of health care providers' presumptive judgments about patients' ability to adhere to medical regimens. The authors contend that with sufficient support and education most patients, even those with difficult social and medical problems, can be helped to initiate and maintain HIV treatment in accordance with current clinical standards. This commentary delineates a new paradigm for HIV care in which patients and providers collaborate on individualized plans to establish patients' readiness for treatment, ensure maintenance of treatment, and make use of the social services necessary to accomplish these goals. Providers have an ethical responsibility to do everything possible to see that patients who might benefit from new HIV treatments have a fair opportunity to do so, and health systems have a responsibility to facilitate this process. Substantial progress toward meeting these responsibilities can be made within the current health care environment.

  6. Emerging from the database shadows: characterizing undocumented immigrants in a large cohort of HIV-infected persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jonathan; Hanna, David B; Felsen, Uriel R; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Patel, Viraj V

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about how HIV affects undocumented immigrants despite social and structural factors that may place them at risk of poor HIV outcomes. Our understanding of the clinical epidemiology of HIV-infected undocumented immigrants is limited by the challenges of determining undocumented immigration status in large data sets. We developed an algorithm to predict undocumented status using social security number (SSN) and insurance data. We retrospectively applied this algorithm to a cohort of HIV-infected adults receiving care at a large urban healthcare system who attended at least one HIV-related outpatient visit from 1997 to 2013, classifying patients as "screened undocumented" or "documented". We then reviewed the medical records of screened undocumented patients, classifying those whose records contained evidence of undocumented status as "undocumented per medical chart" (charted undocumented). Bivariate measures of association were used to identify demographic and clinical characteristics associated with undocumented immigrant status. Of 7593 patients, 205 (2.7%) were classified as undocumented by the algorithm. Compared to documented patients, undocumented patients were younger at entry to care (mean 38.5 years vs. 40.6 years, p immigrants within an HIV-infected population, though it overestimated the prevalence of patients who were undocumented.

  7. Assessment of the knowledge and attitudes regarding HIV/AIDS among pre-clinical medical students in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Today’s medical students are the future physicians of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). It is therefore essential that medical students possess the appropriate knowledge and attitudes regarding PLWHA. This study aims to evaluate knowledge and attitudes of pre-clinical Israeli medical students and to assess whether their knowledge and attitudes change throughout their pre-clinical studies. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among all pre-clinical medical students from the four medical schools in Israel during the academic year of 2010/2011 (a total of 1,470 students). A self-administered questionnaire was distributed. The questionnaire sought student responses pertaining to knowledge of HIV transmission and non-transmission routes, basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS treatment and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS. Results The study’s response rate was 62.24 percent. Knowledge among pre-clinical medical students was generally high and showed a statistically significant improvement as students progressed through their pre-clinical studies. However, there were some misconceptions, mostly regarding HIV transmission via breastfeeding and knowledge of HIV prevention after exposure to the virus. Students’ attitudes were found to include stigmatizing notions. Furthermore, the majority of medical students correlated HIV with shame and fear. In addition, students’ attitudes toward HIV testing and providing confidential medical information were contradictory to health laws, protocols and guidelines. Overall, no positive changes in students’ attitudes were observed during the pre-clinical years of medical school. Conclusion The knowledge of pre-clinical medical students in Israel is generally high, although there are some knowledge inadequacies that require more emphasis in the curricula of the medical schools. Contrary to HIV-related knowledge, medical students’ attitudes are unaffected by their progression through medical school. Therefore, medical

  8. Erectile dysfunction drug receipt, risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Robert L; McGinnis, Kathleen A; Samet, Jeffrey H; Fiellin, David A; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Rodriquez-Barradas, Maria C; Kraemer, Kevin L; Gibert, Cynthia L; Braithwaite, R Scott; Goulet, Joseph L; Mattocks, Kristin; Crystal, Stephen; Gordon, Adam J; Oursler, Krisann K; Justice, Amy C

    2010-02-01

    Health care providers may be concerned that prescribing erectile dysfunction drugs (EDD) will contribute to risky sexual behavior. To identify characteristics of men who received EDD prescriptions, determine whether EDD receipt is associated with risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and determine whether these relationships vary for certain sub-groups. Cross-sectional study. Two thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven sexually-active, HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men recruited from eight Veterans Health Affairs outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from participant surveys, electronic medical records, and administrative pharmacy data. EDD receipt was defined as two or more prescriptions for an EDD, risky sex as having unprotected sex with a partner of serodiscordant or unknown HIV status, and STDs, according to self-report. Overall, 28% of men received EDD in the previous year. Eleven percent of men reported unprotected sex with a serodiscordant/unknown partner in the past year (HIV-infected 15%, HIV-uninfected 6%, P sexual behavior (11% vs. 10%, p = 0.9) and STDs (7% vs 7%, p = 0.7). In multivariate analyses, EDD receipt was not significantly associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in the entire sample or in subgroups of substance users or men who had sex with men. EDD receipt was common but not associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in this sample of HIV-infected and uninfected men. However, risky sexual behaviors persist in a minority of HIV-infected men, indicating ongoing need for prevention interventions.

  9. Attitudes toward suicidal behaviour among professionals at mental health outpatient clinics in Stavropol, Russia and Oslo, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norheim, Astrid Berge; Grimholt, Tine K; Loskutova, Ekaterina; Ekeberg, Oivind

    2016-07-27

    Attitudes toward suicidal behaviour can be essential regarding whether patients seek or are offered help. Patients with suicidal behaviour are increasingly treated by mental health outpatient clinics. Our aim was to study attitudes among professionals at outpatient clinics in Stavropol, Russia and Oslo, Norway. Three hundred and forty-eight (82 %) professionals anonymously completed a questionnaire about attitudes. Professionals at outpatient clinics in Stavropol (n = 119; 94 %) and Oslo (n = 229; 77 %) were enrolled in the study. The Understanding Suicidal Patients (USP) scale (11 = positive to 55 = negative) and the Attitudes Towards Suicide Scale (ATTS) (1 = totally disagree, 5 = totally agree) were used. Questions about religious background, perceived competence and experiences of and views on suicidal behaviour and treatment (0 = totally disagree, 4 = totally agree) were examined. All groups reported positive attitudes, with significant differences between Stavropol and Oslo (USP score, 21.8 vs 18.7; p attitudes towards helping suicidal patients, with significant differences between cities. A need for further education was reported in both cities, but education was less integrated in mental health care in Stavropol than it was in Oslo. In both cities, psychiatric disorders were considered the major reasons for suicide, and psychotherapy was the most important treatment measure.

  10. Clinical Trial Design for HIV Prevention Research: Determining Standards of Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Liza; Zwerski, Sheryl

    2015-06-01

    This article seeks to advance ethical dialogue on choosing standards of prevention in clinical trials testing improved biomedical prevention methods for HIV. The stakes in this area of research are high, given the continued high rates of infection in many countries and the budget limitations that have constrained efforts to expand treatment for all who are currently HIV-infected. New prevention methods are still needed; at the same time, some existing prevention and treatment interventions have been proven effective but are not yet widely available in the countries where they most urgently needed. The ethical tensions in this field of clinical research are well known and have been the subject of extensive debate. There is no single clinical trial design that can optimize all the ethically important goals and commitments involved in research. Several recent articles have described the current ethical difficulties in designing HIV prevention trials, especially in resource limited settings; however, there is no consensus on how to handle clinical trial design decisions, and existing international ethical guidelines offer conflicting advice. This article acknowledges these deep ethical dilemmas and moves beyond a simple descriptive approach to advance an organized method for considering what clinical trial designs will be ethically acceptable for HIV prevention trials, balancing the relevant criteria and providing justification for specific design decisions. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Prevalence and predictors of erectile dysfunction in adult male outpatient clinic attendees in Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Rusli Bin; Soni, Trived; Kaur, Amrina; Loh, Kean Por; Miranda, Shashi

    2018-05-18

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a serious burden globally that affects men as well as their partners. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of ED among male outpatient clinic attendees in Johor, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study of Malaysian men aged 18 and older attending two major outpatient clinics in Johor Bahru and Segamat between 1 January and 31 March 2016 was undertaken. Subjects were chosen via simple random sampling and a sample size of 400 was recruited. The study instrument was a survey form that consisted of three sections: sociodemographic and comorbid profile, validated English and Malay version of the 15-item International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-15) and 21-item Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). The overall prevalence of self-reported ED was 81.5%. The prevalence of ED according to severity was as follows: mild (17%), mild to moderate (23.8%), moderate (11.3%), and severe (29.5%). Multivariate analysis showed that ED was associated with increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 4.023, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.633-9.913), Indians as compared to Malays (OR 3.252, 95% CI 1.280-8.262), secondary as compared to tertiary education (OR 2.171, 95% CI 1.203-3.919), single as compared to married status (OR 6.119, 95% CI 2.542-14.734), and stress (OR 4.259, 95% CI 1.793-10.114). There is significant prevalence and severity of ED among adult male outpatient clinic attendees in Johor. Increasing age, Indian ethnicity, lower educational level, being single, and stress were significant predictors of ED.

  12. A new analytical framework of 'continuum of prevention and care' to maximize HIV case detection and retention in care in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Masami

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global initiative ‘Treatment 2.0’ calls for expanding the evidence base of optimal HIV service delivery models to maximize HIV case detection and retention in care. However limited systematic assessment has been conducted in countries with concentrated HIV epidemic. We aimed to assess HIV service availability and service connectedness in Vietnam. Methods We developed a new analytical framework of the continuum of prevention and care (COPC. Using the framework, we examined HIV service delivery in Vietnam. Specifically, we analyzed HIV service availability including geographical distribution and decentralization and service connectedness across multiple services and dimensions. We then identified system-related strengths and constraints in improving HIV case detection and retention in care. This was accomplished by reviewing related published and unpublished documents including existing service delivery data. Results Identified strengths included: decentralized HIV outpatient clinics that offer comprehensive care at the district level particularly in high HIV burden provinces; functional chronic care management for antiretroviral treatment (ART with the involvement of people living with HIV and the links to community- and home-based care; HIV testing and counseling integrated into tuberculosis and antenatal care services in districts supported by donor-funded projects, and extensive peer outreach networks that reduce barriers for the most-at-risk populations to access services. Constraints included: fragmented local coordination mechanisms for HIV-related health services; lack of systems to monitor the expansion of HIV outpatient clinics that offer comprehensive care; underdevelopment of pre-ART care; insufficient linkage from HIV testing and counseling to pre-ART care; inadequate access to HIV-related services in districts not supported by donor-funded projects particularly in middle and low burden provinces and in

  13. HIV-infected mental health patients: characteristics and comparison with HIV-infected patients from the general population and non-infected mental health patients

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    Schadé Annemiek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing mental health symptoms, which negatively influence the treatment of the HIV-infection. Mental health problems in HIV-infected patients may affect public health. Psychopathology, including depression and substance abuse, can increase hazardous sexual behaviour and, with it, the chance of spreading HIV. Therefore, it is important to develop an optimal treatment plan for HIV-infected patients with mental health problems. The majority of HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands (almost 60% are homosexual men. The main objectives of this study were to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with HIV who seek treatment for their mental health symptoms in the Netherlands. Secondly, we tested whether HIV infected and non-infected homosexual patients with a lifetime depressive disorder differed on several mental health symptoms. Methods We compared a cohort of 196 patients who visited the outpatient clinic for HIV and Mental Health with HIV-infected patients in the general population in Amsterdam (ATHENA-study and with non-HIV infected mental health patients (NESDA-study. DSM-IV diagnoses were determined, and several self-report questionnaires were used to assess mental health symptoms. Results Depressive disorders were the most commonly occurring diagnoses in the cohort and frequent drug use was common. HIV-infected homosexual men with a depressive disorder showed no difference in depressive symptoms or sleep disturbance, compared with non-infected depressive men. However, HIV-positive patients did express more symptoms like fear, anger and guilt. Although they showed significantly more suicidal ideation, suicide attempts were not more prevalent among HIV-infected patients. Finally, the HIV-infected depressive patients displayed a considerably higher level of drug use than the HIV-negative group. Conclusion Habitual drug use is a risk factor for

  14. The role of the primary care outpatient clinic in the promotion of healthy nutrition – preliminary reports

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    Marta Dudzińska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Understanding the principles of prophylaxis, and awareness of the importance of proper nutrition in maintaining wellbeing should be a part of every doctor–patient relationship. Objectives . An evaluation of the sources of knowledge and access to information about healthy nutrition in primary care outpatient clinics. Material and methods . The study comprised 222 subjects (150 women and 72 men aged 18–87 years (median 47.5. The study used a self-prepared questionnaire. Results . 97.7% of the patients (n = 217 were aware of the impact of diet on health, of which only 9.9% (n = 22 knew the rules of healthy nutrition well, 55.4% (n = 123 had knowledge at a medium level, and 31.1% (n = 69 at a low level. Dietary mistakes were more frequently reported by men (p = 0.001, and lack of time (38.2%; n = 85 and knowledge (29.3%; n = 65 were reported as the main reasons. The Internet (64.9%; n = 144 is the main source of knowledge about healthy nutrition. It is used mainly by younger people (78.9% < 50 years; n = 97 vs. 47.5% ≥ 50 years; n = 47; p < 0.001. People ≥ 50 years prefer to talk with a doctor (22.2%; n = 22 vs. 4.9%; n = 6; p < 0.001. Patients expect to get dietary education in their primary care outpatient clinic in the form of leaflets (58.6%; n = 130, posters (25.7%; n = 57, conversation with a doctor (36.9%; n = 82, and consultation with a nutritionist (33.3%; n = 74. Significantly more women want to get information directly from a doctor (p = 0.01. Conclusions . The primary care outpatient clinic is an important source of information on healthy nutrition. Patients expect access to information in the form of leaflets and medical or dietary consultations conducted in a family doctor’s practice. We should consider the implementation of educational programmes on the principles of healthy nutrition in primary care outpatient clinics.

  15. YELLOW FEVER PREVENTION STRATEGIES AWARENESS AMONG HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS IN SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

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    Vivian Iida Avelino-Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vaccination is the main preventive strategy against Yellow Fever (YF, which is a public health concern in Brazil. However, HIV-infected patients might have insufficient knowledge regarding YF, YF prevention, and vaccines in general. Methods: In this questionnaire-based study, data from 158 HIV-infected individuals were addressed in three distinct outpatient clinics in São Paulo. Information was collected on demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as patients' knowledge of vaccines, YF and YF preventive strategies. In addition, individual YF vaccine recommendations and vaccine status were investigated. Results: Although most participants adequately ascertain the vaccine as the main prevention strategy against YF, few participants were aware of the severity and lack of specific treatment for YF. Discrepancy in YF vaccine (patients who should have taken the vaccine, but did not was observed in 18.8% of participants. Conclusion: YF is an important and preventable public health concern, and these results demonstrate that more information is necessary for the HIV-infected population.

  16. Guilt, shame, and suicidal ideation in a military outpatient clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Craig J; Morrow, Chad E; Etienne, Neysa; Ray-Sannerud, Bobbie

    2013-01-01

    Increased suicide risk among US military personnel is a growing concern. Research has linked trauma exposure, including exposure to combat-related injuries, death, and atrocities to suicidal ideation among combat veterans. Guilt (feeling bad about what you did to another) and shame (feeling bad about who you are) have been proposed as potential contributors to suicidal ideation among military personnel, but have not yet received much empirical attention. Sixty-nine active duty military personnel receiving outpatient mental health treatment at a military clinic completed self-report symptom measures of guilt, shame, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and suicidal ideation while engaged in treatment. Generalized linear regression modeling was utilized to test the association of guilt and shame with suicidal ideation. Mean levels of guilt and shame were significantly higher among military personnel with a history of suicidal ideation. Guilt (B = 0.203, SE = .046, P guilt (B = 0.167, SE = .053, P = .001) was significantly associated with increased suicidal ideation. Guilt and shame are associated with increased severity of suicidal ideation in military mental health outpatients. Guilt has a particularly strong relationship with suicidal ideation. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Co-occurrence of Trichomonas vaginalis and bacterial vaginosis and vaginal shedding of HIV-1 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastring, Danielle R; Amedee, Angela; Gatski, Megan; Clark, Rebecca A; Mena, Leandro A; Levison, Judy; Schmidt, Norine; Rice, Janet; Gustat, Jeanette; Kissinger, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV) are independently associated with increased risk of vaginal shedding in HIV-positive women. Because these 2 conditions commonly co-occur, this study was undertaken to examine the association between TV/BV co-occurrence and vaginal shedding of HIV-1 RNA. HIV-positive women attending outpatient HIV clinics in 3 urban US cities underwent a clinical examination; were screened for TV, BV, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and vulvovaginal candidiasis; and completed a behavioral survey. Women shedding HIV-1 RNA vaginally (≥50 copies/mL) were compared with women who had an undetectable (women who were TV positive and BV positive or had co-occurrence of TV/BV had higher odds of shedding vaginally when compared with women who did not have these conditions. In this sample of 373 HIV-positive women, 43.1% (n = 161) had co-occurrence of TV/BV and 33.2% (n = 124) were shedding HIV-1 RNA vaginally. The odds of shedding HIV vaginally in the presence of TV alone or BV alone and when TV/BV co-occurred were 4.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.78-9.37), 5.65 (95% CI, 2.64-12.01), and 18.63 (95% CI, 6.71-51.72), respectively, when compared with women with no diagnosis of TV or BV, and after adjusting for age, antiretroviral therapy status, and plasma viral load. T. vaginalis and BV were independently and synergistically related to vaginal shedding of HIV-1 RNA. Screening and prompt treatment of these 2 conditions among HIV-positive women are important not only clinically but for HIV prevention, as well.

  18. Nurse-delivered universal point-of-care testing for HIV in an open-access returning traveller clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, R; Ashraf, A N; Yates, T A; Spriggs, K; Malinnag, M; Durward-Brown, E; Phillips, D; Mewse, E; Daniel, A; Armstrong, M; Kidd, I M; Waite, J; Wilks, P; Burns, F; Bailey, R; Brown, M

    2012-09-01

    Early diagnosis of HIV infection reduces morbidity and mortality associated with late presentation. Despite UK guidelines, the HIV testing rate has not increased. We have introduced universal HIV screening in an open-access returning traveller clinic. Data were prospectively recorded for all patients attending the open-access returning traveller clinic between August 2008 and December 2010. HIV testing was offered to all patients from May 2009; initially testing with laboratory samples (phase 1) and subsequently a point-of-care test (POCT) (phase 2). A total of 4965 patients attended the clinic; 1342 in phase 0, 792 in phase 1 and 2831 in phase 2. Testing rates for HIV increased significantly from 2% (38 of 1342) in phase 0 to 23.1% (183 of 792) in phase 1 and further increased to 44.5% (1261 of 2831) during phase 2 (P travelling to the Middle East and Europe were less likely to accept an HIV test with POCT. A nurse-delivered universal point-of-care HIV testing service has been successfully introduced and sustained in an acute medical clinic in a low-prevalence country. Caution is required in communicating reactive results in low-prevalence settings where there may be alternative diagnoses or a low population prevalence of HIV infection. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  19. A strategy of clinical tolerance for the prevention of HIV and AIDS in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y

    2000-02-01

    HIV infection and AIDS create many dilemmas in Chinese AIDS/HIV prevention policy. A strategy of clinical tolerance is proposed to address these dilemmas. The immediate purpose of the strategy of clinical tolerance is to win the cooperation of members of stigmatized groups at high risk for contracting HIV infection and AIDS, which occurs as a result of acts done in private and thus beyond the reach of regulation. The strategy of clinical tolerance differs from both tolerance as liberal tolerance and tolerance as a moral ideal of tolerance. A strategy of clinical tolerance does not ask the government, health worker, health official or the public to change either laws or the disapproval of prostitution, homosexuality and drug use. A strategy of clinical tolerance asks, instead, that we weigh what we may regard as the wrong involved in prostitution, homosexuality, and drug use against the greater evil of an HIV/AIDS epidemic. A strategy of clinical tolerance offers the most effective and practical way to confront a growing and significant public health problem in China.

  20. [Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy in childhood anxiety disorders in a university psychiatric outpatient clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goletz, Hildegard; Yang, Young-Im; Suhr-Dachs, Lydia; Walter, Daniel; Döpfner, Manfred

    2013-07-01

    Only few studies have examined whether the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for childhood anxiety disorders as demonstrated in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) generalizes to clinical practice. This study examines the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy for juvenile anxiety disorders under routine care conditions in a university-based psychiatric outpatient clinic. 92 children and adolescents with parent-ratings regarding anxiety and comorbid symptoms and 61 children and adolescents with self-ratings regarding anxiety and comorbid symptoms were treated with cognitive-behavioral interventions. Pre/post mean comparisons, effect sizes, and the clinical significance of changes in symptoms were examined. The effect size for reduction of anxiety symptoms was .81 for children whose parents had completed the rating scale and .79 for children who had filled in a self-rating scale. Effect sizes for reduction of comorbid symptoms varied between .37 and .84 for parent ratings and between .21 and .62 for self-ratings. The percentage of children and adolescents who achieved clinically significant improvements in anxiety symptoms was 55.1 % according to the parent ratings and 65.7 % according to the children's self-ratings. More than 50 % of parents and children reported clinically significant improvements in comorbid symptoms. Significant reductions in both anxiety and comorbid symptoms were demonstrated over the course of cognitive-behavioral therapy of juvenile anxiety disorders in a university psychiatric outpatient clinic. The effect sizes for anxiety symptoms were found to be comparable to the effect sizes reported in RCTs. Similarly, clinically significant improvements were as frequent as the rates of remission of anxiety symptoms reported in RCTs.

  1. BREASTFEEDING: THE MEANING FOR PREGNANT POSITIVE HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristina Silva Vinhas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In The actions of prevention to the HIV AIDS, in the prenatal lens the advising of women infected by the HIV about the risk from the vertical transmission causing to prohibition from the lactation and from the breast-feeding crossed. Objective it identify joined the pregnants HIV positive the main worries as regards the impediment from the breast-feeding natural and evaluate the individual educational needs of activities as form alternative to the affectionate and psychic emotional support to the pregnant. Methodology treats itself of a boarding qualitative, they were interviewed pregnants soropositivas inscription in the outpatient clinic of prenatal of high risk, of a Public Hospital, in Goiânia GO. Analyzing the facts: them interviewed were unanimous in affirm that to pregnancy was not planned. It be pregnant and uncover that they are bearers of the virus HIV brought bigger expectations regarding the pregnancy: fear, insecurity, anguish and doubts are emotions by them related. And, they stood out that the specific groups permit bigger liberty for argument and change of experiences, the work helps to pregnant react to the consequences of the virus HIV. Like this being, we understand that the aid to the pregnant soroposotive, in the institution studied attends a standard quality, however, is important thing systematize the specific formation of groups of pregnant soropositives for HIV. KEY WORDS: Risk Prenatal; Nursing; HIV.

  2. Characterization of HIV Recent Infection Among High-Risk Men at Public STI Clinics in Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hong-Ha M; Fatch, Robin; Grant, Robert M; Mathur, Meenakshi; Kumta, Sameer; Jerajani, Hemangi; Kellogg, Timothy A; Lindan, Christina P

    2018-02-16

    We examined associations with HIV recent infection and estimated transmitted drug resistance (TDR) prevalence among 3345 men at sexually transmitted infection clinics in Mumbai (2002-2005). HIV seroincidence was 7.92% by the BED-CEIA and was higher at a clinic located near brothels (12.39%) than at a hospital-based clinic (3.94%). HIV recent infection was associated with a lifetime history of female sex worker (FSW) partners, HSV-2, genital warts, and gonorrhea. TDR prevalence among recent infection cases was 5.7%. HIV testing services near sex venues may enhance case detection among high-risk men who represent a bridging population between FSWs and the men's other sexual partners.

  3. Clinical profile of HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khopkar Uday

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV seropositivity rate of 14 percent was observed amongst STD cases. Heterosexual contact with prostitutes was the main risk factor. Fever, anorexia, weight loss, lymphadenopathy and tuberculosis were useful clinical leads. Genital ulcers, especially chancroid, were common in seropositivies. Alopecia of unknown cause, atypical pyoderma, seborrhea, zoster, eruptive mollusca and sulfa-induced erythema multiforme were viewed with suspicion in high risk groups. Purpura fulminans, fulminant chancroid, vegetating pyoderma and angioedema with purpura were unique features noted in this study.

  4. A predominance of R5-like HIV genotypes in vaginal secretions is associated with elevated plasma HIV-1 RNA levels and the absence of anti-retroviral therapy

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    Lacour Nedra

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV expressed in genital secretions provides the inoculum from which transmitting variants are selected, both in sexual transmission and mother-to-infant transmission during partuition. Characterization of HIV levels and genotypes found in vaginal secretions and the impact of anti-retroviral therapy (ART on this virus can provide valuable insight for the prevention of HIV transmission. Vaginal HIV was evaluated in a cohort of 43 women attending a New Orleans HIV outpatient clinic. Predominant vaginal genotypes were characterized as R5- or X4-like by heteroduplex tracking analyses of the envelope V3 region. Most women (67.4% shed R5-like genotypes in vaginal secretions which was associated with elevated plasma HIV levels (≥ 10,000 copies HIV-RNA/mL and absence of ART. Because R5-like genotypes are more frequently associated with transmission, these observations suggest that the majority of women shedding HIV in genital secretions present a transmission risk. The levels of vaginal virus were similar between both groups, but shedding of X4-like genotypes was associated with lower plasma viral loads and the use of ART, suggesting that ART use may impact the genotypes of virus found in the female genital compartment.

  5. Prevalence of asymptomatic urethritis by Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and associated risk factors among males living with HIV-1

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    Guilherme Almeida Rosa da Silva

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives The increase in HIV transmissibility in non-ulcerative sexually transmitted infection is already well-established. It is estimated that symptomatic carriers of N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis have a relative risk of 4.8-fold and 3.6-fold, respectively, for the sexual acquisition of HIV. This type of evaluation for asymptomatic urethritis is necessary to reinforce strategies to combat HIV transmission. This study aims to assess the prevalence of patients with asymptomatic urethritis among men diagnosed with HIV-1 and determine the risk factors associated with this infection. Methods We enrolled a total of 115 male patients aged 18 years or older who have been diagnosed with HIV infection and have no symptoms of urethritis or other sexually transmitted infections and who have been evaluated between May and August 2015 in a follow-up visit at the Immunology Outpatient Clinic of a Brazilian University Hospital. Results Four asymptomatic patients were positive for C. trachomatis and were considered asymptomatic carriers of urethritis. Prevalence was 3.47%. Patients who were positive for C. trachomatis urethritis had a lower mean age (p = 0.015. Conclusion The presence of asymptomatic sexually transmitted infection is a challenge in clinical practice. We recommend that, in outpatient practice, the habit of inquiring on previous sexual behavior to obtain more information about risks and associations with asymptomatic sexually transmitted infection, a routine physical examination and complementary tests to detect STI pathogens should be performed to discard these conditions. The development of rapid tests for this purpose should also be encouraged.

  6. Prevalence of asymptomatic urethritis by Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and associated risk factors among males living with HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Guilherme Almeida Rosa da; Motta, Heloisa Loureiro de Sá Neves; Souza, Erik Friedrich Alex de; Cardoso, Pedro Afonso Nogueira Moises; Pilotto, José Henrique; Eyer-Silva, Walter Araujo; Ribeiro, Luiz Cláudio Pereira; Santos, Mônica Soares Dos; Azevedo, Marcelo Costa Velho Mendes de; Pinto, Jorge Francisco da Cunha; Motta, Rogerio Neves; Ferry, Fernando Raphael de Almeida

    2018-03-08

    The increase in HIV transmissibility in non-ulcerative sexually transmitted infection is already well-established. It is estimated that symptomatic carriers of N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis have a relative risk of 4.8-fold and 3.6-fold, respectively, for the sexual acquisition of HIV. This type of evaluation for asymptomatic urethritis is necessary to reinforce strategies to combat HIV transmission. This study aims to assess the prevalence of patients with asymptomatic urethritis among men diagnosed with HIV-1 and determine the risk factors associated with this infection. We enrolled a total of 115 male patients aged 18 years or older who have been diagnosed with HIV infection and have no symptoms of urethritis or other sexually transmitted infections and who have been evaluated between May and August 2015 in a follow-up visit at the Immunology Outpatient Clinic of a Brazilian University Hospital. Four asymptomatic patients were positive for C. trachomatis and were considered asymptomatic carriers of urethritis. Prevalence was 3.47%. Patients who were positive for C. trachomatis urethritis had a lower mean age (p = 0.015). The presence of asymptomatic sexually transmitted infection is a challenge in clinical practice. We recommend that, in outpatient practice, the habit of inquiring on previous sexual behavior to obtain more information about risks and associations with asymptomatic sexually transmitted infection, a routine physical examination and complementary tests to detect STI pathogens should be performed to discard these conditions. The development of rapid tests for this purpose should also be encouraged.

  7. Treatment outcomes in a rural HIV clinic in South Africa: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the treatment outcomes of an HIV clinic in rural Limpopo province, South Africa. Methods: A retrospective cohort study involving medical records review of HIV-positive patients initiated on antiretroviral treatment (ART) was conducted from December 2007 to November 2008 at Letaba Hospital. Data on ...

  8. The role of neuropsychology in UK pediatric HIV care: Relevance to clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Anita

    2017-11-01

    There has been a dramatic improvement in the survival of children with perinatally-acquired HIV (PHIV) following the introduction of effective treatment in 1990s. The care for children living with PHIV is now focused on more accurately understanding the effects of both HIV and HIV treatment on the developing body and brain. An evaluation of current HIV neuroimaging, and neurocognitive research, when combined with clinical experience in the area of HIV, could help to inform United Kingdom (UK) PHIV service provision. This paper argues that an understanding from a neuropsychological perspective will help these young people to optimize their health, quality of life, and future functioning. The aim of the paper is to bring together research and clinical understanding of HIV and its treatment effects on the developing brain, together with an understanding of other potential neurological risk factors. It is argued here that there is a need for targeted neuropsychology assessment and preventative interventions, supported by clinical and preliminary research on the neurocognitive effects of HIV and its treatments.

  9. Acute Appendicitis as the Initial Clinical Presentation of Primary HIV-1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleimann, Mariane H; Leth, Steffen; Krarup, Astrid R

    2018-01-01

    We report a case of an adolescent who presented at our emergency department with acute abdominal pain. While the initial diagnosis was acute appendicitis, a secondary and coincidental diagnosis of primary HIV-1 infection was made. Concurrent and subsequent clinical and molecular biology findings ...... form the basis of our argument that primary HIV-1 infection was the cause of acute appendicitis in this individual.......We report a case of an adolescent who presented at our emergency department with acute abdominal pain. While the initial diagnosis was acute appendicitis, a secondary and coincidental diagnosis of primary HIV-1 infection was made. Concurrent and subsequent clinical and molecular biology findings...

  10. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission in HIV audit in Xhosa clinic, Mahalapye, Botswana

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    Stephane Tshitenge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Mahalapye district health management team (DHMT conducts regular audits to evaluate the standard of services delivered to patients, one of which is the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT programme. Xhosa clinic is one of the facilities in Mahalapye which provides a PMTCT programme.Aim: This audit aimed to identify gaps between the current PMTCT clinical practice in Xhosa clinic and the Botswana PMTCT national guidelines.Setting: This audit took place in Xhosa clinic in the urban village of Mahalapye, in the Central District of Botswana.Methods: This was a retrospective audit using PMTCT Xhosa clinic records of pregnant mothers and HIV-exposed babies seen from January 2013 to June 2013.Results: One hundred and thirty-three pregnant women registered for antenatal care. Twenty-five (19% knew their HIV-positive status as they had been tested before their pregnancy or had tested HIV positive at their first antenatal clinic visit. More than two-thirds of the 115 pregnant women (69% were seen at a gestational age of between 14 and 28 weeks. About two-thirds of the pregnant women (67% took antiretroviral drugs. Of the 44 HIV-exposed infants, 39 (89% were HIV DNA PCR negative at 6 weeks. Thirty-two (73% children were given cotrimoxazole prophylaxis between 6 and 8 weeks.Conclusion: The PMTCT programme service delivery was still suboptimal and could potentially increase the mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Daily monitoring mechanism to track those eligible could help to close the gap.

  11. EULAR task force recommendations on annual cardiovascular risk assessment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: an audit of the success of implementation in a rheumatology outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikdahl, Eirik; Rollefstad, Silvia; Olsen, Inge C; Kvien, Tore K; Hansen, Inger Johanne Widding; Soldal, Dag Magnar; Haugeberg, Glenn; Semb, Anne Grete

    2015-01-01

    EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk management include annual CVD risk assessments for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the recording of CVD risk factors (CVD-RF) in a rheumatology outpatient clinic, where EULAR recommendations had been implemented. Further, we compared CVD-RF recordings between a regular rheumatology outpatient clinic (RegROC) and a structured arthritis clinic (AC). In 2012, 1142 RA patients visited the rheumatology outpatient clinic: 612 attended RegROC and 530 attended AC. We conducted a search in the patient journals to ascertain the rate of CVD-RF recording. The overall CVD-RF recording rate was 40.1% in the rheumatology outpatient clinic, reflecting a recording rate of 59.1% in the AC and 23.6% in the RegROC. The odds ratios for having CVD-RFs recorded for patients attending AC compared to RegROC were as follows: blood pressure: 12.4, lipids: 5.0-6.0, glucose: 9.1, HbA1c: 6.1, smoking: 1.4, and for having all the CVD-RFs needed to calculate the CVD risk by the systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE): 21.0. The CVD-RF recording rate was low in a rheumatology outpatient clinic. However, a systematic team-based model was superior compared to a RegROC. Further measures are warranted to improve CVD-RF recording in RA patients.

  12. EULAR Task Force Recommendations on Annual Cardiovascular Risk Assessment for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Audit of the Success of Implementation in a Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Ikdahl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease (CVD risk management include annual CVD risk assessments for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We evaluated the recording of CVD risk factors (CVD-RF in a rheumatology outpatient clinic, where EULAR recommendations had been implemented. Further, we compared CVD-RF recordings between a regular rheumatology outpatient clinic (RegROC and a structured arthritis clinic (AC. Methods. In 2012, 1142 RA patients visited the rheumatology outpatient clinic: 612 attended RegROC and 530 attended AC. We conducted a search in the patient journals to ascertain the rate of CVD-RF recording. Results. The overall CVD-RF recording rate was 40.1% in the rheumatology outpatient clinic, reflecting a recording rate of 59.1% in the AC and 23.6% in the RegROC. The odds ratios for having CVD-RFs recorded for patients attending AC compared to RegROC were as follows: blood pressure: 12.4, lipids: 5.0-6.0, glucose: 9.1, HbA1c: 6.1, smoking: 1.4, and for having all the CVD-RFs needed to calculate the CVD risk by the systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE: 21.0. Conclusion. The CVD-RF recording rate was low in a rheumatology outpatient clinic. However, a systematic team-based model was superior compared to a RegROC. Further measures are warranted to improve CVD-RF recording in RA patients.

  13. Clinical and Cost Comparison Evaluation of Inpatient Versus Outpatient Administration of EPOCH-Containing Regimens in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sarah S; Gandhi, Arpita S; Clemmons, Amber B; DeRemer, David L

    2017-08-01

    Etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (EPOCH)-containing regimens are frequently utilized in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, however, the incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients receiving inpatient versus outpatient EPOCH has not been described. Additionally, no comparisons have been made regarding financial implications of EPOCH administration in either setting. This study's primary objective was to compare hospital admissions for FN in patients receiving inpatient or outpatient EPOCH. A single-center, institutional review board-approved review was conducted for adults receiving EPOCH beginning January 2010. Clinical and financial data were collected through chart review and the institution's financial department. Descriptive statistics were utilized for analysis. A total of 25 patients received 86 cycles of an EPOCH-containing regimen (61 [70.9%] inpatient). Five (8.2%) inpatient cycles resulted in an admission for FN compared to 4 (16%) outpatient cycles. Prophylactic antifungal and antiviral agents were prescribed more often after inpatient cycles (>80%) compared to outpatient cycles (cost savings of approximately US$141 116 for both chemotherapy costs and hospital day avoidance. EPOCH-containing regimens can be safely administered in the outpatient setting, which may result in cost savings for healthcare institutions.

  14. Digital clubbing in tuberculosis – relationship to HIV infection, extent of disease and hypoalbuminemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smieja Marek

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital clubbing is a sign of chest disease known since the time of Hippocrates. Its association with tuberculosis (TB has not been well studied, particularly in Africa where TB is common. The prevalence of clubbing in patients with pulmonary TB and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, severity of disease, and nutritional status was assessed. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among patients with smear-positive TB recruited consecutively from the medical and TB wards and outpatient clinics at a public hospital in Uganda. The presence of clubbing was assessed by clinical signs and measurement of the ratio of the distal and inter-phalangeal diameters (DPD/IPD of both index fingers. Clubbing was defined as a ratio > 1.0. Chest radiograph, serum albumin and HIV testing were done. Results Two hundred patients (82% HIV-infected participated; 34% had clubbing by clinical criteria whilst 30% had clubbing based on DPD/IPD ratio. Smear grade, extensive or cavitary disease, early versus late HIV disease, and hypoalbuminemia were not associated with clubbing. Clubbing was more common among patients with a lower Karnofsky performance scale score or with prior TB. Conclusion Clubbing occurs in up to one-third of Ugandan patients with pulmonary TB. Clubbing was not associated with stage of HIV infection, extensive disease or hypoalbuminemia.

  15. Use of traditional complementary and alternative medicine for HIV patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Preez, Natalie Friend-du; Ramlagan, Shandir; Fomundam, Henry

    2008-07-24

    Traditional medicine use has been reported is common among individuals with moderate and advanced HIV disease. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the use of Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicine (TCAM) for HIV patients prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy in three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Using systematic sampling, 618 HIV-positive patients were selected from outpatient departments from three hospitals and interviewed with a questionnaire. TCAM was commonly used for HIV in the past six months by study participants (317, 51.3%) and herbal therapies alone (183, 29.6%). The use of micronutrients (42.9%) was excluded from TCAM since mostly vitamins were provided by the health facility. Herbal therapies were the most expensive, costing on average 128 Rand (US$16) per patient per month. Most participants (90%) indicated that their health care provider was not aware that they were taking herbal therapies for HIV (90%). Herbal therapies were mainly used for pain relief (87.1%) and spiritual practices or prayer for stress relief (77.6%). Multivariate logistic regression with use of herbs for HIV as the dependent variable identified being on a disability grant and fewer clinic visits to be associated with use of herbs, and TCAM use for HIV identified being on a disability grant, number of HIV symptoms and family members not contributing to main source of household income to be associated with TCAM use. Traditional herbal therapies and TCAM are commonly used by HIV treatment naïve outpatients of public health facilities in South Africa. Health care providers should routinely screen patients on TCAM use when initiating ART and also during follow-up and monitoring keeping in mind that these patients may not fully disclose other therapies.

  16. Use of traditional complementary and alternative medicine for HIV patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramlagan Shandir

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional medicine use has been reported is common among individuals with moderate and advanced HIV disease. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the use of Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicine (TCAM for HIV patients prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy in three public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods Using systematic sampling, 618 HIV-positive patients were selected from outpatient departments from three hospitals and interviewed with a questionnaire. Results TCAM was commonly used for HIV in the past six months by study participants (317, 51.3% and herbal therapies alone (183, 29.6%. The use of micronutrients (42.9% was excluded from TCAM since mostly vitamins were provided by the health facility. Herbal therapies were the most expensive, costing on average 128 Rand (US$16 per patient per month. Most participants (90% indicated that their health care provider was not aware that they were taking herbal therapies for HIV (90%. Herbal therapies were mainly used for pain relief (87.1% and spiritual practices or prayer for stress relief (77.6%. Multivariate logistic regression with use of herbs for HIV as the dependent variable identified being on a disability grant and fewer clinic visits to be associated with use of herbs, and TCAM use for HIV identified being on a disability grant, number of HIV symptoms and family members not contributing to main source of household income to be associated with TCAM use. Conclusion Traditional herbal therapies and TCAM are commonly used by HIV treatment naïve outpatients of public health facilities in South Africa. Health care providers should routinely screen patients on TCAM use when initiating ART and also during follow-up and monitoring keeping in mind that these patients may not fully disclose other therapies.

  17. Evaluation of the WHO clinical case definition for pediatric HIV infection in Bloemfontein, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gend, Christine L; Haadsma, Maaike L; Sauer, Pieter J J; Schoeman, Cornelius J

    2003-06-01

    The WHO clinical case definition for pediatric HIV infection has been designed to be used in countries where diagnostic laboratory resources are limited. We evaluated the WHO case definition to determine whether it is a useful instrument to discriminate between HIV-positive and HIV-negative children. In addition, clinical features not included in this case definition were recorded. We recorded clinical data from 300 consecutively admitted children in a state hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa, and tested these children for HIV infection. A total of 222 children were included in the study; 69 children (31.1 per cent) were HIV positive. The sensitivity of the WHO case definition in this study was 14.5 per cent, the specificity was 98.6 per cent. Apart from weight loss and generalized dermatitis, the signs of the WHO case definition were significantly more often seen in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative children. Of the clinical signs not included in the WHO case definition, marasmus and hepatosplenomegaly especially occurred more frequently in HIV-positive children. Based on these findings we composed a new case definition consisting of four signs: marasmus, hepatosplenomegaly, oropharyngeal candidiasis, and generalized lymphadenopathy. HIV infection is suspected in a child presenting with at least two of these four signs. The sensitivity of this case definition was 63.2 per cent, the specificity was 96.0 per cent. We conclude that in this study the WHO case definition was not a useful instrument to discriminate between HIV-positive and HIV-negative children, mainly because its sensitivity was strikingly low. The simplified case definition we propose, proved to be more sensitive than the WHO case definition (63.2 vs. 14.5 per cent), whilst its specificity remained high.

  18. Measurement of nurses' workload in an oncology outpatient clinic

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    Célia Alves de Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand and the degree of patient care in oncological outpatient services, as well as the complexity of treatment have had an impact on the workload of nurses. This study aimed at measuring the workload and productivity of nurses in an oncological outpatient service. An observational study using a work sampling technique was conducted and included seven nurses working in an oncological outpatient service in the south-eastern region of Brazil. A total of 1,487 intervention or activity samples were obtained. Nurses used 43.2% of their time on indirect care, 33.2% on direct care, 11.6% on associated activities, and 12% on personal activities. Their mean productivity was 88.0%. The findings showed that nurses in this service spend most of their time in indirect care activities. Moreover, the productivity index in this study was above that recommended in the literature.

  19. Evaluation of factors associated with psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minamisawa A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atsumi Minamisawa,1 Jin Narumoto,1 Isao Yokota,2 Kenji Fukui1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan Background: Patient dropout from treatment can lead to a deterioration in clinical condition, thereby increasing the need for more intensive therapy that incurs substantial social and economic losses. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan.Methods: We retrospectively examined the medical charts of new psychiatric patients who were diagnosed with either a mood disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, code: F3 or an anxiety disorder (F4 in the outpatient clinic at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Hospital in Kyoto, Japan, between April 2010 and March 2013. The baseline characteristics of the patients (age, sex, Global Assessment of Functioning score, Clinical Global Impression–Severity of Illness score, education, occupation, marital status, duration of treatment, and prior treatment history, treating psychiatrist experience in years, and sex concordance between the patients and their treating psychiatrists were analyzed using Cox regression models.Results: From among 1,626 eligible new patients during the study period, 532 patients were enrolled in the study (F3: n=176; F4: n=356. The dropout rate was 35.7%, which was similar to that of previous studies. Higher educational level, being married, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores were associated with a lower dropout rate. Although psychiatrist experience was not significantly associated with patient dropout in the multivariate analysis, patients treated by less experienced psychiatrists had a higher hazard ratio for dropout (1.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.94–1.85.Conclusion: In order to reduce the dropout rate, special focus should be placed on

  20. Home sampling for sexually transmitted infections and HIV in men who have sex with men: a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Fisher

    Full Text Available To determine uptake of home sampling kit (HSK for STI/HIV compared to clinic-based testing, whether the availability of HSK would increase STI testing rates amongst HIV infected MSM, and those attending a community-based HIV testing clinic compared to historical control. Prospective observational study in three facilities providing STI/HIV testing services in Brighton, UK was conducted. Adult MSM attending/contacting a GUM clinic requesting an STI screen (group 1, HIV infected MSM attending routine outpatient clinic (group 2, and MSM attending a community-based rapid HIV testing service (group 3 were eligible. Participants were required to have no symptomatology consistent with STI and known to be immune to hepatitis A and B (group 1. Eligible men were offered a HSK to obtain self-collected specimens as an alternative to routine testing. HSK uptake compared to conventional clinic-based STI/HIV testing in group 1, increase in STI testing rates due to availability of HSK compared to historical controls in group 2 and 3, and HSK return rates in all settings were calculated. Among the 128 eligible men in group 1, HSK acceptance was higher (62.5% (95% CI: 53.5-70.9 compared to GUM clinic-based testing (37.5% (95% CI: 29.1-46.5, (p = 0.0004. Two thirds of eligible MSM offered an HSK in all three groups accepted it, but HSK return rates varied (highest in group 1, 77.5%, lowest in group 3, 16%. HSK for HIV testing was acceptable to 81% of men in group 1. Compared to historical controls, availability of HSK increased the proportion of MSM testing for STIs in group 2 but not in group 3. HSK for STI/HIV offers an alternative to conventional clinic-based testing for MSM seeking STI screening. It significantly increases STI testing uptake in HIV infected MSM. HSK could be considered as an adjunct to clinic-based services to further improve STI/HIV testing in MSM.

  1. A comparison of the clinical features of depression in hiv-positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by far the worst affected region in the world with a continental prevalence of around ... This study compared the clinical features of major depression between .... programme Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS), version 11.5. ... HIV-Positive N=64 n(%) HIV-Negative N=66 n(%) X2. OR (95%CI). P-Value. Gender.

  2. Reliability and validity of Thai versions of the MOS-HIV and SF-12 quality of life questionnaires in people living with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemerer Verne F

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim As Thai people living with HIV/AIDS gain increasing access to antiretroviral (ARV therapy, it is important to evaluate the impact this has not only on clinical outcomes, but also on patients' functional status and well-being. In this study, we translated, culturally adapted and tested the reliability and validity of two widely-used health-related quality of life questionnaires - the MOS-HIV Health Survey and the SF-12 - in people living with HIV/AIDS in Northern Thailand. Methods: Questionnaires were administered to 100 patients at community hospital outpatient ARV clinics in northern Thailand. Reliability was estimated using Cronbach's alpha, while evidence for validity was tested using known-groups comparison based on CD4 group, symptom distress score, bed days and days of reduced activity in the past three months. Results Patients' median age was 36, with 58% female, 58% working as laborers, and 60% completing at least primary education. Median CD4 count was 218 cells/mm3. There were no missing data. For the MOS-HIV and SF-12, mean physical summary scores were 53.1 and 49.0 respectively; mean mental summary scores were 53.4 and 45.6, respectively. Internal consistency coefficients were >0.7 for all but one scale, the PF scale (0.67. As hypothesized, scores were slightly to moderately correlated with CD4 count, symptom score, number of days in bed or with reduced activity. Correlations were higher with physical health scores than with mental health scales. The MOS-HIV discriminated clinical known groups slightly better than the SF-12. Conclusion Both the MOS-HIV and the shorter SF-12 were successfully adapted for people with HIV/AIDS in Northern Thailand, and showed encouraging evidence for reliability and validity. These patient reported questionnaires could be valuable tools in evaluating therapeutic interventions and other innovations in health and social services, and to estimate health needs and population

  3. Structured outpatient treatment of alcohol vs. drug dependencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washton, A M

    1990-01-01

    This chapter describes the rationale, indications, design, and use of a structured outpatient treatment approach as an effective alternative to residential treatment for alcohol and drug dependencies. An increasing demand for outpatient treatment services is being created by a combination of clinical and economic factors, including the influx of employed drug abusers who do not need or desire residential care and mounting financial pressures to contain health care costs. To be effective as a primary treatment modality, outpatient programs must be highly structured and intensive and able to deal with the full spectrum of alcohol and drug addictions. Perpetuating the historical separation between alcoholism and drug abuse treatment programs is unnecessary and counterproductive, although certain modifications in treatment approaches are needed to accommodate the distinctive characteristics of particular classes of drugs and the people who use them. The "outpatient rehab," a treatment model that approximates the intensity of inpatient treatment on an outpatient basis, may help to maximize the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of outpatient treatment as a viable alternative to residential care. Initial treatment results with this model are encouraging.

  4. Social Support as a Key Protective Factor against Depression in HIV-Infected Patients: Report from large HIV clinics in Hanoi, Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Shoko; Yamaoka, Kazue; Takahashi, Kenzo; Tanuma, Junko; Mizushima, Daisuke; Do, Cuong Duy; Nguyen, Dung Thi; Nguyen, Hoai Dung Thi; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Oka, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Depression is the most common mental health issue among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). This study explored how different types and sources of social support are associated with depression among HIV-infected patients in Vietnam. We carried out a cross-sectional survey on 1,503 HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at two HIV clinics in Hanoi in 2016. Depression was prevalent in 26.2% of participants. Higher score of social support, especially emotional/informational supp...

  5. Mixed Methods Approach for Measuring the Impact of Video Telehealth on Outpatient Clinic Triage Nurse Workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G.; Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2015-01-01

    Nurse-delivered telephone triage is a common component of outpatient clinic settings. Adding new communication technology to clinic triage has the potential to not only transform the triage process, but also alter triage workflow. Evaluating the impact of new technology on an existing workflow is paramount to maximizing efficiency of the delivery system. This study investigated triage nurse workflow before and after the implementation of video telehealth using a sequential mixed methods protocol that combined ethnography and time-motion study to provide a robust analysis of the implementation environment. Outpatient clinic triage using video telehealth required significantly more time than telephone triage, indicating a reduction in nurse efficiency. Despite the increased time needed to conduct video telehealth, nurses consistently rated it useful in providing triage. Interpretive analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data suggests the increased depth and breadth of data available during video triage alters the assessment triage nurses provide physicians. This in turn could impact the time physicians spend formulating a diagnosis and treatment plan. While the immediate impact of video telehealth is a reduction in triage nurse efficiency, what is unknown is the impact of video telehealth on physician and overall clinic efficiency. Future studies should address this area. PMID:24080753

  6. Presentation and prognosis of female acute urinary retention: Analysis of an unusual clinical condition in outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özveren, Bora; Keskin, Selçuk

    2016-01-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR) in females is a poorly defined condition with undetermined epidemiology. This study aimed to evaluate female AUR in an outpatient population. One hundred and thirty-eight adult female outpatients who presented to the emergency room with symptoms of urinary retention were retrospectively analyzed. The women who were ultimately diagnosed with true, complete AUR were systematically reviewed for clinical characteristics and management. In this outpatient cohort with urinary retention complaints, only 23% of the patients were diagnosed with objective AUR. Detailed medical and urological history in addition to urogenital, neurological, and pelvic examinations was essential; urine analysis and pelvic ultrasonography were necessary as baseline investigations. Further radiological and urodynamic tests were required in a minority. Specific etiology was established in 77% of the patients, whereas there was more than one probable cause in 16% of the patients, and no specific cause was found in 6.5% of the patients. Bladder decompression and correction of the underlying cause helped 92.6% of the reviewed patients to eventually achieve spontaneous micturition. The proportion of true, complete AUR among female outpatients presenting to the emergency department was 23% following urological evaluation. Acute condition was resolved by urgent catheterization in all, and the majority of women had eventually resumed spontaneous voiding.

  7. [Co-infections of HIV, syphilis and HSV-2 among men who have sex with men at the voluntary HIV counseling and testing clinics in Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Tang, H F; Ning, Z; Zheng, H; He, N; Zhang, Y Y

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To understand the prevalence rates of HIV-syphilis and HIV-herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) co-infections and related factors among men having sex with men (MSM) who had visited the voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) clinics in Shanghai, China. Methods: 756 eligible MSM who attended the VCT clinics of Shanghai Municipality and Putuo district during March to August, 2015 were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional survey with questionnaire interview and blood testing for HIV, syphilis and HSV-2. Results: A total of 732 participants completed a valid questionnaire survey. The prevalence rates were 3.3 % (24/732) for HIV/Syphilis co-infection, 1.9 % (14/732) for HIV/HSV-2 co-infection, and 0.7 % (5/732) for HIV/Syphilis/HSV-2 co-infection, respectively. HIV prevalence appeared significantly higher among syphilis-infected participants (45.3 % , 24/53) than those without Syphilis (7.2 % , 61/679) (χ(2)=63.11, P Syphilis co-infection. Those participants who had high middle school or lower levels of education ( OR =6.87, 95 %CI : 1.86-25.42; OR =9.82, 95 %CI : 2.25-42.85) were under risk on HIV and HSV-2 co-infection. Conclusion: HIV/Syphilis and HIV/HSV-2 co-infection were seen among MSM who attended the VCT clinics in Shanghai that called for special attention, especially on migrants, those with low education or illicit drug users.

  8. Clinical profile of neurological complications in HIV- reactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    2014-07-26

    Jul 26, 2014 ... reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Clinical profile of ... cytology, staining including grams staining, acid-fast ... manifestation of neurological involvement. Exclusion criteria. HIV-positive patients not showing any manifestation of neurological involvement. Ethical issues.

  9. Clinical setting-based smoking cessation programme and the quality of life in people living with HIV in Austria and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabovac, Igor; Brath, Helmut; Schalk, Horst; Degen, Olaf; Dorner, Thomas E

    2017-09-01

    To report on the global quality of life (QOL) in people living with HIV (PLWHIV) and how a smoking cessation intervention influences the changes in QOL. Participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire during visits to their HIV outpatient clinic consisting of sociodemographic information, general health data and the WHOQOL HIV-Bref. Exhaled carbon monoxide measurements were used to confirm the smoking status, based on which participants classified as smokers received a short 5 min structured intervention and were offered participation in a full smoking cessation programme consisting of five sessions. Follow-up was done 8 months after the baseline. Overall 447 (mean age = 45.5) participants took part with 221 being classified as smokers. A total of 165 (74.6%) participants received a short intervention and 63 (29.4%) agreed to participate in the full program. At baseline, differences in QoL were observed, where smokers had lower QoL in domains of physical (M = 16.1 vs. 15.3, p = 0.009) and psychological (M = 15.3 vs. 14.6, p = 0.021) well-being, independency level (M = 16.1 vs. 15.2, p = 0.003) and environment (M = 16.5 vs. 16.0, p = 0.036). At study end, 27 (12.2%) participants quit smoking; 12 (19.0%) participants of the full programme and 15 (14.7%) that received the short intervention. There were no significant differences in QoL between those that continued to smoke and quitters at follow-up. Quality of life results may be used to better understand the underlying motivation of PLWHIV who start cessation programs. In order to reduce the high prevalence and health burden that smoking causes in PLWHIV, it is necessary to introduce effective interventions that can be used in the clinical settings.

  10. Anxiety Level in Dyspeptic Patients at the Gastroenterohepatology Outpatient Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radistrya Sekaranti Brahmanti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dyspepsia is a disease with a high worldwide prevalence, including in Asia; however, the pathophysiology of the disease is still unclear. Recent studies suggest adapting a biopsychosocial model to understand the pathophysiology of dyspepsia that proposes the important role of anxiety. The aim of this study was to assess the anxiety level in dyspeptic patients who visited the Gastroenterohepatology Outpatient Clinic in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study using total sampling method was conducted from September–November 2012 to 19 patients aged 36−85 years old who consisted of 11 women and 8 men patients dyspepsia syndrome in the Gastroenterohepatology outpatient clinic Dr Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. The anxiety levels were measured using the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. All data were analyzed based on gender, age, and occupational status of the patients. Results: Eleven of the nineteen patients had high anxiety levels. Women were more likely to experience high anxiety levels (8 of 11. The group with the highest number of patients with high anxiety was the 46−55 years old group, the high anxiety level was more common among patients who were government or private sector employees. Conclusion: The anxiety level in dyspeptic patients who visited the Gastroenterohepatology outpatient clinic in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung was high.

  11. Registration of symptoms and diagnoses in patients of a Belarussian-Dutch outpatient clinic in Gomel, October 1991 - September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Oostrum, I.E.A.; Svalkoul, T.J.F. [National Poison Control Centre, RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Joore, J.C.A. [Department of Intensive Care and Clinical Toxicology, AZU, Utrecht (Netherlands); Volkova, G.V.; Savkova, M.I.; Derzhitski, V.E. [Gomel Regional Specialized Dispensary, Gomel (Belarus); Bootsma, P.A. [Bureau for International Cooperation, RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    1995-09-01

    The results of a survey of the medical consumption of 4,500 patients at the Belarussian-Dutch Outpatient Clinic in Gomel during 1991-1993 are presented and discussed. Analysis of the patient registration data was focused on complaints related to possible enhanced radiation exposure of the patients since the reactor incident at Chernobyl in 1986. The pattern of complaints and diagnoses was comparable to the situation in a Dutch outpatient clinic, except for a higher number of goitre, gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers. Diagnoses that could be attributed to increased radiation exposure were not enhanced compared to the pattern in a Dutch population of similar size, except for a higher number of thyroid disease. 19 refs.

  12. Offering pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention to pregnant and postpartum women: a clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Dominika L; Weber, Shannon; Cohan, Deborah

    2017-03-08

    HIV prevention during pregnancy and lactation is critical for both maternal and child health. Pregnancy provides a critical opportunity for clinicians to elicit women's vulnerabilities to HIV and offer HIV testing, treatment and referral and/or comprehensive HIV prevention options for the current pregnancy, the postpartum period and safer conception options for future pregnancies. In this commentary, we review the safety of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis with tenofovir/emtricitabine in pregnant and lactating women and suggest opportunities to identify pregnant and postpartum women at substantial risk of HIV. We then describe a clinical approach to caring for women who both choose and decline pre-exposure prophylaxis during pregnancy and postpartum, highlighting areas for future research. Evidence suggests that pre-exposure prophylaxis with tenofovir/emtricitabine is safe in pregnancy and lactation. Identifying women vulnerable to HIV and eligible for pre-exposure prophylaxis is challenging in light of the myriad of individual, community, and structural forces impacting HIV acquisition. Validated risk calculators exist for specific populations but have not been used to screen and offer HIV prevention methods. Partner testing and engagement of men living with HIV are additional means of reaching at-risk women. However, women's vulnerabilities to HIV change over time. Combining screening for HIV vulnerability with HIV and/or STI testing at standard intervals during pregnancy is a practical way to prompt providers to incorporate HIV screening and prevention counselling. We suggest using shared decision-making to offer women pre-exposure prophylaxis as one of multiple HIV prevention strategies during pregnancy and postpartum, facilitating open conversations about HIV vulnerabilities, preferences about HIV prevention strategies, and choosing a method that best meets the needs of each woman. Growing evidence suggests that pre-exposure prophylaxis with tenofovir

  13. Changes in Emotion Work at Interdisciplinary Conferences Following Clinical Supervision in a Palliative Outpatient Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I describe changes in emotion work at weekly interdisciplinary conferences in a palliative1 outpatient ward following clinical supervision (CS). I conceive emotions as constantly negotiated in interaction, and I researched the similarity between how this is done during CS and at ...... conclude that CS enhances professional development and may prevent burnout in palliative care....

  14. [Imported malaria and HIV infection in Madrid. Clinical and epidemiological features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Olivencia, G; Herrero, M D; Subirats, M; de Juanes, J R; Peña, J M; Puente, S

    2012-01-01

    Few data are available in Spain data on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients coinfected with malaria. This study has aimed to determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of imported malaria in patients coinfected with HIV. A case-series retrospective study was performed using the patient's medical records. The study population consisted on patients diagnosed with malaria attended in our center from january 1, 2002 to december 31, 2007. A total of 484 episodes of malaria, 398 of which were included in this study, were identified. Co-infection with HIV was described in 32 cases. All of them occurred in individuals presumably with some degree of semi-immunity. In the coinfected group, there were 13 cases (40.6%) asymptomatic, whereas this event occurred in 99 cases of patients not coinfected (37.2%) (P=0.707). The greater presence of anemia in co-infected patients (62.5% vs 32.3% in non-coinfected [P=0.001]) stands out. In present study, the clinical presentation forms were similar, regardless of the presence or absence of HIV infection. Although the study population does not reflect all possible scenarios of malaria and HIV coinfection, our results indicate the reality of patients attended in the Autonomous Community of Madrid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were compared with…

  16. Institutionalizing provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling for children: an observational case study from Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanga, Jane N; Raymond, Juliette; Towle, Megan S; Mutembo, Simon; Fubisha, Robert Captain; Lule, Frank; Muhe, Lulu

    2012-01-01

    Provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC) is a priority strategy for increasing access for HIV-exposed children to prevention measures, and infected children to treatment and care interventions. This article examines efforts to scale-up paediatric PITC at a second-level hospital located in Zambia's Southern Province, and serving a catchment area of 1.2 million people. Our retrospective case study examined best practices and enabling factors for rapid institutionalization of PITC in Livingstone General Hospital. Methods included clinical observations, key informant interviews with programme management, and a desk review of hospital management information systems (HMIS) uptake data following the introduction of PITC. After PITC roll-out, the hospital experienced considerably higher testing uptake. In a 36-month period following PITC institutionalization, of total inpatient children eligible for PITC (n = 5074), 98.5% of children were counselled, and 98.2% were tested. Of children tested (n = 4983), 15.5% were determined HIV-infected; 77.6% of these results were determined by DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing in children under the age of 18 months. Of children identified as HIV-infected in the hospital's inpatient and outpatient departments (n = 1342), 99.3% were enrolled in HIV care, including initiation on co-trimoxazole prophylaxis. A number of good operational practices and enabling factors in the Livingstone General Hospital experience can inform rapid PITC institutionalization for inpatient and outpatient children. These include the placement of full-time nurse counsellors at key areas of paediatric intake, who interface with patients immediately and conduct testing and counselling. They are reinforced through task-shifting to peer counsellors in the wards. Nurse counsellor capacity to draw specimen for DNA PCR for children under 18 months has significantly enhanced early infant diagnosis. The hospital's bolstered antiretroviral

  17. Prevalence, demographic and clinical characteristics of body dysmorphic disorder among psychiatric outpatients with mood, anxiety or somatoform disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Job; van Rood, Yanda R; van der Wee, Nic J; den Hollander-Gijsman, Margien; van Noorden, Martijn S; Giltay, Erik J; Zitman, Frans G

    2012-09-01

    To describe the prevalence, demographic and clinical characteristics of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) compared with other psychiatric outpatients with a mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder. Outpatients referred for treatment of a mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder were routinely assessed at intake. A structured interview (MINI-Plus), observer-based and self-rating instruments were administered by an independent assessor. Among our sample of 3798 referred patients, 2947 patients were diagnosed with at least one DSM-IV mood, anxiety or somatoform disorder. Of these patients 1.8% (n = 54) met the diagnostic criteria for BDD. In comparison with other outpatients, patients with BDD were on average younger, less often married and were more often living alone. Highly prevalent comorbid diagnoses were major depression (in 46.3% of cases), social anxiety disorder (in 35.2% of cases) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (in 16.7% of cases). Furthermore, patients with BDD had higher scores on the Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S) as well as lower scores on the Short Form 36 social role functioning. BDD is frequently associated with depression, social phobia and OCD. Patients with BDD have more distress and more impaired interpersonal functioning.

  18. Impact of intimate partner violence on clinic attendance, viral suppression and CD4 cell count of women living with HIV in an urban clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jocelyn C; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Glass, Nancy E; Decker, Michele R; Perrin, Nancy; Farley, Jason

    2018-04-01

    The substance abuse, violence and HIV/AIDS (SAVA) syndemic represents a complex set of social determinants of health that impacts the lives of women. Specifically, there is growing evidence that intimate partner violence (IPV) places women at risk for both HIV acquisition and poorer HIV-related outcomes. This study assessed prevalence of IPV in an HIV clinic setting, as well as the associations between IPV, symptoms of depression and PTSD on three HIV-related outcomes-CD4 count, viral load, and missed clinic visits. In total, 239 adult women attending an HIV-specialty clinic were included. Fifty-one percent (95% CI: 45%-58%) reported past year psychological, physical, or sexual intimate partner abuse. In unadjusted models, IPV was associated with having a CD4 count 33% of past year all type clinic visits (OR: 1.535, 95% CI: 0.920-2.560, p = 0.101) or HIV specialty clinic visits (OR: 1.251, 95% CI: 0.732-2.140). In multivariable regression, controlling for substance use, mental health symptoms and demographic covariates, IPV remained associated with CD4 count suppression. The association between IPV and lower CD4 counts, but not adherence markers such as viral suppression and missed visits, indicates a need to examine potential physiologic impacts of trauma that may alter the immune functioning of women living with HIV. Incorporating trauma-informed approaches into current HIV care settings is one opportunity that begins to address IPV in this patient population.

  19. Reasons for attending a general emergency outpatient clinic versus a regular general practitioner – a survey among immigrant and native walk-in patients in Oslo, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore reasons for attending a general emergency outpatient clinic versus a regular general practitioner (RGP). Design Cross-sectional study using a multilingual anonymous questionnaire. Setting Native and immigrant walk-in patients attending a general emergency outpatient clinic in Oslo (Monday–Friday, 08:00–23:00) during 2 weeks in September 2009. Subjects We included 1022 walk-in patients: 565 native Norwegians (55%) and 457 immigrants (45%). Main outcome measures Patients’ reasons for attending an emergency outpatient clinic versus their RGP. Results Among patients reporting an RGP affiliation, 49% tried to contact their RGP before this emergency encounter: 44% of native Norwegian and 58% of immigrant respondents. Immigrants from Africa [odds ratio (OR) = 2.55 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46–4.46)] and Asia [OR = 2.32 (95% CI: 1.42–3.78)] were more likely to contact their RGP before attending the general emergency outpatient clinic compared with native Norwegians. The most frequent reason for attending the emergency clinic was difficulty making an immediate appointment with their RGP. A frequent reason for not contacting an RGP was lack of access: 21% of the native Norwegians versus 4% of the immigrants claimed their RGP was in another district/municipality, and 31% of the immigrants reported a lack of affiliation with the RGP scheme. Conclusions and implications Access to primary care provided by an RGP affects patients’ use of emergency health care services. To facilitate continuity of health care, policymakers should emphasize initiatives to improve access to primary health care services. Key points Access to immediate primary health care provided by a regular general practitioner (RGP) can reduce patients’ use of emergency health care services. The main reason for attending a general emergency outpatient clinic was difficulty obtaining an immediate appointment with an RGP. A frequent reason for native Norwegians

  20. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  1. Respiratory drugs prescribed off-label among children in the outpatient clinics of a hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Nurul Fadilah; Mhd Ali, Adliah; Mohamed Shah, Noraida

    2015-02-01

    Prescribing medicines in an unlicensed and off-label manner for children is a widespread practice around the world. To determine the extent and predictors of off-label respiratory drug prescriptions for children in the outpatient clinics of a hospital in Malaysia. Outpatient clinics at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. The pharmacy-based computer system and medical records of the patients were utilized to collect data from 220 pediatric patients who were prescribed at least one respiratory drug from July 2011 to December 2011. Characteristics of the off-label respiratory drug prescriptions were measured. A total of 134 children (60.9 %) received at least one respiratory drug prescribed in an off-label manner. The most common reasons for the off-label prescribing of drugs were off-label use by indication (31.5 %), followed by higher than the recommended dose (24.9 %) and lower than the recommended frequency (17.1 %). Diphenhydramine was the most common respiratory drug prescribed off-label. The number of medications prescribed was the only significant predictor of off-label prescription of respiratory drugs. Pediatric patients receiving 4-6 medications were 7.8 times more likely to receive at least one off-label respiratory drug compared to pediatric patients that received 1-3 medications (OR 7.8, 95 % CI 1.74-37.44). There was substantial prescribing of respiratory drugs for children in an off-label manner at the outpatient clinics at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre. This highlights the need for more research to be carried out on respiratory drugs in the pediatric population.

  2. Change in quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Rutten, Guy E

    2015-02-01

    To assess the change in level of diabetes quality management in primary care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support. This before-and-after study with a 1-year follow-up surveyed quality managers on six domains of quality management. Questionnaires measured organization of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance results, quality improvement policy, and management strategies (score range 0-100%). Based on the scores, responders received feedback and a benchmark and were granted access to a toolbox of quality improvement instruments. If requested, additional support in improving quality management was available, consisting of an elucidating phone call or a visit from an experienced consultant. After 1 year, the level of quality management was measured again. Of the initially 60 participating care groups, 51 completed the study. The total quality management score improved from 59.8% (95% CI 57.0-62.6%) to 65.1% (62.8-67.5%; P quality management score (P = 0.001). Of the 44 participating outpatient clinics, 28 completed the study. Their total score changed from 65.7% (CI 60.3-71.1%) to 67.3% (CI 62.9-71.7%; P = 0.30). Only the results in the domain multidisciplinary teamwork improved (P = 0.001). Measuring quality management and providing feedback and a benchmark improves the level of quality management in care groups but not in outpatient clinics. The questionnaires might also be a useful asset for other diabetes care groups, such as Accountable Care Organizations. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. Psychiatric disorders in outpatients with borderline intellectual functioning: comparison with both outpatients from regular mental health care and outpatients with mild intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Jannelien; Kapitein-de Haan, Sara; Zitman, Frans G

    2014-04-01

    In the Netherlands, patients with borderline intellectual functioning are eligible for specialized mental health care. This offers the unique possibility to examine the mix of psychiatric disorders in patients who, in other countries, are treated in regular outpatient mental health care clinics. Our study sought to examine the rates of all main Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in outpatients with borderline intellectual functioning of 2 specialized regional psychiatric outpatient departments and to compare these with rates of the same disorders in outpatients from regular mental health care (RMHC) and outpatients with mild intellectual disabilities (IDs). Our study was a cross-sectional, anonymized medical chart review. All participants were patients from the Dutch regional mental health care provider Rivierduinen. Diagnoses of patients with borderline intellectual functioning (borderline intellectual functioning group; n = 235) were compared with diagnoses of patients from RMHC (RMHC group; n = 1026) and patients with mild ID (mild ID group; n = 152). Compared with the RMHC group, psychotic and major depressive disorders were less common in the borderline intellectual functioning group, while posttraumatic stress disorder and V codes were more common. Compared with the mild ID group, psychotic disorders were significantly less common. Mental health problems in people with borderline intellectual functioning may not be well addressed in general psychiatry, or by standard psychiatry for patients with ID. Specific attention to this group in clinical practice and research may be warranted lest they fall between 2 stools.

  4. Wound healing outcomes in a diabetic foot ulcer outpatient clinic at an acute care hospital: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S H; McLaren, A-M

    2017-10-01

    Patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) have an increased risk of lower extremity amputation. A retrospective chart review of patients with DFUs attending the Foot Treatment and Assessment chiropodist-led outpatient clinic at an inner-city academic hospital was conducted to determine wound healing outcomes and characteristics contributing to outcomes. We reviewed the complete clinical history of 279 patients with 332 DFUs spanning over a five-year period. The mean age of patients was 61.5±12.5 years and most patients (83.5%) had one DFU. The majority of wounds (82.5%) were in the forefoot. Overall, 267/332 (80.5%) wounds healed. A greater proportion of wounds healed in the forefoot (82.5%) and midfoot (87.1%) than hindfoot (51.9%; phealing. Our findings are the first to demonstrate the benefits of chiropodists leading an acute care outpatient clinic in the management of DFUs in Canada and delivers wound healing outcomes equivalent to or exceeding those previously published.

  5. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imlay, Hannah; Kaul, Daniel; Rao, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a healthcare-associated infection resulting in significant morbidity. Although immunosuppression is associated with Clostridium difficile infection acquisition and adverse outcomes, the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients has been little studied in the era of antiretroviral therapy. This study identifies the risk factors for acquisition of Clostridium difficile infection in HIV-infected patients. A retrospective, propensity score-matched case-control study design was employed, with patients selected from our institution's outpatient HIV clinic. Clostridium difficile infection cases were defined as having positive stool testing plus an appropriate clinical presentation. The propensity score was generated via multiple logistic regression from year of HIV diagnosis, age at first contact, duration of follow-up, gender, and initial CD4 count. The 46 cases included were matched to a total of 180 controls. Prior antibiotic treatment was a significant predictor of Clostridium difficile infection (odds ratio: 13, 95% confidence interval: 3.49-48.8, p  Clostridium difficile infection in the multivariable model (odds ratio: 15.17, confidence interval: 1.31-175.9, p  = .021). As in the general population, frequent hospitalizations and exposure to antimicrobials are independent predictors of Clostridium difficile infection acquisition in patients with HIV. Additionally, low CD4 count and proton pump inhibitor use are new potentially modifiable variables that can be targeted for prevention of Clostridium difficile infection in future interventional studies.

  6. The effects of additional care by a pulmonary nurse for asthma and COPD patients at a respiratory outpatient clinic: results from a double blind, randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rootmensen, Geert N.; van Keimpema, Anton R. J.; Looysen, Elske E.; van der Schaaf, Letty; de Haan, Rob J.; Jansen, Henk M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of additional information based nursing care program in the treatment of asthma and COPD patients at a pulmonary outpatient clinic. METHODS: In a double blind, randomized clinical trial, 191 patients were allocated to an additional care group or control group.

  7. Using Lean Thinking at an otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic to improve quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leijen-Zeelenberg, Janneke E; Brunings, Jan Wouter; Houkes, Inge; van Raak, Arno J A; Ruwaard, Dirk; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Kremer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Although Lean Thinking has led to considerable improvement in a variety of healthcare settings, its effects on otorhinolaryngology remain underexposed. This study reports on how the implementation of Lean Thinking at an otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic has affected patient and provider satisfaction, waste reduction, and organizational culture. Prospective before-and-after design. The 18-month prospective before-and-after design used mixed methods for data collection and analysis. A survey was conducted to measure satisfaction among patients and providers. Semistructured interviews were conducted to evaluate the effect of Lean Thinking on waste and organizational culture. During the project, 69 issues were posted on the Lean board. Improvements were made on 36 inefficiency issues, not all concerning a specific type of waste. Employees reported considerable improvement in transportation, motion, and waiting. Patient satisfaction was high both at baseline and follow-up and did not change significantly. The effects on provider satisfaction were slight; satisfaction with autonomy and participation decreased significantly, but satisfaction with communication increased significantly. The implementation of Lean Thinking at an otorhinolaryngology outpatient clinic reduced waste and increased provider satisfaction with communication. Although patient satisfaction did not change significantly, it cannot be concluded that the intervention had no effect on perceived quality of care. Other approaches to measure patients' perceptions should be considered. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Managing cancer pain and symptoms of outpatients by rotation to sustained-release hydromorphone: a prospective clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirz, Stefan; Wartenberg, Hans Christian; Elsen, Christian; Wittmann, Maria; Diederichs, Marta; Nadstawek, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this prospective clinical trial we examined the technique of opioid rotation to oral sustained-release hydromorphone for controlling pain and symptoms in outpatients with cancer pain. METHODS: Before and after rotation, 50 patients were assessed by Numerical Analog Scales [Numerical

  9. A formative evaluation of a nurse practitioner-led interprofessional geriatric outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kevin T; McDonald, Cheryl; O'Hara, Sue; Post, Leslie; Silcox, Susan; Gutmanis, Iris A

    2017-07-01

    The number of older adults with multiple complex comorbidities and frailty is expected to increase dramatically in the coming decades, which will necessitate a concomitant increase in the need for skilled clinicians who are able to manage complex geriatric needs. Many physicians, however, lack the required formal training, often leading to long wait-lists for specialist clinics. Yet, clinics led by non-physician professionals specialising in geriatric care could decrease these delays. This article describes the development and evaluation of a nurse practitioner-led interprofessional geriatric outpatient clinic (Inter-D Clinic). A combination of semi-structured clinician interviews, post-clinic follow-up phone calls, satisfaction surveys, and information from the hospital workload management system served as data sources for this formative programme evaluation. Between January 2013 and December 2014, 293 patients were seen in the clinic with the majority being referred for either memory issues (49%) or functional decline (35%). The clinic assessment frequently uncovered other issues, which led to guidance around falls prevention, improved nutrition, medication management, and referrals to available community supports. Both patients and referring physicians were very satisfied with this model of care, which is likely transferable to other locations provided the needed clinical expertise and community support services are available.

  10. Nurse-delivered counselling intervention for parental HIV disclosure: results from a pilot randomized controlled trial in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Jane M; Yang, Joyce P; Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Udell, Wadiya; Bao, Meijuan; Zhang, Lin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to design and conduct a preliminary evaluation of an intervention to assist parents in decision-making about disclosure of their HIV diagnosis to their children. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with blinded assessment. Participants were randomized to intervention or treatment-as-usual (TAU) arms. The study occurred at an outpatient HIV primary care centre in Shanghai, China. Participants were 20 HIV-positive outpatients with at least one child (13-25 years old) who was unaware of the parent's HIV diagnosis. The nurse-delivered intervention involved three, hour-long, individual sessions over 4 weeks. Intervention content comprised family assessment, discussion of advantages and disadvantages of disclosure, psycho-education about cognitive, social and emotional abilities of children at different developmental stages, and disclosure planning and practicing via role-plays. Primary study outcomes for intervention versus TAU arms were self-reported disclosure distress, self-efficacy, and behaviours along a continuum from no disclosure to full disclosure and open communication about HIV. In all cross-sectional (Wald tests) and longitudinal (general estimating equations) analyses, at both postintervention (4 weeks) and follow-up (13 weeks), effects were in the hypothesized directions. Despite the small sample size, most of these between-arm comparisons were statistically significant, with at least one result for each outcome indicating a 'large' effect size. Our results suggest that nurses are able to deliver a counselling intervention in a clinic setting with the potential to alleviate parental distress around HIV disclosure to their children. Findings warrant future trials powered for efficacy.

  11. A Novel Method for Assessing Task Complexity in Outpatient Clinical-Performance Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Amspoker, Amber B; Petersen, Laura A

    2016-04-01

    Clinical-performance measurement has helped improve the quality of health-care; yet success in attaining high levels of quality across multiple domains simultaneously still varies considerably. Although many sources of variability in care quality have been studied, the difficulty required to complete the clinical work itself has received little attention. We present a task-based methodology for evaluating the difficulty of clinical-performance measures (CPMs) by assessing the complexity of their component requisite tasks. Using Functional Job Analysis (FJA), subject-matter experts (SMEs) generated task lists for 17 CPMs; task lists were rated on ten dimensions of complexity, and then aggregated into difficulty composites. Eleven outpatient work SMEs; 133 VA Medical Centers nationwide. Clinical Performance: 17 outpatient CPMs (2000-2008) at 133 VA Medical Centers nationwide. Measure Difficulty: for each CPM, the number of component requisite tasks and the average rating across ten FJA complexity scales for the set of tasks comprising the measure. Measures varied considerably in the number of component tasks (M = 10.56, SD = 6.25, min = 5, max = 25). Measures of chronic care following acute myocardial infarction exhibited significantly higher measure difficulty ratings compared to diabetes or screening measures, but not to immunization measures ([Formula: see text] = 0.45, -0.04, -0.05, and -0.06 respectively; F (3, 186) = 3.57, p = 0.015). Measure difficulty ratings were not significantly correlated with the number of component tasks (r = -0.30, p = 0.23). Evaluating the difficulty of achieving recommended CPM performance levels requires more than simply counting the tasks involved; using FJA to assess the complexity of CPMs' component tasks presents an alternate means of assessing the difficulty of primary-care CPMs and accounting for performance variation among measures and performers. This in turn could be used in designing

  12. A clinical scoring system to prioritise investigation for tuberculosis among adults attending HIV clinics in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Hanifa

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO recommendation for regular tuberculosis (TB screening of HIV-positive individuals with Xpert MTB/RIF as the first diagnostic test has major resource implications.To develop a diagnostic prediction model for TB, for symptomatic adults attending for routine HIV care, to prioritise TB investigation.Cohort study exploring a TB testing algorithm.HIV clinics, South Africa.Representative sample of adult HIV clinic attendees; data from participants reporting ≥1 symptom on the WHO screening tool were split 50:50 to derive, then internally validate, a prediction model.TB, defined as "confirmed" if Xpert MTB/RIF, line probe assay or M. tuberculosis culture were positive; and "clinical" if TB treatment started without microbiological confirmation, within six months of enrolment.Overall, 79/2602 (3.0% participants on ART fulfilled TB case definitions, compared to 65/906 (7.2% pre-ART. Among 1133/3508 (32.3% participants screening positive on the WHO tool, 1048 met inclusion criteria for this analysis: 52/515 (10.1% in the derivation and 58/533 (10.9% in the validation dataset had TB. Our final model comprised ART status (on ART > 3 months vs. pre-ART or ART 1 symptom. We converted this to a clinical score, using clinically-relevant CD4 and BMI categories. A cut-off score of ≥3 identified those with TB with sensitivity and specificity of 91.8% and 34.3% respectively. If investigation was prioritised for individuals with score of ≥3, 68% (717/1048 symptomatic individuals would be tested, among whom the prevalence of TB would be 14.1% (101/717; 32% (331/1048 of tests would be avoided, but 3% (9/331 with TB would be missed amongst those not tested.Our clinical score may help prioritise TB investigation among symptomatic individuals.

  13. Missed opportunities for HIV screening in pharmacies and retail clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Caitlin; Zaller, Nickolas; Bratberg, Jeffrey; Berk, William; Flanigan, Timothy

    2014-04-01

    In the wake of new recommendations to offer HIV screening to everyone aged 13-64 years and to start all people living with HIV/AIDS on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regardless of CD4 count, the need to generate widespread, scalable HIV screening programs is greater than ever. Nearly 50,000 new HIV infections occur in the United States each year, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately half of these new infections are transmitted by individuals who are unaware of their HIV serostatus. Numerous barriers to screening exist, including the lack of primary care for many at-risk patients, expense of screening in traditional settings, and need for repeat testing in high-risk populations. With their relative accessibility and affordability, community pharmacies and retail clinics within those pharmacies are practical and appealing venues for expanded HIV screening. For widespread pharmacy-based testing to become a reality, policymakers and corporate pharmacy leadership would need to develop innovative solutions to the existing time pressures of pharmacists' behind-the-counter functions and absence of reimbursement for direct patient care services. Pharmacists nationwide should also receive training to assist with risk reduction counseling and linkage to care for customers purchasing the new over-the-counter HIV test.

  14. (HIV) INFECTION AMONG ANTENATAL CLINIC ATTENDEES IN St ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was estimated among pregnant women attending clinic at St. ... percentage prevalence by educational status was: women with no formal education 37.5%; those with secondary education, 11.3% and ..... 81% at age 18. These young married girls lack proper.

  15. Treatment Outcomes and Costs of Providing Antiretroviral Therapy at a Primary Health Clinic versus a Hospital-Based HIV Clinic in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Lawrence C.; Rosen, Sydney B.; Brennan, Alana; Moyo, Faith; Sauls, Celeste; Evans, Denise; Modi, Shookdev L.; Sanne, Ian; Fox, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2010 South Africa revised its HIV treatment guidelines to allow the initiation and management of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) by nurses, rather than solely doctors, under a program called NIMART (Nurse Initiated and Managed Antiretroviral Therapy). We compared the outcomes and costs of NIMART between the two major public sector HIV treatment delivery models in use in South Africa today, primary health clinics and hospital-based HIV clinics. Methods and findings The s...

  16. Oral candidiasis as clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS infection in Airlangga University hospital patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranti, A.; Asmarawati, T. P.; Rachman, B. E.; Hadi, U.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis as its clinical manifestation at Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya. This is a descriptive analytic research with cross-sectional design using Chi-Square statistic test. Samples of this study consist of 34 patients using total sampling methods. Those patients were all HIV/AIDS infected patients with oral candidiasis clinical manifestations, who were admitted to Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya from January 2016 to September 2017. Results showed that mostly HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis are male (79.4%), old age (40-75years) total amounted to 58.8%, heterosexual as main risk factor (70%), clinical stadium mostly in stage IV (61.8%), 26% of patients with chronic diarrhea and 56% with pulmonary TB, clinical stages of patients have a significant relation to the incidence of oral candidiasis infection (p=0.024). The most common oral lesions found in people with HIV are Candidiasis. The best management is through routine dental examination and dental precautions to maintain health and achieve a better quality of life.

  17. Survey of young patients with polio and a foreign background at a Swedish post-polio outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werhagen, Lars; Borg, Kristian

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, polio survivors aged under 60 years are non-native Swedes which pose new aspects and challenges to a post-polio outpatient clinic. To analyze the medical data, walking aids, occupational, and family situation in non-native polio survivors aged less than 60 years at a Swedish post-polio outpatient clinic. Retrospective data analysis. Data were retrieved from medical records at the post-polio outpatient clinic. Actual age, age at acute polio infection, walking capacity, pain, concomitant diseases, working and family situation, and ethnical origin were analyzed. Data are presented in numbers and percentage. 153 patients were included. Mean age was 45 (17-60) years, and mean age at acute polio infection was 2 (0-12) years. Paresis of the lower extremities was the most common disability. 10 % were wheelchair dependent. Pain occurred in 70 % with a mean intensity of 55 measured with the visual analog scale. Hypertension was the most common concomitant disease. Half of the polio survivors were working at least part time, and roughly half were singles. Data were comparable with data earlier published in Swedish native polio survivors. Non-native polio survivors aged under 60 years showed similarities in age at acute polio infection, paresis, prevalence, and intensity of pain when compared with native Swedish polio survivors. They were, however, younger, and were less often working and married/cohabitants than native Swedish polio survivors. The results of this study underline the importance of social and vocational rehabilitation tailoring rehabilitation suitable for polio survivors with a foreign background.

  18. Time-driven activity-based costing in an outpatient clinic environment: development, relevance and managerial impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeere, Nathalie; Stouthuysen, Kristof; Roodhooft, Filip

    2009-10-01

    Healthcare managers are continuously urged to provide better patient services at a lower cost. To cope with these cost pressures, healthcare management needs to improve its understanding of the relevant cost drivers. Through a case study, we show how to perform a time-driven activity-based costing of five outpatient clinic's departments and provide evidence of the benefits of such an analysis.

  19. The effect of HIV status on clinical outcomes of surgical sepsis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa (SA), has long been the epicentre of the HIV epidemic, but the impact of HIV co-infection on the clinical outcomes of emergency surgical patients with sepsis remains largely unknown. Objective. To review our experience with the management of patients with HIV ...

  20. Depressive symptoms, HIV medication adherence, and HIV clinical outcomes in Tanzania: a prospective, observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadya M Belenky

    Full Text Available Depressive symptoms have been shown to independently affect both antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and HIV clinical outcomes in high-income countries. We examined the prospective relationship between depressive symptoms and adherence, virologic failure, and suppressed immune function in people living with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania. Data from 403 study participants who were on stable ART and engaged in HIV clinical care were analyzed. We assessed crude and adjusted associations of depressive symptoms and ART adherence, both at baseline and at 12 months, using logistic regression. We used logistic generalized estimating equations to assess the association and 95% confidence intervals (CI between depressive symptoms and both virologic failure and suppressed immune function. Ten percent of participants reported moderate or severe depressive symptoms at baseline and 31% of participants experienced virologic failure (>150 copies/ml over two years. Depressive symptoms were associated with greater odds of reported medication nonadherence at both baseline (Odds Ratio [OR] per 1-unit increase = 1.18, 95% CI [1.12, 1.24] and 12 months (OR = 1.08, 95% CI [1.03, 1.14]. By contrast, increases in depressive symptom score were inversely related to both virologic failure (OR = 0.93, 95% CI [0.87, 1.00] and immune system suppression (OR = 0.88, 95% CI [0.79, 0.99], though the association between depressive symptoms and clinical outcomes was less precise than for the association with nonadherence. Findings indicate a positive association between depressive symptoms and nonadherence, and also an inverse relationship between depressive symptoms and clinical outcomes, possibly due to informative loss to follow-up.

  1. Implementation and evaluation of Parkinson disease management in an outpatient clinical pharmacist-run neurology telephone clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Teodora Cristina; Elharar, Nicole; Garcia, Guadalupe

    2018-05-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive, debilitating neurodegenerative disease that often requires complex pharmacologic treatment regimens. Prior to this clinic, there was no involvement of a clinical pharmacy specialist (CPS) in the outpatient neurology clinic at the West Palm Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center. This was a prospective, quality-improvement project to develop a clinical pharmacist-run neurology telephone clinic and evaluate pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions in an effort to improve the quality of care for patients with PD. Additionally, the CPS conducted medication education groups to 24 patients with PD and their caregivers, if applicable, at this medical center with the purpose of promoting patient knowledge and medication awareness. Medication management was performed via telephone rather than face to face. Only patients with a concomitant mental health diagnosis for which they were receiving at least one psychotropic medication were included for individual visits due to the established scope of practice of the CPS being limited to mental health and primary care medications. Data collection included patient and clinic demographics as well as pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions made for patients enrolled from January 6, 2017, through March 31, 2017. A total of 49 pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions were made for 10 patients. We successfully implemented and evaluated a clinical pharmacist-run neurology telephone clinic for patients with PD. Expansion of this clinic to patients with various neurological disorders may improve access to care using an innovative method of medication management expertise by a CPS.

  2. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badowski ME

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Melissa E Badowski,1 Sarah E Perez2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Section of Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Infectious Diseases Clinic, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol, anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone, or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide. The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (–2.0 to 3.2 kg, dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes. Keywords: dronabinol, weight loss, HIV/AIDS, HIV wasting syndrome, cachexia

  3. High Prevalence of Severe Food Insecurity and Malnutrition among HIV-Infected Adults in Senegal, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekri, Noelle A; Sambou, Jacques; Diaw, Binetou; Sall, El Hadji Ibrahima; Sall, Fatima; Niang, Alassane; Ba, Selly; Ngom Guèye, Ndèye Fatou; Diallo, Mouhamadou Baïla; Hawes, Stephen E; Seydi, Moussa; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and food insecurity are associated with increased mortality and poor clinical outcomes among people living with HIV/AIDS; however, the prevalence of malnutrition and food insecurity among people living with HIV/AIDS in Senegal, West Africa is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and severity of food insecurity and malnutrition among HIV-infected adults in Senegal, and to identify associations between food insecurity, malnutrition, and HIV outcomes. We conducted a cross-sectional study at outpatient clinics in Dakar and Ziguinchor, Senegal. Data were collected using participant interviews, anthropometry, the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale, the Individual Dietary Diversity Scale, and chart review. One hundred and nine HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 participants were enrolled. The prevalence of food insecurity was 84.6% in Dakar and 89.5% in Ziguinchor. The prevalence of severe food insecurity was 59.6% in Dakar and 75.4% in Ziguinchor. The prevalence of malnutrition (BMI insecurity was associated with missing clinic appointments (p = 0.01) and not taking antiretroviral therapy due to hunger (p = 0.02). Malnutrition was associated with lower CD4 cell counts (p = 0.01). Severe food insecurity and malnutrition are highly prevalent among HIV-infected adults in both Dakar and Ziguinchor, and are associated with poor HIV outcomes. Our findings warrant further studies to determine the root causes of malnutrition and food insecurity in Senegal, and the short- and long-term impacts of malnutrition and food insecurity on HIV care. Urgent interventions are needed to address the unacceptably high rates of malnutrition and food insecurity in this population.

  4. Clinical manifestations of primary hyperthyroidism in the elderly patients at the out-patient clinic of Srinagarind Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpawattana, Panita; Sawanyawisut, Kittisak; Mahankanukrau, Ajanee; Wongwipaporn, Chaiyasit

    2006-02-01

    The authors reviewed the outpatient charts diagnosed as hyperthyroidism at Srinagarind Hospital from June 1998-June 2004. The objective was to compare the clinical features of hyperthyroidism in patients older and younger than 60 years old. There were 922 cases enrolled, 84 cases (9.11%) were 60 years old and above. The female: male ratio was 3.4:1 and 4:1 and the mean ages were 64.2 +/- 3.7 and 37.4 +/- 11.2 years old in the elder and younger group, respectively. The common presentations were dyspnea (94.1, 96.5%), weight loss (93.8, 87.9%) and palpitation (83.3, 93.1%) in the elder and younger, respectively. The more significant clinical presentations in the elder group were atrial fibrillation, weakness and anorexia whereas exophthalmos, goiter, heat intolerance and hyperhidrosis were not as frequent. Thus, the classic presentations often lacked in the elder group. Therefore, unexplained AF, weakness and anorexia should not exclude hyperthyroidism even with paucity of typical clinical features.

  5. Antiretroviral Therapy Helps HIV-Positive Women Navigate Social Expectations for and Clinical Recommendations against Childbearing in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Kastner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding factors that influence pregnancy decision-making and experiences among HIV-positive women is important for developing integrated reproductive health and HIV services. Few studies have examined HIV-positive women’s navigation through the social and clinical factors that shape experiences of pregnancy in the context of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART. We conducted 25 semistructured interviews with HIV-positive, pregnant women receiving ART in Mbarara, Uganda in 2011 to explore how access to ART shapes pregnancy experiences. Main themes included: (1 clinical counselling about pregnancy is often dissuasive but focuses on the importance of ART adherence once pregnant; (2 accordingly, women demonstrate knowledge about the role of ART adherence in maintaining maternal health and reducing risks of perinatal HIV transmission; (3 this knowledge contributes to personal optimism about pregnancy and childbearing in the context of HIV; and (4 knowledge about and adherence to ART creates opportunities for HIV-positive women to manage normative community and social expectations of childbearing. Access to ART and knowledge of the accompanying lowered risks of mortality, morbidity, and HIV transmission improved experiences of pregnancy and empowered HIV-positive women to discretely manage conflicting social expectations and clinical recommendations regarding childbearing.

  6. Assessment of satisfaction with pharmaceutical services in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in outpatient HIV treatment setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agu, Kenneth Anene; Oqua, Dorothy; Agada, Peter; Ohiaeri, Samuel I; Adesina, Afusat; Abdulkareem, Mohammed Habeeb; King, Rosalyn C; Wutoh, Anthony K

    2014-06-01

    The patient's perception and satisfaction are increasingly considered as a useful factor in the assessment of competency of health care providers and quality of care. However, these patient focused assessments are largely ignored when assessing health care outcomes. The study assessed the perception and satisfaction of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) with pharmaceutical services received in outpatient HIV treatment settings. Seventeen HIV treatment centres in Nigeria. This cross-sectional survey included 2,700 patients randomly selected from 26,319 HIV patients on ART, who received pharmaceutical services in the study setting. A study-specific Likert-type instrument was administered to the participants at point of exit from the pharmacy. Midpoint of the 5-point scale was computed and scores above it were regarded as positive while below as negative. Chi-square was used for inferential statistics. All reported p values were 2-sided at 95 % confidence interval (CI). Patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical services. Of 2,700 patients sampled, data from 1,617 (59.9 %) were valid for analysis; 62.3 % were aged 26-40 years and 65.4 % were females. The participants had received pharmaceutical services for a mean duration of 25.2 (95 % CI 24.3-26.1) months. Perception of participants regarding the appearance of pharmacy was positive while that regarding the pharmacists' efforts to solve patients' medication related problems was negative. The participants' rating of satisfaction with the waiting time to access pharmaceutical services was negative; the satisfaction decreases with increasing waiting time. However, the satisfaction with the overall quality of pharmaceutical services received was rated as positive; 90.0 % reported that they got the kind of pharmaceutical services they wanted; 98.2 % would come back to the pharmacy if they were to seek help again and would recommend services to others. The level of satisfaction was found to be associated with

  7. The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on quality of life in a multiracial South African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, E A; Wood, R

    1996-04-01

    We set out to document quality of life in South African HIV subjects, using the Medical Outcomes Survey (MOS) SF-36 instrument, and to determine whether this was affected by race, gender or clinical stage of disease. A cross-sectional survey of 134 HIV outpatients (42 White, 49 Mixed race, 43 Black) and 114 healthy non-medical hospital personnel (36 White, 37 Mixed race, 42 Black) was carried out at a referral centre for HIV patients in the Western Cape region of South Africa. Scores on eight scales measuring different aspects of quality of life were calculated. Black female controls scored significantly lower on all scales (p impacts early on all aspects of quality of life and that this impact is largely independent of racial origin.

  8. HIV Rapid Testing in Substance Abuse Treatment: Implementation Following a Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, L. F.; Korte, J. E.; Holmes, B. E.; Gooden, L.; Matheson, T.; Feaster, D. J.; Leff, J. A.; Wilson, L.; Metsch, L. R.; Schackman, B. R.

    2011-01-01

    The Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration has promoted HIV testing and counseling as an evidence-based practice. Nevertheless, adoption of HIV testing in substance abuse treatment programs has been slow. This article describes the experience of a substance abuse treatment agency where, following participation in a clinical trial,…

  9. Integration of HIV and TB services results in improved TB treatment outcomes and earlier prioritized ART initiation in a large urban HIV clinic in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Sabine M; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Katabira, Catherine; Mbidde, Peter; Lange, Joep M A; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Coutinho, Alex; Manabe, Yukari C

    2012-06-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected patients should be integrated with HIV care. In December 2008, a separate outdoor-integrated TB/HIV clinic was instituted for attendees of a large urban HIV clinic in Uganda. We sought to evaluate associated TB and HIV treatment outcomes. Routinely collected clinical, pharmacy, and laboratory data were merged with TB clinic data for patients initiating TB treatment in 2009 and with TB register data for patients in 2007. TB treatment outcomes and (timing of) antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in ART-naive patients [overall and stratified by CD4+ T cell (CD4) count] in 2007 and 2009 were compared. Nosocomial transmission rates could not be assessed. Three hundred forty-six patients were initiated on TB treatment in 2007 and 366 in 2009. Median CD4 counts at TB diagnosis did not differ. TB treatment cure or completion increased from 62% to 68%, death or default decreased from 33% to 25% (P ART-naive TB patients were initiated on ART in 2009 versus 2007 (57% and 66%, P = 0.031), but this decrease was only in patients with CD4 counts >250 cells per cubic millimeter (19% vs. 48%, P = 0.003). More patients were started on ART during TB treatment (94% vs. 78%, P ART initiation. This supports rollout of a fully integrated TB/HIV service delivery model throughout high-prevalence TB and HIV settings.

  10. Vaginal hysterectomy, an outpatient procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh, Marie Ellström; Hauso, Wenche

    2012-11-01

    To report our experience of treating women undergoing vaginal hysterectomy in an outpatient setting and to identify risk factors for hospital admission and women dissatisfied with care. Prospective observational report. department of obstetrics and gynecology, university hospital in Norway. 150 women who underwent vaginal hysterectomy at the outpatient clinic from February 2009 to April 2010. Perioperative data were collected prospectively and case notes were searched for complications. On the first postoperative day all women were contacted by telephone by a nurse. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to monitor pain and nausea during the stay at the outpatient clinic and the day after surgery. VAS was also used to specify the women's degree of satisfaction with care the day after surgery. The number of women who could be discharged from the outpatient unit and had a satisfaction score of ≥7 the day after surgery. Of the 150 women, 84% could be discharged after a mean observation period of 276 min (SD ± 80 min). The mean satisfaction score was 9.0, SD ± 1.4, and 92.6% of the women reported ≥7 points in the satisfaction score. No women with serious complications were sent home. Using a multivariable logistic regression model only pain at discharge was found as significant (p= 0.009) for admittance to hospital. Vaginal hysterectomy is a feasible outpatient procedure and the majority of women were satisfied with the care they received. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. Modernizing Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria: Recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology–Friends of Cancer Research HIV Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Ison, Gwynn; Rudek, Michelle A.; Noy, Ariela; Schwartz, Karl; Bruinooge, Suanna; Schenkel, Caroline; Miller, Barry; Dunleavy, Kieron; Wang, Judy; Zeldis, Jerome; Little, Richard F.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose People with HIV are living longer as a result of effective antiretroviral therapy. Cancer has become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. However, studies of novel cancer therapeutics have historically excluded patients with HIV. Critical review of eligibility criteria related to HIV is required to accelerate development of and access to effective therapeutics for HIV-infected patients with cancer and make studies more generalizable to this patient population. Methods From January through April 2016, the HIV Working Group conducted a series of teleconferences; a review of 46 New Drug Applications from registration studies of unique agents studied in adults with cancer that led to the initial US Food and Drug Administration approval of that agent from 2011 to 2015; and a review of HIV-related eligibility criteria from National Cancer Institute–sponsored studies. Results were discussed and refined at a multistakeholder workshop held May 12, 2016. The HIV Working Group developed recommendations for eligibility criteria that focus on pharmacologic and immunologic considerations in this patient population and that balance patient safety, access to appropriate investigational agents, and study integrity. Results Exclusion of patients with HIV remains common in most studies of novel cancer agents. Models for HIV-related eligibility criteria in National Cancer Institute–sponsored studies are instructive. HIV infection itself should no longer be an exclusion criterion for most studies. Eligibility criteria related to HIV infection that address concurrent antiretroviral therapy and immune status should be designed in a manner that is appropriate for a given cancer. Conclusion Expanding clinical trial eligibility to be more inclusive of patients with HIV is justified in most cases and may accelerate the development of effective therapies in this area of unmet clinical need. PMID:28968173

  12. Modernizing Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria: Recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology-Friends of Cancer Research HIV Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldrick, Thomas S; Ison, Gwynn; Rudek, Michelle A; Noy, Ariela; Schwartz, Karl; Bruinooge, Suanna; Schenkel, Caroline; Miller, Barry; Dunleavy, Kieron; Wang, Judy; Zeldis, Jerome; Little, Richard F

    2017-11-20

    Purpose People with HIV are living longer as a result of effective antiretroviral therapy. Cancer has become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. However, studies of novel cancer therapeutics have historically excluded patients with HIV. Critical review of eligibility criteria related to HIV is required to accelerate development of and access to effective therapeutics for HIV-infected patients with cancer and make studies more generalizable to this patient population. Methods From January through April 2016, the HIV Working Group conducted a series of teleconferences; a review of 46 New Drug Applications from registration studies of unique agents studied in adults with cancer that led to the initial US Food and Drug Administration approval of that agent from 2011 to 2015; and a review of HIV-related eligibility criteria from National Cancer Institute-sponsored studies. Results were discussed and refined at a multistakeholder workshop held May 12, 2016. The HIV Working Group developed recommendations for eligibility criteria that focus on pharmacologic and immunologic considerations in this patient population and that balance patient safety, access to appropriate investigational agents, and study integrity. Results Exclusion of patients with HIV remains common in most studies of novel cancer agents. Models for HIV-related eligibility criteria in National Cancer Institute-sponsored studies are instructive. HIV infection itself should no longer be an exclusion criterion for most studies. Eligibility criteria related to HIV infection that address concurrent antiretroviral therapy and immune status should be designed in a manner that is appropriate for a given cancer. Conclusion Expanding clinical trial eligibility to be more inclusive of patients with HIV is justified in most cases and may accelerate the development of effective therapies in this area of unmet clinical need.

  13. Clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients diagnosed at a tertiary care centre in Kashmir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, M.A.; Ahmad, P.M.; Siddeque, M.A.; Sofi, F.A.; Ahmad, S.N.; Dar, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To study the clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients diagnosed at a tertiary care centre. Methods: The study was conducted on a group of 1141 patients suspected of having HIV/AIDS on clinical grounds. Screening was done using different Elisa's as advised by NACO and those confirmed as HIV positive were studied for their clinical spectrum and different demographic parameters. Results: Out of 1141 patients tested, 26 proved to have HIV 1 infection with no case of HIV 2 detected. Mean age of presentation was 40.04 +- 7 years, main age group affected 31-40 years and a male: female ratio of 4.2:1 was observed. More than 42% were non Kashmiris with armed forces outnumbering all other occupational classes. Heterosexual transmission was the commonest with married out numbering unmarried. Fever, asthenia and weight loss were the predominant symptoms and pulmonary tuberculosis and oropharyngeal candidiasis commonest opportunistic infections. Conclusion: The clinical and demographic profile of HIV/AIDS patients in Kashmir is largely similar to the rest of India. Kashmir no longer stands immune to the menace of HIV/AIDS. With increasing globalization, frequent travel and change in social values the state is likely to witness an alarming rise in new cases unless a multi pronged approach is undertaken to control the spread. (author)

  14. Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and therapeutic differences in tuberculosis disease in patients with and without HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanz, Javier; Lago-Gómez, María Rosa; Rodríguez-Zurita, María Elena; Martín-Echevarría, Esteban; Torralba, Miguel

    2018-04-23

    Our objective is to analyze the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in our population and to compare the characteristics of patients with and without HIV infection. Clinical-epidemiological retrospective cohort study that included patients diagnosed with TB with and without HIV infection between 2005-2016 in the province of Guadalajara (Spain). Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and therapeutic variables were assessed, including microbiological resistances. TB was diagnosed in 261 patients. There were 25 patients (9.6%) who had HIV infection. Patients with HIV infection were predominantly males, had higher incidence of hepatitis C virus, a higher percentage of extrapulmonary TB, a higher prevalence of resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin, a greater paradoxical response and a longer average hospital stay. On the other hand, they had a lower percentage of positive tuberculin skin test and positive sputum smear (microscopy). A significant percentage of TB patients had no serology for HIV. Patients with HIV infection show remarkable differences in epidemiological, clinical and resistance variables to antituberculosis drugs. A high percentage of patients with TB were not tested for HIV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. HIV-associated TB syndemic: A growing clinical challenge worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Theresa Montales

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The association of tuberculosis (TB with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS over the past several years has become an emerging syndemic. Approximately 10% of people living with HIV (PLHIV with latent TB infection will develop active TB disease each year. In this review, we highlight that this phenomenon is not limited to high endemic regions like Afro-Asian nations, but globalization/migration is causing increased case detection even in developed nations such as the United States (US. Active screening should be performed for tuberculosis in PLHIV. A high degree of clinical suspicion for tuberculosis is warranted in PLHIV presenting with fever, cough and unintentional weight loss. HIV-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB coinfection is often paucibacillary, precluding diagnosis by conventional diagnostics and/or smear-microscopy/culture. Improved detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis is now possible by incorporation of the GeneXPERT MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid Inc, Sunnyvale, USA. The World Health Organization (WHO recommends instituting immediate therapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in conjunction with ongoing or newly introduced antiretroviral therapy (ART. Vigilance is required to detect drug-induced organ injuries, and early-treatment induced immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS. Collaborating MTB and HIV activities in concentrated HIV epidemic settings should become a high public health priority.

  16. Associations between the phosphatidylethanol (PEth) alcohol biomarker and self-reported alcohol use in a sample of HIV-infected outpatient drinkers in western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K.; Gakinya, Benson N.; Mwaniki, Michael M.; Keter, Alfred K.; Lee, Hana; Loxley, Michelle P.; Klein, Debra A.; Sidle, John E.; Martino, Steve; Baliddawa, Joyce B.; Schlaudt, Kathryn L.; Maisto, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background To counteract the syndemics of HIV and alcohol in sub-Saharan Africa, international collaborations have developed interventions to reduce alcohol consumption. Reliable and accurate methods are needed to estimate alcohol use outcomes. A direct alcohol biomarker called phosphatidylethanol (PEth) has been shown to validate heavy, daily drinking, but the literature indicates mixed results for moderate and non-daily drinkers, including among HIV-infected populations. This study examined the associations of the PEth biomarker with self-report alcohol use at 2 time points in 127 HIV-infected outpatient drinkers in western Kenya. Methods Participants were consecutively enrolled in a randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of a behavioral intervention to reduce alcohol use in Eldoret, Kenya. They endorsed current alcohol use, and a minimum score of 3 on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption or consuming ≥ 6 drinks per occasion at least monthly in the past year. Study interviews and blood draws were conducted at baseline and at 3 months post-treatment from July 2012 through September 2013. Alcohol use was assessed using the Timeline Followback questionnaire. Blood samples were analyzed for presence of the PEth biomarker and were compared to self-reported alcohol use. We also conducted semi-structured interviews with 14 study completers in February through March 2014. Results Baseline data indicated an average of moderate-heavy alcohol use: 50% drinking days and a median of 4.5 drinks per drinking day. At baseline, 46% of women (31 of 67) and 8% of men (5 of 60) tested negative for PEth (p<.001). At the 3-month follow-up, 93% of women (25 of 27) and 97% of men (30 of 31) who reported drinking tested positive, while 70% of women (28 of 40) and 35% of men (10 of 29) who denied drinking tested negative for PEth. Interviews were consistent with self-reported alcohol use among 13 individuals with negative baseline results. Conclusions These

  17. Clinical and Emotional Factors Related to Erectile Dysfunction in HIV-Infected Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumaz, Carmina R; Ayestaran, Aintzane; Perez-Alvarez, Nuria; Muñoz-Moreno, Jose A; Ferrer, Maria Jose; Negredo, Eugenia; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2017-05-01

    The prevalence and associated factors of erectile dysfunction (ED) in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected men remain controversial. The authors evaluated ED, clinical, and emotional variables in a group of 501 HIV-infected men in a cross-sectional 4-month observational study. ED was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function-5 and emotional status using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire. Median age (interquartile range) was 42 (35, 48) years. Time since HIV diagnosis was 6.3 (2.6, 17.1) years, 92% were taking antiretroviral treatment and 81.8% had an HIV-RNA viral load emotional status seemed to play a fundamental role in its presence.

  18. Bloodstream Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among HIV patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-23

    This podcast looks at bloodstream infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogens among outpatients infected with HIV in Southeast Asia. CDC health scientist Kimberly McCarthy discusses the study and why bloodstream infections occur in HIV-infected populations.  Created: 9/23/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/23/2010.

  19. Pregnancy in HIV clinical trials in Sub Saharan Africa: failure of consent or contraception?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Ssali

    Full Text Available Higher than expected pregnancy rates have been observed in HIV related clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa. We designed a qualitative study to explore the factors contributing to high pregnancy rates among participants in two HIV clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa.Female and male participants enrolled in one of two clinical HIV trials in south-west Uganda were approached. The trials were a phase III microbicide efficacy trial among HIV negative women using vaginal gel (MDP; and a trial of primary prevention prophylaxis for invasive cryptococcal disease using fluconazole among HIV infected men and women in Uganda (CRYPTOPRO. 14 focus group discussions and 8 in-depth interviews were conducted with HIV positive and negative women and their male partners over a six month period. Areas explored were their experiences about why and when one should get pregnant, factors affecting use of contraceptives, HIV status disclosure and trial product use.All respondents acknowledged being advised of the importance of avoiding pregnancy during the trial. Factors reported to contribute to pregnancy included; trust that the investigational product (oral capsules/vaginal gel would not harm the baby, need for children, side effects that led to inconsistent contraceptive use, low acceptance of condom use among male partners. Attitudes towards getting pregnant are fluid within couples over time and the trials often last for more than a year. Researchers need to account for high pregnancy rates in their sample size calculations, and consider lesser used female initiated contraceptive options e.g. diaphragm or female condoms. In long clinical trials where there is a high fetal or maternal risk due to investigational product, researchers and ethics committees should consider a review of participants contraceptive needs/pregnancy desire review after a fixed period, as need for children, partners and health status of participants may alter over time.

  20. Risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis: a clinic-based case control study in The Gambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adegbola Richard A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tuberculosis (TB epidemic in Africa is on the rise, even in low-HIV prevalence settings. Few studies have attempted to identify possible reasons for this. We aimed to identify risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis in those attending a general outpatients clinic in The Gambia, a sub-Saharan African country with relatively low HIV prevalence in the community and in TB patients. Methods We conducted a case control study at the Medical Research Council Outpatients' clinic in The Gambia. Pulmonary TB cases were at least 15 years old, controls were age and sex matched clinic attendees. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results 100 sputum smear positive TB cases and 200 clinic controls were recruited. HIV prevalence was 6.1% in cases and 3.3% in controls. Multivariable assessment of host factors showed that risk of TB was increased among the Jola ethnic group and smokers, and decreased in those in a professional occupation. Assessment of environmental factors showed an increased risk with household crowding, history of household exposure to a known TB case, and absence of a ceiling in the house. In a combined multivariable host-environment model, the risk of TB increased with crowding, exposure to a known TB case, as well as amongst the Jola ethnic group. Conclusion In The Gambia, household crowding and past household exposure to a known TB case are the standout risk factors for TB disease. Further research is needed to identify why risk of TB seems to differ according to ethnicity.

  1. Clinical Course, Radiological Manifestations, and Outcome of Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia in HIV Patients and Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Ebner

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP is a frequent opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients. In literature, presentation and outcome of PCP differs between patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and renal transplant recipients (RTRs.We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients with PCP based on the HIV and renal transplant registries at our institution. Radiological and clinical data from all confirmed PCP cases between 2005 and 2012 were compared.Forty patients were included: 16 with HIV and 24 RTRs. Radiologically, HIV patients had significantly more areas of diffuse lung affection (81% HIV vs. 25% RTR; p = 0.02, more ground glass nodules 5-10 mm (69% vs. 4%; p = 80% in both groups. Duration from illness onset to hospital presentation was longer in the HIV patients (median of 18 vs. 10 days (p = 0.02, implying a less fulminant clinical course. Sixty percent of PCP cases in RTRs occurred >12 months after transplantation. Lengths of hospitalization, admission rates to the intensive care unit, and requirements for mechanical ventilation were similar. Outcome in both groups was favourable.While important differences in radiological presentation of PCP between HIV patients and RTRs were found, clinical presentation was similar. PCP only rarely presented with fulminant respiratory symptoms requiring ICU admission, with similar results and outcomes for HIV patients and RTRs. Early diagnosis and treatment is mandatory for clinical success.

  2. Outpatient Tinnitus Clinic, Self-Help Web Platform, or Mobile Application to Recruit Tinnitus Study Samples?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Probst

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For understanding the heterogeneity of tinnitus, large samples are required. However, investigations on how samples recruited by different methods differ from each other are lacking. In the present study, three large samples each recruited by different means were compared: N = 5017 individuals registered at a self-help web platform for tinnitus (crowdsourcing platform Tinnitus Talk, N = 867 users of a smart mobile application for tinnitus (crowdsensing platform TrackYourTinnitus, and N = 3786 patients contacting an outpatient tinnitus clinic (Tinnitus Center of the University Hospital Regensburg. The three samples were compared regarding age, gender, and duration of tinnitus (month or years perceiving tinnitus; subjective report using chi-squared tests. The three samples significantly differed from each other in age, gender and tinnitus duration (p < 0.05. Users of the TrackYourTinnitus crowdsensing platform were younger, users of the Tinnitus Talk crowdsourcing platform had more often female gender, and users of both newer technologies (crowdsourcing and crowdsensing had more frequently acute/subacute tinnitus (<3 months and 4–6 months as well as a very long tinnitus duration (>20 years. The implications of these findings for clinical research are that newer technologies such as crowdsourcing and crowdsensing platforms offer the possibility to reach individuals hard to get in contact with at an outpatient tinnitus clinic. Depending on the aims and the inclusion/exclusion criteria of a given study, different recruiting strategies (clinic and/or newer technologies offer different advantages and disadvantages. In general, the representativeness of study results might be increased when tinnitus study samples are recruited in the clinic as well as via crowdsourcing and crowdsensing.

  3. Transitioning HIV-Positive Adolescents to Adult Care: Lessons Learned From Twelve Adolescent Medicine Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Amanda E; Philbin, Morgan M; DuVal, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2016-01-01

    To maximize positive health outcomes for youth with HIV as they transition from youth to adult care, clinical staff need strategies and protocols to help youth maintain clinic engagement and medication adherence. Accordingly, this paper describe transition processes across twelve clinics within the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) to provide lessons learned and inform the development of transition protocols to improve health outcomes as youth shift from adolescent to adult HIV care. During a large multi-method Care Initiative program evaluation, three annual visits were completed at each site from 2010-2012 and conducted 174 semi-structured interviews with clinical and program staff (baseline n=64, year 1 n=56, year 2=54). The results underscore the value of adhering to recent American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) transition recommendations, including: developing formal transition protocols, preparing youth for transition, facilitating youth's connection to the adult clinic, and identifying necessary strategies for transition evaluation. Transitioning youth with HIV involves targeting individual-, provider-, and system-level factors. Acknowledging and addressing key barriers is essential for developing streamlined, comprehensive, and context-specific transition protocols. Adolescent and adult clinic involvement in transition is essential to reduce service fragmentation, provide coordinated and continuous care, and support individual and community level health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Early HIV Diagnosis Leads to Significantly Decreased Costs in the First 2 Years of HIV Care in an Urban Charity Hospital in New Orleans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Jason; Katz, Morgan; Pathmanathan, Ishani; Myers, Leann; Van Sickels, Nicholas; Seal, Paula Sereebutra; Richey, Lauren E

    We undertook a retrospective cohort study of patients with a positive HIV test in the emergency department who were then linked to care. Inpatient, outpatient, and emergency costs were collected for the first 2 years after HIV diagnosis. Fifty-six patients met the inclusion criteria; they were predominantly uninsured (73%) and African American (89%). The median total cost for a newly diagnosed patient over the first 2 years was US$36 808, driven predominantly by outpatient costs of US$17 512. Median inpatient and total costs were significantly different between the lowest (499 cells/mm 3 ) CD4 count categories (US$21 878 vs US$6607, P <.05; US$61 378 vs US$18 837, P <.05, respectively). Total costs were significantly different between viral load categories <100 000 HIV-RNA copies/mL and ≥100 000 HIV-RNA copies/mL (US$28 219 vs US$49 482, P <.05). Costs were significantly lower among patients diagnosed earlier in their disease. Decreased cost is another factor supporting early diagnosis and linkage to care for patients with HIV.

  5. Prevalence and determinants for malnutrition in geriatric outpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.; Lonterman-Monasch, S.; de Vries, O.J.; Danner, S.A.; Kramer, M.H.H.; Muller, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background & aims: Few data is available on the nutritional status of geriatric outpatients. The aim of this study is to describe the nutritional status and its clinical correlates of independently living geriatric older individuals visiting a geriatric outpatient department. Methods: From 2005 to

  6. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badowski, Melissa E; Perez, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol), anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone), or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide). The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (-2.0 to 3.2 kg), dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes.

  7. [Variation in the pathology attended in out-patient Neurology Clinics: a demented future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera-Guitart, J; Pedro Cano, M J

    2003-10-01

    We analyze the changes observed between 1996 and 2001 in the distribution of the pathology attended and the follow up model used by the out-patient Neurology Clinic in the Marina Alta area, in order to confirm possible variations that may have repercussions for Human Resource needs in the provision of adequate neurological care. We prospectively registered the attendance records for visits made to the Out-patient Neurology Clinic of Marina Alta in 1996. The variation coefficients between both series were calculated and compared. The average age of patients increased in 5 years. The number of patients attended increased 42.3%, new patients 40%, visits 13%, the "Review visit/First Visit" ratio reduced 29%. The attendance of patients with Cognitive Impairment (Cog. Imp.) doubled. There were no changes in the origins of the patients. Requests due to Cog. Imp. and parkinsonism increased significantly from Primary Care and Emergency Department. The delay to be attended increased 23%. Discharges increased 43.9%, highlighting an increase of 144% observed in the Cog. Imp. group. Changes have been observed in: the age of the population studied; the follow up of patients; the delay in attending them; and the pathology attended, with a significant increase in demand due to neurodegenerative pathology (especially Cog. Imp.). All this requires an increase in care needs that the Health Service has not been able to assume, creating an incongruous care model: we suggest a direct follow up model and offer a consultancy model.

  8. Lymphogranuloma venereum and HIV infection: misdiagnosed as Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sheel; Hay, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The report describes a young Caucasian homosexual man who presented with a 4-month history of bloody diarrhoea and weight loss. Over the next 4 months he was investigated for inflammatory bowel disease and subsequently started on mesalazine and prednisolone as an outpatient. Within a month of starting treatment his symptoms worsened, leading to his self-referral to the genitourinary medicine clinic. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with advanced HIV infection and lymphogranuloma venereum infection. The patient was treated with doxycycline for 3 weeks and started on antiretrovirals. One month later the patient is symptom free with a recovering immune system. PMID:22797476

  9. HIV-1 Immunogen: an overview of almost 30 years of clinical testing of a candidate therapeutic vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Gina M; Angel, Jonathan B

    2016-07-01

    Although current antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV infection into a chronic, manageable disease, ART does not cure HIV infection. Furthermore, the majority of the world's infected individuals live in resource-limited countries in which access to ART is limited. Thus, the development of an effective therapeutic HIV vaccine would be an invaluable treatment alternative. Developed by the late Dr. Jonas Salk, HIV-1 Immunogen (Remune®) is a candidate therapeutic vaccine that has been studied in thousands of HIV-infected individuals in more than a dozen clinical trials during almost three decades. This Drug Evaluation, which summarizes the results of these trials that have shown the vaccine to be safe and immunogenic, also discusses the contradictory and controversial conclusions drawn from the phases 2, 2/3 and 3 trials that assessed the clinical efficacy of this vaccine. Given the lack of unequivocal clinical benefits of HIV-1 Immunogen despite almost 30 years of extensive testing, it does not appear, in our view, that this vaccine is a clinically effective immunotherapy. However, inclusion of this vaccine in the newly proposed 'Kick/Shock and Kill' strategy for HIV eradication, or use as a prophylactic vaccine, could be considered for future trials.

  10. HIV infection among foreign transsexual sex workers in Rome: prevalence, behavior patterns, and seroconversion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spizzichino, L; Zaccarelli, M; Rezza, G; Ippolito, G; Antinori, A; Gattari, P

    2001-07-01

    The Azienda Sanitaria Locale Roma E (ASL-RME) outpatient clinic is the main reference center in Rome for HIV testing of foreign people. To define the prevalence and incidence of HIV infection among foreign transsexual sex workers attending the center. A cross-sectional, follow-up study was conducted. Between 1993 and 1999, 353 transsexuals attended the ASL-RME. They were from Colombia (n = 208), Brazil (n = 122), and other countries (n = 23). Most of these transsexuals reported having 5 to 10 partners per day. The overall HIV prevalence was 38.2%, which multivariate analysis found to be associated with origin from Brazil and a higher number of sex partners. The observed HIV seroconversion rate was 4.1 per 100 person-years, and non-regular condom use was the only factor related to seroconversion. The data from this study suggest that promotion of safer sex practices and regular condom use still is the main priority among marginalized population subgroups, such as foreign prostitutes, involved in sex activities that put them at risk for HIV infection.

  11. Emergency in the clinic: a simulation curriculum to improve outpatient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve; Baty, Gillian; Rask, John; Chungtuyco, Michelle; Pereda, Brenda; Leeman, Lawrence

    2017-12-01

    Emergency response skills are essential when events such as seizure, anaphylaxis, or hemorrhage occur in the outpatient setting. As services and procedures increasingly move outside the hospital, training to manage complications may improve outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate a simulation-based curriculum in outpatient emergency management skills with the outcome measures of graded objective performance and learner self-efficacy. This pre- and postcurriculum study enrolled residents and fellows in Obstetrics and Gynecology and Family Medicine in a simulation-based, outpatient emergency management curriculum. Learners completed self-efficacy questionnaires and were videotaped managing 3 medical emergency scenarios (seizure, over-sedation/cardiopulmonary arrest, and hemorrhage) in the simulation laboratory both before and after completion of the curriculum. Evaluators who were blinded to training level scored the simulation performance videotapes using a graded rubric with critical action checklists. Scenario scores were assigned in 5 domains and globally. Paired t-tests were used to determine differences pre- and postcurriculum. Thirty residents completed the curriculum and pre- and postcurriculum testing. Subjects' objective performance scores improved in all 5 domains (Pimprovement. When scores were stratified by previous outpatient simulation experience, subjects with previous experience improved in all but management of excess sedation. Pre- and postcurriculum self-efficacy evaluations demonstrated improvement in all 7 measured areas: confidence, use of appropriate resources, communication skills, complex airway management, bag mask ventilation, resuscitation, and hemorrhage management. Self-efficacy assessment showed improvement in confidence managing outpatient emergencies (P=.001) and ability to communicate well in emergency situations (Pimproved both self-efficacy and objectively rated performance scores in management of outpatient medical

  12. Sociodemographic and clinical factors of women with HPV and their association with HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspar, Joice; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Reis, Renata Karina; Gir, Elucir

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the association between HIV-seropositive or HIV-seronegative status and the sociodemographic and clinical variables of women with genital HPV infection.METHOD: cross-sectional, retrospective study in a reference service in Ribeirão Preto. A total of 824 women undergoing HIV testing who had high or low grade cervical intraepithelial lesions or condylomatous genital lesions caused by HPV were studied. The chi-square test and logistic regression analysis with the calculati...

  13. Nurse-delivered counselling intervention for parental HIV disclosure: Results from a pilot randomized controlled trial in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Jane M.; Yang, Joyce P.; Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-ti; Udell, Wadiya; Bao, Meijuan; Zhang, Lin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to design and conduct a preliminary evaluation of an intervention to assist parents in decision-making about disclosure of their HIV diagnosis to their children. Design This was a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with blinded assessment. Participants were randomized to intervention or treatment-as-usual (TAU) arms. Setting The study occurred at an outpatient HIV primary care centre in Shanghai, China. Participants Participants were 20 HIV-positive outpatients with at least one child (13–25 years old) who was unaware of the parent’s HIV diagnosis. Intervention The nurse-delivered intervention involved three, hour-long, individual sessions over 4 weeks. Intervention content comprised family assessment, discussion of advantages and disadvantages of disclosure, psycho-education about cognitive, social and emotional abilities of children at different developmental stages, and disclosure planning and practicing via role-plays. Main outcome measure(s) Primary study outcomes for intervention versus TAU arms were self-reported disclosure distress, self-efficacy and behaviours along a continuum from no disclosure to full disclosure and open communication about HIV. Results In all cross-sectional (Wald tests) and longitudinal (general estimating equations) analyses, at both postintervention (4 weeks) and follow-up (13 weeks), effects were in the hypothesized directions. Despite the small sample size, most of these between-arm comparisons were statistically significant, with at least one result for each outcome indicating a ‘large’ effect size. Conclusion Our results suggest that nurses are able to deliver a counselling intervention in a clinic setting with the potential to alleviate parental distress around HIV disclosure to their children. Findings warrant future trials powered for efficacy. PMID:26049544

  14. HIV Surveillance Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinics: Evolution and Current Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Jacob; Garcia Calleja, Jesus M; Marsh, Kimberly; Zaidi, Irum; Murrill, Christopher; Swaminathan, Mahesh

    2017-12-05

    Since the late 1980s, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) sentinel serosurveillance among pregnant women attending select antenatal clinics (ANCs) based on unlinked anonymous testing (UAT) has provided invaluable information for tracking HIV prevalence and trends and informing global and national HIV models in most countries with generalized HIV epidemics. However, increased coverage of HIV testing, prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT), and antiretroviral therapy has heightened ethical concerns about UAT. PMTCT programs now routinely collect demographic and HIV testing information from the same pregnant women as serosurveillance and therefore present an alternative to UAT-based ANC serosurveillance. This paper reports on the evolution and current direction of the global approach to HIV surveillance among pregnant women attending ANCs, including the transition away from traditional UAT-based serosurveillance and toward new guidance from the World Health Organization and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS on the implementation of surveillance among pregnant women attending ANCs based on routine PMTCT program data. ©Jacob Dee, Jesus M Garcia Calleja, Kimberly Marsh, Irum Zaidi, Christopher Murrill, Mahesh Swaminathan. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 05.12.2017.

  15. Clinical Features of Refractory Ascites in Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Regina Caly

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To present the clinical features and outcomes of outpatients who suffer from refractory ascites. METHODS: This prospective observational study consecutively enrolled patients with cirrhotic ascites who submitted to a clinical evaluation, a sodium restriction diet, biochemical blood tests, 24 hour urine tests and an ascitic fluid analysis. All patients received a multidisciplinary evaluation and diuretic treatment. Patients who did not respond to the diuretic treatment were controlled by therapeutic serial paracentesis, and a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was indicated for patients who required therapeutic serial paracentesis up to twice a month. RESULTS: The most common etiology of cirrhosis in both groups was alcoholism [49 refractory (R and 11 non-refractory ascites (NR]. The majority of patients in the refractory group had Child-Pugh class B cirrhosis (p=0.034. The nutritional assessment showed protein-energy malnutrition in 81.6% of the patients in the R group and 35.5% of the patients in the NR group, while hepatic encephalopathy, hernia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, upper digestive hemorrhage and type 2 hepatorenal syndrome were present in 51%, 44.9%, 38.8%, 38.8% and 26.5% of the patients in the R group and 9.1%, 18.2%, 0%, 0% and 0% of the patients in the NR group, respectively (p=0.016, p=0.173, p=0.012, p=0.012, and p=0.100, respectively. Mortality occurred in 28.6% of the patients in the R group and in 9.1% of the patients in the NR group (p=0.262. CONCLUSION: Patients with refractory ascites were malnourished, suffered from hernias, had a high prevalence of complications and had a high postoperative death frequency, which was mostly due to infectious processes.

  16. High Prevalence of Severe Food Insecurity and Malnutrition among HIV-Infected Adults in Senegal, West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelle A Benzekri

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and food insecurity are associated with increased mortality and poor clinical outcomes among people living with HIV/AIDS; however, the prevalence of malnutrition and food insecurity among people living with HIV/AIDS in Senegal, West Africa is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and severity of food insecurity and malnutrition among HIV-infected adults in Senegal, and to identify associations between food insecurity, malnutrition, and HIV outcomes.We conducted a cross-sectional study at outpatient clinics in Dakar and Ziguinchor, Senegal. Data were collected using participant interviews, anthropometry, the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale, the Individual Dietary Diversity Scale, and chart review.One hundred and nine HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 participants were enrolled. The prevalence of food insecurity was 84.6% in Dakar and 89.5% in Ziguinchor. The prevalence of severe food insecurity was 59.6% in Dakar and 75.4% in Ziguinchor. The prevalence of malnutrition (BMI <18.5 was 19.2% in Dakar and 26.3% in Ziguinchor. Severe food insecurity was associated with missing clinic appointments (p = 0.01 and not taking antiretroviral therapy due to hunger (p = 0.02. Malnutrition was associated with lower CD4 cell counts (p = 0.01.Severe food insecurity and malnutrition are highly prevalent among HIV-infected adults in both Dakar and Ziguinchor, and are associated with poor HIV outcomes. Our findings warrant further studies to determine the root causes of malnutrition and food insecurity in Senegal, and the short- and long-term impacts of malnutrition and food insecurity on HIV care. Urgent interventions are needed to address the unacceptably high rates of malnutrition and food insecurity in this population.

  17. Rapid sideline performance meets outpatient clinic: Results from a multidisciplinary concussion center registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle Harrold, G; Hasanaj, Lisena; Moehringer, Nicholas; Zhang, Isis; Nolan, Rachel; Serrano, Liliana; Raynowska, Jenelle; Rucker, Janet C; Flanagan, Steven R; Cardone, Dennis; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J

    2017-08-15

    This study investigated the utility of sideline concussion tests, including components of the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool, 3rd Edition (SCAT3) and the King-Devick (K-D), a vision-based test of rapid number naming, in an outpatient, multidisciplinary concussion center treating patients with both sports-related and non-sports related concussions. The ability of these tests to predict clinical outcomes based on the scores at the initial visit was evaluated. Scores for components of the SCAT3 and the K-D were fit into regression models accounting for age, gender, and sport/non-sport etiology in order to predict clinical outcome measures including total number of visits to the concussion center, whether the patient reached a SCAT3 symptom severity score≤7, and the total types of referrals each patient received over their course. Patient characteristics, differences between those with sport and non-sport etiologies, and correlations between the tests were also analyzed. Among 426 patients with concussion, SCAT3 total symptom score and symptom severity score at the initial visit predicted each of the clinical outcome variables. K-D score at the initial visit predicted the total number of visits and the total number of referrals. Those with sports-related concussions were younger, had less severely-affected test scores, had fewer visits and types of referrals, and were more likely to have clinical resolution of their concussion and to reach a symptom severity score≤7. This large-scale study of concussion patients supports the use of sideline concussion tests as part of outpatient concussion assessment, especially the total symptom and symptom severity score portions of the SCAT3 and the K-D. Women in this cohort had higher total symptom and symptom severity scores compared to men. Our data also suggest that those with non-sports-related concussions have longer lasting symptoms than those with sports-related concussions, and that these two groups should perhaps be

  18. Risk factors for oropharynx cancer in a cohort of HIV-infected veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Erin Y; Hartman, Christine M; Richardson, Peter A; Zevallos, Jose P; Sikora, Andrew G; Kramer, Jennifer R; Chiao, Elizabeth Y

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate HIV-related and other clinical risk factors associated with oropharynx cancer (OPSCC) in HIV-infected U.S. Veterans. Retrospective cohort study utilizing Veterans Affairs HIV Clinical Case Registry (CCR) data from 1985 to 2010. Outcome was incident OPSCC as indicated by 1 inpatient or 2 outpatient ICD-9 codes. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each risk factor on the time to OPSCC diagnosis. A total of 40,996 HIV-infected male veterans were included in the cohort with 97 cases of OPSCC. The age adjusted incidence rate was 23.2/100,000 [95% CI 17.8-29.2]. Age>50 (aHR=3.8, 95% CI 1.9-7.8), recent CD4<200 (aHR=3.8, 95% CI 2.0-7.3), and undetectable HIV viral loads 40-79% of the time (aHR=1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.0) were associated with an increased risk of OPSCC. Era of HIV diagnosis, utilization of cART, nadir CD4 count, race, smoking history, and previous risk of HPV disease, including condyloma or invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SCCA) were not associated with increased risk of OPSCC. Patients who were older at beginning of follow up, had lower CD4 counts around the time of OPSCC diagnosis, and moderate HIV viral control during follow-up had an increased risk of OPSCC. Other HPV-related diseases such as SCCA and condyloma did not increase the risk for OPSCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma HIV-1 tropism and risk of short-term clinical progression to AIDS or death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontdevila, Maria Casadellà; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is uncertain if plasma HIV-1 tropism is an independent predictor of short-term risk of clinical progression / death, in addition to the CD4 count and HIV RNA level. We conducted a nested case-control study within EuroSIDA to assess this question amongst people with current HIV RNA...

  20. [A cross-sectional survey on personality disorder in mental disorder outpatients in Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Hong; Xiao, Ze-Ping; Wang, Lan-Lan; Dai, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Hai-Yin; Qiu, Jian-Yin; Tao, Ming-Yi; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Jun-Han; Wu, Yan-Ru; Jiang, Wen-Hui

    2010-08-01

    To study the prevalence and risk factors for personality disorder (PD) outpatients attending in for psychiatric and psychological counseling in Shanghai. 3075 subjects were sampled by systematic sampling method from outpatients in psycho-counseling clinics and psychiatric clinics in Shanghai Mental Health Center. Based on DSM-IV criteria, personality disorders were assessed by both questionnaires (personality diagnostic questionnaire, PDQ-4+) and interviews (structured clinical interview for DSM-IV Axis II, SCID-II). Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the significant independent contributor to PD. 71.3% of the outpatients were found having pathological personality by using questionnaire of self rating PD scale. 982 outpatients (31.9%) met criteria for at least one personality disorder by using structured clinical interview. Younger age (OR = 1.8, 95%CI: 1.5 - 2.1), single or divorced (OR = 1.6, 95%CI: 1.4 - 1.9), psychological counseling outpatients (OR = 1.2, 95%CI: 1.1 - 1.3), mood and outpatients with neurosis disorders (OR = 1.7, 95%CI: 1.4 - 2.0) were more frequently assigned as personality disorders. Data from logistic regression analysis showed that patients of tender age, not nurtured and raised by their parents, with introvert characters were related risk factors of PD. High prevalence rate of PD was found in this sample of Chinese outpatients, especially in those psychological counseling outpatients with mood or neurosis disorders. More attention should be paid to the recognition and intervention of PD in outpatients with mental disorders.

  1. The prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in HIV-infected patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensvold, Christen Rune; Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Badsberg, Jens Henrik

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, faecal specimens from 96 HIV-infected patients were submitted to microbiological analyses, including microscopy and polymerase chain reaction for protozoa and e...

  2. Limited referral to nephrologists from a tertiary geriatric outpatient clinic despite a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease and anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudville Neil

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing in prevalence world-wide with the largest growth being in the elderly. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of CKD in a geriatric outpatient clinic within a tertiary hospital and its association with anaemia and mortality with a focus on the referral patterns towards nephrologists. Methods Retrospective study utilising administrative databases. The cohort was defined as all patients that attended the geriatric outpatient clinics of a single tertiary hospital within the first 3 months of 2006. Patients were followed for 18 months for mortality and referral to a nephrologist. Results The mean Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of the 439 patients was 67.4 ± 29.1 mL/min/1.73 m2 (44% 2. 11.8% had a haemoglobin 2 (p = 0.0092. Kidney function and anaemia were significantly associated with mortality on multivariate analysis (p = 0.019 and p = 0.0074. After 18 months, 8.8% of patients with CKD were referred to a nephrologist. Conclusion Despite a high prevalence of CKD in patients attending a geriatric outpatient clinic and its association with anaemia and mortality, few of these patients were referred to a nephrologist. An examination of the reasons behind this bias is required.

  3. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Susan; John-Stewart, Grace; Egessa, John J; Mubezi, Sezi; Kusemererwa, Sylvia; Bii, Dennis K; Bulya, Nulu; Mugume, Francis; Campbell, James D; Wangisi, Jonathan; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2015-01-01

    During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  4. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Morrison

    Full Text Available During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART, despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  5. A study of HIV seropositivity with various clinical manifestation of herpes zoster among patients from Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveen, Kikkeri Narayanashetty; Tophakane, R S; Hanumanthayya, Keloji; Pv, Bhagawat; Pai, Varadraj V

    2011-12-15

    To study the various clinical presentations of herpes zoster and to find out the proportion of HIV positivity in these patients. A time bound study was conducted from November 2004 to October 2005. All clinically diagnosed cases of herpes zoster were tested for HIV infection with ELISA and confirmed by Tridot and Coomb AID. Total numbers of 90 zoster cases were recorded. Mean duration of pre herpetic neuralgia was 2.134 (standard deviation=1.424, F=8.951, Psacral (6.66%) nerves. A substantial proportion, 34 (37.77%) out of 90 cases, were found to be HIV positive. Of these, 64.7 percent of the HIV seropositive herpes zoster patients belonged to the age group of 21-40 years. Out of 39 who had a risk of exposure to STDs and whose ages were less than 50 years, 31 (79.48%) tested positive for HIV infection. The occurrence of zoster in the young age group in patients who report a history of risk factors for HIV, may need testing. Herpes zoster serves as a clinical indicator of HIV seropositivity and one of the earliest manifestations.

  6. Treatment outcomes of HIV-positive patients on first-line antiretroviral therapy in private versus public HIV clinics in Johannesburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyo F

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Faith Moyo,1 Charles Chasela,2,3 Alana T Brennan,1,4 Osman Ebrahim,5 Ian M Sanne,1,6 Lawrence Long,1 Denise Evans1 1Health Economics and Epidemiology Research Office, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 2Epidemiology and Biostatistics Department, School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 3Epidemiology and Strategic Information (ESI, HIV/AIDS/STIs and TB, Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria, South Africa; 4Center for Global Health and Development, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA; 5Brenthurst Clinic, Parktown, South Africa; 6Right to Care, Helen Joseph Hospital, Westdene, Johannesburg, South Africa Background: Despite the widely documented success of antiretroviral therapy (ART, stakeholders continue to face the challenges of poor HIV treatment outcomes. While many studies have investigated patient-level causes of poor treatment outcomes, data on the effect of health systems on ART outcomes are scarce.Objective: We compare treatment outcomes among patients receiving HIV care and treatment at a public and private HIV clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa.Patients and methods: This was a retrospective cohort analysis of ART naïve adults (≥18.0 years, initiating ART at a public or private clinic in Johannesburg between July 01, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to identify baseline predictors of mortality and loss to follow-up (>3 months late for the last scheduled visit. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine predictors of failure to suppress viral load (≥400 copies/mL while the Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare the median absolute change in CD4 count from baseline to 12 months post-ART initiation.Results: 12,865 patients initiated ART at the public clinic compared to 610 at the private

  7. Evaluating quality management systems for HIV rapid testing services in primary healthcare clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziningi Jaya

    Full Text Available Rapid HIV tests have improved access to HIV diagnosis and treatment by providing quick and convenient testing in rural clinics and resource-limited settings. In this study, we evaluated the quality management system for voluntary and provider-initiated point-of-care HIV testing in primary healthcare (PHC clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal (KZN, South Africa.We conducted a quality assessment audit in eleven PHC clinics that offer voluntary HIV testing and counselling in rural KZN, South Africa from August 2015 to October 2016. All the participating clinics were purposively selected from the province-wide survey of diagnostic services. We completed an on-site monitoring checklist, adopted from the WHO guidelines for assuring accuracy and reliability of HIV rapid tests, to assess the quality management system for HIV rapid testing at each clinic. To determine clinic's compliance to WHO quality standards for HIV rapid testing the following quality measure was used, a 3-point scale (high, moderate and poor. A high score was defined as a percentage rating of 90 to 100%, moderate was defined as a percentage rating of 70 to 90%, and poor was defined as a percentage rating of less than 70%. Clinic audit scores were summarized and compared. We employed Pearson pair wise correlation coefficient to determine correlations between clinics audit scores and clinic and clinics characteristics. Linear regression model was computed to estimate statistical significance of the correlates. Correlations were reported as significant at p ≤0.05.Nine out of 11 audited rural PHC clinics are located outside 20Km of the nearest town and hospital. Majority (18.2% of the audited rural PHC clinics reported that HIV rapid test was performed by HIV lay counsellors. Overall, ten clinics were rated moderate, in terms of their compliance to the stipulated WHO guidelines. Audit results showed that rural PHC clinics' average rating score for compliance to the WHO guidelines ranged

  8. Evaluating quality management systems for HIV rapid testing services in primary healthcare clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaya, Ziningi; Drain, Paul K; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P

    2017-01-01

    Rapid HIV tests have improved access to HIV diagnosis and treatment by providing quick and convenient testing in rural clinics and resource-limited settings. In this study, we evaluated the quality management system for voluntary and provider-initiated point-of-care HIV testing in primary healthcare (PHC) clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa. We conducted a quality assessment audit in eleven PHC clinics that offer voluntary HIV testing and counselling in rural KZN, South Africa from August 2015 to October 2016. All the participating clinics were purposively selected from the province-wide survey of diagnostic services. We completed an on-site monitoring checklist, adopted from the WHO guidelines for assuring accuracy and reliability of HIV rapid tests, to assess the quality management system for HIV rapid testing at each clinic. To determine clinic's compliance to WHO quality standards for HIV rapid testing the following quality measure was used, a 3-point scale (high, moderate and poor). A high score was defined as a percentage rating of 90 to 100%, moderate was defined as a percentage rating of 70 to 90%, and poor was defined as a percentage rating of less than 70%. Clinic audit scores were summarized and compared. We employed Pearson pair wise correlation coefficient to determine correlations between clinics audit scores and clinic and clinics characteristics. Linear regression model was computed to estimate statistical significance of the correlates. Correlations were reported as significant at p ≤0.05. Nine out of 11 audited rural PHC clinics are located outside 20Km of the nearest town and hospital. Majority (18.2%) of the audited rural PHC clinics reported that HIV rapid test was performed by HIV lay counsellors. Overall, ten clinics were rated moderate, in terms of their compliance to the stipulated WHO guidelines. Audit results showed that rural PHC clinics' average rating score for compliance to the WHO guidelines ranged between 64.4% (CI

  9. Provider Initiated Testing and Counseling (PITC for HIV in resource-limited clinical settings: important questions unanswered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Twyman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Testing is the gateway to HIV care and support services, and efforts to broaden treatment must include a proactive and inclusive approach to testing. Provider Initiated Testing and Counseling (PITC for HIV utilizes the opportunity afforded by the clinical encounter for the care provider to make a clinical recommendation that the patient have a voluntary HIV test. It is hoped that by broadening testing by such strategies as PITC more patients may be identified and linked to treatment and support. However, there exist multiple challenges and questions regarding the provision of routine HIV testing and counseling in clinical facilities. In order to support further PITC efforts and scale up of current testing programs, a research agenda that addresses the ethical, social and operational components of PITC programming in health facilities, is critically needed to further guide its expansion.

  10. Evaluating quality management systems for HIV rapid testing services in primary healthcare clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jaya, Ziningi; Drain, Paul K.; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rapid HIV tests have improved access to HIV diagnosis and treatment by providing quick and convenient testing in rural clinics and resource-limited settings. In this study, we evaluated the quality management system for voluntary and provider-initiated point-of-care HIV testing in primary healthcare (PHC) clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa. Material and methods We conducted a quality assessment audit in eleven PHC clinics that offer voluntary HIV testing and couns...

  11. Defining and improving quality management in Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics: design of the study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, the organisation of diabetes care is changing. As a result general practices and diabetes teams in hospitals are becoming part of new organisations in which multidisciplinary care programs are implemented. In the Netherlands, 97 diabetes care groups and 104 outpatient clinics are working with a diabetes care program. Both types of organisations aim to improve the quality of diabetes care. Therefore, it is essential to understand the comprehensive elements needed for optimal quality management at organisational level. This study aims to assess the current level of diabetes quality management in both care groups and outpatient clinics and its improvement after providing feedback on their quality management system and tailored support. Methods/design This study is a before-after study with a one-year follow-up comparing the levels of quality management before and after an intervention to improve diabetes quality management. To assess the status of quality management, online questionnaires were developed based on current literature. They consist of six domains: organisation of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance management, quality improvement policy and management strategies. Based on the questionnaires, respondents will receive feedback on their score in a radar diagram and an elucidating table. They will also be granted access to an online toolbox with instruments that proved to be effective in quality of care improvement and with practical examples. If requested, personal support in implementing these tools will be available. After one year quality management will be measured again using the same questionnaire. Discussion This study will reveal a nationwide picture of quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics in the Netherlands and evaluate the effect of offering tailored support. The operationalisation of quality management on organisational level may be of interest for other countries

  12. Patients' poor communication with their doctors in the first visit of the gynecological endocrinology outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Han, Zi-Yan; She, Wen-Jing; Lei, Hai-Ke

    2016-01-01

    To investigate patients' communication with their gynecologists in the first visit of the gynecological endocrinology outpatient clinics. We developed a questionnaire to evaluate 379 women' expectations of their first visit, information-giving about illness, and understanding of the consultation they encountered from April to August 2010. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Before the first visit, 55% (208/379) of participants hoped to get the doctors' special attention, and 60% (227/379) of patients expected a very satisfying consultation. During the consultation, only 34% (129/379) of patients provided their case history clearly according to physicians' inquiry, 21% (81/379) of patients understood the examination and 28% (105/379) of patients understood the therapeutic regime after doctors' explanation. Correlation analysis showed that sociodemographic characteristics such as young age (under 20 years old), low level of education (primary school or less), and lack of medical knowledge affected patients' information-giving about illness and understanding of their first visit (all ps endocrinology outpatient clinics. They could not communicate well with their doctors, which was affected by age, education, and medical background.

  13. DO PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN EXPERIENCE PAIN REDUCTION AND FUNCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT AFTER TREATMENT AT A MULTIDISCIPLINARY OUTPATIENT CLINIC?

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    Norbye Anja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain is the most common affliction of the musculoskeletal system. Patients with chronic low back pain cost the society great expenses in treatments and other social benefits; however, the effects of interventions are discussed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients with chronic low back pain experience pain reduction and functional improvement after treatment at a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic. Methods: A prospective study design was used, including 446 patients who participated in follow-up questionnaires with data collection at 6 and 12 months after treatment. The primary outcome was alterations in pain and function. Result: By 12 months after treatment, 71.3 % of the included patients had completed the follow-up questionnaires. Based on these questionnaires, we identified statistically significant changes from baseline at all end points, with clinically significant changes in approximately half of the participants (p = 0.000. Conclusion: Treatment of chronic low back pain at a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic resulted in clinically significant pain reduction and functional improvement within 12 months for approximately half of affected patients.

  14. Institutionalizing provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling for children: an observational case study from Zambia.

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    Jane N Mutanga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC is a priority strategy for increasing access for HIV-exposed children to prevention measures, and infected children to treatment and care interventions. This article examines efforts to scale-up paediatric PITC at a second-level hospital located in Zambia's Southern Province, and serving a catchment area of 1.2 million people. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our retrospective case study examined best practices and enabling factors for rapid institutionalization of PITC in Livingstone General Hospital. Methods included clinical observations, key informant interviews with programme management, and a desk review of hospital management information systems (HMIS uptake data following the introduction of PITC. After PITC roll-out, the hospital experienced considerably higher testing uptake. In a 36-month period following PITC institutionalization, of total inpatient children eligible for PITC (n = 5074, 98.5% of children were counselled, and 98.2% were tested. Of children tested (n = 4983, 15.5% were determined HIV-infected; 77.6% of these results were determined by DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR testing in children under the age of 18 months. Of children identified as HIV-infected in the hospital's inpatient and outpatient departments (n = 1342, 99.3% were enrolled in HIV care, including initiation on co-trimoxazole prophylaxis. A number of good operational practices and enabling factors in the Livingstone General Hospital experience can inform rapid PITC institutionalization for inpatient and outpatient children. These include the placement of full-time nurse counsellors at key areas of paediatric intake, who interface with patients immediately and conduct testing and counselling. They are reinforced through task-shifting to peer counsellors in the wards. Nurse counsellor capacity to draw specimen for DNA PCR for children under 18 months has significantly enhanced early

  15. Everyday ethics issues in the outpatient clinical practice of pediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Margaret; Taylor, Holly A; McDonald, Erin L; Hughes, Mark T; Carrese, Joseph A

    2009-09-01

    To describe the ethics issues that pediatric residents encounter during routine care in an outpatient teaching clinic. Qualitative study including in-depth interviews with pediatric residents and direct observation of interactions between preceptors and residents in a pediatric teaching clinic. The Johns Hopkins Harriet Lane Pediatric Primary Care Clinic, March 20 through April 11, 2006. A convenience sample including all pediatric faculty preceptors supervising at the clinic during the 19 half-day sessions that occurred during the observation period (N = 15) and the pediatric residents seeing patients during these clinic sessions (N = 50). Main Outcome Measure Field notes of preceptor-resident discussions about patient care were made and transcribed for qualitative analysis. Qualitative analysis of the ethics content of cases presented by residents in this pediatric teaching clinic identified 5 themes for categorizing ethics challenges: (1) promoting the child's best interests in complex and resource-poor home and social settings; (2) managing the therapeutic alliance with parents and caregivers; (3) protecting patient privacy and confidentiality; (4) balancing the dual roles of learner and health care provider; and (5) using professional authority appropriately. Qualitative analysis of the ethics content of directly observed preceptor-resident case discussions yielded a set of themes describing the ethics challenges facing pediatric residents. The themes are somewhat different from the lists of residents' ethics experiences developed using recall or survey methods and may be very different from the ideas usually included in hospital-based ethics discussions. This may have implications for improving ethics education during residency training.

  16. Developing clinical strength-of-evidence approach to define HIV-associated malignancies for cancer registration in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korir, Anne; Mauti, Nathan; Moats, Pamela; Gurka, Matthew J; Mutuma, Geoffrey; Metheny, Christine; Mwamba, Peter M; Oyiro, Peter O; Fisher, Melanie; Ayers, Leona W; Rochford, Rosemary; Mwanda, Walter O; Remick, Scot C

    2014-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa cancer registries are beset by an increasing cancer burden further exacerbated by the AIDS epidemic where there are limited capabilities for cancer-AIDS match co-registration. We undertook a pilot study based on a "strength-of-evidence" approach using clinical data that is abstracted at the time of cancer registration for purposes of linking cancer diagnosis to AIDS diagnosis. The standard Nairobi Cancer Registry form was modified for registrars to abstract the following clinical data from medical records regarding HIV infection/AIDS in a hierarchal approach at time of cancer registration from highest-to-lowest strength-of-evidence: 1) documentation of positive HIV serology; 2) antiretroviral drug prescription; 3) CD4+ lymphocyte count; and 4) WHO HIV clinical stage or immune suppression syndrome (ISS), which is Kenyan terminology for AIDS. Between August 1 and October 31, 2011 a total of 1,200 cancer cases were registered. Of these, 171 cases (14.3%) met clinical strength-of-evidence criteria for association with HIV infection/AIDS; 69% (118 cases were tumor types with known HIV association - Kaposi's sarcoma, cervical cancer, non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphoma, and conjunctiva carcinoma) and 31% (53) were consistent with non-AIDS defining cancers. Verifiable positive HIV serology was identified in 47 (27%) cases for an absolute seroprevalence rate of 4% among the cancer registered cases with an upper boundary of 14% among those meeting at least one of strength-of-evidence criteria. This pilot demonstration of a hierarchal, clinical strength-of-evidence approach for cancer-AIDS registration in Kenya establishes feasibility, is readily adaptable, pragmatic, and does not require additional resources for critically under staffed cancer registries. Cancer is an emerging public health challenge, and African nations need to develop well designed population-based studies in order to better define the impact and spectrum of malignant disease in the

  17. Definition of a core set of quality indicators for the assessment of HIV/AIDS clinical care: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Several organizations and individual authors have been proposing quality indicators for the assessment of clinical care in HIV/AIDS patients. Nevertheless, the definition of a consensual core set of indicators remains controversial and its practical use is largely limited. This study aims not only to identify and characterize these indicators through a systematic literature review but also to propose a parsimonious model based on those most used. Methods MEDLINE, SCOPUS, Cochrane databases and ISI Web of Knowledge, as well as official websites of organizations dealing with HIV/AIDS care, were searched for articles and information proposing HIV/AIDS clinical care quality indicators. The ones that are on patient’s perspective and based on services set were excluded. Data extraction, using a predefined data sheet based on Cochrane recommendations, was done by one of the authors while a second author rechecked the extracted data for any inconsistency. Results A total of 360 articles were identified in our search query but only 12 of them met the inclusion criteria. We also identified one relevant site. Overall, we identified 65 quality indicators for HIV/AIDS clinical care distributed as following: outcome (n=15) and process-related (n=50) indicators; generic (n=36) and HIV/AIDS disease-specific (n=29) indicators; baseline examinations (n=19), screening (n=9), immunization (n=4), prophylaxis (n=5), HIV monitoring (n=16), and therapy (=12) indicators. Conclusions There are several studies that set up HIV clinical care indicators, with only a part of them useful to assess the HIV clinical care. More importantly, HIV/AIDS clinical care indicators need to be valid, reliable and most of all feasible. PMID:23809537

  18. [Benefits of using rapid HIV testing at the PMU-FLON walk-in clinic in Lausanne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgien, W; Aubert, J; Bischoff, T; Herzig, L; Perdrix, J

    2012-05-16

    Lab tests are frequently used in primary care to guide patient care. This is particularly the case when a severe disorder, or one that will affect patients' initial care, needs to be excluded rapidly. At the PMU-FLON walk-in clinic the use of HIV testing as recommended by the Swiss Office of Public Health was hampered by the delay in obtaining test results. This led us to introduce rapid HIV testing which provides results within 30 minutes. Following the first 250 tests the authors discuss the results as well as the benefits of rapid HIV testing in an urban walk-in clinic.

  19. Cost-effectiveness assessment in outpatient sinonasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuaire, G; Theis, D; Fackeure, R; Chevalier, D; Gengler, I

    2018-02-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of outpatient sinonasal surgery in terms of clinical efficacy and control of expenses. A retrospective study was conducted from January 2014 to January 2016. Patients scheduled for outpatient sinonasal surgery were systematically included. Clinical data were extracted from surgical and anesthesiology computer files. The cost accounting methods applied in our institution were used to evaluate logistic and technical costs. The standardized hospital fees rating system based on hospital stay and severity in diagnosis-related groups (Groupes homogènes de séjours: GHS) was used to estimate institutional revenue. Over 2years, 927 outpatient surgical procedures were performed. The crossover rate to conventional hospital admission was 2.9%. In a day-1 telephone interview, 85% of patients were very satisfied with the procedure. All outpatient cases showed significantly lower costs than estimated for conventional management with overnight admission, while hospital revenue did not differ between the two. This study confirmed the efficacy of outpatient surgery in this indication. Lower costs could allow savings for the health system by readjusting the rating for the procedure. More precise assessment of cost-effectiveness will require more fine-grained studies based on micro costing at hospital level and assessment of impact on conventional surgical activity and post-discharge community care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Retention among North American HIV-infected persons in clinical care, 2000-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebeiro, Peter; Althoff, Keri N; Buchacz, Kate; Gill, John; Horberg, Michael; Krentz, Hartmut; Moore, Richard; Sterling, Timothy R; Brooks, John T; Gebo, Kelly A; Hogg, Robert; Klein, Marina; Martin, Jeffrey; Mugavero, Michael; Rourke, Sean; Silverberg, Michael J; Thorne, Jennifer; Gange, Stephen J

    2013-03-01

    Retention in care is key to improving HIV outcomes. The goal of this study was to describe 'churn' in patterns of entry, exit, and retention in HIV care in the United States and Canada. Adults contributing ≥1 CD4 count or HIV-1 RNA (HIV-lab) from 2000 to 2008 in North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design clinical cohorts were included. Incomplete retention was defined as lack of 2 HIV-laboratories (≥90 days apart) within 12 months, summarized by calendar year. Beta-binomial regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of factors associated with incomplete retention. Among 61,438 participants, 15,360 (25%) with incomplete retention significantly differed in univariate analyses (P churn. In addition to the programmatic and policy implications, the findings of this study identify patient groups who may benefit from focused retention efforts.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of home telemedical cardiotocography compared with traditional outpatient monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tõrõk, M; Kovács, F; Doszpod, J

    2000-01-01

    We compared the cost of passive sensor telemedical non-stress cardiotocography performed at home and the same test performed by traditional equipment in an outpatient clinic in the Budapest area. The costs were calculated using two years' registered budget data from the home monitoring service in Budapest and the outpatient clinic of the department of obstetrics and gynaecology at the Haynal Imre University of Health Sciences. The traditional test at the university outpatient clinic cost 3652 forint for the health-care and 1000 forint in additional expenses for the patient (travel and time off work). This means that the total cost for each test in the clinic was 4652 forint. The cost of home telemedical cardiotocography was 1500 forint per test, but each test took 2.1 times as long. For a more realistic comparison between the two methods, we adjusted the cost to take account of the extra length of time that home monitoring required. The adjusted cost for home care was 3150 forint, some 32% lower than in the clinic. Passive sensor telemedical non-stress cardiotocography at home was therefore less expensive than the same test performed in the traditional way in an outpatient clinic.

  2. Exploring the Healthcare Environment and Associations with Clinical Outcomes of People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Mary; Coulter, Robert W S; Egan, James E; Friedman, Mackey Reuel; Meanley, Steven; Fisk, Stuart; Watson, Courtney; Kinsky, Suzanne

    2017-12-01

    Despite three decades of dramatic treatment breakthroughs in antiretroviral regimens, clinical outcomes for people living with HIV vary greatly. The HIV treatment cascade models the stages of care that people living with HIV go through toward the goal of viral suppression and demonstrates that <30% of those living with HIV/AIDS in the United States have met this goal. Although some research has focused on the ways that patient characteristics and patient-provider relationships contribute to clinical adherence and treatment success, few studies to date have examined the ways that contextual factors of care and the healthcare environment contribute to patient outcomes. Here, we present qualitative findings from a mixed-methods study to describe contextual and healthcare environment factors in a Ryan White Part C clinic that are associated with patients' abilities to achieve viral suppression. We propose a modification of Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization, and its more recent adaptation developed by Ulett et al., to describe the ways that clinic, system, and provider factors merge to create a system of care in which more than 86% of the patient population is virally suppressed.

  3. Social support and delays seeking care after HIV diagnosis, North Carolina, 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Sandra I; Strauss, Ronald P; MacDonald, Pia D M; Leone, Peter A; Eron, Joseph J; Miller, William C

    2009-09-01

    Many adults in the USA enter primary care late in the course of HIV infection, countering the clinical benefits of timely HIV services and missing opportunities for risk reduction. Our objective was to determine if perceived social support was associated with delay entering care after an HIV diagnosis. Two hundred and sixteen patients receiving primary care at a large, university-based HIV outpatient clinic in North Carolina were included in the study. Dimensions of functional social support (emotional/informational, tangible, affectionate, and positive social interaction) were quantified with a modified Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Scale and included in proportional hazards models to determine their effect on delays seeking care. The median delay between diagnosis and entry to primary care was 5.9 months. Levels of social support were high but only positive social interaction was moderately associated with delayed presentation in adjusted models. The effect of low perceived positive social interaction on the time to initiation of primary care differed by history of alcoholism (no history of alcoholism, hazard ratio (HR): 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88, 2.34; history of alcoholism, HR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.40, 1.28). Ensuring timely access to HIV care remains a challenge in the southeastern USA. Affectionate, tangible, and emotional/informational social support were not associated with the time from diagnosis to care. The presence of positive social interaction may be an important factor influencing care-seeking behavior after diagnosis.

  4. Knowledge, attitudes and personal beliefs about HIV and AIDS among mentally ill patients in Soweto, Johannesburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Jonsson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to determine knowledge, attitudes and personal beliefs regarding HIV and AIDS in a group of mentally ill patients attending outpatient clinics in Soweto, Johannesburg. Method. All patients attending four randomly chosen clinics in Soweto were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire after obtaining informed written consent. The 63-item questionnaire, developed from others specifically for this study, included questions on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics; knowledge on how HIV is acquired and spread; attitudes and beliefs regarding HIV and AIDS; and condom usage. The statements in the knowledge sections were used to calculate a composite score, which if greater than or equal to 75% was defined as ‘adequate knowledge’. Results. A total of 1 151 patients with mental illness participated in the study. The mean age was 41.9 years (standard deviation 11.6 and the majority were males (50%; single (55%, and had achieved only a secondary level of education (53.3%. Overall, most of the study population did not believe in the myths surrounding the spread and acquisition of HIV and AIDS. There were however, significant associations between a low level of education and the belief that HIV is acquired from mosquito bites (odds ratio (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.19 - 2.18; p=0.002 and through masturbation or body rubbing (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.34 - 2.33; p=0.000. Although more than 90% of the patients were aware of the facts regarding the spread of HIV, approximately 40% did not believe that one could acquire HIV through a single sexual encounter. The composite scoring for knowledge showed that less than half the patients had adequate knowledge of HIV/AIDS. This was significantly associated with gender and level of education: females were 1.6 times (p

  5. An analytical comparison of the patient-to-doctor policy and the doctor-to-patient policy in the outpatient clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, P.J.H.; Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; van Houdenhoven, Mark; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.

    Outpatient clinics traditionally organize processes such that the doctor remains in a consultation room, while patients visit for consultation, we call this the Patient-to-Doctor policy. A different approach is the Doctor-to-Patient policy, whereby the doctor travels between multiple consultation

  6. Financial stress is associated with reduced treatment adherence in HIV-infected adults in a resource-rich setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, J; Beardsworth, G; Lavie, E; MacRae, K; Carr, A

    2013-02-01

    Financial stress has been identified as a barrier to antiretroviral adherence, but only in resource- limited settings. Almost half of HIV-infected Australian adults earn no regular income and, despite highly subsidised antiretroviral therapy and universal health care, 3% of HIV-infected Australians cease antiretroviral therapy each year. We studied the relationship between financial stress and treatment adherence in a resource-rich setting. Out-patients attending the HIV clinic at St Vincent's Hospital between November 2010 and May 2011 were invited to complete an anonymous survey including questions relating to costs and adherence. Of 335 HIV-infected patients (95.8% male; mean age 52 years; hepatitis coinfection 9.2%), 65 patients (19.6%) stated that it was difficult or very difficult to meet pharmacy dispensing costs, 49 (14.6%) reported that they had delayed purchasing medication because of pharmacy costs, and 30 (9.0%) reported that they had ceased medication because of pharmacy costs. Of the 65 patients with difficulties meeting pharmacy costs, 19 (29.2%) had ceased medication vs. 11 (4.1%) of the remaining 270 patients (P travel costs to the clinic. Treatment cessation and interruption were both independently associated with difficulty meeting both pharmacy and clinic travel costs. Only 4.9% had been asked if they were having difficulty paying for medication. These are the first data to show that pharmacy dispensing and clinic travel costs may affect treatment adherence in a resource-rich setting. Patients should be asked if financial stress is limiting their treatment adherence. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  7. Evolution of hepatitis B serological markers in HIV coinfected patients: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza de Castro Conde Toscano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the evolution of serological markers among HIV and hepatitis B coinfected patients, with emphasis on evaluating the reactivation or seroreversion of these markers. METHODS The study population consisted of patients met in an AIDS Outpatient Clinic in São Paulo State, Brazil. We included in the analysis all HIV-infected and who underwent at least two positive hepatitis B surface antigen serological testing during clinical follow up, with tests taken six months apart. Patients were tested with commercial kits available for hepatitis B serological markers by microparticle enzyme immunoassay. Clinical variables were collected: age, sex, CD4+ T-cell count, HIV viral load, alanine aminotransferase level, exposure to antiretroviral drugs including lamivudine and/or tenofovir. RESULTS Among 2,242 HIV positive patients, we identified 105 (4.7% patients with chronic hepatitis B. Follow up time for these patients varied from six months to 20.5 years. All patients underwent antiretroviral therapy during follow-up. Among patients with chronic hepatitis B, 58% were hepatitis B “e” antigen positive at the first assessment. Clearance of hepatitis B surface antigen occurred in 15% (16/105 of patients with chronic hepatitis B, and 50% (8/16 of these patients presented subsequent reactivation or seroreversion of hepatitis B surface antigen. Among hepatitis B “e” antigen positive patients, 57% (35/61 presented clearance of this serologic marker. During clinical follow up, 28.5% (10/35 of those who initially cleared hepatitis B “e” antigen presented seroreversion or reactivation of this marker. CONCLUSIONS Among HIV coinfected patients under antiretroviral therapy, changes of HBV serological markers were frequently observed. These results suggest that frequent monitoring of these serum markers should be recommended.

  8. [Evaluation of motivation to quit smoking in outpatients attending smoking cessation clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokłosa, Anna; Skoczylas, Agnieszka; Rudnicka, Anna; Bednarek, Michał; Krzyzanowski, Krystian; Górecka, Dorota

    2010-01-01

    The success in smoking cessation depends not only on a method of treatment but also on patient motivation. The aim of this study was to estimate the motivation and the main reason to quit smoking among outpatients attending smoking cessation clinic. One hundred and eleven patients (50 men and 61 women), mean age 58, filled in a motivation test, nicotine dependence test and a questionnaire of the clinic. The main motivation to quit was for the health reasons (83%). Mean motivation test result was 6.93; mean nicotine addiction evaluated in dependence test was 5.49. Eighty seven percent of patients were ready to quit smoking during one month (36% in 24 hours; 23% in one week; 28% in four weeks). There was no significant difference between men and women. The main motivation to quit smoking were the health reasons as well among men as women. There was no correlation between the readiness to quit smoking determined as time to quit attempt and the motivation test.

  9. Mucocutaneous manifestations of HIV infection: a retrospective analysis of 145 cases in a Chinese population in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, W; Ismail, R

    1999-06-01

    Mucocutaneous lesions directly related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection usually present as initial manifestations of immune deficiency. The most common mucocutaneous lesions are Kaposi's sarcoma, histoplasmosis, oro-esophageal candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, and, in Asia, Penicillium marneffei infection. Non-HIV-related skin lesions, such as psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, and nodular prurigo, may be the initial presentation among HIV infected patients attending outpatient clinics. A retrospective analysis was performed on 145 HIV-positive Malaysians of Chinese descent from two centers at the University Hospital Kuala Lumpur (UHKL) and the General Hospital Kuala Lumpur (GHKL) from March 1997 to February 1998. Demographic data and clinical data were analyzed. The analysis showed that 104 out of 145 patients had mucocutaneous disorders (71.7%). In the study, there were 100 men (96.2%) and four women (3.8%). The majority of patients were in the age group 20-50 years. The patients who presented with mucocutaneous disease also had low CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts and most had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) defining illness. The number of cases with generalized hyperpigmentation was very high in the group (35.9%), followed by nodular prurigo (29.7%) and xerosis (27.6%). Seborrheic dermatitis was seen in 20.7% of cases, with psoriasis in 8.3%. The most common infections were oral candidiasis (35.9%), tinea corporis and onychomycosis (9.7%), and herpes infection (5.5%); however, mucocutaneous manifestations of Kaposi's sarcoma were rare. The results suggest that mucocutaneous findings are useful clinical predictors of HIV infection or signs of the presence of advanced HIV infection.

  10. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of HIV-positive patients regarding disclosure of HIV results at Betesda Clinic in Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Tom

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study examined the practices, knowledge, attitudes, and the reasons for disclosure and non-disclosure of HIV-positive patients with regard to the disclosure of HIV results at Betesda Clinic in Windhoek, Namibia.Objectives: The objectives of the study were to determine knowledge, attitudes, and practices of HIV-positive patients regarding the disclosure of HIV status at Betesda Clinic in Namibia, and to determine the reasons for disclosure and non-disclosure.Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study and 263 HIV-positive patients were enrolled in the study.Results: Analyses revealed that knowledge on disclosure was good, with 68% who thought it was important. The majority (73% have disclosed and 60% disclosed within 1 week of receiving their results. The most common reasons for disclosure were that 32% needed help, 25% wanted his or her partner to go for testing, and 20% wanted to let relatives know. Reasons for non-disclosure were mainly the fear of gossip (79%. Seventy-three per cent had disclosed to their partners, and 23% had disclosed to more than one person. People’s reactions were supportive in 43%, whereas 29% understood, 9% accepted and 6% were angry. Upon disclosure 40% received help, 24% of partners were tested, 23% received psychological support and 5% were stigmatised. Disclosure was higher amongst the married and cohabitating.Conclusion: The attitude was positive with regard to knowledge of disclosure, with most participants thinking that disclosure was important and good. The attitudes and actual practices of disclosure were encouraging; however, people are disclosing only to trustedindividuals in the society and the fear of stigma is still present although the actual stigma was very low.

  11. Characteristics of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples enrolled in a clinical trial of antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mujugira

    Full Text Available Stable heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in Africa have high HIV-1 transmission rates and are a critical population for evaluation of new HIV-1 prevention strategies. The Partners PrEP Study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tenofovir and emtricitabine-tenofovir pre-exposure prophylaxis to decrease HIV-1 acquisition within heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. We describe the trial design and characteristics of the study cohort.HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, in which the HIV-1 infected partner did not meet national guidelines for initiation of antiretroviral therapy, were enrolled at 9 research sites in Kenya and Uganda. The HIV-1 susceptible partner was randomized to daily oral tenofovir, emtricitabine-tenofovir, or matching placebo with monthly follow-up for 24-36 months.From July 2008 to November 2010, 7920 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples were screened and 4758 enrolled. For 62% (2966/4758 of enrolled couples, the HIV-1 susceptible partner was male. Median age was 33 years for HIV-1 susceptible and HIV-1 infected partners [IQR (28-40 and (26-39 respectively]. Most couples (98% were married, with a median duration of partnership of 7.0 years (IQR 3.0-14.0 and recent knowledge of their serodiscordant status [median 0.4 years (IQR 0.1-2.0]. During the month prior to enrollment, couples reported a median of 4 sex acts (IQR 2-8; 27% reported unprotected sex and 14% of male and 1% of female HIV-1 susceptible partners reported sex with outside partners. Among HIV-1 infected partners, the median plasma HIV-1 level was 3.94 log(10 copies/mL (IQR 3.31-4.53 and median CD4 count was 496 cells/µL (IQR 375-662; the majority (64% had WHO stage 1 HIV-1 disease.Couples at high risk of HIV-1 transmission were rapidly recruited into the Partners PrEP Study, the largest efficacy trial of oral PrEP. (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00557245.

  12. Mucocutaneous manifestations of HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobhana A

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is associated with various mucocutaneous features, which may be the first pointer towards the existence of HIV infection. This study was done to note the different mucocutaneous lesions present in the HIV population in eastern India. METHODS: Four hundred and ten HIV seropositive patients attending the outpatient and inpatient departments were included in the study. RESULTS: Out of 410 HIV positives, 40% had mucocutaneous involvement at presentation. The mean age of the study population was 29 years and male to female ratio was 2.5:1. The common mucocutaneous morbidities included oral candidiasis (36%, dermatophytosis and gingivitis (13% each, herpes zoster (6%, herpes simplex and scabies (5% each. A striking feature, noted in 36% males, was straightening of hairs. Genital herpes was the commonest genital ulcer disease. Lesions associated with declining immunity included oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia and herpes zoster with median CD4 counts of 98, 62 and 198/ L respectively. CONCLUSION: Early recognition of mucocutaneous manifestations and associated STDs help in better management of HIV/AIDS.

  13. Association of serum ferritin levels with immunological status and clinical staging of HIV patients: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, R. H.; Mardia, A. I.; Purba, G. C. F.; Syahrini, H.

    2018-03-01

    Serum ferritin has long known as an acute phase reactant during inflammation. It works as an oxidative stress marker beside its role in the storage of intracellular iron. The increase of serum ferritin levels (SFL) has been reported found in HIV patients. It remains unclear though whether it causes, or is the cause, to the progressivity of the disease. The purpose of this study was to find the association between the SFL and the progressivity of the HIV disease. A retrospective study of 91 patients was carried out at the Haji Adam Malik Central General Hospital. All of the study population were HIV positive inpatients admitted from January to December 2016. The data needed to be all obtained from the patient’s medical records. The WHO Clinical Staging System was used to assess the HIV clinical staging. An inverse relationship was found between the SFL with the immunological status of the HIV patients (r=-0.213) based on their CD4+ count. There was no association found between the SFL with the clinical staging of the HIV patients (p=0.953). The elevated SFL is a feature found in HIV-diagnosed patients with the low CD4+ count, and it affects the progressivity of the disease.

  14. friendly clinic on retention of HIV-infected children in care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-08-22

    Aug 22, 2017 ... space where a child feels both physically and emotion- ally secure and at ... experience, retention in care and loss to follow up of. HIV-infected children. ... The clinic area was painted with artistic drawings in child-friendly ...

  15. 42 CFR 410.60 - Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... services furnished under § 410.62; (iii) Outpatient physical therapy and speech-language pathology services... physical therapy and speech-language pathology services furnished by a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions...

  16. Clinical use of vaginal or rectally applied microbicides in patients suffering from HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Satish Kumar; Nutan

    2013-10-22

    Microbicides, primarily used as topical pre-exposure prophylaxis, have been proposed to prevent sexual transmission of HIV. This review covers the trends and challenges in the development of safe and effective microbicides to prevent sexual transmission of HIV Initial phases of microbicide development used such surfactants as nonoxynol-9 (N-9), C13G, and sodium lauryl sulfate, aiming to inactivate the virus. Clinical trials of microbicides based on N-9 and C31G failed to inhibit sexual transmission of HIV. On the contrary, N-9 enhanced susceptibility to sexual transmission of HIV-1. Subsequently, microbicides based on polyanions and a variety of other compounds that inhibit the binding, fusion, or entry of virus to the host cells were evaluated for their efficacy in different clinical setups. Most of these trials failed to show either safety or efficacy for prevention of HIV transmission. The next phase of microbicide development involved antiretroviral drugs. Microbicide in the form of 1% tenofovir vaginal gel when tested in a Phase IIb trial (CAPRISA 004) in a coitally dependent manner revealed that tenofovir gel users were 39% less likely to become HIV-infected compared to placebo control. However, in another trial (VOICE MTN 003), tenofovir gel used once daily in a coitally independent mode failed to show any efficacy to prevent HIV infection. Tenofovir gel is currently in a Phase III safety and efficacy trial in South Africa (FACTS 001) employing a coitally dependent dosing regimen. Further, long-acting microbicide-delivery systems (vaginal ring) for slow release of such antiretroviral drugs as dapivirine are also undergoing clinical trials. Discovering new markers as correlates of protective efficacy, novel long-acting delivery systems with improved adherence in the use of microbicides, discovering new compounds effective against a broad spectrum of HIV strains, developing multipurpose technologies incorporating additional features of efficacy against other

  17. Construct validity and internal consistency reliability of the Malay version of the 21-item depression anxiety stress scale (Malay-DASS-21) among male outpatient clinic attendees in Johor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, B N; Amrina, K; Trived, S; Loh, K P; Shashi, M

    2017-10-01

    The 21-item English version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21) has been proposed as a method for assessing self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress over the past week in various clinical and nonclinical populations. Several Malay versions of the DASS-21 have been validated in various populations with varying success. One particular Malay version has been validated in various occupational groups (such as nurses and automotive workers) but not among male clinic outpatient attendees in Malaysia. To validate the Malay version of the DASS-21 (Malay-DASS-21) among male outpatient clinic attendees in Johor. A validation study with a random sample of 402 male respondents attending the outpatient clinic of a major public outpatient clinic in Johor Bahru and Segamat was carried out from January to March 2016. Construct validity of the Malay-DASS-21 was examined using Exploratory Factor Analysis (KMO = 0.947; Bartlett's test of sphericity is significant, pDASS- 21 and the internal consistency reliability using Cronbach's alpha. Construct validity of the Malay-DASS-21 based on eigenvalues and factor loadings to confirm the three factor structure (depression, anxiety, and stress) was acceptable. The internal consistency reliability of the factor construct was very impressive with Cronbach's alpha values in the range of 0.837 to 0.863. The present study showed that the Malay- DASS-21 has acceptable psychometric construct and high internal consistency reliability to measure self-perceived depression, anxiety and stress over the past week in male outpatient clinic attendees in Johor. Further studies are necessary to revalidate the Malay-DASS-21 across different populations and cultures, and using confirmatory factor analyses.

  18. Patient satisfaction in Malaysia's busiest outpatient medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Perianayagam, Wilson; Manaf, Rizal Abdul; Jadoo, Saad Ahmed Ali; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore factors associated with patient satisfaction of outpatient medical care in Malaysia. A cross-sectional exit survey was conducted among 340 outpatients aged between 13 and 80 years after successful clinical consultations and treatment acquirements using convenience sampling at the outpatient medical care of Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital (HTAR), Malaysia, being the country's busiest medical outpatient facility. A survey that consisted of sociodemography, socioeconomic, and health characteristics and the validated Short-Form Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ-18) scale were used. Patient satisfaction was the highest in terms of service factors or tangible priorities, particularly "technical quality" and "accessibility and convenience," but satisfaction was low in terms of service orientation of doctors, particularly the "time spent with doctor," "interpersonal manners," and "communication" during consultations. Gender, income level, and purpose of visit to the clinic were important correlates of patient satisfaction. Effort to improve service orientation among doctors through periodical professional development programs at hospital and national level is essential to boost the country's health service satisfaction.

  19. Characteristics and problems of 600 adolescent cannabis abusers in outpatient treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tims, Frank M; Dennis, Michael L; Hamilton, Nancy; J Buchan, Betty; Diamond, Guy; Funk, Rod; Brantley, Laura B

    2002-12-01

    Risk factors among adolescent substance abusers have been shown to correlate with substance use severity. Characteristics related to severity, such as demographic and family factors, peer influences, psychiatric co-morbidity and HIV risk behaviors, are examined for a sample of adolescent cannabis users entering treatment. These data are from a clinical trial study utilizing blocked random assignment of clients to one of five treatment conditions. The study targeted adolescents entering outpatient treatment for primarily cannabis abuse or dependence. Treatment and research facilities in four metropolitan areas of the US were used to recruit study participants. Treatment was delivered in outpatient drug-free settings. Participants were 600 clients, ages 12-18, admitted to outpatient substance abuse treatment programs for cannabis problems, 96% with DSM-IV diagnoses of substance abuse or dependence, with the remaining 4% having at least one symptom of dependence plus significant problems indicating need for treatment. The Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) was used to collect the information presented in this paper. The GAIN incorporates DSM-IV criteria for substance use disorders, conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as dimensional (scale) measures for physical and mental health. All participants reported at least one symptom of substance use disorders, and 46% met the DSM-IV criteria for substance dependence, while 50% met criteria for a diagnosis of abuse. Only 20% of the participants perceived any need for help with problems associated with their drug or alcohol use. Clients participating in the study typically presented multiple problems at treatment entry, most often including conduct disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), internal (mental) distress, and physical health distress. The co-occurrence of conduct disorder and ADHD was found in 30% of the sample. Clients meeting criteria for substance

  20. Clinical aspects of headache in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Huma U; Cho, Tracey A

    2014-05-01

    Headaches are commonly seen in those patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and are the most common form of pain reported among HIV patients. There have been relatively few studies attempting to determine the rates and phenotypes of the headaches that occur in patients with HIV. Patients with HIV are susceptible to a much broader array of secondary headache causes, sometimes with atypical manifestations due to a dampened inflammatory response. The investigation of a headache in the HIV patient should be thorough and focused on making sure that secondary and HIV-specific causes are either ruled out or treated if present. An effective treatment plan should incorporate the use of appropriate pharmacological agents along with the integration of non-pharmacological therapies, such as relaxation and lifestyle regulation. When treating for headaches in patients with HIV, it is important to keep in mind comorbidities and other medications, especially combination antiretroviral therapy. For those with complicated headache histories, referral to a specialized headache center may be appropriate. © 2014 American Headache Society.