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Sample records for hiv entry inhibitors

  1. Potent D-Peptide Inhibitors of HIV-1 Entry

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    Welch,B.; VanDemark, A.; Heroux, A.; Hill, C.; Kay, M.

    2007-01-01

    During HIV-1 entry, the highly conserved gp41 N-trimer pocket region becomes transiently exposed and vulnerable to inhibition. Using mirror-image phage display and structure-assisted design, we have discovered protease-resistant D-amino acid peptides (D-peptides) that bind the N-trimer pocket with high affinity and potently inhibit viral entry. We also report high-resolution crystal structures of two of these D-peptides in complex with a pocket mimic that suggest sources of their high potency. A trimeric version of one of these peptides is the most potent pocket-specific entry inhibitor yet reported by three orders of magnitude (IC50 = 250 pM). These results are the first demonstration that D-peptides can form specific and high-affinity interactions with natural protein targets and strengthen their promise as therapeutic agents. The D-peptides described here address limitations associated with current L-peptide entry inhibitors and are promising leads for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS.

  2. HIV entry inhibitors: a new generation of antiretroviral drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elias KRAMBOVITIS; Filippos PORICHIS; Demetrios A SPANDIDOS

    2005-01-01

    AIDS is presently treatable, and patients can have a good prognosis due to the success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), but it is still not curable or preventable. High toxicity of HAART, and the emergence of drug resistance add to the imperative to continue research into new strategies and interventions.Considerable progress in the understanding of HIV attachment and entry into host cells has suggested new possibilities for rationally designing agents that interfere with this process. The approval and introduction of the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide (Fuzeon) for clinical use signals a new era in AIDS therapeutics. Here we review the crucial steps the virus uses to achieve cell entry, which merit attention as potential targets, and the compounds at pre-clinical and clinical development stages, reported to effectively inhibit cell entry.

  3. Assessment of HIV-1 entry inhibitors by MLV/HIV-1 pseudotyped vectors

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    Thaler Sonja

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murine leukemia virus (MLV vector particles can be pseudotyped with a truncated variant of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope protein (Env and selectively target gene transfer to human cells expressing both CD4 and an appropriate co-receptor. Vector transduction mimics the HIV-1 entry process and is therefore a safe tool to study HIV-1 entry. Results Using FLY cells, which express the MLV gag and pol genes, we generated stable producer cell lines that express the HIV-1 envelope gene and a retroviral vector genome encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP. The BH10 or 89.6 P HIV-1 Env was expressed from a bicistronic vector which allowed the rapid selection of stable cell lines. A codon-usage-optimized synthetic env gene permitted high, Rev-independent Env expression. Vectors generated by these producer cells displayed different sensitivity to entry inhibitors. Conclusion These data illustrate that MLV/HIV-1 vectors are a valuable screening system for entry inhibitors or neutralizing antisera generated by vaccines.

  4. Approaches for Identification of HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors Targeting gp41 Pocket

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    Asim K. Debnath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon, was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD, it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs.

  5. A high throughput Cre–lox activated viral membrane fusion assay identifies pharmacological inhibitors of HIV entry

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    Esposito, Anthony M. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Cheung, Pamela [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Swartz, Talia H.; Li, Hongru [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Tsibane, Tshidi [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Durham, Natasha D. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Basler, Christopher F. [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Felsenfeld, Dan P. [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Benjamin K., E-mail: benjamin.chen@mssm.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Enveloped virus entry occurs when viral and cellular membranes fuse releasing particle contents into the target cell. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry occurs by cell-free virus or virus transferred between infected and uninfected cells through structures called virological synapses. We developed a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell-free or virological synapse-mediated entry. An HIV clone carrying Cre recombinase as a Gag-internal gene fusion releases active Cre into cells upon viral entry activating a recombinatorial gene switch changing dsRed to GFP-expression. A screen of a 1998 known-biological profile small molecule library identified pharmacological HIV entry inhibitors that block both cell-free and cell-to-cell infection. Many top hits were noted as HIV inhibitors in prior studies, but not previously recognized as entry antagonists. Modest therapeutic indices for simvastatin and nigericin were observed in confirmatory HIV infection assays. This robust assay is adaptable to study HIV and heterologous viral pseudotypes. - Highlights: • Cre recombinase viral fusion assay screens cell-free or cell–cell entry inhibitors. • This Gag-iCre based assay is specific for the entry step of HIV replication. • Screened a library of known pharmacologic compounds for HIV fusion antagonists. • Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but here are classified as entry antagonists. Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but not as entry antagonists. • The assay is compatible with pseudotyping with HIV and heterologous viruses.

  6. Development of aptamer based HIV-1 entry inhibitor prophylactic drugs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    London, G

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIDS remains a major public health problem globally, especially in Southern Africa where over 6.4 million people are infected by the most prevalent HIV-1 subtype C. To help stop the spread of HIV-1 subtype C, we isolated 2ʹ-F-RNA aptamers against gp...

  7. Mechanistic Studies of Viral Entry: An Overview of Dendrimer-Based Microbicides As Entry Inhibitors Against Both HIV and HSV-2 Overlapped Infections.

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    Sepúlveda-Crespo, Daniel; Ceña-Díez, Rafael; Jiménez, José Luis; Ángeles Muñoz-Fernández, Ma

    2017-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the development of different dendrimers, mainly polyanionic, against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and genital herpes (HSV-2) as topical microbicides targeting the viral entry process. Vaginal topical microbicides to prevent sexually transmitted infections such as HIV and HSV-2 are urgently needed. To inhibit HIV/HSV-2 entry processes, new preventive targets have been established to maximize the current therapies against wild-type and drug-resistant viruses. The entry of HIV/HSV-2 into target cells is a multistep process that triggers a cascade of molecular interactions between viral envelope proteins and cell surface receptors. Polyanionic dendrimers are highly branched nanocompounds with potent activity against HIV/HSV-2. Inhibitors of each entry step have been identified with regard to generations and surface groups, and possible roles for these agents in anti-HIV/HSV-2 therapies have also been discussed. Four potential binding sites for impeding HIV infection (HSPG, DC-SIGN, GSL, and CD4/gp120 inhibitors) and HSV-2 infection (HS, gB, gD, and gH/gL inhibitors) exist according to their mechanisms of action and structures. This review clarifies that inhibition of HIV/HSV-2 entry continues to be a promising target for drug development because nanotechnology can transform the field of HIV/HSV-2 prevention by improving the efficacy of the currently available antiviral treatments.

  8. Evaluation of potential genotoxicity of HIV entry inhibitors derived from natural sources.

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    Paskaleva, Elena E; Arra, Manoj; Liu, Yanze; Guo, Huijun; Swartz, Glenn; Kennedy, Jeffrey S; Breneman, Curt; Shekhtman, Alexander; Canki, Mario

    2014-01-01

    AIDS is a global pandemic that has seen the development of novel and effective treatments to improve the quality of life of those infected and reduction of spread of the disease. Palmitic Acid (PA), which we identified and isolated from Sargassum fusiforme, is a naturally occurring fatty acid that specifically inhibits HIV entry by binding to a novel pocket on the CD4 receptor. We also identified a structural analogue, 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP), as a more effective HIV entry inhibitor with a 20-fold increase in efficacy. We have used the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of 2-BP as a platform to identify new small chemical molecules that fit into the various identified active sites in an effort to identify more potent CD4 entry inhibitors. To validate further drug development, we tested the PA and 2-BP scaffold molecules for genotoxic potential. The FDA and International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) recommends using a standardized 3-test battery for testing compound genotoxicity consisting of the bacterial reverse mutation assay, mouse lymphoma assay, and rat micronucleus assay. PA and 2-BP and their metabolites tested negative in all three genotoxicty tests. 2-BP is the first derivative of PA to undergo pre-clinical screening, which will enable us to now test multiple simultaneous small chemical structures based on activity in scaffold modeling across the dimension of pre-clinical testing to enable transition to human testing.

  9. Evaluation of potential genotoxicity of HIV entry inhibitors derived from natural sources.

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    Elena E Paskaleva

    Full Text Available AIDS is a global pandemic that has seen the development of novel and effective treatments to improve the quality of life of those infected and reduction of spread of the disease. Palmitic Acid (PA, which we identified and isolated from Sargassum fusiforme, is a naturally occurring fatty acid that specifically inhibits HIV entry by binding to a novel pocket on the CD4 receptor. We also identified a structural analogue, 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP, as a more effective HIV entry inhibitor with a 20-fold increase in efficacy. We have used the structure-activity relationship (SAR of 2-BP as a platform to identify new small chemical molecules that fit into the various identified active sites in an effort to identify more potent CD4 entry inhibitors. To validate further drug development, we tested the PA and 2-BP scaffold molecules for genotoxic potential. The FDA and International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH recommends using a standardized 3-test battery for testing compound genotoxicity consisting of the bacterial reverse mutation assay, mouse lymphoma assay, and rat micronucleus assay. PA and 2-BP and their metabolites tested negative in all three genotoxicty tests. 2-BP is the first derivative of PA to undergo pre-clinical screening, which will enable us to now test multiple simultaneous small chemical structures based on activity in scaffold modeling across the dimension of pre-clinical testing to enable transition to human testing.

  10. Punica granatum (Pomegranate juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

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    Li Yun-Yao

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1 infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2 binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored.

  11. Convenient cell fusion assay for rapid screening for HIV entry inhibitors

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    Jiang, Shibo; Radigan, Lin; Zhang, Li

    2000-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV)-induced cell fusion is a critical pathway of HIV spread from infected cells to uninfected cells. A rapid and simple assay was established to measure HIV-induce cell fusion. This study is particularly useful to rapid screen for HIV inhibitors that block HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Present study demonstrated that coculture of HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells at 37 degree(s)C for 2 hours resulted in the highest cell fusion rate. Using this cell fusion assay, we have identified several potent HIV inhibitors targeted to the HIV gp41 core. These antiviral agents can be potentially developed as antiviral drugs for chemotherapy and prophylaxis of HIV infection and AIDS.

  12. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

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    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili [Scripps; (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  13. Ampelopsin, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infection Targeting HIV Entry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DE-YU LIU; JIAN-TAO YE; WEN-HUI YANG; JIN YAN; CHANG-HONG ZENG; SA ZENG

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-HIV effects of ampelopsin and its interaction with HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4. Methods Through anti-virus experiments in vitro, the inhibitory effect of ampelopsin on HIV-1 infection was verified. Chemotaxis assay was performed to show the ability to induce PBMCs migration by ampelopsin, RANTES and SDF-1(. Fluorescence labelling monoclonal antibody was utilized to observe the interaction of ampelopsin and CXCR4. Mice immunosuppressant model was also established to detail the role ampelopsin played in regulating cellular immunological functions. Results Ampelopsin could protect sensitive cells against HIV-1 infection and dramatically reduce HIV-1 antigen P24 expression. HIV-1SF33 attaching to MT-4 cells was interfered by ampelopsin, and the EC50 was 0.175 mg/mL for cellular protection and 0.024 mg/mL for P24 inhibition. At co-cultivating phase, EC50 was 0.229 mg/mL and 0.197 mg/mL respectively. Furthermore, the EC50 was 0.179 mg/mL and 0.348 mg/mL in acute infection. Human PBMCs migration was induced after being challenged with ampelopsin or chemokines, and synergistic action was observed during co-treatment. Ampelopsin alone resulted in maximal chemotaxis at 1 mg/mL. HIV-1 co-receptor CXCR4 on the surface of PBMCs was decreased by internalization, which indicated the effect of ampelopsin on CXCR4. About 70% CXCR4 was reduced by ampelopsin at 1 mg/mL. Ampelopsin also augmented cellular immunological functions in immunosuppressive mice. Conclusion Ampelopsin displays a strong inhibitive role during HIV-1 absorption, incubation and acute infection. These results are coincident with its immune enhancement.

  14. Reversible and efficient activation of HIV-1 cell entry by a tyrosine-sulfated peptide dissects endocytic entry and inhibitor mechanisms.

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    Platt, Emily J; Gomes, Michelle M; Kabat, David

    2014-04-01

    HIV-1 membranes contain gp120-gp41 trimers. Binding of gp120 to CD4 and a coreceptor (CCR5 or CXCR4) reduces the constraint on metastable gp41, enabling a series of conformational changes that cause membrane fusion. An analytic difficulty occurs because these steps occur slowly and asynchronously within cohorts of adsorbed virions. We previously isolated HIV-1JRCSF variants that efficiently use CCR5 mutants severely damaged in the tyrosine-sulfated amino terminus or extracellular loop 2. Surprisingly, both independent adaptations included gp120 mutations S298N, F313L, and N403S, supporting other evidence that they function by weakening gp120's grip on gp41 rather than by altering gp120 binding to specific CCR5 sites. Although several natural HIV-1 isolates reportedly use CCR5(Δ18) (CCR5 with a deletion of 18 N-terminal amino acids, including the tyrosine-sulfated region) when the soluble tyrosine-sulfated peptide is present, we show that HIV-1JRCSF with the adaptive mutations [HIV-1JRCSF(Ad)] functions approximately 100 times more efficiently and that coreceptor activation is reversible, enabling synchronous efficient entry control under physiological conditions. This system revealed that three-stranded gp41 folding intermediates susceptible to the inhibitor enfuvirtide form slowly and asynchronously on cell surface virions but resolve rapidly, with virions generally forming only one target. Adsorbed virions asynchronously and transiently become competent for entry at 37°C but are inactivated if the CCR5 peptide is absent during their window of opportunity. This competency is conferred by endocytosis, which results in inactivation if the peptide is absent. For both wild-type and adapted HIV-1 isolates, early gp41 refolding steps obligatorily occur on cell surfaces, whereas the final step(s) is endosomal. This system powerfully dissects HIV-1 entry and inhibitor mechanisms. We present a powerful means to reversibly and efficiently activate or terminate HIV-1 entry

  15. Enfuvirtide (T20)-Based Lipopeptide Is a Potent HIV-1 Cell Fusion Inhibitor: Implications for Viral Entry and Inhibition.

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    Ding, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiujuan; Chong, Huihui; Zhu, Yuanmei; Wei, Huamian; Wu, Xiyuan; He, Jinsheng; Wang, Xinquan; He, Yuxian

    2017-09-15

    The peptide drug enfuvirtide (T20) is the only viral fusion inhibitor used in combination therapy for HIV-1 infection, but it has relatively low antiviral activity and easily induces drug resistance. Emerging studies demonstrate that lipopeptide-based fusion inhibitors, such as LP-11 and LP-19, which mainly target the gp41 pocket site, have greatly improved antiviral potency and in vivo stability. In this study, we focused on developing a T20-based lipopeptide inhibitor that lacks pocket-binding sequence and targets a different site. First, the C-terminal tryptophan-rich motif (TRM) of T20 was verified to be essential for its target binding and inhibition; then, a novel lipopeptide, termed LP-40, was created by replacing the TRM with a fatty acid group. LP-40 showed markedly enhanced binding affinity for the target site and dramatically increased inhibitory activity on HIV-1 membrane fusion, entry, and infection. Unlike LP-11 and LP-19, which required a flexible linker between the peptide sequence and the lipid moiety, addition of a linker to LP-40 sharply reduced its potency, implying different binding modes with the extended N-terminal helices of gp41. Also, interestingly, LP-40 showed more potent activity than LP-11 in inhibiting HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion while it was less active than LP-11 in inhibiting pseudovirus entry, and the two inhibitors displayed synergistic antiviral effects. The crystal structure of LP-40 in complex with a target peptide revealed their key binding residues and motifs. Combined, our studies have not only provided a potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitor, but also revealed new insights into the mechanisms of viral inhibition.IMPORTANCE T20 is the only membrane fusion inhibitor available for treatment of viral infection; however, T20 requires high doses and has a low genetic barrier for resistance, and its inhibitory mechanism and structural basis remain unclear. Here, we report the design of LP-40, a T20-based lipopeptide inhibitor

  16. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Dual Hotspot Small-Molecule HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaLonde, Judith M.; Kwon, Young Do; Jones, David M.; Sun, Alexander W.; Courter, Joel R.; Soeta, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Toyoharu; Princiotto, Amy M.; Wu, Xueling; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Madani, Navid; Smith, III, Amos B. (Bryn Mawr); (NIH); (UPENN); (JHU); (DFCI)

    2012-06-19

    Cellular infection by HIV-1 is initiated with a binding event between the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 and the cellular receptor protein CD4. The CD4-gp120 interface is dominated by two hotspots: a hydrophobic gp120 cavity capped by Phe43{sub CD4} and an electrostatic interaction between residues Arg59{sub CD4} and Asp368{sub gp120}. The CD4 mimetic small-molecule NBD-556 (1) binds within the gp120 cavity; however, 1 and related congeners demonstrate limited viral neutralization breadth. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, characterization, and X-ray structures of gp120 in complex with small molecules that simultaneously engage both binding hotspots. The compounds specifically inhibit viral infection of 42 tier 2 clades B and C viruses and are shown to be antagonists of entry into CD4-negative cells. Dual hotspot design thus provides both a means to enhance neutralization potency of HIV-1 entry inhibitors and a novel structural paradigm for inhibiting the CD4-gp120 protein-protein interaction.

  17. Novel Approaches to Inhibit HIV Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukwuka A. Didigu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV entry into target cells is a multi-step process involving binding of the viral glycoprotein, Env, to its receptor CD4 and a coreceptor—either CCR5 or CXCR4. Understanding the means by which HIV enters cells has led to the identification of genetic polymorphisms, such as the 32 base-pair deletion in the ccr5 gene (ccr5∆32 that confers resistance to infection in homozygous individuals, and has also resulted in the development of entry inhibitors—small molecule antagonists that block infection at the entry step. The recent demonstration of long-term control of HIV infection in a leukemic patient following a hematopoietic stem cell transplant using cells from a ccr5∆32 homozygous donor highlights the important role of the HIV entry in maintaining an established infection and has led to a number of attempts to treat HIV infection by genetically modifying the ccr5 gene. In this review, we describe the HIV entry process and provide an overview of the different classes of approved HIV entry inhibitors while highlighting novel genetic strategies aimed at blocking HIV infection at the level of entry.

  18. HIV-1 Entry Inhbitors: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on chemokine receptor antagonists. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells is an ordered multi-step process involving attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Inhibitors of each step have been identified and shown to have antiviral activity in clinical trials. Phase 1-2 trials of monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule attachment inhibitors have demonstrated activity in HIV-1-infected subjects, but none has progressed to later phase clinical trials. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonists maraviroc (now been approved for clinical use) and vicriviroc (in phase 3 trials) have shown significant benefit in controlled trials in treatment-experienced subjects; additional CCR5 antagonists are in various stages of clinical development. Targeting CXCR4 has proven to be more challenging. Although proof of concept has been demonstrated in phase 1-2 trials of two compounds, neither proved suitable for chronic administration. Little progress has been reported in developing longer acting or orally bioavailable fusion inhibitors. Summary ACCR5 antagonist and a fusion inhibitor are approved for use as HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Development of drugs targeting other steps in HIV-1 entry is ongoing. PMID:19339945

  19. Activity of the HIV-1 attachment inhibitor BMS-626529, the active component of the prodrug BMS-663068, against CD4-independent viruses and HIV-1 envelopes resistant to other entry inhibitors.

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    Li, Zhufang; Zhou, Nannan; Sun, Yongnian; Ray, Neelanjana; Lataillade, Max; Hanna, George J; Krystal, Mark

    2013-09-01

    BMS-626529 is a novel small-molecule HIV-1 attachment inhibitor active against both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic viruses. BMS-626529 functions by preventing gp120 from binding to CD4. A prodrug of this compound, BMS-663068, is currently in clinical development. As a theoretical resistance pathway to BMS-663068 could be the development of a CD4-independent phenotype, we examined the activity of BMS-626529 against CD4-independent viruses and investigated whether resistance to BMS-626529 could be associated with a CD4-independent phenotype. Finally, we evaluated whether cross-resistance exists between BMS-626529 and other HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Two laboratory-derived envelopes with a CD4-independent phenotype (one CXCR4 tropic and one CCR5 tropic), five envelopes from clinical isolates with preexisting BMS-626529 resistance, and several site-specific mutant BMS-626529-resistant envelopes were examined for their dependence on CD4 for infectivity or susceptibility to BMS-626529. Viruses resistant to other entry inhibitors (enfuvirtide, maraviroc, and ibalizumab) were also examined for susceptibility to BMS-626529. Both CD4-independent laboratory isolates retained sensitivity to BMS-626529 in CD4(-) cells, while HIV-1 envelopes from viruses resistant to BMS-626529 exhibited no evidence of a CD4-independent phenotype. BMS-626529 also exhibited inhibitory activity against ibalizumab- and enfuvirtide-resistant envelopes. While there appeared to be some association between maraviroc resistance and reduced susceptibility to BMS-626529, an absolute correlation cannot be presumed, since some CCR5-tropic maraviroc-resistant envelopes remained sensitive to BMS-626529. Clinical use of the prodrug BMS-663068 is unlikely to promote resistance via generation of CD4-independent virus. No cross-resistance between BMS-626529 and other HIV entry inhibitors was observed, which could allow for sequential or concurrent use with different classes of entry inhibitors.

  20. An inducible cell-cell fusion system with integrated ability to measure the efficiency and specificity of HIV-1 entry inhibitors.

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    Alon Herschhorn

    Full Text Available HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs mediate virus entry by fusing the viral and target cell membranes, a multi-step process that represents an attractive target for inhibition. Entry inhibitors with broad-range activity against diverse isolates of HIV-1 may be extremely useful as lead compounds for the development of therapies or prophylactic microbicides. To facilitate the identification of such inhibitors, we have constructed a cell-cell fusion system capable of simultaneously monitoring inhibition efficiency and specificity. In this system, effector cells stably express a tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA that enables tightly inducible expression of both HIV-1 Env and the Renilla luciferase (R-Luc reporter protein. Target cells express the HIV-1 receptors, CD4 and CCR5, and carry the firefly luciferase (F-Luc reporter gene under the control of a tTA-responsive promoter. Thus, Env-mediated fusion of these two cell types allows the tTA to diffuse to the target cell and activate the expression of the F-Luc protein. The efficiency with which an inhibitor blocks cell-cell fusion is measured by a decrease in the F-Luc activity, while the specificity of the inhibitor is evaluated by its effect on the R-Luc activity. The system exhibited a high dynamic range and high Z'-factor values. The assay was validated with a reference panel of inhibitors that target different steps in HIV-1 entry, yielding inhibitory concentrations comparable to published virus inhibition data. Our system is suitable for large-scale screening of chemical libraries and can also be used for detailed characterization of inhibitory and cytotoxic properties of known entry inhibitors.

  1. A model of peptide triazole entry inhibitor binding to HIV-1 gp120 and the mechanism of bridging sheet disruption.

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    Emileh, Ali; Tuzer, Ferit; Yeh, Herman; Umashankara, Muddegowda; Moreira, Diogo R M; Lalonde, Judith M; Bewley, Carole A; Abrams, Cameron F; Chaiken, Irwin M

    2013-04-02

    Peptide triazole (PT) entry inhibitors prevent HIV-1 infection by blocking the binding of viral gp120 to both the HIV-1 receptor and the coreceptor on target cells. Here, we used all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) to propose a model for the encounter complex of the peptide triazoles with gp120. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) and single-site mutagenesis experiments were performed to test the simulation results. We found that docking of the peptide to a conserved patch of residues lining the "F43 pocket" of gp120 in a bridging sheet naïve gp120 conformation of the glycoprotein led to a stable complex. This pose prevents formation of the bridging sheet minidomain, which is required for receptor-coreceptor binding, providing a mechanistic basis for dual-site antagonism of this class of inhibitors. Burial of the peptide triazole at the gp120 inner domain-outer domain interface significantly contributed to complex stability and rationalizes the significant contribution of hydrophobic triazole groups to peptide potency. Both the simulation model and STD NMR experiments suggest that the I-X-W [where X is (2S,4S)-4-(4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)pyrrolidine] tripartite hydrophobic motif in the peptide is the major contributor of contacts at the gp120-PT interface. Because the model predicts that the peptide Trp side chain hydrogen bonding with gp120 S375 contributes to the stability of the PT-gp120 complex, we tested this prediction through analysis of peptide binding to gp120 mutant S375A. The results showed that a peptide triazole KR21 inhibits S375A with 20-fold less potency than WT, consistent with predictions of the model. Overall, the PT-gp120 model provides a starting point for both the rational design of higher-affinity peptide triazoles and the development of structure-minimized entry inhibitors that can trap gp120 into an inactive conformation and prevent infection.

  2. AMD3465, a monomacrocyclic CXCR4 antagonist and potent HIV entry inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatse, Sigrid; Princen, Katrien; De Clercq, Erik;

    2005-01-01

    and selective anti-HIV activity against CXCR4-using (X4) viruses and showed antiviral efficacy in X4 HIV-1-infected persons in a phase II clinical trial. However, AMD3100 lacks oral bioavailability due to its high overall positive charge. Initial structure-activity relationship studies with bicyclam analogues...

  3. HIV entry inhibitors targeting HIV-1 gp120:research advances%作用于HIV gp120的进入抑制剂研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘叔文; 陈之朋; 王玉芹

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 is an envelope virus. Two glycoprotein subunits, gp120 and gp41, are on the virus membrane and mediate the virus entry. The membrane fusion events leading to HIV entry into the target cell are initiated by the binding of gp120 to CD4 and subsequently to a co-receptor, CXCR4 or CCR5. Then the conformation of gp41 has also changed, resulting in the fusion between the viral and cellular membranes. Many antibodies, proteins, saccharides, peptides and small molecule compounds which bind to gp120 can deter the progress of virus entry. This review discusses recent progress in the development of anti-HIV agents targeting gp120.%HIV-1病毒为包膜病毒,其感染靶细胞的第一步是由HIV包膜蛋白表面亚基gp120与靶细胞上的CD4分子和辅助受体(趋化因子受体CCR5或CXCR4等)结合,导致gp41的构型发生改变,启动病毒包膜与靶细胞膜的融合.与gp120相结合的一些抗体、蛋白、多糖、多肽和小分子化合物,都可能影响HIV-1病毒包膜和靶细胞膜融合的过程,从而起到抗HIV-1病毒的作用.该文对近年来以HIV gp120为靶点的HIV进入抑制剂的研究进展进行综述.

  4. A novel peptide that inhibits HIV-1 entry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong; HUANG Xiaoxing; WANG Qiong; YANG Yaling; TIAN Po; ZHANG Wentao

    2004-01-01

    @@ The global epidemic of HIV infection, the cause of AIDS, has created an urgent need for novel classes of antiretroviral agent. Besides reverse transcriptase and protease, the viral entry process provides new anti-HIV-1 targets. A new generation of antiviral drugs intended to block HIV entry into host cells is now under develop- ment[1]. These compounds are generally referred to as fusion or entry inhibitor. Several HIV-1 entry inhibitors that target CD4-gp120 interactions, co-receptor function, and gp41-mediated membrane fusion are in different stages of clinical development[2].

  5. Development of an HIV-1 Microbicide Based on Caulobacter crescentus: Blocking Infection by High-Density Display of Virus Entry Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Farr

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS pandemic remains an enormous global health concern. Despite effective prevention options, 2.6 million new infections occur annually, with women in developing countries accounting for more than half of these infections. New prevention strategies that can be used by women are urgently needed. Topical microbicides specific for HIV-1 represent a promising prevention strategy. Conceptually, using harmless bacteria to display peptides or proteins capable of blocking entry provides an inexpensive approach to microbicide development. To avoid the potential pitfalls of engineering commensal bacteria, our strategy is to genetically display infection inhibitors on a non-native bacterium and rely on topical application of stabilized bacteria before potential virus exposure. Due to the high density cell-surface display capabilities and the inherent low toxicity of the bacterium, the S-layer mediated protein display capabilities of the non-pathogenic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has been exploited for this approach. We have demonstrated that C. crescentus displaying MIP1α or CD4 interfered with the virus entry pathway and provided significant protection from HIV-1 pseudovirus representing clade B in a standard single cycle infection assay. Here we have expanded our C. crescentus based microbicide approach with additional and diverse classes of natural and synthetic inhibitors of the HIV-1 entry pathway. All display constructs provided variable but significant protection from HIV-1 infection; some with protection as high as 70%. Further, we describe protection from infection with additional viral clades. These findings indicate the significant potential for engineering C. crescentus to be an effective and readily adaptable HIV-1 microbicide platform.

  6. Computer-based design of novel HIV-1 entry inhibitors: neomycin conjugated to arginine peptides at two specific sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchanski, Alexander; Lapidot, Aviva

    2009-03-01

    Aminoglycoside-arginine conjugates (AAC and APAC) are multi-target inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Here, we predict new conjugates of neomycin with two arginine peptide chains binding at specific sites on neomycin [poly-arginine-neomycin-poly-arginine (PA-Neo-PA)]. The rationale for the design of such compounds is to separate two short arginine peptides with neomycin, which may extend the binding region of the CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4). We used homology models of CXCR4 and unliganded envelope glycoprotein 120 (HIV-1(IIIB) gp120) and docked PA-Neo-PAs and APACs to these using a multistep docking procedure. The results indicate that PA-Neo-PAs spread over two negatively charged patches of CXCR4. PA-Neo-PA-CXCR4 complexes are energetically more favorable than AACs/APAC-CXCR4 complexes. Notably, our CXCR4 model and docking procedure can be applied to predict new compounds that are either inhibitors of gp120-CXCR4 binding without affecting stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1 alpha) chemotaxis activity, or inhibitors of SDF-1 alpha-CXCR4 binding resulting in an anti-metastasis effect. We also predict that PA-Neo-PAs and APACs can interfere with CD4-gp120 binding in unliganded conformation.

  7. Energetics of dendrimer binding to HIV-1 gp120-CD4 complex and mechanismic aspects of its role as an entry-inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Suman; Sahoo, Anil Kumar; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and computational studies have established that de-protonated dendrimers (SPL7013 and PAMAM) act as entry-inhibitors of HIV. SPL7013 based Vivagel is currently under clinical development. The dendrimer binds to gp120 in the gp120-CD4 complex, destabilizes it by breaking key contacts between gp120 and CD4 and prevents viral entry into target cells. In this work, we provide molecular details and energetics of the formation of the SPL7013-gp120-CD4 ternary complex and decipher modes of action of the dendrimer in preventing viral entry. It is also known from experiments that the dendrimer binds weakly to gp120 that is not bound to CD4. It binds even more weakly to the CD4-binding region of gp120 and thus cannot directly block gp120-CD4 complexation. In this work, we examine the feasibility of dendrimer binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4 and directly blocking gp120-CD4 complex formation. We find that the process of the dendrimer binding to CD4 can compete with gp120-CD4 binding due to comparable free energy change for the two processes, thus creating a possibility for the dendrimer to directly block gp120-CD4 complexation by binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4.

  8. Variation in HIV-1 R5 macrophage-tropism correlates with sensitivity to reagents that block envelope: CD4 interactions but not with sensitivity to other entry inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmonds Peter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 R5 viruses cause most of the AIDS cases worldwide and are preferentially transmitted compared to CXCR4-using viruses. Furthermore, R5 viruses vary extensively in capacity to infect macrophages and highly macrophage-tropic variants are frequently identified in the brains of patients with dementia. Here, we investigated the sensitivity of R5 envelopes to a range of inhibitors and antibodies that block HIV entry. We studied a large panel of R5 envelopes, derived by PCR amplification without culture from brain, lymph node, blood and semen. These R5 envelopes conferred a wide range of macrophage tropism and included highly macrophage-tropic variants from brain and non-macrophage-tropic variants from lymph node. Results R5 macrophage-tropism correlated with sensitivity to inhibition by reagents that inhibited gp120:CD4 interactions. Thus, increasing macrophage-tropism was associated with increased sensitivity to soluble CD4 and to IgG-CD4 (PRO 542, but with increased resistance to the anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (mab, Q4120. These observations were highly significant and are consistent with an increased affinity of envelope for CD4 for macrophage-tropic envelopes. No overall correlations were noted between R5 macrophage-tropism and sensitivity to CCR5 antagonists or to gp41 specific reagents. Intriguingly, there was a relationship between increasing macrophage-tropism and increased sensitivity to the CD4 binding site mab, b12, but decreased sensitivity to 2G12, a mab that binds a glycan complex on gp120. Conclusion Variation in R5 macrophage-tropism is caused by envelope variation that predominantly influences sensitivity to reagents that block gp120:CD4 interactions. Such variation has important implications for therapy using viral entry inhibitors and for the design of envelope antigens for vaccines.

  9. Molecular interaction of gp120 and B40 aptamer: A potential new HIV-1 entry inhibitor drug

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baron, MK

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available the HIV/Aids epidemic, we have recently discovered and described small nucleic acid ligands called aptamers with antiviral activity (1, 4). These aptamers prevent HIV-1 infection by binding to gp120, which is the viral surface envelope glycoprotein...

  10. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  11. Dopamine receptor activation increases HIV entry into primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Gaskill

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers.

  12. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B; Dauter, Zbigniew; O'Keefe, Barry R; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-08

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  13. Activity of the HIV-1 Attachment Inhibitor BMS-626529, the Active Component of the Prodrug BMS-663068, against CD4-Independent Viruses and HIV-1 Envelopes Resistant to Other Entry Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhufang; Zhou, Nannan; Sun, Yongnian; Ray, Neelanjana; Lataillade, Max; Hanna, George J.; Krystal, Mark

    2013-01-01

    BMS-626529 is a novel small-molecule HIV-1 attachment inhibitor active against both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic viruses. BMS-626529 functions by preventing gp120 from binding to CD4. A prodrug of this compound, BMS-663068, is currently in clinical development. As a theoretical resistance pathway to BMS-663068 could be the development of a CD4-independent phenotype, we examined the activity of BMS-626529 against CD4-independent viruses and investigated whether resistance to BMS-626529 could be asso...

  14. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results.

  15. Binding mode characterization of NBD series CD4-mimetic HIV-1 entry inhibitors by X-ray structure and resistance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Francesca; Kwon, Young Do; Zhang, Hongtao; Yang, Yongping; Scacalossi, Daniel; Kwong, Peter D; Debnath, Asim K

    2014-09-01

    We previously identified two small-molecule CD4 mimetics--NBD-556 and NBD-557--and synthesized a series of NBD compounds that resulted in improved neutralization activity in a single-cycle HIV-1 infectivity assay. For the current investigation, we selected several of the most active compounds and assessed their antiviral activity on a panel of 53 reference HIV-1 Env pseudoviruses representing diverse clades of clinical isolates. The selected compounds inhibited tested clades with low-micromolar potencies. Mechanism studies indicated that they act as CD4 agonists, a potentially unfavorable therapeutic trait, in that they can bind to the gp120 envelope glycoprotein and initiate a similar physiological response as CD4. However, one of the compounds, NBD-09027, exhibited reduced agonist properties, in both functional and biophysical studies. To understand the binding mode of these inhibitors, we first generated HIV-1-resistant mutants, assessed their behavior with NBD compounds, and determined the X-ray structures of two inhibitors, NBD-09027 and NBD-10007, in complex with the HIV-1 gp120 core at ∼2-Å resolution. Both studies confirmed that the NBD compounds bind similarly to NBD-556 and NBD-557 by inserting their hydrophobic groups into the Phe43 cavity of gp120. The basic nitrogen of the piperidine ring is located in close proximity to D368 of gp120 but it does not form any H-bond or salt bridge, a likely explanation for their nonoptimal antagonist properties. The results reveal the structural and biological character of the NBD series of CD4 mimetics and identify ways to reduce their agonist properties and convert them to antagonists. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. HIV-1进入细胞机制及进入抑制剂的研究进展%Advanced on the study of HIV-1's entry mechanism and entry inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴钦梅; 吴昊

    2006-01-01

    关于HIV-1进入抑制剂的研究是HIV研究领域近年来的一个新进展,为人类深入了解HIV发病机理,开发新的抗病毒治疗药物,并最终战胜HIV带来了新的曙光.处于临床应用和试验阶段的HIV-1进入抑制剂包括:阻断gp120与CD4连接的抑制剂;作用于gp120-CCR5或gp120-CXCR4的抑制剂;直接作用于gp41介导的膜融合抑制剂.最近发现一种细胞表面蛋白即细胞表面蛋白即二硫化异构酶(PDI)在HIV-1进入过程中起着重要作用.PDI参与病毒进入的3个步骤:1)表面PDI活化;2)PDI与CD4连接;3)CD4-PDI进入gp120二硫键.新型PDI抑制剂主要针对这3个步骤,也是这类药物与以往药物作用位点不同的地方.

  17. Simplified molecular input-line entry system and International Chemical Identifier in the QSAR analysis of styrylquinoline derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Alla P; Toropov, Andrey A; Benfenati, Emilio; Gini, Giuseppina

    2011-05-01

    The simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES) and IUPAC International Chemical Identifier (InChI) were examined as representations of the molecular structure for quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR), which can be used to predict the inhibitory activity of styrylquinoline derivatives against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Optimal SMILES-based descriptors give a best model with n = 26, r(2) = 0.6330, q(2) = 0.5812, s = 0.502, F = 41 for the training set and n = 10, r(2) = 0.7493, r(pred)(2) = 0.6235, R(m)(2) = 0.537, s = 0.541, F = 24 for the validation set. Optimal InChI-based descriptors give a best model with n = 26, r(2) = 0.8673, q(2) = 0.8456, s = 0.302, F = 157 for the training set and n = 10, r(2) = 0.8562, r(pred)(2) = 0.7715, R(m)(2) = 0.819, s = 0.329, F = 48 for the validation set. Thus, the InChI-based model is preferable. The described SMILES-based and InChI-based approaches have been checked with five random splits into the training and test sets. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. C peptides as entry inhibitors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerer, Lisa; Kiem, Hans-Peter; von Laer, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Antiviral genes encoding either membrane-anchored (ma) or secreted (iSAVE) C peptides have been engineered and allow direct in vivo production of the therapeutic peptides by genetically modified host cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides expressed in the HIV-1 target cells by T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy efficiently prevent virus entry into the modified cells. Such gene-protection confers a selective survival advantage and allows accumulation of the genetically modified cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides have been successfully tested in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS and were found to be safe in a phase I clinical trial in AIDS patients transplanted with autologous gene-modified T-cells. Secreted C peptides have the crucial advantage of not only protecting genetically modified cells from HIV-1 infection, but also neighboring cells, thus suppressing virus replication even if only a small fraction of cells is genetically modified. Accordingly, various cell types can be considered as potential in vivo producer cells for iSAVE-based gene therapeutics, which could even be modified by direct in vivo gene delivery in future. In conclusion, C peptide gene therapeutics may provide a strong benefit to AIDS patients and could present an effective alternative to current antiretroviral drug regimens.

  19. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  20. Rapid dissociation of HIV-1 from cultured cells severely limits infectivity assays, causes the inactivation ascribed to entry inhibitors, and masks the inherently high level of infectivity of virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J; Kozak, Susan L; Durnin, James P; Hope, Thomas J; Kabat, David

    2010-03-01

    By using immunofluorescence microscopy to observe and analyze freshly made HIV-1 virions adsorbed onto cells, we found that they are inherently highly infectious, rather than predominantly defective as previously suggested. Surprisingly, polycations enhance titers 20- to 30-fold by stabilizing adsorption and preventing a previously undescribed process of rapid dissociation, strongly implying that infectivity assays for many viruses are limited not only by inefficient virus diffusion onto cells but also by a postattachment race between entry and dissociation. This kinetic competition underlies inhibitory effects of CCR5 antagonists and explains why adaptive HIV-1 mutations overcome many cell entry limitations by accelerating entry.

  1. Rapid Dissociation of HIV-1 from Cultured Cells Severely Limits Infectivity Assays, Causes the Inactivation Ascribed to Entry Inhibitors, and Masks the Inherently High Level of Infectivity of Virions▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J.; Kozak, Susan L.; Durnin, James P.; Hope, Thomas J.; Kabat, David

    2010-01-01

    By using immunofluorescence microscopy to observe and analyze freshly made HIV-1 virions adsorbed onto cells, we found that they are inherently highly infectious, rather than predominantly defective as previously suggested. Surprisingly, polycations enhance titers 20- to 30-fold by stabilizing adsorption and preventing a previously undescribed process of rapid dissociation, strongly implying that infectivity assays for many viruses are limited not only by inefficient virus diffusion onto cells but also by a postattachment race between entry and dissociation. This kinetic competition underlies inhibitory effects of CCR5 antagonists and explains why adaptive HIV-1 mutations overcome many cell entry limitations by accelerating entry. PMID:20042508

  2. HTCC: Broad Range Inhibitor of Coronavirus Entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Milewska

    Full Text Available To date, six human coronaviruses have been known, all of which are associated with respiratory infections in humans. With the exception of the highly pathogenic SARS and MERS coronaviruses, human coronaviruses (HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43, HCoV-229E, and HCoV-HKU1 circulate worldwide and typically cause the common cold. In most cases, infection with these viruses does not lead to severe disease, although acute infections in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients may progress to severe disease requiring hospitalization. Importantly, no drugs against human coronaviruses exist, and only supportive therapy is available. Previously, we proposed the cationically modified chitosan, N-(2-hydroxypropyl-3-trimethylammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC, and its hydrophobically-modified derivative (HM-HTCC as potent inhibitors of the coronavirus HCoV-NL63. Here, we show that HTCC inhibits interaction of a virus with its receptor and thus blocks the entry. Further, we demonstrate that HTCC polymers with different degrees of substitution act as effective inhibitors of all low-pathogenic human coronaviruses.

  3. 作用于HIV-1 gp120小分子HIV进入抑制剂NC-2的虚拟筛选及其作用机制%Virtual screening of small molecular HIV-1 entry inhibitor NC-2 targeting gp120 and its action mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段恒; 王玉芹; 宋德寿; 陈之朋; 裘佳寅; 陆路; 姜世勃; 刘叔文; 谭穗懿

    2013-01-01

    目的 基于中和抗体VRC01与HIV-1 gpl20的结合模式,利用计算机虚拟筛选,从IBS天然产物数据库中筛选靶向HIV-1gpl20的小分子HIV-l进入抑制剂,并对其抗病毒活性和机制进行研究.方法 运用MM-PBSA方法计算候选化合物与HIV-1gpl20结合后自由能的变化;利用HIV-1假病毒、活病毒技术及细胞融合实验,检测化合物抑制HIV-1感染的活性;XTT比色法检测化合物对细胞的毒性;采用酶联免疫吸附测定法(ELISA)研究化合物体外抗病毒活性的机理.结果 利用计算机从40 000个化合物中虚拟筛选出19个与gpl20结合后自由能降低较大的小分子化合物,其中NC-2具有抑制HIV-1感染和细胞融合的活性,其抑制HIV-1实验株ⅢB的IC50是1.95±0.44 μmol/L,抑制HIV-1JRFL假病毒的IC50是10.58±0.13 μrmol/L.酶联免疫吸附法结果表明NC-2体外能抑制HIV-1 gpl20与CD4的结合,但不抑制HIV-1 gp41六螺旋的形成.结论该计算机虚拟筛选的方法可为开发作用于HIV-1 gpl20的小分子进入抑制剂提供参考.同时,通过计算机辅助设计加病毒活性筛选的方法,得到一个新颖结构的HIV进入抑制剂NC-2.%Objective To screen the HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting HIV-1 gp120 from the IBS natural product database by virtual screening based on the binding mode of the neutralizing antibody VRC01 with HIV-1 gp120 and investigate the anti-viral activities of the inhibitors and their action mechanisms.Methods The binding interaction of the candidate molecules binding gp120 and changes of the binding free energy were analyzed by MM-PBSA calculation.The anti-HIV-1 activities of the tested compounds were detected by HIV-1 pseudotyped virus,laboratory-adapted HIV-1 and a cell-cell fusion assay.The cytotoxicity of the studied molecules was examined by XTT colorimetric assay.The mechanisms of the anti-viral activities of the candidate molecules were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results A total

  4. Tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry by targeting gp41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin L(U); Shu-wen LIU; Shi-bo JIANG; Shu-guang WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism by which tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry into target cells. METHODS: The inhibitory activity of tannin on HIV-1 replication and entry was detected by p24 production and HIV-1-mediated cell fusion, respectively. The inhibitory activity on the gp41 six-helix bundle formation was determined by an improved sandwich ELISA. RESULTS: Tannins from different sources showed potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 replication,HIV-1-mediated cell fusion, and the gp4 six-helix bundle formation. CONCLUSION: Tannin inhibits HIV-1 entry into target cells by interfering with the gp41 six-helix bundle formation, thus blocking HIV-1 fusion with the target cell.

  5. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  6. Cell-type specific requirements for thiol/disulfide exchange during HIV-1 entry and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantchev, Tzanko S; Paciga, Mark; Lankford, Carla R; Schwartzkopff, Franziska; Broder, Christopher C; Clouse, Kathleen A

    2012-12-03

    The role of disulfide bond remodeling in HIV-1 infection is well described, but the process still remains incompletely characterized. At present, the data have been predominantly obtained using established cell lines and/or CXCR4-tropic laboratory-adapted virus strains. There is also ambiguity about which disulfide isomerases/reductases play a major role in HIV-1 entry, as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and/or thioredoxin (Trx) have emerged as the two enzymes most often implicated in this process. We have extended our previous findings and those of others by focusing on CCR5-using HIV-1 strains and their natural targets--primary human macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found that the nonspecific thiol/disulfide exchange inhibitor, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), significantly reduced HIV-1 entry and infection in cell lines, human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), and also phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Subsequent studies were performed using specific anti-PDI or Trx monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in HIV-1 envelope pseudotyped and wild type (wt) virus infection systems. Although human donor-to-donor variability was observed as expected, Trx appeared to play a greater role than PDI in HIV-1 infection of MDM. In contrast, PDI, but not Trx, was predominantly involved in HIV-1 entry and infection of the CD4+/CCR5+ T cell line, PM-1, and PHA-stimulated primary human T lymphocytes. Intriguingly, both PDI and Trx were present on the surface of MDM, PM-1 and PHA-stimulated CD4+ T cells. However, considerably lower levels of Trx were detected on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes, compared to PHA-stimulated cells. Our findings clearly demonstrate the role of thiol/disulfide exchange in HIV-1 entry in primary T lymphocytes and MDM. They also establish a cell-type specificity regarding the involvement of particular disulfide isomerases/reductases in this process and may provide an explanation for differences

  7. Cell-type specific requirements for thiol/disulfide exchange during HIV-1 entry and infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stantchev Tzanko S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of disulfide bond remodeling in HIV-1 infection is well described, but the process still remains incompletely characterized. At present, the data have been predominantly obtained using established cell lines and/or CXCR4-tropic laboratory-adapted virus strains. There is also ambiguity about which disulfide isomerases/ reductases play a major role in HIV-1 entry, as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI and/or thioredoxin (Trx have emerged as the two enzymes most often implicated in this process. Results We have extended our previous findings and those of others by focusing on CCR5-using HIV-1 strains and their natural targets - primary human macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found that the nonspecific thiol/disulfide exchange inhibitor, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB, significantly reduced HIV-1 entry and infection in cell lines, human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM, and also phytohemagglutinin (PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Subsequent studies were performed using specific anti-PDI or Trx monoclonal antibodies (mAb in HIV-1 envelope pseudotyped and wild type (wt virus infection systems. Although human donor-to-donor variability was observed as expected, Trx appeared to play a greater role than PDI in HIV-1 infection of MDM. In contrast, PDI, but not Trx, was predominantly involved in HIV-1 entry and infection of the CD4+/CCR5+ T cell line, PM-1, and PHA-stimulated primary human T lymphocytes. Intriguingly, both PDI and Trx were present on the surface of MDM, PM-1 and PHA-stimulated CD4+ T cells. However, considerably lower levels of Trx were detected on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes, compared to PHA-stimulated cells. Conclusions Our findings clearly demonstrate the role of thiol/disulfide exchange in HIV-1 entry in primary T lymphocytes and MDM. They also establish a cell-type specificity regarding the involvement of particular disulfide isomerases/reductases in this

  8. Entry Properties and Entry Inhibitors of a Human H7N9 Influenza Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Youhui Si; Jianguo Li; Yuqiang Niu; Xiuying Liu; Lili Ren; Li Guo; Min Cheng; Hongli Zhou; Jianwei Wang; Qi Jin; Wei Yang

    2014-01-01

    The recently identified human infections with a novel avian influenza H7N9 virus in China raise important questions regarding possible risk to humans. However, the entry properties and tropism of this H7N9 virus were poorly understood. Moreover, neuraminidase inhibitor resistant H7N9 isolates were recently observed in two patients and correlated with poor clinical outcomes. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the entry properties of H7N9 virus, design and evaluate inhibitors for H7N9 virus e...

  9. An expanded model of HIV cell entry phenotype based on multi-parameter single-cell data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozek Katarzyna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 into the host cell involves interactions between the viral envelope glycoproteins (Env and the cellular receptor CD4 as well as a coreceptor molecule (most importantly CCR5 or CXCR4. Viral preference for a specific coreceptor (tropism is in particular determined by the third variable loop (V3 of the Env glycoprotein gp120. The approval and use of a coreceptor antagonist for antiretroviral therapy make detailed understanding of tropism and its accurate prediction from patient derived virus isolates essential. The aim of the present study is the development of an extended description of the HIV entry phenotype reflecting its co-dependence on several key determinants as the basis for a more accurate prediction of HIV-1 entry phenotype from genotypic data. Results Here, we established a new protocol of quantitation and computational analysis of the dependence of HIV entry efficiency on receptor and coreceptor cell surface levels as well as viral V3 loop sequence and the presence of two prototypic coreceptor antagonists in varying concentrations. Based on data collected at the single-cell level, we constructed regression models of the HIV-1 entry phenotype integrating the measured determinants. We developed a multivariate phenotype descriptor, termed phenotype vector, which facilitates a more detailed characterization of HIV entry phenotypes than currently used binary tropism classifications. For some of the tested virus variants, the multivariant phenotype vector revealed substantial divergences from existing tropism predictions. We also developed methods for computational prediction of the entry phenotypes based on the V3 sequence and performed an extrapolating calculation of the effectiveness of this computational procedure. Conclusions Our study of the HIV cell entry phenotype and the novel multivariate representation developed here contributes to a more detailed

  10. Lysosomotropic agents as HCV entry inhibitors

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    Nawaz Zafar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HCV has two envelop proteins named as E1 and E2 which play an important role in cell entry through two main pathways: direct fusion at the plasma membrane and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Fusion of the HCV envelope proteins is triggered by low pH within the endosome. Lysosomotropic agents (LA such as Chloroquine and Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl are the weak bases and penetrate in lysosome as protonated form and increase the intracellular pH. To investigate the antiviral effect of LA (Chloroquine and NH4Cl on pH dependent endocytosis, HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp of 1a and 3a genotype were produced and used to infect liver cells. The toxicological effects of Chloroquine and NH4Cl were tested in liver cells through MTT cell proliferation assay. For antiviral screening of Chloroquine and NH4Cl, liver cells were infected with HCVpp of 3a and 1a genotype in the presence or absence of different concentrations of Chloroquine and NH4Cl and there luciferase activity was determined by using a luminometer. The results demonstrated that Chloroquine and NH4Cl showed more than 50% reduction of virus infectivity at 50 μM and 10 mM concentrations respectively. These results suggest that inhibition of HCV at fusion step by increasing the lysosomal pH will be better option to treat chronic HCV.

  11. Entry properties and entry inhibitors of a human H7N9 influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhui Si

    Full Text Available The recently identified human infections with a novel avian influenza H7N9 virus in China raise important questions regarding possible risk to humans. However, the entry properties and tropism of this H7N9 virus were poorly understood. Moreover, neuraminidase inhibitor resistant H7N9 isolates were recently observed in two patients and correlated with poor clinical outcomes. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the entry properties of H7N9 virus, design and evaluate inhibitors for H7N9 virus entry. We optimized and developed an H7N9-pseudotyped particle system (H7N9pp that could be neutralized by anti-H7 antibodies and closely mimicked the entry process of the H7N9 virus. Avian, human and mouse-derived cultured cells showed high, moderate and low permissiveness to H7N9pp, respectively. Based on influenza virus membrane fusion mechanisms, a potent anti-H7N9 peptide (P155-185-chol corresponding to the C-terminal ectodomain of the H7N9 hemagglutinin protein was successfully identified. P155-185-chol demonstrated H7N9pp-specific inhibition of infection with IC50 of 0.19 µM. Importantly, P155-185-chol showed significant suppression of A/Anhui/1/2013 H7N9 live virus propagation in MDCK cells and additive effects with NA inhibitors Oseltamivir and Zanamivir. These findings expand our knowledge of the entry properties of the novel H7N9 viruses, and they highlight the potential for developing a new class of inhibitors targeting viral entry for use in the next pandemic.

  12. The V1-V3 region of a brain-derived HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein determines macrophage tropism, low CD4 dependence, increased fusogenicity and altered sensitivity to entry inhibitors

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    Martín-García Julio

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 infects macrophages and microglia in the brain and can cause neurological disorders in infected patients. We and others have shown that brain-derived envelope glycoproteins (Env have lower CD4 dependence and higher avidity for CD4 than those from peripheral isolates, and we have also observed increased fusogenicity and reduced sensitivity to the fusion inhibitor T-1249. Due to the genetic differences between brain and spleen env from one individual throughout gp120 and in gp41's heptad repeat 2 (HR2, we investigated the viral determinants for the phenotypic differences by performing functional studies with chimeric and mutant Env. Results Chimeric Env showed that the V1/V2-C2-V3 region in brain's gp120 determines the low CD4 dependence and high avidity for CD4, as well as macrophage tropism and reduced sensitivity to the small molecule BMS-378806. Changes in brain gp41's HR2 region did not contribute to the increased fusogenicity or to the reduced sensitivity to T-1249, since a T-1249-based peptide containing residues found in brain's but not in spleen's HR2 had similar potency than T-1249 and interacted similarly with an immobilized heptad repeat 1-derived peptide in surface plasmon resonance analysis. However, the increased fusogenicity and reduced T-1249 sensitivity of brain and certain chimeric Env mostly correlated with the low CD4 dependence and high avidity for CD4 determined by brain's V1-V3 region. Remarkably, most but not all of these low CD4-dependent, macrophage tropic envelopes glycoproteins also had increased sensitivity to the novel allosteric entry inhibitor HNG-105. The gp120's C2 region asparagine 283 (N283 has been previously associated with macrophage tropism, brain infection, lower CD4 dependence and higher CD4 affinity. Therefore, we introduced the N283T mutation into an env clone from a brain-derived isolate and into a brain tissue-derived env clone, and the T283N change into a spleen-derived env

  13. HIV包膜蛋白的结构及其相应的病毒进入抑制剂%Research progress on the structure of HIV envelope glycoprotein and related HIV entry inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏承来; 姜世勃; 刘叔文

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1病毒包膜蛋白gp120和gp41在病毒感染中起着重要的作用.在病毒进入细胞的过程中,gp120先和CD4分子结合,发生构象改变,进而导致gp41构象的变化,使病毒包膜和细胞膜融合而感染细胞.与gp120或者gp41相结合的多肽、大分子和小分子化合物,都可能影响HIV-1病毒包膜和靶细胞膜结合的过程,从而起到抗HIV-1病毒的作用.该文对gp120和gp41的结构及其相互作用,以及以HIV-1包膜糖蛋白为靶点的病毒进入抑制剂类抗艾滋病药物进行综述.

  14. Clinical use of CCR5 inhibitors in HIV and beyond

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    Gilliam Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since the discovery of CCR5 as a coreceptor for HIV entry, there has been interest in blockade of the receptor for treatment and prevention of HIV infection. Although several CCR5 antagonists have been evaluated in clinical trials, only maraviroc has been approved for clinical use in the treatment of HIV-infected patients. The efficacy, safety and resistance profile of CCR5 antagonists with a focus on maraviroc are reviewed here along with their usage in special and emerging clinical situations. Despite being approved for use since 2007, the optimal use of maraviroc has yet to be well-defined in HIV and potentially in other diseases. Maraviroc and other CCR5 antagonists have the potential for use in a variety of other clinical situations such as the prevention of HIV transmission, intensification of HIV treatment and prevention of rejection in organ transplantation. The use of CCR5 antagonists may be potentiated by other agents such as rapamycin which downregulate CCR5 receptors thus decreasing CCR5 density. There may even be a role for their use in combination with other entry inhibitors. However, clinical use of CCR5 antagonists may have negative consequences in diseases such as West Nile and Tick-borne encephalitis virus infections. In summary, CCR5 antagonists have great therapeutic potential in the treatment and prevention of HIV as well as future use in novel situations such as organ transplantation. Their optimal use either alone or in combination with other agents will be defined by further investigation.

  15. Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by extracts derived from traditional Chinese medicinal herbal plants

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    Song Xinming

    2009-08-01

    HIV-1 interaction with target cells, i.e., the interaction between gp120 and CD4/CCR5 or gp120 and CD4/CXCR4 and point to the potential of developing these two extracts to be HIV-1 entry inhibitors.

  16. Targeting CXCR4 in HIV Cell-Entry Inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Schwartz, T W; Rosenkilde, M M

    2010-01-01

    CXCR4 and CCR5 constitute the two major coreceptors for HIV-1 entry into host cells. In the course of an HIV-infection, a coreceptor switch takes place in approximately half of the patients - from R5 HIV-1 (CCR5 utilizing) strains to X4 HIV-1 (CXCR4 utilizing) strains. Treatment of HIV......-infected individuals with CXCR4 antagonists delays the onset of AIDS by preventing the CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor switch. In addition to the endogenous CXCR4 and CCR5 ligands, other chemokines, for example the human herpesvirus 8 encoded CC-chemokine, vCCL2, and modifications hereof, have proven efficient HIV-1 cell...... no oral bioavailability. The hunt for orally active small-molecule CXCR4 antagonists led to the development of monocyclam-based compounds, and recently to the non-cyclam antagonist AMD070, which is orally active and currently in Phase II clinical trial as anti-HIV treatment. Current review provides...

  17. Raltegravir: first in class HIV integrase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelalem Temesgen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Zelalem Temesgen1, Dawd S Siraj21Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2East Carolina University Greenville, NC, USAAbstract: On October 16, 2007, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved raltegravir for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection in combination with other antiretroviral agents in treatment-experienced adult patients who have evidence of viral replication and HIV-1 strains resistant to multiple antiretroviral agents. Raltegravir is first in a novel class of antiretroviral drugs known as integrase inhibitors. It has demonstrated potent anti HIV activity in both antiretroviral treatment-naïve and experienced patients. The most common adverse events reported with raltegravir during phase 2 and 3 clinical trials were diarrhea, nausea, and headache. Laboratory abnormalities include mild elevations in liver transaminases and creatine phosphokinase.Keywords: raltegravir, HIV, antiretroviral agents, integrase inhibitors

  18. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223 (China); Pang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223 (China); Department of Molecular Virology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Tam, Siu-Cheung [Department of Physiology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong (China); Tien, Po [Department of Molecular Virology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Zheng, Yong-Tang, E-mail: zhengyt@mail.kiz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223 (China)

    2009-05-08

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC{sub 50}), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC{sub 50}) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1{sub IIIB} were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  19. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Duus, Karen; McSharry, James J; Veille, Jean-Claude L; Thornber, Carol; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Yu-Wei; Canki, Mario

    2008-01-15

    Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme), which at 8 mug/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 mug. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 mug/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development.

  20. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thornber Carol

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme, which at 8 μg/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 μg. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4 and CCR5 (R5 tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 μg/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development.

  1. Medicinal chemistry of small molecule CCR5 antagonists for blocking HIV-1 entry: a review of structural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Dujuan; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a member of G protein-coupled receptors superfamily, plays an important role in the HIV-1 entry process. Antagonism of this receptor finally leads to the inhibition of R5 strains of HIV entry into the human cells. The identification of CCR5 antagonists as antiviral agents will provide more option for HAART. Now, more than a decade after the first small molecule CCR5 inhibitor was discovered, great achievements have been made. In this article, we will give a brief introduction of several series of small molecule CCR5 antagonists, focused on their appealing structure evolution, essential SAR information and thereof the enlightenment of strategies on CCR5 inhibitors design.

  2. Assessment of flavaglines as potential chikungunya virus entry inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintachai, Phitchayapak; Thuaud, Frédéric; Basmadjian, Christine; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Ubol, Sukathida; Désaubry, Laurent; Smith, Duncan R

    2015-03-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that recently caused large epidemics in islands in, and countries around, the Indian Ocean. There is currently no specific drug for therapeutic treatment or for use as a prophylactic agent against infection and no commercially available vaccine. Prohibitin has been identified as a receptor protein used by chikungunya virus to enter mammalian cells. Recently, synthetic sulfonyl amidines and flavaglines (FLs), a class of naturally occurring plant compounds with potent anti-cancer and cytoprotective and neuroprotective activities, have been shown to interact directly with prohibitin. This study therefore sought to determine whether three prohibitin ligands (sulfonyl amidine 1 m and the flavaglines FL3 and FL23) were able to inhibit CHIKV infection of mammalian Hek293T/17 cells. All three compounds inhibited infection and reduced virus production when cells were treated before infection but not when added after infection. Pretreatment of cells for only 15 minutes prior to infection followed by washing out of the compound resulted in significant inhibition of entry and virus production. These results suggest that further investigation of prohibitin ligands as potential Chikungunya virus entry inhibitors is warranted.

  3. Pyridoxine hydroxamic acids as novel HIV-integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranix, Brent R; Wu, Jinzi J; Milot, Guy; Beaulieu, Françis; Bouchard, Jean-Emanuel; Gouveia, Kristine; Forte, André; Garde, Seema; Wang, Zhigang; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Delelis, Olivier; Xiao, Yong

    2016-02-15

    A series of pyridoxine hydroxamic acid analog bearing a 5-aryl-spacers were synthesized. Evaluation of these novel HIV integrase complex inhibitors revealed compounds with high potency against wild-type HIV virus.

  4. Unique small molecule entry inhibitors of hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew M; Rojek, Jillian M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Gundersen, Anette T; Jin, Wei; Shaginian, Alex; York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H; Boger, Dale L; Oldstone, Michael B A; Kunz, Stefan

    2008-07-04

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers caused by the arenaviruses Lassa virus in Africa and Machupo, Guanarito, Junin, and Sabia virus in South America are among the most devastating emerging human diseases with fatality rates of 15-35% and a limited antiviral therapeutic repertoire available. Here we used high throughput screening of synthetic combinatorial small molecule libraries to identify inhibitors of arenavirus infection using pseudotyped virion particles bearing the glycoproteins (GPs) of highly pathogenic arenaviruses. Our screening efforts resulted in the discovery of a series of novel small molecule inhibitors of viral entry that are highly active against both Old World and New World hemorrhagic arenaviruses. We observed potent inhibition of infection of human and primate cells with live hemorrhagic arenaviruses (IC(50)=500-800 nm). Investigations of the mechanism of action revealed that the candidate compounds efficiently block pH-dependent fusion by the arenavirus GPs (IC(50) of 200-350 nm). Although our lead compounds were potent against phylogenetically distant arenaviruses, they did not show activity against other enveloped viruses with class I viral fusion proteins, indicating specificity for arenavirus GP-mediated membrane fusion.

  5. Lessons From HIV-1 Gene Therapy in Humanized Mice: Is Targeting Viral Entry the Road to Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Nicolas; Marodon, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice reconstituted with human CD4(+) T cells, which can be achieved either by transfer of mature cells or immature progenitors, represent the only animal model to study HIV-1 infection of human lymphocytes in vivo. However, the immunocompromised status of most of these models currently rule out their use for vaccine studies. Nevertheless, the model might be ideally suited for HIV-1 gene therapy studies since eliciting an efficient anti-viral immune response is not the primary end-point. Rather, HIV-1 gene therapy should protect CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1- induced deletion and/or reduced viral replication. Here, we describe recent advancements in the field of HIV-1 gene therapy, focusing on tools and targets validated in various models of humanized mice. From the analysis of this literature, it appears that strategies targeting viral entry, by means of neutralizing antibodies or fusion inhibitors, are the most promising so far. Indeed, strategies targeting viral entry have moved to the clinic with encouraging results. Thus, humanized mice should be considered as the prime model to devise the safer and most effective HIV-1 gene therapy strategy.

  6. Electron tomography of the contact between T cells and SIV/HIV-1: implications for viral entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Sougrat

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The envelope glycoproteins of primate lentiviruses, including human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, are heterodimers of a transmembrane glycoprotein (usually gp41, and a surface glycoprotein (gp120, which binds CD4 on target cells to initiate viral entry. We have used electron tomography to determine the three-dimensional architectures of purified SIV virions in isolation and in contact with CD4+ target cells. The trimeric viral envelope glycoprotein surface spikes are heterogeneous in appearance and typically approximately 120 A long and approximately 120 A wide at the distal end. Docking of SIV or HIV-1 on the T cell surface occurs via a neck-shaped contact region that is approximately 400 A wide and consistently consists of a closely spaced cluster of five to seven rod-shaped features, each approximately 100 A long and approximately 100 A wide. This distinctive structure is not observed when viruses are incubated with T lymphocytes in the presence of anti-CD4 antibodies, the CCR5 antagonist TAK779, or the peptide entry inhibitor SIVmac251 C34. For virions bound to cells, few trimers were observed away from this cluster at the virion-cell interface, even in cases where virus preparations showing as many as 70 envelope glycoprotein trimers per virus particle were used. This contact zone, which we term the "entry claw", provides a spatial context to understand the molecular mechanisms of viral entry. Determination of the molecular composition and structure of the entry claw may facilitate the identification of improved drugs for the inhibition of HIV-1 entry.

  7. Fucoidans as Potential Inhibitors of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofjeva, Maria M.; Imbs, Tatyana I.; Shevchenko, Natalya M.; Spirin, Pavel V.; Horn, Stefan; Fehse, Boris; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans) was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001–100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001–0.05 µg/mL). High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan), and S. japonica (galactofucan) were the most effective inhibitors. PMID:23966033

  8. Fucoidans as Potential Inhibitors of HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir S. Prassolov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV. It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001–100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001–0.05 µg/mL. High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan, and S. japonica (galactofucan were the most effective inhibitors.

  9. Fucoidans as potential inhibitors of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofjeva, Maria M; Imbs, Tatyana I; Shevchenko, Natalya M; Spirin, Pavel V; Horn, Stefan; Fehse, Boris; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Prassolov, Vladimir S

    2013-08-19

    The antiviral activity of different structure fucoidans (α-l-fucans and galactofucans) was studied using two model viral systems based on a lentiviral vectors and a replication competent Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). It was found that investigated fucoidans have no cytotoxic effects on Jurkat and SC-1cell at the concentration range of 0.001-100 µg/mL. Fucoidans with different efficiency suppressed transduction of Jurkat cell line by pseudo-HIV-1 particles carrying the envelope protein of HIV-1 and infection of SC-1 cells by Mo-MuLV. According to our data, all natural fucoidans can be considered as potential anti-HIV agents regardless of their carbohydrate backbone and degree of sulfating, since their activity is shown at low concentrations (0.001-0.05 µg/mL). High molecular weight fucoidans isolated from Saccharina cichorioides (1.3-α-l-fucan), and S. japonica (galactofucan) were the most effective inhibitors.

  10. Survival of the fittest: positive selection of CD4+ T cells expressing a membrane-bound fusion inhibitor following HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Kimpel

    Full Text Available Although a variety of genetic strategies have been developed to inhibit HIV replication, few direct comparisons of the efficacy of these inhibitors have been carried out. Moreover, most studies have not examined whether genetic inhibitors are able to induce a survival advantage that results in an expansion of genetically-modified cells following HIV infection. We evaluated the efficacy of three leading genetic strategies to inhibit HIV replication: 1 an HIV-1 tat/rev-specific small hairpin (sh RNA; 2 an RNA antisense gene specific for the HIV-1 envelope; and 3 a viral entry inhibitor, maC46. In stably transduced cell lines selected such that >95% of cells expressed the genetic inhibitor, the RNA antisense envelope and viral entry inhibitor maC46 provided the strongest inhibition of HIV-1 replication. However, when mixed populations of transduced and untransduced cells were challenged with HIV-1, the maC46 fusion inhibitor resulted in highly efficient positive selection of transduced cells, an effect that was evident even in mixed populations containing as few as 1% maC46-expressing cells. The selective advantage of the maC46 fusion inhibitor was also observed in HIV-1-infected cultures of primary T lymphocytes as well as in HIV-1-infected humanized mice. These results demonstrate robust inhibition of HIV replication with the fusion inhibitor maC46 and the antisense Env inhibitor, and importantly, a survival advantage of cells expressing the maC46 fusion inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. Evaluation of the ability of genetic inhibitors of HIV-1 replication to confer a survival advantage on genetically-modified cells provides unique information not provided by standard techniques that may be important in the in vivo efficacy of these genes.

  11. Lamiridosins, hepatitis C virus entry inhibitors from Lamium album.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjie; Rothwangl, Katharina; Mesecar, Andrew D; Sabahi, Ali; Rong, Lijun; Fong, Harry H S

    2009-12-01

    Phytochemical study of the aqueous extract of the flowering tops of Lamium album led to identification of the antiviral iridoid isomers lamiridosins A and B (1, 2). These compounds were found to significantly inhibit hepatitis C virus entry (IC(50) 2.31 muM) in vitro. Studies of 14 iridoid analogues showed that, while the parent iridoid glucosides demonstrated no anti-HCV entry activity, the aglycones of shanzhiside methyl ester (4), loganin (5), loganic acid (6), geniposide (10), verbenalin (12), eurostoside (15), and picroside II (17) exhibited significant anti-HCV entry and anti-infectivity activities.

  12. Striking HIV-1 Entry by Targeting HIV-1 gp41. But, Where Should We Target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Teixeira

    Full Text Available HIV-1 gp41 facilitates the viral fusion through a conformational switch involving the association of three C-terminal helices along the conserved hydrophobic grooves of three N-terminal helices coiled-coil. The control of these structural rearrangements is thought to be central to HIV-1 entry and, therefore, different strategies of intervention are being developed. Herewith, we describe a procedure to simulate the folding of an HIV-1 gp41 simplified model. This procedure is based on the construction of plausible conformational pathways, which describe protein transition between non-fusogenic and fusogenic conformations. The calculation of the paths started with 100 molecular dynamics simulations of the non-fusogenic conformation, which were found to converge to different intermediate states. Those presenting defined criteria were selected for separate targeted molecular dynamics simulations, subjected to a force constant imposing a movement towards the gp41 fusogenic conformation. Despite significant diversity, a preferred sequence of events emerged when the simulations were analyzed in terms of the formation, breakage and evolution of the contacts. We pointed out 29 residues as the most relevant for the movement of gp41; also, 2696 possible interactions were reduced to only 48 major interactions, which reveals the efficiency of the method. The analysis of the evolution of the main interactions lead to the detection of four main behaviors for those contacts: stable, increasing, decreasing and repulsive interactions. Altogether, these results suggest a specific small cavity of the HIV-1 gp41 hydrophobic groove as the preferred target to small molecules.

  13. Activity and safety of synthetic lectins based on benzoboroxole-functionalized polymers for inhibition of HIV entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Alamelu; Geonnotti, Anthony R; Balzarini, Jan; Kiser, Patrick F

    2011-12-05

    Lectins derived from plant and microbial sources constitute a vital class of entry inhibitors that target the oligomannose residues on the HIV envelope gp120. Despite their potency and specificity, success of lectin-based entry inhibitors may be impeded by high manufacturing costs, formulation and potential mitogenicity. Therefore, there exists a gap in the HIV microbicides pipeline that underscores the need for mass producible, synthetic, broad-spectrum, and biocomptabile inhibitors of HIV entry. Here, we present the development of a polymeric synthetic lectin, based on benzoboroxole (BzB), which exhibits weak affinity (∼25 M(-1)) for nonreducing sugars, similar to those found on the HIV envelope. High molecular weight BzB-functionalized polymers demonstrated antiviral activity that increased with an increase in ligand density and molecular weight of the polymer construct, revealing that polyvalency improves activity. Polymers showed significant increase in activity from 25 to 75 mol % BzB functionalization with EC(50) of 15 μM and 15 nM, respectively. A further increase in mole functionalization to 90% resulted in an increase of the EC(50) (59 ± 5 nM). An increase in molecular weight of the polymer at 50 mol % BzB functionalization showed a gradual but significant increase in antiviral activity, with the highest activity seen with the 382 kDa polymer (EC(50) of 1.1 ± 0.5 nM in CEM cells and 11 ± 3 nM in TZM-bl cells). Supplementing the polymer backbone with 10 mol % sulfonic acid not only increased the aqueous solubility of the polymers by at least 50-fold but also demonstrated a synergistic increase in anti-HIV activity (4.0 ± 1.5 nM in TZM-bl cells), possibly due to electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged polymer backbone and the positively charged V3-loop in the gp120. The benzoboroxole-sulfonic acid copolymers showed no decrease in activity in the presence of a seminal concentration of fructose (p > 0.05). Additionally, the copolymers

  14. FAITH – Fast Assembly Inhibitor Test for HIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadravová, Romana [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry IOCB Research Centre & Gilead Sciences, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Rumlová, Michaela, E-mail: michaela.rumlova@vscht.cz [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry IOCB Research Centre & Gilead Sciences, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Department of Biotechnology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Ruml, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.ruml@vscht.cz [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    Due to the high number of drug-resistant HIV-1 mutants generated by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), there is continuing demand for new types of inhibitors. Both the assembly of the Gag polyprotein into immature and mature HIV-1 particles are attractive candidates for the blocking of the retroviral life cycle. Currently, no therapeutically-used assembly inhibitor is available. One possible explanation is the lack of a reliable and simple assembly inhibitor screening method. To identify compounds potentially inhibiting the formation of both types of HIV-1 particles, we developed a new fluorescent high-throughput screening assay. This assay is based on the quantification of the assembly efficiency in vitro in a 96-well plate format. The key components of the assay are HIV-1 Gag-derived proteins and a dual-labelled oligonucleotide, which emits fluorescence only when the assembly of retroviral particles is inhibited. The method was validated using three (CAI, BM2, PF74) reported assembly inhibitors. - Highlights: • Allows screening of assembly inhibitors of both mature and immature HIV-1 particles. • Based on Gag-derived proteins with CA in mature or immature conformation. • Simple and sensitive method suitable for high-throughput screening of inhibitors. • Unlike in other HIV assembly methods, works under physiological conditions. • No washing steps are necessary.

  15. Role of Abl kinase and the Wave2 signaling complex in HIV-1 entry at a post-hemifusion step.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Harmon

    Full Text Available Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 commences with binding of the envelope glycoprotein (Env to the receptor CD4, and one of two coreceptors, CXCR4 or CCR5. Env-mediated signaling through coreceptor results in Galphaq-mediated Rac activation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements necessary for fusion. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs activate Rac and regulate its downstream protein effectors. In this study we show that Env-induced Rac activation is mediated by the Rac GEF Tiam-1, which associates with the adaptor protein IRSp53 to link Rac to the Wave2 complex. Rac and the tyrosine kinase Abl then activate the Wave2 complex and promote Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization. Env-mediated cell-cell fusion, virus-cell fusion and HIV-1 infection are dependent on Tiam-1, Abl, IRSp53, Wave2, and Arp3 as shown by attenuation of fusion and infection in cells expressing siRNA targeted to these signaling components. HIV-1 Env-dependent cell-cell fusion, virus-cell fusion and infection were also inhibited by Abl kinase inhibitors, imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib. Treatment of cells with Abl kinase inhibitors did not affect cell viability or surface expression of CD4 and CCR5. Similar results with inhibitors and siRNAs were obtained when Env-dependent cell-cell fusion, virus-cell fusion or infection was measured, and when cell lines or primary cells were the target. Using membrane curving agents and fluorescence microscopy, we showed that inhibition of Abl kinase activity arrests fusion at the hemifusion (lipid mixing step, suggesting a role for Abl-mediated actin remodeling in pore formation and expansion. These results suggest a potential utility of Abl kinase inhibitors to treat HIV-1 infected patients.

  16. How HIV-1 entry mechanism and broadly neutralizing antibodies guide structure-based vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancera, Marie; Changela, Anita; Kwong, Peter D

    2017-05-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) remains to be developed. Here, we review how knowledge of bNAbs and HIV-1 entry mechanism is guiding the structure-based design of vaccine immunogens and immunization regimens. Isolation of bNAbs from HIV-1-infected donors has led to an unprecedented understanding of the sites of vulnerability that these antibodies target on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) as well as of the immunological pathways that these antibody lineages follow to develop broad and potent neutralization. Sites of vulnerability, however, reside in the context of diverse Env conformations required for HIV-1 entry, including a prefusion-closed state, a single-CD4-bound intermediate, a three-CD4-bound intermediate, a prehairpin intermediate and postfusion states, and it is not always clear which structural state optimally presents a particular site of vulnerability in the vaccine context. Furthermore, detailed knowledge of immunological pathways has led to debate among vaccine developers as to how much of the natural antibody-developmental pathway immunogens should mimic, ranging from only the recognized epitope to multiple antigens from the antibody-virus coevolution process. A plethora of information on bNAbs is guiding HIV-1-vaccine development. We highlight consideration of the appropriate structural context from the HIV-1-entry mechanism and extraordinary progress with replicating template B-cell ontogenies.

  17. Small-molecule inhibitors of dengue-virus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron G Schmidt

    Full Text Available Flavivirus envelope protein (E mediates membrane fusion and viral entry from endosomes. A low-pH induced, dimer-to-trimer rearrangement and reconfiguration of the membrane-proximal "stem" of the E ectodomain draw together the viral and cellular membranes. We found stem-derived peptides from dengue virus (DV bind stem-less E trimer and mimic the stem-reconfiguration step in the fusion pathway. We adapted this experiment as a high-throughput screen for small molecules that block peptide binding and thus may inhibit viral entry. A compound identified in this screen, 1662G07, and a number of its analogs reversibly inhibit DV infectivity. They do so by binding the prefusion, dimeric E on the virion surface, before adsorption to a cell. They also block viral fusion with liposomes. Structure-activity relationship studies have led to analogs with submicromolar IC₉₀s against DV2, and certain analogs are active against DV serotypes 1,2, and 4. The compounds do not inhibit the closely related Kunjin virus. We propose that they bind in a previously identified, E-protein pocket, exposed on the virion surface and although this pocket is closed in the postfusion trimer, its mouth is fully accessible. Examination of the E-trimer coordinates (PDB 1OK8 shows that conformational fluctuations around the hinge could open the pocket without dissociating the trimer or otherwise generating molecular collisions. We propose that compounds such as 1662G07 trap the sE trimer in a "pocket-open" state, which has lost affinity for the stem peptide and cannot support the final "zipping up" of the stem.

  18. Aqueous Extracts of the Marine Brown Alga Lobophora variegata Inhibit HIV-1 Infection at the Level of Virus Entry into Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kremb, Stephan

    2014-08-21

    In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs). Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

  19. Identification of HIV inhibitors guided by free energy perturbation calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Orlando; Ambrose, Zandrea; Flaherty, Patrick T; Aamer, Hadega; Jain, Prashi; Sambasivarao, Somisetti V

    2012-01-01

    Free energy perturbation (FEP) theory coupled to molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) statistical mechanics offers a theoretically precise method for determining the free energy differences of related biological inhibitors. Traditionally requiring extensive computational resources and expertise, it is only recently that its impact is being felt in drug discovery. A review of computer-aided anti-HIV efforts employing FEP calculations is provided here that describes early and recent successes in the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. In addition, our ongoing work developing and optimizing leads for small molecule inhibitors of cyclophilin A (CypA) is highlighted as an update on the current capabilities of the field. CypA has been shown to aid HIV-1 replication by catalyzing the cis/trans isomerization of a conserved Gly-Pro motif in the Nterminal domain of HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein. In the absence of a functional CypA, e.g., by the addition of an inhibitor such as cyclosporine A (CsA), HIV-1 has reduced infectivity. Our simulations of acylurea-based and 1-indanylketone-based CypA inhibitors have determined that their nanomolar and micromolar binding affinities, respectively, are tied to their ability to stabilize Arg55 and Asn102. A structurally novel 1-(2,6-dichlorobenzamido) indole core was proposed to maximize these interactions. FEP-guided optimization, experimental synthesis, and biological testing of lead compounds for toxicity and inhibition of wild-type HIV-1 and CA mutants have demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 infection in two cell lines. While the inhibition is modest compared to CsA, the results are encouraging.

  20. Elite suppressor-derived HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins exhibit reduced entry efficiency and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Kara G; Lobritz, Michael A; Bailey, Justin R; Johnston, Samantha; Nguyen, Sandra; Lee, Benhur; Chou, Tom; Siliciano, Robert F; Markowitz, Martin; Arts, Eric J

    2009-04-01

    Elite suppressors (ES) are a rare subset of HIV-1-infected individuals who are able to maintain HIV-1 viral loads below the limit of detection by ultra-sensitive clinical assays in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. Mechanism(s) responsible for this elite control are poorly understood but likely involve both host and viral factors. This study assesses ES plasma-derived envelope glycoprotein (env) fitness as a function of entry efficiency as a possible contributor to viral suppression. Fitness of virus entry was first evaluated using a novel inducible cell line with controlled surface expression levels of CD4 (receptor) and CCR5 (co-receptor). In the context of physiologic CCR5 and CD4 surface densities, ES envs exhibited significantly decreased entry efficiency relative to chronically infected viremic progressors. ES envs also demonstrated slow entry kinetics indicating the presence of virus with reduced entry fitness. Overall, ES env clones were less efficient at mediating entry than chronic progressor envs. Interestingly, acute infection envs exhibited an intermediate phenotypic pattern not distinctly different from ES or chronic progressor envs. These results imply that lower env fitness may be established early and may directly contribute to viral suppression in ES individuals.

  1. Elite suppressor-derived HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins exhibit reduced entry efficiency and kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara G Lassen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Elite suppressors (ES are a rare subset of HIV-1-infected individuals who are able to maintain HIV-1 viral loads below the limit of detection by ultra-sensitive clinical assays in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. Mechanism(s responsible for this elite control are poorly understood but likely involve both host and viral factors. This study assesses ES plasma-derived envelope glycoprotein (env fitness as a function of entry efficiency as a possible contributor to viral suppression. Fitness of virus entry was first evaluated using a novel inducible cell line with controlled surface expression levels of CD4 (receptor and CCR5 (co-receptor. In the context of physiologic CCR5 and CD4 surface densities, ES envs exhibited significantly decreased entry efficiency relative to chronically infected viremic progressors. ES envs also demonstrated slow entry kinetics indicating the presence of virus with reduced entry fitness. Overall, ES env clones were less efficient at mediating entry than chronic progressor envs. Interestingly, acute infection envs exhibited an intermediate phenotypic pattern not distinctly different from ES or chronic progressor envs. These results imply that lower env fitness may be established early and may directly contribute to viral suppression in ES individuals.

  2. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. HIV Protease Inhibitors: Effect on the Opportunistic Protozoan Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Yenisey; Monzote, Lianet

    2011-01-01

    The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the natural history of AIDS disease has been allowed to prolong the survival of people with HIV infection, particularly whose with increased HIV viral load. Additionally, the antiretroviral therapy could exert a certain degree of protection against parasitic diseases. A number of studies have been evidenced a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic parasitic infections in the era of HAART. Although these changes have been attributed to the restoration of cell-mediated immunity, induced by either non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or HIV protease inhibitors, in combination with at least two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors included in HAART, there are evidence that the control of these parasitic infections in HIV-positive persons under HAART, is also induced by the inhibition of the proteases of the parasites. This review focuses on the principal available data related with therapeutic HIV-protease inhibitors and their in vitro and in vivo effects on the opportunistic protozoan parasites.

  4. Developments of indoles as anti-HIV-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Lv, Min

    2009-01-01

    Since the first case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was reported in 1981, AIDS has always been a global health threat and the leading cause of deaths due to the rapid emergence of drug-resistance and unwanted metabolic side effects. Every day in 2007 an estimated 6850 people were newly infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Over the past 28 years the rapid worldwide spread of AIDS has prompted an intense research effort to discover compounds that could effectively inhibit HIV. The development of new, selective and safe inhibitors for the treatment of HIV, therefore, still remains a high priority for medical research. To the best of our knowledge, the indole derivatives have been considered as one class of promising HIV-1 inhibitors, such as delavirdine approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1997 for use in combination with other antiretrovirals in adults with HIV infection. In this review we focus on the synthesis and anti-HIV-1 activity of indole derivatives, in the meantime, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for some derivatives are also surveyed. It will pave the way for the design of indole derivatives as anti-HIV-1 drugs in the future.

  5. An anti-HIV microbicide engineered in commensal bacteria: secretion of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors by lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pusch, O.; Kalyanaraman, R.; Tucker, L.D.; Wells, J.; Rmanratnam, B.; Boden, D.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To engineer Lactobacillus spp. to secrete HIV-1 fusion inhibitors with potent neutralizing activity against primary HIV-1 isolates. Methods: HIV-1 fusion inhibitors (FI-1, FI-2, and FI-3) were introduced into the previously developed shuttle vector pTSV2 and transformed in L. plantarum a

  6. An anti-HIV microbicide engineered in commensal bacteria: secretion of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors by lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pusch, O.; Kalyanaraman, R.; Tucker, L.D.; Wells, J.; Rmanratnam, B.; Boden, D.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To engineer Lactobacillus spp. to secrete HIV-1 fusion inhibitors with potent neutralizing activity against primary HIV-1 isolates. Methods: HIV-1 fusion inhibitors (FI-1, FI-2, and FI-3) were introduced into the previously developed shuttle vector pTSV2 and transformed in L. plantarum a

  7. A compensatory mutation provides resistance to disparate HIV fusion inhibitor peptides and enhances membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wood

    Full Text Available Fusion inhibitors are a class of antiretroviral drugs used to prevent entry of HIV into host cells. Many of the fusion inhibitors being developed, including the drug enfuvirtide, are peptides designed to competitively inhibit the viral fusion protein gp41. With the emergence of drug resistance, there is an increased need for effective and unique alternatives within this class of antivirals. One such alternative is a class of cyclic, cationic, antimicrobial peptides known as θ-defensins, which are produced by many non-human primates and exhibit broad-spectrum antiviral and antibacterial activity. Currently, the θ-defensin analog RC-101 is being developed as a microbicide due to its specific antiviral activity, lack of toxicity to cells and tissues, and safety in animals. Understanding potential RC-101 resistance, and how resistance to other fusion inhibitors affects RC-101 susceptibility, is critical for future development. In previous studies, we identified a mutant, R5-tropic virus that had evolved partial resistance to RC-101 during in vitro selection. Here, we report that a secondary mutation in gp41 was found to restore replicative fitness, membrane fusion, and the rate of viral entry, which were compromised by an initial mutation providing partial RC-101 resistance. Interestingly, we show that RC-101 is effective against two enfuvirtide-resistant mutants, demonstrating the clinical importance of RC-101 as a unique fusion inhibitor. These findings both expand our understanding of HIV drug-resistance to diverse peptide fusion inhibitors and emphasize the significance of compensatory gp41 mutations.

  8. Epsilon substituted lysinol derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kristen L G; Holloway, M Katharine; Su, Hua-Poo; Carroll, Steven S; Burlein, Christine; Touch, Sinoeun; DiStefano, Daniel J; Sanchez, Rosa I; Williams, Theresa M; Vacca, Joseph P; Coburn, Craig A

    2010-07-15

    A series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors containing an epsilon substituted lysinol backbone was synthesized. Two novel synthetic routes using N-boc-L-glutamic acid alpha-benzyl ester and 2,6-diaminopimelic acid were developed. Incorporation of this epsilon substituent enabled access to the S2 pocket of the enzyme, affording high potency inhibitors. Modeling studies and synthetic efforts suggest the potency increase is due to both conformational bias and van der Waals interactions with the S2 pocket.

  9. Synthesis of a new class of HIV-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farese-Di Giorgio, A; Pairot, S; Patino, N; Condom, R; Di Giorgio, C; Aumelas, A; Aubertin, A M; Guedj, R

    1999-02-01

    A new family of molecules potentially inhibitors of the HIV-1 Tat-TAR complex was prepared. These compounds are constituted by dinucleotide analogs (PNA dimer) bound, through a linker, to an arginine residue. In this series, several molecules inhibit viral development in cell culture with a micromolar IC50 and without cellular toxicity until 200 microM concentration.

  10. CCR5 inhibitors: Emerging promising HIV therapeutic strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Rao Padmasri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Though potent anti-HIV therapy has spectacularly reduced the morbidity and mortality of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection in the advanced countries, it continues to be associated with substantial toxicity, drug-drug interactions, difficulties in adherence, and abnormal cost. As a result, better effective, safe antiretroviral drugs and treatment strategies keep on to be pursued. In this process, CCR5 (chemokine receptor 5 inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral drug used in the treatment of HIV. They are designed to prevent HIV infection of CD4 T-cells by blocking the CCR5. When the CCR5 receptor is unavailable, ′R5-tropic′ HIV (the variant of the virus that is common in earlier HIV infection cannot engage with a CD4 T-cell to infect the cell. In August 2007, the FDA approved the first chemokine (C-C motif CCR5 inhibitor, maraviroc, for treatment-experienced patients infected with R5-using virus. Studies from different cohort in regions, affected by clad B HIV-1, demonstrate that 81-88% of HIV-1 variants in treatment naïve patients are CCR5 tropic and that virtually all the remaining variants are dual/mixed tropic i.e., are able to utilize both CCR5 and CXCR4 coreceptors. In treatment experienced patients, 49−78% of the variants are purely CCR5 tropic, 22−48% are dual/mixed tropic, and 2-5% exclusively utilize CXCR4. A 32 bp deletion in the CCR5 gene, which results in a frame shift and truncation of the normal CCR5 protein, was identified in a few persons who had remained uninfected after exposure to CCR5 tropic HIV-1 virus. This allele is common in white of European origin, with prevalence near to 10%, but is absent among East Asian, American Indian, Tamil Indian, and African ethnic groups. HIV-infected individuals, who are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32, have slower rates of disease progression. The currently available data supports the continuation of the development of CCR5 antagonists in different settings related

  11. Tryptophan dendrimers that inhibit HIV replication, prevent virus entry and bind to the HIV envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Colomer, Ignacio; Quesada, Ernesto; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Camarasa, María-José; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Balzarini, Jan; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Dendrimers containing from 9 to 18 tryptophan residues at the peryphery have been efficiently synthesized and tested against HIV replication. These compounds inhibit an early step of the replicative cycle of HIV, presumably virus entry into its target cell. Our data suggest that HIV inhibition can be achieved by the preferred interaction of the compounds herein described with glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 of the HIV envelope preventing interaction between HIV and the (co)receptors present on the host cells. The results obtained so far indicate that 9 tryptophan residues on the periphery are sufficient for efficient gp120/gp41 binding and anti-HIV activity.

  12. HIV-1 Entry and Trans-Infection of Astrocytes Involves CD81 Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lachlan R.; Turville, Stuart G.; HItchen, Tina L.; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M.; Salimi, Hamid; Roche, Michael J.; Wesselingh, Steve L.; Gorry, Paul R.; Churchill, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are extensively infected with HIV-1 in vivo and play a significant role in the development of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Despite their extensive infection, little is known about how astrocytes become infected, since they lack cell surface CD4 expression. In the present study, we investigated the fate of HIV-1 upon infection of astrocytes. Astrocytes were found to bind and harbor virus followed by biphasic decay, with HIV-1 detectable out to 72 hours. HIV-1 was observed to associate with CD81-lined vesicle structures. shRNA silencing of CD81 resulted in less cell-associated virus but no loss of co-localization between HIV-1 and CD81. Astrocytes supported trans-infection of HIV-1 to T-cells without de novo virus production, and the virus-containing compartment required 37°C to form, and was trypsin-resistant. The CD81 compartment observed herein, has been shown in other cell types to be a relatively protective compartment. Within astrocytes, this compartment may be actively involved in virus entry and/or spread. The ability of astrocytes to transfer virus, without de novo viral synthesis suggests they are capable of sequestering and protecting virus and thus, they could potentially facilitate viral dissemination in the CNS. PMID:24587404

  13. High-throughput screening of viral entry inhibitors using pseudotyped virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arnab; Mills, Debra M; Bowlin, Terry L

    2010-12-01

    Virus entry into a host cell is an attractive target for therapy because propagation of virus can be blocked at an early stage, minimizing chances for the virus to acquire drug resistance. Anti-infective drug discovery for BSL-4 viruses like Ebola or Lassa hemorrhagic fever virus presents challenges due to the requirement for a BSL-4 laboratory containment facility. Pseudotyped viruses provide a surrogate model in which the native envelope glycoprotein of a BSL-2 level virus (e.g., vesicular stomatitis virus) is replaced with envelope glycoprotein of a foreign BSL-4 virus (e.g., Ebola virus). Because the envelope glycoprotein determines interaction of virus with its cellular receptors, pseudotyped viruses can mimic the viral entry process of the original virus. Moreover, they are competent for only a single cycle of infection, and therefore can be used in BSL-2 facilities. Pseudotyped viruses have been used in high-throughput screening of entry inhibitors for a number of BSL-4 level viruses. This unit includes protocols for preparing pseudotyped viruses using lentiviral vectors and use of pseudotyped viruses for high-throughput screening of viral entry inhibitors.

  14. Predictors of Delayed Entry into Medical Care of Children Diagnosed with HIV Infection: Data from an HIV Cohort Study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alvarez-Uria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data about the attrition before entry into care of children diagnosed with HIV in low- or middle-income countries are scarce. The aim of this study is to describe the attrition before engagement in HIV medical care in 523 children who were diagnosed with HIV from 2007 to 2012 in a cohort study in India. The cumulative incidence of children who entered into care was 87.2% at one year, but most children who did not enter into care within one year were lost to followup. The mortality before entry into care was low (1.3% at one year and concentrated during the first three months after HIV diagnosis. Factors associated with delayed entry into care were being diagnosed after mother’s HIV diagnosis, belonging to scheduled castes, age 90 minutes from the HIV centre. Children whose parents were alive and were living in a rented house were at a higher risk of delayed entry into care than those who were living in an owned house. The results of this study can be used to improve the linkage between HIV testing and HIV care of children diagnosed with HIV in India.

  15. Identification of a human protein-derived HIV-1 fusion inhibitor targeting the gp41 fusion core structure.

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    Lijun Chao

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env gp41 plays a crucial role in the viral fusion process. The peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR of gp41 are potent HIV fusion inhibitors. However, the activity of these anti-HIV-1 peptides in vivo may be attenuated by their induction of anti-gp41 antibodies. Thus, it is essential to identify antiviral peptides or proteins with low, or no, immunogenicity to humans. Here, we found that the C-terminal fragment (aa 462-521 of the human POB1 (the partner of RalBP1, designated C60, is an HIV-1 fusion inhibitor. It bound to N36, the peptide derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR of gp41, and to the six-helix bundle (6-HB formed by N36 and C34, a CHR-peptide, but it did not bind to C34. Unlike the CHR-peptides, C60 did not block gp41 6-HB formation. Rather, results suggest that C60 inhibits HIV-1 fusion by binding to the 6-HB, in particular, the residues in the gp41 NHR domain that are exposed on the surface of 6-HB. Since 6-HB plays a crucial role in the late stage of fusion between the viral envelope and endosomal membrane during the endocytic process of HIV-1, C60 may serve as a host restriction factor to suppress HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T lymphocytes. Taken together, it can be concluded from these results that C60 can be used as a lead for the development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics or microbicides for the treatment and prevention of HIV-1 infection, as well as a molecular probe to study the fusogenic mechanism of HIV-1.

  16. The phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate 5-kinase inhibitor apilimod blocks filoviral entry and infection.

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    Elizabeth A Nelson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate 5-kinase (PIKfyve is a lipid kinase involved in endosome maturation that emerged from a haploid genetic screen as being required for Ebola virus (EBOV infection. Here we analyzed the effects of apilimod, a PIKfyve inhibitor that was reported to be well tolerated in humans in phase 2 clinical trials, for its effects on entry and infection of EBOV and Marburg virus (MARV. We first found that apilimod blocks infections by EBOV and MARV in Huh 7, Vero E6 and primary human macrophage cells, with notable potency in the macrophages (IC50, 10 nM. We next observed that similar doses of apilimod block EBOV-glycoprotein-virus like particle (VLP entry and transcription-replication competent VLP infection, suggesting that the primary mode of action of apilimod is as an entry inhibitor, preventing release of the viral genome into the cytoplasm to initiate replication. After providing evidence that the anti-EBOV action of apilimod is via PIKfyve, we showed that it blocks trafficking of EBOV VLPs to endolysosomes containing Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1, the intracellular receptor for EBOV. Concurrently apilimod caused VLPs to accumulate in early endosome antigen 1-positive endosomes. We did not detect any effects of apilimod on bulk endosome acidification, on the activity of cathepsins B and L, or on cholesterol export from endolysosomes. Hence by antagonizing PIKfyve, apilimod appears to block EBOV trafficking to its site of fusion and entry into the cytoplasm. Given the drug's observed anti-filoviral activity, relatively unexplored mechanism of entry inhibition, and reported tolerability in humans, we propose that apilimod be further explored as part of a therapeutic regimen to treat filoviral infections.

  17. Factors associated with delayed entry into HIV medical care after HIV diagnosis in a resource-limited setting: Data from a cohort study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alvarez-Uria

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies from sub-Saharan Africa have shown that a substantial proportion of patients diagnosed with HIV enter into HIV medical care late. However, data from low or middle-income countries outside Africa are scarce. In this study, we investigated risk factors associated with delayed entry into care stratified by gender in a large cohort study in India. 7701 patients were diagnosed with HIV and 5410 entered into care within three months of HIV diagnosis. Nearly 80% entered into care within a year, but most patients who did not enter into care within a year remained lost to follow up or died. Patient with risk factors related to having a low socio-economic status (poverty, being homeless, belonging to a disadvantaged community and illiteracy were more likely to enter into care late. In addition, male gender and being asymptomatic at the moment of HIV infection were factors associated with delayed entry into care. Substantial gender differences were found. Younger age was found to be associated with delayed entry in men, but not in women. Widows and unmarried men were more likely to enter into care within three months. Women belonging to disadvantaged communities or living far from a town were more likely to enter into care late. The results of this study highlight the need to improve the linkage between HIV diagnosis and HIV treatment in India. HIV programmes should monitor patients diagnosed with HIV until they engage in HIV medical care, especially those at increased risk of attrition.

  18. The conserved residue Arg46 in the N-terminal heptad repeat domain of HIV-1 gp41 is critical for viral fusion and entry.

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    Xiaoyi Wang

    Full Text Available During the process of HIV-1 fusion with the target cell, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR of gp41 interacts with the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR to form fusogenic six-helix bundle (6-HB core. We previously identified a crucial residue for 6-HB formation and virus entry--Lys63 (K63 in the C-terminal region of NHR (aa 54-70, which forms a hydrophobic cavity. It can form an important salt bridge with Asp121 (D121 in gp41 CHR. Here, we found another important conserved residue for virus fusion and entry, Arg46 (R46, in the N-terminal region of NHR (aa 35-53, which forms a hydrogen bond with a polar residue, Asn43 (N43, in NHR, as a part of the hydrogen-bond network. R46 can also form a salt bridge with a negatively charged residue, Glu137 (E137, in gp41 CHR. Substitution of R46 with the hydrophobic residue Ala (R46A or the negatively charged residue Glu (R46E resulted in disruption of the hydrogen bond network, breakage of the salt bridge and reduction of 6-HB's stability, leading to impairment of viral fusion and decreased inhibition of N36, an NHR peptide. Similarly, CHR peptide C34 with substitution of E137 for Ala (E137A or Arg (E137R also exhibited reduced inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and HIV-1-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. These results suggest that the positively charged residue R46 and its hydrogen bond network, together with the salt bridge between R46 and E137, are important for viral fusion and entry and may therefore serve as a target for designing novel HIV fusion/entry inhibitors.

  19. Design of second generation HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jinxia; Dayam, Raveendra; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q; Neamati, Nouri

    2007-01-01

    The prospect of HIV-1 integrase (IN) as a therapeutically viable retroviral drug target is on the verge of realization. The observed preclinical and clinical performance of beta-diketo containing and naphthyridine carboxamide compounds provides direct proof for the clinical application of IN inhibition. These validated lead compounds are useful in the design and development of second generation IN inhibitors. The results from preclinical and clinical studies on the first generation IN inhibitors reiterate a demand for novel second generation inhibitors with improved pharmacokinetic and metabolic properties. Pharmacophore-based drug design techniques facilitate the discovery of novel compounds on the basis of validated lead compounds specific for a drug target. In this article we have comprehensively reviewed the application of pharmacophore-based drug design methods in the field of IN inhibitor discovery.

  20. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 entry by chloride channel inhibitors tamoxifen and NPPB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Kai [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Maoyun [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Xiang, Yangfei; Ma, Kaiqi [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Jin, Fujun [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Xiao [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shaoxiang [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Yifei, E-mail: twang-yf@163.com [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We analyze the anti-HSV potential of chloride channel inhibitors. • Tamoxifen and NPPB show anti-HSV-1 and anti-ACV-resistant HSV-1 activities. • HSV-1 infection induces intracellular chloride concentration increasing. • Tamoxifen and NPPB inhibit HSV-1 early infection. • Tamoxifen and NPPB prevent the fusion process of HSV-1. - Abstract: Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is very common worldwide and can cause significant health problems from periodic skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. Appearance of drug-resistant viruses in clinical therapy has made exploring novel antiviral agents emergent. Here we show that chloride channel inhibitors, including tamoxifen and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl-propylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB), exhibited extensive antiviral activities toward HSV-1 and ACV-resistant HSV viruses. HSV-1 infection induced chloride ion influx while treatment with inhibitors reduced the increase of intracellular chloride ion concentration. Pretreatment or treatment of inhibitors at different time points during HSV-1 infection all suppressed viral RNA synthesis, protein expression and virus production. More detailed studies demonstrated that tamoxifen and NPPB acted as potent inhibitors of HSV-1 early entry step by preventing viral binding, penetration and nuclear translocation. Specifically the compounds appeared to affect viral fusion process by inhibiting virus binding to lipid rafts and interrupting calcium homeostasis. Taken together, the observation that tamoxifen and NPPB can block viral entry suggests a stronger potential for these compounds as well as other ion channel inhibitors in antiviral therapy against HSV-1, especially the compound tamoxifen is an immediately actionable drug that can be reused for treatment of HSV-1 infections.

  1. Contribution of intrinsic reactivity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins to CD4-independent infection and global inhibitor sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillel Haim

    2011-06-01

    inhibitor/antibody binding to the envelope glycoprotein trimer and by envelope glycoprotein reactivity to the inhibitor/antibody binding event. Quantitative differences in intrinsic reactivity contribute to HIV-1 strain variability in global susceptibility to neutralization and explain the long-observed relationship between increased inhibitor sensitivity and decreased entry requirements for target cell CD4.

  2. Positioning of HIV-protease inhibitors in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, M; Perno, C F

    2012-01-01

    The availability of more than 20 drugs for the treatment of HIV infection, and the success of the current antiretroviral regimens, should not overlook the difficulty of long-term maintaining the control of viral replication. The therapy needs to be continued for decades, if not for lifetime, and there are clear evidences that, even in patients fully suppressed for many years, HIV starts again its replication cycles in case antiviral pressure is removed. The development of resistance is a natural event at the time of virological failure, that needs to be taken into account in the global strategy against HIV in each particular patient. Taking all together, therapeutic regiments must be embedded, since the beginning, in a long-term strategy whose main task is the stable control of the replication of HIV. To do so, the choice of the first antiviral regimen has to be highly appropriate to keep the virus in check, and at the same time maintain future therapeutic options. Change of therapy at the time of failure has to be also appropriate, in term of timing, diagnostic strategy, and selection of drugs. Under these circumstances, the use of protease inhibitors in the first line acquires a strong rationale, that balances the greater pure potency of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), and makes them a valuable options for many patients that need to start antiviral therapy.

  3. Journey describing the discoveries of anti-HIV triterpene acid families targeting HIV-entry/fusion, protease functioning and maturation stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rahul V; Park, Se Won

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection/AIDS, is a fatal disease multiplying rapidly in virtually every country. Extensive creations are in progress to arrest the replication of the HIV, following the destruction of either particular step involved in the progression of HIV infection. In such endeavors, mechanistically more diverse antiviral therapies were showcased using naturally occurring triterpene acid and their derivatives acting at various stages of HIV life cycle like entry or fusion, function of HIV protease enzyme and finally at maturation. The present article holds an extensive step-by-step summary of anti-HIV breakthroughs of triterpene acid analogues and their derivatives with synthetic and activity aspects, featuring fertile clues for novel anti-HIV drug design, which helps to develop unprecedented opportunities to discover the next-generation anti- HIV armamentarium.

  4. Cenicriviroc blocks HIV entry but does not lead to redistribution of HIV into extracellular space like maraviroc

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    Victor Kramer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cenicriviroc (CVC, a once-daily, dual CCR5/CCR2 co-receptor antagonist, has completed Phase 2b development. CVC demonstrated favourable safety and similar efficacy compared with efavirenz (EFV in Study 202 (NCT01338883; an ex vivo sub-analysis evaluated treatment effects on HIV entry, measured by intracellular HIV DNA declines, in subjects with virologic success at Week 24. In addition, in vitro assays determined and compared the extent of any cell-free virion redistribution that CVC or maraviroc (MVC may cause. Methods: Ex vivo: intracellular DNA (frozen PBMCs from 30 subjects with virologic success at Week 24 (10, 13 and 7 subjects on CVC 100 mg, CVC 200 mg and EFV, respectively. Early (strong-stop and late (full-length reverse transcript levels were measured by qPCR. In vitro: PM-1 cells were infected with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 BaL in the presence or absence of inhibitory concentrations of CVC (20 nM, MVC (50 nM or controls. P24 and viral load levels were measured by ELISA and qRT-PCR after 4 hours. Results: Ex vivo analysis showed full-length HIV DNA declines were similar across all groups (CVC 100 mg, CVC 200 mg and EFV at Week 24. Strong-stop HIV DNA declines (a marker of HIV entry at Week 24 were pronounced for both CVC arms (CVC 100 mg, 51% decline; CVC 200 mg, 37% decline compared to no decline for the EFV arm. In vitro experiments revealed that CVC-treated cells had lower levels of supernatant P24 at 4 hours versus baseline (0 hrs: 506 ng/mL; 4 hrs: 192 ng/mL, but P24 levels remained constant for MVC-treated cells after 4 hours (0 hrs: 506 ng/mL; 4 hrs: 520 ng/mL. Viral load levels for CVC-treated cells remained stable after 4 hours (0 hrs: 1.19×1010 copies/mL; 4 hrs: 1.26×1010 copies/mL. MVC-treated cells exhibited a slight increase in viral load after 4 hours (0 hrs: 1.19×1010 copies/mL; 4 hrs: 1.67×1010 copies/mL. Conclusions: Ex vivo analysis confirmed that CVC treatment blocks HIV entry (strong-stop HIV DNA declines

  5. V3-independent competitive resistance of a dual-X4 HIV-1 to the CXCR4 inhibitor AMD3100.

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    Yosuke Maeda

    Full Text Available A CXCR4 inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 was isolated from a dual-X4 HIV-1 in vitro. The resistant variant displayed competitive resistance to the CXCR4 inhibitor AMD3100, indicating that the resistant variant had a higher affinity for CXCR4 than that of the wild-type HIV-1. Amino acid sequence analyses revealed that the resistant variant harbored amino acid substitutions in the V2, C2, and C4 regions, but no remarkable changes in the V3 loop. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that the changes in the C2 and C4 regions were principally involved in the reduced sensitivity to AMD3100. Furthermore, the change in the C4 region was associated with increased sensitivity to soluble CD4, and profoundly enhanced the entry efficiency of the virus. Therefore, it is likely that the resistant variant acquired the higher affinity for CD4/CXCR4 by the changes in non-V3 regions. Taken together, a CXCR4 inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 can evolve using a non-V3 pathway.

  6. Update on D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA): a viral entry inhibitor that blocks CCR5 chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Michael R; Polianova, Maria; Yang, Quan-en; Leoung, Gifford S; Ruscetti, Francis W; Pert, Candace B

    2003-01-01

    Peptide T, named for its high threonine content (ASTTTNYT), was derived by a database search which assumed that a relevant receptor binding epitope within env (gp120) would have sequence homology to a known signaling peptide. Binding of radiolabeled gp120 to brain membranes was displaced by peptide T and three octapeptide analogs (including "DAPTA", Dala1-peptide T-amide, the protease-resistant analog now in Phase II clinical trials) with the same potency that these four octapeptides blocked infectivity of an early passage patient isolate. This 1986 report was controversial due to a number of laboratories' failure to find peptide T antiviral effects; we now know that peptide T is a potent HIV entry inhibitor selectively targeting CCR5 receptors with minimal effects on the X4 tropic lab adapted virus exclusively in use at that time. Early clinical trials, which demonstrated lack of toxicity and focused on neurological and neurocognitive benefits, are reviewed and data from a small ongoing Phase II trial--the first to assess peptide T's antiviral effects--are presented. Studies using infectivity, receptor binding, chemotaxis, and blockade of gp120-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, discussed and presented here. Peptide T and analogs of its core pentapeptide, present near the V2 stem of numerous gp120 isolates, are potent ligands for CCR5. Clinical data showing peptide T's immunomodulation of plasma cytokine levels and increases in the percentage of IFNgamma secreting CD8+ T cells in patients with HIV disease are presented and suggests additional therapeutic mechanisms via regulation of specific immunity.

  7. Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by the tricyclic coumarin GUT-70 through the modification of membrane fluidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Kouki; Hattori, Shinichiro; Kariya, Ryusho [Division of Hematopoiesis, Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Komizu, Yuji [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Sojo University, 4-22-1 Ikeda, Nishi-ku, Kumamoto 860-0082 (Japan); Kudo, Eriko; Goto, Hiroki; Taura, Manabu [Division of Hematopoiesis, Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Ueoka, Ryuichi [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Sojo University, 4-22-1 Ikeda, Nishi-ku, Kumamoto 860-0082 (Japan); Kimura, Shinya [Division of Hematology, Respiratory Medicine and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Okada, Seiji, E-mail: okadas@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Hematopoiesis, Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan)

    2015-02-13

    Membrane fusion between host cells and HIV-1 is the initial step in HIV-1 infection, and plasma membrane fluidity strongly influences infectivity. In the present study, we demonstrated that GUT-70, a natural product derived from Calophyllum brasiliense, stabilized plasma membrane fluidity, inhibited HIV-1 entry, and down-regulated the expression of CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4. Since GUT-70 also had an inhibitory effect on viral replication through the inhibition of NF-κB, it is expected to be used as a dual functional and viral mutation resistant reagent. Thus, these unique properties of GUT-70 enable the development of novel therapeutic agents against HIV-1 infection.

  8. HIV-1 uncoating: connection to nuclear entry and regulation by host proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrose, Zandrea, E-mail: zaa4@pitt.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Aiken, Christopher [Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    The RNA genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is enclosed by a capsid shell that dissociates within the cell in a multistep process known as uncoating, which influences completion of reverse transcription of the viral genome. Double-stranded viral DNA is imported into the nucleus for integration into the host genome, a hallmark of retroviral infection. Reverse transcription, nuclear entry, and integration are coordinated by a capsid uncoating process that is regulated by cellular proteins. Although uncoating is not well understood, recent studies have revealed insights into the process, particularly with respect to nuclear import pathways and protection of the viral genome from DNA sensors. Understanding uncoating will be valuable toward developing novel antiretroviral therapies for HIV-infected individuals.

  9. HIV-1 stimulates nuclear entry of amyloid beta via dynamin dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    András, Ibolya E., E-mail: iandras@med.miami; Toborek, Michal, E-mail: mtoborek@med.miami.edu

    2014-04-15

    Clinical evidence indicates increased amyloid deposition in HIV-1-infected brains, which contributes to neurocognitive dysfunction in infected patients. Here we show that HIV-1 exposure stimulates amyloid beta (Aβ) nuclear entry in human brain endothelial cells (HBMEC), the main component of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Treatment with HIV-1 and/or Aβ resulted in concurrent increase in early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1), Smad, and phosphorylated Smad (pSmad) in nuclear fraction of HBMEC. A series of inhibition and silencing studies indicated that Smad and EEA1 closely interact by influencing their own nuclear entry; the effect that was attenuated by dynasore, a blocker of GTP-ase activity of dynamin. Importantly, inhibition of dynamin, EEA1, or TGF-β/Smad effectively attenuated HIV-1-induced Aβ accumulation in the nuclei of HBMEC. The present study indicates that nuclear uptake of Aβ involves the dynamin-dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling pathways. These results identify potential novel targets to protect against HIV-1-associated dysregulation of amyloid processes at the BBB level. - Highlights: • HIV-1 induces nuclear accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in brain endothelial cells. • EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad act in concert to regulate nuclear entry of Aβ. • Dynamin appropriates the EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad signaling. • Dynamin serves as a master regulator of HIV-1-induced nuclear accumulation of Aβ.

  10. Oral candidiasis in HIV+ patients under treatment with protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Andréa Lusvarghi; Silveira, Fernando Ricardo Xavier da; Pires, Maria de Fátima Costa; Lotufo, Mônica Andrade

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the influence of Protease Inhibitors (PI) on the occurrence of oral candidiasis in 111 HIV+ patients under PI therapy (Group A). The controls consisted of 56 patients that were not using PI drugs (Group B) and 26 patients that were not using any drugs for HIV therapy (Group C). The patient's cd4 cell counts were taken in account for the correlations. One hundred and ninety three patients were evaluated. The PI did not affect the prevalence of oral candidiasis (p = 0.158) or the frequency of C. albicans isolates (p = 0.133). Patients with lower cd4 cell counts showed a higher frequency of C. albicans isolates (p = 0.046) and a greater occurrence of oral candidiasis (p = 0.036).

  11. Effects of sequence changes in the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide on CCR5 inhibitor resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Sanders, Rogier W. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Laboratory of Experimental Virology, Department of Medical Microbiology, Center for Infection and Immunity Amsterdam (CINIMA), Academic Medical Center of the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Johan Klasse, Per [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Moore, John P., E-mail: jpm2003@med.cornell.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2012-07-05

    A rare pathway of HIV-1 resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as Vicriviroc (VCV) involves changes solely in the gp41 fusion peptide (FP). Here, we show that the G516V change is critical to VCV resistance in PBMC and TZM-bl cells, although it must be accompanied by either M518V or F519I to have a substantial impact. Modeling VCV inhibition data from the two cell types indicated that G516V allows both double mutants to use VCV-CCR5 complexes for entry. The model further identified F519I as an independent determinant of preference for the unoccupied, high-VCV affinity form of CCR5. From inhibitor-free reversion cultures, we also identified a substitution in the inner domain of gp120, T244A, which appears to counter the resistance phenotype created by the FP substitutions. Examining the interplay of these changes will enhance our understanding of Env complex interactions that influence both HIV-1 entry and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors.

  12. Experiences with HIV testing, entry, and engagement in care by HIV-infected women of color, and the need for autonomy, competency, and relatedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, E Byrd; Messer, Lynne C; Adimora, Adaora A; Roytburd, Katya; Bowditch, Natasha; Parnell, Heather; Seay, Julia; Bell, Lynda; Pierce, Jonah K

    2013-07-01

    Self-determination theory examines the needs of people adopting new behaviors but has not been applied to the adoption of HIV healthcare behaviors. The current study applied self-determination theory to descriptions of healthcare behaviors adopted by ethnic minority women after an HIV diagnosis. Women of color were asked to describe their experiences with HIV testing, entry, and engagement-in-care in qualitative interviews and focus groups. Participants were mostly African-American (88%), over 40 years old (70%), had been diagnosed for more than 6 years (87%) and had disclosed their HIV infection to more than 3 people (73%). Women described unmet self-determination needs at different time points along the HIV Continuum of Care. Women experienced a significant loss of autonomy at the time of HIV diagnosis. Meeting competency and relatedness needs assisted women in entry and engagement-in-care. However, re-establishing autonomy was a key element for long-term engagement-in-care. Interventions that satisfy these needs at the optimal time point in care could improve diagnosis, entry-to-care, and retention-in-care for women living with HIV.

  13. Indole-based allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pratiq A; Kvaratskhelia, Nina; Mansour, Yara; Antwi, Janet; Feng, Lei; Koneru, Pratibha; Kobe, Mathew J; Jena, Nivedita; Shi, Guqin; Mohamed, Mosaad S; Li, Chenglong; Kessl, Jacques J; Fuchs, James R

    2016-10-01

    Employing a scaffold hopping approach, a series of allosteric HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors (ALLINIs) have been synthesized based on an indole scaffold. These compounds incorporate the key elements utilized in quinoline-based ALLINIs for binding to the IN dimer interface at the principal LEDGF/p75 binding pocket. The most potent of these compounds displayed good activity in the LEDGF/p75 dependent integration assay (IC50=4.5μM) and, as predicted based on the geometry of the five- versus six-membered ring, retained activity against the A128T IN mutant that confers resistance to many quinoline-based ALLINIs.

  14. HIV-2 integrase variation in integrase inhibitor-naive adults in Senegal, West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey S Gottlieb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy for HIV-2 infection is hampered by intrinsic resistance to many of the drugs used to treat HIV-1. Limited studies suggest that the integrase inhibitors (INIs raltegravir and elvitegravir have potent activity against HIV-2 in culture and in infected patients. There is a paucity of data on genotypic variation in HIV-2 integrase that might confer intrinsic or transmitted INI resistance. METHODS: We PCR amplified and analyzed 122 HIV-2 integrase consensus sequences from 39 HIV-2-infected, INI-naive adults in Senegal, West Africa. We assessed genetic variation and canonical mutations known to confer INI-resistance in HIV-1. RESULTS: No amino acid-altering mutations were detected at sites known to be pivotal for INI resistance in HIV-1 (integrase positions 143, 148 and 155. Polymorphisms at several other HIV-1 INI resistance-associated sites were detected at positions 72, 95, 125, 154, 165, 201, 203, and 263 of the HIV-2 integrase protein. CONCLUSION: Emerging genotypic and phenotypic data suggest that HIV-2 is susceptible to the new class of HIV integrase inhibitors. We hypothesize that intrinsic HIV-2 integrase variation at "secondary" HIV-1 INI-resistance sites may affect the genetic barrier to HIV-2 INI resistance. Further studies will be needed to assess INI efficacy as part of combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-2-infected patients.

  15. Delayed entry into HIV medical care in a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, McKaylee; Wei, Stanley C; Beer, Linda; Adedinsewo, Demilade; Stockwell, Sandra; Dombrowski, Julia C; Johnson, Christopher; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Before widespread antiretroviral therapy (ART), an estimated 17% of people delayed HIV care. We report national estimates of the prevalence and factors associated with delayed care entry in the contemporary ART era. We used Medical Monitoring Project data collected from June 2009 through May 2011 for 1425 persons diagnosed with HIV from May 2004 to April 2009 who initiated care within 12 months. We defined delayed care as entry >three months from diagnosis. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were calculated to identify risk factors associated with delayed care. In this nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care, 7.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3-8.8) delayed care after diagnosis. Black race was associated with a lower likelihood of delay than white race (aPR 0.38). Men who have sex with women versus women who have sex with men (aPR 1.86) and persons required to take an HIV test versus recommended by a provider (aPR 2.52) were more likely to delay. Among those who delayed 48% reported a personal factor as the primary reason. Among persons initially diagnosed with HIV (non-AIDS), those who delayed care were twice as likely (aPR 2.08) to develop AIDS as of May 2011. Compared to the pre-ART era, there was a nearly 60% reduction in delayed care entry. Although relatively few HIV patients delayed care entry, certain groups may have an increased risk. Focus on linkage to care among persons who are required to take an HIV test may further reduce delayed care entry.

  16. Timing of entry to care by newly diagnosed HIV cases before and after the 2010 New York State HIV testing law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Daniel E; Bian, Fuqin; Anderson, Bridget J; Smith, Lou C

    2015-01-01

    Prompt entry to care after HIV diagnosis benefits the infected individual and reduces the likelihood of further transmission of the virus. The New York State HIV Testing Law of 2010 requires diagnosing providers to refer persons newly diagnosed with HIV to follow-up medical care. This study used routinely collected HIV-related laboratory data from the New York State HIV surveillance system to assess whether the fraction of newly diagnosed cases entering care within 90 days of diagnosis increased after the implementation of the law. Laboratory data on 23,302 newly diagnosed cases showed that entry to care within 90 days rose steadily from 72.0% in 2007 to 85.4% in 2012. The rise was observed across all race/ethnic groups, ages, transmission risk groups, sexes, and regions of residence. Logistic regression analyses of entry to care pre-law and post-law, controlling for demographic characteristics, transmission risk, and geographic area, indicate that percentage of newly diagnosed cases entering care within 90 days grew more rapidly in the post-law period. This is consistent with a positive effect of the law on entry to care.

  17. Discovery of MK-8718, an HIV Protease Inhibitor Containing a Novel Morpholine Aspartate Binding Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bungard, Christopher J; Williams, Peter D; Ballard, Jeanine E; Bennett, David J; Beaulieu, Christian; Bahnck-Teets, Carolyn; Carroll, Steve S; Chang, Ronald K; Dubost, David C; Fay, John F; Diamond, Tracy L; Greshock, Thomas J; Hao, Li; Holloway, M Katharine; Felock, Peter J; Gesell, Jennifer J; Su, Hua-Poo; Manikowski, Jesse J; McKay, Daniel J; Miller, Mike; Min, Xu; Molinaro, Carmela; Moradei, Oscar M; Nantermet, Philippe G; Nadeau, Christian; Sanchez, Rosa I; Satyanarayana, Tummanapalli; Shipe, William D; Singh, Sanjay K; Truong, Vouy Linh; Vijayasaradhi, Sivalenka; Wiscount, Catherine M; Vacca, Joseph P; Crane, Sheldon N; McCauley, John A

    2016-07-14

    A novel HIV protease inhibitor was designed using a morpholine core as the aspartate binding group. Analysis of the crystal structure of the initial lead bound to HIV protease enabled optimization of enzyme potency and antiviral activity. This afforded a series of potent orally bioavailable inhibitors of which MK-8718 was identified as a compound with a favorable overall profile.

  18. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant S Goda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor, RAS (rat sarcoma oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells, it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  19. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Jayant S; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  20. An allosteric rheostat in HIV-1 gp120 reduces CCR5 stoichiometry required for membrane fusion and overcomes diverse entry limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J; Durnin, James P; Shinde, Ujwal; Kabat, David

    2007-11-16

    Binding of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the CCR5 co-receptor reduces constraints on the metastable transmembrane subunit gp41, thereby enabling gp41 refolding, fusion of viral and cellular membranes, and infection. We previously isolated adapted HIV-1(JRCSF) variants that more efficiently use mutant CCR5s, including CCR5(Delta18) lacking the important tyrosine sulfate-containing amino terminus. Effects of mutant CCR5 concentrations on HIV-1 infectivities were highly cooperative, implying that several may be required. However, because wild-type CCR5 efficiently mediates infections at trace concentrations that were difficult to measure accurately, analyses of its cooperativity were not feasible. New HIV-1(JRCSF) variants efficiently use CCR5(HHMH), a chimera containing murine extracellular loop 2. The adapted virus induces large syncytia in cells containing either wild-type or mutant CCR5s and has multiple gp120 mutations that occurred independently in CCR5(Delta18)-adapted virus. Accordingly, these variants interchangeably use CCR5(HHMH) or CCR5(Delta18). Additional analyses strongly support a novel energetic model for allosteric proteins, implying that the adaptive mutations reduce quaternary constraints holding gp41, thus lowering the activation energy barrier for membrane fusion without affecting bonds to specific CCR5 sites. In accordance with this mechanism, highly adapted HIV-1s require only one associated CCR5(HHMH), whereas poorly adapted viruses require several. However, because they are allosteric ensembles, complexes with additional co-receptors fuse more rapidly and efficiently than minimal ones. Similarly, wild-type HIV-1(JRCSF) is highly adapted to wild-type CCR5 and minimally requires one. The adaptive mutations cause resistances to diverse entry inhibitors and cluster appropriately in the gp120 trimer interface overlying gp41. We conclude that membrane fusion complexes are allosteric machines with an

  1. Multi-step inhibition explains HIV-1 protease inhibitor pharmacodynamics and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, S Alireza; Laird, Gregory M; Durand, Christine M; Laskey, Sarah; Shan, Liang; Bailey, Justin R; Chioma, Stanley; Moore, Richard D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2013-09-01

    HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the most effective antiretroviral drugs. They are characterized by highly cooperative dose-response curves that are not explained by current pharmacodynamic theory. An unresolved problem affecting the clinical use of PIs is that patients who fail PI-containing regimens often have virus that lacks protease mutations, in apparent violation of fundamental evolutionary theory. Here, we show that these unresolved issues can be explained through analysis of the effects of PIs on distinct steps in the viral life cycle. We found that PIs do not affect virion release from infected cells but block entry, reverse transcription, and post-reverse transcription steps. The overall dose-response curves could be reconstructed by combining the curves for each step using the Bliss independence principle, showing that independent inhibition of multiple distinct steps in the life cycle generates the highly cooperative dose-response curves that make these drugs uniquely effective. Approximately half of the inhibitory potential of PIs is manifest at the entry step, likely reflecting interactions between the uncleaved Gag and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Sequence changes in the CT alone, which are ignored in current clinical tests for PI resistance, conferred PI resistance, providing an explanation for PI failure without resistance.

  2. Progress in the Identification of Dengue Virus Entry/Fusion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina De La Guardia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever, a reemerging disease, is putting nearly 2.5 billion people at risk worldwide. The number of infections and the geographic extension of dengue fever infection have increased in the past decade. The disease is caused by the dengue virus, a flavivirus that uses mosquitos Aedes sp. as vectors. The disease has several clinical manifestations, from the mild cold-like illness to the more serious hemorrhagic dengue fever and dengue shock syndrome. Currently, there is no approved drug for the treatment of dengue disease or an effective vaccine to fight the virus. Therefore, the search for antivirals against dengue virus is an active field of research. As new possible receptors and biological pathways of the virus biology are discovered, new strategies are being undertaken to identify possible antiviral molecules. Several groups of researchers have targeted the initial step in the infection as a potential approach to interfere with the virus. The viral entry process is mediated by viral proteins and cellular receptor molecules that end up in the endocytosis of the virion, the fusion of both membranes, and the release of viral RNA in the cytoplasm. This review provides an overview of the targets and progress that has been made in the quest for dengue virus entry inhibitors.

  3. Interleukin-27 is a potent inhibitor of cis HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived dendritic cells via a type I interferon-independent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chen

    Full Text Available IL-27, a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines, plays an important and diverse role in the function of the immune system. Whilst generally recognized as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, in addition IL-27 has been found to have broad anti-viral effects. Recently, IL-27 has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 infection in CD4+ T cells and macrophages. The main objective of this study was to see whether IL-27 has a similar inhibitory effect on HIV-1 replication in dendritic cells (DCs. Monocytes were differentiated into immature DCs (iDCs and mature DCs (mDCs with standard techniques using a combination of GM-CSF, IL-4 and LPS. Following differentiation, iDCs were infected with HIV-1 and co-cultured in the presence or absence of IL-27. IL-27 treated DCs were shown to be highly potent inhibitors of cis HIV-1, particularly of CCR5 tropic strains. Of note, other IL-12 family members (IL-12, IL-23 and IL-35 had no effect on HIV-1 replication. Microarray studies of IL-27 treated DCs showed no up-regulation of Type I (IFN gene expression. Neutralization of the Type-I IFN receptor had no impact on the HIV inhibition. Lastly, IL-27 mediated inhibition was shown to act post-viral entry and prior to completion of reverse transcription. These results show for the first time that IL-27 is a potent inhibitor of cis HIV-1 infection in DCs by a Type I IFN independent mechanism. IL-27 has previously been reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells and macrophages, thus taken together, this cytokine is a potent anti-HIV agent against all major cell types targeted by the HIV-1 virus and may have a therapeutic role in the future.

  4. Endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 entry and its significance in the elusive behavior of the virus in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ashok; Mehla, Rajeev; Vijayakumar, Theophilus Sunder; Handy, Indhira

    2014-05-01

    Astrocytes protect neurons but also evoke a proinflammatory response to injury and viral infections including HIV. We investigated the mechanism of HIV-1 infection in primary astrocytes, which showed minimal but productive viral infection independent of CXCR4. As with ectopic-CD4-expressing astrocytes, lysosomotropic agents led to increased HIV-1 infection in wild-type but not Rabs 5, 7, and 11-ablated astrocytes. Instead, HIV-1 infection was decreased in Rab-depleted astrocytes, corroborating viral entry by endocytosis. HIV-1 produced persistent infection in astrocytes (160 days); no evidence of latent infection was seen. Notably, one caveat is that endosomal modifiers enhanced wild-type HIV-1 infection (M- and T-tropic) in astrocytes, suggesting endocytic entry of the virus. Impeding endocytosis by inhibition of Rab 5, 7 or 11 will inhibit HIV infection in astrocytes. Although the contribution of such low-level infection in astrocytes to neurological complications is unclear, it may serve as an elusive viral reservoir in the central nervous system.

  5. Domain 15 of the serine proteinase inhibitor LEKTI blocks HIV infection in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Palesch

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lympho-epithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI is a 15-domain serine proteinase inhibitor, parts of which have first been isolated from human blood filtrate. It is encoded by the gene SPINK5. In the past, different groups reported antiviral activities of certain serine proteinase inhibitors, such as mucous proteinase inhibitor and alpha1-proteinase inhibitor. The purpose of this study was to test two representative domains of the proteinase inhibitor LEKTI for anti-HIV activities.Methods: LEKTI domains 6 and 15 were recombinantly produced in E.coli. To test their inhibitory activity against HIV infection, the reporter cell line P4-R5 MAGI carrying an HIV-inducible reporter gene was infected by a CCR5-tropic HIV strain in the presence of different inhibitor concentrations. After three days, infection rates were determined by quantifying ß-galactosidase activities using the Galacto-Light Plus™ ß-Galactosidase Reporter Gene Assay.Results: In contrast to LEKTI domain 6, LEKTI domain 15 suppressed HIV-induced reporter gene activities with an IC50 value of approximately 29 µM.Conclusion: LEKTI domain 15 represents an inhibitor of HIV infection. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:131-5. doi: 10.13181/mji.v22i3.580Keywords: HIV, inhibition, LEKTI, P4-R5 MAGI

  6. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of some [Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor]-C5'-linker-[Integrase Inhibitor] heterodimers as inhibitors of HIV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeac, Elena; Fossey, Christine; Ladurée, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2004-12-01

    Selected for their expected ability to inhibit HIV replication, a series of eight heterodimers containing a Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NRTI) and an Integrase Inhibitor (INI), bound by a linker, were designed and synthesized. For the NRTIs, d4U, d2U and d4T were chosen. For the INIs, 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (6) and 4-(3,5-dibenzyloxyphenyl)-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (9) (belonging to the beta-diketo acids class) were chosen. The conjugation of the two different inhibitors (NRTI and INI) was performed using an amino acid (glycine or beta-alanine) as a cleavable linker.

  7. 3-Hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an inhibitor scaffold of HIV integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Metifiot, Mathieu; Sham, Yuk Y; Vince, Robert; Pommier, Yves; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2011-04-14

    Integrase (IN) represents a clinically validated target for the development of antivirals against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Inhibitors with a novel structure core are essential for combating resistance associated with known IN inhibitors (INIs). We have previously disclosed a novel dual inhibitor scaffold of HIV IN and reverse transcriptase (RT). Here we report the complete structure-activity relationship (SAR), molecular modeling, and resistance profile of this inhibitor type on IN inhibition. These studies support an antiviral mechanism of dual inhibition against both IN and RT and validate 3-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-diones as an IN inhibitor scaffold.

  8. HIV aspartyl protease inhibitors as promising compounds against Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    André; Luis; Souza; dos; Santos

    2010-01-01

    Cells of Candida albicans(C.albicans) can invade humans and may lead to mucosal and skin infections or to deep-seated my coses of almost all inner organs,especially in immunocompromised patients.In this context,both the host immune status and the ability of C.albicans to modulate the expression of its virulence factors are relevant aspects that drive the candidal susceptibility or resistance;in this last case,culminating in the establishment of successful infection knownas candidiasis.C.albicans possesses a potent arma-mentarium consisting of several virulence moleculesthat help the fungal cells to escape of the host immuneresponses.There is no doubt that the secretion of aspartyl-type proteases,designated as Saps,are one of the major virulence attributes produced by C.albicans cells,since these hydrolytic enzymes participate in a wide range of fungal physiological processes as well as in different facets of the fungal-host interactions.For these reasons,Saps clearly hold promise as new potential drug targets.Corroborating this hypothesis,the introduction of new anti-human immunodeficiency virus drugs of the as party l protease inhibitor-type(HIV PIs) have emerged as new agents for the inhibition of Saps.The introduction of HIV PIs has revolutionized the treatment of HIV disease,reducing opportunistic infections,especially candidiasis.The attenuation of candidal infections in HIV-infected individuals might not solely have resulted from improved immunological status,but also as a result of direct inhibition of C.albicans Saps.In this article,we review updates on the beneficial effects of HIV PIs against the human fungal pathogen C.albicans,focusing on the effects of these compounds on Sap activity,growth behavior,morphological architecture,cellular differentiation,fungal adhesion to animal cells and abiotic materials,modulation of virulence factors,experimental candidiasis infection,and their synergistic actions with classical antifungal agents.

  9. Latent HIV in primary T lymphocytes is unresponsive to histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Gautam K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, there is considerable interest in the field of anti-HIV therapy to identify and develop chromatin-modifying histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors that can effectively reactivate latent HIV in patients. The hope is that this would help eliminate cells harboring latent HIV and achieve an eventual cure of the virus. However, how effectively these drugs can stimulate latent HIVs in quiescent primary CD4 T cells, despite their relevant potencies demonstrated in cell line models of HIV latency, is not clear. Here, we show that the HDAC inhibitors valproic acid (VPA and trichostatin A (TSA are unable to reactivate HIV in latently infected primary CD4 T cells generated in the H80 co-culture system. This raises a concern that the drugs inhibiting HDAC function alone might not be sufficient for stimulating latent HIV in resting CD4 T cells in patients and not achieve any anticipated reduction in the pool of latent reservoirs.

  10. Methylene bisphosphonates as the inhibitors of HIV RT phosphorolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanvarev, D V; Korovina, A N; Usanov, N N; Khomich, O A; Vepsäläinen, J; Puljula, E; Kukhanova, M K; Kochetkov, S N

    2016-08-01

    The structure-function analysis of 36 methylenebisphosphonates (BPs) as inhibitors of the phosphorolytic activity of native and drug-resistant forms of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was performed. It was shown that with the increase of the inhibitory potential of BPs towards the phosphorolytic activity raises their ability to inhibit the RT-catalyzed DNA elongation. Herein, we report the impact of the thymidine analog mutations (TAM) on the activity of bisphosphonates, as well as some structural features of the BPs, allowing them to maintain the inhibitory activity on the enzyme resistant to nucleoside analog therapy. We estimated the Mg(2+)-coordinating group structure, the linker and the aromatic pharmacophore influence on the inhibitory potential of the BPs. Based on the 31 BPs SAR, several BPs with improved inhibitory properties were designed and synthesized.

  11. HIV-1 integrase inhibitor resistance and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Jose-Luis; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Gatell, Jose M; Shafer, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical development-elvitegravir and S/GSK1349572-may prove equally versatile. However, the INIs have a relatively low genetic barrier to resistance in that 1 or 2 mutations are capable of causing marked reductions in susceptibility to raltegravir and elvitegravir, the most well-studied INIs. This perspective reviews the genetic mechanisms of INI resistance and their implications for initial INI therapy, the treatment of antiretroviral-experienced patients, and regimen simplification.

  12. A randomized trial of Raltegravir replacement for protease inhibitor or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in HIV-infected women with lipohypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jordan E; McComsey, Grace A; Hulgan, Todd M; Wanke, Christine A; Mangili, Alexandra; Walmsley, Sharon L; Boger, M Sean; Turner, Ralph R; McCreath, Heather E; Currier, Judith S

    2012-09-01

    Lipohypertrophy in HIV-infected patients is associated with metabolic abnormalities. Raltegravir (RAL) is not known to induce fat changes or severe metabolic perturbations. HIV-infected women with central adiposity and HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per milliliter on non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)- or protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) continued their nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) backbone and were randomized to switch to open label RAL immediately or after 24 weeks. The primary end point was 24-week between-group change in computed tomography (CT)-quantified visceral adipose tissue (AT) volume. Fasting lipids, glucose, C-reactive protein (CRP), anthropometric measurements, and patient-reported quality of life assessments were also measured. Thirty-six subjects provided 80% power to detect a 10% between-group difference in visceral AT over 24 weeks. Thirty-seven of 39 enrolled subjects completed week 24. At entry, subjects were 75% black or Hispanic, and on 62% PI-based and 38% NNRTI-based regimens. The median age was 43 years, CD4 count 558 cells per microliter, and body mass index (BMI) 32 kg/m(2). After 24 weeks, no statistically significant changes in visceral or subcutaneous AT, anthropometrics, BMI, glucose, or CRP were observed. In subjects receiving RAL, significant improvements in total and LDL cholesterol (p=0.04), self-reported belly size (p=0.02) and composite body size (p=0.02) were observed. Body size changes correlated well with percent visceral AT change. No RAL-related adverse events occurred. Compared to continued PI or NNRTI, switch to RAL was associated with statistically significant 24-week improvements in total and LDL cholesterol but not AT volumes. Additional insights into AT and metabolic changes in women on RAL will be provided by 48-week follow-up of the immediate-switch arm.

  13. Phylogeny and drug resistance of HIV PR gene among HIV patients receiving RT inhibitors in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazem Baesi; Majedeh Moradbeigi; Mehrdad Ravanshad; Ashrafolnesa Baghban

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey the level and patterns of reverse transcriptase-based drug resistance and subtype distribution among antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected patients receiving only reverse transcriptase inhibitors in Iran. Methods: A total of 25 samples of antiretroviral therapy experienced patients with no history of using protease inhibitors were collected. After RNA extraction, reverse transcriptase-nested PCR was performed. The final products were sequenced and then analysed for drug-resistant mutations and subtypes. Results: No drug resistant mutations were observed among the 25 subjects. The results showed the following subtypes among patients:CRF 35_AD (88%), CRF 28_BF (8%), and CRF 29_BF (4%). Conclusions: A significant increase in drug resistance has been noted in recently-infected patients worldwide. Subtype distributions are needed to perform properly-designed surveillance studies to continuously monitor rates and patterns of transmitted drug resistance and subtypes to help guide therapeutic approaches and limit transmission of these variants.

  14. Focus on Chirality of HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Famiglini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chiral HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs are of great interest since one enantiomer is often more potent than the corresponding counterpart against the HIV-1 wild type (WT and the HIV-1 drug resistant mutant strains. This review exemplifies the various studies made to investigate the effect of chirality on the antiretroviral activity of top HIV-1 NNRTI compounds, such as nevirapine (NVP, efavirenz (EFV, alkynyl- and alkenylquinazolinone DuPont compounds (DPC, diarylpyrimidine (DAPY, dihydroalkyloxybenzyloxopyrimidine (DABO, phenethylthiazolylthiourea (PETT, indolylarylsulfone (IAS, arylphosphoindole (API and trifluoromethylated indole (TFMI The chiral separation, the enantiosynthesis, along with the biological properties of these HIV-1 NNRTIs, are discussed.

  15. Kinetic mechanism for HIV-1 neutralization by antibody 2G12 entails reversible glycan binding that slows cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J; Gomes, Michelle M; Kabat, David

    2012-05-15

    Despite structural knowledge of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NMAbs) complexed to HIV-1 gp120 and gp41 envelope glycoproteins, virus inactivation mechanisms have been difficult to prove, in part because neutralization assays are complex and were previously not understood. Concordant with recent evidence that HIV-1 titers are determined by a race between entry of cell-attached virions and competing inactivation processes, we show that NMAb 2G12, which binds to gp120 N-glycans with α (1, 2)-linked mannose termini and inhibits replication after passive transfer into patients, neutralizes by slowing entry of adsorbed virions. Accordingly, apparent neutralization is attenuated when a kinetically competing virus inactivation pathway is blocked. Moreover, removing 2G12 from media causes its dissociation from virions coupled to accelerated entry and restored infectivity, demonstrating the reversibility of neutralization. A difference between 2G12 dissociation and infectivity recovery rates implies that the inhibited complexes at virus-cell junctions contain several 2G12's that must dissociate before entry commences. Quantitative microscopy of 2G12 binding and dissociation from single virions and studies using a split CCR5 coreceptor suggest that 2G12 competitively inhibits interactions between gp120's V3 loop and the tyrosine sulfate-containing CCR5 amino terminus, thereby reducing assembly of complexes that catalyze entry. These results reveal a unique reversible kinetic mechanism for neutralization by an antibody that binds near a critical V3 region in the glycan shield of gp120.

  16. Impact of Stereochemistry on Ligand Binding: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Epoxide-Based HIV Protease Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Fabio; Berti, Federico; Campaner, Pietro; Fanfoni, Lidia; Demitri, Nicola; Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; De March, Matteo; Geremia, Silvano

    2014-09-11

    A new pseudopeptide epoxide inhibitor, designed for irreversible binding to HIV protease (HIV-PR), has been synthesized and characterized in solution and in the solid state. However, the crystal structure of the complex obtained by inhibitor-enzyme cocrystallization revealed that a minor isomer, with inverted configuration of the epoxide carbons, has been selected by HIV-PR during crystallization. The structural characterization of the well-ordered pseudopeptide, inserted in the catalytic channel with its epoxide group intact, provides deeper insights into inhibitor binding and HIV-PR stereoselectivity, which aids development of future epoxide-based HIV inhibitors.

  17. Novel nonpeptidic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease obtained via a new multicomponent chemistry strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yehia, Nasser A. M.; Antuch, Walfrido; Beck, Barbara; Hess, Sibylle; Schauer-Vukašinović, Vesna; Almstetter, Michael; Furer, Patrick; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Dömling, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Using a newly developed multicomponent chemistry strategy in combination with structure based drug design, a new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors has been obtained. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Design of dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartic proteinase: A computer-based combinatorial approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caflisch, Amedeo; Schramm, Hans J.; Karplus, Martin

    2000-02-01

    Inhibition of dimerization to the active form of the HIV-1 aspartic proteinase (HIV-1 PR) may be a way to decrease the probability of escape mutations for this viral protein. The Multiple Copy Simultaneous Search (MCSS) methodology was used to generate functionality maps for the dimerization interface of HIV-1 PR. The positions of the MCSS minima of 19 organic fragments, once postprocessed to take into account solvation effects, are in good agreement with experimental data on peptides that bind to the interface. The MCSS minima combined with an approach for computational combinatorial ligand design yielded a set of modified HIV-1 PR C-terminal peptides that are similar to known nanomolar inhibitors of HIV-1 PR dimerization. A number of N-substituted 2,5-diketopiperazines are predicted to be potential dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 PR.

  19. A SHORT-TERM STUDY OF THE SAFETY, PHARMACOKINETICS, AND EFFICACY OF RITONAVIR, AN INHIBITOR OF HIV-1 PROTEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DANNER, SA; CARR, A; LEONARD, JM; LEHMAN, LM; GUDIOL, F; GONZALES, J; RAVENTOS, A; RUBIO, R; BOUZA, E; PINTADO, Olga; AGUADO, AG; DELOMAS, JG; DELGADO, R; BORLEFFS, JCC; HSU, A; VALDES, JM; BOUCHER, CAB; COOPER, DA; GIMENO, C; CLOTET, B; TOR, J; FERRER, E; MARTINEZ, PL; MORENO, S; ZANCADA, G; ALCAMI, J; NORIEGA, AR; PULIDO, F; GLASSMAN, HN

    1995-01-01

    Background. Reverse-transcriptase inhibitors have only moderate clinical efficacy against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Ritonavir is an inhibitor of HIV-1 pretease with potent in vitro anti-HIV properties and good oral bioavailability. Methods. We evaluated the antiviral activity

  20. Critical differences in HIV-1 and HIV-2 protease specificity for clinical inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Boross, Peter I; Chiu, Ting-Yi; Ghosh, Arun K; Tozser, Jozsef; Louis, John M; Harrison, Robert W; Weber, Irene T

    2012-03-01

    Clinical inhibitor amprenavir (APV) is less effective on HIV-2 protease (PR₂) than on HIV-1 protease (PR₁). We solved the crystal structure of PR₂ with APV at 1.5 Å resolution to identify structural changes associated with the lowered inhibition. Furthermore, we analyzed the PR₁ mutant (PR(1M) ) with substitutions V32I, I47V, and V82I that mimic the inhibitor binding site of PR₂. PR(1M) more closely resembled PR₂ than PR₁ in catalytic efficiency on four substrate peptides and inhibition by APV, whereas few differences were seen for two other substrates and inhibition by saquinavir (SQV) and darunavir (DRV). High resolution crystal structures of PR(1M) with APV, DRV, and SQV were compared with available PR₁ and PR₂ complexes. Val/Ile32 and Ile/Val47 showed compensating interactions with SQV in PR(1M) and PR₁, however, Ile82 interacted with a second SQV bound in an extension of the active site cavity of PR(1M). Residues 32 and 82 maintained similar interactions with DRV and APV in all the enzymes, whereas Val47 and Ile47 had opposing effects in the two subunits. Significantly diminished interactions were seen for the aniline of APV bound in PR₁ (M) and PR₂ relative to the strong hydrogen bonds observed in PR₁, consistent with 15- and 19-fold weaker inhibition, respectively. Overall, PR(1M) partially replicates the specificity of PR₂ and gives insight into drug resistant mutations at residues 32, 47, and 82. Moreover, this analysis provides a structural explanation for the weaker antiviral effects of APV on HIV-2. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  1. Natural killer cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are an important source of CC-chemokines and suppress HIV-1 entry and replication in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), which are the natural ligands of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5, inhibit replication of MT-2- negative strains of HIV-1 by interfering with the ability of these strains to utilize CCR5 as a coreceptor for entry in CD4(+) cells. The present study investigates the capacity of natural killer (NK) cells isolated from HIV-infected individuals to produce CC-chemokines...

  2. The histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat lowers biomarkers of cardiovascular risk and inflammation in HIV patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjaer, A.S. Hogh Kolbaek; Brinkmann, C.R.; Dinarello, C.A.; Olesen, R.; Ostergaard, L.; Sogaard, O.S.; Tolstrup, M.; Rasmussen, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat on HIV-associated inflammation. DESIGN: Sub-study of a single-arm, phase I/II clinical trial. METHODS: HIV-infected adults on suppressive antiretroviral therapy received oral panobinostat 20 mg three times per wee

  3. Metabolic Disorders in HIV-Infected Adolescents Receiving Protease Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiprabhob, Jeerunda; Tanchaweng, Surapong; Maturapat, Sirinoot; Lermankul, Watcharee; Sricharoenchai, Sirintip; Wittawatmongkol, Orasri; Lapphra, Keswadee; Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya

    2017-01-01

    Protease inhibitor (PI) may cause abnormal glucose metabolism, abnormal lipid metabolism, and metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected adults but less well studied in Asian adolescents. This cross-sectional study evaluated anthropometric factors, oral glucose tolerance test, and lipid profiles of perinatally HIV-infected Thai adolescents who had received PI-based antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months. Eighty adolescents were enrolled [median (IQR) age 16.7 (14.6–18.0) years, 42 males]. Metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were found in 8 (10%), 17 (22.1%), and 3 (3.8%) adolescents, respectively. Dyslipidemia was found in 56 (70%) adolescents, with hypertriglyceridemia being the most common type. In multivariate analysis, presence of lipohypertrophy (OR: 25.7, 95% CI: 3.2–202.8; p = 0.002) and longer duration of PI use (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00–1.08; p = 0.023) were associated with metabolic syndrome. Obesity (OR: 7.71, 95% CI: 1.36–43.7; p = 0.021), presence of lipohypertrophy (OR: 62.9, 95% CI: 4.97–795.6; p = 0.001), and exposure to stavudine for ≥6 months (OR: 8.18, 95% CI: 1.37–48.7; p = 0.021) were associated with prediabetes/T2DM, while exposure to tenofovir for ≥6 months reduced the risk (OR: 0.17, 95% CI: 0.04–0.78; p = 0.022). Metabolic disorders were commonly found in adolescents receiving PI. Careful monitoring and early intervention to modify cardiovascular risk should be systematically implemented in this population particularly those with exposure to stavudine. PMID:28293638

  4. Metabolic Disorders in HIV-Infected Adolescents Receiving Protease Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeerunda Santiprabhob

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Protease inhibitor (PI may cause abnormal glucose metabolism, abnormal lipid metabolism, and metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected adults but less well studied in Asian adolescents. This cross-sectional study evaluated anthropometric factors, oral glucose tolerance test, and lipid profiles of perinatally HIV-infected Thai adolescents who had received PI-based antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months. Eighty adolescents were enrolled [median (IQR age 16.7 (14.6–18.0 years, 42 males]. Metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were found in 8 (10%, 17 (22.1%, and 3 (3.8% adolescents, respectively. Dyslipidemia was found in 56 (70% adolescents, with hypertriglyceridemia being the most common type. In multivariate analysis, presence of lipohypertrophy (OR: 25.7, 95% CI: 3.2–202.8; p=0.002 and longer duration of PI use (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00–1.08; p=0.023 were associated with metabolic syndrome. Obesity (OR: 7.71, 95% CI: 1.36–43.7; p=0.021, presence of lipohypertrophy (OR: 62.9, 95% CI: 4.97–795.6; p=0.001, and exposure to stavudine for ≥6 months (OR: 8.18, 95% CI: 1.37–48.7; p=0.021 were associated with prediabetes/T2DM, while exposure to tenofovir for ≥6 months reduced the risk (OR: 0.17, 95% CI: 0.04–0.78; p=0.022. Metabolic disorders were commonly found in adolescents receiving PI. Careful monitoring and early intervention to modify cardiovascular risk should be systematically implemented in this population particularly those with exposure to stavudine.

  5. Dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi entry into peritoneal macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile S Barrias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite that, like some other intracellular pathogens, targets specific proteins of the host cell vesicular transport machinery, leading to a modulation of host cell processes that results in the generation of unique phagosomes. In mammalian cells, several molecules have been identified that selectively regulate the formation of endocytic transport vesicles and the fusion of such vesicles with appropriate acceptor membranes. Among these, the GTPase dynamin plays an important role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and it was recently found that dynamin can participate in a phagocytic process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a compound called dynasore that has the ability to block the GTPase activity of dynamin. Dynasore acts as a potent inhibitor of endocytic pathways by blocking coated vesicle formation within seconds of its addition. Here, we investigated whether dynamin is involved in the entry process of T. cruzi in phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells by using dynasore. In this aim, peritoneal macrophages and LLC-MK2 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of dynasore before interaction with trypomastigotes, amastigotes or epimastigotes. We observed that, in both cell lines, the parasite internalization was drastically diminished (by greater than 90% in LLC-MK2 cells and 70% in peritoneal macrophages when we used 100 microM dynasore. The T. cruzi adhesion index, however, was unaffected in either cell line. Analyzing these interactions by scanning electron microscopy and comparing peritoneal macrophages to LLC-MK2 cells revealed differences in the stage at which cell entry was blocked. In LLC-MK2 cells, this blockade is observed earlier than it is in peritoneal macrophages. In LLC-MK2 cells, the parasites were only associated with cellular microvilli, whereas in peritoneal macrophages, trypomastigotes were not completely engulfed by a host cell plasma membrane. CONCLUSIONS

  6. Anatomic dissociation between HIV-1 and its endogenous inhibitor in mucosal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, S. M.; Worley, P.; Jin, W.; McNeely, T. B.; Eisenberg, S.; Fasching, C.; Orenstein, J. M.; Janoff, E. N.

    1997-01-01

    The rarity of oral transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 by saliva suggests the absence of HIV-1 in the oral cavity and/or the presence of viral inhibitory molecules. We analyzed salivary gland tissues from 55 individuals with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) for the presence of HIV-1 by in situ hybridization and detected the virus in more than 30% of these salivary glands. These data, together with previous demonstrations of HIV-1 in oral secretions, implicate a key role for an anti-viral molecule(s) in suppressing transmission. Thus, we focused on the characterization and localization of the endogenous antiviral molecule secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), which inhibits HIV-1 infection in vitro. Expression of SLPI transcripts was evident in submandibular, parotid, and minor salivary glands from both HIV-1-infected and seronegative subjects. Gene expression was reflected by similar levels of SLPI protein by immunohistochemical analysis in the tissues and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the saliva. However, although SLPI accumulated in acinar cells or ductal epithelium, HIV-1 transcripts did not, and these viral transcripts were identified only in mononuclear cells within the salivary gland stroma. By in situ hybridization, we found no evidence of productive HIV-1 infection of salivary gland epithelium. Thus, HIV-1 was frequently identified in salivary gland tissue, but the virus was found in interstitial mononuclear cells only and did not co-localize with SLPI. Once within the oral cavity, HIV-1 exposure to antiviral levels of SLPI may impede infection of additional target cells, contributing to the virtual absence of oral transmission of HIV-1 by saliva. These studies emphasize the importance of innate, endogenous inhibitors of HIV-1, particularly SLPI, as effective inhibitors of HIV-1 transmission. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9094984

  7. Continuum in HIV care from entry to ART initiation in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazy, Mélanie; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Dabis, François; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2014-06-01

    To quantify time from entry in HIV care until Antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and identify factors associated with ART initiation in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Adults ≥16 years entering the decentralised Hlabisa ART programme between 2007 and 2011 were followed until June 2013. Median survival times to ART initiation from date of programme entry and from date of ART eligibility were estimated with Kaplan-Meier methods. Associated factors were evaluated in Cox regressions, censoring for deaths. Of 37 749 adults (71.6% female), 17 638 (46.7%) initiated ART. Nearly half (46.9%) met the CD4 criteria for treatment eligibility at programme entry. Among the 20 039 individuals not yet ART-eligible at entry, only 62.5% were retained in care with at least one further CD4 measurement, of whom 6688 subsequently became ART-eligible. Overall, 65.5% of the 24 398 ART-eligible individuals initiated ART over the study period. ART initiation was more likely in women (P < 0.001), in individuals ≥ 25 years old (P < 0.001) and in patients with low CD4 count (P < 0.001). Patients who became eligible during follow up were significantly more likely to initiate ART than those eligible at programme entry (72.6% vs. 62.9%, Adjusted Hazard Ratio = 1.46; 95% Confidence Interval [1.41-1.51]), adjusting for sex, age, year and CD4 count at eligibility. In this rural programme, continuation of care remains challenging, especially in men and younger adults. ART initiation is more likely in those engaged prior eligibility than in those entering HIV care only late in their HIV disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A scalable low-cost cGMP process for clinical grade production of the HIV inhibitor 5P12-RANTES in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerini, Fabrice; Gaertner, Hubert; Madden, Knut; Tolstorukov, Ilya; Brown, Scott; Laukens, Bram; Callewaert, Nico; Harner, Jay C; Oommen, Anna M; Harms, John T; Sump, Anthony R; Sealock, Robert C; Peterson, Dustin J; Johnson, Scott K; Abramson, Stephan B; Meagher, Michael; Offord, Robin; Hartley, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    In the continued absence of an effective anti-HIV vaccine, approximately 2 million new HIV infections occur every year, with over 95% of these in developing countries. Calls have been made for the development of anti-HIV drugs that can be formulated for topical use to prevent HIV transmission during sexual intercourse. Because these drugs are principally destined for use in low-resource regions, achieving production costs that are as low as possible is an absolute requirement. 5P12-RANTES, an analog of the human chemokine protein RANTES/CCL5, is a highly potent HIV entry inhibitor which acts by achieving potent blockade of the principal HIV coreceptor, CCR5. Here we describe the development and optimization of a scalable low-cost production process for 5P12-RANTES based on expression in Pichia pastoris. At pilot (150 L) scale, this cGMP compliant process yielded 30 g of clinical grade 5P12-RANTES. As well as providing sufficient material for the first stage of clinical development, this process represents an important step towards achieving production of 5P12-RANTES at a cost and scale appropriate to meet needs for topical HIV prevention worldwide.

  9. Identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through fragment screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Jennifer; Latham, Catherine F.; Tinetti, Ricky N.; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Huber, Kelly D.; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Simpson, Jamie S.; Headey, Stephen J.; Chalmers, David K.; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based screening methods can be used to discover novel active site or allosteric inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. Using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and in vitro activity assays, we have identified fragment-sized inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with distinct chemical scaffolds and mechanisms compared to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs). Three compounds were found to inhibit RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT in the micromolar range while retaining potency against RT variants carrying one of three major NNRTI resistance mutations: K103N, Y181C, or G190A. These compounds also inhibit Moloney murine leukemia virus RT but not the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Steady-state kinetic analyses demonstrate that one of these fragments is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 RT with respect to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate, whereas a second compound is a competitive inhibitor of RT polymerase activity with respect to the DNA template/primer (T/P), and consequently also inhibits RNase H activity. The dNTP competing RT inhibitor retains activity against the NRTI-resistant mutants K65R and M184V, demonstrating a drug resistance profile distinct from the nucleotide competing RT inhibitors indolopyridone-1 (INDOPY-1) and 4-dimethylamino-6-vinylpyrimidine-1 (DAVP-1). In antiviral assays, the T/P competing compound inhibits HIV-1 replication at a step consistent with an RT inhibitor. Screening of additional structurally related compounds to the three fragments led to the discovery of molecules with improved potency against HIV-1 RT. These fragment inhibitors represent previously unidentified scaffolds for development of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. PMID:26038551

  10. Immunological changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals during HIV-specific protease inhibitor treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, H; Katzenstein, T; Aladdin, H;

    1999-01-01

    The present study examines the influence of effective anti-retroviral treatment on immune function, evaluated by a broad array of immunological tests. We followed 12 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) for 6 months after initiation of combination anti-retroviral treatment...... Vaccinia virus was increased after 3-6 months, whereas the specific HIV-directed CTL activity and the concentration and lytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells were unchanged during follow-up. These results demonstrate that the initiation of a treatment including an HIV protease inhibitor is followed...

  11. HIV protease inhibitors acutely impair glucose-stimulated insulin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Joseph C; Remedi, Maria S; Qiu, Haijun; Nichols, Colin G; Hruz, Paul W

    2003-07-01

    HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) acutely and reversibly inhibit the insulin-responsive glucose transporter Glut 4, leading to peripheral insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. Minimal modeling analysis of glucose tolerance tests on PI-treated patients has revealed an impaired insulin secretory response, suggesting additional pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction. To determine whether beta-cell function is acutely affected by PIs, we assayed glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in rodent islets and the insulinoma cell line MIN6. Insulin release from MIN6 cells and rodent islets was significantly inhibited by the PI indinavir with IC(50) values of 1.1 and 2.1 micro mol/l, respectively. The uptake of 2-deoxyglucose in MIN6 cells was similarly inhibited (IC(50) of 2.0 micro mol/l), whereas glucokinase activity was unaffected at drug levels as high as 1 mmol/l. Glucose utilization was also impaired at comparable drug levels. Insulin secretogogues acting downstream of glucose transport mostly reversed the indinavir-mediated inhibition of insulin release in MIN6 cells. Intravenous infusion of indinavir during hyperglycemic clamps on rats significantly suppressed the first-phase insulin response. These data suggest that therapeutic levels of PIs are sufficient to impair glucose sensing by beta-cells. Thus, together with peripheral insulin resistance, beta-cell dysfunction likely contributes to altered glucose homeostasis associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  12. Solid-state characterization of the HIV protease inhibitor

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y A

    2002-01-01

    The LB71350, (3S, 4R)-Epoxy-(5S)-[[N-(1-methylethoxy) carbonyl]-3-(methylsulfonyl)-L-valinyl]amin= o]-N-[2-methyl-(1R)-[(phenyl)carbonyl]propyl-6-phenylhexanamide, is a novel HIV protease inhibitor. Its equilibrium solubility at room temperature was less than 40 mu g/mL. It was speculated that the low aqueous solubility might be due to the high crystalline lattice energy resulting from intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The present study was carried out to learn the solid-state characteristics of LB71350 using analytical methods such as NMR, FT-IR and XRD. sup 1 sup 3 C Solid-state NMR, solution NMR, and FT-IR spectra of the various solid forms of LB71350 were used to identify the conformation and structure of the solid forms. The chemical shifts of sup 1 sup 3 C solid-state NMR spectra suggest that the crystalline form might have 3 intermolecular hydrogen bondings between monomers.

  13. Structural investigation of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: 2-Aryl-substituted benzimidazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-11-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most destructive epidemics in history. Inhibitors of HIV enzymes are the main targets to develop drugs against that disease. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic. Structural studies provide information necessary to design more active compounds. The crystal structures of four NNRTI derivatives of 2-aryl-substituted N-benzyl-benzimidazole are presented here. Analysis of the geometrical parameters shows that the structures of the investigated inhibitors are rigid. The important geometrical parameter is the dihedral angle between the planes of the π-electron systems of the benzymidazole and benzyl moieties. The values of these dihedral angles are in a narrow range for all investigated inhibitors. There is no significant difference between the structure of the free inhibitor and the inhibitor in the complex with RT HIV-1. X-ray structures of the investigated inhibitors are a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions in rational drug design.

  14. A modular system to evaluate the efficacy of protease inhibitors against HIV-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahdi

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV protease is a homodimeric aspartyl protease that is crucial for the viral life-cycle, cleaving proviral polyproteins, hence creating mature protein components that are required for the formation of an infectious virus. With diagnostic measures and clinically used protease inhibitors focusing on HIV-1, due to its higher virulence and prevalence, studies of the efficacy of those inhibitors on HIV-2 protease remain widely lacking. Utilizing a wild-type HIV-2 vector backbone and cloning techniques we have developed a cassette system where the efficacy of clinically used protease inhibitors can be studied for various serotypes of HIV-2 protease both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. In our experiments, optimization of the expression protocol led to a relatively stable enzyme, for cell culture assays, the efficiency of transfection and transduction capability of the modified vector was tested and was not found to differ from that of the wild-type, moreover, a 2nd generation protease inhibitor was used to demonstrate the usefulness of the system. The combination of assays performed with our cassette system is expected to provide an accurate measure of the efficacy of currently used; as well as experimental protease inhibitors on HIV-2.

  15. HIV-1 evolution under pressure of protease inhibitors: climbing the stairs of viral fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhout, B

    1999-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has evolved into a viral quasispecies with a high replication capacity or fitness. Antiretroviral drugs potently inhibit replication of the wild-type virus, but HIV-1 responds by selection of drug-resistant variants. Here we review, in brief, the evolution of resistance to protease inhibitors that is characterized by severe fitness losses and an abundance of subsequent repair strategies. The possibility to restrict HIV-1 fitness is discussed in relation to the control of HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  16. Preclinical safety and efficacy of an anti–HIV-1 lentiviral vector containing a short hairpin RNA to CCR5 and the C46 fusion inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Wolstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene transfer has therapeutic potential for treating HIV-1 infection by generating cells that are resistant to the virus. We have engineered a novel self-inactivating lentiviral vector, LVsh5/C46, using two viral-entry inhibitors to block early steps of HIV-1 cycle. The LVsh5/C46 vector encodes a short hairpin RNA (shRNA for downregulation of CCR5, in combination with the HIV-1 fusion inhibitor, C46. We demonstrate here the effective delivery of LVsh5/C46 to human T cell lines, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, primary CD4+ T lymphocytes, and CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC. CCR5-targeted shRNA (sh5 and C46 peptide were stably expressed in the target cells and were able to effectively protect gene-modified cells against infection with CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic strains of HIV-1. LVsh5/C46 treatment was nontoxic as assessed by cell growth and viability, was noninflammatory, and had no adverse effect on HSPC differentiation. LVsh5/C46 could be produced at a scale sufficient for clinical development and resulted in active viral particles with very low mutagenic potential and the absence of replication-competent lentivirus. Based on these in vitro results, plus additional in vivo safety and efficacy data, LVsh5/C46 is now being tested in a phase 1/2 clinical trial for the treatment of HIV-1 disease.

  17. Discovery of a small molecule PDI inhibitor that inhibits reduction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maola M G; Simizu, Siro; Lai, Ngit Shin; Kawatani, Makoto; Shimizu, Takeshi; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-18

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a promiscuous protein with multifunctional properties. PDI mediates proper protein folding by oxidation or isomerization and disrupts disulfide bonds by reduction. The entry of HIV-1 into cells is facilitated by the PDI-catalyzed reductive cleavage of disulfide bonds in gp120. PDI is regarded as a potential drug target because of its reduction activity. We screened a chemical library of natural products for PDI-specific inhibitors in a high-throughput fashion and identified the natural compound juniferdin as the most potent inhibitor of PDI. Derivatives of juniferdin were synthesized, with compound 13 showing inhibitory activities comparable to those of juniferdin but reduced cytotoxicity. Both juniferdin and compound 13 inhibited PDI reductase activity in a dose-dependent manner, with IC(50) values of 156 and 167 nM, respectively. Our results also indicated that juniferdin and compound 13 exert their inhibitory activities specifically on PDI but do not significantly inhibit homologues of this protein family. Moreover, we found that both compounds can inhibit PDI-mediated reduction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120.

  18. Pyrroloaryls and pyrroloheteroaryls: Inhibitors of the HIV fusion/attachment, reverse transcriptase and integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rahul V; Park, Se Won

    2015-09-01

    Heterocyclic compounds execute a very important role in drug design and discovery. This article provides the basic milestones of the research for pyrroloaryl and pyrroloheteroaryl based components targeting HIV viral replication cycle. Anti-HIV activity is elaborated for several classes of pyrrolo-compounds as pyrrolopyridines, pyrrolopyrimidines, pyrrolopyridazines, pyrrolobenzodiazepinones, pyrrolobenzothiazepines, pyrrolobenzoxazepinones, pyrrolophenanthridines, pyrroloquinoxalines, pyrrolotriazines, pyrroloquinolines, pyrrolopyrazinones, pyrrolothiatriazines, arylthiopyrroles and pyrrolopyrazolones targeting two essential HIV enzymes, reverse transcriptase and integrase as well as attachment/fusion of HIV virons to the host CD-4 cell. Such attempts were resulted in a discovery of highly potent anti-HIV agents suitable for clinical trials, for example, BMS-378806, BMS-585248, BMS-626529, BMS-663068, BMS-488043 and BMS-663749, etc. as anti-HIV attachment agents, triciribine, QX432, BI-1 and BI-2 as HIV RT inhibitors which are in preclinical or clinical development. Mechanism of action of compounds presented in this article towards the suppression of HIV attachment/fusion as well as against the activities of HIV enzymes reverse transcriptase and integrase has been discussed. Relationships of new compounds' molecular framework and HIV viral target has been overviewed in order to facilitate further construction of promising anti-HIV agents in future drug discovery process.

  19. Bryostatin-1 synergizes with histone deacetylase inhibitors to reactivate HIV-1 from latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Moisés; de Vinuesa, Amaya García; Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Marquez, Nieves; Bellido, M Luz; Muñoz-Fernandez, M Angeles; Moreno, Santiago; Castor, Trevor P; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2010-09-01

    The persistence of latent HIV-infected cellular reservoirs represents the major hurdle to virus eradication on patients treated with HAART. It has been suggested that successful depletion of such latent reservoirs will require a combination of therapeutic agents that can specifically and efficiently act on cells harboring latent HIV-1 provirus. Using Jurkat-LAT-GFP cells, a tractable model of HIV-1 latency, we have found that bryostatin -1 reactivates HIV-1 through a classical PKC-dependent pathway. Bryostatin-1 also activates MAPKs and NF-κB pathways and synergizes with HDAC inhibitors to reactivate HIV-1 from latency. Bryostatin-1 downregulates the expression of the HIV-1 co-receptors CD4 and CXCR4 and prevented de novo HIV-1 infection in susceptible cells. We applied proteomic methods to investigate major changes in protein expression in Jurkat-LAT-GFP under latency and reactivation conditions. We identified up-regulation of proteins that may be involved in the innate anti-HIV-1 response (NKEF-A and MHD2) and in different cell functions (i.e. cofilin-1 and transgelin-2) of the host cells. PKC agonists may represent a valuable pharmacological approach to purge latent HIV from cellular reservoirs and at the moment, the only clinically available PKC agonist is bryostatin-1. This drug has been tested in numerous clinical trials and its pharmacokinetics and toxicity in humans is well known. Moreover, bryostatin-1 potently synergizes with other HDAC inhibitors commonly used in the medical practice such as valproic acid. Therefore, bryostatin-1, alone or in combination with HDAC inhibitors, could be used in HAART treated patients to validate the hypothesis that reactivating HIV-1 from latency could purge HIV-1 reservoirs.

  20. Modeling the HIV-1 Intasome: A Prototype View of the Target of Integrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Craigie

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 integrase enzyme is essential for integrating the viral DNA into the host chromosome. Infection is aborted in the absence of integration, making integrase an attractive antiviral target. Recently approved inhibitors of integrase bind tightly to integrase assembled in a nucleoprotein complex with the viral DNA ends (intasome, but have only low affinity for free integrase. High-resolution structures of HIV-1 intasomes are therefore required to understand the detailed mechanisms of inhibition and resistance. Although the structure of the HIV-1 intasome has not yet been determined, the structure of the related prototype foamy virus (PFV intasome was recently solved. A new study [1] exploits the PFV structure to model the HIV-1 intasome. The model provides the most reliable picture to date of the active site region of the HIV-1 intasome and is an important advance in studies of inhibition of this essential HIV-1 enzyme.

  1. Potent Inhibitor of Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Strains Identified from the Medicinal Plant Justicia gendarussa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Jie; Rumschlag-Booms, Emily; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Dong-Ying; Liu, Kang-Lun; Li, Wan-Fei; Nguyen, Van H; Cuong, Nguyen M; Soejarto, Djaja D; Fong, Harry H S; Rong, Lijun

    2017-06-23

    Justicia gendarussa, a medicinal plant collected in Vietnam, was identified as a potent anti-HIV-1 active lead from the evaluation of over 4500 plant extracts. Bioassay-guided separation of the extracts of the stems and roots of this plant led to the isolation of an anti-HIV arylnaphthalene lignan (ANL) glycoside, patentiflorin A (1). Evaluation of the compound against both the M- and T-tropic HIV-1 isolates showed it to possess a significantly higher inhibition effect than the clinically used anti-HIV drug AZT. Patentiflorin A and two congeners were synthesized, de novo, as an efficient strategy for resupply as well as for further structural modification of the anti-HIV ANL glycosides in the search for drug leads. Subsequently, it was determined that the presence of a quinovopyranosyloxy group in the structure is likely essential to retain the high degree of anti-HIV activity of this type of compounds. Patentiflorin A was further investigated against the HIV-1 gene expression of the R/U5 and U5/gag transcripts, and the data showed that the compound acts as a potential inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcription. Importantly, the compound displayed potent inhibitory activity against drug-resistant HIV-1 isolates of both the nucleotide analogue (AZT) and non-nucleotide analogue (nevaripine). Thus, the ANL glycosides have the potential to be developed as novel anti-HIV drugs.

  2. HIV-related restrictions on entry, residence and stay in the WHO European Region: a survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Curth, Nadja; Weait, Matthew;

    2010-01-01

    Back in 1987, the World Health Organization (WHO) concluded that the screening of international travellers was an ineffective way to prevent the spread of HIV. However, some countries still restrict the entrance and/or residency of foreigners with an HIV infection. HIV-related travel restrictions...

  3. The root extract of the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides is a potent HIV-1 attachment inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Helfer

    Full Text Available Global HIV-1 treatment would benefit greatly from safe herbal medicines with scientifically validated novel anti-HIV-1 activities. The root extract from the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS is licensed in Germany as the herbal medicine EPs®7630, with numerous clinical trials supporting its safety in humans. Here we provide evidence from multiple cell culture experiments that PS extract displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that PS extract protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages from infection with various X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates. Functional studies revealed that the extract from PS has a novel mode-of-action. It interferes directly with viral infectivity and blocks the attachment of HIV-1 particles to target cells, protecting them from virus entry. Analysis of the chemical footprint of anti-HIV activity indicates that HIV-1 inhibition is mediated by multiple polyphenolic compounds with low cytotoxicity and can be separated from other extract components with higher cytotoxicity. Based on our data and its excellent safety profile, we propose that PS extract represents a lead candidate for the development of a scientifically validated herbal medicine for anti-HIV-1 therapy with a mode-of-action different from and complementary to current single-molecule drugs.

  4. The root extract of the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides is a potent HIV-1 attachment inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Markus; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schneider, Martha; Rebensburg, Stephanie; Forcisi, Sara; Müller, Constanze; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Schindler, Michael; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Global HIV-1 treatment would benefit greatly from safe herbal medicines with scientifically validated novel anti-HIV-1 activities. The root extract from the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS) is licensed in Germany as the herbal medicine EPs®7630, with numerous clinical trials supporting its safety in humans. Here we provide evidence from multiple cell culture experiments that PS extract displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that PS extract protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages from infection with various X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 strains, including clinical isolates. Functional studies revealed that the extract from PS has a novel mode-of-action. It interferes directly with viral infectivity and blocks the attachment of HIV-1 particles to target cells, protecting them from virus entry. Analysis of the chemical footprint of anti-HIV activity indicates that HIV-1 inhibition is mediated by multiple polyphenolic compounds with low cytotoxicity and can be separated from other extract components with higher cytotoxicity. Based on our data and its excellent safety profile, we propose that PS extract represents a lead candidate for the development of a scientifically validated herbal medicine for anti-HIV-1 therapy with a mode-of-action different from and complementary to current single-molecule drugs.

  5. Cryo-electron microscopy and single molecule fluorescent microscopy detect CD4 receptor induced HIV size expansion prior to cell entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Son [Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Tabarin, Thibault [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Garvey, Megan; Pade, Corinna [Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Rossy, Jérémie [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Monaghan, Paul; Hyatt, Alex [CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Böcking, Till [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Leis, Andrew [CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia); Gaus, Katharina, E-mail: k.gaus@unsw.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular Imaging, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 3220 (Australia); Mak, Johnson, E-mail: j.mak@deakin.edu.au [Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Victoria 3220 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Viruses are often thought to have static structure, and they only remodel after the viruses have entered target cells. Here, we detected a size expansion of virus particles prior to viral entry using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single molecule fluorescence imaging. HIV expanded both under cell-free conditions with soluble receptor CD4 (sCD4) targeting the CD4 binding site on the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) and when HIV binds to receptor on cellular membrane. We have shown that the HIV Env is needed to facilitate receptor induced virus size expansions, showing that the ‘lynchpin’ for size expansion is highly specific. We demonstrate that the size expansion required maturation of HIV and an internal capsid core with wild type stability, suggesting that different HIV compartments are linked and are involved in remodelling. Our work reveals a previously unknown event in HIV entry, and we propose that this pre-entry priming process enables HIV particles to facilitate the subsequent steps in infection. - Highlights: • Cell free viruses are able to receive external trigger that leads to apparent size expansion. • Virus envelope and CD4 receptor engagement is the lynchpin of virus size expansion. • Internal capsid organisation can influence receptor mediated virus size expansion. • Pre-existing virus-associated lipid membrane in cell free virus can accommodate the receptor mediated virus size expansion.

  6. Polyurethane intravaginal ring for controlled delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kavita M; Pearce, Serena M; Poursaid, Azadeh E; Aliyar, Hyder A; Tresco, Patrick A; Mitchnik, Mark A; Kiser, Patrick F

    2008-10-01

    Women-controlled methods for prevention of male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV-1 are urgently needed. Providing inhibitory concentrations of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors to impede the replication of the virus in the female genital tissue offers a mechanism for prophylaxis of HIV-1. To this end, an intravaginal ring device that can provide long duration delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1, was developed utilizing a medical-grade polyether urethane. Monolithic intravaginal rings were fabricated and sustained release with cumulative flux linear with time was demonstrated under sink conditions for a period of 30 days. The release rate was directly proportional to the amount of drug loaded. Another release study conducted for a week utilizing liposome dispersions as sink conditions, to mimic the partitioning of dapivirine into vaginal tissue, also demonstrated release rates constant with time. These results qualify polyether urethanes for development of intravaginal rings for sustained delivery of microbicidal agents.

  7. Outcome of protease inhibitor substitution with nevirapine in HIV-1 infected children

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    Gomez M Luisa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protease inhibitors (PIs have been associated with metabolic complications. There is a trend to switch to simpler therapy to improve these disturbances. We report a case-series describing the effects in metabolic abnormalities in seven HIV-infected children, previously treated with protease inhibitor (PI after switching to nevirapine. Methods Seven children with stable PI-containing regimen and a long lasting HIV-1 RNA Results Seven HIV-infected children were enrolled. Median age: 130 months (99,177. Median baseline CD4%: 32%. All had HIV-1 RNA Conclusion PI substitution with nevirapine improved lipid profile in our patients, although this strategy did not show significant changes in body fat or lipodystrophy.

  8. Evolution of resistance to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huigen, C.D.G.

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the primary etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV replicates as a complex and dynamic population of mutants referred to as viral quasispecies, which can be seen as a cloud of distinct but closely related genetic variants. The

  9. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

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    Leena Pohjala

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2, obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs. The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV, their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate

  10. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjala, Leena; Utt, Age; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Aleksei; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero; Tammela, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2), obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs). The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV), their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate models for anti

  11. Inibidores da HIV-integrase: potencial abordagem farmacológica para tratamento da AIDS HIV-integrase inhibitors: potential pharmacological approach for AIDS therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Borges de Melo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available AIDS has the HIV as its etiological agent. Researches has been done to find new pharmacological agents to be used in therapy, because of problems of resistance and side effects. The HIV-integrase inhibitors are some of those new agents that are being studied. This updating focusses on the fundamental information about HIV and HIV-integrase and the main methods being used to develop these new drugs, with examples for each case.

  12. Synthesis, screening and computational investigation of pentacycloundecane-peptoids as potent CSA-HIV PR inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makatini, Maya M; Petzold, Katja; Arvidsson, Per I; Honarparvar, Bahareh; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Parboosing, Raveen; Sayed, Yasien; Soliman, Mahmoud E S; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2012-11-01

    Herein, we present the first pentacycloundecane (PCU) diol peptoid derived HIV protease inhibitors with IC(50) values ranging from 6.5 to 0.075 μM. Five derivatives were synthesized in an attempt to understand the structure activity relationship of this class of compounds for HIV protease inhibition. NMR spectroscopy (new Efficient Adiabatic Symmetrized Rotating Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy, EASY-ROESY) was employed to determine the predominant conformation of the active compound. In this study docking studies and MD simulations provided insight into the binding theme of this class of peptoid inhibitors to the CSA-HIV PR active site. Conserved and stable hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl groups of the inhibitors and the active site Asp25/Asp25' residues were observed from the docking and along the MD trajectories.

  13. prevention an update on female-controlled methods for hiv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the female condom entered the market in 1992, more than 100 million ... attachment by an infectious agent (entry and fusion inhibitor), and/ ... However, internationally few ... HIV infection.33 Second, compared with the thicker cell lining.

  14. The rhesus macaque CCR3 chemokine receptor is a cell entry cofactor for HIV-2, but not for HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, N; Tréboute, C; Gomas, E; Ferchal, F; Shacklett, B; Alizon, M

    1998-01-20

    The eotaxin receptor (CCR3) is a CD4-associated coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2). By comparison with other chemokine receptors, such as CCR5 and CXCR4, the primary sequences of human CCR3 and its rhesus macaque homolog were markedly different in their extracellular domains. Human CD4+ cells expressing CCR3 from either human or macaque origin could be infected by HIV-2, with apparently similar efficiency, but only cells expressing human CCR3 could be infected by HIV-1. It suggests that HIV-1 and HIV-2 envelope proteins interact differently with the CCR3 coreceptor HIV-1 could infect cells expressing chimeric human/macaque CCR3 bearing either the first and second, or the third and fourth extracellular domains of human CCR3. As previously observed for CCR5, there seems to be a certain functional redundancy between domains supporting the coreceptor activity of CCR3. In spite of their close genetic relationship to HIV-2, two macaque simian immunodeficiency virus strains were apparently unable to use the CCR3 coreceptor from either human or simian origin.

  15. Characterization of natural polymorphic sites of the HIV-1 integrase before the introduction of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors in Germany

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    Karolin Meixenberger

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of our study was to analyze the occurrence and evolution of HIV-1 integrase polymorphisms during the HIV-1 epidemic in Germany prior to the introduction of the first integrase inhibitor raltegravir in 2007. Materials and Methods: Plasma samples from drug-naïve HIV-1 infected individuals newly diagnosed between 1986 and 2006 were used to determine PCR-based population sequences of the HIV-1 integrase (amino acids 1–278. The HIV-1 subtype was determined using the REGA HIV-1 subtyping tool. We calculated the frequency of amino acids at each position of the HIV-1 integrase in 337 subtype B strains for the time periods 1986–1989, 1991–1994, 1995–1998, 1999–2002, and 2003–2006. Positions were defined as polymorphic if amino acid variation was >1% in any period. Logistic regression was used to identify trends in amino acid variation over time. Resistance-associated mutations were identified according to the IAS 2013 list and the HIVdb, ANRS and GRADE algorithms. Results: Overall, 56.8% (158/278 amino acid positions were polymorphic and 15.8% (25/158 of these positions exhibited a significant trend in amino acid variation over time. Proportionately, most polymorphic positions (63.3%, 31/49 were detected in the N-terminal zinc finger domain of the HIV-1 integrase. Motifs and residues essential for HIV-1 integrase activity were little polymorphic, but within the minimal non-specific DNA binding region I220-D270 up to 18.1% amino acid variation was noticed, including four positions with significant amino acid variation over time (S230, D232, D256, A265. No major resistance mutations were identified, and minor resistance mutations were rarely observed without trend over time. E157Q considered by HIVdb, ANRS, and GRADE algorithms was the most frequent resistance-associated polymorphism with an overall prevalence of 2.4%. Conclusions: Detailed knowledge of the evolutionary variation of HIV-1 integrase polymorphisms is

  16. Role of semen in HIV-1 transmission: inhibitor or facilitator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncel, Gustavo F; Joseph, Theresa; Thurman, Andrea R

    2011-03-01

    Sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) accounts for 60-90% of new infections, especially in developing countries. During male-to-female transmission, the virus is typically deposited in the vagina as cell-free and cell-associated virions carried by semen. But semen is more than just a carrier for HIV-1. Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies supports both inhibitory and enhancing effects. Intrinsic antiviral activity mediated by cationic antimicrobial peptides, cytotoxicity, and blockage of HIV-dendritic cell interactions are seminal plasma properties that inhibit HIV-1 infection. On the contrary, neutralization of vaginal acidic pH, enhanced virus-target cell attachment by seminal amyloid fibrils, opsonization by complement fragments, and electrostatic interactions are factors that facilitate HIV-1 infection. The end result, i.e., inhibition or enhancement of HIV mucosal infection, in vivo, likely depends on the summation of all these biological effects. More research is needed, especially in animal models, to dissect the role of these factors and establish their relevance in HIV-1 transmission.

  17. Recent patents and emerging therapeutics for HIV infections: a focus on protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mitesh; Mandava, Nanda K; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-07-01

    The inclusion of protease inhibitors (PIs) in highly active antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved clinical outcomes in HIV-1-infected patients. To date, PIs are considered to be the most important therapeutic agents for the treatment of HIV infections. Despite high anti-HIV-1 potency, poor oral bioavailability of PIs has been a major concern. For achieving therapeutic concentrations, large doses of PIs are administered, which results in unacceptable systemic toxicities. Such severe and long-term toxicities necessitate the development of safer and potentially promising PIs. Recently, considerable attention has been paid to the development of newer compounds capable of inhibiting wild-type and resistant HIV-1 protease. Some of these PIs have displayed potent HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity. In this review, we have made an attempt to provide an overview on clinically approved and newly developing PIs, and related recent patents in the development of novel PIs.

  18. Design, synthesis and biological activity of aromatic diketone derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liming; Li, Zhipeng; Wang, Zhanyang; Liu, Gengxin; He, Xianzhuo; Wang, Xiaoli; Zeng, Chengchu

    2015-01-01

    A series of aromatic diketone derivatives were designed and synthesized as potential HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors and evaluated to determine their ability to inhibit the strand transfer process of HIV-1 integrase. The results indicate that (Z)-1-(3-acetyl-2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(substituted)phenylprop-2-en-1-one (5a-5d) can moderately inhibit HIV-1 integrase. The cyclization and condensation products (6a-6c and 7e-7f) of compounds 5a-5d show poor inhibitory activity against HIV-1 integrase. The molecular docking results indicate that the different types of compounds act on HIV-1 integrase in different ways, and these results can explain the differences in the inhibitory activities.

  19. Discovery and crystallography of bicyclic arylaminoazines as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Gil; Frey, Kathleen M; Gallardo-Macias, Ricardo; Spasov, Krasimir A; Chan, Albert H; Anderson, Karen S; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-11-01

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) are reported that incorporate a 7-indolizinylamino or 2-naphthylamino substituent on a pyrimidine or 1,3,5-triazine core. The most potent compounds show below 10 nanomolar activity towards wild-type HIV-1 and variants bearing Tyr181Cys and Lys103Asn/Tyr181Cys resistance mutations. The compounds also feature good aqueous solubility. Crystal structures for two complexes enhance the analysis of the structure-activity data.

  20. PEPSIN ASSAY ONE OF THE EASIEST APPROACH FOR PRESCREENING OF HIV-PROTEASE INHIBITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh K.P.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available As HIV is quickly becoming one of the world deadliest viruses, one of the biggest problem in curing AIDS is as HIV can easily develop resistance against the provided drugs. HAART (Highly active antiretroviral therapy is the only one hope for the AIDS patients till now, which can increase the survival period of the AIDS patient by sustaining the viral load below 50 copies/ml. in blood serum, in which we use combination of three to five drugs targeting different stages of replication cycle of HIV. HIV-protease inhibitors are the indispensable part of this therapy. There is a great need of screening of anti-HIV agents from chemical as well as natural resources. But this process is not so easy because it needs huge amount of money for required chemicals, as well as highly sophisticated labs. Here we have developed a substitute of this problem unto some extent, i.e." Pepsin Assay", it is a substitute of HIV- protease, both of them belongs to same Aspartyl family of enzyme & share same signature sequence at the active site. So we hope that development of this assay will enhance the screening programme of HIV-protease inhibitors.

  1. Structure-based design of HIV protease inhibitors: 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2-pyrones as effective, nonpeptidic inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaisrivongs, S; Romero, D L; Tommasi, R A; Janakiraman, M N; Strohbach, J W; Turner, S R; Biles, C; Morge, R R; Johnson, P D; Aristoff, P A; Tomich, P K; Lynn, J C; Horng, M M; Chong, K T; Hinshaw, R R; Howe, W J; Finzel, B C; Watenpaugh, K D

    1996-11-08

    From a broad screening program, the 4-hydroxycoumarin phenprocoumon (I) was previously identified as a lead template with HIV protease inhibitory activity. The crystal structure of phenprocoumon/HIV protease complex initiated a structure-based design effort that initially identified the 4-hydroxy-2-pyrone U-96988 (II) as a first-generation clinical candidate for the potential treatment of HIV infection. Based upon the crystal structure of the 4-hydroxy-2-pyrone III/HIV protease complex, a series of analogues incorporating a 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2-pyrone template were studied. It was recognized that in addition to having the required pharmacophore (the 4-hydroxy group with hydrogen-bonding interaction with the two catalytic aspartic acid residues and the lactone moiety replacing the ubiquitous water molecule in the active site), these 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2-pyrones incorporated side chains at the C-6 position that appropriately extended into the S1' and S2' subsites of the enzyme active site. The crystal structures of a number of representative 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2-pyrones complexed with the HIV protease were also determined to provide better understanding of the interaction between the enzyme and these inhibitors to aid the structure-based drug design effort. The crystal structures of the ligands in the enzyme active site did not always agree with the conformations expected from experience with previous pyrone inhibitors. This is likely due to the increased flexibility of the dihydropyrone ring. From this study, compound XIX exhibited reasonably high enzyme inhibitory activity (Ki = 15 nM) and showed antiviral activity (IC50 = 5 microM) in the cell-culture assay. This result provided a research direction which led to the discovery of active 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2-pyrones as potential agents for the treatment of HIV infection.

  2. HIV-1 efficient entry in inner foreskin is mediated by elevated CCL5/RANTES that recruits T cells and fuels conjugate formation with Langerhans cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhicheng Zhou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Male circumcision reduces acquisition of HIV-1 by 60%. Hence, the foreskin is an HIV-1 entry portal during sexual transmission. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 transmission occurs following 1 h of polarized exposure of the inner, but not outer, foreskin to HIV-1-infected cells, but not to cell-free virus. At this early time point, Langerhans cells (LCs and T-cells within the inner foreskin epidermis are the first cells targeted by the virus. To gain in-depth insight into the molecular mechanisms governing inner foreskin HIV-1 entry, foreskin explants were inoculated with HIV-1-infeceted cells for 4 h. The chemokine/cytokine milieu secreted by the foreskin tissue, and resulting modifications in density and spatial distribution of T-cells and LCs, were then investigated. Our studies show that in the inner foreskin, inoculation with HIV-1-infected cells induces increased CCL5/RANTES (1.63-fold and decreased CCL20/MIP-3-alpha (0.62-fold secretion. Elevated CCL5/RANTES mediates recruitment of T-cells from the dermis into the epidermis, which is blocked by a neutralizing CCL5/RANTES Ab. In parallel, HIV-1-infected cells mediate a bi-phasic modification in the spatial distribution of epidermal LCs: attraction to the apical surface at 1 h, followed by migration back towards the basement membrane later on at 4 h, in correlation with reduced CCL20/MIP-3-alpha at this time point. T-cell recruitment fuels the continuous formation of LC-T-cell conjugates, permitting the transfer of HIV-1 captured by LCs. Together, these results reveal that HIV-1 induces a dynamic process of immune cells relocation in the inner foreskin that is associated with specific chemokines secretion, which favors efficient HIV-1 entry at this site.

  3. 3-Phenylcoumarins as Inhibitors of HIV-1 Replication

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    José Alcamí

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized fourteen 3-phenylcoumarin derivatives and evaluated their anti-HIV activity. Antiviral activity was assessed on MT-2 cells infected with viral clones carrying the luciferase gene as reporter. Inhibition of HIV transcription and Tat function were tested on cells stably transfected with the HIV-LTR and Tat protein. Six compounds displayed NF-κB inhibition, four resulted Tat antagonists and three of them showed both activities. Three compounds inhibited HIV replication with IC50 values < 25 µM. The antiviral effect of the 4-hydroxycoumarin derivative 19 correlates with its specific inhibition of Tat functions, while compound 8, 3-(2-chlorophenylcoumarin, seems to act through a mechanism unrelated to the molecular targets considered in this research.

  4. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor.

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    Tahir Bashir

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV. Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection.

  5. Mode of action for linear peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 gp120 interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biorn, Alyssa C; Cocklin, Simon; Madani, Navid; Si, Zhihai; Ivanovic, Tijana; Samanen, James; Van Ryk, Donald I; Pantophlet, Ralph; Burton, Dennis R; Freire, Ernesto; Sodroski, Joseph; Chaiken, Irwin M

    2004-02-24

    The linear peptide 12p1 (RINNIPWSEAMM) was previously isolated from a phage display library and was found to inhibit interaction of HIV-1 gp120 with both CD4 and a CCR5 surrogate, mAb 17b [Ferrer, M., and Harrison, S. (1999) J. Virol. 73, 5795-5802]. In this work, we investigated the mechanism that leads to this dual inhibition of gp120 binding. We found that there is a direct interaction of 12p1 with gp120, which occurs with a binding stoichiometry of 1:1. The peptide inhibits binding of monomeric YU2 gp120 to both sCD4 and 17b at IC(50) values of 1.1 and 1.6 microM, respectively. The 12p1 peptide also inhibited the binding of these ligands to trimeric envelope glycoproteins, blocked the binding of gp120 to the native coreceptor CCR5, and specifically inhibited HIV-1 infection of target cells in vitro. Analyses of sCD4 saturation of monomeric gp120 in the presence or absence of a fixed concentration of peptide suggest that 12p1 suppression of CD4 binding to gp120 is due to allosteric inhibitory effects rather than competitive inhibition of CD4 binding. Using a panel of gp120 mutants that exhibit weakened inhibition by 12p1, the putative binding site of the peptide was mapped to a region immediately adjacent to, but distinguishable from, the CD4 binding footprint. In the case of the peptide, the effects of single-12p1 residue substitutions and various peptide truncations indicate that the side chain of Trp7 and other structural elements of 12p1 are critical for gp120 binding or efficient inhibition of binding of a ligand to gp120. Finally, 12p1 was unable to inhibit binding of sCD4 to a gp120 mutant that is believed to resemble the CD4-induced conformation of gp120. These results suggest that 12p1 preferentially binds gp120 prior to engagement of CD4; binding of the peptide to gp120 limits the interaction with ligands (CD4 and CCR5) that are generally crucial for viral entry. More importantly, these results indicate that 12p1 binds to a unique site that may prove

  6. HIV aspartyl peptidase inhibitors interfere with cellular proliferation, ultrastructure and macrophage infection of Leishmania amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia O Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania is the etiologic agent of leishmanisais, a protozoan disease whose pathogenic events are not well understood. Current therapy is suboptimal due to toxicity of the available therapeutic agents and the emergence of drug resistance. Compounding these problems is the increase in the number of cases of Leishmania-HIV coinfection, due to the overlap between the AIDS epidemic and leishmaniasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we have investigated the effect of HIV aspartyl peptidase inhibitors (PIs on the Leishmania amazonensis proliferation, ultrastructure, interaction with macrophage cells and expression of classical peptidases which are directly involved in the Leishmania pathogenesis. All the HIV PIs impaired parasite growth in a dose-dependent fashion, especially nelfinavir and lopinavir. HIV PIs treatment caused profound changes in the leishmania ultrastructure as shown by transmission electron microscopy, including cytoplasm shrinking, increase in the number of lipid inclusions and some cells presenting the nucleus closely wrapped by endoplasmic reticulum resembling an autophagic process, as well as chromatin condensation which is suggestive of apoptotic death. The hydrolysis of HIV peptidase substrate by L. amazonensis extract was inhibited by pepstatin and HIV PIs, suggesting that an aspartyl peptidase may be the intracellular target of the inhibitors. The treatment with HIV PIs of either the promastigote forms preceding the interaction with macrophage cells or the amastigote forms inside macrophages drastically reduced the association indexes. Despite all these beneficial effects, the HIV PIs induced an increase in the expression of cysteine peptidase b (cpb and the metallopeptidase gp63, two well-known virulence factors expressed by Leishmania spp. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In the face of leishmaniasis/HIV overlap, it is critical to further comprehend the sophisticated interplays among Leishmania

  7. Developing HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors through Stereospecific Reactions in Protein Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folasade M. Olajuyigbe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Protease inhibitors are key components in the chemotherapy of HIV infection. However, the appearance of viral mutants routinely compromises their clinical efficacy, creating a constant need for new and more potent inhibitors. Recently, a new class of epoxide-based inhibitors of HIV-1 protease was investigated and the configuration of the epoxide carbons was demonstrated to play a crucial role in determining the binding affinity. Here we report the comparison between three crystal structures at near-atomic resolution of HIV-1 protease in complex with the epoxide-based inhibitor, revealing an in-situ epoxide ring opening triggered by a pH change in the mother solution of the crystal. Increased pH in the crystal allows a stereospecific nucleophile attack of an ammonia molecule onto an epoxide carbon, with formation of a new inhibitor containing amino-alcohol functions. The described experiments open a pathway for the development of new stereospecific protease inhibitors from a reactive lead compound.

  8. Coevolutionary analysis of resistance-evading peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, C D; Belew, R K; Morris, G M; Olson, A J; Goodsell, D S

    1999-02-16

    We have developed a coevolutionary method for the computational design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors selected for their ability to retain efficacy in the face of protease mutation. For HIV-1 protease, typical drug design techniques are shown to be ineffective for the design of resistance-evading inhibitors: An inhibitor that is a direct analogue of one of the natural substrates will be susceptible to resistance mutation, as will inhibitors designed to fill the active site of the wild-type or a mutant enzyme. Two design principles are demonstrated: (i) For enzymes with broad substrate specificity, such as HIV-1 protease, resistance-evading inhibitors are best designed against the immutable properties of the active site-the properties that must be conserved in any mutant protease to retain the ability to bind and cleave all of the native substrates. (ii) Robust resistance-evading inhibitors can be designed by optimizing activity simultaneously against a large set of mutant enzymes, incorporating as much of the mutational space as possible.

  9. HIV Protease Inhibitor-Induced Cathepsin Modulation Alters Antigen Processing and Cross-Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourjian, Georgio; Rucevic, Marijana; Berberich, Matthew J; Dinter, Jens; Wambua, Daniel; Boucau, Julie; Le Gall, Sylvie

    2016-05-01

    Immune recognition by T cells relies on the presentation of pathogen-derived peptides by infected cells, but the persistence of chronic infections calls for new approaches to modulate immune recognition. Ag cross-presentation, the process by which pathogen Ags are internalized, degraded, and presented by MHC class I, is crucial to prime CD8 T cell responses. The original degradation of Ags is performed by pH-dependent endolysosomal cathepsins. In this article, we show that HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) prescribed to HIV-infected persons variably modulate cathepsin activities in human APCs, dendritic cells and macrophages, and CD4 T cells, three cell subsets infected by HIV. Two HIV PIs acted in two complementary ways on cathepsin hydrolytic activities: directly on cathepsins and indirectly on their regulators by inhibiting Akt kinase activities, reducing NADPH oxidase 2 activation, and lowering phagolysosomal reactive oxygen species production and pH, which led to enhanced cathepsin activities. HIV PIs modified endolysosomal degradation and epitope production of proteins from HIV and other pathogens in a sequence-dependent manner. They altered cross-presentation of Ags by dendritic cells to epitope-specific T cells and T cell-mediated killing. HIV PI-induced modulation of Ag processing partly changed the MHC self-peptidome displayed by primary human cells. This first identification, to our knowledge, of prescription drugs modifying the regulation of cathepsin activities and the MHC-peptidome may provide an alternate therapeutic approach to modulate immune recognition in immune disease beyond HIV.

  10. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Stoszko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4+ T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal.

  11. Fragment Based Strategies for Discovery of Novel HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Catherine F; La, Jennifer; Tinetti, Ricky N; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global health problem. While combined antiretroviral therapy has been successful in controlling the virus in patients, HIV can develop resistance to drugs used for treatment, rendering available drugs less effective and limiting treatment options. Initiatives to find novel drugs for HIV treatment are ongoing, although traditional drug design approaches often focus on known binding sites for inhibition of established drug targets like reverse transcriptase and integrase. These approaches tend towards generating more inhibitors in the same drug classes already used in the clinic. Lack of diversity in antiretroviral drug classes can result in limited treatment options, as cross-resistance can emerge to a whole drug class in patients treated with only one drug from that class. A fresh approach in the search for new HIV-1 drugs is fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), a validated strategy for drug discovery based on using smaller libraries of low molecular weight molecules (<300 Da) screened using primarily biophysical assays. FBDD is aimed at not only finding novel drug scaffolds, but also probing the target protein to find new, often allosteric, inhibitory binding sites. Several fragment-based strategies have been successful in identifying novel inhibitory sites or scaffolds for two proven drug targets for HIV-1, reverse transcriptase and integrase. While any FBDD-generated HIV-1 drugs have yet to enter the clinic, recent FBDD initiatives against these two well-characterised HIV-1 targets have reinvigorated antiretroviral drug discovery and the search for novel classes of HIV-1 drugs.

  12. Biased small-molecule ligands for selective inhibition of HIV-1 cell entry via CCR5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Christian; Spiess, Katja; von Lüttichau, Hans Rudolf;

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of HIV's use of CCR5 as the primary coreceptor in fusion, the focus on developing small-molecule receptor antagonists for inhibition hereof has only resulted in one single drug, Maraviroc. We therefore investigated the possibility of using small-molecule CCR5 agonists as HIV-1...

  13. HIV-2 infection, end-stage renal disease and protease inhibitor intolerance: which salvage regimen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisci, Daniela; Martinelli, Laura; Weimer, Liliana E; Zazzi, Maurizio; Floridia, Marco; Masini, Giulia; Baldelli, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and enfuvirtide are ineffective against HIV-2 replication. These considerations may have particular significance in the formulation of second-line or salvage regimens for HIV-2 infection when resistance or toxicity precludes the use of protease inhibitors (PIs) or specific nucleoside analogues. We describe a case of a treatment-experienced patient with important limitations in therapeutic options dictated by the presence of HIV-2 infection, severe HIV nephropathy (requiring haemodialysis), intolerance to PIs and clinical contraindications to the use of some nucleoside analogues (anaemia, pancreatic toxicity and high cardiovascular risk). A three-drug regimen based on raltegravir, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and lamivudine was given, with no major toxicity, good immunological response and complete viral suppression. Our case indicates that regimens based on integrase inhibitors could represent an effective alternative in PI-resistant or PI-intolerant patients with HIV-2, and that tenofovir disoproxil fumarate may be used in patients with end-stage renal disease requiring haemodialysis who cannot take other nucleoside analogues because of treatment-limiting adverse effects.

  14. Quantitative Structure-activity Relationship of TIBO HIV-1 Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Hong; ZHANG Rui-Zhou; CHENG Xin-Lu; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2007-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was used to calculate a set of molecular descriptors (properties) for 14 TIBO derivatives with anti-HIV activity. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were employed in order to reduce dimensionality and investigate which subset of variables should be more effective for classifying TIBO derivatives according to their degree of anti-HIV activity. The PCA showed that the EHOMO, μ, LogP, QA, QB and MR variables are responsible for the separation between compounds with higher and lower anti-HIV activity. The HCA results are similar to those obtained with PCA. By using the chemometric results, four synthetic compounds were analyzed through PCA and HCA and three of them are proposed as active molecules against HIV, which is consistent with the results of clinic experiments. The methodologies of PCA and HCA provide a reliable rule for classifying new TIBO derivatives with anti-HIV activity. The model obtained showed not only statistical significance but also predictive ability.

  15. HIV integrase inhibitors: from diketoacids to heterocyclic templates: a history of HIV integrase medicinal chemistry at Merck West Point and Merck Rome (IRBM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbertson, Melissa S

    2007-01-01

    Replication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is dependent upon the enzyme HIV integrase (IN), one of three essential enzymes encoded in the viral genome. HIV-1 IN catalyzes the insertion of the proviral DNA into the host genome (strand transfer). HIV-1 IN therefore presents an attractive chemotherapeutic target for the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS that could provide patients and physicians with an additional option for treatment. Assays were developed to identify inhibitors of IN strand transfer. Diketoacid lead compounds were explored and developed into a variety of heterocyclic templates that are potent inhibitors of integrase strand transfer with suitable medicinal chemical properties for treating HIV infection and AIDS. The 1,6-naphthyridine L-870810 (Antiviral activity in cells IC(95) NHS = 102 nM, n=237), was shown to be efficacious in reducing viral RNA by 1.7 log units after doses of 400mg BID to HIV infected patients. Optimization of physical properties led to L-900564, an inhibitor of HIV IN that has excellent cell potency in the presence of protein (Antiviral activity in cells IC(95) NHS = 16 nM, n=15), excellent activity against mutants raised to HIV integrase inhibitors, and a very good pharmacokinetic profile.

  16. Quantitative analysis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors in cell lysates using MALDI-FTICR mass spectrometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, JJ van; Burgers, P.C.; Groot, R. de; Osterhaus, A.D.; Reedijk, M.L.; Verschuren, E.J.; Gruters, R.A.; Luider, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this report we explore the use of MALDI-FTICR mass spectrometry for the quantitative analysis of five HIV-1 protease inhibitors in cell lysates. 2,5-Dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) was used as the matrix. From a quantitative perspective, DHB is usually a poor matrix due to its poor shot-to-shot and p

  17. Structures of HIV Protease Guide Inhibitor Design to Overcome Drug Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Irene T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W. (GSU)

    2008-06-03

    The HIV/AIDS infection continues to be a major epidemic worldwide despite the initial promise of antiviral drugs. Current therapy includes a combination of drugs that inhibit two of the virally-encoded enzymes, the reverse transcriptase and the protease. The first generation of HIV protease inhibitors that have been in clinical use for treatment of AIDS since 1995 was developed with the aid of structural analysis of protease-inhibitor complexes. These drugs were successful in improving the life span of HIV-infected people. Subsequently, the rapid emergence of drug resistance has necessitated the design of new inhibitors that target mutant proteases. This second generation of antiviral protease inhibitors has been developed with the aid of data from medicinal chemistry, kinetics, and X-ray crystallographic analysis. Traditional computational methods such as molecular mechanics and dynamics can be supplemented with intelligent data mining approaches. One approach, based on similarities to the protease interactions with substrates, is to incorporate additional interactions with main chain atoms that cannot easily be eliminated by mutations. Our structural and inhibition data for darunavir have helped to understand its antiviral activity and effectiveness on drug resistant HIV and demonstrate the success of this approach.

  18. Evolving uses of oral reverse transcriptase inhibitors in the HIV-1 epidemic: From treatment to prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.K. Gupta (Ravindra); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); S. Manicklal (Sheetal); M.A. Wainberg (Mark)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe HIV epidemic continues unabated, with no highly effective vaccine and no cure. Each new infection has significant economic, social and human costs and prevention efforts are now as great a priority as global antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale up. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the

  19. Raltegravir, elvitegravir, and metoogravir: the birth of "me-too" HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neamati Nouri

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Merck's MK-0518, known as raltegravir, has recently become the first FDA-approved HIV-1 integrase (IN inhibitor and has since risen to blockbuster drug status. Much research has in turn been conducted over the last few years aimed at recreating but optimizing the compound's interactions with the protein. Resulting me-too drugs have shown favorable pharmacokinetic properties and appear drug-like but, as expected, most have a highly similar interaction with IN to that of raltegravir. We propose that, based upon conclusions drawn from our docking studies illustrated herein, most of these me-too MK-0518 analogues may experience a low success rate against raltegravir-resistant HIV strains. As HIV has a very high mutational competence, the development of drugs with new mechanisms of inhibitory action and/or new active substituents may be a more successful route to take in the development of second- and third-generation IN inhibitors.

  20. Structure-aided design of novel inhibitors of HIV protease based on a benzodiazepine scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimer, Jiří; Cígler, Petr; Veselý, Jan; Grantz Šašková, Klára; Lepšík, Martin; Brynda, Jiří; Rezáčová, Pavlína; Kožíšek, Milan; Císařová, Ivana; Oberwinkler, Heike; Kraeusslich, Hans-Georg; Konvalinka, Jan

    2012-11-26

    HIV protease is a primary target for the design of virostatics. Screening of libraries of non-peptide low molecular weight compounds led to the identification of several new compounds that inhibit HIV PR in the low micromolar range. X-ray structure of the complex of one of them, a dibenzo[b,e][1,4]diazepinone derivative, showed that two molecules of the inhibitor bind to the PR active site. Covalent linkage of two molecules of such a compound by a two-carbon linker led to a decrease of the inhibition constant of the resulting compound by 3 orders of magnitude. Molecular modeling shows that these dimeric inhibitors form two crucial hydrogen bonds to the catalytic aspartates that are responsible for their improved activity compared to the monomeric parental building blocks. Dibenzo[b,e][1,4]diazepinone analogues might represent a potential new class of HIV PIs.

  1. Computational Design of Hypothetical New Peptides Based on a Cyclotide Scaffold as HIV gp120 Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangphukieo, Apiwat; Nawae, Wanapinun; Laomettachit, Teeraphan; Supasitthimethee, Umaporn; Ruengjitchatchawalya, Marasri

    2015-01-01

    Cyclotides are a family of triple disulfide cyclic peptides with exceptional resistance to thermal/chemical denaturation and enzymatic degradation. Several cyclotides have been shown to possess anti-HIV activity, including kalata B1 (KB1). However, the use of cyclotides as anti-HIV therapies remains limited due to the high toxicity in normal cells. Therefore, grafting anti-HIV epitopes onto a cyclotide might be a promising approach for reducing toxicity and simultaneously improving anti-HIV activity. Viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 is required for entry of HIV into CD4+ T cells. However, due to a high degree of variability and physical shielding, the design of drugs targeting gp120 remains challenging. We created a computational protocol in which molecular modeling techniques were combined with a genetic algorithm (GA) to automate the design of new cyclotides with improved binding to HIV gp120. We found that the group of modified cyclotides has better binding scores (23.1%) compared to the KB1. By using molecular dynamic (MD) simulation as a post filter for the final candidates, we identified two novel cyclotides, GA763 and GA190, which exhibited better interaction energies (36.6% and 22.8%, respectively) when binding to gp120 compared to KB1. This computational design represents an alternative tool for modifying peptides, including cyclotides and other stable peptides, as therapeutic agents before the synthesis process.

  2. Computational Design of Hypothetical New Peptides Based on a Cyclotide Scaffold as HIV gp120 Inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apiwat Sangphukieo

    Full Text Available Cyclotides are a family of triple disulfide cyclic peptides with exceptional resistance to thermal/chemical denaturation and enzymatic degradation. Several cyclotides have been shown to possess anti-HIV activity, including kalata B1 (KB1. However, the use of cyclotides as anti-HIV therapies remains limited due to the high toxicity in normal cells. Therefore, grafting anti-HIV epitopes onto a cyclotide might be a promising approach for reducing toxicity and simultaneously improving anti-HIV activity. Viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 is required for entry of HIV into CD4+ T cells. However, due to a high degree of variability and physical shielding, the design of drugs targeting gp120 remains challenging. We created a computational protocol in which molecular modeling techniques were combined with a genetic algorithm (GA to automate the design of new cyclotides with improved binding to HIV gp120. We found that the group of modified cyclotides has better binding scores (23.1% compared to the KB1. By using molecular dynamic (MD simulation as a post filter for the final candidates, we identified two novel cyclotides, GA763 and GA190, which exhibited better interaction energies (36.6% and 22.8%, respectively when binding to gp120 compared to KB1. This computational design represents an alternative tool for modifying peptides, including cyclotides and other stable peptides, as therapeutic agents before the synthesis process.

  3. Virtual Screening of Indonesian Herbal Database as HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanuar, Arry; Suhartanto, Heru; Munim, Abdul; Anugraha, Bram Hik; Syahdi, Rezi Riadhi

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 (Human immunodeficiency virus type 1)׳s infection is considered as one of most harmful disease known by human, the survivability rate of the host reduced significantly when it developed into AIDS. HIV drug resistance is one of the main problems of its treatment and several drug designs have been done to find new leads compound as the cure. In this study, in silico virtual screening approach was used to find lead molecules from the library or database of natural compounds as HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Virtual screening against Indonesian Herbal Database with AutoDock was performed on HIV-1 protease. From the virtual screening, top ten compounds obtained were 8-Hydroxyapigenin 8-(2",4"-disulfatoglucuronide), Isoscutellarein 4'-methyl ether, Amaranthin, Torvanol A, Ursonic acid, 5-Carboxypyranocyanidin 3-O-(6"-O-malonyl-beta-glucopyranoside), Oleoside, Jacoumaric acid, Platanic acid and 5-Carboxypyranocyanidin 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside.

  4. Drug Resistance in Non-B Subtype HIV-1: Impact of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalendra Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV causes approximately 2.5 million new infections every year, and nearly 1.6 million patients succumb to HIV each year. Several factors, including cross-species transmission and error-prone replication have resulted in extraordinary genetic diversity of HIV groups. One of these groups, known as group M (main contains nine subtypes (A-D, F-H and J-K and causes ~95% of all HIV infections. Most reported data on susceptibility and resistance to anti-HIV therapies are from subtype B HIV infections, which are prevalent in developed countries but account for only ~12% of all global HIV infections, whereas non-B subtype HIV infections that account for ~88% of all HIV infections are prevalent primarily in low and middle-income countries. Although the treatments for subtype B infections are generally effective against non-B subtype infections, there are differences in response to therapies. Here, we review how polymorphisms, transmission efficiency of drug-resistant strains, and differences in genetic barrier for drug resistance can differentially alter the response to reverse transcriptase-targeting therapies in various subtypes.

  5. Investigating the role of metal chelation in HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Alessia; Carcelli, Mauro; Compari, Carlotta; Fisicaro, Emilia; Pala, Nicolino; Rispoli, Gabriele; Rogolino, Dominga; Sanchez, Tino W; Sechi, Mario; Sinisi, Valentina; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-12-22

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) has been validated as an attractive target for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Several studies have confirmed that the metal binding function is a crucial feature in many of the reported IN inhibitors. To provide new insights on the metal chelating mechanism of IN inhibitors, we prepared a series of metal complexes of two ligands (HL1 and HL2), designed as representative models of the clinically used compounds raltegravir and elvitegravir. Potentiometric measurements were conducted for HL2 in the presence of Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) in order to delineate a metal speciation model. We also determined the X-ray structures of both of the ligands and of three representative metal complexes. Our results support the hypothesis that several selective strand transfer inhibitors preferentially chelate one cation in solution and that the metal complexes can interact with the active site of the enzyme.

  6. [Antiviral activity in vitro and pharmacokinetics of HCV entry inhibitor AVR560].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashchenko, A V; Iamanushkin, P M; Mit'kin, O D; Ezhova, E V; Korzinov, O M; Bulanova, E A; Koriakova, A G; Vyshemirskaia, P V; Bychko, V V; Ivashchenko, A A

    2014-01-01

    Several novel compounds were found to be potent inhibitors of the HCV (JFH-1 isolate) infection in vitro. Human serum did not significantly reduce antiviral activity of the lead compound, AVR560 (New Guinea type 2) in in vitro infection experiments. AVR560 also did not inhibit any of the tested human CYP450 isozymes (3A4, 1A2, 2C19 and 2D6). In the pharmacokinetic studies in mice, rats and dogs, favorable pharmacokinetic profiles and good oral bioavailability were observed for AV560. Further pre-clinical studies with this novel HCV inhibitor are in progress.

  7. 酸性天然凝胶电泳法研究HIV进入抑制剂ADS-J1的作用机制%Acid native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis:a method for studying the mechanism of action of HIV entry inhibitor ADS-J1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛芹超; 王洪涛; 李旭桂; 夏承来; 姜世勃; 刘叔文

    2010-01-01

    目的 ADS-J1是通过虚拟筛选从20 000个化合物中获得的靶向HIV gp41的小分子HIV进入抑制剂.该研究探讨ADS-J1与gp41的结合位点和作用机制.方法 采用酸性天然聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳技术(AN-PAGE),研究ADS-J1与衍生于gp41不同功能区的多肽的结合.结果 此前采用的天然聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳(N-PAGE)等方法,由于不能显示衍生于gp41的N-端多肽,未能确定ADS-J1的作用位点.该研究建立的AN-PAGE技术,能直接显示N-端多肽的条带,证实ADS-J1能与gp41的N-端螺旋重复序列(NHR)复合螺旋核中的深穴结合,从而抑制gp41六螺旋束结构的形成,而且深穴中第574位的赖氨酸残基(K574)与ADS-J1的抑制作用密切相关.结论 ADS-J1通过与gp41 NHR靶穴中的K574结合,抑制gp41六螺旋束结构的形成,从而抑制HIV进入靶细胞.此外,该研究建立的AN-PAGE技术,为研究靶向Ⅰ型包膜病毒的病毒进入抑制剂的作用机制提供了一个简便有效的实验方法.

  8. Large-Scale Screening and Identification of Novel Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Entry Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantpadma, Manu; Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Wang, Hang; Huang, Ruili; Kolokoltsov, Andrey; Guha, Rajarshi; Lindstrom, Aaron R; Shtanko, Olena; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J; Maury, Wendy; LaCount, Douglas J; Jadhav, Ajit; Davey, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Filoviruses are highly infectious, and no FDA-approved drug therapy for filovirus infection is available. Most work to find a treatment has involved only a few strains of Ebola virus and testing of relatively small drug libraries or compounds that have shown efficacy against other virus types. Here we report the findings of a high-throughput screening of 319,855 small molecules from the Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository library for their activities against Marburg virus and Ebola virus. Nine of the most potent, novel compounds that blocked infection by both viruses were analyzed in detail for their mechanisms of action. The compounds inhibited known key steps in the Ebola virus infection mechanism by blocking either cell surface attachment, macropinocytosis-mediated uptake, or endosomal trafficking. To date, very few specific inhibitors of macropinocytosis have been reported. The 2 novel macropinocytosis inhibitors are more potent inhibitors of Ebola virus infection and less toxic than ethylisopropylamiloride, one commonly accepted macropinocytosis inhibitor. Each compound blocked infection of primary human macrophages, indicating their potential to be developed as new antifiloviral therapies.

  9. Pentosan polysulfate as an inhibitor of extracellular HIV-1 Tat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnati, M; Urbinati, C; Caputo, A; Possati, L; Lortat-Jacob, H; Giacca, M; Ribatti, D; Presta, M

    2001-06-22

    HIV-1 Tat protein, released from HIV-infected cells, may act as a pleiotropic heparin-binding growth factor. From this observation, extracellular Tat has been implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and of AIDS-associated pathologies. Here we demonstrate that the heparin analog pentosan polysulfate (PPS) inhibits the interaction of glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Tat protein with heparin immobilized to a BIAcore sensor chip. Competition experiments showed that Tat-PPS interaction occurs with high affinity (K(d) = 9.0 nm). Also, GST.Tat prevents the binding of [(3)H]heparin to GST.Tat immobilized to glutathione-agarose beads. In vitro, PPS inhibits GST.Tat internalization and, consequently, HIV-1 long terminal repeat transactivation in HL3T1 cells. Also, PPS inhibits cell surface interaction and mitogenic activity of GST.Tat in murine adenocarcinoma T53 Tat-less cells. In all assays, PPS exerts its Tat antagonist activity with an ID(50) equal to approximately 1.0 nm. In vivo, PPS inhibits the neovascularization induced by GST.Tat or by Tat-overexpressing T53 cells in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. In conclusion, PPS binds Tat protein and inhibits its cell surface interaction, internalization, and biological activity in vitro and in vivo. PPS may represent a prototypic molecule for the development of novel Tat antagonists with therapeutic implications in AIDS and AIDS-associated pathologies, including Kaposi's sarcoma.

  10. Short Communication: Preferential Killing of HIV Latently Infected CD4+ T Cells by MALT1 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; He, Hui; Gong, Leyi; Fu, Mingui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report that the addition of an host paracaspase MALT1 inhibitor, MI-2, to HIV latently infected ACH-2, Jurkat E4, and J-LAT cells accelerated cell death in the presence of cell stimuli or the protein kinase C agonist, bryostatin 1. MI-2-mediated cell death correlated with the induction of the cellular RNase MCPIP1 and requires the presence of viral component(s). Altogether, the combination of MI-2 and bryostatin 1 displays selective killing of HIV latently infected CD4+ T cells. PMID:26728103

  11. Short Communication: Preferential Killing of HIV Latently Infected CD4(+) T Cells by MALT1 Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; He, Hui; Gong, Leyi; Fu, Mingui; Wang, Tony T

    2016-02-01

    We report that the addition of an host paracaspase MALT1 inhibitor, MI-2, to HIV latently infected ACH-2, Jurkat E4, and J-LAT cells accelerated cell death in the presence of cell stimuli or the protein kinase C agonist, bryostatin 1. MI-2-mediated cell death correlated with the induction of the cellular RNase MCPIP1 and requires the presence of viral component(s). Altogether, the combination of MI-2 and bryostatin 1 displays selective killing of HIV latently infected CD4(+) T cells.

  12. Enantioselective Synthesis of Protease Inhibitors and AntiHIV Agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhe

    2001-01-01

    @@ Part 1: A highly enantio-and diastereoselective Ireland-Claisen rearrangement of chiral C3(acyloxy)-vinyl silanes for the synthesis of anti-disubstituted succinic acid, an important intermediate for matrix metalloprotease inhibitors, has been developed (enantio-and anti/syn selectivities up to 95% and 38/1). The diastereoselectivity of this reaction was found to be sensitive to remote hydroxyl protecting groups, for example, with-OMOM group, the anti/syn ratio was 19/1, while with-OTBDMS, the ratio was 38/1. The resultant Ireland-Claisen rearrangement product was applied to the synthesis of macrocyclic MMP inhibitors, such as SL 422.

  13. HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole inhibit plasmodium liver stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Charlotte V; Voza, Tatiana; De La Vega, Patricia; Vanvliet, Jillian; Conteh, Solomon; Penzak, Scott R; Fay, Michael P; Anders, Nicole; Ilmet, Tiina; Li, Yonghua; Borkowsky, William; Krzych, Urszula; Duffy, Patrick E; Sinnis, Photini

    2012-12-01

    Although nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are usually part of first-line treatment regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), their activity on Plasmodium liver stages remains unexplored. Additionally, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), used for opportunistic infection prophylaxis in HIV-exposed infants and HIV-infected patients, reduces clinical episodes of malaria; however, TMP-SMX effect on Plasmodium liver stages requires further study. We characterized NNRTI and TMP-SMX effects on Plasmodium liver stages in vivo using Plasmodium yoelii. On the basis of these results, we conducted in vitro studies assessing TMP-SMX effects on the rodent parasites P. yoelii and Plasmodium berghei and on the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Our data showed NNRTI treatment modestly reduced P. yoelii liver stage parasite burden and minimally extended prepatent period. TMP-SMX administration significantly reduced liver stage parasite burden, preventing development of patent parasitemia in vivo. TMP-SMX inhibited development of rodent and P. falciparum liver stage parasites in vitro. NNRTIs modestly affect liver stage Plasmodium parasites, whereas TMP-SMX prevents patent parasitemia. Because drugs that inhibit liver stages target parasites when they are present in lower numbers, these results may have implications for eradication efforts. Understanding HIV drug effects on Plasmodium liver stages will aid in optimizing treatment regimens for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected infected patients in malaria-endemic areas.

  14. Safety of protease inhibitors in HIV-infected pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chougrani I

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Imène Chougrani,1 Dominique Luton,1,2 Sophie Matheron,3 Laurent Mandelbrot,2,4 Elie Azria1,2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bichat Claude Bernard Hospital, Paris Diderot University, Paris, 2Departement Hospitalo-Universitaire "Risk and Pregnancy", Paris, 3Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Bichat Claude Bernard Hospital, Paris Diderot University, Paris, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Louis Mourier Hospital, Paris Diderot University, Colombes, France Abstract: The dire conditions of the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic and the immense benefits of antiretroviral prophylaxis in prevention of mother-to-child transmission far outweigh the potential for adverse effects and undeniably justify the rapid and widespread use of this therapy, despite incomplete safety data. Highly active antiretroviral therapy has now become standard care, and more than half the validated regimens include protease inhibitors. This paper reviews current knowledge of the safety of these drugs during pregnancy, in terms of maternal and fetal outcomes. Transfer of protease inhibitors across the placenta is known to be minimal, and current data about birth defects and fetal malignancies are reassuring. Maternal liver function and glucose metabolism should be monitored in women treated with protease inhibitor-based regimens, but concerns about the development of maternal resistance, should treatment be discontinued, have been shown to be groundless. Neonates should be screened for hematologic abnormalities, although these are rarely severe or permanent and are not usually related to the protease inhibitor component of the antiretroviral combination. Current findings concerning pre-eclampsia and growth restriction are discordant, and further research is needed to address the question of placental vascular complications. The increased risk of preterm birth attributed to protease inhibitors should be

  15. Structure of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole with different substituents in position 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-01-01

    The constant development of new drugs against HIV-1 is necessary due to global expansion of AIDS and HIV-1 drug resistance. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic drugs in AIDS therapy. The crystal structures of six nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole are reported here. The investigated compounds belong to the group of so called "butterfly like" inhibitors with characteristic two π-electron moieties with an angled orientation. The structural data show the influence of the substituents of the benzimidazole ring on the geometry of the molecule and correlation between the structure of the inhibitor and its biological activity.

  16. 2D-QSAR study of fullerene nanostructure derivatives as potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Jafari Mousavi, Somaye; Hamidi, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2017-09-01

    The protease of human immunodeficiency virus1 (HIV-PR) is an essential enzyme for antiviral treatments. Carbon nanostructures of fullerene derivatives, have nanoscale dimension with a diameter comparable to the diameter of the active site of HIV-PR which would in turn inhibit HIV. In this research, two dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (2D-QSAR) of fullerene derivatives against HIV-PR activity were employed as a powerful tool for elucidation the relationships between structure and experimental observations. QSAR study of 49 fullerene derivatives was performed by employing stepwise-MLR, GAPLS-MLR, and PCA-MLR models for variable (descriptor) selection and model construction. QSAR models were obtained with higher ability to predict the activity of the fullerene derivatives against HIV-PR by a correlation coefficient (R2training) of 0.942, 0.89, and 0.87 as well as R2test values of 0.791, 0.67and 0.674 for stepwise-MLR, GAPLS-MLR, and PCA -MLR models, respectively. Leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient (R2CV) and Y-randomization methods confirmed the models robustness. The descriptors indicated that the HIV-PR inhibition depends on the van der Waals volumes, polarizability, bond order between two atoms and electronegativities of fullerenes derivatives. 2D-QSAR simulation without needing receptor's active site geometry, resulted in useful descriptors mainly denoting ;C60 backbone-functional groups; and ;C60 functional groups; properties. Both properties in fullerene refer to the ligand fitness and improvement van der Waals interactions with HIV-PR active site. Therefore, the QSAR models can be used in the search for novel HIV-PR inhibitors based on fullerene derivatives.

  17. Synthesis of N-glyoxylyl peptides and their in vitro evaluation as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasmi, D; de Rosny, E; René, L; Badet, B; Vergely, I; Boggetto, N; Reboud-Ravaux, M

    1997-04-01

    A series of novel synthetic peptides containing an N-terminal glyoxylyl function (CHOCO-) have been tested as inhibitors of HIV-1 protease. The N-glyoxylyl peptide CHOCO-Pro-Ile-Val-NH2, which fulfills the specificity requirements of the MA/CA protease cleavage site together with the criteria of transition state analogue of the catalyzed reaction, was found to be a moderate competitive inhibitor although favorable interactions were visualized between its hydrated form and the catalytic aspartates using molecular modeling. Increasing the length of the peptide sequence led to compounds acting only as substrates.

  18. Structure-based design of nonpeptidic HIV protease inhibitors: the sulfonamide-substituted cyclooctylpyramones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulnick, H I; Johnson, P D; Aristoff, P A; Morris, J K; Lovasz, K D; Howe, W J; Watenpaugh, K D; Janakiraman, M N; Anderson, D J; Reischer, R J; Schwartz, T M; Banitt, L S; Tomich, P K; Lynn, J C; Horng, M M; Chong, K T; Hinshaw, R R; Dolak, L A; Seest, E P; Schwende, F J; Rush, B D; Howard, G M; Toth, L N; Wilkinson, K R; Romines, K R

    1997-03-28

    Recently, cyclooctylpyranone derivatives with m-carboxamide substituents (e.g. 2c) were identified as potent, nonpeptidic HIV protease inhibitors, but these compounds lacked significant antiviral activity in cell culture. Substitution of a sulfonamide group at the meta position, however, produces compounds with excellent HIV protease binding affinity and antiviral activity. Guided by an iterative structure-based drug design process, we have prepared and evaluated a number of these derivatives, which are readily available via a seven-step synthesis. A few of the most potent compounds were further evaluated for such characteristics as pharmacokinetics and toxicity in rats and dogs. From this work, the p-cyanophenyl sulfonamide derivative 35k emerged as a promising inhibitor, was selected for further development, and entered phase I clinical trials.

  19. Crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complexes with thiocarbamate non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallarossa, Andrea; Cesarini, Sara; Ranise, Angelo; Ponassi, Marco; Unge, Torsten; Bolognesi, Martino

    2008-01-25

    O-Phthalimidoethyl-N-arylthiocarbamates (TCs) have been recently identified as a new class of potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), by means of computer-aided drug design techniques [Ranise A. Spallarossa, S. Cesarini, F. Bondavalli, S. Schenone, O. Bruno, G. Menozzi, P. Fossa, L. Mosti, M. La Colla, et al., Structure-based design, parallel synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and molecular modeling studies of thiocarbamates, new potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor isosteres of phenethylthiazolylthiourea derivatives, J. Med. Chem. 48 (2005) 3858-3873]. To elucidate the atomic details of RT/TC interaction and validate an earlier TC docking model, the structures of three RT/TC complexes were determined at 2.8-3.0A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The conformations adopted by the enzyme-bound TCs were analyzed and compared with those of bioisosterically related NNRTIs.

  20. Development of a receptor model for efficient in silico screening of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Mario A; Ribone, Sergio R; Briñón, Margarita C; Dehaen, Wim

    2014-07-01

    Integrase (IN) is a key viral enzyme for the replication of the type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and as such constitutes a relevant therapeutic target for the development of anti-HIV agents. However, the lack of crystallographic data of HIV IN complexed with the corresponding viral DNA has historically hindered the application of modern structure-based drug design techniques to the discovery of new potent IN inhibitors (INIs). Consequently, the development and validation of reliable HIV IN structural models that may be useful for the screening of large databases of chemical compounds is of particular interest. In this study, four HIV-1 IN homology models were evaluated respect to their capability to predict the inhibition potency of a training set comprising 36 previously reported INIs with IC50 values in the low nanomolar to the high micromolar range. Also, 9 inactive structurally related compounds were included in this training set. In addition, a crystallographic structure of the IN-DNA complex corresponding to the prototype foamy virus (PFV) was also evaluated as structural model for the screening of inhibitors. The applicability of high throughput screening techniques, such as blind and ligand-guided exhaustive rigid docking was assessed. The receptor models were also refined by molecular dynamics and clustering techniques to assess protein sidechain flexibility and solvent effect on inhibitor binding. Among the studied models, we conclude that the one derived from the X-ray structure of the PFV integrase exhibited the best performance to rank the potencies of the compounds in the training set, with the predictive power being further improved by explicitly modeling five water molecules within the catalytic side of IN. Also, accounting for protein sidechain flexibility enhanced the prediction of inhibition potencies among the studied compounds. Finally, an interaction fingerprint pattern was established for the fast identification of potent IN

  1. Enantioselective Synthesis of Protease Inhibitors and AntiHIV Agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Zhe

    2001-01-01

    Part 1: A highly enantio-and diastereoselective Ireland-Claisen rearrangement of chiral C3(acyloxy)-vinyl silanes for the synthesis of anti-disubstituted succinic acid, an important intermediate for matrix metalloprotease inhibitors, has been developed (enantio-and anti/syn selectivities up to 95% and 38/1). The diastereoselectivity of this reaction was found to be sensitive to remote hydroxyl protecting groups, for example, with-OMOM group, the anti/syn ratio was 19/1, while with-OTBDMS, the ratio was 38/1. The resultant Ireland-Claisen rearrangement product was applied to the synthesis of macrocyclic MMP inhibitors, such as SL 422.……

  2. Fluorogenic Assay for Inhibitors of HIV-1 Protease with Sub-picomolar Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Ian W.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2015-08-01

    A fluorogenic substrate for HIV-1 protease was designed and used as the basis for a hypersensitive assay. The substrate exhibits a kcat of 7.4 s-1, KM of 15 μM, and an increase in fluorescence intensity of 104-fold upon cleavage, thus providing sensitivity that is unmatched in a continuous assay of HIV-1 protease. These properties enabled the enzyme concentration in an activity assay to be reduced to 25 pM, which is close to the Kd value of the protease dimer. By fitting inhibition data to Morrison’s equation, Ki values of amprenavir, darunavir, and tipranavir were determined to be 135, 10, and 82 pM, respectively. This assay, which is capable of measuring Ki values as low as 0.25 pM, is well-suited for characterizing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  3. HIV-1 replication in central nervous system increases over time on only protease inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donath, Maximilian; Wolf, Timo; Stürmer, Martin; Herrmann, Eva; Bickel, Markus; Khaykin, Pavel; Göpel, Siri; Gute, Peter; Haberl, Annette; de Leuw, Philipp; Schüttfort, Gundolf; Berger, Annemarie; Stephan, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    There are concerns about central nervous system (CNS)-replication of HIV-1 in patients on boosted protease inhibitors. Purpose of this study was to compare HIV-1 viral loads (VLs) from patients treated with only boosted dual protease inhibitor (bdPI), versus combination antiretroviral therapy (cART group), containing two nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and a third partner. All patients from a large German HIV-treatment cohort with available medication, clinical and demographic data, including results from simultaneous HIV-1 viral load (VL) assessments in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma, were retrospectively evaluated as controlled cross-sectional study. CSF had been obtained from patients with variable neurological symptoms during 2005-2014. Statistical analysis comprised nonparametric tests, regression and correlation techniques accounting for undetectable quantifications. Statistical analysis comprised nonparametric tests, regression and correlation techniques accounting for undetectable quantifications. Overall, 155 patients were evaluable (bdPI: 24; cART: 131). At time of CSF-collection, both groups were comparable in age, gender, CD4-cell counts, or primary HIV-transmission risks, though bdPI patients were clinically more advanced. The proportion of patients with undetectable HIV-1 (<50 copies/ml) in CSF was lower for bdPI group (25 vs 49.6 %; p = 0.026), but similar in plasma (46 vs 41 %). Median CSF-VL was higher in bdPI group (600 vs 50 copies/ml; p = 0.027) and similar in plasma. Mean VL CSF/plasma ratio was 342.91 for bdPI- and 54.48 for cART patients (p < 0.001). Pearson's regression analysis revealed a trend for an elevated VL-ratio over time within bdPI group. HIV-1 replication was higher and more frequently detectable in CSF from bdPI patients, indicating a worse CNS penetration effectiveness of used boosted PI. Within bdPI group, measured CNS-viral replication was increasing over time, suggesting an over

  4. HIV-1 integrase inhibitors are substrates for the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Andrea

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of diketoacid-containing derivatives as inhibitors of HIV-1 Integrase (IN (IN inhibitors, IINs has played a major role in validating this enzyme as an important target for antiretroviral therapy. Since the in vivo efficacy depends on access of these drugs to intracellular sites where HIV-1 replicates, we determined whether the IINs are recognized by the multidrug transporter MDR1-P-glycoprotein (P-gp thereby reducing their intracellular accumulation. To address the effect of IINs on drug transport, nine quinolonyl diketo acid (DKA derivatives active on the HIV-1 IN strand transfer (ST step and with EC50 ranging from 1.83 to >50 μm in cell-based assays were tested for their in vitro interaction with P-gp in the CEM-MDR cell system. IINs were investigated for the inhibition and induction of the P-gp function and expression as well as for multidrug resistance (MDR reversing ability. Results The HIV-1 IINs act as genuine P-gp substrates by inhibiting doxorubicin efflux and inducing P-gp functional conformation changes as evaluated by the modulation of UIC2 mAb epitope. Further, IINs chemosensitize MDR cells to vinblastine and induce P-gp expression in drug sensitive revertants of CEM-MDR cells. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that HIV-1 IINs are P-gp substrates. This biological property may influence the absorption, distribution and elimination of these novels anti HIV-1 compounds.

  5. New treatment options for HIV salvage patients: an overview of second generation PIs, NNRTIs, integrase inhibitors and CCR5 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amelia; Barber, Tristan; Nelson, Mark

    2008-07-01

    Since 1996, the prognosis of those living with HIV and AIDS has improved significantly due to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Treatment failure can occur clinically, immunologically or virologically. Until recently, treatment options for those individuals harboring resistance to the three initial licensed classes of drug have been limited. These three classes are the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs). New drugs are now available in these classes (second generation NNRTIs and novel PIs) as well as new classes of drugs, integrase inhibitors, CCR5 antagonists and fusion inhibitors. If these new drugs are used appropriately with other active antiretroviral agents, it is probable that antiretroviral therapy can achieve the optimum outcome of HIV therapy - durable suppression of HIV viraemia. This article is a review of currently available antiretroviral agents including the new classes and second generation drugs, resistance pathways and treatment options for salvage therapy.

  6. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E.; Hoyte, Ashley C.; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. PMID:27517812

  7. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Hoyte, Ashley C; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2016-11-10

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

  8. Mechanisms of HIV entry into the CNS: increased sensitivity of HIV infected CD14+CD16+ monocytes to CCL2 and key roles of CCR2, JAM-A, and ALCAM in diapedesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionna W Williams

    Full Text Available As HIV infected individuals live longer, the prevalence of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders is increasing, despite successful antiretroviral therapy. CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes are critical to the neuropathogenesis of HIV as they promote viral seeding of the brain and establish neuroinflammation. The mechanisms by which HIV infected and uninfected monocytes cross the blood brain barrier and enter the central nervous system are not fully understood. We determined that HIV infection of CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes resulted in their highly increased transmigration across the blood brain barrier in response to CCL2 as compared to uninfected cells, which did not occur in the absence of the chemokine. This exuberant transmigration of HIV infected monocytes was due, at least in part, to increased CCR2 and significantly heightened sensitivity to CCL2. The entry of HIV infected and uninfected CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes into the brain was facilitated by significantly increased surface JAM-A, ALCAM, CD99, and PECAM-1, as compared to CD14(+ cells that are CD16 negative. Upon HIV infection, there was an additional increase in surface JAM-A and ALCAM on CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes isolated from some individuals. Antibodies to ALCAM and JAM-A inhibited the transmigration of both HIV infected and uninfected CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes across the BBB, demonstrating their importance in facilitating monocyte transmigration and entry into the brain parenchyma. Targeting CCR2, JAM-A, and ALCAM present on CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes that preferentially infiltrate the CNS represents a therapeutic strategy to reduce viral seeding of the brain as well as the ongoing neuroinflammation that occurs during HIV pathogenesis.

  9. Mechanisms of HIV entry into the CNS: increased sensitivity of HIV infected CD14+CD16+ monocytes to CCL2 and key roles of CCR2, JAM-A, and ALCAM in diapedesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dionna W; Calderon, Tina M; Lopez, Lillie; Carvallo-Torres, Loreto; Gaskill, Peter J; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Morgello, Susan; Berman, Joan W

    2013-01-01

    As HIV infected individuals live longer, the prevalence of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders is increasing, despite successful antiretroviral therapy. CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes are critical to the neuropathogenesis of HIV as they promote viral seeding of the brain and establish neuroinflammation. The mechanisms by which HIV infected and uninfected monocytes cross the blood brain barrier and enter the central nervous system are not fully understood. We determined that HIV infection of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes resulted in their highly increased transmigration across the blood brain barrier in response to CCL2 as compared to uninfected cells, which did not occur in the absence of the chemokine. This exuberant transmigration of HIV infected monocytes was due, at least in part, to increased CCR2 and significantly heightened sensitivity to CCL2. The entry of HIV infected and uninfected CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes into the brain was facilitated by significantly increased surface JAM-A, ALCAM, CD99, and PECAM-1, as compared to CD14(+) cells that are CD16 negative. Upon HIV infection, there was an additional increase in surface JAM-A and ALCAM on CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes isolated from some individuals. Antibodies to ALCAM and JAM-A inhibited the transmigration of both HIV infected and uninfected CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes across the BBB, demonstrating their importance in facilitating monocyte transmigration and entry into the brain parenchyma. Targeting CCR2, JAM-A, and ALCAM present on CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes that preferentially infiltrate the CNS represents a therapeutic strategy to reduce viral seeding of the brain as well as the ongoing neuroinflammation that occurs during HIV pathogenesis.

  10. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Antiretroviral Drug Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    The advent of combination antiretroviral drug regimens has transformed HIV infection from a fatal illness into a manageable chronic condition. All patients with HIV infection should be considered for antiretroviral therapy, regardless of CD4 count or HIV viral load, for individual benefit and to prevent HIV transmission. Antiretroviral drugs affect HIV in several ways: entry inhibitors block HIV entry into CD4 T cells; nucleotide and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent reverse transcription from RNA to DNA via chain-terminating proteins; nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent reverse transcription through enzymatic inhibition; integrase strand transfer inhibitors block integration of viral DNA into cellular DNA; protease inhibitors block maturation and production of the virus. Current guidelines recommend six combination regimens for initial therapy. Five are based on tenofovir and emtricitabine; the other uses abacavir and lamivudine. Five include integrase strand transfer inhibitors. HIV specialists should assist with treating patients with complicated HIV infection, including patients with treatment-resistant HIV infection, coinfection with hepatitis B or C virus, pregnancy, childhood infections, severe opportunistic infections, complex drug interactions, significant drug toxicity, or comorbidities. Family physicians can treat most patients with HIV infection effectively by choosing appropriate treatment regimens, monitoring patients closely, and retaining patients in care.

  11. Integrase inhibitors in late pregnancy and rapid HIV viral load reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahangdale, Lisa; Cates, Jordan; Potter, JoNell; Badell, Martina L; Seidman, Dominika; Miller, Emilly S; Coleman, Jenell S; Lazenby, Gweneth B; Levison, Judy; Short, William R; Yawetz, Sigal; Ciaranello, Andrea; Livingston, Elizabeth; Duthely, Lunthita; Rimawi, Bassam H; Anderson, Jean R; Stringer, Elizabeth M

    2016-03-01

    Minimizing time to HIV viral suppression is critical in pregnancy. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), like raltegravir, are known to rapidly suppress plasma HIV RNA in nonpregnant adults. There are limited data in pregnant women. We describe time to clinically relevant reduction in HIV RNA in pregnant women using INSTI-containing and non-INSTI-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) options. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of pregnant HIV-infected women in the United States from 2009 through 2015. We included women who initiated ART, intensified their regimen, or switched to a new regimen due to detectable viremia (HIV RNA >40 copies/mL) at ≥20 weeks gestation. Among women with a baseline HIV RNA permitting 1-log reduction, we estimated time to 1-log RNA reduction using the Kaplan-Meier estimator comparing women starting/adding an INSTI in their regimen vs other ART. To compare groups with similar follow-up time, we also conducted a subgroup analysis limited to women with ≤14 days between baseline and follow-up RNA data. This study describes 101 HIV-infected pregnant women from 11 US clinics. In all, 75% (76/101) of women were not taking ART at baseline; 24 were taking non-INSTI containing ART, and 1 received zidovudine monotherapy. In all, 39% (39/101) of women started an INSTI-containing regimen or added an INSTI to their ART regimen. Among 90 women with a baseline HIV RNA permitting 1-log reduction, the median time to 1-log RNA reduction was 8 days (interquartile range [IQR], 7-14) in the INSTI group vs 35 days (IQR, 20-53) in the non-INSTI ART group (P < .01). In a subgroup of 39 women with first and last RNA measurements ≤14 days apart, median time to 1-log reduction was 7 days (IQR, 6-10) in the INSTI group vs 11 days (IQR, 10-14) in the non-INSTI group (P < .01). ART that includes INSTIs appears to induce more rapid viral suppression than other ART regimens in pregnancy. Inclusion of an INSTI may play a role in optimal reduction

  12. Activation of HIV-1 from latent infection via synergy of RUNX1 inhibitor Ro5-3335 and SAHA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Klase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 infection is the presence of a pool of long-lived, latently infected CD4+ memory T-cells. The search for treatments to re-activate latent HIV to aid in clearance is hindered by the incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to transcriptional silencing of viral gene expression in host cells. Here we identify a previously unknown role for RUNX1 in HIV-1 transcriptional latency. The RUNX proteins, in combination with the co-factor CBF-β, are critical transcriptional regulators in T-cells. RUNX1 strongly modulates CD4 expression and contributes to CD4+ T-cell function. We show that RUNX1 can bind DNA sequences within the HIV-1 LTR and that this binding represses transcription. Using patient samples we show a negative correlation between RUNX1 expression and viral load. Furthermore, we find that pharmacologic inhibition of RUNX1 by a small molecule inhibitor, Ro5-3335, synergizes with the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat to enhance the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and PBMCs from patients. Our findings indicate that RUNX1 and CBF-β cooperate in cells to modulate HIV-1 replication, identifying for the first time RUNX1 as a cellular factor involved in HIV-1 latency. This work highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibitors of RUNX1 to re-activate virus and aid in clearance of HIV-1.

  13. Activation of HIV-1 from latent infection via synergy of RUNX1 inhibitor Ro5-3335 and SAHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klase, Zachary; Yedavalli, Venkat S R K; Houzet, Laurent; Perkins, Molly; Maldarelli, Frank; Brenchley, Jason; Strebel, Klaus; Liu, Paul; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2014-03-01

    A major barrier to the elimination of HIV-1 infection is the presence of a pool of long-lived, latently infected CD4+ memory T-cells. The search for treatments to re-activate latent HIV to aid in clearance is hindered by the incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to transcriptional silencing of viral gene expression in host cells. Here we identify a previously unknown role for RUNX1 in HIV-1 transcriptional latency. The RUNX proteins, in combination with the co-factor CBF-β, are critical transcriptional regulators in T-cells. RUNX1 strongly modulates CD4 expression and contributes to CD4+ T-cell function. We show that RUNX1 can bind DNA sequences within the HIV-1 LTR and that this binding represses transcription. Using patient samples we show a negative correlation between RUNX1 expression and viral load. Furthermore, we find that pharmacologic inhibition of RUNX1 by a small molecule inhibitor, Ro5-3335, synergizes with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat) to enhance the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and PBMCs from patients. Our findings indicate that RUNX1 and CBF-β cooperate in cells to modulate HIV-1 replication, identifying for the first time RUNX1 as a cellular factor involved in HIV-1 latency. This work highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibitors of RUNX1 to re-activate virus and aid in clearance of HIV-1.

  14. Enabling clinical development of an HIV attachment inhibitor through innovative pharmaceutical development: novel extended-release delivery of prodrug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Tobyn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV-1 attachment inhibitors are a new class of viral entry inhibitors which target viral gp120 preventing attachment of virus to its host cell receptor CD4. This class presents major challenges for development based upon low solubility and short half-lives. For progression into clinical studies, requirements include reliable and reproducible absorption from a tolerable and convenient oral dosing regimen. Methods: A series of highly soluble prodrugs were designed to overcome the poor absorption caused by the low solubility of the active compounds. A regional absorption study was conducted to assess the uptake of active throughout the gastro-intestinal tract following oral prodrug delivery. An extended-release (ER strategy was subsequently devised to optimise tolerability, decrease peak to trough ratios and reduce frequency of dosing. In silico absorption modelling was used to verify feasibility and drive in vitro testing leading to dosage form development and selection. The performance of the ER dosage form was verified in vivo prior to use in clinical studies. Results: Phosphonooxymethyl prodrugs with aqueous solubilities in excess of 250 mg/mL were synthesised and shown to be readily converted to parent compound via alkaline phosphatase in vitro. Results of regional absorption studies for the selected compound, BMS-663068, confirmed the rapid absorption but short half-life of active following oral administration of prodrug. Delivery to specific regions throughout the GI tract showed absorption of active to be subject to regional variation with an extent of colonic absorption of approximately 40% of intestinal absorption. Incorporation of this data into an in silico model guided development of an ER tablet which releases prodrug over 24 hours and achieves the required exposure, pharmacokinetics and reproducibility in vivo. Conclusions: The novel approach of combining prodrug synthesis and ER formulation has enabled clinical

  15. HIV-1 Protease with 20 Mutations Exhibits Extreme Resistance to Clinical Inhibitors through Coordinated Structural Rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Aniana, Annie; Sayer, Jane M.; Louis, John M.; Weber, Irene T. (GSU); (NIH)

    2012-06-28

    The escape mutant of HIV-1 protease (PR) containing 20 mutations (PR20) undergoes efficient polyprotein processing even in the presence of clinical protease inhibitors (PIs). PR20 shows >3 orders of magnitude decreased affinity for PIs darunavir (DRV) and saquinavir (SQV) relative to PR. Crystal structures of PR20 crystallized with yttrium, substrate analogue p2-NC, DRV, and SQV reveal three distinct conformations of the flexible flaps and diminished interactions with inhibitors through the combination of multiple mutations. PR20 with yttrium at the active site exhibits widely separated flaps lacking the usual intersubunit contacts seen in other inhibitor-free dimers. Mutations of residues 35-37 in the hinge loop eliminate interactions and perturb the flap conformation. Crystals of PR20/p2-NC contain one uninhibited dimer with one very open flap and one closed flap and a second inhibitor-bound dimer in the closed form showing six fewer hydrogen bonds with the substrate analogue relative to wild-type PR. PR20 complexes with PIs exhibit expanded S2/S2' pockets and fewer PI interactions arising from coordinated effects of mutations throughout the structure, in agreement with the strikingly reduced affinity. In particular, insertion of the large aromatic side chains of L10F and L33F alters intersubunit interactions and widens the PI binding site through a network of hydrophobic contacts. The two very open conformations of PR20 as well as the expanded binding site of the inhibitor-bound closed form suggest possible approaches for modifying inhibitors to target extreme drug-resistant HIV.

  16. Strengthening Health Systems Using HIV Services as an entry point in Plateau State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olubunmi O. Chirdan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria, Jos University Teaching Hospital’s Community Directed Intervention (CDI approach to prevention and control of the spread of HIV/AIDS, in Plateau state, Nigeria commenced in July, 2008. Management of Tuberculosis and Sexually Transmitted Infections were also included in the package. METHODS: The project utilized the ‘hub and spoke’ principle with the Jos University Teaching Hospital as the hub. Provision of health services commenced in December, 2008 after a period of community sensitization, advocacy and mobilization as well as training and re-training of various cadres of health staff and volunteer community members. RESULTS: To date (July, 2009, thirty PHCs have been renovated and furnished; more than 300 healthcare workers trained, about 115 communities reached and about 8000 patients managed. Other outcomes of the project include equipping of the PHCs, strengthening of the PHC and referral systems, and improved community involvement in programme implementation. CONCLUSION: The project methodology utilized showed that it is possible to achieve additional long term benefits from programmes primarily aimed at controlling HIV/AIDS. It is recommended that other programmes adapt this methodology for the control of diseases, so as to achieve similar impact and strengthen existing health care systems. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(6.000: 563-568

  17. Inhibitor Ranking Through QM based Chelation Calculations for Virtual Screening of HIV-1 RNase H inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have been used to predict the binding affinity of a set of ligands towards HIV-1 RT associated RNase H (RNH). The QM based chelation calculations show improved binding affinity prediction for the inhibitors compared to using an empirical scoring function. Furt....... Thus, the computational models tested in this study could be useful as high throughput filters for searching HIV-1 RNase H active-site molecules in the virtual screening process.......Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have been used to predict the binding affinity of a set of ligands towards HIV-1 RT associated RNase H (RNH). The QM based chelation calculations show improved binding affinity prediction for the inhibitors compared to using an empirical scoring function...... of the methods based on the use of a training set of molecules, QM based chelation calculations were used as filter in virtual screening of compounds in the ZINC database. By this, we find, compared to regular docking, QM based chelation calculations to significantly reduce the large number of false positives...

  18. QSAR analysis on benzodithiazine derivatives as HIV-1 in-tegrase inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravichandran V; Jain A; Mourya VK; Agrawal RK

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Inhibition of HIV-1 integrase is an important strategy for the treatment of HIV and AIDS.There-fore,HIV-1 integrase inhibitory activity of 3-aroyl-1,1-dioxo-1,4,2-benzodithiazines has been analyzed with different physicochemical parameters.Methods:In the present work,quantitative structure activity relation-ship studies were performed on a series of benzodithiazines as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using the modeling software Win CAChe version 6.1.Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to derive quantitative structure activity relationship models which were further evaluated for statistical significance and predictive power by internal and external validation.Results:The best QSAR models were having good correlation coeffi-cient (r)with low standard error of estimation (SEE)and cross validated square of correlation coefficient (q2 ).The robustness of the models was checked by Y-randomization test and they were identified as good pre-dictive models.The model for HIV integrase (wt)inhibitory activity of benzodithiazines suggest that the in-crease of dipole moment (Z)of molecules leads to reduce 3'processing and strand transfer inhibitory activity, substitution with high electro positive groups is conducive for the 3'processing inhibitory activity,and the in-crease in heat of formation is favorable for 3'-processing and strand transfer inhibitory activity.Conclusion:The model for HIV integrase (C65s)inhibitory activity of benzodithiazines suggest that the increase of dipole moment (X)of molecules leads to reduce 3'processing and strand transfer inhibitory activity,and the substitu-tion with high hydrophobic groups is conducive for the 3'processing and strand transfer inhibitory.

  19. Structural and functional insights into the HIV-1 maturation inhibitor binding pocket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayoko Waki

    Full Text Available Processing of the Gag precursor protein by the viral protease during particle release triggers virion maturation, an essential step in the virus replication cycle. The first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid [PA-457 or bevirimat (BVM] blocks HIV-1 maturation by inhibiting the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1 intermediate to mature CA. A structurally distinct molecule, PF-46396, was recently reported to have a similar mode of action to that of BVM. Because of the structural dissimilarity between BVM and PF-46396, we hypothesized that the two compounds might interact differentially with the putative maturation inhibitor-binding pocket in Gag. To test this hypothesis, PF-46396 resistance was selected for in vitro. Resistance mutations were identified in three regions of Gag: around the CA-SP1 cleavage site where BVM resistance maps, at CA amino acid 201, and in the CA major homology region (MHR. The MHR mutants are profoundly PF-46396-dependent in Gag assembly and release and virus replication. The severe defect exhibited by the inhibitor-dependent MHR mutants in the absence of the compound is also corrected by a second-site compensatory change far downstream in SP1, suggesting structural and functional cross-talk between the HIV-1 CA MHR and SP1. When PF-46396 and BVM were both present in infected cells they exhibited mutually antagonistic behavior. Together, these results identify Gag residues that line the maturation inhibitor-binding pocket and suggest that BVM and PF-46396 interact differentially with this putative pocket. These findings provide novel insights into the structure-function relationship between the CA MHR and SP1, two domains of Gag that are critical to both assembly and maturation. The highly conserved nature of the MHR across all orthoretroviridae suggests that these findings will be broadly relevant to retroviral assembly. Finally, the results presented here provide a framework

  20. Structural and functional insights into the HIV-1 maturation inhibitor binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, Kayoko; Durell, Stewart R; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Butler, Scott L; Freed, Eric O

    2012-01-01

    Processing of the Gag precursor protein by the viral protease during particle release triggers virion maturation, an essential step in the virus replication cycle. The first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid [PA-457 or bevirimat (BVM)] blocks HIV-1 maturation by inhibiting the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. A structurally distinct molecule, PF-46396, was recently reported to have a similar mode of action to that of BVM. Because of the structural dissimilarity between BVM and PF-46396, we hypothesized that the two compounds might interact differentially with the putative maturation inhibitor-binding pocket in Gag. To test this hypothesis, PF-46396 resistance was selected for in vitro. Resistance mutations were identified in three regions of Gag: around the CA-SP1 cleavage site where BVM resistance maps, at CA amino acid 201, and in the CA major homology region (MHR). The MHR mutants are profoundly PF-46396-dependent in Gag assembly and release and virus replication. The severe defect exhibited by the inhibitor-dependent MHR mutants in the absence of the compound is also corrected by a second-site compensatory change far downstream in SP1, suggesting structural and functional cross-talk between the HIV-1 CA MHR and SP1. When PF-46396 and BVM were both present in infected cells they exhibited mutually antagonistic behavior. Together, these results identify Gag residues that line the maturation inhibitor-binding pocket and suggest that BVM and PF-46396 interact differentially with this putative pocket. These findings provide novel insights into the structure-function relationship between the CA MHR and SP1, two domains of Gag that are critical to both assembly and maturation. The highly conserved nature of the MHR across all orthoretroviridae suggests that these findings will be broadly relevant to retroviral assembly. Finally, the results presented here provide a framework for increased

  1. The inhibitors of corrosion and hydrogen entry into carbon steel in the H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsygankova, L. E.; Vigdorovich, V. I.; Mozharov, A.V. [Derzhavin State University 33, Internatsionalnaya St., Tambov, 392622 (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    The efficiency of Mannich's Phenol Bases (MPB) as the universal inhibitors of carbonic-acid and hydrogen-sulphide corrosion and hydrogen entry into carbon steel (St3) has been studied. Two Mannich's Phenol Bases were used: MPB 9 and MPB 9-20. Second of them has 20 ethoxy groups in the molecule. The HCl solutions (0.005 - 0.1 mole/l) saturated with CO{sub 2} (1-2 atm) and H{sub 2}S (50 - 400 mg/l) separately and together have been used. Protective efficiency of the inhibitors increases with increasing inhibitor concentration (10-200 mg/l), medium acidity and in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. The effect of the inhibitors is high enough in the presence of the liquid hydrocarbon (decane) in the used HCl solutions (1:10) too. Depending on the conditions the inhibitors slow down the anodic process (0.005 - 0.01 M HCl) or both partial electrode reactions (0.1 M HCl). In the presence of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} separately and together Mannich's Phenol Bases decrease hydrogen entry into the steel membrane both at the corrosion potential and in the conditions of the anodic and cathodic polarization. An analysis of the mechanism of the hydrogen entry retardation in the presence of the inhibitors has been made taking into account a rate determining stage of the hydrogen evolution reaction and the existence of two forms of the adsorbed hydrogen atoms: subsurface and raised above surface. (authors)

  2. The association between adolescent entry into the trucking industry and risk of HIV among long-distance truck drivers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ram Manohar; Dube, Madhulika; Saggurti, Niranjan; Pandey, Arvind; Mahapatra, Bidhubhusan; Ramesh, Sowmya

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between entry into the trucking industry during adolescence and both sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among long-distance truck drivers in India. Data were sourced from a cross-sectional survey (sample size: 2066) undertaken in 2007 among long-distance truck drivers. The survey spread across major transshipment locations covering the bulk of India's transport volume along four routes. Participants were interviewed about sexual behaviors and were tested for HIV and STIs. The present authors constructed two synthetic cohorts based on the participants' duration of employment in the trucking industry: (1) low (duration ≤ 6 years) and (2) high experience (duration ≥ 7 years). Based on age at entry into the trucking industry, participants were termed as either adolescent (age at entry 4.0%, respectively; adjusted OR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2-3.1) and syphilis (5.7% versus 3.5%, respectively; adjusted OR: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.1-3.1). These results suggest the need for focused behavioral change programs in HIV prevention interventions for adolescent truckers in India and elsewhere.

  3. Multifaceted mechanisms of HIV inhibition and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors PSC-RANTES and Maraviroc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobritz, Michael A; Ratcliff, Annette N; Marozsan, Andre J; Dudley, Dawn M; Tilton, John C; Arts, Eric J

    2013-06-01

    Small-molecule CCR5 antagonists, such as maraviroc (MVC), likely block HIV-1 through an allosteric, noncompetitive inhibition mechanism, whereas inhibition by agonists such as PSC-RANTES is less defined and may involve receptor removal by cell surface downregulation, competitive inhibition by occluding the HIV-1 envelope binding, and/or allosteric effects by altering CCR5 conformation. We explored the inhibitory mechanisms of maraviroc and PSC-RANTES by employing pairs of virus clones with differential sensitivities to these inhibitors. Intrinsic PSC-RANTES-resistant virus (YA versus RT) or those selected in PSC-RANTES treated macaques (M584 versus P3-4) only displayed resistance in multiple-cycle assays or with a CCR5 mutant that cannot be downregulated. In single-cycle assays, these HIV-1 clones displayed equal sensitivity to PSC-RANTES inhibition, suggesting effective receptor downregulation. Prolonged PSC-RANTES exposure resulted in desensitization of the receptor to internalization such that increasing virus concentration (substrate) could saturate the receptors and overcome PSC-RANTES inhibition. In contrast, resistance to MVC was observed with the MVC-resistant HIV-1 (R3 versus S2) in both multiple- and single-cycle assays and with altered virus concentrations, which is indicative of allosteric inhibition. MVC could also mediate inhibition and possibly resistance through competitive mechanisms.

  4. Synergistic Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Bryostatin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Clemente, Maria Isabel; Serramía, Maria Jesús; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Ángeles

    2015-11-13

    Viral reactivation from latently infected cells has become a promising therapeutic approach to eradicate HIV. Due to the complexity of the viral latency, combinations of efficient and available drugs targeting different pathways of latency are needed. In this work, we evaluated the effect of various combinations of bryostatin-1 (BRY) and novel histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) on HIV-reactivation and on cellular phenotype. The lymphocyte (J89GFP) or monocyte/macrophage (THP89GFP) latently infected cell lines were treated with BRY, panobinostat (PNB) and romidepsin (RMD) either alone or in combination. Thus, the effect on the viral reactivation was evaluated. We calculated the combination index for each drug combination; the BRY/HDACIs showed a synergistic HIV-reactivation profile in the majority of the combinations tested, whereas non-synergistic effects were observed when PNB was mixed with RMD. Indeed, the 75% effective concentrations of BRY, PNB and RMD were reduced in these combinations. Moreover, primary CD4 T cells treated with such drug combinations presented similar activation and proliferation profiles in comparison with single drug treated cells. Summing up, combinations between BRY, PNB and/or RMD presented a synergistic profile by inducing virus expression in HIV-latently infected cells, rendering these combinations an attractive novel and safe option for future clinical trials.

  5. Peptide Inhibitors of HIV-1 Virus Infection Based on Cullin-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ke-tong; ZHANG Xi-zhen; LOU Chao-ping; GUO Bo; DU Juan; WANG Xiao-dan; WU Yong-ge; KONG Wei; YU Xiang-hui

    2008-01-01

    Virion infectivity factor(Vif) is one of the six accessory proteins of HIV-1 and is necessary for viral infectivity. Human Apolipoprotein B editing complex protein 3G(h-APOBEC3G) is a cytidine deaminase only expressed in "nonpermissive" cells and exhibits virus suppressive activity. With the aid of a Cullin-5 E3 ligase, Vif induces h-APOBEC3G degradation and with the destruction of this ligase, Vif is functionally inactive. Therefore, it is expected that blocking this E3 pathway would be a new therapeutic strategy against HIV-1 infection. In this article, the authors' took sequence alignment of the N-termini of Cullin-5 and three other members of the Cullin protein family,respectively. A set of small peptides has been synthesized based on the sequence comparison results and possible Vif-Cullin-5 interaction domains. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that several peptides can reduce virus infectivity in "nonpermissive" cells with a dose-responsive manner, but not in "permissive" cells. The results also indicate that the loss of viral infectivity may be because of the increase of APOBEC3G amount in the peptide-treated cells. It is concluded that peptides derived from Cullin-5 can block the APOBEC3G degradation induced by Vif and suppress HIV-1 infectivity. Therefore this study starts a novel strategy for the development of a new HIV-1 inhibitor.

  6. Prevalence and incidence of diabetes in HIV-infected minority patients on protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehian, Behrouz; Bilas, Josephine; Bazargan, Mohsen; Abbasian, Mohammad

    2005-01-01

    In HIV-infected patients, the use of protease inhibitors (PIs) is associated with a constellation of abdominal obesity; buffalo hump; decreased facial and subcutaneous fat; hyperlipidemia and type-2 diabetes mellitus, a so-called HAART-associated dysmetabolic syndrome. The incidence and prevalence of one of its components, the type-2 diabetes mellitus, among minority population is unknown. In August and September 1999, we reviewed 101 charts of HIV-infected patients who visited an inner-city HIV outpatient clinic. The age, gender, ethnicity, BMI, fasting plasma glucose, random serum glucose, triglycerides, CD4 counts, and the type and duration of antiretroviral drugs were recorded. Three years later (2002), the same patient charts were reviewed for evidence of new-onset diabetes. Ten percent of the subjects were identified as diabetic at baseline. The prevalence of diabetes was 12% among those who were taking PIs, compared to 0% among those who were not taking PIs. The incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes during this three-year period was 7.2%. Diabetes occurred only in the group taking PIs. Diabetic subjects were older than their nondiabetic counterparts. All were African Americans. Our study suggests that PIs increase the likelihood of diabetes developing with increasing age in African Americans infected with HIV. PMID:16173323

  7. Nutritional status changes in HIV-infected children receiving combined antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, P; Donelli, E; Boni, S; Pontali, E; Tramalloni, R; Bassetti, D

    2000-11-01

    Maintaining linear growth and weight gain in HIV-infected children is often difficult. Nutritional evaluation and support are recognised as important factors to improve their quality of life. Combination antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors (HAART) reduces HIV-viral load and improves survival, quality of life and nutritional status. Our study aimed to determine changes in nutrional status based on body weight, height and nutritional habits, of HIV-infected children receiving HAART. Possible side effects of lipid metabolism were also studied. Twenty five children, 13 treated with HAART (group B) were followed up for 12 months. We did not observe statistically significant differences in nutritional status over that time or between groups A and B. Inadequate energy intake was more common in patients with advanced HIV-disease. Hyperlipidemia was found in 70% of children receiving ritonavir and in approximately 50% of children receiving nelfinavir. We observed an important although not statistically significative modification in the height of those in group B.

  8. Crystal structure of an FIV/HIV chimeric protease complexed with the broad-based inhibitor, TL-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder John H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have obtained the 1.7 Å crystal structure of FIV protease (PR in which 12 critical residues around the active site have been substituted with the structurally equivalent residues of HIV PR (12X FIV PR. The chimeric PR was crystallized in complex with the broad-based inhibitor TL-3, which inhibits wild type FIV and HIV PRs, as well as 12X FIV PR and several drug-resistant HIV mutants 1234. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that TL-3 inhibits these PRs in the order HIV PR > 12X FIV PR > FIV PR, with Ki values of 1.5 nM, 10 nM, and 41 nM, respectively 234. Comparison of the crystal structures of the TL-3 complexes of 12X FIV and wild-typeFIV PR revealed theformation of additinal van der Waals interactions between the enzyme inhibitor in the mutant PR. The 12X FIV PR retained the hydrogen bonding interactions between residues in the flap regions and active site involving the enzyme and the TL-3 inhibitor in comparison to both FIV PR and HIV PR. However, the flap regions of the 12X FIV PR more closely resemble those of HIV PR, having gained several stabilizing intra-flap interactions not present in wild type FIV PR. These findings offer a structural explanation for the observed inhibitor/substrate binding properties of the chimeric PR.

  9. Novel functions of plant cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, ICK1/KRP1, can act non-cell-autonomously and inhibit entry into mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinl, Christina; Marquardt, Sebastian; Kuijt, Suzanne J H

    2005-01-01

    numbers of cells consistent with a function of CKIs in blocking the G1-S cell cycle transition. Here, we demonstrate that at least one inhibitor from Arabidopsis, ICK1/KRP1, can also block entry into mitosis but allows S-phase progression causing endoreplication. Our data suggest that plant CKIs act...... independently from ICK1/KRP1-induced endoreplication. Strikingly, we found that endoreplicated cells were able to reenter mitosis, emphasizing the high degree of flexibility of plant cells during development. Moreover, we show that in contrast with animal CDK inhibitors, ICK1/KRP1 can move between cells...

  10. HIV-1 IN strand transfer chelating inhibitors: a focus on metal binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Alessia; Carcelli, Mauro; Compari, Carlotta; Fisicaro, Emilia; Pala, Nicolino; Rispoli, Gabriele; Rogolino, Dominga; Sanchez, Tino W; Sechi, Mario; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-04-01

    Most active and selective strand transfer HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors contain chelating functional groups that are crucial feature for the inhibition of the catalytic activities of the enzyme. In particular, diketo acids and their derivatives can coordinate one or two metal ions within the catalytic core of the enzyme. The present work is intended as a contribution to elucidate the mechanism of action of the HIV-IN inhibitors by studying the coordinative features of H₂L¹ (L-708,906), an important member of the diketo acids family of inhibitors, and H₂L₂, a model for S-1360, another potent IN inhibitor. Magnesium(II) and manganese(II) complexes of H₂L¹ and H₂L² were isolated and fully characterized in solution and in the solid state. The crystal structures of the manganese complex [Mn(HL₂)₂(CH₃OH)₂]·2CH₃OH were solved by X-ray diffraction analysis. Moreover, the speciation models for H₂L₂ with magnesium(II) and manganese(II) ions were performed and the formation constants of the complexes were measured. M(HL₂)₂ (M = Mg²+, Mn²+) was the most abundant species in solution at physiological pH. All the synthesized compounds were tested for their anti-IN activity, showing good results both for the ligand and the corresponding complexes. From analysis of the speciation models and of the biological data we can conclude that coordination of both metal cofactors could not be strictly necessary and that inhibitors can act as complexes and not only as free ligands.

  11. HIV-1 predisposed to acquiring resistance to maraviroc (MVC and other CCR5 antagonists in vitro has an inherent, low-level ability to utilize MVC-bound CCR5 for entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westby Mike

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maraviroc (MVC and other CCR5 antagonists are HIV-1 entry inhibitors that bind to- and alter the conformation of CCR5, such that CCR5 is no longer recognized by the viral gp120 envelope (Env glycoproteins. Resistance to CCR5 antagonists results from HIV-1 Env acquiring the ability to utilize the drug-bound conformation of CCR5. Selecting for HIV-1 resistance to CCR5-antagonists in vitro is relatively difficult. However, the CCR5-using CC1/85 strain appears to be uniquely predisposed to acquiring resistance to several CCR5 antagonists in vitro including MVC, vicriviroc and AD101. Findings Here, we show that Env derived from the parental CC1/85 strain is inherently capable of a low affinity interaction with MVC-bound CCR5. However, this phenotype was only revealed in 293-Affinofile cells and NP2-CD4/CCR5 cells that express very high levels of CCR5, and was masked in TZM-bl, JC53 and U87-CD4/CCR5 cells as well as PBMC, which express comparatively lower levels of CCR5 and which are more commonly used to detect resistance to CCR5 antagonists. Conclusions Env derived from the CC1/85 strain of HIV-1 is inherently capable of a low-affinity interaction with MVC-bound CCR5, which helps explain the relative ease in which CC1/85 can acquire resistance to CCR5 antagonists in vitro. The detection of similar phenotypes in patients may identify those who could be at higher risk of virological failure on MVC.

  12. Functional and structural analysis of the internal ribosome entry site present in the mRNA of natural variants of the HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejos, Maricarmen; Carvajal, Felipe; Pino, Karla; Navarrete, Camilo; Ferres, Marcela; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Sargueil, Bruno; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The 5'untranslated regions (UTR) of the full length mRNA of the HIV-1 proviral clones pNL4.3 and pLAI, harbor an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). In this study we extend this finding by demonstrating that the mRNA 5'UTRs of natural variants of HIV-1 also exhibit IRES-activity. Cap-independent translational activity was demonstrated using bicistronic mRNAs in HeLa cells and in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The possibility that expression of the downstream cistron in these constructs was due to alternative splicing or to cryptic promoter activity was ruled out. The HIV-1 variants exhibited significant 5'UTR nucleotide diversity with respect to the control sequence recovered from pNL4.3. Interestingly, translational activity from the 5'UTR of some of the HIV-1 variants was enhanced relative to that observed for the 5'UTR of pNL4.3. In an attempt to explain these findings we probed the secondary structure of the variant HIV-1 5'UTRs using enzymatic and chemical approaches. Yet subsequent structural analyses did not reveal significant variations when compared to the pNL4.3-5'UTR. Thus, the increased IRES-activity observed for some of the HIV-1 variants cannot be ascribed to a specific structural modification. A model to explain these findings is proposed.

  13. Functional and structural analysis of the internal ribosome entry site present in the mRNA of natural variants of the HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricarmen Vallejos

    Full Text Available The 5'untranslated regions (UTR of the full length mRNA of the HIV-1 proviral clones pNL4.3 and pLAI, harbor an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES. In this study we extend this finding by demonstrating that the mRNA 5'UTRs of natural variants of HIV-1 also exhibit IRES-activity. Cap-independent translational activity was demonstrated using bicistronic mRNAs in HeLa cells and in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The possibility that expression of the downstream cistron in these constructs was due to alternative splicing or to cryptic promoter activity was ruled out. The HIV-1 variants exhibited significant 5'UTR nucleotide diversity with respect to the control sequence recovered from pNL4.3. Interestingly, translational activity from the 5'UTR of some of the HIV-1 variants was enhanced relative to that observed for the 5'UTR of pNL4.3. In an attempt to explain these findings we probed the secondary structure of the variant HIV-1 5'UTRs using enzymatic and chemical approaches. Yet subsequent structural analyses did not reveal significant variations when compared to the pNL4.3-5'UTR. Thus, the increased IRES-activity observed for some of the HIV-1 variants cannot be ascribed to a specific structural modification. A model to explain these findings is proposed.

  14. The discovery of S/GSK1265744: a carbamoyl pyridone HIV-1 integrase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Murai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV-1 integrase is a virally encoded enzyme essential for lentiviral replication. Assiduous medicinal chemistry efforts culminated in the discovery of raltegravir, the first marketed HIV-1 integrase inhibitor (INI. However, there is significant opportunity for improvement including overall dose burden, dosing interval and potency against resistant viruses. Our molecular design approach used a two-metal binding pharmacophore strategy and succeeded in identification of carbamoyl pyridone HIV-1 INIs. This enriched core scaffold has abundant structural features expanding the opportunity to control drug properties, leading to the discovery of S/GSK1265744. Methods: The carbamoyl pyridone scaffold was derivatized and evaluated for antiviral activity against wild-type virus (±HSA along with key INI-resistant mutants. Animal pharmacokinetic profiles including a key measure of the trough drug concentration over protein-adjusted antiviral potency (C24/PAIC50 along with in vitro DMPK properties, were used along with the virological data for compound selection. Results: The carbamoyl pyridone series inhibitors exhibited potent antiviral profiles with promising DMPK properties. S/GSK1265744 demonstrated good coverage of C24 over PAIC50 predicting low mg unboosted once daily dosing, now validated in phase 2 clinical studies. These preclinical data along with a long human T1/2 of ~30 hours in oral tablet study supports S/GSK1265744 as a long acting parenteral agent for once-monthly or less frequent dosing. Conclusions: A medicinal chemistry approach utilizing key viral mutants in combination with C24/PAIC50 has allowed for discovery of S/GSK1265744. This agent is currently in phase 2 development evaluating a novel, long-acting parenteral route of administration and may enable new approaches to HIV therapy and prevention.

  15. Inhibitor RNA blocks the protein translation mediated by hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Song Liang; Jian-Qi Lian; Yong-Xing Zhou; Mo-Bin Wan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effect of hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site (HCV IRES) specific inhibitor RNA (IRNA) on gene expression mediated by HCV IRES in vivo.METHODS: By using G418 screening system, hepatoma cells constitutively expressing IRNA or mutant IRNA (mIRNA) were established and characterized, and HCV replicons containing the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) were constructed by using the same method. Cotransfection of pCMVNCRluc containing HCV 5'UTR-luc fusion genes and eukaryotic vector of IRNA into human hepatic carcinoma cells (HepG2) was performed and the eukaryotic expression plasmid of IRNA was transfected transiently into HCV replicons, pCMVNCRluc or pCDNA-luc was cotransfected with pSV40-β Gal into IRNA expressing hepatoma cells by using lipofectamine 2000 in vitro. Then the reporting gene expression level was examined at 48 h after transfection by using a luminometer and the expressing level of HCV C antigen was analysed with a confocal microscope.RESULTS: Transient expression of IRES specific IRNA could significantly inhibit the expression of reporter gene and viral antigen mediated by HCV IRES by 50% to 90% in vivo, but mIRNA lost its inhibitory activity completely. The luciferase gene expression mediated by HCV IRES was blocked in the HHCC constitutively expressing IRNA. At 48 h after transfection, the expression level of reportor gene descreased by 20%, but cap-dependent luciferase gene expression was not affected. IRNA could inhibit the HCV replicon expression 24 h after transfection and the highest inhibitory activity was 80% by 72 h, and the inhibitory activity was not increased until 7d after transfection.CONCLUSION: IRNA can inhibit HCV IRES mediated gene expression in vivo.

  16. Evolution of inhibitor-resistant natural mutant forms of HIV-1 protease probed by pre-steady state kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Maria Yu; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kaliberda, Elena N; Dronina, Maria A; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Kozyr, Arina V; Smirnov, Ivan V; Rumsh, Lev D; Fedorova, Olga S; Knorre, Dmitry G; Gabibov, Alexander G; Kuznetsov, Nikita A

    2017-08-23

    Pre-steady state kinetic analysis of mechanistic features of substrate binding and processing is crucial for insight into the evolution of inhibitor-resistant forms of HIV-1 protease. These data may provide a correct vector for rational drug design assuming possible intrinsic dynamic effects. These data should also give some clues to the molecular mechanism of protease action and resistance to inhibitors. Here we report pre-steady state kinetics of the interaction of wild type or mutant forms of HIV-1 protease with a FRET-labeled peptide. The three-stage "minimal" kinetic scheme with first and second reversible steps of substrate binding and with following irreversible peptide cleavage step adequately described experimental data. For the first time, a set of "elementary" kinetic parameters of wild type HIV-1 protease and its natural mutant inhibitor-resistant forms MDR-HM, ANAM-11 and prDRV4 were compared. Inhibitors of the first and second generation were used to estimate the inhibitory effects on HIV-1 protease activity. The resulting set of kinetic data supported that the mutant forms are kinetically unaffected by inhibitors of the first generation, proving their functional resistance to these compounds. The second generation inhibitor darunavir inhibited mutant forms MDR-HM and ANAM-11, but was ineffective against prDRV4. Our kinetic data revealed that these inhibitors induced different conformational changes in the enzyme and, thereby they have different mode of binding in the enzyme active site. These data confirmed hypothesis that the driving force of the inhibitor-resistance evolution is disruption of enzyme-inhibitor complex by changing of the contact network in the inhibitor binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. Role of Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase inhibitors in HIV-1 infected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendel, Irene; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Sampey, Gavin C; Van Duyne, Rachel; Calvert, Valerie; Petricoin, Emanuel; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular cofactors have been documented to be critical for various stages of viral replication. Using high throughput proteomic assays, we have previously identified Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) as a host protein that was uniquely up-regulated in the plasma membrane of HIV-1 infected T-cells. Here, we have further characterized the BTK expression in HIV-1 infection and show that this cellular factor is specifically expressed in infected myeloid cells. Significant up-regulation of the phosphorylated form of BTK was observed in infected cells. Using size exclusion chromatography, we found BTK to be virtually absent in the uninfected U937 cells, however new BTK protein complexes were identified and distributed in both high molecular weight (~600 kDa) and a small molecular weight complex (~60–120 kDa) in the infected U1 cells. BTK levels were highest in cells either chronically expressing virus or induced/infected myeloid cells and that BTK translocated to the membrane following induction of the infected cells. BTK knockdown in HIV-1 infected cells using siRNA resulted in selective death of infected, but not uninfected, cells. Using BTK specific antibody and small molecule inhibitors including LFM-A13 and a FDA approved compound, Ibrutinib (PCI – 32765), we have found that HIV-1 infected cells are sensitive to apoptotic cell death and result in a decrease in virus production. Overall, our data suggests that HIV-1 infected cells are sensitive to treatments targeting BTK expressed in infected cells. PMID:25672887

  18. Role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors in HIV-1-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendel, Irene; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Sampey, Gavin C; Van Duyne, Rachel; Calvert, Valerie; Petricoin, Emanuel; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-06-01

    Many cellular cofactors have been documented to be critical for various stages of viral replication. Using high-throughput proteomic assays, we have previously identified Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) as a host protein that was uniquely upregulated in the plasma membrane of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected T cells. Here, we have further characterized the BTK expression in HIV-1 infection and show that this cellular factor is specifically expressed in infected myeloid cells. Significant upregulation of the phosphorylated form of BTK was observed in infected cells. Using size exclusion chromatography, we found BTK to be virtually absent in the uninfected U937 cells; however, new BTK protein complexes were identified and distributed in both high molecular weight (∼600 kDa) and a small molecular weight complex (∼60-120 kDa) in the infected U1 cells. BTK levels were highest in cells either chronically expressing virus or induced/infected myeloid cells and that BTK translocated to the membrane following induction of the infected cells. BTK knockdown in HIV-1-infected cells using small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in selective death of infected, but not uninfected, cells. Using BTK-specific antibody and small-molecule inhibitors including LFM-A13 and a FDA-approved compound, ibrutinib (PCI-32765), we have found that HIV-1-infected cells are sensitive to apoptotic cell death and result in a decrease in virus production. Overall, our data suggests that HIV-1-infected cells are sensitive to treatments targeting BTK expressed in infected cells.

  19. The CD8-derived chemokine XCL1/lymphotactin is a conformation-dependent, broad-spectrum inhibitor of HIV-1.

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    Christina Guzzo

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells play a key role in the in vivo control of HIV-1 replication via their cytolytic activity as well as their ability to secrete non-lytic soluble suppressive factors. Although the chemokines that naturally bind CCR5 (CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP- 1β, CCL5/RANTES are major components of the CD8-derived anti-HIV activity, evidence indicates the existence of additional, still undefined, CD8-derived HIV-suppressive factors. Here, we report the characterization of a novel anti-HIV chemokine, XCL1/lymphotactin, a member of the C-chemokine family that is produced primarily by activated CD8+ T cells and behaves as a metamorphic protein, interconverting between two structurally distinct conformations (classic and alternative. We found that XCL1 inhibits a broad spectrum of HIV-1 isolates, irrespective of their coreceptor-usage phenotype. Experiments with stabilized variants of XCL1 demonstrated that HIV-1 inhibition requires access to the alternative, all-β conformation, which interacts with proteoglycans but does not bind/activate the specific XCR1 receptor, while the classic XCL1 conformation is inactive. HIV-1 inhibition by XCL1 was shown to occur at an early stage of infection, via blockade of viral attachment and entry into host cells. Analogous to the recently described anti-HIV effect of the CXC chemokine CXCL4/PF4, XCL1-mediated inhibition is associated with direct interaction of the chemokine with the HIV-1 envelope. These results may open new perspectives for understanding the mechanisms of HIV-1 control and reveal new molecular targets for the design of effective therapeutic and preventive strategies against HIV-1.

  20. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein by HIV protease inhibitors increases intracellular accumulation of berberine in murine and human macrophages.

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    Weibin Zha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV protease inhibitor (PI-induced inflammatory response in macrophages is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We have previously reported that berberine (BBR, a traditional herbal medicine, prevents HIV PI-induced inflammatory response through inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in macrophages. We also found that HIV PIs significantly increased the intracellular concentrations of BBR in macrophages. However, the underlying mechanisms of HIV PI-induced BBR accumulation are unknown. This study examined the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in HIV PI-mediated accumulation of BBR in macrophages. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cultured mouse RAW264.7 macrophages, human THP-1-derived macrophages, Wild type MDCK (MDCK/WT and human P-gp transfected (MDCK/P-gp cells were used in this study. The intracellular concentration of BBR was determined by HPLC. The activity of P-gp was assessed by measuring digoxin and rhodamine 123 (Rh123 efflux. The interaction between P-gp and BBR or HIV PIs was predicated by Glide docking using Schrodinger program. The results indicate that P-gp contributed to the efflux of BBR in macrophages. HIV PIs significantly increased BBR concentrations in macrophages; however, BBR did not alter cellular HIV PI concentrations. Although HIV PIs did not affect P-gp expression, P-gp transport activities were significantly inhibited in HIV PI-treated macrophages. Furthermore, the molecular docking study suggests that both HIV PIs and BBR fit the binding pocket of P-gp, and HIV PIs may compete with BBR to bind P-gp. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: HIV PIs increase the concentration of BBR by modulating the transport activity of P-gp in macrophages. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of potential drug-drug interactions is critical prior to applying successful combinational therapy in the clinic.

  1. Prediction of activity for nonnucleoside inhibitors with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase based on Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Robert C; Udier-Blagović, Marina; Wang, De-Ping; Watkins, Edward K; Kroeger Smith, Marilyn B; Smith, Richard H; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2002-07-04

    Results of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for more than 200 nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs) representing eight diverse chemotypes have been correlated with their anti-HIV activities in an effort to establish simulation protocols and methods that can be used in the development of more effective drugs. Each inhibitor was modeled in a complex with the protein and by itself in water, and potentially useful descriptors of binding affinity were collected during the MC simulations. A viable regression equation was obtained for each data set using an extended linear response approach, which yielded r(2) values between 0.54 and 0.85 and an average unsigned error of only 0.50 kcal/mol. The most common descriptors confirm that a good geometrical match between the inhibitor and the protein is important and that the net loss of hydrogen bonds with the inhibitor upon binding is unfavorable. Other physically reasonable descriptors of binding are needed on a chemotype case-by-case basis. By including descriptors in common from the individual fits, combination regressions that include multiple data sets were also developed. This procedure led to a refined "master" regression for 210 NNRTIs with an r(2) of 0.60 and a cross-validated q(2) of 0.55. The computed activities show an rms error of 0.86 kcal/mol in comparison with experiment and an average unsigned error of 0.69 kcal/mol. Encouraging results were obtained for the predictions of 27 NNRTIs, representing a new chemotype not included in the development of the regression model. Predictions for this test set using the master regression yielded a q(2) value of 0.51 and an average unsigned error of 0.67 kcal/mol. Finally, additional regression analysis reveals that use of ligand-only descriptors leads to models with much diminished predictive ability.

  2. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activities of halogenated gomisin J derivatives, new nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihashi, T; Hara, H; Sakata, T; Mori, K; Higuchi, H; Tanaka, A; Kaji, H; Kaji, A

    1995-09-01

    Halogenated gomisin J (a derivative of lignan compound), represented by the bromine derivative 1506 [(6R, 7S, S-biar)-4,9-dibromo-3,10-dihydroxy-1,2,11,12-tetramethoxy-6, 7-dimethyl-5,6,7,8- tetrahydrodibenzo[a,c]cyclo-octene], was found to be a potent inhibitor of the cytopathic effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on MT-4 human T cells (50% effective dose, 0.1 to 0.5 microM). Gomisin J derivatives were active in preventing p24 production from acutely HIV-1-infected H9 cells. The selective indices (toxic dose/effective dose) of these compounds were as high as > 300 in some systems. 1506 was active against 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-resistant HIV-1 and acted synergistically with AZT and 2',3'-ddC. 1506 inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in vitro but not HIV-1 protease. From the time-of-addition experiment, 1506 was found to inhibit the early phase of the HIV life cycle. A 1506-resistant HIV mutant was selected and shown to possess a mutation within the RT-coding region (at position 188 [Tyr to Leu]). The mutant RT expressed in Escherichia coli was resistant to 1506 in the in vitro RT assay. Some of the HIV strains resistant to other nonnucleoside HIV-1 RT inhibitors were also resistant to 1506. Comparison of various gomisin J derivatives with gomisin J showed that iodine, bromine, and chlorine in the fourth and ninth positions increased RT inhibitory activity as well as cytoprotective activity.

  3. Nef alleles from all major HIV-1 clades activate Src-family kinases and enhance HIV-1 replication in an inhibitor-sensitive manner.

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    Purushottam S Narute

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 accessory factor Nef is essential for high-titer viral replication and AIDS progression. Nef function requires interaction with many host cell proteins, including specific members of the Src kinase family. Here we explored whether Src-family kinase activation is a conserved property of Nef alleles from a wide range of primary HIV-1 isolates and their sensitivity to selective pharmacological inhibitors. Representative Nef proteins from the major HIV-1 subtypes A1, A2, B, C, F1, F2, G, H, J and K strongly activated Hck and Lyn as well as c-Src to a lesser extent, demonstrating for the first time that Src-family kinase activation is a highly conserved property of primary M-group HIV-1 Nef isolates. Recently, we identified 4-amino substituted diphenylfuropyrimidines (DFPs that selectively inhibit Nef-dependent activation of Src-family kinases as well as HIV replication. To determine whether DFP compounds exhibit broad-spectrum Nef-dependent antiretroviral activity against HIV-1, we first constructed chimeric forms of the HIV-1 strain NL4-3 expressing each of the primary Nef alleles. The infectivity and replication of these Nef chimeras was indistinguishable from that of wild-type virus in two distinct cell lines (U87MG astroglial cells and CEM-T4 lymphoblasts. Importantly, the 4-aminopropanol and 4-aminobutanol derivatives of DFP potently inhibited the replication of all chimeric forms of HIV-1 in both U87MG and CEM-T4 cells in a Nef-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effects of these compounds correlated with inhibition of Nef-dependent activation of endogenous Src-family kinases in the HIV-infected cells. Our results demonstrate that the activation of Hck, Lyn and c-Src by Nef is highly conserved among all major clades of HIV-1 and that selective targeting of this pathway uniformly inhibits HIV-1 replication.

  4. HIV-1 RT Inhibitors with a Novel Mechanism of Action: NNRTIs that Compete with the Nucleotide Substrate

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    Giovanni Maga

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitors currently used in antiretroviral therapy can be divided into two classes: (i nucleoside analog RT inhibitors (NRTIs, which compete with natural nucleoside substrates and act as terminators of proviral DNA synthesis, and (ii non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs, which bind to a hydrophobic pocket close to the RT active site. In spite of the efficiency of NRTIs and NNRTIs, the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant mutations requires the development of new RT inhibitors with an alternative mechanism of action. Recently, several studies reported the discovery of novel non-nucleoside inhibitors with a distinct mechanism of action. Unlike classical NNRTIs, they compete with the nucleotide substrate, thus forming a new class of RT inhibitors: nucleotide-competing RT inhibitors (NcRTIs. In this review, we discuss current progress in the understanding of the peculiar behavior of these compounds.

  5. Methods for the Analyses of Inhibitor-Induced Aberrant Multimerization of HIV-1 Integrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessl, Jacques J.; Sharma, Amit; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target as its function is essential for the viral lifecycle. The discovery of multifunctional allosteric IN inhibitors or ALLINIs, which potently impair viral replication by promoting aberrant, higher order IN multimerization as well as inhibit IN interactions with its cellular cofactor, LEDGF/p75, has opened new venues to exploit IN multimerization as a therapeutic target. Furthermore, the recent discovery of multimerization selective IN inhibitors or MINIs, has provided new investigational probes to study the direct effects of aberrant IN multimerization in vitro and in infected cells. Here we describe three complementary methods designed to detect and quantify the effects of these new classes of inhibitors on IN multimerization. These methods include a homogenous time-resolved fluorescence-based assay which allows for measuring EC50 values for the inhibitor-induced aberrant IN multimerization, a dynamic light scattering-based assay which allows for monitoring the formation and sizes of oligomeric IN particles in a time-dependent manner, and a chemical cross-linking-based assay of interacting IN subunits which allows for the determination of IN oligomers in viral particles. PMID:26714710

  6. Synthesis and biological evaluation of imidazole thioacetanilides as novel non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong; Zhu, Junjie; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Pannecouque, Christophe; Clercq, Erik De

    2009-08-15

    A series of 2-(1-aryl-1H-imidazol-2-ylthio)acetamide [imidazole thioacetanilide (ITA)] derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Among them, the most potent HIV-1 inhibitors were 4a5 (EC(50)=0.18microM), and 4a2 (EC(50)=0.20microM), which were more effective than the lead compound L1 (EC(50)=2.053microM) and the reference drugs nevirapine and delavirdine. The preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the newly synthesized congeners is discussed.

  7. Assessment of atherosclerosis using carotid ultrasonography in a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated with protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminari, E; Pan, A; Voltini, G; Carnevale, G; Maserati, R; Minoli, L; Meneghetti, G; Tinelli, C; Testa, S

    2002-06-01

    Lipid disorders associated with the use of protease inhibitors (PI) may be a risk factor for premature atherosclerosis development. The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent of carotid intima media thickness (IMT) among HIV-positive patients treated with PI containing regimens compared to PI-naïve and HIV-negative subjects. We analysed plasma lipid levels and carotid IMT in 28 HIV-positive patients treated with protease inhibitors (PIs) for a mean of 28.7 months (range 18-43) and in two control groups constituted, respectively, by 15 HIV-positive naïve patients and 16 HIV-negative subjects, that were matched for age, risk factors for HIV infection, cigarette smoke use and CD4+ cell count. PI-treated patients had higher triglyceride, HDL and apo B levels than controls. Carotid IMT was significantly increased in PI-treated patients compared to naïve or HIV-negative subjects. A correlation between cholesterol HDL, triglyceride and ApoB levels and IMT was observed among the entire cohort. Plasma lipid alterations were associated with an increased IMT and intima media thickening was more pronounced in PI-treated patients than in the two control groups. Periodical evaluation of blood lipid profile and, if required, the use of lipid-lowering agents is advisable. Moreover, physicians should address concurrent risk factor for atherosclerosis that can be modified, including smoking, hypertension, obesity and sedentary life-style.

  8. Gender-specific effects of HIV protease inhibitors on body mass in mice

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    Rosewell Amanda N

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Protease inhibitors, as part of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART, have significantly increased the lifespan of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients. Several deleterious side effects including dyslipidemia and lipodystrophy, however, have been observed with HAART. Women are at a higher risk of developing adipose tissue alterations and these alterations have different characteristics as compared to men. We have previously demonstrated that in mice the HIV protease inhibitor, ritonavir, caused a reduction in weight gain in females, but had no effect on male mice. In the present study, we examined the potential causes of this difference in weight gain. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R null mice or wild-type C57BL/6 mice, were administered 15 μg/ml ritonavir or vehicle (0.01% ethanol in the drinking water for 6 weeks. The percent of total body weight gained during the treatment period was measured and confirmed that female LDL-R gained significantly less weight with ritonavir treatment than males. In wild type mice, however, there was no effect of ritonavir treatment in either sex. Despite the weight loss in LDL-R null mice, ritonavir increased food intake, but no difference was observed in gonadal fat weight. Serum leptin levels were significantly lower in females. Ritonavir further suppressed leptin levels in (p

  9. Global Conformational Dynamics of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Bound to Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors

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    Peter V. Coveney

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT is a multifunctional enzyme responsible for the transcription of the RNA genome of the HIV virus into DNA suitable for incorporation within the DNA of human host cells. Its crucial role in the viral life cycle has made it one of the major targets for antiretroviral drug therapy. The Non-Nucleoside RT Inhibitor (NNRTI class of drugs binds allosterically to the enzyme, affecting many aspects of its activity. We use both coarse grained network models and atomistic molecular dynamics to explore the changes in protein dynamics induced by NNRTI binding. We identify changes in the flexibility and conformation of residue Glu396 in the RNaseH primer grip which could provide an explanation for the acceleration in RNaseH cleavage rate observed experimentally in NNRTI bound HIV-1 RT. We further suggest a plausible path for conformational and dynamic changes to be communicated from the vicinity of the NNRTI binding pocket to the RNaseH at the other end of the enzyme.

  10. Study on the drug resistance and the binding mode of HIV-1 integrase with LCA inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; JianPing; CHANG; Shan; CHEN; WeiZu; WANG; CunXin

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in the lifecycle of this virus and also an important target for the study of anti-HIV drugs. The binding mode of the wild type IN core domain and its G140S mutant with L-Chicoric acid (LCA) inhibitor were investigated by using multiple conformation molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Based on the binding modes, the drug resistance mechanism was explored for the G140S mutant of IN with LCA. The results indicate that the binding site of the G140S mutant of IN core domain with LCA is different from that of the core domain of the wild type IN, which leads to the partial loss of inhibition potency of LCA. The flexibility of the IN functional loop region and the interactions between Mg2+ ion and the three key residues (i.e., D64, D116, E152) stimulate the biological operation of IN. The drug resistance also lies in several other important effects, such as the repulsion between LCA and E152 in the G140S mutant core domain, the weakening of K159 binding with LCA and Y143 pointing to the pocket of the G140S mutant. All of the above simulation results agree well with experimental data, which provide us with some helpful information for designing the drug of anti-HIV based on the structure of IN.

  11. The HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir inhibits Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Ikoma, Minako; Gachelet, Eliora; Gray, Matthew; Geballe, Adam P; Corey, Lawrence; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael; Vieira, Jeffrey

    2011-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common HIV-associated cancer worldwide and is associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality in some regions. Antiretroviral (ARV) combination regimens have had mixed results for KS progression and resolution. Anecdotal case reports suggest that protease inhibitors (PIs) may have effects against KS that are independent of their effect on HIV infection. As such, we evaluated whether PIs or other ARVs directly inhibit replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the gammaherpesvirus that causes KS. Among a broad panel of ARVs tested, only the PI nelfinavir consistently displayed potent inhibitory activity against KSHV in vitro as demonstrated by an efficient quantitative assay for infectious KSHV using a recombinant virus, rKSHV.294, which expresses the secreted alkaline phosphatase. This inhibitory activity of nelfinavir against KSHV replication was confirmed using virus derived from a second primary effusion lymphoma cell line. Nelfinavir was similarly found to inhibit in vitro replication of an alphaherpesvirus (herpes simplex virus) and a betaherpesvirus (human cytomegalovirus). No activity was observed with nelfinavir against vaccinia virus or adenovirus. Nelfinavir may provide unique benefits for the prevention or treatment of HIV-associated KS and potentially other human herpesviruses by direct inhibition of replication.

  12. The association between adolescent entry into the trucking industry and risk of HIV among long-distance truck drivers in India

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    Mishra RM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ram Manohar Mishra,1 Madhulika Dube,2 Niranjan Saggurti,1 Arvind Pandey,3 Bidhubhusan Mahapatra,1 Sowmya Ramesh11Population Council, New Delhi, 2Department of Statistics, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak, Haryana, 3National Institute of Medical Statistics, Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, IndiaAbstract: This study examines the relationship between entry into the trucking industry during adolescence and both sexually transmitted infections (STIs and infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV among long-distance truck drivers in India. Data were sourced from a cross-sectional survey (sample size: 2066 undertaken in 2007 among long-distance truck drivers. The survey spread across major transshipment locations covering the bulk of India's transport volume along four routes. Participants were interviewed about sexual behaviors and were tested for HIV and STIs. The present authors constructed two synthetic cohorts based on the participants' duration of employment in the trucking industry: (1 low (duration ≤ 6 years and (2 high experience (duration ≥ 7 years. Based on age at entry into the trucking industry, participants were termed as either adolescent (age at entry < 18 complete years or adult entrants (age at entry ≥ 18 complete years. In the low-experience cohort, the adolescent entrants were more likely than the adult entrants to have sex with paid female partners (42.6% versus 27.2%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3–2.9 and to practice inconsistent condom use with such partners (69.1% versus 26.8%, respectively; adjusted OR: 5.3; 95% CI: 2.4–11.6. However, no significant differences were found in STI and HIV prevalence between the adolescent and the adult entrants in this cohort. In the high-experience cohort, the adolescent entrants were about two times more likely than the adult entrants to practice inconsistent condom use with paid female partners (38.5% versus

  13. Modular construction of quaternary hemiaminal-based inhibitor candidates and their in cellulo assessment with HIV-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Guillaume; Martinez, Lorena; Gimenez, Anna Servat; Adler, Paula; Maurin, Philippe; Wolkowicz, Roland; Falson, Pierre; Hasserodt, Jens

    2013-09-01

    Non-peptidomimetic drug-like protease inhibitors have potential for circumventing drug resistance. We developed a much-improved synthetic route to our previously reported inhibitor candidate displaying an unusual quaternized hemi-aminal. This functional group forms from a linear precursor upon passage into physiological media. Seven variants were prepared and tested in cellulo with our HIV-1 fusion-protein technology that result in an eGFP-based fluorescent readout. Three candidates showed inhibition potency above 20μM and toxicity at higher concentrations, making them attractive targets for further refinement. Importantly, our class of original inhibitor candidates is not recognized by two major multidrug resistance pumps, quite in contrast to most clinically applied HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  14. “Right Here is the Gateway”: Mobility, Sex Work Entry and HIV Risk Along the Mexico-U.S. Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, SM; Silverman, JS; Engstrom, D; Bojorquez-Chapela, I; Strathdee, SA

    2013-01-01

    Women comprise an increasing proportion of migrants. Many voluntarily migrate for sex work or practice survival sex, while others may be trafficked for sexual exploitation. To investigate how the context of mobility shapes sex work entry and HIV risk, we conducted in-depth interviews with formerly trafficked women currently engaged in sex work (n=31) in Tijuana, Mexico and their service providers (n=7) in Tijuana and San Diego, USA from 2010–2011. Women’s experiences of coerced and deceptive migration, deportation as forced migration, voluntary mobility, and migration to a risk environment illustrate that circumstances driving and resulting from migration shape vulnerability to sex trafficking, voluntary sex work entry, and HIV risk. Findings suggest an urgent need for public health and immigration policies that provide integrated support for deported and/or recently arrived female migrants. Policies to prevent sex trafficking and assist trafficked females must also consider the varying levels of personal agency involved in migration and sex work entry. PMID:25346548

  15. Safety profile of HIV-1 attachment inhibitor prodrug BMS-663068 in antiretroviral-experienced subjects: week 24 analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Lalezari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: BMS-663068 is a prodrug of BMS-626529, an attachment inhibitor that binds directly to HIV-1 gp120, preventing initial viral attachment and entry into the host CD4+ T-cell. AI438011 is an ongoing, Phase IIb, randomized, active-controlled trial investigating the safety, efficacy and dose–response of BMS-663068 vs. atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r in treatment-experienced (TE, HIV-1-positive subjects. At Week 24, response rates across the BMS-663068 arms were consistent with ATV/r. Materials and Methods: Antiretroviral TE subjects (exposure to ≥1 antiretroviral for ≥1 week with susceptibility to all study drugs (including BMS-626529 IC50 100 nM were randomized equally to four BMS-663068 arms (400 or 800 mg, BID; 600 or 1200 mg, QD and a control arm (ATV/r 300/100 mg QD, with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF + raltegravir (RAL. The complete safety profile through Week 24 is reported. Results: In total, 251 subjects were treated (BMS-663068, 200; ATV/r, 51. No BMS-663068-related adverse events (AEs led to discontinuation. Grade 2–4 drug-related AEs occurred in 17/200 (8.5% subjects across the BMS-633068 arms; however, these events were mostly single instances and no dose-relationship was seen. Similarly, no noticeable trend for Grade 3–4 laboratory abnormalities was seen and Grade 3–4 hematologic changes and liver chemistry elevations were uncommon (neutropenia, 2.5%; AST/ALT elevations, 1% (n=196. In the ATV/r arm, Grade 2–4 drug-related AEs occurred in 14/51 (27.5% subjects and were mostly secondary to gastrointestinal and/or hepatobiliary disorders. Serious adverse events (SAEs occurred in 13/200 (6.5% and 5/51 (9.8% subjects receiving BMS-663068 and ATV/r, respectively; most were secondary to infections and none were related to study drugs. The most common AE reported for BMS-663068 was headache (28/200, 14%, occurring in 5/51 (10% subjects in the ATV/r arm; in the BMS-663068 arms, this was not dose-related. There were no

  16. Using water and sanitation as an entry point to fight poverty and respond to HIV/AIDS: The case of Isulabasha Small Medium Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manase, G.; Nkuna, Z.; Ngorima, E.

    South Africa is faced by a number of challenges that include low water and sanitation coverage in rural and peri-urban areas, high unemployment and increasing inequality between the rich and the poor as indicated by a Gini coefficient of 0.77; the second highest inequality in the world after Brazil. The situation is compounded by high HIV prevalence with South Africa having the largest HIV infection in the world. This case study demonstrates how water and sanitation is used as an entry point to address these major challenges and to empower communities. The project has two main components: the Small Medium Enterprise (SME) that trades in water and sanitation facilities and a community garden that ensures food security and nutrition for people living with HIV/AIDS. Income generated through these activities is ploughed back into the community through construction of sanitation facilities, maintenance of water pipes and paying school fees for orphans. In addition to creating employment, the project has also empowered the community to mobilise and address other challenges such as gender, child abuse and crime. The case study identifies weaknesses with projects designed solely to provide domestic drinking water and sanitation and calls for an integrated approach that uses water and sanitation as an entry point to unlock opportunities and empower the targeted communities.

  17. Rationally Designed Interfacial Peptides Are Efficient In Vitro Inhibitors of HIV-1 Capsid Assembly with Antiviral Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rebeca Bocanegra; María Nevot; Rosa Doménech; Inmaculada López; Olga Abián; Alicia Rodríguez-Huete; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Adrián Velázquez-Campoy; Javier Gómez; Miguel Ángel Martínez; José Luis Neira; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2011-01-01

    Virus capsid assembly constitutes an attractive target for the development of antiviral therapies; a few experimental inhibitors of this process for HIV-1 and other viruses have been identified by screening compounds or by selection from chemical libraries. As a different, novel approach we have undertaken the rational design of peptides that could act as competitive assembly inhibitors by mimicking capsid structural elements involved in intersubunit interfaces. Several discrete interfaces in...

  18. 艾滋病治疗药物——HIV抑制剂作用机制及研究进展%Anti-AIDS drugs——HIV Inhibitors: Function Mechanism and Research Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文思; 王洋

    2012-01-01

    AIDS or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome is a progressive and fatal contagious disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Currently, as an incurable disease, AIDS became a serious public health problem in the whole world. At present, anti-AIDS drugs arc mainly belong to HIV inhibitors, including inhibitors of reverse transcriptase, protease, integrase and entry inhibitors, as well as some Chinese herbal medicines. Although these anti-HTV drugs can not cure AIDS, it may enhance patient's life quality and prolong disease free survival. This article will review the function mechanism, by-effect and research progress of HIV inhibitors.%艾滋病(ADS)是由人类免疫缺陷病毒(HIV)感染而引起的慢性进行性致死性传染病,又称获得性免疫缺陷综合症,目前无有效治愈的方法,严重危害着人类的健康.现今,艾滋病治疗药物主要包括逆转录酶抑制剂、蛋白酶抑制剂、进入抑制剂、整合酶抑制剂四大类化学药物和一些中草药制剂.抗HIV药物虽然不能完全治愈艾滋病,但可以控制艾滋病病情的发展,延长患者的无病生存期,提高患者的生活质量.本文就艾滋病发病机制、HIV抑制药物的抗病机制、副作用及其研究进展做一综述.

  19. Differential Impact of Resistance-Associated Mutations to Protease Inhibitors and Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors on HIV-1 Replication Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Szu-Min; Pan, Sung-Ching; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Chen, Mao-Yuan; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2013-01-01

    The effects of drug resistance on HIV-1 replication capacity have been studied, but data from clinical isolates are few. We accessed the patients with HIV-1 infection at the National Taiwan University Hospital who experienced virological failure. Genotypic susceptibility and replication capacity of clinical HIV-1 isolates were measured. There were 80 patients enrolled between September 2007 and August 2010. The HIV-1 replication capacity declined significantly with the increasing number of ma...

  20. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  1. HIV protease inhibitors disrupt lipid metabolism by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress and inhibiting autophagy activity in adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth S Zha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV protease inhibitors (PI are core components of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART, the most effective treatment for HIV infection currently available. However, HIV PIs have now been linked to lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia, which are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Our previous studies have shown that HIV PIs activate endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and disrupt lipid metabolism in hepatocytes and macrophages. Yet, little is known on how HIV PIs disrupt lipid metabolism in adipocytes, a major cell type involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cultured and primary mouse adipocytes and human adipocytes were used to examine the effect of frequently used HIV PIs in the clinic, lopinavir/ritonavir, on adipocyte differentiation and further identify the underlying molecular mechanism of HIV PI-induced dysregulation of lipid metabolism in adipocytes. The results indicated that lopinavir alone or in combination with ritonavir, significantly activated the ER stress response, inhibited cell differentiation, and induced cell apoptosis in adipocytes. In addition, HIV PI-induced ER stress was closely linked to inhibition of autophagy activity. We also identified through the use of primary adipocytes of CHOP(-/- mice that CHOP, the major transcriptional factor of the ER stress signaling pathway, is involved in lopinavir/ritonavir-induced inhibition of cell differentiation in adipocytes. In addition, lopinavir/ritonavir-induced ER stress appears to be associated with inhibition of autophagy activity in adipocytes. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Activation of ER stress and impairment of autophagy activity are involved in HIV PI-induced dysregulation of lipid metabolism in adipocytes. The key components of ER stress and autophagy signaling pathways are potential therapeutic targets for HIV PI-induced metabolic side effects in HIV patients.

  2. Algorithm to design inhibitors using stereochemically mixed l,d polypeptides: Validation against HIV protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pooja; Durani, Susheel

    2015-11-01

    Polypeptides have potential to be designed as drugs or inhibitors against the desired targets. In polypeptides, every chiral α-amino acid has enantiomeric structural possibility to become l or d amino acids and can be used as design monomer. Among the various possibilities, use of stereochemistry as a design tool has potential to determine both functional specificity and metabolic stability of the designed polypeptides. The polypeptides with mixed l,d amino acids are a class of peptidomimitics, an attractive drug like molecules and also less susceptible to proteolytic activities. Therefore in this study, a three step algorithm is proposed to design the polypeptides against desired drug targets. For this, all possible configurational isomers of mixed l,d polyleucine (Ac-Leu8-NHMe) structure were randomly modeled with simulated annealing molecular dynamics and the resultant library of discrete folds were scored against HIV protease as a model target. The best scored folds of mixed l,d structures were inverse optimized for sequences in situ and the resultant sequences as inhibitors were validated for conformational integrity using molecular dynamics. This study presents and validates an algorithm to design polypeptides of mixed l,d structures as drugs/inhibitors by inverse fitting them as molecular ligands against desired target.

  3. Compounds acting against HIV: Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridines as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bode, M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A compound possessing anti-HIV activity similar to that of FDA-approved nevirapine was developed. It acts as a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, the compound shows good cell permeability, and a quantitative structure activity...

  4. Bringing Research into a First Semester Organic Chemistry Laboratory with the Multistep Synthesis of Carbohydrate-Based HIV Inhibitor Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Benefits of incorporating research experiences into laboratory courses have been well documented, yet examples of research projects designed for the first semester introductory organic chemistry lab course are extremely rare. To address this deficiency, a Carbohydrate-Based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Inhibitor project consisting of a…

  5. Implications of integrase inhibitors for HIV-infected transplantation recipients: raltegravir and dolutegravir (S/GSK 1349572).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, Kayo; Sugawara, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    In the modern era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), reluctance to perform transplantation (Tx) in HIV-infected individuals is no longer justified. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) or protease inhibitors (PIs), the current first line regimens of HAART, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 family (CYP3A4). Most NNRTIs induce CYP3A4, whereas PIs inhibit it. Calcinuerin inhibitors (CNIs), which are mandatory for Tx, need the same enzyme complex for their clearance. Therefore, a significant drug-drug interaction (DDI) is encountered between current HAART and CNIs. This results in extreme difficulty in adjusting the optimal dose of CNIs, for which the therapeutic range is narrow. Of interest, integrase inhibitors (INIs) - novel, potent anti-HIV drugs - are mainly metabolized by uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 and do not induce or inhibit CYP3A4. DDI is presumably absent when NNTRIs or PIs are replaced by INIs. Raltegravir (RAL), a first generation INI, has been introduced into kidney and liver Tx. There is increasing evidence that rejection is well controlled without renal impairment due to CNI over-exposure while persistent, robust suppression of HIV is achieved. Global phase III clinical trials of dolutegravir (DTG), a second generation INI, are currently in progress. In vitro data has suggested that DTG may be less prone to resistance than RAL (referred to as having a higher genetic barrier). The time has come to extensively discuss the implications of INIs in Tx for HIV positive patients.

  6. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activities of halogenated gomisin J derivatives, new nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujihashi, T; Hara, H.; Sakata, T.; Mori, K.; Higuchi, H.; Tanaka, A.; Kaji, H.; Kaji, A

    1995-01-01

    Halogenated gomisin J (a derivative of lignan compound), represented by the bromine derivative 1506 [(6R, 7S, S-biar)-4,9-dibromo-3,10-dihydroxy-1,2,11,12-tetramethoxy-6, 7-dimethyl-5,6,7,8- tetrahydrodibenzo[a,c]cyclo-octene], was found to be a potent inhibitor of the cytopathic effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on MT-4 human T cells (50% effective dose, 0.1 to 0.5 microM). Gomisin J derivatives were active in preventing p24 production from acutely HIV-1-infected H9 cell...

  7. Determination of the absolute binding free energies of HIV-1 protease inhibitors using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2017-05-01

    The absolute binding free energy of an inhibitor to HIV-1 Protease (PR) was determined throughout evaluation of the non-bonded interaction energy difference between the two bound and unbound states of the inhibitor and surrounding molecules by the fast pulling of ligand (FPL) process using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The calculated free energy difference terms help clarifying the nature of the binding. Theoretical binding affinities are in good correlation with experimental data, with R = 0.89. The paradigm used is able to rank two inhibitors having the maximum difference of ∼1.5 kcal/mol in absolute binding free energies.

  8. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Still Remains a New Drug Target: Structure, Function, Classical Inhibitors, and New Inhibitors with Innovative Mechanisms of Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Esposito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the retrotranscription process, characteristic of all retroviruses, the viral ssRNA genome is converted into integration-competent dsDNA. This process is accomplished by the virus-coded reverse transcriptase (RT protein, which is a primary target in the current treatments for HIV-1 infection. In particular, in the approved therapeutic regimens two classes of drugs target RT, namely, nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs. Both classes inhibit the RT-associated polymerase activity: the NRTIs compete with the natural dNTP substrate and act as chain terminators, while the NNRTIs bind to an allosteric pocket and inhibit polymerization noncompetitively. In addition to these two classes, other RT inhibitors (RTIs that target RT by distinct mechanisms have been identified and are currently under development. These include translocation-defective RTIs, delayed chain terminators RTIs, lethal mutagenesis RTIs, dinucleotide tetraphosphates, nucleotide-competing RTIs, pyrophosphate analogs, RT-associated RNase H function inhibitors, and dual activities inhibitors. This paper describes the HIV-1 RT function and molecular structure, illustrates the currently approved RTIs, and focuses on the mechanisms of action of the newer classes of RTIs.

  9. Ultra-fast analysis of plasma and intracellular levels of HIV protease inhibitors in children: a clinical application of MALDI mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen J A van Kampen

    Full Text Available HIV protease inhibitors must penetrate into cells to exert their action. Differences in the intracellular pharmacokinetics of these drugs may explain why some patients fail on therapy or suffer from drug toxicity. Yet, there is no information available on the intracellular levels of HIV protease inhibitors in HIV infected children, which is in part due to the large amount of sample that is normally required to measure the intracellular concentrations of these drugs. Therefore, we developed an ultra-fast and sensitive assay to measure the intracellular concentrations of HIV protease inhibitors in small amounts of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, and determined the intracellular concentrations of lopinavir and ritonavir in HIV infected children. An assay based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry was developed to determine the concentrations of HIV protease inhibitors in 10 microL plasma and 1x10(6 PBMCs. Precisions and accuracies were within the values set by the FDA for bioanalytical method validation. Lopinavir and ritonavir did not accumulate in PBMCs of HIV infected children. In addition, the intracellular concentrations of lopinavir and ritonavir correlated poorly to the plasma concentrations of these drugs. MALDI-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry is a new tool for ultra-fast and sensitive determination of drug concentrations which can be used, for example, to assess the intracellular pharmacokinetics of HIV protease inhibitors in HIV infected children.

  10. Anti-HIV drugs: 25 compounds approved within 25 years after the discovery of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2009-04-01

    In 2008, 25 years after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was discovered as the then tentative aetiological agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), exactly 25 anti-HIV compounds have been formally approved for clinical use in the treatment of AIDS. These compounds fall into six categories: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs: zidovudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, stavudine, lamivudine, abacavir and emtricitabine); nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs: tenofovir); non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs: nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz and etravirine); protease inhibitors (PIs: saquinavir, ritonavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, lopinavir, atazanavir, fosamprenavir, tipranavir and darunavir); cell entry inhibitors [fusion inhibitors (FIs: enfuvirtide) and co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs: maraviroc)]; and integrase inhibitors (INIs: raltegravir). These compounds should be used in drug combination regimens to achieve the highest possible benefit, tolerability and compliance and to diminish the risk of resistance development.

  11. Describing Point of Entry into Care and Being Lost to Program in a Cohort of HIV Positive Pregnant Women in a Large Urban Centre in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Musomba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We aim to describe the time of entry into care and factors associated with being lost to program (LTP in pregnant women on Option B Plus in an integrated HIV and antenatal care (ANC clinic in Uganda. Methods. We included all pregnant women enrolled into the integrated HIV-ANC clinic from January 2012 to 31st July 2014, while the follow up period extended up to October 30th 2015. LTP was defined as being out of care for ≥3 months. Results. Overall 856 women were included. Only 36.4% (86/236 of the women were enrolled in the first trimester. Overall 69 (8.1% were LTP. In the multivariate analysis older women (HR: 0.80 per five-year increase, CI: 0.64–1.0, and P=0.060 and women on ART at the time of pregnancy (0.58, CI: 0.34–0.98, and P=0.040 were more likely not to be LTP. Among women already on ART at the time of pregnancy no factor was associated with LTP. Conclusion. Our results suggest the need for interventions to enhance prompt linkage of HIV positive women to HIV services for ART initiation and for increased retention particularly in young and ART naive women.

  12. Anti-HIV efficacy and biodistribution of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors delivered as squalenoylated prodrug nanoassemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaireau, Hervé; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Skanji, Rym; Bekkara-Aounallah, Fawzia; Caron, Joachim; Lepêtre, Sinda; Argote, Sébastien; Bauduin, Laurent; Yousfi, Rahima; Rogez-Kreuz, Christine; Desmaële, Didier; Rousseau, Bernard; Gref, Ruxandra; Andrieux, Karine; Clayette, Pascal; Couvreur, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Due to their hydrophilic nature, most nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) display a variable bioavailability after oral administration and a poor control over their biodistribution, thus hampering their access to HIV sanctuaries. The limited cellular uptake and activation in the triphosphate form of NRTIs further restrict their efficacy and favour the emergence of viral resistance. We have shown that the conjugation of squalene (sq) to the nucleoside analogues dideoxycytidine (ddC) and didanosine (ddI) leads to amphiphilic prodrugs (ddC-sq and ddI-sq) that spontaneously self-organize in water as stable nanoassemblies of 100-300 nm. These nanoassemblies can also be formulated with polyethylene glycol coupled to either cholesterol (Chol-PEG) or squalene (sq-PEG). When incubated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro infected with HIV, the NRTI-sq prodrugs enhanced the antiviral efficacy of the parent NRTIs, with a 2- to 3-fold decrease of the 50% effective doses and a nearly 2-fold increase of the selectivity index. This was also the case with HIV-1 strains resistant to ddC and/or ddI. The enhanced antiviral activity of ddI-sq was correlated with an up to 5-fold increase in the intracellular concentration of the corresponding pharmacologically active metabolite ddA-TP. The ddI-sq prodrug was further investigated in vivo by the oral route, the preferred route of administration of NRTIs. Pharmacokinetics studies performed on rats showed that the prodrug maintained low amounts of free ddI in the plasma. Administration of (3)H-ddI-sq led to radioactivity levels higher in the plasma and relevant organs in HIV infection as compared to administration of free (3)H-ddI. Taken together, these results show the potential of the squalenoylated prodrugs of NRTIs to enhance their absorption and improve their biodistribution, but also to enhance their intracellular delivery and antiviral efficacy towards HIV-infected cells.

  13. Screening of Potential HIV-1 Inhibitors/Replication Blockers Using Secure Lentiviral in Vitro System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofjeva, M M; Spirin, P V; Yanvarev, D V; Ivanov, A V; Novikov, M S; Stepanov, O A; Gottikh, M B; Kochetkov, S N; Fehse, B; Stocking, C; Prassolov, V S

    2011-10-01

    The development and usage of safe cell systems for testing agents which possess anti-HIV activity is a very important factor in the design of new drugs. We have described in detail a system we designed that is based on lentiviral vectors (Prokofjeva et. al.,Antiviral Therapy,in print) for swift and completely safe screening of potential HIV-1 replication inhibitors. The system enables one to test the efficiency of the inhibitory activity of compounds whose action is directed towards either wild-type HIV-1 reverse transcriptase or integrase, or mutant enzymes corresponding to the drug-resistant virus form. Testing results of a number of already known drugs, which correlate well with published data as well as data on newly synthesized compounds, were obtained. Application of this system substantially broadens the possibilities of preclinical anti-HIV drugs testing.

  14. Dynamic mechanism for encapsulating two HIV replication inhibitor peptides with carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Bao-Dong; Yang Chuan-Lu; Wang Mei-Shan; Ma Xiao-Guang

    2012-01-01

    Encapsulation of biomolecules inside a carbon nanotube (CNT) has attracted great interest because it could enable the delivery of nanoscale pharmaceutical drugs with CNT-based devices.Using a molecular dynamics simulation,we investigate the dynamic process by which human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication inhibitor peptides (HRIPs)are encapsulated in a water solution contained inside a CNT.The van der Waals attraction between the HRIPs and the CNT and the root-mean-square deviation are used to analyse the evolution of the encapsulation.It is found that the interaction between the HRIPs and the CNT is the main driving force for the encapsulation process,which does not cause an obvious conformationai change to the HRIPs.

  15. Characterization of HIV-1 from patients with virological failure to a boosted protease inhibitor regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemark, Marie Rathcke; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) regimens with unboosted protease inhibitors (PIs) has resulted in a high level of virological failure primarily due to the development of resistant virus. Current boosted PI regimens combine successfully low-dose ritonavir (r) with a second...... PI. The aim of the study was to estimate the proportion of patients, in a population based setting, who develop virological failure on a PI/r regimen. Through The Danish HIV Cohort Study 1,007 patients who received PI/r based treatment between 1995 and 2008 were identified. Twenty-three (2.......3%) experienced virological failure, of whom 19 (83%) started PI/r treatment before 2001. Patients from Copenhagen (n=19) were selected to study the development of protease (PR) and gag cleavage site (CS) mutations during PI/r treatment and PI plasma levels at the time of virological failure. Three patients (16...

  16. Discovery of a new HIV-1 inhibitor scaffold and synthesis of potential prodrugs of indazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Ho; Markovitz, Benjamin; Trovato, Richard; Murphy, Brett R; Austin, Harry; Willardsen, Adam J; Baichwal, Vijay; Morham, Scott; Bajji, Ashok

    2013-05-15

    A new oxazole scaffold showing great promise in HIV-1 inhibition has been discovered by cell-based screening of an in-house library and scaffold modification. Follow-up SAR study focusing on the 5-aryl substituent of the oxazole core has identified 4k (EC50=0.42μM, TI=50) as a potent inhibitor. However, the analogues suffered from poor aqueous solubility. To address this issue, we have developed broadly applicable potential prodrugs of indazoles. Among them, N-acyloxymethyl analogue 11b displayed promising results (i.e., increased aqueous solubility and susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis). Further studies are warranted to fully evaluate the analogues as the potential prodrugs with improved physiochemical and PK properties.

  17. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of indolizine derivatives as HIV-1 VIF-ElonginC interaction inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenlin; Zuo, Tao; Jin, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenming; Yang, Zhenjun; Yu, Xianghui; Zhang, Liangren; Zhang, Lihe

    2013-05-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (VIF) protein is essential for viral replication. VIF recruits cellular ElonginB/C-Cullin5 E3 ubiquitin ligase to target the host antiviral protein APOBEC3G (A3G) for proteasomal degradation. Thus, the A3G-Vif-E3 complex represents an attractive target for the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. In this study, we describe the design and synthesis of indolizine derivatives as VIF inhibitors targeting the VIF-ElonginC interaction. Many of the synthesized compounds exhibited obvious inhibition activities of VIF-mediated A3G degradation, and 5 compounds showed improvement of activity compared to the known VIF inhibitor VEC-5 (1) with IC(50) values about 20 μM. The findings described here will be useful for the development of more potent VIF inhibitors.

  18. Inhaled corticosteroid use in HIV-positive individuals taking protease inhibitors: a review of pharmacokinetics, case reports and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, P; Phengrasamy, T; Nguyen, D P

    2013-10-01

    As a consequence of inhibition of the hepatic cytochrome P450 3A4 isozyme, treatment with HIV protease inhibitors can result in significant drug-drug interactions. One noteworthy interaction is between protease inhibitors and inhaled or intranasal corticosteroids. This interaction can result in adrenal insufficiency and iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (with symptoms such as rapid weight gain, obesity, facial hirsutism and swelling), as well as hypertension, osteoporosis and decreased CD4 cell count. In this paper, we review and unite pharmacokinetic data, case reports and current research regarding this drug-drug interaction in order to suggest options for the clinical management of HIV-positive patients requiring treatment with protease inhibitors and inhaled or intranasal corticosteroids.

  19. Malaria in HIV-Infected Children Receiving HIV Protease-Inhibitor- Compared with Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy, IMPAACT P1068s, Substudy to P1060

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Charlotte V.; Gabriel, Erin E.; Kamthunzi, Portia; Tegha, Gerald; Tauzie, Jean; Petzold, Elizabeth; Barlow-Mosha, Linda; Chi, Benjamin H.; Li, Yonghua; Ilmet, Tiina; Kirmse, Brian; Neal, Jillian; Parikh, Sunil; Deygoo, Nagamah; Jean Philippe, Patrick; Mofenson, Lynne; Prescott, William; Chen, Jingyang; Musoke, Philippa; Palumbo, Paul; Duffy, Patrick E.; Borkowsky, William

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV and malaria geographically overlap. HIV protease inhibitors kill malaria parasites in vitro and in vivo, but further evaluation in clinical studies is needed. Methods Thirty-one children from Malawi aged 4–62 months were followed every 3 months and at intercurrent illness visits for ≤47 months (September 2009-December 2011). We compared malaria parasite carriage by blood smear microscopy (BS) and confirmed clinical malaria incidence (CCM, or positive BS with malaria symptoms) in children initiated on HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) with zidovudine, lamivudine, and either nevirapine (NVP), a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, or lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV-rtv), a protease inhibitor. Results We found an association between increased time to recurrent positive BS, but not CCM, when anti-malarial treatment and LPV-rtv based ART were used concurrently and when accounting for a LPV-rtv and antimalarial treatment interaction (adjusted HR 0.39; 95% CI (0.17,0.89); p = 0.03). Conclusions LPV-rtv in combination with malaria treatment was associated with lower risk of recurrent positive BS, but not CCM, in HIV-infected children. Larger, randomized studies are needed to confirm these findings which may permit ART optimization for malaria-endemic settings. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00719602 PMID:27936233

  20. Acute toxicity of second generation HIV protease-inhibitors in combination with radiotherapy: a retrospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Phuoc T

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little data on the safety of combining radiation therapy and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV protease inhibitors to treat cancers in HIV-positive patients. We describe acute toxicities observed in a series of HIV-positive patients receiving modern radiation treatments, and compare patients receiving HIV protease inhibitors (PI with patients not receiving HIV PIs. Methods By reviewing the clinical records beginning January 1, 2009 from the radiation oncology department, we identified 29 HIV-positive patients who received radiation therapy to 34 body sites. Baseline information, treatment regimen, and toxicities were documented by review of medical records: patient age, histology and source of the primary tumor, HIV medication regimen, pre-radiation CD4 count, systemic chemotherapy, radiation therapy dose and fractionation, irradiated body region, toxicities, and duration of follow-up. Patients were grouped according to whether they received concurrent HIV PIs and compared using Pearson's chi-square test. Results At baseline, the patients in the two groups were similar with the exception of HIV medication regimens, CD4 count and presence of AIDS-defining malignancy. Patients taking concurrent PIs were more likely to be taking other HIV medications (p = 0.001 and have CD4 count >500 (p = 0.006. Patients taking PIs were borderline less likely to have an AIDS-defining malignancy (p = 0.06. After radiation treatment, 100 acute toxicities were observed and were equally common in both groups (64 [median 3 per patient, IQR 1-7] with PIs; 36 [median 3 per patient, IQR 2-3] without PIs. The observed toxicities were also equally severe in the two groups (Grades I, II, III respectively: 30, 30, 4 with PIs; 23, 13, 0 without PIs: p = 0.38. There were two cases that were stopped early, one in each group; these were not attributable to toxicity. Conclusions In this study of recent radiotherapy in HIV-positive patients taking

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitors impair the elimination of HIV-infected cells by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

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    Richard Brad Jones

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Resting memory CD4+ T-cells harboring latent HIV proviruses represent a critical barrier to viral eradication. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis, such as suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA, romidepsin, and panobinostat have been shown to induce HIV expression in these resting cells. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the low levels of viral gene expression induced by a candidate HDACi may be insufficient to cause the death of infected cells by viral cytopathic effects, necessitating their elimination by immune effectors, such as cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL. Here, we study the impact of three HDACis in clinical development on T-cell effector functions. We report two modes of HDACi-induced functional impairment: i the rapid suppression of cytokine production from viable T-cells induced by all three HDACis ii the selective death of activated T-cells occurring at later time-points following transient exposures to romidepsin or, to a lesser extent, panobinostat. As a net result of these factors, HDACis impaired CTL-mediated IFN-γ production, as well as the elimination of HIV-infected or peptide-pulsed target cells, both in liquid culture and in collagen matrices. Romidepsin exerted greater inhibition of antiviral function than SAHA or panobinostat over the dose ranges tested. These data suggest that treatment with HDACis to mobilize the latent reservoir could have unintended negative impacts on the effector functions of CTL. This could influence the effectiveness of HDACi-based eradication strategies, by impairing elimination of infected cells, and is a critical consideration for trials where therapeutic interruptions are being contemplated, given the importance of CTL in containing rebound viremia.

  2. Molecular docking guided structure based design of symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea/thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Vangala, Radhika; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2013-08-01

    Induced fit molecular docking studies were performed on BMS-806 derivatives reported as small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding. Comprehensive study of protein-ligand interactions guided in identification and design of novel symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea and thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors. These molecules were synthesized in aqueous medium using microwave irradiation. Synthesized molecules were screened for their inhibitory ability by HIV-1 gp120-CD4 capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Designed compounds were found to inhibit HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding in micromolar (0.013-0.247 μM) concentrations.

  3. Inhibitor ranking through QM based chelation calculations for virtual screening of HIV-1 RNase H inhibition.

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    Vasanthanathan Poongavanam

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanical (QM calculations have been used to predict the binding affinity of a set of ligands towards HIV-1 RT associated RNase H (RNH. The QM based chelation calculations show improved binding affinity prediction for the inhibitors compared to using an empirical scoring function. Furthermore, full protein fragment molecular orbital (FMO calculations were conducted and subsequently analysed for individual residue stabilization/destabilization energy contributions to the overall binding affinity in order to better understand the true and false predictions. After a successful assessment of the methods based on the use of a training set of molecules, QM based chelation calculations were used as filter in virtual screening of compounds in the ZINC database. By this, we find, compared to regular docking, QM based chelation calculations to significantly reduce the large number of false positives. Thus, the computational models tested in this study could be useful as high throughput filters for searching HIV-1 RNase H active-site molecules in the virtual screening process.

  4. Effects of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Liver Fibrosis in HIV and Hepatitis C Coinfection

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    Lindsey J. Reese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Liver fibrosis is accelerated in HIV and hepatitis C coinfection, mediated by profibrotic effects of angiotensin. The objective of this study was to determine if angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is attenuate liver fibrosis in coinfection. Methods. A retrospective review of 156 coinfected subjects was conducted to analyze the association between exposure to ACE-Is and liver fibrosis. Noninvasive indices of liver fibrosis (APRI, FIB-4, Forns indices were compared between subjects who had taken ACE-Is and controls who had not taken them. Linear regression was used to evaluate ACE-I use as an independent predictor of fibrosis. Results. Subjects taking ACE-Is for three years were no different than controls on the APRI and the FIB-4 but had significantly higher scores than controls on the Forns index, indicating more advanced fibrosis. The use of ACE-Is for three years remained independently associated with an elevated Forns score when adjusted for age, race, and HIV viral load (P<0.001. There were significant associations between all of the indices and significant fibrosis, as determined clinically and radiologically. Conclusions. There was not a protective association between angiotensin inhibition and liver fibrosis in coinfection. These noninvasive indices may be useful for ruling out significant fibrosis in coinfection.

  5. Virtual screening of the SAMPL4 blinded HIV integrase inhibitors dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, Claire; Iorga, Bogdan I.

    2014-04-01

    Several combinations of docking software and scoring functions were evaluated for their ability to predict the binding of a dataset of potential HIV integrase inhibitors. We found that different docking software were appropriate for each one of the three binding sites considered (LEDGF, Y3 and fragment sites), and the most suitable two docking protocols, involving Glide SP and Gold ChemScore, were selected using a training set of compounds identified from the structural data available. These protocols could successfully predict respectively 20.0 and 23.6 % of the HIV integrase binders, all of them being present in the LEDGF site. When a different analysis of the results was carried out by removing all alternate isomers of binders from the set, our predictions were dramatically improved, with an overall ROC AUC of 0.73 and enrichment factor at 10 % of 2.89 for the prediction obtained using Gold ChemScore. This study highlighted the ability of the selected docking protocols to correctly position in most cases the ortho-alkoxy-carboxylate core functional group of the ligands in the corresponding binding site, but also their difficulties to correctly rank the docking poses.

  6. Novel non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. 1. Tricyclic pyridobenzo- and dipyridodiazepinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, K D; Proudfoot, J R; Grozinger, K G; Cullen, E; Kapadia, S R; Patel, U R; Fuchs, V U; Mauldin, S C; Vitous, J; Behnke, M L

    1991-07-01

    Novel pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepinones (I), pyrido[2,3-b][1,5]benzodiazepinones (II), and dipyrido[3,2-b:2',3'-e][1,4]diazepinones (III) were found to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase in vitro at concentrations as low as 35 nM. In all three series, small substituents (e.g., methyl, ethyl, acetyl) are preferred at the lactam nitrogen, whereas slightly larger alkyl moieties (e.g., ethyl, cyclopropyl) are favored at the other (N-11) diazepinone nitrogen. In general, lipophilic substituents are preferred on the A ring, whereas substitution on the C ring generally reduces potency relative to the corresponding compounds with no substituents on the aromatic rings. Maximum potency is achieved with methyl substitution at the position ortho to the lactam nitrogen atom; however, in this case an unsubstituted lactam nitrogen is preferred. Additional substituents on the A ring can be readily tolerated. The dipyridodiazepinone derivative 11-cyclopropyl-5,11-dihydro-4-methyl-6H-dipyrido[3,2-b:2',3'-e] [1,4]diazepin-6-one (96, nevirapine) is a potent (IC50 = 84 nM) and and selective non-nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and has been chosen for clinical evaluation.

  7. Ex vivo response to histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors of the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR derived from HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

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    Hao K Lu

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi can induce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transcription from the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR. However, ex vivo and in vivo responses to HDACi are variable and the activity of HDACi in cells other than T-cells have not been well characterised. Here, we developed a novel assay to determine the activity of HDACi on patient-derived HIV LTRs in different cell types. HIV LTRs from integrated virus were amplified using triple-nested Alu-PCR from total memory CD4+ T-cells (CD45RO+ isolated from HIV-infected patients prior to and following suppressive antiretroviral therapy. NL4-3 or patient-derived HIV LTRs were cloned into the chromatin forming episomal vector pCEP4, and the effect of HDACi investigated in the astrocyte and epithelial cell lines SVG and HeLa, respectively. There were no significant differences in the sequence of the HIV LTRs isolated from CD4+ T-cells prior to and after 18 months of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. We found that in both cell lines, the HDACi panobinostat, trichostatin A, vorinostat and entinostat activated patient-derived HIV LTRs to similar levels seen with NL4-3 and all patient derived isolates had similar sensitivity to maximum HDACi stimulation. We observed a marked difference in the maximum fold induction of luciferase by HDACi in HeLa and SVG, suggesting that the effect of HDACi may be influenced by the cellular environment. Finally, we observed significant synergy in activation of the LTR with vorinostat and the viral protein Tat. Together, our results suggest that the LTR sequence of integrated virus is not a major determinant of a functional response to an HDACi.

  8. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies...... indicating that the immunomodulatory drug rapamycin (RAPA) possesses anti-HIV properties both in vitro and in vivo that qualifies it as a potential new anti-HIV drug. It represents a literature review of published studies that evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of RAPA in HIV. RAPA represses HIV-1...... replication in vitro through different mechanisms including, but not limited, to down regulation of CCR5. In addition RAPA synergistically enhances the anti-HIV activity of entry inhibitors such as vicriviroc, aplaviroc and enfuvirtide in vitro. RAPA also inhibits HIV-1 infection in human peripheral blood...

  9. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies...... indicating that the immunomodulatory drug rapamycin (RAPA) possesses anti-HIV properties both in vitro and in vivo that qualifies it as a potential new anti-HIV drug. It represents a literature review of published studies that evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of RAPA in HIV. RAPA represses HIV-1...... replication in vitro through different mechanisms including, but not limited, to down regulation of CCR5. In addition RAPA synergistically enhances the anti-HIV activity of entry inhibitors such as vicriviroc, aplaviroc and enfuvirtide in vitro. RAPA also inhibits HIV-1 infection in human peripheral blood...

  10. Adherence to protease inhibitors, HIV-1 viral load, and development of drug resistance in an indigent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsberg, D R; Hecht, F M; Charlebois, E D; Zolopa, A R; Holodniy, M; Sheiner, L; Bamberger, J D; Chesney, M A; Moss, A

    2000-03-10

    To examine the relationship between adherence, viral suppression and antiretroviral resistance in HIV-infected homeless and marginally housed people on protease inhibitor (PI) therapy. A cross-sectional analysis of subjects in an observational prospective cohort systematically sampled from free meal lines, homeless shelters and low-income, single-room occupancy (SRO) hotels. Thirty-four HIV-infected people with a median of 12 months of PI therapy. Adherence measured by periodic unannounced pill counts, electronic medication monitoring, and self-report; HIV RNA viral load; and HIV-1 genotypic changes associated with drug resistance. Median adherence was 89, 73, and 67% by self-report, pill count, and electronic medication monitor, respectively. Thirty-eight per cent of the population had over 90% adherence by pill count. Depending on the measure, adherence explained 36-65% of the variation in concurrent HIV RNA levels. The three adherence measures were closely related. Of 20 genotyped patients who received a new reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) when starting a PI, three had primary protease gene substitutions. Of 12 genotyped patients who received a PI without a new RTI, six had primary protease gene substitutions (P < 0.03). A substantial proportion of homeless and marginally housed individuals had good adherence to PI therapy. A strong relationship was found between independent methods of measuring adherence and concurrent viral suppression. PI resistance was more closely related to the failure to change RTI when starting a PI than to the level of adherence.

  11. Chiral-catalyst-based convergent synthesis of HIV protease inhibitor GRL-06579A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, Hisashi; Sohtome, Yoshihiro; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2008-02-01

    Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of GRL-06579A (1), an HIV-1 protease inhibitor effective against multi-protease-inhibitor-resistant viruses, is described. A convergent strategy that utilizes heterobimetallic multifunctional catalysts developed in our group is a key feature of the synthesis. The chirality of the bicyclic tetrahydrofuran unit of 1 was introduced through Al-Li-bis(binaphthoxide) (ALB) catalyst-controlled Michael addition of dimethyl malonate to racemic 4-O-protected cyclopentenone. ALB afforded not only the trans adduct with up to 96% ee from a matched substrate through kinetic resolution, but also the cis adduct with 99% ee through a catalyst-controlled Michael addition to a mismatched substrate. The Michael addition to produce the unusual cis adduct is described in detail. The framework of the bicyclic tetrahydrofuran was constructed by an intramolecular oxy-Michael reaction. The amino alcohol unit was constructed by an La-Li3-tris(binaphthoxide) (LLB)-catalyzed diastereoselective nitroaldol reaction of N-Boc aldehyde (Boc = tert-butoxycarbonyl) derived from L-phenylalanine. LLB promoted the nitroaldol reaction without racemization of the chiral aldehyde to give the nitroaldol adduct in 85% yield and with 93:7 diastereoselectivity and over 99% ee.

  12. 含双环哌啶结构HIV-1抑制剂的设计合成及生物活性研究%Design, synthesis and biological activity of bicyclic piperidine-based HIV-1 inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛文祥; 董铭心; 朱卫国; 姜世勃; 戴秋云

    2011-01-01

    目的 设计合成一系列具有新型结构特征的双环哌啶类C-C族趋化因子受体5(CCR5)抑制剂并测定其抗HIV-1活性.方法 以HIV-1辅助受体CCR5抑制剂Vicriviroc的结构为模板,通过改变左侧哌嗪结构、取代基位置等方法设计并合成一系列新化合物.并利用MS及1H-NMR谱对这些化合物进行结构表征.结果 与结论合成了15个新结构化合物,活性测试结果表明,该系列化合物具有较强的抗HIV-1 R5病毒株的活性(IC50=1.20~66.24μmol·L-1).当R1为芳基结构且两个氮原子满足标准的丙二胺结构时,化合物的活性更好.%CCR5 is a major co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into human cells and is also a good target for antiHIV-1 drug design. Based on the chemical structure of Vicriviroc, a CCR5 antagonist, a series of new compounds were designed by changing its piperazine loop and other group substitutions. In the present study,15 bicyclic piperidine-based compounds were synthesized using a convergent synthetic route, and the structures of the target compounds were confirmed by MS and 1H-NMR. The synthetic routes were as follows:N-Bocpiperidine-4-carboxylic acid, N-Boc-pyrro-3-carboxylic acid and N-Boc-ethylenediamine were coupled with theamine derivatives to give the corresponding compounds 1a- 1d,2a- 2c,3a- 3c,4-piperidinone hydrochloride reacted with 2,6-dimethylbenzoyl chloride,2,6-dichlorobenzoyl chloride and 2,4,6-trimethyl-5-pyrimidine carbonyl chloride to obtain the compounds 4a -4c. Then 4a -4c was reacted with 1a - 1d,2a -2c ,3a - 3c to give the target compounds I 1 - I 15. Furthermore, the antiviral activity and cell cytotoxicity of these compounds were evaluated with HIV-1 R5 strain in vitro. The results showed that all the target compounds exhibited potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 R5 strain( IC50 = 1.20 -66. 24 μmol· L-1 ). Preliminary analysis of the structure-activity relationship showed that some compounds with an aryl group and the 1,3-diamino

  13. In vitro and ex vivo evaluations on transdermal delivery of the HIV inhibitor IQP-0410.

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    Anthony S Ham

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the physicochemical and in vitro/ex vivo characteristics of the pyrmidinedione IQP-0410 formulated into transdermal films. IQP-0410 is a potent therapeutic anti-HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that would be subjected to extensive first pass metabolism, through conventional oral administration. Therefore, IQP-0410 was formulated into ethyl cellulose/HPMC-based transdermal films via solvent casting. In mano evaluations were performed to evaluate gross physical characteristics. In vitro release studies were performed in both Franz cells and USP-4 dissolution vessels. Ex vivo release and permeability assays were performed on human epidermal tissue models, and the permeated IQP-0410 was collected for in vitro HIV-1 efficacy assays in CEM-SS cells and PBMCs. Film formulation D3 resulted in pliable, strong transdermal films that were loaded with 2% (w/w IQP-0410. Composed of 60% (w/w ethyl cellulose and 20% (w/w HPMC, the films contained < 1.2% (w/w of water and were hygroscopic resulting in significant swelling under humid conditions. The water permeable nature of the film resulted in complete in vitro dissolution and drug release in 26 hours. When applied to ex vivo epidermal tissues, the films were non-toxic to the tissue and also were non-toxic to HIV target cells used in the in vitro efficacy assays. Over a 3 day application, the films delivered IQP-0410 through the skin tissue at a zero-order rate of 0.94 ± 0.06 µg/cm(2/hr with 134 ± 14.7 µM collected in the basal media. The delivered IQP-0410 resulted in in vitro EC50 values against HIV-1 of 2.56 ± 0.40 nM (CEM-SS and 0.58 ± 0.03 nM (PBMC. The film formulation demonstrated no significant deviation from target values when packaged in foil pouches under standard and accelerated environmental conditions. It was concluded that the transdermal film formulation was a potentially viable method of administering IQP-0410 that warrants

  14. The evaluation of statins as potential inhibitors of the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Angela T; Kriel, Frederik H; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A; Mosebi, Salerwe; Abrahams, Shaakira; Hewer, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    Lovastatin was identified through virtual screening as a potential inhibitor of the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction. In an AlphaScreen assay, lovastatin inhibited the purified recombinant protein-protein interaction (IC50 = 1.97 ± 0.45 μm) more effectively than seven other tested statins. None of the eight statins, however, yielded antiviral activity in vitro, while only pravastatin lactone yielded detectable inhibition of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer activity (31.65% at 100 μm). A correlation between lipophilicity and increased cellular toxicity of the statins was observed.

  15. An Acquired Factor VIII Inhibitor in a Patient with HIV and HCV: A Case Presentation and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Zeichner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite its low incidence, acquired factor VIII inhibitor is the most common autoantibody affecting the clotting cascade. The exact mechanism of acquisition remains unclear, but postpartum patients, those with autoimmune conditions or malignancies, and those with exposure to particular drugs appear most susceptible. There have been several case reports describing acquired FVIII inhibitors in patients receiving interferon alpha for HCV treatment and in patients being treated for HIV. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient with HCV and HIV who was not actively receiving treatment for either condition. Case Presentation. A 57-year-old Caucasian male with a history of HIV and HCV was admitted to our hospital for a several day history of progressively worsening right thigh bruising and generalized weakness. CTA of the abdominal arteries revealed large bilateral retroperitoneal hematomas. Laboratory studies revealed the presence of a high titer FVIII inhibitor. Conclusion. Our case of a very rare condition highlights the importance of recognizing and understanding the diagnosis of acquired FVIII inhibitor. Laboratory research and clinical data on the role of newer agents are needed in order to better characterize disease pathogenesis, disease associations, genetic markers, and optimal disease management.

  16. Plasma Selenium Concentrations Are Sufficient and Associated with Protease Inhibitor Use in Treated HIV-Infected Adults123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hileman, Corrilynn O; Dirajlal-Fargo, Sahera; Lam, Suet Kam; Kumar, Jessica; Lacher, Craig; Combs, Gerald F; McComsey, Grace A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selenium is an essential constituent of selenoproteins, which play a substantial role in antioxidant defense and inflammatory cascades. Selenium deficiency is associated with disease states characterized by inflammation, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although HIV infection has been associated with low selenium, the role of selenium status in HIV-related CVD is unclear. Objectives: We sought to assess associations between plasma selenium and markers of inflammation, immune activation, and subclinical vascular disease in HIV-infected adults on contemporary antiretroviral therapy (ART) and to determine if statin therapy modifies selenium status. Methods: In the Stopping Atherosclerosis and Treating Unhealthy bone with RosuvastatiN trial, HIV-infected adults on stable ART were randomly assigned 1:1 to rosuvastatin or placebo. Plasma selenium concentrations were determined at entry, week 24, and week 48. Spearman correlation and linear regression analyses were used to assess relations between baseline selenium, HIV-related factors and markers of inflammation, immune activation, and subclinical vascular disease. Changes in selenium over 24 and 48 wk were compared between groups. Results: One hundred forty-seven HIV-infected adults were included. All participants were on ART. Median current CD4+ count was 613, and 76% had HIV-1 RNA ≤48 copies/mL (range: contemporary ART. The association between current PI use and higher selenium may have implications for ART allocation, especially in resource-limited countries. Also, it appears that statin therapy may increase selenium concentrations; however, larger studies are necessary to confirm this finding. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01218802. PMID:26269240

  17. Extracts of medicinal herb Sanguisorba officinalis inhibit the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianguo; Chen, Jianping; Tan, Zhiwu; Peng, Jie; Zheng, Xiao; Nishiura, Kenji; Ng, Jenny; Wang, Zhiyu; Wang, Dongmei; Chen, Zhiwei; Liu, Li

    2013-12-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been successful in reducing HIV-1-associated morbidity and mortality since its introduction in 1996. It, however, fails to eradicate HIV-1 infection thoroughly. The high cost of life-long HAART and the emergence of drug resistance among HIV-1-infected individuals have brought renewed pressure for the discovery of novel antivirals and alternative medicines. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is one of the mainstreams of complementary and alternative medicine, and serves as rich resources for new drug development. Despite almost 100 plant-derived compounds are in clinical trials, few target HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that extract of Sanguisorba officinalis (SOE) has anti-HIV-1 activities. Using a cell-based assay and single-cycle luciferase reporter viruses pseudotyped with envelopes from HIV-1 or control viruses, we found that SOE exhibited significant inhibitory ability against both CCR5 and CXCR4 tropic HIV-1 (ADA and HXB2) with respective IC50 values of 1.91±0.16 μg/ml and 3.70±0.53 μg/ml. Interestingly, SOE also inhibited SIV infection but failed to block vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), SARS-CoV and influeunza H5N1 pseudoviruses. Furthermore, we showed that SOE had no effects on post-entry events of HIV-1 replication. It blocked entry by acting on viral envelope directly because SOE pre-treatment with the virus but not with cell lines expressing viral receptors showed the maximal inhibitory activity. In addition, SOE was able to inhibit reverse-transcription-inhibitor-resistant viruses (K103N, Y188L, and K103N/Y188L/G190A) and a protease-inhibitor-resistant strain (PI-2840). Our findings demonstrated SOE as a novel and specific entry inhibitor, which shed lights on the discovery of anti-HIV-1 drugs from traditional herbal medicines.

  18. Reduced maximal inhibition in phenotypic susceptibility assays indicates that viral strains resistant to the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc utilize inhibitor-bound receptor for entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westby, Mike; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Mori, Julie; Lewis, Marilyn; Mosley, Michael; Stockdale, Mark; Dorr, Patrick; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Perros, Manos

    2007-03-01

    Maraviroc is a CCR5 antagonist in clinical development as one of a new class of antiretrovirals targeting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptor binding. We investigated the mechanism of HIV resistance to maraviroc by using in vitro sequential passage and site-directed mutagenesis. Serial passage through increasing maraviroc concentrations failed to select maraviroc-resistant variants from some laboratory-adapted and clinical isolates of HIV-1. However, high-level resistance to maraviroc was selected from three of six primary isolates passaged in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The SF162 strain acquired resistance to maraviroc in both treated and control cultures; all resistant variants were able to use CXCR4 as a coreceptor. In contrast, maraviroc-resistant virus derived from isolates CC1/85 and RU570 remained CCR5 tropic, as evidenced by susceptibility to the CCR5 antagonist SCH-C, resistance to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, and an inability to replicate in CCR5 Delta32/Delta32 PBL. Strain-specific mutations were identified in the V3 loop of maraviroc-resistant CC1/85 and RU570. The envelope-encoding region of maraviroc-resistant CC1/85 was inserted into an NL4-3 background. This recombinant virus was completely resistant to maraviroc but retained susceptibility to aplaviroc. Reverse mutation of gp120 residues 316 and 323 in the V3 loop (numbering from HXB2) to their original sequence restored wild-type susceptibility to maraviroc, while reversion of either mutation resulted in a partially sensitive virus with reduced maximal inhibition (plateau). The plateaus are consistent with the virus having acquired the ability to utilize maraviroc-bound receptor for entry. This hypothesis was further corroborated by the observation that a high concentration of maraviroc blocks the activity of aplaviroc against maraviroc-resistant virus.

  19. Multi-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistant HIV type-1 in a patient from Sierra Leone failing stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Hamers; A.M.J. Wensing; N.K.T. Back; M.S. Arcilla; J.P.H. Frissen

    2011-01-01

    We report a 33-year-old HIV type-1 (HIV-1)-infected male from Sierra Leone who harboured extensive drug resistance mutations to all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-NRTIs, including the multi-NRTI-resistance Q151M complex, K65R, M184I and Y181I, after using standard first-

  20. Ultra-fast analysis of plasma and intracellular levels of HIV protease inhibitors in children: A clinical application of MALDI mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); M.L. Reedijk (Mariska); P.C. Burgers (Peter); L.J.M. Dekker (Lennard); N.G. Hartwig (Nico); I.E. van der Ende (Ineke); R. de Groot (Ronald); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D.M. Burger (David); T.M. Luider (Theo); R.A. Gruters (Rob)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHIV protease inhibitors must penetrate into cells to exert their action. Differences in the intracellular pharmacokinetics of these drugs may explain why some patients fail on therapy or suffer from drug toxicity. Yet, there is no information available on the intracellular levels of HIV

  1. IFN-λ Inhibits Drug-Resistant HIV Infection of Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Wang, He; Liu, Man-Qing; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Run-Hong; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Zhou, Wang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) have been demonstrated to inhibit a number of viruses, including HIV. Here, we further examined the anti-HIV effect of IFN-λs in macrophages. We found that IFN-λs synergistically enhanced anti-HIV activity of antiretrovirals [azidothymidine (AZT), efavirenz, indinavir, and enfuvirtide] in infected macrophages. Importantly, IFN-λs could suppress HIV infection of macrophages with the drug-resistant strains, including AZT-resistant virus (A012) and reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant virus (TC49). Mechanistically, IFN-λs were able to induce the expression of several important anti-HIV cellular factors, including myxovirus resistance 2 (Mx2), a newly identified HIV post-entry inhibitor and tetherin, a restriction factor that blocks HIV release from infected cells. These observations provide additional evidence to support the potential use of IFN-λs as therapeutics agents for the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:28321215

  2. Screening of new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 based on traditional Chinese medicines database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Liu; Ai Xiu Li; You Pan Miao; Ke Zhu Wu; Yi Ma

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 RT is an important target for the treatment of AIDS. There are two major classes of antiviral agents that inhibit HIV-1 RT have been identified, nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). In this report, a noval class of non-nucleoside compound with potential RT inhibitory activity were found from the traditional Chinese medicines database (TCMD) using a combination of virtual screening, docking, molecular dynamic simulations, where results were ranked by scoring function of the docking tool. The result indicates that M4753 (a compound derived from TCMD) has not only the lowest bonding energy but also the best match in geometric conformation with the forthcoming NNRTIs. Accordingly M4753 might possibly become a promising lead compound of NNRTIs for AIDS therapy.

  3. Diastereoselective synthesis and molecular docking studies of novel fused tetrahydropyridine derivatives as new inhibitors of HIV protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali A.; Taheri, Salman; Amouzegar, Ali; Ahdenov, Reza; Halvagar, Mohammad Reza; Sadr, Ahmad Shahir

    2017-07-01

    An efficient one-pot, catalyst-free, and four-components procedure for the synthesis of novel 10b-hydroxy-4-nitro-5-phenyl-2,3,5,5a-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[1,2-a]indeno[2,1-e]pyridin-6(10bH)-one derivatives from corresponding diamine, nitro ketene dithioacetal, aldehydes and 1,3-indandione in ethanol has been achieved upon a Knoevenagel condensation-Michael addition-tautomerism-cyclisation sequence. All the newly synthesized compounds were screened for molecular docking studies. Molecular docking studies were carried out using the crystal structure of HIV protease enzyme. Some of the compounds obtain minimum binding energy and good affinity toward the active pocket of HIV protease enzyme in compare with Saquinavir as a standard HIV protease inhibitor.

  4. Selective histonedeacetylase inhibitor M344 intervenes in HIV-1 latency through increasing histone acetylation and activation of NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ying

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors present an exciting new approach to activate HIV production from latently infected cells to potentially enhance elimination of these cells and achieve a cure. M344, a novel HDAC inhibitor, shows robust activity in a variety of cancer cells and relatively low toxicity compared to trichostatin A (TSA. However, little is known about the effects and action mechanism of M344 in inducing HIV expression in latently infected cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the Jurkat T cell model of HIV latency, we demonstrate that M344 effectively reactivates HIV-1 gene expression in latently infected cells. Moreover, M344-mediated activation of the latent HIV LTR can be strongly inhibited by a NF-κB inhibitor aspirin. We further show that M344 acts by increasing the acetylation of histone H3 and histone H4 at the nucleosome 1 (nuc-1 site of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR and by inducing NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and direct RelA DNA binding at the nuc-1 region of the HIV-1 LTR. We also found that M344 synergized with prostratin to activate the HIV-1 LTR promoter in latently infected cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest the potential of M344 in anti-latency therapies and an important role for histone modifications and NF-κB transcription factors in regulating HIV-1 LTR gene expression.

  5. Creating an Artificial Tail Anchor as a Novel Strategy To Enhance the Potency of Peptide-Based HIV Fusion Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shan; Zhu, Yun; Ye, Sheng; Qi, Qianqian; Xia, Shuai; Ma, Zhenxuan; Yu, Fei; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Rongguang; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2017-01-01

    20 (enfuvirtide) and other peptides derived from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) region inhibit HIV fusion by binding to the hydrophobic grooves on the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) trimer and blocking six-helix-bundle (6-HB) formation. Several strategies focusing on the binding grooves of the NHR trimer have been adopted to increase the antiviral activity of the CHR peptides. Here, we developed a novel and simple strategy to greatly enhance the potency of the existing peptide-based HIV fusion inhibitors. First, we identified a shallow pocket adjacent to the groove in the N-terminal region of NHR trimer as a new drug target, and then we designed several short artificial peptides to fit this target. After the addition of IDL (Ile-Asp-Leu) to the C terminus of CHR peptide WQ or MT-WQ, the conjugated peptides, WQ-IDL and MT-WQ-IDL, showed much more potent activities than WQ and T20, respectively, in inhibiting HIV-1 IIIB infection. WQ-IDL and MT-WQ-IDL were also more effective than WQ in blocking HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and had higher levels of binding affinity with NHR peptide N46. We solved the crystal structure of the 6-HB formed by MT-WQ-IDL and N46 and found that, besides the N-terminal MT hook tail, the IDL tail anchor of MT-WQ-IDL also binds with the shallow hydrophobic pocket outside the groove of the NHR trimer, resulting in enhanced inhibition of HIV-1 fusion with the target cell. It is expected that this novel approach can be widely used to improve the potency of peptidic fusion inhibitors against other enveloped viruses with class I fusion proteins.

  6. Structural studies of series HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors 1-(2,6-difluorobenzyl)-2-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-benzimidazoles with different 4-substituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-03-01

    Over the past 10 years, several anti-viral drugs have become available to fight the HIV infection. Antiretroviral treatment reduces the mortality of AIDS. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are specific and potentially nontoxic drugs against AIDS. The crystal structures of five nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are presented here. The structural parameters, especially those describing the angular orientation of the π-electron systems and influencing biological activity, were determined for all of the investigated inhibitors. The chemical character and orientation of the substituent at C4 position of the benzimidazole moiety substantially influences the anti-viral activity. The structural data of the investigated inhibitors is a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions for structure-assisted drug design.

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors To Combat Drug Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M. (MIT); (UMASS, MED); (Sanford-Burnham)

    2012-09-11

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants. In particular, inhibitors containing the 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies.

  8. The dual CCR5 and CCR2 inhibitor cenicriviroc does not redistribute HIV into extracellular space: implications for plasma viral load and intracellular DNA decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Victor G; Hassounah, Said; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Oliveira, Maureen; Lefebvre, Eric; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Cenicriviroc is a potent antagonist of the chemokine coreceptors 5 and 2 (CCR5/CCR2) and blocks HIV-1 entry. The CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has been shown in tissue culture to be able to repel cell-free virions from the cell surface into extracellular space. We hypothesized that cenicriviroc might exhibit a similar effect, and tested this using clinical samples from the Phase IIb study 652-2-202, by measuring rates of intracellular DNA decline. We also monitored viral RNA levels in culture fluids. We infected PM-1 cells with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 BaL in the presence or absence of inhibitory concentrations of cenicriviroc (20 nM) or maraviroc (50 nM) or controls. Viral load levels and p24 were measured by ELISA, quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR at 4 h post-infection. Frozen PBMC DNA samples from 30 patients with virological success in the Phase IIb study were studied, as were early and late reverse transcript levels. Docking studies compared binding between cenicriviroc/CCR5 and maraviroc/CCR5. Unlike maraviroc, cenicriviroc did not cause an increase in the amount of virus present in culture fluids at 4 h compared with baseline. The use of cenicriviroc did, however, result in lower levels of intracellular viral DNA after 4 h. Structural modelling indicates that cenicriviroc binds more deeply than maraviroc to the hydrophobic pocket of CCR5, providing an explanation for the absence of viral rebound with cenicriviroc. In contrast to maraviroc, cenicriviroc does not repel virus back into extracellular space. Differences in results may be due to superior binding of cenicriviroc to CCR5 compared with maraviroc. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Potent NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by the HIV Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Abacavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toksoy, Atiye; Sennefelder, Helga; Adam, Christian; Hofmann, Sonja; Trautmann, Axel; Goebeler, Matthias; Schmidt, Marc

    2017-02-17

    There is experimental and clinical evidence that some exanthematous allergic drug hypersensitivity reactions are mediated by drug-specific T cells. We hypothesized that the capacity of certain drugs to directly stimulate the innate immune system may contribute to generate drug-specific T cells. Here we analyzed whether abacavir, an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor often inducing severe delayed-type drug hypersensitivity, can trigger innate immune activation that may contribute to its allergic potential. We show that abacavir fails to generate direct innate immune activation in human monocytes but potently triggers IL-1β release upon pro-inflammatory priming with phorbol ester or Toll-like receptor stimulation. IL-1β processing and secretion were sensitive to Caspase-1 inhibition, NLRP3 knockdown, and K(+) efflux inhibition and were not observed with other non-allergenic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, identifying abacavir as a specific inflammasome activator. It further correlated with dose-dependent mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and cytotoxicity, indicating that inflammasome activation resulted from mitochondrial damage. However, both NLRP3 depletion and inhibition of K(+) efflux mitigated abacavir-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and cytotoxicity, suggesting that these processes were secondary to NLRP3 activation. Instead, depletion of cardiolipin synthase 1 abolished abacavir-induced IL-1β secretion, suggesting that mitochondrial cardiolipin release may trigger abacavir-induced inflammasome activation. Our data identify abacavir as a novel inflammasome-stimulating drug allergen. They implicate a potential contribution of innate immune activation to medication-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity, which may stimulate new concepts for treatment and prevention of drug allergies.

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel L-ascorbic acid-conjugated pentacyclic triterpene derivatives as potential influenza virus entry inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Xu, Renyang; Shi, Yongying; Si, Longlong; Jiao, Pingxuan; Fan, Zibo; Han, Xu; Wu, Xingyu; Zhou, Xiaoshu; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Yongmin; Zhang, Liangren; Zhang, Lihe; Zhou, Demin; Xiao, Sulong

    2016-03-03

    Since the influenza viruses can rapidly evolve, it is urgently required to develop novel anti-influenza agents possessing a novel mechanism of action. In our previous study, two pentacyclic triterpene derivatives (Q8 and Y3) have been found to have anti-influenza virus entry activities. Keeping the potential synergy of biological activity of pentacyclic triterpenes and l-ascorbic acid in mind, we synthesized a series of novel l-ascorbic acid-conjugated pentacyclic triterpene derivatives (18-26, 29-31, 35-40 and 42-43). Moreover, we evaluated these novel compounds for their anti-influenza activities against A/WSN/33 virus in MDCK cells. Among all evaluated compounds, the 2,3-O,O-dibenzyl-6-deoxy-l-ascorbic acid-betulinic acid conjugate (30) showed the most significant anti-influenza activity with an EC50 of 8.7 μM, and no cytotoxic effects on MDCK cells were observed. Time-of-addition assay indicated that compound 30 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle. Further analyses revealed that influenza virus-induced hemagglutination of chicken red blood cells was inhibited by treatment of compound 30, and the interaction between the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) and compound 30 was determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with a dissociation constant of KD = 3.76 μM. Finally, silico docking studies indicated that compound 30 and its derivative 31 were able to occupy the binding pocket of HA for sialic acid receptor. Collectively, these results suggested that l-ascorbic acid-conjugated pentacyclic triterpenes were promising anti-influenza entry inhibitors, and HA protein associated with viral entry was a promising drug target.

  11. A Novel Role for the Receptor of the Complement Cleavage Fragment C5a, C5aR1, in CCR5-Mediated Entry of HIV into Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E; Aliberti, Julio; Groeneweg, Sander; Köhl, Jörg; Chougnet, Claire A

    2016-04-01

    The complement system is an ancient pattern recognition system that becomes activated during all stages of HIV infection. Previous studies have shown that C5a can enhance the infection of monocyte-derived macrophages and T cells indirectly through the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the attraction of dendritic cells. C5a exerts its multiple biologic functions mainly through activation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1). Here, we assessed the role of C5aR1 as an enhancer of CCR5-mediated HIV infection. We determined CCR5 and C5aR1 heterodimer formation in myeloid cells and the impact of C5aR1 blockade on HIV entry and genomic integration. C5aR1/CCR5 heterodimer formation was identified by immunoprecipitation and western blotting. THP-1 cells and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were infected by R5 laboratory strains or HIV pseudotyped for the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) envelope. Levels of integrated HIV were measured by quantitative PCR after targeting of C5aR1 by a C5aR antagonist, neutralizing C5aR1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or hC5a. C5aR1 was also silenced by specific siRNA prior to viral entry. We found that C5aR1 forms heterodimers with the HIV coreceptor CCR5 in myeloid cells. Targeting C5aR1 significantly decreased integration by R5 viruses but not by VSV-pseudotyped viruses, suggesting that C5aR1 is critical for viral entry. The level of inhibition achieved with C5aR1-blocking reagents was comparable to that of CCR5 antagonists. Mechanistically, C5aR1 targeting decreased CCR5 expression. MDM from CCR5Δ32 homozygous subjects expressed levels of C5aR1 similar to CCR5 WT individuals, suggesting that mere C5aR1 expression is not sufficient for HIV infection. HIV appeared to preferentially enter THP-1 cells expressing high levels of both C5aR1 and CCR5. Targeted reduction of C5aR1 expression in such cells reduced HIV infection by ~50%. Our data thus suggest that C5aR1 acts as an enhancer of CCR5-mediated HIV entry into

  12. Proteochemometric modeling of the bioactivity spectra of HIV-1 protease inhibitors by introducing protein-ligand interaction fingerprint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Huang

    Full Text Available HIV-1 protease is one of the main therapeutic targets in HIV. However, a major problem in treatment of HIV is the rapid emergence of drug-resistant strains. It should be particularly helpful to clinical therapy of AIDS if one method can be used to predict antivirus capability of compounds for different variants. In our study, proteochemometric (PCM models were created to study the bioactivity spectra of 92 chemical compounds with 47 unique HIV-1 protease variants. In contrast to other PCM models, which used Multiplication of Ligands and Proteins Descriptors (MLPD as cross-term, one new cross-term, i.e. Protein-Ligand Interaction Fingerprint (PLIF was introduced in our modeling. With different combinations of ligand descriptors, protein descriptors and cross-terms, nine PCM models were obtained, and six of them achieved good predictive abilities (Q(2(test>0.7. These results showed that the performance of PCM models could be improved when ligand and protein descriptors were complemented by the newly introduced cross-term PLIF. Compared with the conventional cross-term MLPD, the newly introduced PLIF had a better predictive ability. Furthermore, our best model (GD & P & PLIF: Q(2(test = 0.8271 could select out those inhibitors which have a broad antiviral activity. As a conclusion, our study indicates that proteochemometric modeling with PLIF as cross-term is a potential useful way to solve the HIV-1 drug-resistant problem.

  13. An assay to monitor HIV-1 protease activity for the identification of novel inhibitors in T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett J Hilton

    Full Text Available The emergence of resistant HIV strains, together with the severe side-effects of existing drugs and lack of development of effective anti-HIV vaccines highlight the need for novel antivirals, as well as innovative methods to facilitate their discovery. Here, we have developed an assay in T-cells to monitor the proteolytic activity of the HIV-1 protease (PR. The assay is based on the inducible expression of HIV-1 PR fused within the Gal4 DNA-binding and transactivation domains. The fusion protein binds to the Gal4 responsive element and activates the downstream reporter, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP gene only in the presence of an effective PR Inhibitor (PI. Thus, in this assay, eGFP acts as a biosensor of PR activity, making it ideal for flow cytometry based screening. Furthermore, the assay was developed using retroviral technology in T-cells, thus providing an ideal environment for the screening of potential novel PIs in a cell-type that represents the natural milieu of HIV infection. Clones with the highest sensitivity, and robust, reliable and reproducible reporter activity, were selected. The assay is easily adaptable to other PR variants, a multiplex platform, as well as to high-throughput plate reader based assays and will greatly facilitate the search for novel peptide and chemical compound based PIs in T-cells.

  14. 3D-QSAR studies on chromone derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn; Samee, Weerasak; Pimthon, Jutarat

    2004-02-01

    The three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) approach using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) was applied to a series of 30 chromone derivatives, a new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. The best predictive CoMFA model gives cross-validated r2 ( q2)=0.763, non-cross-validated r2=0.967, standard error of estimate ( S)=5.092, F=90.701. The best CoMSIA model has q2=0.707, non-cross-validated r2=0.943, S=7.018, F=51.734, included steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bond donor fields. The predictive ability of these models was validated by a set of five compounds that were not included in the training set. The calculated (predicted) and experimental inhibitory activities were well correlated. The contour maps obtained from CoMFA and CoMSIA models were in agreement with the previous docking study for this chromone series.

  15. Searching for novel scaffold of triazole non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frączek, Tomasz; Paneth, Agata; Kamiński, Rafał; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Paneth, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Azoles are a promising class of the new generation of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). From thousands of reported compounds, many possess the same basic structure of an aryl substituted azole ring linked by a thioglycolamide chain with another aromatic ring. In order to find novel extensions for this basic scaffold, we explored the 5-position substitution pattern of triazole NNRTIs using molecular docking followed by the synthesis of selected compounds. We found that heterocyclic substituents in the 5-position of the triazole ring are detrimental to the inhibitory activity of compounds with four-membered thioglycolamide linker and this substitution seems to be viable only for compounds with shorter two-membered linker. Promising compound, N-(4-carboxy-2-chlorophenyl)-2-((4-benzyl-5-methyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)sulfanyl)acetamide, with potent inhibitory activity and acceptable aqueous solubility has been identified in this study that could serve as lead scaffold for the development of novel water-soluble salts of triazole NNRTIs.

  16. HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitors: design, synthesis and molecular modeling investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Laura; De Grazia, Sara; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Chimirri, Alba

    2011-02-01

    This study is focused on a new series of benzylindole derivatives with various substituents at the benzene-fused ring, suggested by our 3D pharmacophore model developed for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs). All synthesized compounds proved to be active in the nanomolar range (6-35 nM) on the strand-transfer step (ST). In particular, derivative 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5,7-dimethoxy-1H-indol-3-yl]-2-hydroxy-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid (8e), presenting the highest best-fit value on pharmacophore model, showed a potency comparable to that of clinical INSTIs GS 9137 (1) and MK-0518 (2). The binding mode of our molecules has been investigated using the recently published crystal structure of the complex of full-length integrase from the prototype foamy virus in complex with its cognate DNA (PFV-IN/DNA). The results highlighted the ability of derivative 8e to assume the same binding mode of MK-0518 and GS 9137.

  17. Rationally designed interfacial peptides are efficient in vitro inhibitors of HIV-1 capsid assembly with antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Bocanegra

    Full Text Available Virus capsid assembly constitutes an attractive target for the development of antiviral therapies; a few experimental inhibitors of this process for HIV-1 and other viruses have been identified by screening compounds or by selection from chemical libraries. As a different, novel approach we have undertaken the rational design of peptides that could act as competitive assembly inhibitors by mimicking capsid structural elements involved in intersubunit interfaces. Several discrete interfaces involved in formation of the mature HIV-1 capsid through polymerization of the capsid protein CA were targeted. We had previously designed a peptide, CAC1, that represents CA helix 9 (a major part of the dimerization interface and binds the CA C-terminal domain in solution. Here we have mapped the binding site of CAC1, and shown that it substantially overlaps with the CA dimerization interface. We have also rationally modified CAC1 to increase its solubility and CA-binding affinity, and designed four additional peptides that represent CA helical segments involved in other CA interfaces. We found that peptides CAC1, its derivative CAC1M, and H8 (representing CA helix 8 were able to efficiently inhibit the in vitro assembly of the mature HIV-1 capsid. Cocktails of several peptides, including CAC1 or CAC1M plus H8 or CAI (a previously discovered inhibitor of CA polymerization, or CAC1M+H8+CAI, also abolished capsid assembly, even when every peptide was used at lower, sub-inhibitory doses. To provide a preliminary proof that these designed capsid assembly inhibitors could eventually serve as lead compounds for development of anti-HIV-1 agents, they were transported into cultured cells using a cell-penetrating peptide, and tested for antiviral activity. Peptide cocktails that drastically inhibited capsid assembly in vitro were also able to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 infection ex vivo. This study validates a novel, entirely rational approach for the design of capsid

  18. A novel bispecific peptide HIV-1 fusion inhibitor targeting the N-terminal heptad repeat and fusion peptide domains in gp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xifeng; Jia, Qiyan; Lu, Lu; Yu, Fei; Zheng, Jishen; Shi, Weiguo; Cai, Lifeng; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 fusion with the target cell is initiated by the insertion of the gp41 fusion peptide (FP) into the target cell membrane and the interaction between the gp41 N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR), followed by the formation of the six-helix bundle (6-HB) fusion core. Therefore, both FP and NHR are important targets for HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Here, we designed and synthesized a dual-target peptidic HIV-1 fusion inhibitor, 4HR-LBD-VIRIP, in which 4HR-LBD is able to bind to the gp41 NHR domain, while VIRIP is able to interact with gp41 FP. We found that 4HR-LBD-VIRIP is about tenfold more potent than 4HR-LBD and VIRIP in inhibiting HIV-1IIIB infection and HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env)-mediated cell-cell fusion, suggesting that this dual-target HIV-1 fusion inhibitor possesses a strong synergistic antiviral effect. A biophysical analysis indicates that 4HR-LBD-VIRIP can interact with N70 peptide that contains the gp41 NHR and FP domains and binds with lipid membrane. This study provides a new approach for designing novel viral fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses with class I membrane fusion proteins.

  19. The prototype HIV-1 maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, binds to the CA-SP1 cleavage site in immature Gag particles

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    Nguyen Albert T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bevirimat, the prototype Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 maturation inhibitor, is highly potent in cell culture and efficacious in HIV-1 infected patients. In contrast to inhibitors that target the active site of the viral protease, bevirimat specifically inhibits a single cleavage event, the final processing step for the Gag precursor where p25 (CA-SP1 is cleaved to p24 (CA and SP1. Results In this study, photoaffinity analogs of bevirimat and mass spectrometry were employed to map the binding site of bevirimat to Gag within immature virus-like particles. Bevirimat analogs were found to crosslink to sequences overlapping, or proximal to, the CA-SP1 cleavage site, consistent with previous biochemical data on the effect of bevirimat on Gag processing and with genetic data from resistance mutations, in a region predicted by NMR and mutational studies to have α-helical character. Unexpectedly, a second region of interaction was found within the Major Homology Region (MHR. Extensive prior genetic evidence suggests that the MHR is critical for virus assembly. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a direct interaction between the maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, and its target, Gag. Information gained from this study sheds light on the mechanisms by which the virus develops resistance to this class of drug and may aid in the design of next-generation maturation inhibitors.

  20. The prototype HIV-1 maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, binds to the CA-SP1 cleavage site in immature Gag particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Bevirimat, the prototype Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation inhibitor, is highly potent in cell culture and efficacious in HIV-1 infected patients. In contrast to inhibitors that target the active site of the viral protease, bevirimat specifically inhibits a single cleavage event, the final processing step for the Gag precursor where p25 (CA-SP1) is cleaved to p24 (CA) and SP1. Results In this study, photoaffinity analogs of bevirimat and mass spectrometry were employed to map the binding site of bevirimat to Gag within immature virus-like particles. Bevirimat analogs were found to crosslink to sequences overlapping, or proximal to, the CA-SP1 cleavage site, consistent with previous biochemical data on the effect of bevirimat on Gag processing and with genetic data from resistance mutations, in a region predicted by NMR and mutational studies to have α-helical character. Unexpectedly, a second region of interaction was found within the Major Homology Region (MHR). Extensive prior genetic evidence suggests that the MHR is critical for virus assembly. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a direct interaction between the maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, and its target, Gag. Information gained from this study sheds light on the mechanisms by which the virus develops resistance to this class of drug and may aid in the design of next-generation maturation inhibitors. PMID:22151792

  1. Nonnucleoside Reverse-transcriptase Inhibitor- vs Ritonavir-boosted Protease Inhibitor-based Regimens for Initial Treatment of HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Álvaro H; Lundh, Andreas; Tendal, Britta;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Previous studies suggest that nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) cause faster virologic suppression, while ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/r) recover more CD4 cells. However, individual trials have not been powered to compare clinical outcomes. METHODS:...

  2. Insights into the broad cellular effects of nelfinavir and the HIV protease inhibitors supporting their role in cancer treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Casper, Corey; Ambinder, Richard F

    2013-09-01

    The development of HIV protease inhibitors more than two decades ago heralded a new era in HIV care, changing the infection from universally fatal to chronic but controllable. With the widespread use of protease inhibitors, there was a reduction in the incidence and mortality of HIV-associated malignancies. Studies later found these drugs to have promising direct antitumor effects. Protease inhibitors have a wide range of effects on several cellular pathways that are important for tumorigenesis and independent of inhibition of the HIV protease, including reducing angiogenesis and cell invasion, inhibition of the Akt pathway, induction of autophagy, and promotion of apoptosis. Among protease inhibitors, nelfinavir appears to have the most potent and broad antineoplastic activities, and also affects replication of the oncogenic herpesviruses Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus. Nelfinavir is being studied for the prevention and treatment of a wide range of malignancies in persons with and without HIV infection. Nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors are well tolerated, oral drugs that have promising antitumor properties, and may prove to play an important role in the prevention and treatment of several cancers. Additional insights into protease inhibitors' mechanisms of action may lead to the development of novel cancer chemotherapy agents.

  3. Preferential S phase entry and apoptosis of CD4(+) T lymphocytes of HIV-1-infected patients after in vitro cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, A H; Zielske, S P; Sieg, S F; Lederman, M M

    2000-12-01

    We have studied the relationship between spontaneous apoptosis and cell cycle perturbations in circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes of HIV-1-infected patients and healthy controls. PBMC obtained from HIV-1-infected patients and healthy controls were incubated in culture medium for 48 h. Cells were separated into CD4(+) and CD8(+) populations using immunomagnetic beads. Apoptosis and cell cycle phases were measured by propidium iodide staining and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation followed by flow cytometric analyses. In experiments using cells obtained from HIV-1-infected patients, spontaneous apoptosis was more frequent in CD4(+) T lymphocytes than in CD8(+) T lymphocytes (17.6% vs 9.5%, P lymphocytes was comparable (4.5% vs 5.1%). Lymphocytes obtained from patients were more frequently in S phase than healthy controls' cells (2.2 +/- 0.9% vs 0.5 +/- 0.2%, P 0.4). Kinetic analyses using BrdU and PI staining revealed that S phase cells were more likely to become apoptotic than resting (G(0)-G(1)) cells (28.4% +/- 10.3% vs 11.3% +/- 9.9% in patients, P Lymphocytes obtained from HIV-1-infected persons are activated in vivo to enter S phase and to undergo spontaneous apoptosis after brief in vitro cultivation. The present studies indicate that most apoptotic cells in this system are CD4(+) and kinetic analyses reveal that S phase cells are more likely to undergo spontaneous apoptosis than G(0)-G(1) cells. Accelerated cell death in HIV-1 disease may contribute to the failure of lymphocyte responsiveness to appropriate T cell receptor stimulation.

  4. Escape of HIV-1 from a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor is not associated with a fitness loss.

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    Cleo G Anastassopoulou

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Fitness is a parameter used to quantify how well an organism adapts to its environment; in the present study, fitness is a measure of how well strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replicate in tissue culture. When HIV-1 develops resistance in vitro or in vivo to antiretroviral drugs such as reverse transcriptase or protease inhibitors, its fitness is often impaired. Here, we have investigated whether the development of resistance in vitro to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, AD101, has an associated fitness cost. To do this, we developed a growth-competition assay involving dual infections with molecularly cloned viruses that are essentially isogenic outside the env genes under study. Real-time TaqMan quantitative PCR (QPCR was used to quantify each competing virus individually via probes specific to different, phenotypically silent target sequences engineered within their vif genes. Head-to-head competition assays of env clones derived from the AD101 escape mutant isolate, the inhibitor-sensitive parental virus, and a passage control virus showed that AD101 resistance was not associated with a fitness loss. This observation is consistent with the retention of the resistant phenotype when the escape mutant was cultured for a total of 20 passages in the absence of the selecting compound. Amino acid substitutions in the V3 region of gp120 that confer complete AD101 resistance cause a fitness loss when introduced into an AD101-sensitive, parental clone; however, in the resistant isolate, changes elsewhere in env that occurred prior to the substitutions within V3 appear to compensate for the adverse effect of the V3 changes on replicative capacity. These in vitro studies may have implications for the development and management of resistance to other CCR5 inhibitors that are being evaluated clinically for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  5. Hyperlipidemia related to the use of HIV-protease inhibitors: natural history and results of treatment with fenofibrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caramelli Bruno

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia has been frequently recorded as a side effect of treating HIV patients with protease inhibitors (PI. This study was initiated to analyze the modifications on blood lipids in HIV-patients receiving PI and the safety and efficacy of the treatment with fenofibrate. Total (TC and HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides (TG, and CD4+ T-cell counts were measured in 30 HAART-naive patients (Group I before and after PI introduction. In a second phase of the study, the effects of fenofibrate on lipids, CPK, CD4+, and viral load were determined in 13 patients (Group II with elevated TC or TG. In Group I, 60% of the patients showed TC or TG elevations. Average increments of 31% and 146% in TC and TG respectively (p<0.0006 and p<0.0001 were observed. In Group II, fenofibrate treatment was associated with decrements of 6.6% (TC and 45.7% (TG (p=0.07 and 0.0002 and no modifications on CPK, CD4+, and viral load. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia is common during the treatment of HIV with protease inhibitors, and fenofibrate appears to be an effective and safe choice for its treatment.

  6. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  7. Protein kinase C-delta regulates HIV-1 replication at an early post-entry step in macrophages

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    Contreras Xavier

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages, which are CD4 and CCR5 positive, can sustain HIV-1 replication for long periods of time. Thus, these cells play critical roles in the transmission, dissemination and persistence of viral infection. Of note, current antiviral therapies do not target macrophages efficiently. Previously, it was demonstrated that interactions between CCR5 and gp120 stimulate PKC. However, the PKC isozymes involved were not identified. Results In this study, we identified PKC-delta as a major cellular cofactor for HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Indeed, PKC-delta was stimulated following the interaction between the virus and its target cell. Moreover, inhibition of PKC-delta blocked the replication of R5-tropic viruses in primary human macrophages. However, this inhibition did not have significant effects on receptor and co-receptor expression or fusion. Additionally, it did not affect the formation of the early reverse transcription product containing R/U5 sequences, but did inhibit the synthesis of subsequent cDNAs. Importantly, the inhibition of PKC-delta altered the redistribution of actin, a cellular cofactor whose requirement for the completion of reverse transcription was previously established. It also prevented the association of the reverse transcription complex with the cytoskeleton. Conclusion This work highlights the importance of PKC-delta during early steps of the replicative cycle of HIV-1 in human macrophages.

  8. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV is stimulated by efavirenz during early stages of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiong; Zhang, Gang; Bambara, Robert A; Li, Dongge; Liang, Hua; Wu, Hulin; Smith, Hannah M; Lowe, Nicholas R; Demeter, Lisa M; Dykes, Carrie

    2011-10-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are potent and commonly prescribed antiviral agents used in combination therapy (CART) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. The development of drug resistance is a major limitation of CART. Reverse transcriptase (RT) genotypes with the NNRTI resistance mutations K101E+G190S are highly resistant to efavirenz (EFV) and can develop during failure of EFV-containing regimens in patients. We have previously shown that virus with K101E+G190S mutations can replicate more efficiently in the presence of EFV than in its absence. In this study, we evaluated the underlying mechanism for drug-dependent stimulation, using a single-cycle cell culture assay in which EFV was added either during the infection or the virus production step. We determined that EFV stimulates K101E+G190S virus during early infection and does not affect late steps of virus replication, such as increasing the amount of active RT incorporated into virions. Additionally, we showed that another NNRTI, nevirapine (NVP), stimulated K101E+G190S virus replication during the early steps of infection similar to EFV, but that the newest NNRTI, etravirine (ETR), did not. We also showed that EFV stimulates K101E+Y188L and K101E+V106I virus, but not K101E+L100I, K101E+K103N, K101E+Y181C, or K101E+G190A virus, suggesting that the stimulation is mutation specific. Real-time PCR of reverse transcription intermediates showed that although the drug did not stimulate minus-strand transfer, it did stimulate minus-strand strong-stop DNA synthesis. Our results indicate that stimulation most likely occurs through a mechanism whereby NNRTIs stimulate priming or elongation of the tRNA.

  9. Sublimation characterization and vapor pressure estimation of an HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Minli; Ziemba, Theresa M; Maurin, Michael B

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the sublimation process of DPC 963, a second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for HIV-1 retrovirus, and to better understand the effect of sublimation during active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) manufacture and formulation development, especially the drying processes. Sublimation of DPC 963 at 150 degrees C and above was determined by thermogravimetric analysis-Fourier transform infrared (TGA-FTIR). The rates of sublimation at different temperatures were measured using isothermal TGA. Condensed material was collected and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and infrared (IR) spectrometry. Benzoic acid was used as a reference standard to derive a linear logarithmic relationship between sublimation/evaporation rate and vapor pressure specific to the TGA system used in this study. Sublimation and evaporation of DPC 963 were found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics. Using the Eyring equation, the enthalpy and entropy of the sublimation and evaporation processes were obtained. The enthalpies of sublimation and evaporation were found to be 29 and 22 kcal/mol, respectively. The condensed material from the vapor phase was found to exist in 2 physical forms, amorphous and crystalline. Using benzoic acid as a reference standard, vapor pressure of DPC 963 at different temperatures was calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained. DPC 963 undergoes sublimation at appreciable rates at 150 degrees C and above but this is not likely to pose a serious issue during the manufacturing process. Vapor pressure estimation using thermogravimetric analysis provided sufficient accuracy to be used as a fast, simple, and safe alternative to the traditional methods of vapor pressure determination.

  10. Subtype diversity associated with the development of HIV-1 resistance to integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Bluma G; Lowe, Matthew; Moisi, Daniela; Hardy, Isabelle; Gagnon, Simon; Charest, Hugues; Baril, Jean Guy; Wainberg, Mark A; Roger, Michel

    2011-05-01

    We used genotypic and phylogenetic analysis to determine integrase diversity among subtypes, and studied natural polymorphisms and mutations implicated in resistance to integrase inhibitors (INI) in treatment-naïve persons (n = 220) and -experienced individuals (n = 24). Phylogenetics revealed 7 and 10% inter-subtype diversity in the integrase and reverse transcriptase (RT)/protease regions, respectively. Integrase sequencing identified a novel A/B recombinant in which all viruses in a male-sex-male (MSM) transmission cluster (n = 12) appeared to possess subtype B in integrase and subtype A in the remainder of the pol region. Natural variations and signature polymorphisms were observed at codon positions 140, 148, 151, 157, and 160 among HIV subtypes. These variations predicted higher genetic barriers to G140S and G140C in subtypes C, CRF02_AG, and A/CRF01_AE, as well as higher genetic barriers toward acquisition of V151I in subtypes CRF02_AG and A/CRF01_AE. The E157Q and E160Q mutational motif was observed in 35% of INI-naïve patients harboring subtype C infections, indicating intra-subtype variations. Thirteen patients failed raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimens within 8 ± 1 months, in association with the major Q148K/R/H and G140A/S (n = 8/24) or N155H (n = 5/24) mutational pathways. Of note, the remaining patients on RAL regimens for 14 ± 3 months harbored no or only minor integrase mutations/polymorphisms (T66I, T97A, H114P, S119P, A124S, G163R, I203M, R263K). These results demonstrate the importance of understanding subtype variability in the development of resistance to INIs.

  11. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor -1 (PAI-1) Predicts Negative Alterations in Whole Body Insulin Sensitivity in Chronic HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirunsawanya, Kamonkiat; Belyea, Loni; Shikuma, Cecilia; Watanabe, Richard; Kohorn, Lindsay; Shiramizu, Bruce; Mitchell, Brooks; Souza, Scott A; Keating, Sheila; Norris, Philip J; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa; Chow, Dominic

    2017-03-21

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), a key negative regulator of fibrinolysis, has been investigated to be a potential predictor of the development of insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. Because chronically stable HIV-infected individuals frequently develop abnormal glucose metabolism including insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, we postulated PAI-1 could be one of multifactorial pathogenic roles in the development of insulin resistance among chronic HIV-infected individuals. From our longitudinal cohort study, we selectively recruited chronically stable HIV-infected individuals without diagnosis of diabetes mellitus at baseline (N = 62) to analyze the correlation of baseline inflammatory cytokines including PAI-1 and whole body insulin sensitivity with two-year follow-up, as measured by Matsuda Index. We found a negative correlation between baseline PAI-1 and Matsuda Index (r = -.435 , p = .001) and a negative correlation with PAI-1 at baseline and Matsuda Index at two years (r = -.377 , p = .005). In a linear regression model that included age, total body fat mass percentage, serum amyloid A and family history of diabetes mellitus, PAI-1 still remained significantly associated with Matsuda Index at two-year follow-up (β = -.397, p = .002). Our longitudinal study suggests PAI-1 is an independent predictor of insulin resistance among chronic HIV-infected individuals.

  12. Solid-Phase Synthesis of the Lipopeptide Myr-HBVpreS/2-78, a Hepatitis B Virus Entry Inhibitor

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    Walter Mier

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic HBV infection is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Synthetic peptides derived from the N-terminus of the large HBV envelope protein (L-protein have been shown to efficiently block HBV entry. Myr-HBVpreS/2-78, the parent compound of these drugs, inhibits human HBV infection in vitro and in vivo. An efficient synthesis is required, as these peptides constitute a novel class of anti HBV drugs. Consequently, the solid phase synthesis of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of the viral L-protein was studied in detail. The peptide was N-terminally myristoylated to resemble the natural, postranslationally modified protein. The synthesis was monitored using the Fmoc cleavage pattern of the solid phase synthesis on a standard peptide synthesizer and by LC-MS analyses of the arising side products. “Difficult sequences” in the positions 42-47 of the peptide sequence complicate the efficient synthesis of the 77-mer peptide HBVpreS/2-78. Attempts were undertaken to optimize the synthesis by heating, double coupling or the use of pseudoproline dipeptides. HPLC-MS analyses showed that the efficiency of the synthesis could be increased best by temperature elevation. This resulted in a higher purity of the crude product after solid phase synthesis. It was possible to minimize the occurrence of side products due to the positive effects related to higher reaction temperature. In conclusion, the peptide is accessible by stepwise SPPS without the necessity of segment coupling.

  13. Molecular mechanisms and design principles for promiscuous inhibitors to avoid drug resistance: lessons learned from HIV-1 protease inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Tidor, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biology and ranges from highly selective to broadly promiscuous. The ability to modulate specificity at will is particularly important for drug development, and discovery of mechanisms contributing to binding specificity is crucial for our basic understanding of biology and for applications in health care. In this study, we used computational molecular design to create a large dataset of diverse small molecules with a range of binding specificities. We then performed structural, energetic, and statistical analysis on the dataset to study molecular mechanisms of achieving specificity goals. The work was done in the context of HIV-1 protease inhibition and the molecular designs targeted a panel of wild-type and drug-resistant mutant HIV-1 protease structures. The analysis focused on mechanisms for promiscuous binding to bind robustly even to resistance mutants. Broadly binding inhibitors tended to be smaller in size, more flexible in chemical structure, and more hydrophobic in nature compared to highly selective ones. Furthermore, structural and energetic analyses illustrated mechanisms by which flexible inhibitors achieved binding; we found ligand conformational adaptation near mutation sites and structural plasticity in targets through torsional flips of asymmetric functional groups to form alternative, compensatory packing interactions or hydrogen bonds. As no inhibitor bound to all variants, we designed small cocktails of inhibitors to do so and discovered that they often jointly covered the target set through mechanistic complementarity. Furthermore, using structural plasticity observed in experiments, and potentially in simulations, is suggested to be a viable means of designing adaptive inhibitors that are promiscuous binders.

  14. Discovery of BMS-955176, a Second Generation HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitor with Broad Spectrum Antiviral Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yan; Sin, Ny; Sit, Sing-Yuen; Swidorski, Jacob J; Chen, Jie; Venables, Brian L; Zhu, Juliang; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Protack, Tricia; Lin, Zeyu; Terry, Brian; Samanta, Himadri; Zhang, Sharon; Li, Zhufang; Beno, Brett R; Huang, Xiaohua S; Rahematpura, Sandhya; Parker, Dawn D; Haskell, Roy; Jenkins, Susan; Santone, Kenneth S; Cockett, Mark I; Krystal, Mark; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Hanumegowda, Umesh; Dicker, Ira B

    2016-06-09

    HIV-1 maturation inhibition (MI) has been clinically validated as an approach to the control of HIV-1 infection. However, identifying an MI with both broad polymorphic spectrum coverage and good oral exposure has been challenging. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and preclinical characterization of a potent, orally active, second generation HIV-1 MI, BMS-955176 (2), which is currently in Phase IIb clinical trials as part of a combination antiretroviral regimen.

  15. Advances of screening methods in vitro for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors%HIV-1整合酶抑制剂体外筛选方法研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旋; 杨柳萌; 郑永唐

    2013-01-01

    整合酶是HIV基因表达和复制所必需的酶,而且宿主细胞内不存在该酶的类似物.因此,HIV-1整合酶已成为设计、筛选抗HIV药物的理想靶点.迄今为止,Raltegravir仍是唯一上市的HIV整合酶抑制剂,而且临床上也已经出现耐药问题.研发新一代整合酶抑制剂非常必要.高通量、高灵敏度、简单易行的筛选方法是研究开发新一代HIV-1整合酶抑制剂的关键.目前,HIV-1整合酶抑制剂筛选方法有多种,各有优缺点,该文将对文献报道的整合酶抑制剂体外筛选方法的最新进展做一介绍.%Integrase is an essential enzyme for HIV-1 replication and has no functional analogue in host cells. The integrase is an ideal target for designing and screening anti-HIV drugs. Ralte-gravir is the only marked HIV-1 integrase inhibitor so far, and has caused drug resistance. It is necessary to developing new generation of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. High-throughput, highly sensitive, easy and feasible screening methods are the key to developing new HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. This review introduces the various HIV-1 integrase inhibitors screening methods that were reported recently.

  16. Structural and Preclinical Studies of Computationally Designed Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors for Treating HIV infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudalkar, Shalley N.; Beloor, Jagadish; Chan, Albert H.; Lee, Won-Gil; Jorgensen, William L.; Kumar, Priti; Anderson, Karen S.

    2017-02-06

    The clinical benefits of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) are hindered by their unsatisfactory pharmacokinetic (PK) properties along with the rapid development of drug-resistant variants. However, the clinical efficacy of these inhibitors can be improved by developing compounds with enhanced pharmacological profiles and heightened antiviral activity. We used computational and structure-guided design to develop two next-generation NNRTI drug candidates, compounds I and II, which are members of a class of catechol diethers. We evaluated the preclinical potential of these compounds in BALB/c mice because of their high solubility (510 µg/ml for compound I and 82.9 µg/ml for compound II), low cytotoxicity, and enhanced antiviral activity against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 RT and resistant variants. Additionally, crystal structures of compounds I and II with WT RT suggested an optimal binding to the NNRTI binding pocket favoring the high anti-viral potency. A single intraperitoneal dose of compounds I and II exhibited a prolonged serum residence time of 48 hours and concentration maximum (Cmax) of 4000- to 15,000-fold higher than their therapeutic/effective concentrations. These Cmax values were 4- to 15-fold lower than their cytotoxic concentrations observed in MT-2 cells. Compound II showed an enhanced area under the curve (0–last) and decreased plasma clearance over compound I and efavirenz, the standard of care NNRTI. Hence, the overall (PK) profile of compound II was excellent compared with that of compound I and efavirenz. Furthermore, both compounds were very well tolerated in BALB/c mice without any detectable acute toxicity. Taken together, these data suggest that compounds I and II possess improved anti-HIV-1 potency, remarkable in vivo safety, and prolonged in vivo circulation time, suggesting strong potential for further development as new NNRTIs for the potential treatment of HIV infection.

  17. Immunological changes in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals during HIV-specific protease inhibitor treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, H; Katzenstein, T; Aladdin, H

    1999-01-01

    The present study examines the influence of effective anti-retroviral treatment on immune function, evaluated by a broad array of immunological tests. We followed 12 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) for 6 months after initiation of combination anti-retroviral treatment...

  18. Novel 3′-Processing Integrase Activity Assay by Real-Time PCR for Screening and Identification of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supachai Sakkhachornphop

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3′-end processing (3′P of each viral long terminal repeat (LTR during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 integration is a vital step in the HIV life cycle. Blocking the 3′P using 3′P inhibitor has recently become an attractive strategy for HIV-1 therapeutic intervention. Recently, we have developed a novel real-time PCR based assay for the detection of 3′P activity in vitro. The methodology usually involves biotinylated HIV-1 LTR, HIV-1 integrase (IN, and specific primers and probe. In this novel assay, we designed the HIV-1 LTR substrate based on a sequence with a homology to HIV-1 LTR labeled at its 3′ end with biotin on the sense strand. Two nucleotides at the 3′ end were subsequently removed by IN activity. Only two nucleotides labeled biotin were captured on an avidin-coated tube; therefore, inhibiting the binding of primers and probe results in late signals in the real-time PCR. This novel assay has successfully detected both the 3′P activity of HIV-1 IN and the anti-IN activity by Raltegravir and sodium azide agent. This real-time PCR assay has been shown to be effective and inexpensive for a high-throughput screening of novel IN inhibitors.

  19. V3 loop truncations in HIV-1 envelope impart resistance to coreceptor inhibitors and enhanced sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies.

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    Meg M Laakso

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The V1/V2 region and the V3 loop of the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 envelope (Env protein are targets for neutralizing antibodies and also play an important functional role, with the V3 loop largely determining whether a virus uses CCR5 (R5, CXCR4 (X4, or either coreceptor (R5X4 to infect cells. While the sequence of V3 is variable, its length is highly conserved. Structural studies indicate that V3 length may be important for interactions with the extracellular loops of the coreceptor. Consistent with this view, genetic truncation of the V3 loop is typically associated with loss of Env function. We removed approximately one-half of the V3 loop from three different HIV-1 strains, and found that only the Env protein from the R5X4 strain R3A retained some fusion activity. Loss of V1/V2 (DeltaV1/V2 was well tolerated by this virus. Passaging of virus with the truncated V3 loop resulted in the derivation of a virus strain that replicated with wild-type kinetics. This virus, termed TA1, retained the V3 loop truncation and acquired several adaptive changes in gp120 and gp41. TA1 could use CCR5 but not CXCR4 to infect cells, and was extremely sensitive to neutralization by HIV-1 positive human sera, and by antibodies to the CD4 binding site and to CD4-induced epitopes in the bridging sheet region of gp120. In addition, TA1 was completely resistant to CCR5 inhibitors, and was more dependent upon the N-terminal domain of CCR5, a region of the receptor that is thought to contact the bridging sheet of gp120 and the base of the V3 loop, and whose conformation may not be greatly affected by CCR5 inhibitors. These studies suggest that the V3 loop protects HIV from neutralization by antibodies prevalent in infected humans, that CCR5 inhibitors likely act by disrupting interactions between the V3 loop and the coreceptor, and that altered use of CCR5 by HIV-1 associated with increased sensitivity to changes in the N-terminal domain can be linked

  20. Changes in lipids over twelve months after initiating protease inhibitor therapy among persons treated for HIV/AIDS

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    Hogg Robert S

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protease inhibitors are known to alter the lipid profiles in subjects treated for HIV/AIDS. However, the magnitude of this effect on plasma lipoproteins and lipids has not been adequately quantified. Objective To estimate the changes in plasma lipoproteins and triglycerides occurring within 12 months of initiating PI-based antiretroviral therapy among HIV/AIDS afflicted subjects. Methods We included all antiretroviral naïve HIV-infected persons treated at St-Paul's Hospital, British Columbia, Canada, who initiated therapy with protease inhibitor antiretroviral (ARV drugs between August 1996 and January 2002 and who had at least one plasma lipid measurement. Longitudinal associations between medication use and plasma lipids were estimated using mixed effects models that accounted for repeated measures on the same subjects and were adjusted for age, sex, time dependent CD4+ T-cell count, and time dependent cumulative use of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and adherence. The cumulative number of prescriptions filled for PIs was considered time dependent. We estimated the changes in the 12 months following any initiation of a PI based regimen. Results A total of 679 eligible subjects were dispensed nucleoside analogues and PI at the initiation of therapy. Over a median 47 months of follow-up (interquartile range (IQR: 29–62, subjects had a median of 3 (IQR: 1–6 blood lipid measurements. Twelve months after treatment initiation of PI use, there was an estimated 20% (95% confidence interval: 17% – 24% increase in total cholesterol and 22% (12% – 33% increase in triglycerides. Conclusions Twelve months after treatment initiation with PIs, statistically significant increases in total cholesterol and triglycerides levels were observed in HIV-infected patients under conditions of standard treatment. Our results contribute to the growing body of evidence implicating PIs in the development of blood lipid

  1. Effect of cytokines on Siglec-1 and HIV-1 entry in monocyte-derived macrophages: the importance of HIV-1 envelope V1V2 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobe, Ousman; Trinh, Hung V; Kim, Jiae; Alsalmi, Wadad; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Ehrenberg, Philip K; Peachman, Kristina K; Gao, Guofen; Thomas, Rasmi; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Alving, Carl R; Rao, Venigalla B; Rao, Mangala

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages express relatively low levels of CD4. Despite this, macrophages can be effectively infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Macrophages have a critical role in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission; however, the mechanism or mechanisms of virus infection are poorly understood. We report that growth factors, such as granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and macrophage colony-stimulating factor affect the phenotypic profile and permissiveness of macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of monocyte-derived macrophages derived from granulocyte macrophage and macrophage colony-stimulating factors was predominantly facilitated by the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin-1. The number of sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin receptors on macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages was significantly greater than on granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages, and correspondingly, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection was greater in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages. Single-genome analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the differences in infectivity was not due to differences in viral fitness or in viral variants with differential infectivity but was due to reduced viral entry into the granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-derived monocyte-derived macrophages. Anti-sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin, trimeric glycoprotein 145, and scaffolded V1V2 proteins were bound to sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin and significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry and infection. Furthermore, sialic acid residues present in the V1V2 region of the envelope protein mediated human immunodeficiency virus type 1

  2. Inhibition of the ribonuclease H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by GSK5750 correlates with slow enzyme-inhibitor dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Ngure, Marianne; Johns, Brian A; DeAnda, Felix; Gerondelis, Peter; Götte, Matthias

    2014-06-06

    Compounds that efficiently inhibit the ribonuclease (RNase) H activity of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) have yet to be developed. Here, we demonstrate that GSK5750, a 1-hydroxy-pyridopyrimidinone analog, binds to the enzyme with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) of ~400 nM. Inhibition of HIV-1 RNase H is specific, as DNA synthesis is not affected. Moreover, GSK5750 does not inhibit the activity of Escherichia coli RNase H. Order-of-addition experiments show that GSK5750 binds to the free enzyme in an Mg(2+)-dependent fashion. However, as reported for other active site inhibitors, binding of GSK5750 to a preformed enzyme-substrate complex is severely compromised. The bound nucleic acid prevents access to the RNase H active site, which represents a possible biochemical hurdle in the development of potent RNase H inhibitors. Previous studies suggested that formation of a complex with the prototypic RNase H inhibitor β-thujaplicinol is slow, and, once formed, it dissociates rapidly. This unfavorable kinetic behavior can limit the potency of RNase H active site inhibitors. Although the association kinetics of GSK5750 remains slow, our data show that this compound forms a long lasting complex with HIV-1 RT. We conclude that slow dissociation of the inhibitor and HIV-1 RT improves RNase H active site inhibitors and may circumvent the obstacle posed by the inability of these compounds to bind to a preformed enzyme-substrate complex.

  3. PRO140:a MAB HIV Entry Inhibitor%单克隆抗体HIV进入抑制剂PRO140

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    HIV病毒株可分为R5嗜性和X4嗜性,它们分别通过趋化因子CCR5和CXCR4辅助受体进入CD4细胞。在HIV的整个发展进程中,可常发生其病毒株由R5嗜性转型为X4嗜性,且也有可能某个体同时被R5嗜性和X4嗜性病毒感染,而CCR5拮抗剂则对x4嗜性病毒无效。由Progenics制药公司开发的用于治疗HIV感染的人源化单克隆抗体CCR5拮抗剂PRO140为一种新型HIV进人抑制剂,可与CCR5受体的特殊区段紧密结合,对CCR5产生拮抗作用,从而抑制HIV通过这一辅助受体进入靶细胞;

  4. Potent and selective HIV-1 ribonuclease H inhibitors based on a 1-hydroxy-1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter D; Staas, Donnette D; Venkatraman, Shankar; Loughran, H Marie; Ruzek, Rowena D; Booth, Theresa M; Lyle, Terry A; Wai, John S; Vacca, Joseph P; Feuston, Bradley P; Ecto, Linda T; Flynn, Jessica A; DiStefano, Daniel J; Hazuda, Daria J; Bahnck, Carolyn M; Himmelberger, Amy L; Dornadula, Geetha; Hrin, Renee C; Stillmock, Kara A; Witmer, Marc V; Miller, Michael D; Grobler, Jay A

    2010-11-15

    Optimization studies using an HIV RNase H active site inhibitor containing a 1-hydroxy-1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one core identified 4-position substituents that provided several potent and selective inhibitors. The best compound was potent and selective in biochemical assays (IC(50)=0.045 μM, HIV RT RNase H; 13 μM, HIV RT-polymerase; 24 μM, HIV integrase) and showed antiviral efficacy in a single-cycle viral replication assay in P4-2 cells (IC(50)=0.19 μM) with a modest window with respect to cytotoxicity (CC(50)=3.3 μM).

  5. Synthesis and antiviral activity of new dimeric inhibitors against HIV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danel, Krzysztof; Larsen, Louise M.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerreg.

    2008-01-01

    by Sonogashira reaction, ‘click' chemistry or Pd-catalyzed oxidative coupling. The iodo precursor 5 turned out as a potent compound against wild type and mutated HIV-1 virus. All dimeric compounds showed lower activity against HIV-1 than MKC-442, except the asymmetric dimer of AZT and 1a which showed an activity...

  6. Impact of first-line protease inhibitors on predicted resistance to tipranavir in HIV-1-infected patients with virological failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Mao-Yuan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tipranavir (TPV is a recently approved nonpeptidic protease inhibitor (PI of HIV-1 and has been indicated for those infected with PIs-resistant HIV-1. However, in clinical practice, whether the HIV-1 from the patients with virological failure to the regimens containing first-line PIs remains susceptible to TPV/r may be questionable. Methods To assess the resistance levels to TPV of HIV-1 from patients with treatment failure to first-line PIs, patients who experienced virological failure were tested for genotypic resistance of HIV-1 since August 2006 in National Taiwan University Hospital. Patients were enrolled for this analysis if their failed regimens contained > 12 weeks of atazanavir or lopinavir/ritonavir (defined as ATV group and LPV/r group, respectively, but were excluded if they experienced both or other PIs. The levels of genotypic resistance to TPV/r were determined by TPV mutation score. Results Till May 2008, 21 subjects in ATV group and 20 subjects in LPV/r group were enrolled. The TPV mutation scores in subjects in LPV/r group were significantly higher than these in ATV group (median, 3 vs 1, P = 0.007. 95.2% subjects in ATV group and only 45% subjects in LPV/r group had an estimated maximal virological response to TPV/r (P Conclusion Cross-resistance from first-line PIs may impede the effectiveness of TPV/r-containing salvage therapy. TPV/r should be used cautiously for patients with virological failure to LPV/r especially long duration of exposure.

  7. HIV Aspartic Peptidase Inhibitors Modulate Surface Molecules and Enzyme Activities Involved with Physiopathological Events in Fonsecaea pedrosoi

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    Vanila F. Palmeira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fonsecaea pedrosoi is the main etiological agent of chromoblastomycosis, a recalcitrant disease that is extremely difficult to treat. Therefore, new chemotherapeutics to combat this fungal infection are urgently needed. Although aspartic peptidase inhibitors (PIs currently used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have shown anti-F. pedrosoi activity their exact mechanisms of action have not been elucidated. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of four HIV-PIs on crucial virulence attributes expressed by F. pedrosoi conidial cells, including surface molecules and secreted enzymes, both of which are directly involved in the disease development. In all the experiments, conidia were treated with indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir and saquinavir (100 μM for 24 h, and then fungal cells were used to evaluate the effects of HIV-PIs on different virulence attributes expressed by F. pedrosoi. In comparison to untreated controls, exposure of F. pedrosoi cells to HIV-PIs caused (i reduction on the conidial granularity; (ii irreversible surface ultrastructural alterations, such as shedding of electron dense and amorphous material from the cell wall, undulations/invaginations of the plasma membrane with and withdrawal of this membrane from the cell wall; (iii a decrease in both mannose-rich glycoconjugates and melanin molecules and an increase in glucosylceramides on the conidial surface; (iv inhibition of ergosterol and lanosterol production; (v reduction in the secretion of aspartic peptidase, esterase and phospholipase; (vi significant reduction in the viability of non-pigmented conidia compared to pigmented ones. In summary, HIV-PIs are efficient drugs with an ability to block crucial biological processes of F. pedrosoi and can be seriously considered as potential compounds for the development of new chromoblastomycosis chemotherapeutics.

  8. Targeting Tuberculosis and HIV Infection-Specific Regulatory T Cells with MEK/ERK Signaling Pathway Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieske, Nora V.; Tonby, Kristian; Kvale, Dag; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne M.; Tasken, Kjetil

    2015-01-01

    Human regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential in maintaining immunological tolerance and suppress effector T cells. Tregs are commonly up-regulated in chronic infectious diseases such as tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and thereby hamper disease-specific immune responses and eradication of pathogens. The MEK/ERK signaling pathway is involved in regulation of the FoxP3 transcription factor, which directs a lineage-specific transcriptional program to define Tregs and control their suppressive function. Here, we aimed to target activation of disease-specific Tregs by inhibition of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway based on the hypothesis that this would improve anti-HIV and anti-TB immunity. Stimulation of T cells from untreated TB (n = 12) and HIV (n = 8) patients with disease-specific antigens in vitro in the presence of the MEK inhibitor (MEKI) trametinib (GSK1120212) resulted in significant down-regulation of both FoxP3 levels (MFI) and fractions of resting (CD45RA+FoxP3+) and activated (CD45RA−FoxP3++) Tregs. MEKI also reduced the levels of specific T effector cells expressing the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2) in both HIV and TB patients. In conclusion, MEKIs modulate disease antigen-specific Treg activation and may have potential application in new treatment strategies in chronic infectious diseases where reduction of Treg activity would be favorable. Whether MEKIs can be used in current HIV or TB therapy regimens needs to be further investigated. PMID:26544592

  9. Targeting Tuberculosis and HIV Infection-Specific Regulatory T Cells with MEK/ERK Signaling Pathway Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora V Lieske

    Full Text Available Human regulatory T cells (Tregs are essential in maintaining immunological tolerance and suppress effector T cells. Tregs are commonly up-regulated in chronic infectious diseases such as tuberculosis (TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and thereby hamper disease-specific immune responses and eradication of pathogens. The MEK/ERK signaling pathway is involved in regulation of the FoxP3 transcription factor, which directs a lineage-specific transcriptional program to define Tregs and control their suppressive function. Here, we aimed to target activation of disease-specific Tregs by inhibition of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway based on the hypothesis that this would improve anti-HIV and anti-TB immunity. Stimulation of T cells from untreated TB (n = 12 and HIV (n = 8 patients with disease-specific antigens in vitro in the presence of the MEK inhibitor (MEKI trametinib (GSK1120212 resulted in significant down-regulation of both FoxP3 levels (MFI and fractions of resting (CD45RA+FoxP3+ and activated (CD45RA-FoxP3++ Tregs. MEKI also reduced the levels of specific T effector cells expressing the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in both HIV and TB patients. In conclusion, MEKIs modulate disease antigen-specific Treg activation and may have potential application in new treatment strategies in chronic infectious diseases where reduction of Treg activity would be favorable. Whether MEKIs can be used in current HIV or TB therapy regimens needs to be further investigated.

  10. The HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922 radiosensitizes by abrogation of homologous recombination resulting in mitotic entry with unresolved DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Zaidi

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 is a molecular chaperone responsible for the conformational maintenance of a number of client proteins that play key roles in cell cycle arrest, DNA damage repair and apoptosis following radiation. HSP90 inhibitors exhibit antitumor activity by modulating the stabilisation and activation of HSP90 client proteins. We sought to evaluate NVP-AUY922, the most potent HSP90 inhibitor yet reported, in preclinical radiosensitization studies.NVP-AUY922 potently radiosensitized cells in vitro at low nanomolar concentrations with a concurrent depletion of radioresistance-linked client proteins. Radiosensitization by NVP-AUY922 was verified for the first time in vivo in a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model in athymic mice, as measured by delayed tumor growth and increased surrogate end-point survival (p = <0.0001. NVP-AUY922 was shown to ubiquitously inhibit resolution of dsDNA damage repair correlating to delayed Rad51 foci formation in all cell lines tested. Additionally, NVP-AUY922 induced a stalled mitotic phenotype, in a cell line-dependent manner, in HeLa and HN5 cell lines irrespective of radiation exposure. Cell cycle analysis indicated that NVP-AUY922 induced aberrant mitotic entry in all cell lines tested in the presence of radiation-induced DNA damage due to ubiquitous CHK1 depletion, but resultant downstream cell cycle effects were cell line dependent.These results identify NVP-AUY922 as the most potent HSP90-mediated radiosensitizer yet reported in vitro, and for the first time validate it in a clinically relevant in vivo model. Mechanistic analysis at clinically achievable concentrations demonstrated that radiosensitization is mediated by the combinatorial inhibition of cell growth and survival pathways, ubiquitous delay in Rad51-mediated homologous recombination and CHK1-mediated G(2/M arrest, but that the contribution of cell cycle perturbation to radiosensitization may be cell line

  11. Inhibitors of HIV-protease from computational design. A history of theory and synthesis still to be fully appreciated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Federico; Frecer, Vladimir; Miertus, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that HIV-Protease is an over 20 years old target, computational approaches to rational design of its inhibitors still have a great potential to stimulate the synthesis of new compounds and the discovery of new, potent derivatives, ever capable to overcome the problem of drug resistance. This review deals with successful examples of inhibitors identified by computational approaches, rather than by knowledge-based design. Such methodologies include the development of energy and scoring functions, docking protocols, statistical models, virtual combinatorial chemistry. Computations addressing drug resistance, and the development of related models as the substrate envelope hypothesis are also reviewed. In some cases, the identified structures required the development of synthetic approaches in order to obtain the desired target molecules; several examples are reported.

  12. Toward the discovery of novel anti-HIV drugs. Second-generation inhibitors of the cellular ATPase DDX3 with improved anti-HIV activity: synthesis, structure-activity relationship analysis, cytotoxicity studies, and target validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Giovanni; Falchi, Federico; Radi, Marco; Botta, Lorenzo; Casaluce, Gianni; Bernardini, Martina; Irannejad, Hamid; Manetti, Fabrizio; Garbelli, Anna; Samuele, Alberta; Zanoli, Samantha; Esté, José A; Gonzalez, Emmanuel; Zucca, Elisa; Paolucci, Stefania; Baldanti, Fausto; De Rijck, Jan; Debyser, Zeger; Botta, Maurizio

    2011-08-01

    A hit optimization protocol applied to the first nonnucleoside inhibitor of the ATPase activity of human DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 led to the design and synthesis of second-generation rhodanine derivatives with better inhibitory activity toward cellular DDX3 and HIV-1 replication. Additional DDX3 inhibitors were identified among triazine compounds. Biological data were rationalized in terms of structure-activity relationships and docking simulations. Antiviral activity and cytotoxicity of selected DDX3 inhibitors are reported and discussed. A thorough analysis confirmed human DDX3 as a valid anti-HIV target. The compounds described herein represent a significant advance in the pursuit of novel drugs that target HIV-1 host cofactors.

  13. Rational improvement of gp41-targeting HIV-1 fusion inhibitors: an innovatively designed Ile-Asp-Leu tail with alternative conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Su, Shan; Qin, Lili; Wang, Qian; Shi, Lei; Ma, Zhenxuan; Tang, Jianchao; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2016-09-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of HIV gp41 have been developed as effective fusion inhibitors against HIV-1, but facing the challenges of enhancing potency and stability. Here, we report a rationally designed novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitor derived from CHR-derived peptide (Trp628~Gln653, named CP), but with an innovative Ile-Asp-Leu tail (IDL) that dramatically increased the inhibitory activity by up to 100 folds. We also determined the crystal structures of artificial fusion peptides N36- and N43-L6-CP-IDL. Although the overall structures of both fusion peptides share the canonical six-helix bundle (6-HB) configuration, their IDL tails adopt two different conformations: a one-turn helix with the N36, and a hook-like structure with the longer N43. Structural comparison showed that the hook-like IDL tail possesses a larger interaction interface with NHR than the helical one. Further molecular dynamics simulations of the two 6-HBs and isolated CP-IDL peptides suggested that hook-like form of IDL tail can be stabilized by its binding to NHR trimer. Therefore, CP-IDL has potential for further development as a new HIV fusion inhibitor, and this strategy could be widely used in developing artificial fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses.

  14. Progress of bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Since the first case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was reported in 1981, AIDS, as the global disease affecting 33.2 million people in 2007, has always been an unsolved problem worldwide. Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a crucial enzyme in the life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and thereby has been the prime drugs target for antiretroviral (ARV) therapy against AIDS. To date, two classes of RT inhibitors (RTIs), e.g., nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), and a lot of compounds tested as RTIs have been described. To our knowledge, bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) have been considered as one class of promising NNRTIs, such as structurally and chemically related NNRTI delavirdine, which was approved by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in 1997. In this mini-review, we make attempts to report the progress of synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of BHAPs, in the meantime, the synergistic inhibition of HIV-1 replication by combining delavirdine with other HIV-1 inhibitors is also discussed. It will pave the way for the design and development of BHAPs as anti-HIV-1 agents in AIDS chemotherapy in the future.

  15. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  16. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  17. Fluorine Substituted 1,2,4-Triazinones as Potential Anti-HIV-1 and CDK2 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. I. Makki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine substituted 1,2,4-triazinones have been synthesized via alkylation, amination, and/or oxidation of 6-(2-amino-5-fluorophenyl-3-thioxo-3,4-dihydro-1,2,4-triazin-5(2H-one 1 and 4-fluoro-N-(4-fluoro-2-(5-oxo-3-thioxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,2,4-triazin-6-ylphenylbenzamide 5 as possible anti-HIV-1 and CDK2 inhibitors. Alkylation on positions 2 and 4 in 1,2,4-triazinone gave compounds 6–8. Further modification was performed by selective alkylation and amination on position 3 to form compounds 9–15. However oxidation of 5 yielded compounds 16–18. Structures of the target compounds have been established by spectral analysis data. Five compounds (5, 11, 14, 16, and 17 have shown very good anti-HIV activity in MT-4 cells. Similarly, five compounds (1, 3, and 14–16 have exhibited very significant CDK2 inhibition activity. Compounds 14 and 16 were found to have dual anti-HIV and anticancer activities.

  18. Monte Carlo sampling and multivariate adaptive regression splines as tools for QSAR modelling of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamdari, R F; Mani-Varnosfaderani, A; Asadollahi-Baboli, M; Khalafi-Nezhad, A

    2012-10-01

    The present work focuses on the development of an interpretable quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model for predicting the anti-HIV activities of 67 thiazolylthiourea derivatives. This set of molecules has been proposed as potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RT-INs). The molecules were encoded to a diverse set of molecular descriptors, spanning different physical and chemical properties. Monte Carlo (MC) sampling and multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS) techniques were used to select the most important descriptors and to predict the activity of the molecules. The most important descriptor was found to be the aspherisity index. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and interpretable spline equations showed that the geometrical shape of the molecules has considerable effect on their activities. It seems that the linear molecules are more active than symmetric top compounds. The final MARS model derived displayed a good predictive ability judging from the determination coefficient corresponding to the leave multiple out (LMO) cross-validation technique, i.e. r (2 )= 0.828 (M = 12) and r (2 )= 0.813 (M = 20). The results of this work showed that the developed spline model is robust, has a good predictive power, and can then be used as a reliable tool for designing novel HIV-1 RT-INs.

  19. Resveratrol Co-Treatment Attenuates the Effects of HIV Protease Inhibitors on Rat Body Weight and Enhances Cardiac Mitochondrial Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symington, Burger; Mapanga, Rudo F.; Norton, Gavin R.

    2017-01-01

    Since the early 1990s human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) emerged as a global health pandemic, with sub-Saharan Africa the hardest hit. While the successful roll-out of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy provided significant relief to HIV-positive individuals, such treatment can also elicit damaging side-effects. Here especially HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) are implicated in the onset of cardio-metabolic complications such as type-2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. As there is a paucity of data regarding suitable co-treatments within this context, this preclinical study investigated whether resveratrol (RSV), aspirin (ASP) or vitamin C (VitC) co-treatment is able to blunt side-effects in a rat model of chronic PI exposure (Lopinavir/Ritonavir treatment for 4 months). Body weights and weight gain, blood metabolite levels (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides), echocardiography and cardiac mitochondrial respiration were assessed in PI-treated rats ± various co-treatments. Our data reveal that PI treatment significantly lowered body weight and cardiac respiratory function while no significant changes were found for heart function and blood metabolite levels. Moreover, all co-treatments ameliorated the PI-induced decrease in body weight after 4 months of PI treatment, while RSV co-treatment enhanced cardiac mitochondrial respiratory capacity in PI-treated rats. This pilot study therefore provides novel hypotheses regarding RSV co-treatment that should be further assessed in greater detail. PMID:28107484

  20. The Rates of Serious Infections in HIV-infected Patients Who Received Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α Inhibitor Therapy for Concomitant Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsiricharoen, Sintawat; Ligon, Colin; Gedmintas, Lydia; Dehrab, Admad; Tungsiripat, Marisa; Bingham, Clifton; Lozada, Carlos; Calabrese, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the incidence of serious infections in patients with HIV infection and autoimmune disease who were treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α inhibitor therapy, and to compare these rates among stratified viral load levels. Methods Using a unified search strategy, four centers identified HIV-infected patients exposed to TNF-α inhibitors. Patient characteristics and infection data were assessed via chart review in all patients who were ≥18 years old and received TNF-α inhibitor therapy after HIV diagnosis between January 1999 and March 2015. Results Twenty-three patients with 26 uses of TNF-α inhibitor therapy provided 86.7 person-years of follow-up. Two (8.7%) experienced at least 1 serious infection episode, an overall incidence rate of 2.55 per 100 patient-years (95% CI 0.28–9.23). The incidence rate per 100 patient-years was 3.28 (95% CI 0.04–18.26) among patients with viral load > 500 copies/mL at therapy initiation and 2.09 (0.03–11.65) among patients with viral load ≤ 500 copies/mL. Conclusion This study suggests that TNF-α inhibitors may have a comparable rate of serious infections to the range of those observed in registry databases when used in patients with HIV infection under active care. PMID:27332039

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitor romidepsin induces HIV expression in CD4 T cells from patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy at concentrations achieved by clinical dosing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datsen George Wei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Persistent latent reservoir of replication-competent proviruses in memory CD4 T cells is a major obstacle to curing HIV infection. Pharmacological activation of HIV expression in latently infected cells is being explored as one of the strategies to deplete the latent HIV reservoir. In this study, we characterized the ability of romidepsin (RMD, a histone deacetylase inhibitor approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphomas, to activate the expression of latent HIV. In an in vitro T-cell model of HIV latency, RMD was the most potent inducer of HIV (EC50 = 4.5 nM compared with vorinostat (VOR; EC50 = 3,950 nM and other histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors in clinical development including panobinostat (PNB; EC50 = 10 nM. The HIV induction potencies of RMD, VOR, and PNB paralleled their inhibitory activities against multiple human HDAC isoenzymes. In both resting and memory CD4 T cells isolated from HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART, a 4-hour exposure to 40 nM RMD induced a mean 6-fold increase in intracellular HIV RNA levels, whereas a 24-hour treatment with 1 µM VOR resulted in 2- to 3-fold increases. RMD-induced intracellular HIV RNA expression persisted for 48 hours and correlated with sustained inhibition of cell-associated HDAC activity. By comparison, the induction of HIV RNA by VOR and PNB was transient and diminished after 24 hours. RMD also increased levels of extracellular HIV RNA and virions from both memory and resting CD4 T-cell cultures. The activation of HIV expression was observed at RMD concentrations below the drug plasma levels achieved by doses used in patients treated for T-cell lymphomas. In conclusion, RMD induces HIV expression ex vivo at concentrations that can be achieved clinically, indicating that the drug may reactivate latent HIV in patients on suppressive cART.

  2. Reported Church Attendance at the Time of Entry into HIV Care is Associated with Viral Load Suppression at 12 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wagoner, Nicholas; Elopre, Latesha; Westfall, Andrew O; Mugavero, Michael J; Turan, Janet; Hook, Edward W

    2016-08-01

    The Southeast has high rates of church attendance and HIV infection rates. We evaluated the relationship between church attendance and HIV viremia in a Southeastern US, HIV-infected cohort. Viremia (viral load ≥200 copies/ml) was analyzed 12 months after initiation of care. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were fit for variables potentially related to viremia. Of 382 patients, 74 % were virally suppressed at 12 months. Protective variables included church attendance (AOR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.2, 0.9), being on antiretroviral therapy (AOR 0.01; 95 % CI 0.004, 0.04), CD4(+) T lymphocyte count 200-350 cells/mm(3) at care entry (AOR 0.3; 95 % 0.1, 0.9), and education (AOR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.2, 0.9). Variables predicting viremia included black race (AOR 3.2; 95 % CI 1.4, 7.4) and selective disclosure of HIV status (AOR 2.7; 95 % CI 1.2, 5.6). Church attendance may provide needed support for patients entering HIV care for the first time. El Sur Este de los Estados Unidos tiene tasas altas de visitas a iglesias y de infección por VIH. Evaluamos la relación entre visitas a iglesias y viremia por VIH en una cohorte de pacientes infectados con VIH en el Sur Este de los EEUU. La viremia (carga viral ≥ 200 copias/ml) fue analizada a los 12 meses de iniciar el cuidado médico. Los modelos de regresión logística univariado y multivariado fueron ajustados para variables potencialmente relacionadas a viremia. De 382 pacientes, 75 % tuvieron supresión virológica a los 12 meses. Variables que ofrecieron protección fueron visitas a iglesias (AOR 0.5; IC95 % 0.2-0.9), recibir terapia antiretroviral (AOR 0.01; IC95 % 0.004,0.04), recuento de linfocitos T CD4 + 200-350 al iniciar cuidado médico (AOR 0.3; IC95 % 0.1,09), y educación (AOR 0.5; IC95 % 0.2,0.9). Las variables que predijeron viremia incluyeron raza negra (AOR 3.2; IC95 % 1.4,7.4) y la comunicación selectiva del diagnóstico de VIH a otras personas (AOR 2.7; 95 % IC 1

  3. The QSAR and docking calculations of fullerene derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Noha A.

    2015-02-01

    The inhibition of HIV-1 protease is considered as one of the most important targets for drug design and the deactivation of HIV-1. In the present work, the fullerene surface (C60) is modified by adding oxygen atoms as well as hydroxymethylcarbonyl (HMC) groups to form 6 investigated fullerene derivative compounds. These compounds have one, two, three, four or five O atoms + HMC groups at different positions on phenyl ring. The effect of the repeating of these groups on the ability of suggested compounds to inhibit the HIV protease is studied by calculating both Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) properties and docking simulation. Based on the QSAR descriptors, the solubility and the hydrophilicity of studied fullerene derivatives increased with increasing the number of oxygen atoms + HMC groups in the compound. While docking calculations indicate that, the compound with two oxygen atoms + HMC groups could interact and binds with HIV-1 protease active site. This is could be attributed to the active site residues of HIV-1 protease are hydrophobic except the two aspartic acids. So that, the increase in the hydrophilicity and polarity of the compound is preventing and/or decreasing the hydrophobic interaction between the compound and HIV-1 protease active site.

  4. Nonhuman Primate IFITM Proteins Are Potent Inhibitors of HIV and SIV.

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    Jordan Wilkins

    Full Text Available Interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM proteins are potent antiviral factors shown to restrict the infection of many enveloped viruses, including HIV. Here we report cloning and characterization of a panel of nonhuman primate IFITMs. We show that, similar to human IFITM, nonhuman primate IFITM proteins inhibit HIV and other primate lentiviruses. While some nonhuman primate IFITM proteins are more potent than human counterparts to inhibit HIV-1, they are generally not effective against HIV-2 similar to that of human IFITMs. Notably, depending on SIV strains and also IFITM species tested, nonhuman primate IFITM proteins exhibit distinct activities against SIVs; no correlation was found to support the notion that IFITM proteins are most active in non-natural primate hosts. Consistent with our recent findings for human IFITMs, nonhuman primate IFITM proteins interact with HIV-1 Env and strongly act in viral producer cells to impair viral infectivity and block cell-to-cell transmission. Accordingly, knockdown of primate IFITM3 increases HIV-1 replication in nohuman primate cells. Interestingly, analysis of DNA sequences of human and nonhuman primate IFITMs suggest that IFITM proteins have been undergoing purifying selection, rather than positive selection typical for cellular restriction factors. Overall, our study reveals some new and unexpected features of IFITMs in restricting primate lentiviruses, which enhances our understanding of virus-host interaction and AIDS pathogenesis.

  5. Renal function in HIV-infected children and adolescents treated with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and protease inhibitors

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    Pontrelli Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kidney disease is an important complication in HIV infected people, and this may be related to infection or antiretroviral therapy (ART. Our aim is to assess renal function in HIV infected paediatric patients, who may be particularly affected and are likely to take ART for longer than adults, and investigate the long term role of Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate (TDF alone or co-administered with Ritonavir-boosted Protease Inhibitors (PI. Methods Serum creatinine, phosphate and potassium levels, with estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR, had been prospectively evaluated for 2 years in a cohort of HIV infected children and adolescents (age 9-18 on ART, and data analyzed according to the exposure to TDF or simultaneous TDF and PI. Results Forty-nine patients were studied (57% female, mean age 14. Sixty-three percent were treated with ART containing TDF (Group A, and 37% without TDF (Group B; 47% with concomitant use of TDF and PI (Group C and 53% without this combination (Group D. The groups didn't differ for age, gender or ethnicity. The median creatinine increased in the entire cohort and in all the groups analyzed; eGFR decreased from 143.6 mL/min/1.73 m2 at baseline to 128.9 after 2 years (p = 0.006 in the entire cohort. Three patients presented a mild eGFR reduction, all were on TDF+PI. Phosphatemia decreased significantly in the entire cohort (p = 0.0003 and in TDF+PI group (p = 0.0128 after 2 years. Five patients (10% developed hypophosphatemia (Division of Acquired Immune Deficiency AE grade 1 or 2, and four of them were on TDF+PI. Conclusions Renal function decrease and hypophosphatemia occur over time in HIV infected children and adolescents on ART. The association with co-administration of TDF and PI appears weak, and further studies are warranted.

  6. Protease inhibitor associated mutations compromise the efficacy of therapy in human immunodeficiency virus – 1 (HIV-1 infected pediatric patients: a cross-sectional study

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    Petrova Anna

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the introduction of combined therapy with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors has resulted in considerable decrease in HIV related mortality; it has also induced the development of multiple drug-resistant HIV-1 variants. The few studies on HIV-1 mutagenesis in HIV infected children have not evaluated the impact of HIV-1 mutations on the clinical, virological and immunological presentation of HIV disease that is fundamental to optimizing the treatment regimens for these patients. Results A cross sectional study was conducted to evaluate the impact of treatment regimens and resistance mutation patterns on the clinical, virological, and immunological presentation of HIV disease in 41 children (25 male and 16 female at the Robert Wood Johnson Pediatric AIDS Program in New Brunswick, New Jersey. The study participants were symptomatic and had preceding treatment history with combined ARV regimens including protease inhibitors (PIs, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. Fifteen (36.6% children were treated with NRTI+NNRTI+ PI, 6 (14.6% with NRTI+NNRTIs, 13 (31.7% with NRTI+PIs, and the remaining 7 (17.1% received NRTIs only. Combined ARV regimens did not significantly influence the incidence of NRTI and NNRTI associated mutations. The duration of ARV therapy and the child's age had no significant impact on the ARV related mutations. The clinico-immunological presentation of the HIV disease was not associated with ARV treatment regimens or number of resistance mutations. However, primary mutations in the protease (PR gene increased the likelihood of plasma viral load (PVL ≥ 10,000 copies/mL irrespective of the child's age, duration of ARV therapy, presence of NRTI and NNRTI mutation. Viremia ≥ 10,000 copies/mL was recorded in almost all the children with primary mutations in the PR region (n = 12/13, 92.3% as compared with only 50.0% (n

  7. Kinetic studies of HIV-1 and HIV-2 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion

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    Doms Robert W

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env-mediated fusion is driven by the concerted coalescence of the HIV gp41 N-helical and C-helical regions, which results in the formation of 6 helix bundles. Kinetics of HIV Env-mediated fusion is an important determinant of sensitivity to entry inhibitors and antibodies. However, the parameters that govern the HIV Env fusion cascade have yet to be fully elucidated. We address this issue by comparing the kinetics HIV-1IIIB Env with those mediated by HIV-2 from two strains with different affinities for CD4 and CXCR4. Results HIV-1 and HIV-2 Env-mediated cell fusion occurred with half times of about 60 and 30 min, respectively. Binding experiments of soluble HIV gp120 proteins to CD4 and co-receptor did not correlate with the differences in kinetics of fusion mediated by the three different HIV Envs. However, escape from inhibition by reagents that block gp120-CD4 binding, CD4-induced CXCR4 binding and 6-helix bundle formation, respectively, indicated large difference between HIV-1 and HIV-2 envelope glycoproteins in their CD4-induced rates of engagement with CXCR4. Conclusion The HIV-2 Env proteins studied here exhibited a significantly reduced window of time between the engagement of gp120 with CD4 and exposure of the CXCR4 binding site on gp120 as compared with HIV-1IIIB Env. The efficiency with which HIV-2 Env undergoes this CD4-induced conformational change is the major cause of the relatively rapid rate of HIV-2 Env mediated-fusion.

  8. HIV protease inhibitors act as competitive inhibitors of the cytoplasmic glucose binding site of GLUTs with differing affinities for GLUT1 and GLUT4.

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    Richard C Hresko

    Full Text Available The clinical use of several first generation HIV protease inhibitors (PIs is associated with the development of insulin resistance. Indinavir has been shown to act as a potent reversible noncompetitive inhibitor of zero-trans glucose influx via direct interaction with the insulin responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4. Newer drugs within this class have differing effects on insulin sensitivity in treated patients. GLUTs are known to contain two distinct glucose-binding sites that are located on opposite sides of the lipid bilayer. To determine whether interference with the cytoplasmic glucose binding site is responsible for differential effects of PIs on glucose transport, intact intracellular membrane vesicles containing GLUT1 and GLUT4, which have an inverted transporter orientation relative to the plasma membrane, were isolated from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The binding of biotinylated ATB-BMPA, a membrane impermeable bis-mannose containing photolabel, was determined in the presence of indinavir, ritonavir, atazanavir, tipranavir, and cytochalasin b. Zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose transport was measured in both 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and primary rat adipocytes acutely exposed to these compounds. PI inhibition of glucose transport correlated strongly with the PI inhibition of ATB-BMPA/transporter binding. At therapeutically relevant concentrations, ritonavir was not selective for GLUT4 over GLUT1. Indinavir was found to act as a competitive inhibitor of the cytoplasmic glucose binding site of GLUT4 with a K(I of 8.2 µM. These data establish biotinylated ATB-BMPA as an effective probe to quantify accessibility of the endofacial glucose-binding site in GLUTs and reveal that the ability of PIs to block this site differs among drugs within this class. This provides mechanistic insight into the basis for the clinical variation in drug-related metabolic toxicity.

  9. The HSP90 Inhibitor NVP-AUY922 Radiosensitizes by Abrogation of Homologous Recombination Resulting in Mitotic Entry with Unresolved DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhide, Shreerang A.; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Workman, Paul; Nutting, Christopher M.; Huddart, Robert A.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone responsible for the conformational maintenance of a number of client proteins that play key roles in cell cycle arrest, DNA damage repair and apoptosis following radiation. HSP90 inhibitors exhibit antitumor activity by modulating the stabilisation and activation of HSP90 client proteins. We sought to evaluate NVP-AUY922, the most potent HSP90 inhibitor yet reported, in preclinical radiosensitization studies. Principal Findings NVP-AUY922 potently radiosensitized cells in vitro at low nanomolar concentrations with a concurrent depletion of radioresistance-linked client proteins. Radiosensitization by NVP-AUY922 was verified for the first time in vivo in a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model in athymic mice, as measured by delayed tumor growth and increased surrogate end-point survival (p = <0.0001). NVP-AUY922 was shown to ubiquitously inhibit resolution of dsDNA damage repair correlating to delayed Rad51 foci formation in all cell lines tested. Additionally, NVP-AUY922 induced a stalled mitotic phenotype, in a cell line-dependent manner, in HeLa and HN5 cell lines irrespective of radiation exposure. Cell cycle analysis indicated that NVP-AUY922 induced aberrant mitotic entry in all cell lines tested in the presence of radiation-induced DNA damage due to ubiquitous CHK1 depletion, but resultant downstream cell cycle effects were cell line dependent. Conclusions These results identify NVP-AUY922 as the most potent HSP90-mediated radiosensitizer yet reported in vitro, and for the first time validate it in a clinically relevant in vivo model. Mechanistic analysis at clinically achievable concentrations demonstrated that radiosensitization is mediated by the combinatorial inhibition of cell growth and survival pathways, ubiquitous delay in Rad51-mediated homologous recombination and CHK1-mediated G2/M arrest, but that the contribution of cell cycle perturbation to

  10. A Novel Bromodomain Inhibitor Reverses HIV-1 Latency through Specific Binding with BRD4 to Promote Tat and P-TEFb Association

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    Huachao Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available While combinatory antiretroviral therapy (cART can effectively reduce HIV-1 viremia, it cannot eliminate HIV-1 infection. In the presence of cART, viral reservoirs remain latent, impeding the cure of HIV-1/AIDS. Recently, latency-reversing agents (LRAs have been developed with the intent of purging latent HIV-1, providing an intriguing strategy for the eradication of the residual viral reservoirs. Our earlier studies show that the first-generation, methyl-triazolo bromodomain, and extra-terminal domain inhibitor (BETi, JQ1, facilitates the reversal of HIV-1 latency. BETis have emerged as a new class of compounds that are promising for this HIV-1 “shock and kill” eradication approach. However, when used as a single drug, JQ1 only modestly reverses HIV-1 latency, which complicates studying the underlining mechanisms. Meanwhile, it has been widely discussed that the induction of latent proviruses is stochastic (Ho et al., 2013. Thus, new BETis are currently under active development with focus on improving potency, ease of synthesis and structural diversity. Using fluorous-tagged multicomponent reactions, we developed a novel second-generation, 3,5-dimethylisoxazole BETi based on an imidazo[1,2-a] pyrazine scaffold, UMB-32. Furthermore, we screened 37 UMB-32 derivatives and identified that one, UMB-136, reactivates HIV-1 in multiple cell models of HIV-1 latency with better efficiency than either JQ1 or UMB-32. UMB-136 enhances HIV-1 transcription and increases viral production through the release of P-TEFb. Importantly, UMB-136 enhances the latency-reversing effects of PKC agonists (prostratin, bryostatin-1 in CD8-depleted PBMCs containing latent viral reservoirs. Our results illustrate that structurally improved BETis, such as UMB-136, may be useful as promising LRAs for HIV-1 eradication.

  11. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of 4,6-diarylpyrimidines and diarylbenzenes as novel non-nucleosides HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribone, Sergio R; Leen, Volker; Madrid, Marcela; Dehaen, Wim; Daelemans, Dirk; Pannecouque, Christophe; Briñón, Margarita C

    2012-12-01

    A series of novel 4,6-diarylpyrimidines (4,6-DAPY) and diarylbenzenes (DABE) compounds were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Among them, the most potent HIV-1 inhibitors were 8b, 8d, 14b and 18 (EC(50) = 0.049, 0.381, 0.599 and 0.398 μM, respectively), with HIV-1 inhibitory activity improved or similar to nevirapine (NVP, EC(50) = 0.097 μM) and delavirdine (DEV, EC(50) = 0.55 μM). The other compounds displayed moderate activity (8c, EC(50) = 5.25 μM) or were inactive (8a and 14a) against HIV-1 replication. Molecular modeling studies were performed with the synthesized compounds in complex with the wild-type reverse transcriptase (RT). A correlation was found between the anti-HIV activity and the electrostatic energy of interaction with Lys101 residue. These findings enrich the SAR of these Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) families.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of tipranavir versus comparator protease inhibitor regimens in HIV infected patients previously exposed to antiretroviral therapy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubben, Gijs A A; Bos, Jasper M; Veltman-Starkenburg, Christa A; Stegmeijer, Simon; Finnern, Henrik W; Kappelhoff, Bregt S; Simpson, Kit N; Tramarin, Andrea; Postma, Maarten J

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study compares the costs and effects of a regimen with ritonavir-boosted tipranavir (TPV/r) to a physician-selected genotypically-defined standard-of-care comparator protease inhibitor regimen boosted with ritonavir (CPI/r) in HIV infected patients that were previously exposed to an

  13. Impact of the HIV-1 env genetic context outside HR1-HR2 on resistance to the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and viral infectivity in clinical isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baatz, F.; Nijhuis, M.; Lemaire, M.; Riedijk, M.; Wensing, A.M.; Servais, J.Y.; Ham, P.M. van; Hoepelman, A.I.; Koopmans, P.P.; Sprenger, H.G.; Devaux, C.; Schmit, J.C.; Perez Bercoff, D.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance mutations to the HIV-1 fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide emerge mainly within the drug's target region, HR1, and compensatory mutations have been described within HR2. The surrounding envelope (env) genetic context might also contribute to resistance, although to what extent and through which

  14. Impact of the HIV-1 env Genetic Context outside HR1-HR2 on Resistance to the Fusion Inhibitor Enfuvirtide and Viral Infectivity in Clinical Isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baatz, Franky; Nijhuis, Monique; Lemaire, Morgane; Riedijk, Martiene; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Servais, Jean-Yves; van Ham, Petra M.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Koopmans, Peter P.; Sprenger, Herman G.; Devaux, Carole; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Bercoff, Danielle Perez

    2011-01-01

    Resistance mutations to the HIV-1 fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide emerge mainly within the drug's target region, HR1, and compensatory mutations have been described within HR2. The surrounding envelope (env) genetic context might also contribute to resistance, although to what extent and through which

  15. From the traditional Chinese medicine plant Schisandra chinensis new scaffolds effective on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase resistant to non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijia; Grandi, Nicole; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Mandas, Daniela; Corona, Angela; Piano, Dario; Esposito, Francesca; Parolin, Cristina; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-04-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is still an extremely attractive pharmaceutical target for the identification of new inhibitors possibly active on drug resistant strains. Medicinal plants are a rich source of chemical diversity and can be used to identify novel scaffolds to be further developed by chemical modifications. We investigated the ability of the main lignans from Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. fruits, commonly used in Traditional Chinese Medicine, to affect HIV-1 RT functions. We purified 6 lignans from Schisandra chinensis fruits and assayed their effects on HIV-1 RT and viral replication. Among the S. chinensis fruit lignans, Schisandrin B and Deoxyschizandrin selectively inhibited the HIV-1 RT-associated DNA polymerase activity. Structure activity relationship revealed the importance of cyclooctadiene ring substituents for efficacy. In addition, Schisandrin B was also able to impair HIV-1 RT drug resistant mutants and the early phases of viral replication. We identified Schisandrin B and Deoxyschizandrin as new scaffold for the further development of novel HIV-1 RT inhibitors.

  16. Measuring enzymatic HIV-1 susceptibility to two reverse transcriptase inhibitors as a rapid and simple approach to HIV-1 drug-resistance testing.

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    Dieter Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Simple and cost-effective approaches for HIV drug-resistance testing are highly desirable for managing increasingly expanding HIV-1 infected populations who initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART, particularly in resource-limited settings. Non-nucleoside reverse trancriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based regimens with an NRTI backbone containing lamivudine (3TC or emtricitabine (FTC are preferred first ART regimens. Failure with these drug combinations typically involves the selection of NNRTI- and/or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses. Therefore, the availability of simple assays to measure both types of drug resistance is critical. We have developed a high throughput screening test for assessing enzymatic resistance of the HIV-1 RT in plasma to 3TC/FTC and NNRTIs. The test uses the sensitive "Amp-RT" assay with a newly-developed real-time PCR format to screen biochemically for drug resistance in single reactions containing either 3TC-triphosphate (3TC-TP or nevirapine (NVP. Assay cut-offs were defined based on testing a large panel of subtype B and non-subtype B clinical samples with known genotypic profiles. Enzymatic 3TC resistance correlated well with the presence of M184I/V, and reduced NVP susceptibility was strongly associated with the presence of K103N, Y181C/I, Y188L, and G190A/Q. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting resistance were 97.0% and 96.0% in samples with M184V, and 97.4% and 96.2% for samples with NNRTI mutations, respectively. We further demonstrate the utility of an HIV capture method in plasma by using magnetic beads coated with CD44 antibody that eliminates the need for ultracentifugation. Thus our results support the use of this simple approach for distinguishing WT from NNRTI- or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses in clinical samples. This enzymatic testing is subtype-independent and can assist in the clinical management of diverse populations particularly in resource-limited settings.

  17. Studies on the Compounds of d4T Combined with Nitric Oxide Donors and Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors and their Anti-HIV and AIDS Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KWALE MOLIME GUITREMBI Blaise(Central African); YAO Qi-zheng

    2004-01-01

    Stavudine, a potent anti-HIV and AiDS-related complex, is one of the Nucleoside Analogue Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NARTIs). It is phosphorylated intracellularly and then inhibits the viral reverse transcriptase by acting as a false substrate. Modifications made on the hydrogen labile at the 5'-position on the sugar is an interesting template for the elaboration of new potent anti-HIV and AIDS drugs. The expected advantages of the modified stavudine prodrugs can be multiple: synergistic drug activities, enhancement of stavudine intracellular uptake, increase of stavudine brain delivery, and bypass of the first stavudine phosphorylation step into the cells. Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors of stavudine and nitric oxide donors of stavudine may hold significant promise for the treatment of HIV and AIDS.

  18. Synthesis and anti-HIV evaluation of hybrid-type prodrugs conjugating HIV integrase inhibitors with d4t by self-cleavable spacers containing an amino acid residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossey, Christine; Huynh, Ngoc-Trinh; Vu, Anh-Hoang; Vidu, Anamaria; Zarafu, Irina; Laduree, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2007-10-01

    In an attempt to combine the anti-HIV inhibitory capacity of reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and integrase (IN) inhibitors (INIs), several heterodimer analogues of the previously reported [d4T]-PABC-[INI] and [d4T]-OABC-[INI] prototypes have been prepared. In these novel series, we wished to extend our results to conjugates which incorporated an enzymatically labile aminoacid unit (L-alanine) connected to d4T through a self-immolative para- or ortho-aminobenzyl carbonate (PABC or OABC) spacer. Among the novel heterodimers, several derivatives show a potent anti-HIV-1 activity, which proved comparable to that of the [L-708,906]-PABC-[d4T] Heterodimer A prototype. However, although the compounds proved inhibitory to HIV-1, they were less potent than the parent compounds from which they were derived.

  19. Novel non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. 3. Dipyrido[2,3-b:2',3'-e]diazepinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, J R; Patel, U R; Kapadia, S R; Hargrave, K D

    1995-04-14

    We have explored the potential of derivatives of the dipyrido[2,3-b:2',3'-e][1,4]diazepinone ring system as inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). These compounds are isomeric to the potent RT inhibitor nevirapine and are available via a novel Smiles rearrangement on intermediates used for the synthesis of nevirapine analogs. Derivatives of this isomeric series are weaker inhibitors of RT than corresponding nevirapine analogs, although with appropriate substitution of the A- and C-pyridine rings activity can be improved.

  20. The Novel Cyclophilin Inhibitor CPI-431-32 Concurrently Blocks HCV and HIV-1 Infections via a Similar Mechanism of Action.

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    Philippe A Gallay

    Full Text Available HCV-related liver disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality of HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients. Despite the recent advent of anti-HCV direct acting antivirals (DAAs, the treatment of HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients remains a challenge, as these patients are refractory to most therapies and develop liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer more often than HCV mono-infected patients. Until the present study, there was no suitable in vitro assay to test the inhibitory activity of drugs on HCV/HIV-1 co-infection. Here we developed a novel in vitro "co-infection" model where HCV and HIV-1 concurrently replicate in their respective main host target cells--human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Using this co-culture model, we demonstrate that cyclophilin inhibitors (CypI, including a novel cyclosporin A (CsA analog, CPI-431-32, simultaneously inhibits replication of both HCV and HIV-1 when added pre- and post-infection. In contrast, the HIV-1 protease inhibitor nelfinavir or the HCV NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir only blocks the replication of a single virus in the "co-infection" system. CPI-431-32 efficiently inhibits HCV and HIV-1 variants, which are normally resistant to DAAs. CPI-431-32 is slightly, but consistently more efficacious than the most advanced clinically tested CypI--alisporivir (ALV--at interrupting an established HCV/HIV-1 co-infection. The superior antiviral efficacy of CPI-431-32 over ALV correlates with its higher potency inhibition of cyclophilin A (CypA isomerase activity and at preventing HCV NS5A-CypA and HIV-1 capsid-CypA interactions known to be vital for replication of the respective viruses. Moreover, we obtained evidence that CPI-431-32 prevents the cloaking of both the HIV-1 and HCV genomes from cellular sensors. Based on these results, CPI-431-32 has the potential, as a single agent or in combination with DAAs, to inhibit both HCV and HIV-1 infections.

  1. A Novel Class of HIV-1 Antiviral Agents Targeting HIV via a SUMOylation-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Ikenna G; Li, Shirley; Li, Baozong; Li, Haitang; Chang, Tammy; Li, Yi-Jia; Vega, Ramir; Rossi, John; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Zaia, John; Chen, Yuan

    2015-12-08

    We have recently identified a chemotype of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease (SENP) inhibitors. Prior to the discovery of their SENP inhibitory activity, these compounds were found to inhibit HIV replication, but with an unknown mechanism. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how these compounds inhibit HIV-1. We found that they do not affect HIV-1 viral production, but significantly inhibited the infectivity of the virus. Interestingly, virions produced from cells treated with these compounds could gain entry and carry out reverse transcription, but could not efficiently integrate into the host genome. This phenotype is different from the virus produced from cells treated with the class of anti-HIV-1 agents that inhibit HIV protease. Upon removal of the SUMO modification sites in the HIV-1 integrase, the compound no longer alters viral infectivity, indicating that the effect is related to SUMOylation of the HIV integrase. This study identifies a novel mechanism for inhibiting HIV-1 integration and a new class of small molecules that inhibits HIV-1 via such mechanism that may contribute a new strategy for cure of HIV-1 by inhibiting the production of infectious virions upon activation from latency.

  2. BST2/Tetherin enhances entry of human cytomegalovirus.

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    Kasinath Viswanathan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-induced BST2/Tetherin prevents budding of vpu-deficient HIV-1 by tethering mature viral particles to the plasma membrane. BST2 also inhibits release of other enveloped viruses including Ebola virus and Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV, indicating that BST2 is a broadly acting antiviral host protein. Unexpectedly however, recovery of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV from supernatants of BST2-expressing human fibroblasts was increased rather than decreased. Furthermore, BST2 seemed to enhance viral entry into cells since more virion proteins were released into BST2-expressing cells and subsequent viral gene expression was elevated. A significant increase in viral entry was also observed upon induction of endogenous BST2 during differentiation of the pro-monocytic cell line THP-1. Moreover, treatment of primary human monocytes with siRNA to BST2 reduced HCMV infection, suggesting that BST2 facilitates entry of HCMV into cells expressing high levels of BST2 either constitutively or in response to exogenous stimuli. Since BST2 is present in HCMV particles we propose that HCMV entry is enhanced via a reverse-tethering mechanism with BST2 in the viral envelope interacting with BST2 in the target cell membrane. Our data suggest that HCMV not only counteracts the well-established function of BST2 as inhibitor of viral egress but also employs this anti-viral protein to gain entry into BST2-expressing hematopoietic cells, a process that might play a role in hematogenous dissemination of HCMV.

  3. 以 gp41为靶点的 HIV-1肽类融合抑制剂研究进展%Advancement on the study of peptides fusion inhibitors anti HIV-1 targeting gp41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许燕珍; 吴文言

    2016-01-01

    gp41是 HIV-1表面的一种包膜糖蛋白,介导病毒粒子与宿主细胞的细胞膜发生膜融合从而使病毒进入靶细胞,在 HIV-1感染和传播的过程中起关键作用。以 gp41为靶点的融合抑制剂不失为一种新型的抗 HIV-1药物之选,其中2003年多肽类融合抑制剂 T-20的上市,使得多肽融合抑制剂成为备受关注的研究热点。本文就 gp41的结构、融合机制以及肽类融合抑制剂的研究进展进行了综述。%The transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 of HIV-1 plays a key role in HIV-1 infection and transmission,mediating the fusion of virus and target cell membranes. Developing various peptides and peptidomimetics used as fusion inhibitors have be-came an attractive research area since the first peptide fusion inhibitor(T-20)targeting HIV-1 gp41 approved by FDA in 2003. This review summarizes the structure and fusion mechanism of gp41 and the recent progresses in the design and development of novel peptides and peptidominetics used as HIV-1 fusion inhibitors.

  4. Anti-HIV-1 Activity Prediction of Novel Gp41 Inhibitors Using Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Saghi; Saghaie, Lotfollah; Fassihi, Afshin

    2016-10-12

    The fusion of viral and host cell membranes is mediated using gp41 subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein. As the HIV-1 enters the host cells, the two helical regions (HR1 and HR2) in the ectodomain of gp41 form a six-helix bundle, which carries the target and viral cell membranes to close proximity. Steps of this process serve as attractive targets for developing HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Identification of some novel HIV fusion inhibitors with the goal of blocking the formation of the six-helix bundle was accomplished by computer-aided drug design techniques. A virtual screening strategy was employed to recognize small molecules presumably able to bind the gp41 at the internal interface of the NHR helices at the core native viral six-helix. This study was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, a library of more than seven thousand compounds was collected from ZINC, PubChem and BindingDB databases and protein data bank. Key contacts of known inhibitors with gp41 binding site residues were considered as the collecting criteria. In the second stage series of filtering processes were performed on this library in subsequent steps to find the potential gp41 inhibitors. The filtering criteria included pharmacokinetic and ADMET properties as well as in silico anti-HIV-1 prediction. Molecular docking simulation was carried out to identify interactions of the filtered molecules with the key residues in the gp41 binding site. Finally, molecular dynamics simulation indicates the superior inhibitory ability of three selected compounds over the known gp41inhibitor, NB-64.

  5. Tipranavir (PNU-140690): a potent, orally bioavailable nonpeptidic HIV protease inhibitor of the 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2-pyrone sulfonamide class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S R; Strohbach, J W; Tommasi, R A; Aristoff, P A; Johnson, P D; Skulnick, H I; Dolak, L A; Seest, E P; Tomich, P K; Bohanon, M J; Horng, M M; Lynn, J C; Chong, K T; Hinshaw, R R; Watenpaugh, K D; Janakiraman, M N; Thaisrivongs, S

    1998-08-27

    A broad screening program previously identified phenprocoumon (1) as a small molecule template for inhibition of HIV protease. Subsequent modification of this lead through iterative cycles of structure-based design led to the activity enhancements of pyrone and dihydropyrone ring systems (II and V) and amide-based substitution (III). Incorporation of sulfonamide substitution within the dihydropyrone template provided a series of highly potent HIV protease inhibitors, with structure-activity relationships described in this paper. Crystallographic studies provided further information on important binding interactions responsible for high enzymatic binding. These studies culminated in compound VI, which inhibits HIV protease with a Ki value of 8 pM and shows an IC90 value of 100 nM in antiviral cell culture. Clinical trials of this compound (PNU-140690, Tipranavir) for treatment of HIV infection are currently underway.

  6. Identification of an HIV-1 replication inhibitor which rescues host restriction factor APOBEC3G in Vif-APOBEC3G complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoyang; Zhong, Limei; Chen, Bing; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Xue; Liang, Liting; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Ziying; Chen, Hui; Zhou, Jie; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Hui; Bai, Chuan

    2015-10-01

    HIV-1 Vif protein is one of the most crucial accessory proteins for viral replication. It efficiently counteracts the important host restriction factor APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G, A3G) which is lethal to HIV-1 by causing G to A mutation of viral genome. Vif protein mediates degradation of APOBEC3G via the complicated protein-protein interactions of Vif, APOBEC3G, Elongin C/B and Cullin 5. The importance of Vif-APOBEC3G complex makes it a good potential target to develop new therapeutics of HIV-1. We identified a potent HIV-1 replication inhibitor (ZBMA-1, IC50 = 1.01 μM) that efficiently protected APOBEC3G protein by targeting Vif-APOBEC3G complex. The co-immunoprecipitation and docking studies indicated that compound ZBMA-1 affected the binding of Elongin C with Vif protein.

  7. [The role of structural protein Gag and related gene (protein) in late stages of the HIV-1 replication cycle and the inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Liu, Xin-yong

    2010-02-01

    The late stages of the HIV-1 replication cycle are important to the overall replication cycle. During the late stages, HIV-1 replication undergoes the processes of assembly, release, and maturation, resulting in the production of a mature virus particle capable of infecting a new target cell. The structural protein Gag and its related gene (protein) play a central role in these pathways. The different regions of Gag worked in concert to drive production of a mature infectious particle through protein-protein, protein-RNA and protein-lipid interactions. The designed drug aimed directly at these stages can efficiently block the maturation and infectivity of HIV-1. In this article, the role of structural protein Gag and related gene (protein) in late stages of the HIV-1 replication cycle and related inhibitors is reviewed.

  8. 3D-QSAR and molecular docking studies on HIV protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jianbo; Wu, Yingji; Bai, Min; Zhan, Pei

    2017-02-01

    In order to well understand the chemical-biological interactions governing their activities toward HIV protease activity, QSAR models of 34 cyclic-urea derivatives with inhibitory HIV were developed. The quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model was built by using comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) technique. And the best CoMSIA model has rcv2, rncv2 values of 0.586 and 0.931 for cross-validated and non-cross-validated. The predictive ability of CoMSIA model was further validated by a test set of 7 compounds, giving rpred2 value of 0.973. Docking studies were used to find the actual conformations of chemicals in active site of HIV protease, as well as the binding mode pattern to the binding site in protease enzyme. The information provided by 3D-QSAR model and molecular docking may lead to a better understanding of the structural requirements of 34 cyclic-urea derivatives and help to design potential anti-HIV protease molecules.

  9. Efficacy of etravirine combined with darunavir or other ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vingerhoets, J; Calvez, V; Flandre, P

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This observational study in antiretroviral treatment-experienced, HIV-1-infected adults explored the efficacy of etravirine plus darunavir/ritonavir (DRV group; n = 999) vs. etravirine plus an alternative boosted protease inhibitor (other PI group; n = 116) using pooled European cohort...... data. METHODS: Two international (EuroSIDA; EUResist Network) and five national (France, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and UK) cohorts provided data (collected in 2007-2012). Stratum-adjusted (for confounding factors) Mantel-Haenszel differences in virological responses (viral load .../mL) and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics were balanced between groups except for previous use of antiretrovirals (≥ 10: 63% in the DRV group vs. 49% in the other PI group), including previous use of at least three PIs (64% vs. 53...

  10. Combinations of isoform-targeted histone deacetylase inhibitors and bryostatin analogues display remarkable potency to activate latent HIV without global T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Brice J; Niu, Austin; Ramani, Rashmi; Marshall, Garland R; Wender, Paul A; Williams, Robert M; Ratner, Lee; Barnes, Alexander B; Kyei, George B

    2017-08-07

    Current antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV/AIDS slows disease progression by reducing viral loads and increasing CD4 counts. Yet ART is not curative due to the persistence of CD4+ T-cell proviral reservoirs that chronically resupply active virus. Elimination of these reservoirs through the administration of synergistic combinations of latency reversing agents (LRAs), such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and protein kinase C (PKC) modulators, provides a promising strategy to reduce if not eradicate the viral reservoir. Here, we demonstrate that largazole and its analogues are isoform-targeted histone deacetylase inhibitors and potent LRAs. Significantly, these isoform-targeted HDAC inhibitors synergize with PKC modulators, namely bryostatin-1 analogues (bryologs). Implementation of this unprecedented LRA combination induces HIV-1 reactivation to unparalleled levels and avoids global T-cell activation within resting CD4+ T-cells.

  11. Prevention of perinatal HIV I transmission by protease inhibitor based triple drug antiretroviral therapy versus nevirapine as single dose at the time of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendle, Meenakshi; Bajpai, Smrati; Choudhary, Ashwini; Pazare, Amar

    2012-12-01

    In India, parent to child transmission is the most important source of HIV infection in children below fifteen years of age. Transmission of HIV from mother to child can occur even at low or undetectable HIV virus levels. CD4 count or HIV RNA levels should not be the determining factor when deciding whether to use antiretroviral drugs for prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV. Use of single dose nevirapine during labour, in prevention of parent to child transmission (PPTCT) programme for pregnant females with CD4 count > 250 cells/cumm has less efficacy in reducing perinatal transmission. And there are high chances of development of nevirapine resistance to both mother and baby after single dose nevirapine exposure. Short course Protease inhibitor(PI) based triple drug combination ART from 28 weeks till delivery for perinatal prophylaxis is effective in reducing perinatal HIV transmission. PI's are safe in pregnancy and also have less chances of development of resistance when used for perinatal prophylaxis and stopped post delivery.Hence, it is opined that PI based combination ART should be offered to pregnant females in PPTCT programme, thereby preventing occurrence of paediatric HIV infection in India. This can have significant impact on the society at large.

  12. Novel high-throughput screen identifies an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Chih-Wei; Alptürk, Onur; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2014-09-15

    HIV-1 resistance to zidovudine [AZT (azidothymidine)] is associated with selection of the mutations M41L, D67N, K70R, L210W, T215F/Y and K219Q/E in RT (reverse transcriptase). These mutations decrease HIV-1 susceptibility to AZT by augmenting RT's ability to excise the chain-terminating AZT-MP (AZT-monophosphate) moiety from the chain-terminated DNA primer. Although AZT-MP excision occurs at the enzyme's polymerase active site, it is mechanistically distinct from the DNA polymerase reaction. Consequently, this activity represents a novel target for drug discovery, and inhibitors that target this activity may increase the efficacy of nucleoside/nucleotide analogues, and may help to delay the onset of drug resistance. In the present study, we have developed a FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer)-based high-throughput screening assay for the AZT-MP excision activity of RT. This assay is sensitive and robust, and demonstrates a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.3 and a Z' factor of 0.69. We screened three chemical libraries (7265 compounds) using this assay, and identified APEX57219 {3,3'-[(3-carboxy-4-oxo-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)methylene]bis[6-hydroxybenzoic acid]} as the most promising hit. APEX57219 displays a unique activity profile against wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 RT, and was found to inhibit virus replication at the level of reverse transcription. Mechanistic analyses revealed that APEX57219 blocked the interaction between RT and the nucleic acid substrate.

  13. [The influence of long-term nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors on lipids metabolism in HIV/AIDS patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuan-bo; Xie, Jing; Han, Yang; Qiu, Zhi-feng; Li, Yan-ling; Song, Xiao-jing; Yu, Wei; Li, Tai-sheng

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of long-term nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) on lipids metabolism in HIV/AIDS patients and correlating clinical factors. A total of 118 HIV/AIDS patients were divided into 3 groups: untreated group (40 patients), highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for 1 - 2 years group (37 patients) and HAART over 5 years group (41 patients), with 20 healthy individuals as the control group. Clinical lipodystrophy (LD) was defined as concordance between patient's report of change and physical examination. Fat mass (FM) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). There was no significant difference in the incidence of LD between HAART for 1 - 2 years group and HAART over 5 years group (51.2% vs 40.5%, P = 0.345). The prevalence of LD was 2.4 folds with stavudine (d4T) treatment compared with zidovudine (AZT)-containing regimens (61.6% vs 23.5%, P = 0.001). Based on DXA measurements, FM of total body and limbs were significantly lower in the HAART over 5 years group than that in the control group, the untreated group and the HAART for 1 - 2 years group (P HIV/AIDS patients with NRTIs therapy have high prevalence of LD, which mainly occurs 1 - 2 years after therapy, and increases with d4T treatment compared with AZT-containing regimens. There was no significant difference in the incidence of LD between the HAART for 1 - 2 years group and the HAART over 5 years group. FM was significantly decreased after long-term HAART in the patients with or without LD. DXA can evaluate LD objectively and guide further clinical treatment.

  14. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 predicts myocardial infarction in HIV-1-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Katzenstein, Terese L; Benfield, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    of antiretroviral therapy, sex, smoking and no known cardiovascular disease. Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, soluble endothelial selectin, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule, matrix metalloprotease 9, myeloperoxidase, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1...

  15. Computational Analysis of Molecular Interaction Networks Underlying Change of HIV-1 Resistance to Selected Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierczak, Marcin; Dramiński, Michał; Koronacki, Jacek; Komorowski, Jan

    2010-12-12

    Despite more than two decades of research, HIV resistance to drugs remains a serious obstacle in developing efficient AIDS treatments. Several computational methods have been developed to predict resistance level from the sequence of viral proteins such as reverse transcriptase (RT) or protease. These methods, while powerful and accurate, give very little insight into the molecular interactions that underly acquisition of drug resistance/hypersusceptibility. Here, we attempt at filling this gap by using our Monte Carlo feature selection and interdependency discovery method (MCFS-ID) to elucidate molecular interaction networks that characterize viral strains with altered drug resistance levels. We analyzed a number of HIV-1 RT sequences annotated with drug resistance level using the MCFS-ID method. This let us expound interdependency networks that characterize change of drug resistance to six selected RT inhibitors: Abacavir, Lamivudine, Stavudine, Zidovudine, Tenofovir and Nevirapine. The networks consider interdependencies at the level of physicochemical properties of mutating amino acids, eg,: polarity. We mapped each network on the 3D structure of RT in attempt to understand the molecular meaning of interacting pairs. The discovered interactions describe several known drug resistance mechanisms and, importantly, some previously unidentified ones. Our approach can be easily applied to a whole range of problems from the domain of protein engineering. A portable Java implementation of our MCFS-ID method is freely available for academic users and can be obtained at: http://www.ipipan.eu/staff/m.draminski/software.htm.

  16. Bringing research into a first semester organic chemistry laboratory with the multistep synthesis of carbohydrate-based HIV inhibitor mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontrello, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    Benefits of incorporating research experiences into laboratory courses have been well documented, yet examples of research projects designed for the first semester introductory organic chemistry lab course are extremely rare. To address this deficiency, a Carbohydrate-Based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Inhibitor project consisting of a synthetic scheme of four reactions was developed for and implemented in the first semester organic lab. Students carried out the synthetic reactions during the last 6 of 10 total labs in the course, generating carbohydrate-based dimeric target molecules modeled after published dimers with application in HIV therapy. The project was designed to provide a research experience through use of literature procedures for reactions performed, exploration of variation in linker length in the target structure, and synthesis of compounds not previously reported in the scientific literature. Project assessment revealed strong student support, indicating enhanced engagement and interest in the course as a direct result of the use of scientific literature and the applications of the synthesized carbohydrate-based molecules. Regardless of discussed challenges in designing a research project for the first semester lab course, the finding from data analysis that a project implemented in the first semester lab had significantly greater student impact than a second semester project should provide motivation for development of additional research projects for a first semester organic course. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Secondary mutations in viruses resistant to HIV-1 integrase inhibitors that restore viral infectivity and replication kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Koichiro; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kobayashi, Masanori; Miki, Shigeru; Noshi, Takeshi; Seki, Takahiro; Kanamori-Koyama, Mikiko; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward P; Johns, Brian A; Foster, Scott A; Underwood, Mark R; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2009-02-01

    Passage of HIV-1 in the presence of integrase inhibitors (INIs) generates resistant viruses that have mutations in the integrase region. Integrase-resistant mutations Q148K and Q148R were identified as primary mutations with the passage of HIV-1 IIIB in the presence of INIs S-1360 or S/GSK-364735, respectively. Secondary amino acid substitutions E138K or G140S were observed when passage with INI was continued. The role of these mutations was investigated with molecular clones. Relative to Q148K alone, Q148K/E138K had 2- and >6-fold increases in resistance to S-1360 and S/GSK-364735, respectively, and the double mutant had slightly better infectivity and replication kinetics. In contrast, Q148K/G140S and Q148R/E138K had nearly equivalent or slightly reduced fold resistance to the INI compared with their respective Q148 primary mutants, and had increases in infectivity and replication kinetics. Recovery of these surrogates of viral fitness coincided with the recovery of integration efficiency of viral DNA into the host cell chromosome for these double mutants. These data show that recovery of viral integration efficiency can be an important factor for the emergence and maintenance of INI-resistant mutations.

  18. C-5-Modified Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydofuran-Derived Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Exert Potent Inhibition of the Replication of HIV-1 Variants Highly Resistant to Various PIs, including Darunavir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Manabu; Hayashi, Hironori; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Takamatsu, Yuki; Aoki-Ogata, Hiromi; Nakamura, Teruya; Nakata, Hirotomo; Das, Debananda; Yamagata, Yuriko; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified three nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), GRL-015, -085, and -097, containing tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF) with a C-5 hydroxyl. The three compounds were potent against a wild-type laboratory HIV-1 strain (HIV-1WT), with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 3.0 to 49 nM, and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, with 50% cytotoxic concentrations (CC50) for GRL-015, -085, and -097 of 80, >100, and >100 μM, respectively. All the three compounds potently inhibited the replication of highly PI-resistant HIV-1 variants selected with each of the currently available PIs and recombinant clinical HIV-1 isolates obtained from patients harboring multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants (HIVMDR). Importantly, darunavir (DRV) was >1,000 times less active against a highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant (HIV-1DRVRP51); the three compounds remained active against HIV-1DRVRP51 with only a 6.8- to 68-fold reduction. Moreover, the emergence of HIV-1 variants resistant to the three compounds was considerably delayed compared to the case of DRV. In particular, HIV-1 variants resistant to GRL-085 and -097 did not emerge even when two different highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variants were used as a starting population. In the structural analyses, Tp-THF of GRL-015, -085, and -097 showed strong hydrogen bond interactions with the backbone atoms of active-site amino acid residues (Asp29 and Asp30) of HIV-1 protease. A strong hydrogen bonding formation between the hydroxyl moiety of Tp-THF and a carbonyl oxygen atom of Gly48 was newly identified. The present findings indicate that the three compounds warrant further study as possible therapeutic agents for treating individuals harboring wild-type HIV and/or HIVMDR. IMPORTANCE Darunavir (DRV) inhibits the replication of most existing multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains and has a high genetic barrier. However, the emergence of highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 strains (HIVDRVR) has recently been observed in vivo and in

  19. Inhibitors and facilitators of willingness to participate (WTP) in an HIV vaccine trial: construction and initial validation of the Inhibitors and Facilitators of Willingness to Participate Scale (WPS) among women at risk for HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincham, Dylan; Kagee, Ashraf; Swartz, Leslie

    2010-04-01

    A psychometric scale assessing inhibitors and facilitators of willingness to participate (WTP) in an HIV vaccine trial has not yet been developed. This study aimed to construct and derive the exploratory factor structure of such a scale. The 35-item Inhibitors and Facilitators of Willingness to Participate Scale (WPS) was developed and administered to a convenience sample of 264 Black females between the ages of 16 and 49 years living in an urban-informal settlement near Cape Town. The subscales of the WPS demonstrated good internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranging between 0.69 and 0.82. A principal components exploratory factor analysis revealed the presence of five latent factors. The factors, which accounted for 45.93% of the variance in WTP, were (1) personal costs, (2) safety and convenience, (3) stigmatisation, (4) personal gains and (5) social approval and trust. Against the backdrop of the study limitations, these results provide initial support for the reliability and construct validity of the WPS among the most eligible trial participants in the Western Cape of South Africa.

  20. Virtual screening for HIV protease inhibitors: a comparison of AutoDock 4 and Vina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Max W; Ayeni, Christian; Breuer, Sebastian; Torbett, Bruce E

    2010-08-04

    The AutoDock family of software has been widely used in protein-ligand docking research. This study compares AutoDock 4 and AutoDock Vina in the context of virtual screening by using these programs to select compounds active against HIV protease. Both programs were used to rank the members of two chemical libraries, each containing experimentally verified binders to HIV protease. In the case of the NCI Diversity Set II, both AutoDock 4 and Vina were able to select active compounds significantly better than random (AUC = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively; pAutoDock 4 and Vina were equally capable, though both exhibited a size-related bias in scoring. However, as Vina executes more quickly and is able to more accurately rank larger molecules, researchers should look to it first when undertaking a virtual screen.

  1. Synthesis of Novel Uracil Non-Nucleoside Derivatives as Potential Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors of HIV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Brollosy, Nasser R.; Al-Deeb, Omar. A.; El-Emam, Ali A.

    2009-01-01

    Novel emivirine and TNK-651 analogues 5a-d were synthesized by reaction of chloromethyl ethyl ether and / or benzyl chloromethyl ether, respectively, with uracils having 5-ethyl and 6-(4-methylbenzyl) or 6-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl) substituents. A series of new uracil non-nucleosides substituted at N-1...... with cyclopropylmethyloxymethyl 9a-d, 2-phenylethyloxymethyl 9e-h, and 3-phenylprop-1-yloxymethyl 9i-l were prepared on treatment of the corresponding uracils with the appropriate acetals 8a-c. Some of the tested compounds showed good activity against HIV-1 wild type. Among them, 1-cyclopropylmethyloxymethyl-5-ethyl-6......-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)uracil 9c and 5-ethyl-6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-1-(2-phenylethyloxymethyl)uracil 9g showed inhibitory potency equally to emivirine against HIV-1 wild type. Furthermore, compounds 9c and 9g showed marginal better activity against NNRTI resistant mutants than emivirine....

  2. Effect of Amphipathic HIV Fusion Inhibitor Peptides on POPC and POPC/Cholesterol Membrane Properties: A Molecular Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís M. S. Loura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available T-20 and T-1249 fusion inhibitor peptides were shown to interact with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC (liquid disordered, ld and POPC/cholesterol (1:1 (POPC/Chol (liquid ordered, lo bilayers, and they do so to different extents. Although they both possess a tryptophan-rich domain (TRD, T-20 lacks a pocket binding domain (PBD, which is present in T-1249. It has been postulated that the PBD domain enhances FI interaction with HIV gp41 protein and with model membranes. Interaction of these fusion inhibitor peptides with both the cell membrane and the viral envelope membrane is important for function, i.e., inhibition of the fusion process. We address this problem with a molecular dynamics approach focusing on lipid properties, trying to ascertain the consequences and the differences in the interaction of T-20 and T-1249 with ld and lo model membranes. T-20 and T-1249 interactions with model membranes are shown to have measurable and different effects on bilayer structural and dynamical parameters. T-1249’s adsorption to the membrane surface has generally a stronger influence in the measured parameters. The presence of both binding domains in T-1249 appears to be paramount to its stronger interaction, and is shown to have a definite importance in membrane properties upon peptide adsorption.

  3. Ionic derivatives of betulinic acid as novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Holmes, Shaletha S; Baker, Gary A; Challa, Suresh; Bose, Himangshu S; Song, Zhiyan

    2012-10-01

    Betulinic acid is a natural product possessing abundant and favourable biological activity, including anti-cancer, anti-malarial, anti-inflammatory and anti-HIV properties, while causing minimal toxicity to unaffected cells. The full biological potency of betulinic acid cannot be fully unlocked, however, for a number of reasons, a primary one being its limited solubility in aqueous and biologically pertinent organic media. Aiming to improve the water solubility of betulinic acid without disrupting its structurally related bioactivity, we have prepared different ionic derivatives of betulinic acid. Inhibition bioassays on HIV-1 protease-catalysed peptide hydrolysis indicate significantly improved performance resulting from converting the betulinic acid to organic salt form. Indeed, for one particular cholinium-based derivative, its water solubility is improved more than 100 times and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value (22 μg mL(-1)) was one-third that of wide-type betulinic acid (60 μg mL(-1)). These encouraging results advise that additional studies of ionic betulinic acid derivatives as a therapeutic solution against HIV-1 infection are warranted.

  4. Characterizing the Anti-HIV Activity of Papuamide A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis R. Barrows

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Papuamide A is representative of a class of marine derived cyclic depsipeptides, reported to have cytoprotective activity against HIV-1 in vitro. We show here that papuamide A acts as an entry inhibitor, preventing human immunodeficiency virus infection of host cells and that this inhibition is not specific to R5 or X4 tropic virus. This inhibition of viral entry was determined to not be due to papuamide A binding to CD4 or HIV gp120, the two proteins involved in the cell-virus recognition and binding. Furthermore, papuamide A was able to inhibit HIV pseudotype viruses expressing envelope glycoproteins from vesicular stomatitis virus or amphotropic murine leukemia virus indicating the mechanism of viral entry inhibition is not HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein specific. Time delayed addition studies with the pseudotyped viruses show that papuamide A inhibits viral infection only at the initial stage of the viral life cycle. Additionally, pretreatment studies revealed that the virus, and not the cell, is the target of papuamide A’s action. Together, these results suggest a direct virucidal mechanism of HIV-1 inhibition by papuamide A. We also demonstrate here that the other papuamides (B-D are able to inhibit viral entry indicating that the free amino moiety of 2,3-diaminobutanoic acid residue is not required for the virucidal activity.

  5. Characterizing the Anti-HIV Activity of Papuamide A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelic, Cynthia D; Planelles, Vicente; Barrows, Louis R

    2008-01-01

    Papuamide A is representative of a class of marine derived cyclic depsipeptides, reported to have cytoprotective activity against HIV-1 in vitro. We show here that papuamide A acts as an entry inhibitor, preventing human immunodeficiency virus infection of host cells and that this inhibition is not specific to R5 or X4 tropic virus. This inhibition of viral entry was determined to not be due to papuamide A binding to CD4 or HIV gp120, the two proteins involved in the cell-virus recognition and binding. Furthermore, papuamide A was able to inhibit HIV pseudotype viruses expressing envelope glycoproteins from vesicular stomatitis virus or amphotropic murine leukemia virus indicating the mechanism of viral entry inhibition is not HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein specific. Time delayed addition studies with the pseudotyped viruses show that papuamide A inhibits viral infection only at the initial stage of the viral life cycle. Additionally, pretreatment studies revealed that the virus, and not the cell, is the target of papuamide A’s action. Together, these results suggest a direct virucidal mechanism of HIV-1 inhibition by papuamide A. We also demonstrate here that the other papuamides (B-D) are able to inhibit viral entry indicating that the free amino moiety of 2,3-diaminobutanoic acid residue is not required for the virucidal activity. PMID:19172193

  6. Mechanistic Studies and Modeling Reveal the Origin of Differential Inhibition of Gag Polymorphic Viruses by HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zeyu; Cantone, Joseph; Lu, Hao; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Protack, Tricia; Yuan, Tian; Yang, Hong; Liu, Zheng; Drexler, Dieter; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Cockett, Mark; Krystal, Mark; Lataillade, Max; Dicker, Ira B

    2016-11-01

    HIV-1 maturation inhibitors (MIs) disrupt the final step in the HIV-1 protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag polyprotein between capsid p24 capsid (CA) and spacer peptide 1 (SP1), leading to the production of infectious virus. BMS-955176 is a second generation MI with improved antiviral activity toward polymorphic Gag variants compared to a first generation MI bevirimat (BVM). The underlying mechanistic reasons for the differences in polymorphic coverage were studied using antiviral assays, an LC/MS assay that quantitatively characterizes CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics of virus like particles (VLPs) and a radiolabel binding assay to determine VLP/MI affinities and dissociation kinetics. Antiviral assay data indicates that BVM does not achieve 100% inhibition of certain polymorphs, even at saturating concentrations. This results in the breakthrough of infectious virus (partial antagonism) regardless of BVM concentration. Reduced maximal percent inhibition (MPI) values for BVM correlated with elevated EC50 values, while rates of HIV-1 protease cleavage at CA/SP1 correlated inversely with the ability of BVM to inhibit HIV-1 Gag polymorphic viruses: genotypes with more rapid CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics were less sensitive to BVM. In vitro inhibition of wild type VLP CA/SP1 cleavage by BVM was not maintained at longer cleavage times. BMS-955176 exhibited greatly improved MPI against polymorphic Gag viruses, binds to Gag polymorphs with higher affinity/longer dissociation half-lives and exhibits greater time-independent inhibition of CA/SP1 cleavage compared to BVM. Virological (MPI) and biochemical (CA/SP1 cleavage rates, MI-specific Gag affinities) data were used to create an integrated semi-quantitative model that quantifies CA/SP1 cleavage rates as a function of both MI and Gag polymorph. The model outputs are in accord with in vitro antiviral observations and correlate with observed in vivo MI efficacies. Overall, these findings may be useful to further understand antiviral

  7. Antiretroviral effects of deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase inhibitors: a hypusine-dependent host cell mechanism for replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, L; Szabo, P; Grady, R W; Hanauske, A R; Huima-Byron, T; Slowinska, B; Zagulska, S; Hanauske-Abel, H M

    1998-06-01

    The HIV-1 protein Rev, critical for translation of incompletely spliced retroviral mRNAs encoding capsid elements, requires a host cell protein termed "eukaryotic initiation factor 5A" (eIF-5A). This is the only protein containing hypusine, a lysine-derived hydroxylated residue that determines its proposed bioactivity, the translation of a subset of cellular mRNAs controlling G1-to-S transit of the cell cycle. We postulated that inhibiting the hypusine-forming deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase (DOHH) should, by depleting eukaryotic initiation factor 5A, compromise Rev function and thus reduce HIV-1 multiplication. We now report that the alpha-hydroxypyridones, specifically mimosine, a natural product, and deferiprone, an experimental drug, inhibited deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase in T-lymphocytic and promonocytic cell lines and, in a concentration-dependent manner, suppressed replication of HIV-1. However, the alpha-hydroxypyridones did not affect the formation of unspliced or multiply spliced HIV-1 transcripts. Rather, these agents caused Rev-dependent incompletely spliced HIV-1 mRNA such as gag, but not cellular "housekeeping" mRNAs, to disappear from polysomes. Consequently, alpha-hydroxypyridone-mediated depletion of eIF-5A decreased biosynthesis of structural HIV-1 protein encoded by gag, measured as p24, whereas the induced formation of cellular protein like tumor necrosis factor alpha remained unaffected. By interfering with the translation of incompletely spliced retroviral mRNAs, these compounds restrict HIV-1 to the early, nongenerative phase of its reproductive cycle. In the inducibly HIV-1 expressing T-cell line ACH-2, the deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase inhibitors triggered extensive apoptosis, particularly of cells that actively produce HIV-1. Selective suppression of retroviral protein biosynthesis and preferential apoptosis of retrovirally infected cells by alpha-hydroxypyridones point to a novel mode of antiretroviral action.

  8. Synthesis, 2D-NMR and molecular modelling studies of pentacycloundecane lactam-peptides and peptoids as potential HIV-1 wild type C-SA protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makatini, Maya M; Petzold, Katja; Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Arvidsson, Per I; Honarparvar, Bahareh; Govender, Patrick; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; Sayed, Yasien; JerônimoLameira; Maguire, Glenn E M; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2013-02-01

    In this study, eight non-natural peptides and peptoids incorporating the pentacycloundecane (PCU) lactam were designed and synthesized as potential inhibitors of the wild type C-SA HIV-protease. Five of these inhibitors gave IC(50) values ranging from 0.5 up to 0.75 µM against the resistance-prone wild type C-South African HIV-protease. NMR EASY-ROESY studies enabled us to describe the secondary structure of three of these compounds in solution. The 3D structures of the selected cage peptides were also modelled in solution using QM/MM/MD simulations. Satisfactory agreement between the NMR observations and the low energy calculated structures exists. Only one of these inhibitors (11 peptoid), which showed the best IC(50)(0.5 µM), exhibited a definable 3-D structure in solution. Autodock4 and AutodockVina were used to model the potential interaction between these inhibitors and the HIV-PR. It appears that the docking results are too crude to be correlated with the relative narrow range of experimental IC(50) values (0.5-10 µM). The PCU-peptides and peptoides were several orders less toxic (145 μM for 11 and 102 μM for 11 peptoid) to human MT-4 cells than lopinavir (0.025 μM). This is the first example of a polycyclic cage framework to be employed as an HIV-PR transition state analogue inhibitor and can potentially be utilized for other diseases related proteases. [Figure: see text].

  9. Role of HIV-1 subtype C envelope V3 to V5 regions in viral entry, coreceptor utilization and replication efficiency in primary T-lymphocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages

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    Gopalan Sarla

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several subtypes of HIV-1 circulate in infected people worldwide, including subtype B in the United States and subtype C in Africa and India. To understand the biological properties of HIV-1 subtype C, including cellular tropism, virus entry, replication efficiency and cytopathic effects, we reciprocally inserted our previously characterized envelope V3–V5 regions derived from 9 subtype C infected patients from India into a subtype B molecular clone, pNL4-3. Equal amounts of the chimeric viruses were used to infect T-lymphocyte cell lines (A3.01 and MT-2, coreceptor cell lines (U373-MAGI-CCR5/CXCR4, primary blood T-lymphocytes (PBL and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM. Results We found that subtype C envelope V3–V5 region chimeras failed to replicate in T-lymphocyte cell lines but replicated in PBL and MDM. In addition, these chimeras were able to infect U373MAGI-CD4+-CCR5+ but not U373MAGI-CD4+-CXCR4+ cell line, suggesting CCR5 coreceptor utilization and R5 phenotypes. These subtype C chimeras were unable to induce syncytia in MT-2 cells, indicative of non-syncytium inducing (NSI phenotypes. More importantly, the subtype C envelope chimeras replicated at higher levels in PBL and MDM compared with subtype B chimeras and isolates. Furthermore, the higher levels subtype C chimeras replication in PBL and MDM correlated with increased virus entry in U373MAGI-CD4+-CCR5+. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that the envelope V3 to V5 regions of subtype C contributed to higher levels of HIV-1 replication compared with subtype B chimeras, which may contribute to higher viral loads and faster disease progression in subtype C infected individuals than other subtypes as well as rapid HIV-1 subtype C spread in India.

  10. Significantly improved HIV inhibitor efficacy prediction employing proteochemometric models generated from antivirogram data.

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    Gerard J P van Westen

    Full Text Available Infection with HIV cannot currently be cured; however it can be controlled by combination treatment with multiple anti-retroviral drugs. Given different viral genotypes for virtually each individual patient, the question now arises which drug combination to use to achieve effective treatment. With the availability of viral genotypic data and clinical phenotypic data, it has become possible to create computational models able to predict an optimal treatment regimen for an individual patient. Current models are based only on sequence data derived from viral genotyping; chemical similarity of drugs is not considered. To explore the added value of chemical similarity inclusion we applied proteochemometric models, combining chemical and protein target properties in a single bioactivity model. Our dataset was a large scale clinical database of genotypic and phenotypic information (in total ca. 300,000 drug-mutant bioactivity data points, 4 (NNRTI, 8 (NRTI or 9 (PI drugs, and 10,700 (NNRTI 10,500 (NRTI or 27,000 (PI mutants. Our models achieved a prediction error below 0.5 Log Fold Change. Moreover, when directly compared with previously published sequence data, derived models PCM performed better in resistance classification and prediction of Log Fold Change (0.76 log units versus 0.91. Furthermore, we were able to successfully confirm both known and identify previously unpublished, resistance-conferring mutations of HIV Reverse Transcriptase (e.g. K102Y, T216M and HIV Protease (e.g. Q18N, N88G from our dataset. Finally, we applied our models prospectively to the public HIV resistance database from Stanford University obtaining a correct resistance prediction rate of 84% on the full set (compared to 80% in previous work on a high quality subset. We conclude that proteochemometric models are able to accurately predict the phenotypic resistance based on genotypic data even for novel mutants and mixtures. Furthermore, we add an applicability domain to

  11. Antiretroviral therapy outcomes in HIV-infected children after adjusting protease inhibitor dosing during tuberculosis treatment.

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    Cordula Frohoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modification of ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r-based antiretroviral therapy is required for HIV-infected children co-treated for tuberculosis (TB. We aimed to determine virologic and toxicity outcomes among TB/HIV co-treated children with the following modifications to their antiretroviral therapy (ART: (1 super-boosted LPV/r, (2 double-dose LPV/r or (3 ritonavir. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A medical record review was conducted at two clinical sites in Johannesburg, South Africa. The records of children 6-24 months of age initiating LPV/r-based therapy were reviewed. Children co-treated for TB were categorized based on the modifications made to their ART regimen and were compared to children of the same age at each site not treated for TB. Included are 526 children, 294 (56% co-treated for TB. All co-treated children had more severe HIV disease, including lower CD4 percents and worse growth indicators, than comparisons. Children in the super-boosted group (n = 156 were as likely to be virally suppressed (<400 copies/ml at 6 months as comparisons (69.2% vs. 74.8%, p = 0.36. Children in the double-dose (n = 47 and ritonavir groups (n = 91 were significantly less likely to be virally suppressed at 6 months (53.1% and 49.3% than comparisons (74.8% and 82.1%; p = 0.02 and p<0.0001, respectively. At 12 months only children in the ritonavir group still had lower rates of virological suppression relative to comparisons (63.9% vs 83.3% p<0.05. Grade 1 or greater ALT elevations were more common in the super-boosted (75% than double-dose (54.6% or ritonavir (33.9% groups (p = 0.09 and p<0.0001 but grade 3/4 elevations were observed in 3 (13.6% of the super-boosted, 7 (15.9% of the double-dose and 5 (8.9% of the ritonavir group (p = 0.81 and p = 0.29. CONCLUSION: Good short-term virologic outcomes were achieved in children co-treated for TB and HIV who received super-boosted LPV/r. Treatment limiting toxicity was

  12. Synthesis, in vitro evaluation, and docking studies of novel chromone derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn; Wiwat, Chanpen; Samee, Weerasak; Nunthanavanit, Patcharawee; Phosrithong, Narumol

    2011-08-01

    Novel chromone derivatives with a benzopyran-4-one scaffold have been prepared by the one-pot cyclization reaction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of these new compounds towards HIV-1 protease have been evaluated using stop time HPLC method as the preliminary screening. The most potent compound, 7,8-dihydroxy-2-(3'-trifluoromethyl phenyl)-3-(3″-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)chromone ( 32), showed IC 50 = 0.34 μM. The molecular docking study supported results from experimental activity testing and also provided structure-activity relationship of this series.

  13. Effect of lysine to arginine mutagenesis in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 on viral entry efficiency and neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Birco; Schreiber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by an ongoing replication leading to T-lymphocyte decline which is paralleled by the switch from CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor usage. To predict coreceptor usage, several computer algorithms using gp120 V3 loop sequence data have been developed. In these algorithms an occupation of the V3 positions 11 and 25, by one of the amino acids lysine (K) or arginine (R), is an indicator for CXCR4 usage. Amino acids R and K dominate at these two positions, but can also be identified at positions 9 and 10. Generally, CXCR4-viruses possess V3 sequences, with an overall positive charge higher than the V3 sequences of R5-viruses. The net charge is calculated by subtracting the number of negatively charged amino acids (D, aspartic acid and E, glutamic acid) from the number of positively charged ones (K and R). In contrast to D and E, which are very similar in their polar and acidic properties, the characteristics of the R guanidinium group differ significantly from the K ammonium group. However, in coreceptor predictive computer algorithms R and K are both equally rated. The study was conducted to analyze differences in infectivity and coreceptor usage because of R-to-K mutations at the V3 positions 9, 10 and 11. V3 loop mutants with all possible RRR-to-KKK triplets were constructed and analyzed for coreceptor usage, infectivity and neutralization by SDF-1α and RANTES. Virus mutants R9R10R11 showed the highest infectivity rates, and were inhibited more efficiently in contrast to the K9K10K11 viruses. They also showed higher efficiency in a virus-gp120 paired infection assay. Especially V3 loop position 9 was relevant for a switch to higher infectivity when occupied by R. Thus, K-to-R exchanges play a role for enhanced viral entry efficiency and should therefore be considered when the viral phenotype is predicted based on V3 sequence data.

  14. Effect of lysine to arginine mutagenesis in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 on viral entry efficiency and neutralization.

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    Birco Schwalbe

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection is characterized by an ongoing replication leading to T-lymphocyte decline which is paralleled by the switch from CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor usage. To predict coreceptor usage, several computer algorithms using gp120 V3 loop sequence data have been developed. In these algorithms an occupation of the V3 positions 11 and 25, by one of the amino acids lysine (K or arginine (R, is an indicator for CXCR4 usage. Amino acids R and K dominate at these two positions, but can also be identified at positions 9 and 10. Generally, CXCR4-viruses possess V3 sequences, with an overall positive charge higher than the V3 sequences of R5-viruses. The net charge is calculated by subtracting the number of negatively charged amino acids (D, aspartic acid and E, glutamic acid from the number of positively charged ones (K and R. In contrast to D and E, which are very similar in their polar and acidic properties, the characteristics of the R guanidinium group differ significantly from the K ammonium group. However, in coreceptor predictive computer algorithms R and K are both equally rated. The study was conducted to analyze differences in infectivity and coreceptor usage because of R-to-K mutations at the V3 positions 9, 10 and 11. V3 loop mutants with all possible RRR-to-KKK triplets were constructed and analyzed for coreceptor usage, infectivity and neutralization by SDF-1α and RANTES. Virus mutants R9R10R11 showed the highest infectivity rates, and were inhibited more efficiently in contrast to the K9K10K11 viruses. They also showed higher efficiency in a virus-gp120 paired infection assay. Especially V3 loop position 9 was relevant for a switch to higher infectivity when occupied by R. Thus, K-to-R exchanges play a role for enhanced viral entry efficiency and should therefore be considered when the viral phenotype is predicted based on V3 sequence data.

  15. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

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    Dechang Li

    Full Text Available To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  16. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  17. Design of inhibitors of the HIV-1 integrase core domain using virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regon, Preetom; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Rai, Ashok Kumar; Bordoloi, Manabjyoti; Bezbaruah, Rajib Lochan

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The integrase (IN) enzyme of HIV interacts with several cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Thus, it represents an appropriate target for antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). We performed virtual screening of database compounds and designed analogues using Elvitegravir (EVG) as a standard compound. The 378 screened compounds were retrieved from ZINC, ChemSpider, PubChem, and ChemBank Chemical Databases based on chemical similarity and literature searches related to the structure of EVG. The Physiochemical properties, Bioactivity, Toxicity and Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of Molecules (ADME) of these compounds were predicted and docking Experiments were conducted using Molegro Virtual Docker software. The docking and ADME suggested very significant results in regard to EVG. The MolDock and Rerank scores were used to analyze the results. The compounds ZINC26507991 (-84.22), Analogue 9 (-68.49), ZINC20731658 (-66.79), ZINC00210363 (-43.44) showed better binding orientation with IN receptor model with respect to EVG (182.52). The ZINC26507991 has showed significant ADME result.

  18. Virtual screening for HIV protease inhibitors: a comparison of AutoDock 4 and Vina.

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    Max W Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The AutoDock family of software has been widely used in protein-ligand docking research. This study compares AutoDock 4 and AutoDock Vina in the context of virtual screening by using these programs to select compounds active against HIV protease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both programs were used to rank the members of two chemical libraries, each containing experimentally verified binders to HIV protease. In the case of the NCI Diversity Set II, both AutoDock 4 and Vina were able to select active compounds significantly better than random (AUC = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively; p<0.001. The binding energy predictions were highly correlated in this case, with r = 0.63 and iota = 0.82. For a set of larger, more flexible compounds from the Directory of Universal Decoys, the binding energy predictions were not correlated, and only Vina was able to rank compounds significantly better than random. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In ranking smaller molecules with few rotatable bonds, AutoDock 4 and Vina were equally capable, though both exhibited a size-related bias in scoring. However, as Vina executes more quickly and is able to more accurately rank larger molecules, researchers should look to it first when undertaking a virtual screen.

  19. Design of inhibitors of the HIV-1 integrase core domain using virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regon, Preetom; Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Rai, Ashok Kumar; Bordoloi, Manabjyoti; Bezbaruah, Rajib Lochan

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The integrase (IN) enzyme of HIV interacts with several cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Thus, it represents an appropriate target for antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). We performed virtual screening of database compounds and designed analogues using Elvitegravir (EVG) as a standard compound. The 378 screened compounds were retrieved from ZINC, ChemSpider, PubChem, and ChemBank Chemical Databases based on chemical similarity and literature searches related to the structure of EVG. The Physiochemical properties, Bioactivity, Toxicity and Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of Molecules (ADME) of these compounds were predicted and docking Experiments were conducted using Molegro Virtual Docker software. The docking and ADME suggested very significant results in regard to EVG. The MolDock and Rerank scores were used to analyze the results. The compounds ZINC26507991 (-84.22), Analogue 9 (-68.49), ZINC20731658 (-66.79), ZINC00210363 (-43.44) showed better binding orientation with IN receptor model with respect to EVG (182.52). The ZINC26507991 has showed significant ADME result. PMID:24616558

  20. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki, E-mail: y-yasutake@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo, Hokkaido 062-8517 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  1. Interaction of 2'-deoxyguanosine triphosphate analogue inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase with human mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Adrian S; Feng, Joy Y; Murakami, Eisuke; Chu, Chung K; Schinazi, Raymond F; Anderson, Karen S

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is a limiting factor in the use of some nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV. To further understand the impact of structural features on the incorporation and exonuclease removal of nucleoside monophosphate (MP) analogues by human mitochondrial DNA polymerase (pol gamma), transient kinetic studies were done with analogues of 2'-deoxyguanosine triphosphate. The kinetic parameters for the incorporation and removal of carbovir (CBV)-MP, dioxolane guanosine (DXG)-MP and 2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydroguanosine (d4G)-MP were studied with pol gamma holoenzyme. The importance of the ribose oxygen in incorporation by pol gamma was illustrated by an approximate 3,000-fold decrease in the incorporation efficiency of an analogue lacking the ribose oxygen (CBV-TP) relative to those containing a ribose oxygen (DXG-TP and d4G-TP). As a result, a comparison with previous data for the incorporation by HIV reverse transcriptase showed CBV-TP to be approximately 800-8,000-fold more selective for its antiviral target over pol gamma relative to the other guanosine analogues. However, DXG-TP and d4G-TP were found to be much more selective than previously reported values for mitochondrial toxic nucleoside analogues. Structural modelling based on sequence homology with other polymerase A family members suggests that an interaction between the ribose oxygen and arginine 853 in pol gamma may play a critical role in causing this differential incorporation. Exonuclease removal of a chain-terminating CBV-MP was also found to be more efficient by pol gamma. These results help to further elucidate the structure activity relationships for pol gamma and should aid in the design of more selective antiviral agents.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and metabolic effects of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius in healthy volunteers receiving the HIV protease inhibitor indinavir

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    Flexner Charles W

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is prevalent among HIV-infected patients to reduce the toxicity of antiretroviral therapy. Ginseng has been used for treatment of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, a common side effect of some HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PI. However, it is unknown whether American ginseng (AG can reverse insulin resistance induced by the PI indinavir (IDV, and whether these two agents interact pharmacologically. We evaluated potential pharmacokinetic interactions between IDV and AG, and assessed whether AG improves IDV-induced insulin resistance. Methods After baseline assessment of insulin sensitivity using the insulin clamp technique, healthy volunteers received IDV 800 mg q8 h for 3 days and then IDV and AG 1g q8h for 14 days. IDV pharmacokinetics and insulin sensitivity were assessed before and after AG co-administration. Results There was no difference in the area-under the plasma-concentration-time curve after the co-administration of AG, compared to IDV alone (n = 13. Although insulin-stimulated glucose disposal per unit of insulin (M/I decreased by an average of 14.8 ± 5.9% after 3 days of IDV (from 0.113 ± 0.012 to 0.096 ± 0.014 mg/kgFFM/min per μU/ml of insulin, p = 0.03, n = 11, M/I remained unchanged after co-administration of IDV and AG. Conclusion IDV decreases insulin sensitivity, which is unaltered by AG co-administration. AG does not significantly affect IDV pharmacokinetics.

  3. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione analogues as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase associated ribonuclease H and polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Vernekar, Sanjeev Kumar V; Chen, Yue-Lei; Miller, Lena; Huber, Andrew D; Myshakina, Nataliya; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Parniak, Michael A; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2017-06-16

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) remains the only virally encoded enzymatic function not clinically validated as an antiviral target. 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione (HID) is known to confer active site directed inhibition of divalent metal-dependent enzymatic functions, such as HIV RNase H, integrase (IN) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase. We report herein the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of a few C-5, C-6 or C-7 substituted HID subtypes as HIV RNase H inhibitors. Our data indicate that while some of these subtypes inhibited both the RNase H and polymerase (pol) functions of RT, potent and selective RNase H inhibition was achieved with subtypes 8-9 as exemplified with compounds 8c and 9c. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular design, synthesis and biological evaluation of BP-O-DAPY and O-DAPY derivatives as non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shiqiong; Pannecouque, Christophe; Daelemans, Dirk; Ma, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Fen-Er; De Clercq, Erik

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and antiviral evaluation of a series of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) that combine the peculiar structural features of diarylpyrimidine derivatives (DAPYs) and benzophenone derivatives (BPs). The DAPY derivatives bearing benzoyl or alkoxyl substitutes on the A-ring showed the inhibitory activity against wild-type HIV-1 at the cellular level within the range of EC50 values from micromolar to nanomolar. Among these compounds, 1u exhibited the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 0.06 ± 0.01 μM, SI > 6260), which were about 1.8-fold more active than nevirapine (NVP) and delavirdine (DLV). In addition, the binding modes with HIV-1 RT and the preliminary SAR studies of these derivatives were also considered for further investigation.

  5. Selective killing of human immunodeficiency virus infected cells by non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-induced activation of HIV protease

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    Smeulders Liesbeth

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current antiretroviral therapy against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 reduces viral load and thereby prevents viral spread, but it cannot eradicate proviral genomes from infected cells. Cells in immunological sanctuaries as well as cells producing low levels of virus apparently contribute to a reservoir that maintains HIV persistence in the presence of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Thus, accelerated elimination of virus producing cells may represent a complementary strategy to control HIV infection. Here we sought to exploit HIV protease (PR related cytotoxicity in order to develop a strategy for drug induced killing of HIV producing cells. PR processes the viral Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins during virus maturation, but is also implicated in killing of virus producing cells through off-target cleavage of host proteins. It has been observed previously that micromolar concentrations of certain non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs can stimulate intracellular PR activity, presumably by enhancing Gag-Pol dimerization. Results Using a newly developed cell-based assay we compared the degree of PR activation displayed by various NNRTIs. We identified inhibitors showing higher potency with respect to PR activation than previously described for NNRTIs, with the most potent compounds resulting in ~2-fold increase of the Gag processing signal at 250 nM. The degree of enhancement of intracellular Gag processing correlated with the compound's ability to enhance RT dimerization in a mammalian two-hybrid assay. Compounds were analyzed for their potential to mediate specific killing of chronically infected MT-4 cells. Levels of cytotoxicity on HIV infected cells determined for the different NNRTIs corresponded to the relative degree of drug induced intracellular PR activation, with CC50 values ranging from ~0.3 μM to above the tested concentration range (10 μM. Specific cytotoxicity was reverted by addition

  6. Design and Synthesis of Bis-amide and Hydrazide-containing Derivatives of Malonic Acid as Potential HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouri Neamati

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is an attractive and validated target for the development of novel therapeutics against AIDS. In the search for new IN inhibitors, we designed and synthesized three series of bis-amide and hydrazide-containing derivatives of malonic acid. We performed a docking study to investigate the potential interactions of the title compounds with essential amino acids on the IN active site.

  7. PLGA-PEG Nanoparticles Coated with Anti-CD45RO and Loaded with HDAC Plus Protease Inhibitors Activate Latent HIV and Inhibit Viral Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yong; Liu, Xinkuang; Zhou, Shuping; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Fujina; Xie, Chunmei; Cai, Shuyu; Wei, Jia; Zhu, Yongqiang; Hou, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Activating HIV-1 proviruses in latent reservoirs combined with inhibiting viral spread might be an effective anti-HIV therapeutic strategy. Active specific delivery of therapeutic drugs into cells harboring latent HIV, without the use of viral vectors, is a critical challenge to this objective. In this study, nanoparticles of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol diblock copolymers conjugated with anti-CD45RO antibody and loaded with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and/or protease inhibitor nelfinavir (Nel) were tested for activity against latent virus in vitro. Nanoparticles loaded with SAHA, Nel, and SAHA + Nel were characterized in terms of size, surface morphology, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, drug release, and toxicity to ACH-2 cells. We show that SAHA- and SAHA + Nel-loaded nanoparticles can target latently infected CD4+ T-cells and stimulate virus production. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with SAHA + NEL were capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel reagent for targeting and eliminating latent HIV reservoirs.

  8. Species-specific interaction of HIV protease inhibitors with accumulation of cholyl-glycylamido-fluorescein (CGamF) in sandwich-cultured hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhi-wei; Van Pelt, Jos; Camus, Sandrine; Snoeys, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick; Annaert, Pieter

    2010-06-01

    Using sandwich-cultured hepatocytes from rat, dog, pig, and human, we investigated the species-specificity of interaction of HIV protease inhibitors (PI) with in vitro hepatic accumulation of the bile salt analogue cholyl-glycylamido-fluorescein (CGamF). Extracellular sodium depletion or coincubation with the OATP/Oatp inhibitors rifampicin and digoxin revealed that about 35% of active CGamF accumulation was mediated by Ntcp/NTCP in rat and human hepatocytes, while the contribution of this sodium-dependent transporter reached 50-60% in dog and pig hepatocytes. One or more sodium-independent transporters, likely belonging to the Oatp/OATP family, constitute a major transport mechanism for CGamF accumulation. Various HIV PI (0.5, 5, 25 microM) exhibited pronounced species differences in their interaction with active CGamF accumulation (1 microM), although some similarity was observed between the dog and human interaction profiles when HIV PI were tested at 0.5 microM. Atazanavir, indinavir, and darunavir were the most potent inhibitors of CGamF accumulation in human hepatocytes. Potent inhibition of CGamF accumulation by ritonavir in rat hepatocytes contrasted with a weak effect in human hepatocytes. Thorough characterization of in vitro disposition of probe substrates in preclinical species compared to human hepatocytes will ultimately support a better insight in species-specific mechanisms underlying drug interactions and drug-mediated toxicity.

  9. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Muhuhi, Joseck M. [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Liu, Zhigang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Bencze, Krisztina Z. [Department of Chemistry, Fort Hays State University, Hays, KS 67601 (United States); Koupparis, Kyriacos [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); O’Connor, Carrie E.; Kovari, Iulia A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Spaller, Mark R. [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Kovari, Ladislau C., E-mail: kovari@med.wayne.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Inhibitors against MDR HIV-1 protease were designed, synthesized and evaluated. •Lead peptide (6a) showed potent inhibition (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) of MDR HIV-1 protease. •(6a) Showed favorable binding isotherms against NL4-3 and MDR proteases. •(6a) Induced perturbations in the {sup 15}N-HSQC spectrum of MDR HIV-1 protease. •Molecular modeling suggested that (6a) may induce total flap closure inMDR protease. -- Abstract: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: (1TW7)), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6aagainst both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of {sup 15}N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV.

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of CD4-gp120 binding based on virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Judith M; Elban, Mark A; Courter, Joel R; Sugawara, Akihiro; Soeta, Takahiro; Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M; Kwon, Young Do; Kwong, Peter D; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Sodroski, Joseph; Smith, Amos B

    2011-01-01

    The low-molecular-weight compound JRC-II-191 inhibits infection of HIV-1 by blocking the binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the CD4 receptor and is therefore an important lead in the development of a potent viral entry inhibitor. Reported here is the use of two orthogonal screening methods, gold docking and ROCS shape-based similarity searching, to identify amine-building blocks that, when conjugated to the core scaffold, yield novel analogs that maintain similar affinity for gp120. Use of this computational approach to expand SAR produced analogs of equal inhibitory activity but with diverse capacity to enhance viral infection. The novel analogs provide additional lead scaffolds for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors that employ protein-ligand interactions in the vestibule of gp120 Phe 43 cavity.

  11. Discovery of HIV fusion inhibitors targeting gp41 using a comprehensive α-helix mimetic library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Landon R.; Boyle, Kristopher E.; Cai, Lifeng; Yu, Xiaoqian; Gochin, Miriam; Boger, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of a comprehensive α-helix mimetic library for binding the gp41 NHR hydrophobic pocket recognizing an intramolecular CHR α-helix provided a detailed depiction of structural features required for binding and led to the discovery of small molecule inhibitors (Ki 0.6–1.3 µM) that not only match or exceed the potency of those disclosed over the past decade, but that also exhibit effective activity in a cell–cell fusion assay (IC50 5–8 µM). PMID:22424973

  12. In vitro and ex vivo inhibition of human telomerase by anti-HIV nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs but not by non-NRTIs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle R Hukezalie

    Full Text Available Telomerase is a specialized reverse transcriptase responsible for the de novo synthesis of telomeric DNA repeats. In addition to its established reverse transcriptase and terminal transferase activities, recent reports have revealed unexpected cellular activities of telomerase, including RNA-dependent RNA polymerization. This telomerase characteristic, distinct from other reverse transcriptases, indicates that clinically relevant reverse transcriptase inhibitors might have unexpected telomerase inhibition profiles. This is particularly important for the newer generation of RT inhibitors designed for anti-HIV therapy, which have reported higher safety margins than older agents. Using an in vitro primer extension assay, we tested the effects of clinically relevant HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors on cellular telomerase activity. We observed that all commonly used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, including zidovudine, stavudine, tenofovir, didanosine and abacavir, inhibit telomerase effectively in vitro. Truncated telomere synthesis was consistent with the expected mode of inhibition by all tested NRTIs. Through dose-response experiments, we established relative inhibitory potencies of NRTIs on in vitro telomerase activity as compared to the inhibitory potencies of the corresponding dideoxynucleotide triphosphates. In contrast to NRTIs, the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs nevirapine and efavirenz did not inhibit the primer extension activity of telomerase, even at millimolar concentrations. Long-term, continuous treatment of human HT29 cells with select NRTIs resulted in an accelerated loss of telomere repeats. All tested NRTIs exhibited the same rank order of inhibitory potencies on telomerase and HIV RT, which, according to published data, were orders-of-magnitude more sensitive than other DNA polymerases, including the susceptible mitochondria-specific DNA polymerase gamma. We concluded that

  13. Free energy calculation of single molecular interaction using Jarzynski's identity method: the case of HIV-1 protease inhibitor system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Chang Li; Bao-Hua Ji

    2012-01-01

    Jarzynski' identity (JI) method was suggested a promising tool for reconstructing free energy landscape of biomolecular interactions in numerical simulations and experiments.However,JI method has not yet been well tested in complex systems such as ligand-receptor molecular pairs.In this paper,we applied a huge number of steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to dissociate the protease of human immunodeficiency type I virus (HIV-1 protease)and its inhibitors.We showed that because of intrinsic complexity of the ligand-receptor system,the energy barrier predicted by JI method at high pulling rates is much higher than experimental results.However,with a slower pulling rate and fewer switch times of simulations,the predictions of JI method can approach to the experiments.These results suggested that the JI method is more appropriate for reconstructing free energy landscape using the data taken from experiments,since the pulling rates used in experiments are often much slower than those in SMD simulations.Furthermore,we showed that a higher loading stiffness can produce higher precision of calculation of energy landscape because it yields a lower mean value and narrower bandwidth of work distribution in SMD simulations.

  14. Naringin Reverses Hepatocyte Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Associated with HIV-1 Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors-Induced Metabolic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafeyisetan O. Adebiyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs have not only improved therapeutic outcomes in the treatment of HIV infection but have also led to an increase in associated metabolic complications of NRTIs. Naringin’s effects in mitigating NRTI-induced complications were investigated in this study. Wistar rats, randomly allotted into seven groups (n = 7 were orally treated daily for 56 days with 100 mg/kg zidovudine (AZT (groups I, II III, 50 mg/kg stavudine (d4T (groups IV, V, VI and 3 mL/kg of distilled water (group VII. Additionally, rats in groups II and V were similarly treated with 50 mg/kg naringin, while groups III and VI were treated with 45 mg/kg vitamin E. AZT or d4T treatment significantly reduced body weight and plasma high density lipoprotein concentrations but increased liver weights, plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol compared to controls, respectively. Furthermore, AZT or d4T treatment significantly increased oxidative stress, adiposity index and expression of Bax protein, but reduced Bcl-2 protein expression compared to controls, respectively. However, either naringin or vitamin E significantly mitigated AZT- or d4T-induced weight loss, dyslipidemia, oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis compared to AZT- or d4T-only treated rats. Our results suggest that naringin reverses metabolic complications associated with NRTIs by ameliorating oxidative stress and apoptosis. This implies that naringin supplements could mitigate lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia associated with NRTI therapy.

  15. NMR-assisted computational studies of peptidomimetic inhibitors bound in the hydrophobic pocket of HIV-1 glycoprotein 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goc