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Sample records for histology-equivalent sectioning laser-scanning

  1. Combining confocal laser scanning microscopy with serial section reconstruction in the study of adult neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLuzzati

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Current advances in imaging techniques have extended the possibility of visualizing small structures within large volumes of both fixed and live specimens without sectioning. These techniques have contributed valuable information to study neuronal plasticity in the adult brain. However, technical limits still hamper the use of these approaches to investigate neurogenic regions located far from the ventricular surface such as parenchymal neurogenic niches, or the scattered neuroblasts induced by brain lesions. Here, we present a method to combine confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM and serial section reconstruction in order to reconstruct large volumes of brain tissue at cellular resolution. In this method a series of thick sections are imaged with CLSM and the resulting stacks of images are registered and 3D reconstructed. This approach is based on existing freeware software and can be performed on ordinary laboratory personal computers (PC. By using this technique we have investigated the morphology and spatial organization of a group of doublecortin (DCX+ neuroblasts located in the lateral striatum of the late post-natal guinea pig. The 3D study unravelled a complex network of long and poorly ramified cell processes, often fascicled and mostly oriented along the internal capsule fibre bundles. These data support CLSM serial section reconstruction as a reliable alternative to the whole mount approaches to analyze cyto-architectural features of adult germinative niches.

  2. Laser Scanning in Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Olsson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS to forests has been revolutionary during the last decade. This development was facilitated by combining earlier ranging lidar discoveries [1–5], with experience obtained from full-waveform ranging radar [6,7] to new airborne laser scanning systems which had components such as a GNSS receiver (Global Navigation Satellite System, IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit and a scanning mechanism. Since the first commercial ALS in 1994, new ALS-based forest inventory approaches have been reported feasible for operational activities [8–12]. ALS is currently operationally applied for stand level forest inventories, for example, in Nordic countries. In Finland alone, the adoption of ALS for forest data collection has led to an annual savings of around 20 M€/year, and the work is mainly done by companies instead of governmental organizations. In spite of the long implementation times and there being a limited tradition of making changes in the forest sector, laser scanning was commercially and operationally applied after about only one decade of research. When analyzing high-ranked journal papers from ISI Web of Science, the topic of laser scanning of forests has been the driving force for the whole laser scanning research society over the last decade. Thus, the topic “laser scanning in forests” has provided a significant industrial, societal and scientific impact. [...

  3. Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eric W.; Zelten, J. Peter; Wiseman, Benjamin A.

    1988-06-01

    We report on the development of a laser scanning fluorescence microscope possessing several features which facilitate its application to biological and biophysical analyses in living cells. It is built around a standard inverted microscope stand, enabling the use of standard optics, micromanipulation apparatus, and conventional (including video) microscopy in conjunction with laser scanning. The beam is scanned across the specimen by a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors, driven by a programmable controller which can operate in three modes: full raster scan, region of interest, and random-access. A full 512x512 pixel image can be acquired in one second. In region of interest mode, several subareas of the field can be selected for more rapid or detailed analysis. For those cases where the time scale of the observed phenomenon precludes full-field imaging, or where a full-field image is unnecessary, the random access mode enables an arbitrary pattern of isolated points to be selected and rapidly sequenced through. Via a graphical user interface implemented on the system's host computer, a user will be able to take a scout image either with video or a full-field laser scan, select regions or points on the scout image with a mouse, and set up experimental parameters such as detector integration times with a window-style menu. The instrument is designed to be a flexible testbed for investigating new techniques, without compromising its utility as a tool for biological research.

  4. Influence of nail varnish on the remineralization of enamel single sections assessed by microradiography and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iijima, Y; Takagi, O; Duschner, H; Ruben, J; Arends, J

    1998-01-01

    Single-section techniques are attractive in enamel de- and remineralization investigations because they allow longitudinal studies in which mineral changes can be assessed by microradiography (TMR), Nail Varnish (NV) is in general applied to coat the cut thin-section sides, The aims of this study

  5. Hyperchromatic laser scanning cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja

    2007-02-01

    In the emerging fields of high-content and high-throughput single cell analysis for Systems Biology and Cytomics multi- and polychromatic analysis of biological specimens has become increasingly important. Combining different technologies and staining methods polychromatic analysis (i.e. using 8 or more fluorescent colors at a time) can be pushed forward to measure anything stainable in a cell, an approach termed hyperchromatic cytometry. For cytometric cell analysis microscope based Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) technologies are ideal as, unlike flow cytometry, they are non-consumptive, i.e. the analyzed sample is fixed on the slide. Based on the feature of relocation identical cells can be subsequently reanalyzed. In this manner data on the single cell level after manipulation steps can be collected. In this overview various components for hyperchromatic cytometry are demonstrated for a SBC instrument, the Laser Scanning Cytometer (Compucyte Corp., Cambridge, MA): 1) polychromatic cytometry, 2) iterative restaining (using the same fluorochrome for restaining and subsequent reanalysis), 3) differential photobleaching (differentiating fluorochromes by their different photostability), 4) photoactivation (activating fluorescent nanoparticles or photocaged dyes), and 5) photodestruction (destruction of FRET dyes). With the intelligent combination of several of these techniques hyperchromatic cytometry allows to quantify and analyze virtually all components of relevance on the identical cell. The combination of high-throughput and high-content SBC analysis with high-resolution confocal imaging allows clear verification of phenotypically distinct subpopulations of cells with structural information. The information gained per specimen is only limited by the number of available antibodies and by sterical hindrance.

  6. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  7. STREET-SCENE TREE SEGMENTATION FROM MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA

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    H. Guan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Our work addresses the problem of extracting trees from mobile laser scanning data. The work is a two step-wise strategy, including terrain point removal and tree segmentation. First, a voxel-based upward growing filtering is proposed to remove terrain points from the mobile laser scanning data. Then, a tree segmentation is presented to extract individual trees via a Euclidean distance clustering approach and Voxel-based Normalized Cut (VNCut segmentation approach. A road section data acquired by a RIEGL VMX-450 system are selected for evaluating the proposed tree segmentation method. Qualitative analysis shows that our algorithm achieves a good performance.

  8. A New Multichannel Spectral Imaging Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhai Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multichannel spectral imaging laser scanning confocal microscope for effective detection of multiple fluorescent labeling in the research of biological tissues. In this paper, the design and key technologies of the system are introduced. Representative results on confocal imaging, 3-dimensional sectioning imaging, and spectral imaging are demonstrated. The results indicated that the system is applicable to multiple fluorescent labeling in biological experiments.

  9. Conversion of biocytin labelled cells and structures for the confocal laser-scanning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, H; Müller, A

    1997-05-23

    The method for converting biocytin preparations of brain sections fills a gap in the application of confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Both neuronal and non-neuronal structures are converted. The background remains free of staining. The protocol can be applied to old and already existing biocytin-(diaminobenzidine)-nickel preparations which are then made accessible to evaluation with the laser-scanning microscope by the substitution of nickel with silver-gold. Sodium thiosulphate is used to remove the unbound silver. The reflection image of the laser-scanning microscopy provides more information than the transmission image.

  10. Laser scan with upstream crystal #1

    CERN Document Server

    Gyr, Marcel

    1996-01-01

    A laser scan was performed with the new U-shaped crystal G5, which has a known miscut of +1 mrad and is installed at the upstream position #1 in the TEC. The aim was to cross-check the angular sensitivity of the stepping motor of the goniometer, which theoretically should be 1.98 µrad/step.

  11. Multiplatform Mobile Laser Scanning: Usability and Performance

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    Yuwei Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning is an emerging technology capable of capturing three-dimensional data from surrounding objects. With state-of-the-art sensors, the achieved point clouds capture object details with good accuracy and precision. Many of the applications involve civil engineering in urban areas, as well as traffic and other urban planning, all of which serve to make 3D city modeling probably the fastest growing market segment in this field. This article outlines multiplatform mobile laser scanning solutions such as vehicle- and trolley-operated urban area data acquisition, and boat-mounted equipment for fluvial environments. Moreover, we introduce a novel backpack version of mobile laser scanning equipment for surveying applications in the field of natural sciences where the requirements include precision and mobility in variable terrain conditions. In addition to presenting a technical description of the systems, we discuss the performance of the solutions in the light of various applications in the fields of urban mapping and modeling, fluvial geomorphology, snow-cover characterization, precision agriculture, and in monitoring the effects of climate change on permafrost landforms. The data performance of the mobile laser scanning approach is described by the results of an evaluation of the ROAMER on a permanent MLS test field. Furthermore, an in situ accuracy assessment using a field of spherical 3D targets for the newly-introduced Akhka backpack system is conducted and reported on.

  12. [Current application of confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) in stomatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-sen; Li, Ning-yi

    2007-04-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy is one kind of modern Hi-tech on the basis of confocal imaging which is characterized by depth discrimination capability. It has been widely used in the field of stomatology due to its great advantages of non-destructive and non-invasive optical sectioning and three-dimensional reconstruction of the vital objects, in situ and dynamic real-time observation of the tissues and cells can be performed at high resolution. This paper reviews the fundamentals of confocal imaging and the application of CLSM in the fields of dental material, caries, dentin bonding interface and other basic researches in stomatology in recent years.

  13. A video rate laser scanning confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongzhou; Jiang, James; Ren, Hongwu; Cable, Alex E.

    2008-02-01

    A video-rate laser scanning microscope was developed as an imaging engine to integrate with other photonic building blocks to fulfill various microscopic imaging applications. The system is quipped with diode laser source, resonant scanner, galvo scanner, control electronic and computer loaded with data acquisition boards and imaging software. Based on an open frame design, the system can be combined with varies optics to perform the functions of fluorescence confocal microscopy, multi-photon microscopy and backscattering confocal microscopy. Mounted to the camera port, it allows a traditional microscope to obtain confocal images at video rate. In this paper, we will describe the design principle and demonstrate examples of applications.

  14. Sagebrush Biomass Estimation Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsoy, P.; Glenn, N. F.; Clark, P. E.; Spaete, L.; Mitchell, J.; Shrestha, R.

    2012-12-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) is a proven tool for inventory of many vegetation types. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) has been demonstrated for estimation of biomass of trees, but the relatively low number of laser points (1-10 m-2) typical of ALS datasets makes estimating biomass of shrubs and small stature vegetation challenging. This study uses terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to estimate sagebrush biomass (Artemisia tridentata subsp. wyomingensis) by relating destructively sampled estimates to TLS-derived volumetric estimates. At close range, TLS can commonly provide in excess of 100,000 3-D points for a single sagebrush of approximately 1 m3 in volume. In this study, thirty sagebrush were scanned and destructively sampled at 6 sites within Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southwestern Idaho, USA. The 3-D point cloud data are converted into 1-cm voxels to give quantitative estimates of shrub volume. The accuracy of the TLS-based metrics for estimating biomass are then compared to several traditional plot sampling methods including point-intercept and simple crown dimension measurements. The findings of this study are expected to provide guidance on methods for data collection and analysis such that biomass can be accurately estimated across plot-scales (e.g., 100 m x 100 m).

  15. Extraction of power lines from mobile laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Qing; Li, Jonathan; Wen, Chenglu; Huang, Pengdi

    2016-03-01

    Modern urban life is becoming increasingly more dependent on reliable electric power supply. Since power outages cause substantial financial losses to producers, distributors and consumers of electric power, it is in the common interest to minimize failures of power lines. In order to detect defects as early as possible and to plan efficiently the maintenance activities, distribution networks are regularly inspected. Carrying out foot patrols or climbing the structures to visually inspect transmission lines and aerial surveys (e.g., digital imaging or most recent airborne laser scanning (ALS) are the two most commonly used methods of power line inspection. Although much faster in comparison to the foot patrol inspection, aerial inspection is more expensive and usually less accurate, in complex urban areas particularly. This paper presents a scientific work that is done in the use of mobile laser scanning (MLS) point clouds for automated extraction of power lines. In the proposed method, 2D power lines are extracted using Hough transform in the projected XOY plane and the 3D power line points are visualized after the point searching. Filtering based on an elevation threshold is applied, which is combined with the vehicle's trajectory in the horizontal section.

  16. Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Geometry Documentation and Construction Management of Highway Tunnels during Excavation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Gikas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered.

  17. Three-dimensional laser scanning for geometry documentation and construction management of highway tunnels during excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered.

  18. Laser scanning laser diode photoacoustic microscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Kumavor, Patrick D; Zhu, Quing

    2018-03-01

    The development of low-cost and fast photoacoustic microscopy systems enhances the clinical applicability of photoacoustic imaging systems. To this end, we present a laser scanning laser diode-based photoacoustic microscopy system. In this system, a 905 nm, 325 W maximum output peak power pulsed laser diode with 50 ns pulsewidth is utilized as the light source. A combination of aspheric and cylindrical lenses is used for collimation of the laser diode beam. Two galvanometer scanning mirrors steer the beam across a focusing aspheric lens. The lateral resolution of the system was measured to be ∼21 μm using edge spread function estimation. No averaging was performed during data acquisition. The imaging speed is ∼370 A-lines per second. Photoacoustic microscopy images of human hairs, ex vivo mouse ear, and ex vivo porcine ovary are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and potentials of the proposed system.

  19. Evaluation of 3-D laser scanning equipment : 2016 interim report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    As a follow-up to ICT Project R27-030, Evaluation of 3-D Laser Scanning, this report provides findings of an evaluation of 3-D laser : scanning equipment to determine the tangible costs versus benefits and the manpower savings realized by using the e...

  20. Automatic classification of trees from laser scanning point clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sirmacek, B.; Lindenbergh, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Development of laser scanning technologies has promoted tree monitoring studies to a new level, as the laser scanning point clouds enable accurate 3D measurements in a fast and environmental friendly manner. In this paper, we introduce a probability matrix computation based algorithm for

  1. Automatic change detection using mobile laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebel, M.; Hammer, M.; Gordon, M.; Arens, M.

    2014-10-01

    Automatic change detection in 3D environments requires the comparison of multi-temporal data. By comparing current data with past data of the same area, changes can be automatically detected and identified. Volumetric changes in the scene hint at suspicious activities like the movement of military vehicles, the application of camouflage nets, or the placement of IEDs, etc. In contrast to broad research activities in remote sensing with optical cameras, this paper addresses the topic using 3D data acquired by mobile laser scanning (MLS). We present a framework for immediate comparison of current MLS data to given 3D reference data. Our method extends the concept of occupancy grids known from robot mapping, which incorporates the sensor positions in the processing of the 3D point clouds. This allows extracting the information that is included in the data acquisition geometry. For each single range measurement, it becomes apparent that an object reflects laser pulses in the measured range distance, i.e., space is occupied at that 3D position. In addition, it is obvious that space is empty along the line of sight between sensor and the reflecting object. Everywhere else, the occupancy of space remains unknown. This approach handles occlusions and changes implicitly, such that the latter are identifiable by conflicts of empty space and occupied space. The presented concept of change detection has been successfully validated in experiments with recorded MLS data streams. Results are shown for test sites at which MLS data were acquired at different time intervals.

  2. Slope excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation in hydraulic projects based on laser scanning technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slope excavation is one of the most crucial steps in the construction of a hydraulic project. Excavation project quality assessment and excavated volume calculation are critical in construction management. The positioning of excavation projects using traditional instruments is inefficient and may cause error. To improve the efficiency and precision of calculation and assessment, three-dimensional laser scanning technology was used for slope excavation quality assessment. An efficient data acquisition, processing, and management workflow was presented in this study. Based on the quality control indices, including the average gradient, slope toe elevation, and overbreak and underbreak, cross-sectional quality assessment and holistic quality assessment methods were proposed to assess the slope excavation quality with laser-scanned data. An algorithm was also presented to calculate the excavated volume with laser-scanned data. A field application and a laboratory experiment were carried out to verify the feasibility of these methods for excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation. The results show that the quality assessment indices can be obtained rapidly and accurately with design parameters and scanned data, and the results of holistic quality assessment are consistent with those of cross-sectional quality assessment. In addition, the time consumption in excavation project quality assessment with the laser scanning technology can be reduced by 70%−90%, as compared with the traditional method. The excavated volume calculated with the scanned data only slightly differs from measured data, demonstrating the applicability of the excavated volume calculation method presented in this study.

  3. Slope excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation in hydraulic projects based on laser scanning technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slope excavation is one of the most crucial steps in the construction of a hydraulic project. Excavation project quality assessment and excavated volume calculation are critical in construction management. The positioning of excavation projects using traditional instruments is inefficient and may cause error. To improve the efficiency and precision of calculation and assessment, three-dimensional laser scanning technology was used for slope excavation quality assessment. An efficient data acquisition, processing, and management workflow was presented in this study. Based on the quality control indices, including the average gradient, slope toe elevation, and overbreak and underbreak, cross-sectional quality assessment and holistic quality assessment methods were proposed to assess the slope excavation quality with laser-scanned data. An algorithm was also presented to calculate the excavated volume with laser-scanned data. A field application and a laboratory experiment were carried out to verify the feasibility of these methods for excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation. The results show that the quality assessment indices can be obtained rapidly and accurately with design parameters and scanned data, and the results of holistic quality assessment are consistent with those of cross-sectional quality assessment. In addition, the time consumption in excavation quality assessment with the laser scanning technology can be reduced by 70%–90%, as compared with the traditional method. The excavated volume calculated with the scanned data only slightly differs from measured data, demonstrating the applicability of the excavated volume calculation method presented in this study.

  4. A confocal laser scanning microscopic study on thermoresponsive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CdTe QDs composites using a fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope. These composites have potential applications both in material science and biology. Keywords. Confocal ... of binary colloidal alloys and other soft matter systems.

  5. Laser scanning cytometry: principles and applications-an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozarowski, Piotr; Holden, Elena; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Laser scanning cytometer (LSC) is the microscope-based cytofluorometer that offers a plethora of unique analytical capabilities, not provided by flow cytometry (FCM). This review describes attributes of LSC and covers its numerous applications derived from plentitude of the parameters that can be measured. Among many LSC applications the following are emphasized: (a) assessment of chromatin condensation to identify mitotic, apoptotic cells, or senescent cells; (b) detection of nuclear or mitochondrial translocation of critical factors such as NF-κB, p53, or Bax; (c) semi-automatic scoring of micronuclei in mutagenicity assays; (d) analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and use of the FISH analysis attribute to measure other punctuate fluorescence patterns such as γH2AX foci or receptor clustering; (e) enumeration and morphometry of nucleoli and other cell organelles; (f) analysis of progeny of individual cells in clonogenicity assay; (g) cell immunophenotyping; (h) imaging, visual examination, or sequential analysis using different probes of the same cells upon their relocation; (i) in situ enzyme kinetics, drug uptake, and other time-resolved processes; (j) analysis of tissue section architecture using fluorescent and chromogenic probes; (k) application for hypocellular samples (needle aspirate, spinal fluid, etc.); and (l) other clinical applications. Advantages and limitations of LSC are discussed and compared with FCM.

  6. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  7. AN AUTOMATED ROAD ROUGHNESS DETECTION FROM MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rough roads influence the safety of the road users as accident rate increases with increasing unevenness of the road surface. Road roughness regions are required to be efficiently detected and located in order to ensure their maintenance. Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS systems provide a rapid and cost-effective alternative by providing accurate and dense point cloud data along route corridor. In this paper, an automated algorithm is presented for detecting road roughness from MLS data. The presented algorithm is based on interpolating smooth intensity raster surface from LiDAR point cloud data using point thinning process. The interpolated surface is further processed using morphological and multi-level Otsu thresholding operations to identify candidate road roughness regions. The candidate regions are finally filtered based on spatial density and standard deviation of elevation criteria to detect the roughness along the road surface. The test results of road roughness detection algorithm on two road sections are presented. The developed approach can be used to provide comprehensive information to road authorities in order to schedule maintenance and ensure maximum safety conditions for road users.

  8. HOVE-Wedge-Filtering of Geomorphologic Terrestrial Laser Scan Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Panholzer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning has become an important surveying technique in many fields such as natural hazard assessment. To analyse earth surface processes, it is useful to generate a digital terrain model originated from laser scan point cloud data. To determine the terrain surface as precisely as possible, it is often necessary to filter out points that do not represent the terrain surface. Examples are vegetation, vehicles, and animals. In mountainous terrain with a small-structured topography, filtering is very difficult. Here, automatic filtering solutions usually designed for airborne laser scan data often lead to unsatisfactory results. In this work, we further develop an existing approach for automated filtering of terrestrial laser scan data, which is based on the assumption that no other surface point can be located in the area above a direct line of sight between scanner and another measured point. By taking into account several environmental variables and a repetitive calculation method, the modified method leads to significantly better results. The root-mean-square-error (RSME for the same test measurement area could be reduced from 5.284 to 1.610. In addition, a new approach for filtering and interpolation of terrestrial laser scanning data is presented using a grid with horizontal and vertical angular data and the measurement length.

  9. Development of Large Concrete Object Geometrical Model Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaczek-Peplinska Janina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents control periodic measurements of movements and survey of concrete dam on Dunajec River in Rożnów, Poland. Topographical survey was conducted using laser scanning technique. The goal of survey was data collection and creation of a geometrical model. Acquired cross- and horizontal sections were utilised to create a numerical model of object behaviour at various load depending of changing level of water in reservoir. Modelling was accomplished using finite elements technique. During the project an assessment was conducted to terrestrial laser scanning techniques for such type of research of large hydrotechnical objects such as gravitational water dams. Developed model can be used to define deformations and displacement prognosis.

  10. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari, E-mail: tetsu-n@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Imai, Koichi [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Akio [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 {mu}m/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  11. Optimal lens design and use in laser-scanning microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negrean, A.; Mansvelder, H.D.

    2014-01-01

    In laser-scanning microscopy often an off-the-shelf achromatic doublet is used as a scan lens which can reduce the available diffraction-limited field-of-view (FOV) by a factor of 3 and introduce chromatic aberrations that are scan angle dependent. Here we present several simple lens designs of

  12. Classification of mobile laser scanning point clouds from height features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, M.; Lemmens, M.J.P.M.; van Oosterom, P.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The demand for 3D maps of cities and road networks is steadily growing and mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems are often the preferred geo-data acquisition method for capturing such scenes. Because MLS systems are mounted on cars or vans they can acquire billions of points of road scenes within a

  13. From Point Cloud to Textured Model, the Zamani Laser Scanning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper describes the stages of the laser scanning pipeline from data acquisition to the final 3D computer model based on experiences gained during the ongoing creation of data for the African Cultural Heritage Sites and Landscapes database. The various processes are briefly discussed and challenges are highlighted ...

  14. From Point Cloud to Textured Model, the Zamani Laser Scanning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    roshan

    Abstract. The paper describes the stages of the laser scanning pipeline from data acquisition to the final. 3D computer model based on experiences gained during the ongoing creation of data for the. African Cultural Heritage Sites and Landscapes database. The various processes are briefly discussed and challenges are ...

  15. Spatial-spectral analysis of a laser scanning video system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapustin, A. A.; Razumovskii, V. N.; Iatsevich, G. B.

    1980-06-01

    A spatial-spectral analysis method is considered for a laser scanning video system with the phase processing of a received signal, on a modulation frequency. Distortions caused by the system are analyzed, and a general problem is reduced for the case of a cylindrical surface. The approach suggested can also be used for scanning microwave systems.

  16. Optomechatronics Design and Control for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is considered as one of the major advancements in microscopy in the last century and is widely accepted as a 3D fluorescence imaging tool for biological studies. For the emerging biological questions CLSM requires fast imaging to detect rapid biological

  17. SEMANTIC LABELLING OF ROAD FURNITURE IN MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Road furniture semantic labelling is vital for large scale mapping and autonomous driving systems. Much research has been investigated on road furniture interpretation in both 2D images and 3D point clouds. Precise interpretation of road furniture in mobile laser scanning data still remains unexplored. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to interpret road furniture based on their logical relations and functionalities. Our work represents the most detailed interpretation of road furniture in mobile laser scanning data. 93.3 % of poles are correctly extracted and all of them are correctly recognised. 94.3 % of street light heads are detected and 76.9 % of them are correctly identified. Despite errors arising from the recognition of other components, our framework provides a promising solution to automatically map road furniture at a detailed level in urban environments.

  18. Semantic Labelling of Road Furniture in Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Oude Elberink, S.; Vosselman, G.

    2017-09-01

    Road furniture semantic labelling is vital for large scale mapping and autonomous driving systems. Much research has been investigated on road furniture interpretation in both 2D images and 3D point clouds. Precise interpretation of road furniture in mobile laser scanning data still remains unexplored. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to interpret road furniture based on their logical relations and functionalities. Our work represents the most detailed interpretation of road furniture in mobile laser scanning data. 93.3 % of poles are correctly extracted and all of them are correctly recognised. 94.3 % of street light heads are detected and 76.9 % of them are correctly identified. Despite errors arising from the recognition of other components, our framework provides a promising solution to automatically map road furniture at a detailed level in urban environments.

  19. Modeling 3D Objects for Navigation Purposes Using Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Specht

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the creation of 3d models and their applications in navigation. It contains a review of available methods and geometric data sources, focusing mostly on terrestrial laser scanning. It presents detailed description, from field survey to numerical elaboration, how to construct accurate model of a typical few storey building as a hypothetical reference in complex building navigation. Hence, the paper presents fields where 3d models are being used and their potential new applications.

  20. Airborne laser scanning and usefulness for hydrological models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hollaus

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital terrain models form the basis for distributed hydrologic models as well as for two-dimensional hydraulic river flood models. The technique used for generating high accuracy digital terrain models has shifted from stereoscopic aerial-photography to airborne laser scanning during the last years. Since the disastrous floods 2002 in Austria, large airborne laser-scanning flight campaigns have been carried out for several river basins. Additionally to the topographic information, laser scanner data offer also the possibility to estimate object heights (vegetation, buildings. Detailed land cover maps can be derived in conjunction with the complementary information provided by high-resolution colour-infrared orthophotos. As already shown in several studies, the potential of airborne laser scanning to provide data for hydrologic/hydraulic applications is high. These studies were mostly constraint to small test sites. To overcome this spatial limitation, the current paper summarises the experiences to process airborne laser scanner data for large mountainous regions, thereby demonstrating the applicability of this technique in real-world hydrological applications.

  1. RIGOROUS POINT-TO-PLANE REGISTRATION OF TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Grant

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning data that are acquired from multiple scan locations need to be registered before any 3D modeling and/or analysis is conducted. This paper presents a rigorous point-to-plane registration approach that minimizes the distances between two overlapping laser scans, using the General Least Squares adjustment model. The proposed approach falls under the class of fine registration and does not require any targets or tie points. Given some initial registration parameters, the proposed approach utilizes the scanned points and estimated planar features on both scans to determine the optimum parameters in the least squares sense. Both the uncertainty of the points due to the incidence angle, and the uncertainty of the local normal vectors of the planar features are taken into account in the stochastic model of the adjustment. The impact that these considerations with the stochastic model have on the registration is then demonstrated with comparisons on real terrestrial laser scanning data, and on smaller simulated data.

  2. Control Measurements of Crane Rails Performed by Terrestrial Laser Scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregar, Klemen; Možina, Jan; Ambrožič, Tomaž; Kogoj, Dušan; Marjetič, Aleš; Štebe, Gašper; Savšek, Simona

    2017-07-20

    This article presents a method for measuring the geometry of crane rails with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Two sets of crane rails were divided into segments, their planes were adjusted, and the characteristic rail lines were defined. We used their profiles to define the positional and altitude deviations of the rails, the span and height difference between the two rails, and we also verified that they complied with the Eurocode 3 standard. We tested the method on crane rails at the hydroelectric power plant in Krško and the thermal power plant in Brestanica. We used two scanning techniques: "pure" TLS (Riegel VZ-400) and "hybrid" TLS (Leica MS50) scanning. This article's original contribution lies in the detailed presentation of the computations used to define the characteristic lines of the rails without using the numeric procedures from existing software packages. We also analysed the influence of segment length and point density on the rail geometry results, and compared the two laser scanning techniques. We also compared the results obtained by terrestrial laser scanning with the results obtained from the classic polar method, which served as a reference point for its precision.

  3. Confocal laser scanning microscopy. Using new technology to answer old questions in forensic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Karch, Steven B; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2008-03-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a relatively new technique for microscopic imaging. It has found a wide field of application in the general sphere of biological sciences. It has completely changed the study of cells and tissues by allowing greater resolution, optical sectioning of the sample and three-dimensional sanoke reconstruction. Confocal microscopy represents a valid, precious and useful tool capable of providing data (images) of unrivalled clearness and definition. This review discusses the possible applications of confocal microscopy in specific fields of forensic investigation, with specific regard to ballistics, forensic histopathology and toxicological pathology.

  4. Applying Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Soil Surface Roughness Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milutin Milenković

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning can provide high-resolution, two-dimensional sampling of soil surface roughness. While previous studies demonstrated the usefulness of these roughness measurements in geophysical applications, questions about the number of required scans and their resolution were not investigated thoroughly. Here, we suggest a method to generate digital elevation models, while preserving the surface’s stochastic properties at high frequencies and additionally providing an estimate of their spatial resolution. We also study the impact of the number and positions of scans on roughness indices’ estimates. An experiment over a smooth and isotropic soil plot accompanies the analysis, where scanning results are compared to results from active triangulation. The roughness measurement conditions for ideal sampling are revisited and updated for diffraction-limited sampling valid for close-range laser scanning over smooth and isotropic soil roughness. Our results show that terrestrial laser scanning can be readily used for roughness assessment on scales larger than 5 cm, while for smaller scales, special processing is required to mitigate the effect of the laser beam footprint. Interestingly, classical roughness parametrization (correlation length, root mean square height (RMSh was not sensitive to these effects. Furthermore, comparing the classical roughness parametrization between one- and four-scan setups shows that the one-scan data can replace the four-scan setup with a relative loss of accuracy below 1% for ranges up to 3 m and incidence angles no larger than 50°, while two opposite scans can replace it over the whole plot. The incidence angle limit for the spectral slope is even stronger and is 40°. These findings are valid for scanning over smooth and isotropic soil roughness.

  5. Optics designs and system MTF for laser scanning displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, Hakan; Nestorovic, Ned; Ng, Baldwin S.; Gross, Abraham A.

    1999-07-01

    The Virtual Retinal DisplayTM (VRDTM) technology is a new display technology being developed at Microvision Inc. The displayed image is scanned onto the viewer's retina using low- power red, green, and blue light sources. Microvision's proprietary miniaturized scanner designs make VRD system very well suited for head-mounted displays. In this paper we discuss some of the advantages of the VRD technology, various ocular designs for HMD and other applications, and details of constructing a system MTF budget for laser scanning systems that includes electronics, modulators, scanners, and optics.

  6. Maritime Laser Scanning as the Source for Spatial Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szulwic Jakub

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of scanning technology, especially mobile scanning, gives the possibility to collect spatial data coming from maritime measurement platforms and autonomous manned or unmanned vehicles. Presented solution is derived from the mobile scanning. However we should keep in mind that the specificity of laser scanning at sea and processing collected data should be in the form acceptable in Geographical Information Systems, especially typical for the maritime needs. At the same time we should be aware that data coming from maritime mobile scanning constitutes a new approach to the describing of maritime environment and brings a new perspective that is completely different than air and terrestrial scanning.

  7. Registration Procedures for Terrestrial Laser Scanning in Geomorphologic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B. D.; Kayen, R.; Minasian, D.

    2006-12-01

    Terrestrial based laser scanning, from either vehicle or tripod mounts allows the collection of geomorphologic data at previously unprecedented detail and volume. However, despite the ease of collecting this data in many settings, post-processing datasets collected without laser-visible reflectors within individual scans can lead to difficulties in both registration and georeferencing procedures. We have been actively involved in gathering data sets from a number of different environments and have been developing various techniques to post-process the data using surface registration methods. These methods use the point cloud or model surface to find a best-fit of the three-dimensional terrain. Recently, we have collected laser scan data of levee breaches in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, a glacial cirque basin in the Canadian Rockies, a deep-seated landslide mass in Ventura County, California, rapidly evolving coastal bluffs in Central California, and sand bars and archeological sites in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. In each of these projects, setting up accurately surveyed reflectors was impractical due to the locations dynamic and fairly inaccessible setting. Robust surface registration procedures were therefore needed to provide accurate terrain models. We have used laser scanning results from these projects to assess the efficiency of the various post- processing methodologies for obtaining final registered and georeferenced point clouds and surface models. We compared registration results obtained both with and without accurate GPS coordinates for the laser scanner origin (Ventura and coastal landslides), use of a supporting total station unit (Grand Canyon), and collection of DGPS data on targets imaged in the LIDAR data after the scanning process (Katrina Levees). In many of these settings, the model fit improved by four times, from a root mean square error of 20 cm to 5cm when accurately surveyed coordinates were utilized for the laser scan

  8. Adaptive phase compensation for ultracompact laser scanning endomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alex J; Paterson, Carl; Neil, Mark A A; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M W

    2011-05-01

    We present an approach to laser scanning endomicroscopy that requires no moving parts and can be implemented with no distal scanners or optics, permitting extremely compact endoscopic probes to be developed. Our approach utilizes a spatial light modulator to correct for phase variations across a fiber imaging bundle and to encode for arbitrary wavefronts at the distal end of the fiber bundle. Thus, it is possible to realize both focusing and beam scanning at the output of the fiber bundle with no distal components. We present proof of principle results to illustrate three-dimensional scanning of the focal spot and exemplar images of a United States Air Force resolution test chart.

  9. [Observation and analysis of microstructure of dentin caries lesions through 3D laser scanning microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lixia, Xu; Hongmei, Xu; Xiaoying, Zhu; Limei, Sun

    2016-10-01

    Microstructural changes in dentin carious lesions were investigated using a 3D laser scanning microscope, which has a morphological theoretical foundation in the further study of clinical caries disease prevention and treatments. Six fresh extracted caries molars were prepared into cross-section specimens. The sections were examined by 3D and laser measuring morphology. Zones were identified in the lesions on the basis of their optical appearance. Two zones were identified in the lesions on the basis of their laser appearance. The microstructure showed that the tubular was partly closed in transparent dentin; peritubular and intertubular dentin were reduced in the zone of demineralization; peritubular and intertubular dentin were damaged and fused; a beaded sample and oval lesions formed in the zone of bacterial invasion; and abnormal dentin structure was present in the zone of destruction on the basis of their laser appearance. Four zones were iden-tified in the lesions according to their colors, as determined from their 3D appearance. 3D laser scanning micros-cope may be a powerful, accessible, and non-destructive technique, as it identified the lesion and tubular zones, as well as peritubular and intertubular dentin in the four zones' lesions. The microstructure of dentin caries lesions may have significant merit in the evaluation of clinical prevention and treatment.

  10. SEMI - AUTOMATED BUILDING E XTRACTION FROM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjasiewicz Marcin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main idea of this project is to introduce a conception of semi - automated method for building model extraction from Airborne Laser Scanning data. The presented method is based on the RANSAC algorithm, which provides automatic collection planes for roofs model creation. In the case of Airborne Laser Scanning, the algorithm can process point clouds influenced with noise and erroneous measurement (gross errors. The RANSAC algorithm is based on the iterative processing of a set of points in order to estimate the geometric model. Research of u sing algorithm for ALS data was performed in available Cloud Compare and SketchUP software. An important aspect in this research was algorithm parameters selection, which was made on the basis of characteristics of point cloud and scanned objects. Analysis showed that the accuracy of plane extraction with RANSAC algorithm does not exceed 20 centimeters for point clouds of density 4 pts . /m 2 . RANSAC can be successfully used in buildings modelling based on ALS data. Roofs created by the presented method could be used in visualizations on a much better level than Level of Detail 2 by CityGML standard. If model is textured it can represent LoD3 standard.

  11. Automatic Indoor Building Reconstruction from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, L.; Wang, R.

    2017-09-01

    Indoor reconstruction from point clouds is a hot topic in photogrammetry, computer vision and computer graphics. Reconstructing indoor scene from point clouds is challenging due to complex room floorplan and line-of-sight occlusions. Most of existing methods deal with stationary terrestrial laser scanning point clouds or RGB-D point clouds. In this paper, we propose an automatic method for reconstructing indoor 3D building models from mobile laser scanning point clouds. The method includes 2D floorplan generation, 3D building modeling, door detection and room segmentation. The main idea behind our approach is to separate wall structure into two different types as the inner wall and the outer wall based on the observation of point distribution. Then we utilize a graph cut based optimization method to solve the labeling problem and generate the 2D floorplan based on the optimization result. Subsequently, we leverage an ?-shape based method to detect the doors on the 2D projected point clouds and utilize the floorplan to segment the individual room. The experiments show that this door detection method can achieve a recognition rate at 97% and the room segmentation method can attain the correct segmentation results. We also evaluate the reconstruction accuracy on the synthetic data, which indicates the accuracy of our method is comparable to the state-of-the art.

  12. Two-color two-photon fluorescence laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentmeier, S; Denicke, S; Gericke, K-H

    2009-11-01

    We present the first realization of a Two-Color Two-Photon Laser-Scanning Microscope (2c2pLSM) and UV fluorescence images of cells acquired with this technique. Fluorescence is induced by two-color two-photon absorption using the fundamental and the second harmonic of a Ti:Sa femtosecond laser. Simultaneous absorption of an 800 nm photon and a 400 nm photon energetically corresponds to one-photon absorption at 266 nm. This technique for Laser-Scanning Microscopy extends the excitation wavelength range of a Ti:Sa powered fluorescence microscope to the UV. In addition to the known advantages of multi-photon microscopy like intrinsic 3D resolution, reduced photo damage and high penetration depth 2c2pLSM offers the possibility of using standard high numeric aperture objectives for UV fluorescence imaging. The effective excitation wavelength of 266 nm corresponds especially well to the excitation spectrum of tryptophan. Hence, it is an ideal tool for label free fluorescence studies and imaging of intrinsic protein fluorescence which originates mainly from tryptophan. Thus a very sensitive natural lifetime probe can be used for monitoring protein reactions or changes in conformation. First measurements of living MIN-6 cells reveal differences between the UV fluorescence lifetimes of the nucleus and cytoplasm. The significance of this method was further demonstrated by monitoring the binding of biotin to avidin.

  13. Ta Keo Temple Reconstruction Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ta Keo temple is one of the very famous temple complex of Angkor Wat in northwestern Cambodia. It has been suffering massive collapse and other serious damages in recent years. Nowadays, Terrestrial Laser Scanning(TLS technology is considered as a wellestablished resource for heritage documentation and protection (Lerma et al, 2008; Reshetyuk, 2009. This paper used TLS to reconstruct Ta Keo Temple. Firstly, we acquired 71 scanning stations of points cloud data with high density and high accuracy, and over one thousand images with high spatial resolution about the temple. Secondly, the raw points cloud data were denoised, reduced and managed efficiently, and registrated using an adjusted ICP algorithm. Thirdly, a triangulation method was used to model most objects. At last, we mapped the texture data into the digital model and a 3-D model of Ta Keo with high accuracy was achieved. The authors focus on large object reconstruction by TLS technology, and pay much attention to the scanning design, multi-station data and the whole project’s data registration, and texture mapping and so on. The research result will be useful for Ta Keo restoration, reconstruction and protection. Also, it is a good reference source for large complex buildings reconstruction when using terrestrial laser scanning technology.

  14. TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING IN MONITORING OF HYDROTECHNICAL OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Zaczek-Peplinska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing Terrestrial Laser Scanning technology is provided by modern measuring instruments, i.e. total stations and laser scanners. Owing to these instruments, periodic control measurements of concrete dams carried out as a part of geodetic surveying provide point models characterised by quasi-continuity. Basing on the results of these surveys, it is possible to conduct a number of geometric analyses, as well as to obtain information for detailed analytic and calculative deliberations. A scanner, similarly to a total station, determines spatial coordinates (X, Y, Z of the surveyed points by identifying distances and angles. Registration of intensity of the reflected laser beam (Intensity sent out by the scanner provides additional information on the surveyed object. Thanks to high working speed and a large amount of collected data, scanners have become an essential tool for a geodesist.This paper evaluates the possibility of applying Terrestrial Laser Scanning to test deformations and shifts of flagged points of concrete dam construction based on experimental measurements, including object inventory and evaluation of the dam’s concrete structure condition.

  15. Categorisation of full waveform data provided by laser scanning devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Andreas; Pfennigbauer, Martin

    2011-11-01

    In 2004, a laser scanner device for commercial airborne laser scanning applications, the RIEGL LMS-Q560, was introduced to the market, making use of a radical alternative approach to the traditional analogue signal detection and processing schemes found in LIDAR instruments so far: digitizing the echo signals received by the instrument for every laser pulse and analysing these echo signals off-line in a so-called full waveform analysis in order to retrieve almost all information contained in the echo signal using transparent algorithms adaptable to specific applications. In the field of laser scanning the somewhat unspecific term "full waveform data" has since been established. We attempt a categorisation of the different types of the full waveform data found in the market. We discuss the challenges in echo digitization and waveform analysis from an instrument designer's point of view and we will address the benefits to be gained by using this technique, especially with respect to the so-called multi-target capability of pulsed time-of-flight LIDAR instruments.

  16. LAND-BASED MOBILE LASER SCANNING SYSTEMS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Puente

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile mapping has been using various photogrammetric techniques for many years. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of mobile mapping systems using laser scanners available in the market, partially because of the improvement in GNSS/INS performance for direct georeferencing. In this article, some of the most important land-based mobile laser scanning (MLS systems are reviewed. Firstly, the main characteristics of MLS systems vs. airborne (ALS and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS systems are compared. Secondly, a short overview of the mobile mapping technology is also provided so that the reader can fully grasp the complexity and operation of these devices. As we put forward in this paper, a comparison of different systems is briefly carried out regarding specifications provided by the manufacturers. Focuses on the current research are also addressed with emphasis on the practical applications of these systems. Most of them have been utilized for data collection on road infrastructures or building façades. This article shows that MLS technology is nowadays well established and proven, since the demand has grown to the point that there are several systems suppliers offering their products to satisfy this particular market.

  17. Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanning to Study the Geometry of Slender Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszynski, Zbigniew; Milczarek, Wojciech

    2017-12-01

    Slender objects are a special group among the many types of industrial structures. These objects are characterized by a considerable height which is at least several times bigger than the diameter of the base. Mainly various types of industrial chimneys, as well as truss masts, towers, radio and television towers and also windmill columns belong to this group. During their operation slender objects are exposed to a number of unfavourable factors. For this reason, these objects require regular inspection, including geodetic measurements. In the paper the results of geodetic control of geometry of industrial chimney with a height of 120 m has been presented. The measurements were made by means of terrestrial laser scanning technique under rather unfavourable conditions (at night, during snowfall, with low air temperature) which allowed to verify the real usefulness and accuracy of this technique in engineering practice. On the basis of point cloud, the values of deviations from the vertical for main axis of the chimney have been calculated. Using point cloud, the selected horizontal cross sections of chimney were analysed and were compared with the archival geodetic documentation. On this basis the final conclusions about the advantages and limitations of the using of terrestrial laser scanning technique for the control of geometry of high industrial chimneys have been formulated.

  18. Fine Deformation Monitoring of Ancient Building Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhou; Huadong, Guo; Qi, Li; Tianhua, Hong

    2014-03-01

    Laser scanning technology has been widely used to build high-precision three dimensional models in the preservation of ancient buildings. In this paper, we take the Tower of Buddhist Incense in the Summer Palace as our research subject. Combining laser scanning technologies with close-range photogrammetry, GIS and virtual reality technologies, we acquired comprehensive and high accuracy geospatial data of the tower, and built the 3D models with an average measurement error of a single point less than 2 millimeters and a registration error of 3D data less than 5 millimeters. After data registration of the whole tower with high-precision, deformation monitoring was conducted. Having been repaired many times, the cross-sections of the tower's pillars are not in a circular shape. In order to know the dip and dip direction of each pillar exactly, ellipse fitting algorithm was used to calculate the location of the centre of every pillar. And then, the coordinates of the pillars' centre points, the major and minor axes of the ellipses, and rotation angles were calculated. The technologies and methodology used in this paper could significantly contribute towards the long-term protection of endangered cultural relics using measurements and modelling with high-levels of scientific precision.

  19. The Registration and Segmentation of Heterogeneous Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Durgham, Mohannad M.

    Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) mapping has been emerging over the past few years as a mainstream tool for the dense acquisition of three dimensional point data. Besides the conventional mapping missions, LiDAR systems have proven to be very useful for a wide spectrum of applications such as forestry, structural deformation analysis, urban mapping, and reverse engineering. The wide application scope of LiDAR lead to the development of many laser scanning technologies that are mountable on multiple platforms (i.e., airborne, mobile terrestrial, and tripod mounted), this caused variations in the characteristics and quality of the generated point clouds. As a result of the increased popularity and diversity of laser scanners, one should address the heterogeneous LiDAR data post processing (i.e., registration and segmentation) problems adequately. Current LiDAR integration techniques do not take into account the varying nature of laser scans originating from various platforms. In this dissertation, the author proposes a methodology designed particularly for the registration and segmentation of heterogeneous LiDAR data. A data characterization and filtering step is proposed to populate the points' attributes and remove non-planar LiDAR points. Then, a modified version of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP), denoted by the Iterative Closest Projected Point (ICPP) is designed for the registration of heterogeneous scans to remove any misalignments between overlapping strips. Next, a region-growing-based heterogeneous segmentation algorithm is developed to ensure the proper extraction of planar segments from the point clouds. Validation experiments show that the proposed heterogeneous registration can successfully align airborne and terrestrial datasets despite the great differences in their point density and their noise level. In addition, similar testes have been conducted to examine the heterogeneous segmentation and it is shown that one is able to identify common

  20. A polygon laser scanning micrometer for magnet size measurement studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khullar, R.; Mishra, G.; Sharma, G.; Prakash, B.; Gehlot, M.; Huse, V.; Mishra, S.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and development of a polygon laser scanner for undulator magnet size measurement studies. In the laser scan micrometer, a laser light source is focused on to the facets of a rotating polygon mirror that reflects the laser beam. The parallel light emerging from the polygon surface falls on the object through a F-theta lens. The object obstructs the light. A lens at the opposite side of the object collects and focuses the light onto a detector. The shadow caused by the obstruction results in an output voltage for a period of time that is proportional to the size of the object. The method is used for undulator magnet size measurements for free electron laser applications.

  1. Confocal laser scanning microscopy-guided surgery for neurofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, S; Horn, M; Weger, W; Massone, C; Smolle, J; Gerger, A

    2009-12-01

    The neurofibromatoses comprise at least two separate genetic disorders with variable clinical features and an unpredictable course. The most common type, neurofibromatosis 1, is characterized by > or = 6 café-au-lait spots and the occurrence of neurofibromas, which may present as cutaneous, subcutaneous or plexiform lesions. Normally, excision of neurofibromas is only indicated in the presence of neurological symptoms, suspicion of malignancy or for exceptional cosmetic reasons. For a good functional and aesthetic result with the least danger of recurrence, the surgeon's goal is to excise as much tissue as necessary and as little tissue as possible. One of the main issues during the surgical procedure is to distinguish between neurofibroma and surrounding tissue. We report for the first time the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy to differentiate between neurofibroma and healthy skin.

  2. Quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukojevic, Vladana; Heidkamp, Marcus; Ming, Yu; Johansson, Björn; Terenius, Lars; Rigler, Rudolf

    2008-11-25

    A new approach to quantitative single-molecule imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is presented. It relies on fluorescence intensity distribution to analyze the molecular occurrence statistics captured by digital imaging and enables direct determination of the number of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion rates without resorting to temporal or spatial autocorrelation analyses. Digital images of fluorescent molecules were recorded by using fast scanning and avalanche photodiode detectors. In this way the signal-to-background ratio was significantly improved, enabling direct quantitative imaging by CLSM. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using standard solutions of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules, quantum dots, and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein in solution and in live cells. The method was verified by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The relevance for biological applications, in particular, for live cell imaging, is discussed.

  3. CLASSIFICATION OF MOBILE LASER SCANNING POINT CLOUDS FROM HEIGHT FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The demand for 3D maps of cities and road networks is steadily growing and mobile laser scanning (MLS systems are often the preferred geo-data acquisition method for capturing such scenes. Because MLS systems are mounted on cars or vans they can acquire billions of points of road scenes within a few hours of survey. Manual processing of point clouds is labour intensive and thus time consuming and expensive. Hence, the need for rapid and automated methods for 3D mapping of dense point clouds is growing exponentially. The last five years the research on automated 3D mapping of MLS data has tremendously intensified. In this paper, we present our work on automated classification of MLS point clouds. In the present stage of the research we exploited three features – two height components and one reflectance value, and achieved an overall accuracy of 73 %, which is really encouraging for further refining our approach.

  4. Classification of Mobile Laser Scanning Point Clouds from Height Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M.; Lemmens, M.; van Oosterom, P.

    2017-09-01

    The demand for 3D maps of cities and road networks is steadily growing and mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems are often the preferred geo-data acquisition method for capturing such scenes. Because MLS systems are mounted on cars or vans they can acquire billions of points of road scenes within a few hours of survey. Manual processing of point clouds is labour intensive and thus time consuming and expensive. Hence, the need for rapid and automated methods for 3D mapping of dense point clouds is growing exponentially. The last five years the research on automated 3D mapping of MLS data has tremendously intensified. In this paper, we present our work on automated classification of MLS point clouds. In the present stage of the research we exploited three features - two height components and one reflectance value, and achieved an overall accuracy of 73 %, which is really encouraging for further refining our approach.

  5. Road Orthophoto/dtm Generation from Mobile Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, B.; Papelard, J.-P.

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a pipeline to produce road orthophoto and DTM from Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS). For the ortho, modern laser scanners provide a reflectance information allowing for high quality grayscale images, at a much finer resolution than aerial photography can offer. For DTM, MLS offers a much higher accuracy and density than aerial products. This increased precision and resolution leverages new applications for both ortho and DEM. The first task is to filter ground vs non ground, then an interpolation is conducted to build image tiles from the filtered points. Finally, multiple layers are registered and blended to allow for seamless fusion. Our proposed approach achieves high quality products and scaling up is demonstrated.

  6. Airborne Laser Scanning and Image Processing Techniques for Archaeological Prospection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltýnová, M.; Nový, P.

    2014-06-01

    Aerial photography was, for decades, an invaluable tool for archaeological prospection, in spite of the limitation of this method to deforested areas. The airborne laser scanning (ALS) method can be nowadays used to map complex areas and suitable complement earlier findings. This article describes visualization and image processing methods that can be applied on digital terrain models (DTMs) to highlight objects hidden in the landscape. Thanks to the analysis of visualized DTM it is possible to understand the landscape evolution including the differentiation between natural processes and human interventions. Different visualization methods were applied on a case study area. A system of parallel tracks hidden in a forest and its surroundings - part of old route called "Devil's Furrow" near the town of Sázava was chosen. The whole area around well known part of Devil's Furrow has not been prospected systematically yet. The data from the airborne laser scanning acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre was used. The average density of the point cloud was approximately 1 point/m2 The goal of the project was to visualize the utmost smallest terrain discontinuities, e.g. tracks and erosion furrows, which some were not wholly preserved. Generally we were interested in objects that are clearly not visible in DTMs displayed in the form of shaded relief. Some of the typical visualization methods were tested (shaded relief, aspect and slope image). To get better results we applied image-processing methods that were successfully used on aerial photographs or hyperspectral images in the past. The usage of different visualization techniques on one site allowed us to verify the natural character of the southern part of Devil's Furrow and find formations up to now hidden in the forests.

  7. URBAN TREE CLASSIFICATION USING FULL-WAVEFORM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zs. Koma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation mapping in urban environments plays an important role in biological research and urban management. Airborne laser scanning provides detailed 3D geodata, which allows to classify single trees into different taxa. Until now, research dealing with tree classification focused on forest environments. This study investigates the object-based classification of urban trees at taxonomic family level, using full-waveform airborne laser scanning data captured in the city centre of Vienna (Austria. The data set is characterised by a variety of taxa, including deciduous trees (beeches, mallows, plane trees and soapberries and the coniferous pine species. A workflow for tree object classification is presented using geometric and radiometric features. The derived features are related to point density, crown shape and radiometric characteristics. For the derivation of crown features, a prior detection of the crown base is performed. The effects of interfering objects (e.g. fences and cars which are typical in urban areas on the feature characteristics and the subsequent classification accuracy are investigated. The applicability of the features is evaluated by Random Forest classification and exploratory analysis. The most reliable classification is achieved by using the combination of geometric and radiometric features, resulting in 87.5% overall accuracy. By using radiometric features only, a reliable classification with accuracy of 86.3% can be achieved. The influence of interfering objects on feature characteristics is identified, in particular for the radiometric features. The results indicate the potential of using radiometric features in urban tree classification and show its limitations due to anthropogenic influences at the same time.

  8. Estimation of forest resources from a country wide laser scanning survey and national forest inventory data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Schumacher, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning may provide a means for assessing local forest biomass resources. In this study, national forest inventory (NFI) data was used as reference data for modeling forest basal area, volume, aboveground biomass, and total biomass from laser scanning data obtained in a countrywide...

  9. The potential of UAV laser scanning in forest inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert; Bronner, Günther

    2017-04-01

    Forest management, harvest operation, ecological conservation and relevant decision making need information from inventories. Conventionally, forest inventories were carried out mainly from field measurements with simple tools, and from field samples. Several vital tree attributes such as diameter at breast height (DBH), tree height, and species were collected at individual tree level. Various other attributes then can be inferred. For example, stem curve (i.e., taper function) can be interpolated by mathematical functions. The relation of different components of trees is often estimated by allometric functions based on DBH, tree height or other parameters of interest. In addition, these attributes are often aggregated to plot-level. For deriving taper functions for individual plots the required field measurements would be too expensive and therefore, the available taper functions are based on few sample trees. Recent advancements of remote sensing techniques, especially terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) showed promising potential in forest inventories. It acquires millions of 3D points, which enables fast determination of forest attributes in an automatic manner. Some additional attributes that cannot be directly measured in traditional field inventories such as stem curve and volume, even ecologically related parameters such as leaf area index (LAI) can be estimated with high precision. The deficiencies of the employment of TLS in forests include limited terrain accessibility, area coverage, and visibility in top canopy layer. On the other hand, the next geospatial frontier, UAV-borne Laser Scanning (ULS) is emerging as a candidate for forest inventories. The high density and accuracy of ULS data enable the modeling of individual tree with fine details up to branch level. In addition to its plot or transect level coverage, it achieves a high level of completeness with respect to the top canopy layer. Therefore, it generates a high potential especially in

  10. Forest structure analysis combining laser scanning with digital airborne photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissak, Candide; Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2017-04-01

    The interest of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) for vegetation structure analysis has been demonstrated in several research context. Indeed, airborne or ground Lidar surveys can provide detailed three-dimensional data of the forest structure from understorey forest to the canopy. To characterize at different timescale the vegetation components in dense cedar forests we can combine several sources point clouds from Lidar survey and photogrammetry data. For our study, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS-Leica ScanStation C10 processed with Cyclone software) have been lead in three forest areas (≈ 200m2 each zone) mainly composed of japanese cedar (Japonica cryptomeria), in the region of Fukushima (Japan). The study areas are characterized by various vegetation densities. For the 3 areas, Terrestrial laser scanning has been performed from several location points and several heights. Various floors shootings (ground, 4m, 6m and 18m high) were able with the use of a several meters high tower implanted to study the canopy evolution following the Fukushima Daiishi nuclear power plant accident. The combination of all scanners provides a very dense 3D point cloud of ground and canopy structure (average 300 000 000 points). For the Tochigi forest area, a first test of a low-cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry has been lead and calibrated by ground GPS measurements to determine the coordinates of points. TLS combined to UAV photogrammetry make it possible to obtain information on vertical and horizontal structure of the Tochigi forest. This combination of technologies will allow the forest structure mapping, morphometry analysis and the assessment of biomass volume evolution from multi-temporal point clouds. In our research, we used a low-cost UAV 3 Advanced (200 m2 cover, 1300 pictures...). Data processing were performed using PotoScan Pro software to obtain a very dense point clouds to combine to TLS data set. This low-cost UAV photogrammetry data has been

  11. Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning for Automated Map Updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, Leena; Hyyppä, Juha; Litkey, Paula

    2016-06-01

    During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS), often combined with multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and multispectral information is for the first time directly available for 3D ALS point clouds. This article discusses the potential of this new single-sensor technology in map updating, especially in automated object detection and change detection. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from a random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral intensity information is useful for land cover classification, also when considering ground surface objects and classes, such as roads. An out-of-bag estimate for classification error was about 3% for separating classes asphalt, gravel, rocky areas and low vegetation from each other. For buildings and trees, it was under 1%. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral features based on several channels were more useful that those based on one channel. Automatic change detection utilizing the new multispectral ALS data, an old digital surface model (DSM) and old building vectors was also demonstrated. Overall, our first analyses suggest that the new data are very promising for further increasing the automation level in mapping. The multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and intensity images produced from the data do not include shadows. These are significant advantages when the development of automated classification and change detection procedures is considered.

  12. MULTISPECTRAL AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING FOR AUTOMATED MAP UPDATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Matikainen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS, often combined with multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and multispectral information is for the first time directly available for 3D ALS point clouds. This article discusses the potential of this new single-sensor technology in map updating, especially in automated object detection and change detection. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from a random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral intensity information is useful for land cover classification, also when considering ground surface objects and classes, such as roads. An out-of-bag estimate for classification error was about 3% for separating classes asphalt, gravel, rocky areas and low vegetation from each other. For buildings and trees, it was under 1%. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral features based on several channels were more useful that those based on one channel. Automatic change detection utilizing the new multispectral ALS data, an old digital surface model (DSM and old building vectors was also demonstrated. Overall, our first analyses suggest that the new data are very promising for further increasing the automation level in mapping. The multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and intensity images produced from the data do not include shadows. These are significant advantages when the development of automated classification and change detection procedures is considered.

  13. CLUSTERING OF MULTISPECTRAL AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA USING GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Morsy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the evolution of the LiDAR technology, multispectral airborne laser scanning systems are currently available. The first operational multispectral airborne LiDAR sensor, the Optech Titan, acquires LiDAR point clouds at three different wavelengths (1.550, 1.064, 0.532 μm, allowing the acquisition of different spectral information of land surface. Consequently, the recent studies are devoted to use the radiometric information (i.e., intensity of the LiDAR data along with the geometric information (e.g., height for classification purposes. In this study, a data clustering method, based on Gaussian decomposition, is presented. First, a ground filtering mechanism is applied to separate non-ground from ground points. Then, three normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVIs are computed for both non-ground and ground points, followed by histograms construction from each NDVI. The Gaussian function model is used to decompose the histograms into a number of Gaussian components. The maximum likelihood estimate of the Gaussian components is then optimized using Expectation – Maximization algorithm. The intersection points of the adjacent Gaussian components are subsequently used as threshold values, whereas different classes can be clustered. This method is used to classify the terrain of an urban area in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, into four main classes, namely roofs, trees, asphalt and grass. It is shown that the proposed method has achieved an overall accuracy up to 95.1 % using different NDVIs.

  14. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  15. Monitoring Riverbank Erosion in Mountain Catchments Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Longoni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sediment yield is a key factor in river basins management due to the various and adverse consequences that erosion and sediment transport in rivers may have on the environment. Although various contributions can be found in the literature about sediment yield modeling and bank erosion monitoring, the link between weather conditions, river flow rate and bank erosion remains scarcely known. Thus, a basin scale assessment of sediment yield due to riverbank erosion is an objective hard to be reached. In order to enhance the current knowledge in this field, a monitoring method based on high resolution 3D model reconstruction of riverbanks, surveyed by multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning, was applied to four banks in Val Tartano, Northern Italy. Six data acquisitions over one year were taken, with the aim to better understand the erosion processes and their triggering factors by means of more frequent observations compared to usual annual campaigns. The objective of the research is to address three key questions concerning bank erosion: “how” erosion happens, “when” during the year and “how much” sediment is eroded. The method proved to be effective and able to measure both eroded and deposited volume in the surveyed area. Finally an attempt to extrapolate basin scale volume for bank erosion is presented.

  16. MEASURING LEAF WATER CONTENT USING MULTISPECTRAL TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Junttila

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is increasing the amount and intensity of disturbance events, i.e. drought, pest insect outbreaks and fungal pathogens, in forests worldwide. Leaf water content (LWC is an early indicator of tree stress that can be measured remotely using multispectral terrestrial laser scanning (MS-TLS. LWC affects leaf reflectance in the shortwave infrared spectrum which can be used to predict LWC from spatially explicit MS-TLS intensity data. Here, we investigated the relationship between LWC and MS-TLS intensity features at 690 nm, 905 nm and 1550 nm wavelengths with Norway spruce seedlings in greenhouse conditions. We found that a simple ratio of 905 nm and 1550 nm wavelengths was able to explain 84 % of the variation (R2 in LWC with a respective prediction accuracy of 0.0041 g/cm2. Our results showed that MS-TLS can be used to estimate LWC with a reasonable accuracy in environmentally stable conditions.

  17. Globally consistent registration of terrestrial laser scans via graph optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, Pascal Willy; Wegner, Jan Dirk; Schindler, Konrad

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present a framework for the automatic registration of multiple terrestrial laser scans. The proposed method can handle arbitrary point clouds with reasonable pairwise overlap, without knowledge about their initial orientation and without the need for artificial markers or other specific objects. The framework is divided into a coarse and a fine registration part, which each start with pairwise registration and then enforce consistent global alignment across all scans. While we put forward a complete, functional registration system, the novel contribution of the paper lies in the coarse global alignment step. Merging multiple scans into a consistent network creates loops along which the relative transformations must add up. We pose the task of finding a global alignment as picking the best candidates from a set of putative pairwise registrations, such that they satisfy the loop constraints. This yields a discrete optimization problem that can be solved efficiently with modern combinatorial methods. Having found a coarse global alignment in this way, the framework proceeds by pairwise refinement with standard ICP, followed by global refinement to evenly spread the residual errors. The framework was tested on six challenging, real-world datasets. The discrete global alignment step effectively detects, removes and corrects failures of the pairwise registration procedure, finally producing a globally consistent coarse scan network which can be used as initial guess for the highly non-convex refinement. Our overall system reaches success rates close to 100% at acceptable runtimes < 1 h, even in challenging conditions such as scanning in the forest.

  18. Terrestrial laser scanning in monitoring of anthropogenic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaczek-Peplinska, Janina; Kowalska, Maria

    2017-12-01

    The registered xyz coordinates in the form of a point cloud captured by terrestrial laser scanner and the intensity values (I) assigned to them make it possible to perform geometric and spectral analyses. Comparison of point clouds registered in different time periods requires conversion of the data to a common coordinate system and proper data selection is necessary. Factors like point distribution dependant on the distance between the scanner and the surveyed surface, angle of incidence, tasked scan's density and intensity value have to be taken into consideration. A prerequisite for running a correct analysis of the obtained point clouds registered during periodic measurements using a laser scanner is the ability to determine the quality and accuracy of the analysed data. The article presents a concept of spectral data adjustment based on geometric analysis of a surface as well as examples of geometric analyses integrating geometric and physical data in one cloud of points: cloud point coordinates, recorded intensity values, and thermal images of an object. The experiments described here show multiple possibilities of usage of terrestrial laser scanning data and display the necessity of using multi-aspect and multi-source analyses in anthropogenic object monitoring. The article presents examples of multisource data analyses with regard to Intensity value correction due to the beam's incidence angle. The measurements were performed using a Leica Nova MS50 scanning total station, Z+F Imager 5010 scanner and the integrated Z+F T-Cam thermal camera.

  19. PEDESTRIAN DETECTION BY LASER SCANNING AND DEPTH IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barsi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrian flow is much less regulated and controlled compared to vehicle traffic. Estimating flow parameters would support many safety, security or commercial applications. Current paper discusses a method that enables acquiring information on pedestrian movements without disturbing and changing their motion. Profile laser scanner and depth camera have been applied to capture the geometry of the moving people as time series. Procedures have been developed to derive complex flow parameters, such as count, volume, walking direction and velocity from laser scanned point clouds. Since no images are captured from the faces of pedestrians, no privacy issues raised. The paper includes accuracy analysis of the estimated parameters based on video footage as reference. Due to the dense point clouds, detailed geometry analysis has been conducted to obtain the height and shoulder width of pedestrians and to detect whether luggage has been carried or not. The derived parameters support safety (e.g. detecting critical pedestrian density in mass events, security (e.g. detecting prohibited baggage in endangered areas and commercial applications (e.g. counting pedestrians at all entrances/exits of a shopping mall.

  20. Detecting Terrain Stoniness From Airborne Laser Scanning Data †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paavo Nevalainen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Three methods to estimate the presence of ground surface stones from publicly available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS point clouds are presented. The first method approximates the local curvature by local linear multi-scale fitting, and the second method uses Discrete-Differential Gaussian curvature based on the ground surface triangulation. The third baseline method applies Laplace filtering to Digital Elevation Model (DEM in a 2 m regular grid data. All methods produce an approximate Gaussian curvature distribution which is then vectorized and classified by logistic regression. Two training data sets consisted of 88 and 674 polygons of mass-flow deposits, respectively. The locality of the polygon samples is a sparse canopy boreal forest, where the density of ALS ground returns is sufficiently high to reveal information about terrain micro-topography. The surface stoniness of each polygon sample was categorized for supervised learning by expert observation on the site. The leave-pair-out (L2O cross-validation of the local linear fit method results in the area under curve A U C = 0 . 74 and A U C = 0 . 85 on two data sets, respectively. This performance can be expected to suit real world applications such as detecting coarse-grained sediments for infrastructure construction. A wall-to-wall predictor based on the study was demonstrated.

  1. AUTOMATIC EXTRACTION OF ROAD MARKINGS FROM MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Road markings as critical feature in high-defination maps, which are Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS and self-driving technology required, have important functions in providing guidance and information to moving cars. Mobile laser scanning (MLS system is an effective way to obtain the 3D information of the road surface, including road markings, at highway speeds and at less than traditional survey costs. This paper presents a novel method to automatically extract road markings from MLS point clouds. Ground points are first filtered from raw input point clouds using neighborhood elevation consistency method. The basic assumption of the method is that the road surface is smooth. Points with small elevation-difference between neighborhood are considered to be ground points. Then ground points are partitioned into a set of profiles according to trajectory data. The intensity histogram of points in each profile is generated to find intensity jumps in certain threshold which inversely to laser distance. The separated points are used as seed points to region grow based on intensity so as to obtain road mark of integrity. We use the point cloud template-matching method to refine the road marking candidates via removing the noise clusters with low correlation coefficient. During experiment with a MLS point set of about 2 kilometres in a city center, our method provides a promising solution to the road markings extraction from MLS data.

  2. Automatic Extraction of Road Markings from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H.; Pei, Z.; Wei, Z.; Zhong, R.

    2017-09-01

    Road markings as critical feature in high-defination maps, which are Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS) and self-driving technology required, have important functions in providing guidance and information to moving cars. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) system is an effective way to obtain the 3D information of the road surface, including road markings, at highway speeds and at less than traditional survey costs. This paper presents a novel method to automatically extract road markings from MLS point clouds. Ground points are first filtered from raw input point clouds using neighborhood elevation consistency method. The basic assumption of the method is that the road surface is smooth. Points with small elevation-difference between neighborhood are considered to be ground points. Then ground points are partitioned into a set of profiles according to trajectory data. The intensity histogram of points in each profile is generated to find intensity jumps in certain threshold which inversely to laser distance. The separated points are used as seed points to region grow based on intensity so as to obtain road mark of integrity. We use the point cloud template-matching method to refine the road marking candidates via removing the noise clusters with low correlation coefficient. During experiment with a MLS point set of about 2 kilometres in a city center, our method provides a promising solution to the road markings extraction from MLS data.

  3. Clustering of Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning Data Using Gaussian Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, S.; Shaker, A.; El-Rabbany, A.

    2017-09-01

    With the evolution of the LiDAR technology, multispectral airborne laser scanning systems are currently available. The first operational multispectral airborne LiDAR sensor, the Optech Titan, acquires LiDAR point clouds at three different wavelengths (1.550, 1.064, 0.532 μm), allowing the acquisition of different spectral information of land surface. Consequently, the recent studies are devoted to use the radiometric information (i.e., intensity) of the LiDAR data along with the geometric information (e.g., height) for classification purposes. In this study, a data clustering method, based on Gaussian decomposition, is presented. First, a ground filtering mechanism is applied to separate non-ground from ground points. Then, three normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVIs) are computed for both non-ground and ground points, followed by histograms construction from each NDVI. The Gaussian function model is used to decompose the histograms into a number of Gaussian components. The maximum likelihood estimate of the Gaussian components is then optimized using Expectation - Maximization algorithm. The intersection points of the adjacent Gaussian components are subsequently used as threshold values, whereas different classes can be clustered. This method is used to classify the terrain of an urban area in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, into four main classes, namely roofs, trees, asphalt and grass. It is shown that the proposed method has achieved an overall accuracy up to 95.1 % using different NDVIs.

  4. Multi-Pass Approach for Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, J.; Eckels, R.; Evers, M.; Singh, R.; Olsen, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning (MTLS) has been utilised for an increasing number of corridor surveys. Current MTLS surveys require that many targets be placed along the corridor to monitor the MTLS trajectory's accuracy. These targets enable surveyors to directly evaluate the magnitude of GNSS errors at regular intervals and can also be used to adjust the trajectory to the survey control. However, this "Multi-Target" approach (MTA) is an onerous task that can significantly reduce efficiency. It also is inconvenient to the travelling public, as lanes are often blocked and traffic slowed to permit surveyors to work safely along the road corridor. This paper introduces a "Multi-Pass" approach (MPA), which minimises the number of targets required for monitoring the GNSS-controlled trajectory while still maintaining strict engineering accuracies. MPA uses the power of multiple, independent MTLS passes with different GNSS constellations to generate a "Control Polyline" from the point cloud for the corridor. The Control Polyline can be considered as a statistically valid survey measurement and be incorporated in a network adjustment to strengthen a control network by identifying outliers. Results from a test survey at the MTLS course maintained by the Oregon Department of Transportation illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.

  5. A NEW APPROACH FOR SUBWAY TUNNEL DEFORMATION MONITORING: HIGH-RESOLUTION TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available With the improvement of the accuracy and efficiency of laser scanning technology, high-resolution terrestrial laser scanning (TLS technology can obtain high precise points-cloud and density distribution and can be applied to high-precision deformation monitoring of subway tunnels and high-speed railway bridges and other fields. In this paper, a new approach using a points-cloud segmentation method based on vectors of neighbor points and surface fitting method based on moving least squares was proposed and applied to subway tunnel deformation monitoring in Tianjin combined with a new high-resolution terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl VZ-400. There were three main procedures. Firstly, a points-cloud consisted of several scanning was registered by linearized iterative least squares approach to improve the accuracy of registration, and several control points were acquired by total stations (TS and then adjusted. Secondly, the registered points-cloud was resampled and segmented based on vectors of neighbor points to select suitable points. Thirdly, the selected points were used to fit the subway tunnel surface with moving least squares algorithm. Then a series of parallel sections obtained from temporal series of fitting tunnel surfaces were compared to analysis the deformation. Finally, the results of the approach in z direction were compared with the fiber optical displacement sensor approach and the results in x, y directions were compared with TS respectively, and comparison results showed the accuracy errors of x, y, z directions were respectively about 1.5 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm. Therefore the new approach using high-resolution TLS can meet the demand of subway tunnel deformation monitoring.

  6. Laser Scanning in Engineering Surveying: Methods of Measurement and Modeling of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenda Grzegorz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to the uses of laser scanning in the field of engineering surveying. It is currently one of the main trends of research which is developed at the Department of Engineering Surveying and Civil Engineering at the Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering of AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow. They mainly relate to the issues associated with tower and shell structures, infrastructure of rail routes, or development of digital elevation models for a wide range of applications. These issues often require the use of a variety of scanning techniques (stationary, mobile, but the differences also regard the planning of measurement stations and methods of merging point clouds. Significant differences appear during the analysis of point clouds, especially when modeling objects. Analysis of the selected parameters is already possible basing on ad hoc measurements carried out on a point cloud. However, only the construction of three-dimensional models provides complete information about the shape of structures, allows to perform the analysis in any place and reduces the amount of the stored data. Some structures can be modeled in the form of simple axes, sections, or solids, for others it becomes necessary to create sophisticated models of surfaces, depicting local deformations. The examples selected for the study allow to assess the scope of measurement and office work for a variety of uses related to the issue set forth in the title of this study. Additionally, the latest, forward-looking technology was presented - laser scanning performed from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (drones. Currently, it is basically in the prototype phase, but it might be expected to make a significant progress in numerous applications in the field of engineering surveying.

  7. All-optical histology using two photon laser scanning microscopy and ablation with ultrashort pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Philbert S.

    This dissertation discusses the use of ultrashort laser pulses to image and manipulate tissue for the purpose of three-dimensional histological reconstruction of extended brain structures. Two photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) and ultrashort pulsed laser ablation are used to provide in situ three-dimensional imaging through thick preparations of fixed tissue. Surface regions of fixed tissue are first imaged using TPLSM. The imaged regions are then removed by ablation with amplified, ultrashort laser pulses, thereby exposing a previously underlying tissue region for imaging. This process of imaging and ablation proceeds iteratively until the desired tissue volume has been processed. First, the principles, design, and construction of a two photon laser scanning microscope are discussed, followed by a discussion of the physical mechanisms of tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses. The compatibility of tissue ablation using ultrashort pulses with subsequent histological analysis, particularly with fluorescent microscopy, is evaluated. Tissue ablation with ultrashort laser pulses is found to produce ablated tissue surfaces that are smooth to within a micrometer. Intrinsic fluorescence as well as immunoreactivity are found to be resilient to the ablation process. The all-optical histological technique is demonstrated on brain tissue from rats and mice, including tissue from embryonic mouse as early at E15. The ablation process is shown to preserve both macroscopic and microscopic structures within tissue. To facilitate the all-optical histological analysis of neuronal vasculature and its relative distribution to surrounding neuronal tissue, a fluorescent gel perfusion technique is developed that provides a temperature-stabilized fluorescent label of the neuronal vasculature. The use of immunohistochemistry to label specific cell populations throughout an 800 micrometer-thick tissue section is demonstrated. Additionally, the immersion of fixed tissue in high

  8. Laser Scanning in Engineering Surveying: Methods of Measurement and Modeling of Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenda, Grzegorz; Uznański, Andrzej; Strach, Michał; Lewińska, Paulina

    2016-06-01

    The study is devoted to the uses of laser scanning in the field of engineering surveying. It is currently one of the main trends of research which is developed at the Department of Engineering Surveying and Civil Engineering at the Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering of AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow. They mainly relate to the issues associated with tower and shell structures, infrastructure of rail routes, or development of digital elevation models for a wide range of applications. These issues often require the use of a variety of scanning techniques (stationary, mobile), but the differences also regard the planning of measurement stations and methods of merging point clouds. Significant differences appear during the analysis of point clouds, especially when modeling objects. Analysis of the selected parameters is already possible basing on ad hoc measurements carried out on a point cloud. However, only the construction of three-dimensional models provides complete information about the shape of structures, allows to perform the analysis in any place and reduces the amount of the stored data. Some structures can be modeled in the form of simple axes, sections, or solids, for others it becomes necessary to create sophisticated models of surfaces, depicting local deformations. The examples selected for the study allow to assess the scope of measurement and office work for a variety of uses related to the issue set forth in the title of this study. Additionally, the latest, forward-looking technology was presented - laser scanning performed from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (drones). Currently, it is basically in the prototype phase, but it might be expected to make a significant progress in numerous applications in the field of engineering surveying.

  9. Tree Height Growth Measurement with Single-Scan Airborne, Static Terrestrial and Mobile Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the feasibility of applying single-scan airborne, static terrestrial and mobile laser scanning for improving the accuracy of tree height growth measurement. Specifically, compared to the traditional works on forest growth inventory with airborne laser scanning, two issues are regarded: “Can the new technique characterize the height growth for each individual tree?” and “Can this technique refine the minimum growth-discernable temporal interval further?” To solve these two puzzles, the sampling principles of the three laser scanning modes were first examined, and their error sources against the task of tree-top capturing were also analyzed. Next, the three-year growths of 58 Nordic maple trees (Crimson King for test were intermittently surveyed with one type of laser scanning each time and then analyzed by statistics. The evaluations show that the height growth of each individual tree still cannot be reliably characterized even by single-scan terrestrial laser scanning, and statistical analysis is necessary in this scenario. After Gaussian regression, it is found that the minimum temporal interval with distinguishable tree height growths can be refined into one month based on terrestrial laser scanning, far better than the two years deduced in the previous works based on airborne laser scanning. The associated mean growth was detected to be about 0.12 m. Moreover, the parameter of tree height generally under-estimated by airborne and even mobile laser scanning can be relatively revised by means of introducing static terrestrial laser scanning data. Overall, the effectiveness of the proposed technique is primarily validated.

  10. Modeling Mediterranean forest structure using airborne laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottalico, Francesca; Chirici, Gherardo; Giannini, Raffaello; Mele, Salvatore; Mura, Matteo; Puxeddu, Michele; McRoberts, Ronald E.; Valbuena, Ruben; Travaglini, Davide

    2017-05-01

    The conservation of biological diversity is recognized as a fundamental component of sustainable development, and forests contribute greatly to its preservation. Structural complexity increases the potential biological diversity of a forest by creating multiple niches that can host a wide variety of species. To facilitate greater understanding of the contributions of forest structure to forest biological diversity, we modeled relationships between 14 forest structure variables and airborne laser scanning (ALS) data for two Italian study areas representing two common Mediterranean forests, conifer plantations and coppice oaks subjected to irregular intervals of unplanned and non-standard silvicultural interventions. The objectives were twofold: (i) to compare model prediction accuracies when using two types of ALS metrics, echo-based metrics and canopy height model (CHM)-based metrics, and (ii) to construct inferences in the form of confidence intervals for large area structural complexity parameters. Our results showed that the effects of the two study areas on accuracies were greater than the effects of the two types of ALS metrics. In particular, accuracies were less for the more complex study area in terms of species composition and forest structure. However, accuracies achieved using the echo-based metrics were only slightly greater than when using the CHM-based metrics, thus demonstrating that both options yield reliable and comparable results. Accuracies were greatest for dominant height (Hd) (R2 = 0.91; RMSE% = 8.2%) and mean height weighted by basal area (R2 = 0.83; RMSE% = 10.5%) when using the echo-based metrics, 99th percentile of the echo height distribution and interquantile distance. For the forested area, the generalized regression (GREG) estimate of mean Hd was similar to the simple random sampling (SRS) estimate, 15.5 m for GREG and 16.2 m SRS. Further, the GREG estimator with standard error of 0.10 m was considerable more precise than the SRS

  11. Research on calibration algorithm in laser scanning projection system

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    Li, Li Juan; Qu, Song; Hou, Mao Sheng

    2017-10-01

    Laser scanning projection technology can project the image defined by the existing CAD digital model to the working surface, in the form of a laser harness profile. This projection is in accordance with the ratio of 1: 1. Through the laser harness contours with high positioning quality, the technical staff can carry out the operation with high precision. In a typical process of the projection, in order to determine the relative positional relationship between the laser projection instrument and the target, it is necessary to place several fixed reference points on the projection target and perform the calibration of projection. This position relationship is the transformation from projection coordinate system to the global coordinate system. The entire projection work is divided into two steps: the first step, the calculation of the projector six position parameters is performed, that is, the projector calibration. In the second step, the deflection angle is calculated by the known projector position parameter and the known coordinate points, and then the actual model is projected. Typically, the calibration requires the establishment of six reference points to reduce the possibility of divergence of the nonlinear equations, but the whole solution is very complex and the solution may still diverge. In this paper, the distance is detected combined with the calculation so that the position parameters of the projector can be solved by using the coordinate values of three reference points and the distance of at least one reference point to the projector. The addition of the distance measurement increases the stability of the solution of the nonlinear system and avoids the problem of divergence of the solution caused by the reference point which is directly under the projector. Through the actual analysis and calculation, the Taylor expansion method combined with the least squares method is used to obtain the solution of the system. Finally, the simulation experiment is

  12. Reflection across plant cell boundaries in confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D Y T; Kuhlmey, B T; Smith, P M C; Day, D A; Faulkner, C R; Overall, R L

    2008-08-01

    The fluorescence patterns of proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its derivatives are routinely used in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy to identify their sub-cellular localization in plant cells. GFP-tagged proteins localized to plasmodesmata, the intercellular junctions of plants, are often identified by single or paired punctate labelling across the cell wall. The observation of paired puncta, or 'doublets', across cell boundaries in tissues that have been transformed through biolistic bombardment is unexpected if there is no intercellular movement of the GFP-tagged protein, since bombardment usually leads to the transformation of single, isolated cells. We expressed a putative plasmodesmal protein tagged with GFP by bombarding Allium porrum epidermal cells and assessed the nature of the doublets observed at the cell boundaries. Doublets were formed when fluorescent spots were abutting a cell boundary and were only observable at certain focal planes. Fluorescence emitted from the half of a doublet lying outside the transformed cells was polarized. Optical simulations performed using finite-difference time-domain computations showed a dramatic distortion of the confocal microscope's point spread function when imaging voxels close to the plant cell wall due to refractive index differences between the wall and the cytosol. Consequently, axially and radially out-of-focus light could be detected. A model of this phenomenon suggests how a doublet may form when imaging only a single real fluorescent body in the vicinity of a plant cell wall using confocal microscopy. We suggest, therefore, that the appearance of doublets across cell boundaries is insufficient evidence for plasmodesmal localization due to the effects of the cell wall on the reflection and scattering of light.

  13. Tree Classification with Fused Mobile Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Data

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    Juha Hyyppä

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Laser Scanning data were collected simultaneously with hyperspectral data using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Sensei system. The data were tested for tree species classification. The test area was an urban garden in the City of Espoo, Finland. Point clouds representing 168 individual tree specimens of 23 tree species were determined manually. The classification of the trees was done using first only the spatial data from point clouds, then with only the spectral data obtained with a spectrometer, and finally with the combined spatial and hyperspectral data from both sensors. Two classification tests were performed: the separation of coniferous and deciduous trees, and the identification of individual tree species. All determined tree specimens were used in distinguishing coniferous and deciduous trees. A subset of 133 trees and 10 tree species was used in the tree species classification. The best classification results for the fused data were 95.8% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes. The best overall tree species classification succeeded with 83.5% accuracy for the best tested fused data feature combination. The respective results for paired structural features derived from the laser point cloud were 90.5% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes and 65.4% for the species classification. Classification accuracies with paired hyperspectral reflectance value data were 90.5% for the separation of coniferous and deciduous classes and 62.4% for different species. The results are among the first of their kind and they show that mobile collected fused data outperformed single-sensor data in both classification tests and by a significant margin.

  14. Extracting Rail Track Geometry from Static Terrestrial Laser Scans for Monitoring Purposes

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    A. Soni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the capabilities of detecting relevant geometry of railway track for monitoring purposes from static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS systems at platform level. The quality of the scans from a phased based scanner (Scanner A and a hybrid timeof- flight scanner (Scanner B are compared by fitting different sections of the track profile to its matching standardised rail model. The various sections of track investigated are able to fit to the model with an RMS of less than 3 mm. Both scanners show that once obvious noise and artefacts have been removed from the data, the most confident fit of the point cloud to the model is the section closest to the scanner position. The results of the fit highlight the potential to use this method as a bespoke track monitoring tool during major redevelopment projects where traditional methods, such as robotic total stations, results in missed information, for example due to passing trains or knocked prisms and must account for offset target locations to compute track parameters.

  15. Photorealistic Building Reconstruction from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

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    Harri Kaartinen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, advanced real-time visualization for location-based applications, such as vehicle navigation or mobile phone navigation, requires large scale 3D reconstruction of street scenes. This paper presents methods for generating photorealistic 3D city models from raw mobile laser scanning data, which only contain georeferenced XYZ coordinates of points, to enable the use of photorealistic models in a mobile phone for personal navigation. The main focus is on the automated processing algorithms for noise point filtering, ground and building point classification, detection of planar surfaces, and on the key points (e.g., corners of building derivation. The test site is located in the Tapiola area, Espoo, Finland. It is an area of commercial buildings, including shopping centers, banks, government agencies, bookstores, and high-rise residential buildings, with the tallest building being 45 m in height. Buildings were extracted by comparing the overlaps of X and Y coordinates of the point clouds between the cutoff-boxes at different and transforming the top-view of the point clouds of each overlap into a binary image and applying standard image processing technology to remove the non-building points, and finally transforming this image back into point clouds. The purpose for using points from cutoff-boxes instead of all points for building detection is to reduce the influence of tree points close to the building facades on building extraction. This method can also be extended to transform point clouds in different views into binary images for various other object extractions. In order to ensure the building geometry completeness, manual check and correction are needed after the key points of building derivation by automated algorithms. As our goal is to obtain photorealistic 3D models for walk-through views, terrestrial images were captured and used for texturing building facades. Currently, fully automatic generation of high quality 3D models is

  16. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (marsh elevation response away from the measurement site. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) offers potential for high definition monitoring of marsh surface evolution. However, several challenges must be overcome in the application of the technology for geodetic imaging of marsh surfaces. These challenges include surface occlusion by dense vegetation, error propagation due to scan co-registration and referencing across time, impacts of scan angle, and filtering of non-ground points. Researchers at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi conducted a field-survey of a marsh within the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve using TLS and RTK GPS for comparison. Grand Bay in Mississippi USA is one of the most biologically productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to extract the bare-earth surface below the dense vegetation. This presentation will present results of the study including the developed

  17. Development of an Online Archive for Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Christopher; Lowry, Ben; McWhirter, Jeff; Phillips, David; Meertens, Chuck

    2013-04-01

    The UNAVCO Geodetic Imaging program provides terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) support to the Earth science research community through a TLS instrumentation pool of five scanners, field engineering, data processing, and technical training. As part of this community TLS support role, UNAVCO is responsible for generation of level one (L1) TLS data products and TLS data archive and access. A UNAVCO-organized and US National Science Foundation-funded TLS community workshop held October 2011 in Boulder, Colorado defined many of the challenges and requirements a TLS data archive and access system must address. TLS data acquisition presents unique challenges for metadata, provenance capture, and data archive. TLS datasets are often large and level zero (L0 - raw) data are stored in a variety of proprietary formats, requiring conversion and standardization for access and exchange. Due to the wide range of scientific and engineering objectives that motivate TLS data collection, field methods and collection techniques vary greatly and must be thoroughly documented in project metadata. These challenges make data and metadata capture, preservation, and provenance important objectives for an online TLS archive. To address these challenges, UNAVCO is developing a TLS archive based on the open source RAMADDA platform (http://ramadda.org). The UNAVCO TLS archive will provide online archive of L0 and L1 data products, capture field metadata and data processing workflows for provenance, and store original georeferencing information. In addition, the TLS repository provides on-demand services for simple point cloud visualization, data sub-setting and thinning, and file format (e.g., LAS, ASCII, proprietary) data conversion. The system also offers automation of RINEX processing of GPS data, OPUS and CSRS submission and solution ingestion, and generation of control point lists to streamline georeferencing of TLS point cloud data. Georeferencing metadata and GPS file provenance are

  18. Improved axial point spread function in a two-frequency laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jheng-Syong; Chung, Yung-Chin; Chien, Jun-Jei; Chou, Chien

    2018-01-01

    A two-frequency laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope (TF-LSCFM) based on intensity modulated fluorescence signal detection was proposed. The specimen-induced spherical aberration and scattering effect were suppressed intrinsically, and high image contrast was presented due to heterodyne interference. An improved axial point spread function in a TF-LSCFM compared with a conventional laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscope was demonstrated and discussed. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  19. Laser scanning microscopy of broad freezing interfaces with applications to biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neils, Christopher Martin

    2000-09-01

    A new, vertical cryostage was used for microscopic observation of broad-front freezing in aqueous solutions. This cryostage complements traditional studies of cell behavior and interface morphology in cryobiology. Traditional systems directionally solidify thin samples perpendicular to the optical axis. Thin samples confer thermal and optical advantages for video brightfield microscopy. However, sample thickness can affect the interface morphology. In the new cryostage, ice propagates parallel to the microscope optical axis. The sample cup is 1 cm tall and 1.5 cm in diameter, with insulated sides and a nitrogen-cooled base to freeze the solution upward. The top of the solution is warmed passively through a cover glass or immersion objective. The freezing solutions contain dilute fluorescein dye, which is visible where it is concentrated by exclusion from the ice. The stage is mounted on a confocal laser-scanning microscope, and thermal control and image capture routines are centralized in a LabView user interface. Filtered water, physiological saline, 9.5% glycerol, and 10% glycerol with PBS were frozen at rates between -2°C/min and -10°C/min and sequential images at one plane were captured. Images distinctly revealed a lamellar interface but could not resolve 3-D morphology. The average lamellar spacing was quantified using image analysis. Physiological saline was frozen in flat glass capillary tubes with 0.05 to 0.4 mm path length, mounted vertically to observe internal ice in cross-section. Lamellae were randomly oriented with respect to the glass, suggesting caution when measuring dendrite spacing in a horizontal cryostage. No correlation between capillary size and lamellar spacing was noted. Cell monolayers and synthetic membranes were mounted horizontally to let a well-developed ice front approach the layer broadly. In transparent membranes, ice-membrane interaction was visible until ice grew over and obscured the membrane. The vertical cryostage improved

  20. Development of a 3D modeling algorithm for tunnel deformation monitoring based on terrestrial laser scanning

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    Xiongyao Xie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Deformation monitoring is vital for tunnel engineering. Traditional monitoring techniques measure only a few data points, which is insufficient to understand the deformation of the entire tunnel. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS is a newly developed technique that can collect thousands of data points in a few minutes, with promising applications to tunnel deformation monitoring. The raw point cloud collected from TLS cannot display tunnel deformation; therefore, a new 3D modeling algorithm was developed for this purpose. The 3D modeling algorithm includes modules for preprocessing the point cloud, extracting the tunnel axis, performing coordinate transformations, performing noise reduction and generating the 3D model. Measurement results from TLS were compared to the results of total station and numerical simulation, confirming the reliability of TLS for tunnel deformation monitoring. Finally, a case study of the Shanghai West Changjiang Road tunnel is introduced, where TLS was applied to measure shield tunnel deformation over multiple sections. Settlement, segment dislocation and cross section convergence were measured and visualized using the proposed 3D modeling algorithm.

  1. Processing of airborne laser scanning data to generate accurate DTM for floodplain wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Mirosław-Świątek, Dorota; Grygoruk, Mateusz; Michałowski, Robert; Kardel, Ignacy

    2015-10-01

    Structure of the floodplain, especially its topography and vegetation, influences the overland flow and dynamics of floods which are key factors shaping ecosystems in surface water-fed wetlands. Therefore elaboration of the digital terrain model (DTM) of a high spatial accuracy is crucial in hydrodynamic flow modelling in river valleys. In this study the research was conducted in the unique Central European complex of fens and marshes - the Lower Biebrza river valley. The area is represented mainly by peat ecosystems which according to EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) are called "water-dependent ecosystems". Development of accurate DTM in these areas which are overgrown by dense wetland vegetation consisting of alder forest, willow shrubs, reed, sedges and grass is very difficult, therefore to represent terrain in high accuracy the airborne laser scanning data (ALS) with scanning density of 4 points/m2 was used and the correction of the "vegetation effect" on DTM was executed. This correction was performed utilizing remotely sensed images, topographical survey using the Real Time Kinematic positioning and vegetation height measurements. In order to classify different types of vegetation within research area the object based image analysis (OBIA) was used. OBIA allowed partitioning remotely sensed imagery into meaningful image-objects, and assessing their characteristics through spatial and spectral scale. The final maps of vegetation patches that include attributes of vegetation height and vegetation spectral properties, utilized both the laser scanning data and the vegetation indices developed on the basis of airborne and satellite imagery. This data was used in process of segmentation, attribution and classification. Several different vegetation indices were tested to distinguish different types of vegetation in wetland area. The OBIA classification allowed correction of the "vegetation effect" on DTM. The final digital terrain model was compared and examined

  2. The application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, W. Z.; Xu, A. E.; Xu, J.; Bi, Z. G.; Shang, Y. B.; Ren, Q. S.

    2010-08-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) allows noninvasive visualization of human skin in vivo, without needing to fix or section the tissue. Melanocytes and pigmented keratinocytes at the level of the basal layer form bright dermal papillary rings which are readily amenable to identify in confocal images. Our purpose was to explore the role of dermal papillary rings in assessment of lesion location, the diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. Seventy-one patients were imaged with the VivaScope 1500 reflectance confocal microscope provided by Lucid, Inc. The results indicate that dermal papillary rings can assess the location of lesion; the application of dermal papillary rings can provide diagnostic support and differential diagnosis for vitiligo, nevus depigmentosus, tinea versicolor, halo nevus, common nevi, and assess the therapeutic efficacy of NBUVB phototherapy plus topical 0.1 percent tacrolimus ointment for vitiligo. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the dermal papillary rings play an important role in the assessment the location of lesion, diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. CLSM may be a promising tool for noninvasive examination in dermatology. However, larger studies are needed to expand the application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology.

  3. Confocal laser scanning microscopic investigation of ultrasonic, sonic, and rotary sealer placement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Singh, Renuka

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sealers are used to attain an impervious seal between the core material and root canal walls. Aim: To compare the depth and percentage of sealer penetration with three different placement techniques using confocal laser scanning microscopy as the evaluative tool. Materials and Methods: Root canals of 30 single-rooted teeth were prepared to a size of F3 and AH plus sealer with Rhodamine B was applied with Ultlrasonic file (Gr-1), lentulospiral (Gr-2), and Endoactivator (Gr-3). Canals were obturated with gutta-percha. The roots were sectioned at the 3 and 6-mm levels from the apical foramen and were examined on a confocal microscope. Results: A statistical significant differences among Gr-1, Gr-2, and Gr-3 were found at the 3 and 6-mm level (P < 0.05; ANOVA-Tukey tests) for the depth and percentage of sealer penetration except for Gr-1 and Gr-2 at 3-mm level. Gr-1 showed maximum mean depth of penetration (810 μm) and maximum mean percentage of sealer penetration (64.5) while Gr-3 showed minimum mean depth of penetration (112.7 μm) and minimum mean percentage of sealer penetration (26.7). Conclusion: Depth and percentage of penetration of sealer is influenced by the type of placement technique and by the root canal level with penetration decreasing apically. PMID:23956528

  4. Axial Fan Blade Vibration Assessment under Inlet Cross-Flow Conditions Using Laser Scanning Vibrometry

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    Till Heinemann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In thermal power plants equipped with air-cooled condensers (ACCs, axial cooling fans operate under the influence of ambient flow fields. Under inlet cross-flow conditions, the resultant asymmetric flow field is known to introduce additional harmonic forces to the fan blades. This effect has previously only been studied numerically or by using blade-mounted strain gauges. For this study, laser scanning vibrometry (LSV was used to assess fan blade vibration under inlet cross-flow conditions in an adapted fan test rig inside a wind tunnel test section. Two co-rotating laser beams scanned a low-pressure axial fan, resulting in spectral, phase-resolved surface vibration patterns of the fan blades. Two distinct operating points with flow coefficients of 0.17 and 0.28 were examined, with and without inlet cross-flow influence. While almost identical fan vibration patterns were found for both reference operating points, the overall blade vibration increased by 100% at the low fan flow rate as a result of cross-flow, and by 20% at the high fan flow rate. While numerically predicted natural frequency modes could be confirmed from experimental data as minor peaks in the vibration amplitude spectrum, they were not excited significantly by cross-flow. Instead, primarily higher rotation-rate harmonics were amplified; that is, a synchronous blade-tip flapping was strongly excited at the blade-pass frequency.

  5. DETECTION OF WATER SURFACES IN FULL-WAVEFORM LASER SCANNING DATA

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    A. Schmidt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne laser scanning has become a standard method for recording topographic data. A new generation of laser scanners digitises the complete waveform of the backscattered signal and thus offers the possibility of analysing the signal shape. As a product of the laser scanning, a digital surface model (DSM or a digital terrain model (DTM can be derived. In water regions, data acquisition by laser scanning is limited to the water surface because the near-infrared laser pulses hardly penetrate water. Therefore, a height model generated from laser scanner point clouds over water regions does not represent the actual terrain. The generation of a DTM thus requires the detection of water surfaces. In this study, a method for the detection and classification of water surfaces in airborne laser scanning data is proposed. The method works with both geometrical features (e.g. height or height variation and characteristics of the pulses derived from the full waveform of the returned signal (e.g. intensity or pulse width. In our strategy, based on fuzzy logic, all classification parameters are derived automatically from training areas. According to their statistical distributions, the features are considered with individual weights. The aim of this paper is to analyse crucial features for classification and to investigate the potential of full waveform laser scanning data for this application. We present results from different areas with lakes and rivers, analysing the contribution of the individual groups of features for the detection of water surfaces.

  6. DEFORMATION MONITORING OF MOTORWAY UNDERPASSES USING LASER SCANNING DATA

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    I. Puente

    2012-07-01

    point of the voussoirs ranging between 1 mm and 5 mm. These deformations are under the tolerances predicted by the structure and confirm the success in the construction works developed. The laser scanning and the post-processing algorithms here developed appear as an easy methodology to make deformation monitoring of underpass structures and guarantee the load capacity of the structure.

  7. Enumeration of leukocyte infiltration in solid tumors by confocal laser scanning microscopy

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    Amirkhosravi A

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leukocytes commonly infiltrate solid tumors, and have been implicated in the mechanism of spontaneous regression in some cancers. Conventional techniques for the quantitative estimation of leukocyte infiltrates in tumors rely on light microscopy of immunostained thin tissue sections, in which an arbitrary assessment (based on low, medium or high levels of infiltration of antigen density is made by the pathologist. These estimates are relatively subjective and often require the opinion of a second pathologist. In addition, since thin tissue sections are cut, no data regarding the three-dimensional distribution of antigen can be obtained. Results To overcome these problems, we have designed a method to enumerate leukocyte infiltration into tumors, using confocal laser scanning microscopy of fluorescently immunostained leukocytes in thick tissue sections. Using image analysis software, a threshold was applied to eliminate unstained tissue and residual noise. The total antigen volume in the scanned tissue was calculated and divided by the mean cell volume (calculated by "seeding" ten individual cells to obtain the cell count. Using this method, we compared the calculated leukocyte counts with those obtained manually by ten laboratory personnel. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05 between the cell counts obtained by either method. We then compared leukocyte infiltration into seven tumors and matched non-malignant tissue obtained from the periphery of the resected tissue. There was a significant increase in the infiltration of all leukocyte subsets into the tumors compared to minimal numbers in the non-malignant tissue. Conclusion From these results we conclude that this method may be of considerable use for the enumeration of cells in tissues. Furthermore, since it can be performed by laboratory technical staff, less time input is required by the pathologist in assessing the degree of leukocyte infiltration into tumors.

  8. Rapid Prototyping — A Tool for Presenting 3-Dimensional Digital Models Produced by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

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    Juho-Pekka Virtanen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid prototyping has received considerable interest with the introduction of affordable rapid prototyping machines. These machines can be used to manufacture physical models from three-dimensional digital mesh models. In this paper, we compare the results obtained with a new, affordable, rapid prototyping machine, and a traditional professional machine. Two separate data sets are used for this, both of which were acquired using terrestrial laser scanning. Both of the machines were able to produce complex and highly detailed geometries in plastic material from models based on terrestrial laser scanning. The dimensional accuracies and detail levels of the machines were comparable, and the physical artifacts caused by the fused deposition modeling (FDM technique used in the rapid prototyping machines could be found in both models. The accuracy of terrestrial laser scanning exceeded the requirements for manufacturing physical models of large statues and building segments at a 1:40 scale.

  9. Plot-scale soil loss estimation with laser scanning and photogrammetry methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Boglárka; Szabó, Judit; Jakab, Gergely; Centeri, Csaba; Szalai, Zoltán; Somogyi, Árpád; Barsi, Árpád

    2017-04-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) is an automatic feature-matching algorithm, which nowadays is widely used tool in photogrammetry for geoscience applications. SfM method and parallel terrestrial laser scanning measurements are widespread and they can be well accomplished for quantitative soil erosion measurements as well. Therefore, our main scope was soil erosion characterization quantitatively and qualitatively, 3D visualization and morphological characterization of soil-erosion-dynamics. During the rainfall simulation, the surface had been measured and compared before and after the rainfall event by photogrammetry (SfM - Structure from Motion) and laser scanning (TLS - Terrestrial Laser Scanning) methods. The validation of the given results had been done by the caught runoff and the measured soil-loss value. During the laboratory experiment, the applied rainfall had 40 mm/h rainfall intensity. The size of the plot was 0.5 m2. The laser scanning had been implemented with Faro Focus 3D 120 S type equipment, while the SfM shooting had been carried out by 2 piece SJCAM SJ4000+ type, 12 MP resolution and 4K action cams. The photo-reconstruction had been made with Agisoft Photoscan software, while evaluation of the resulted point-cloud from laser scanning and photogrammetry had been implemented partly in CloudCompare and partly in ArcGIS. The resulted models and the calculated surface changes didn't prove to be suitable for estimating soil-loss, only for the detection of changes in the vertical surface. The laser scanning resulted a quite precise surface model, while the SfM method is affected by errors at the surface model due to other factors. The method needs more adequate technical laboratory preparation.

  10. Development of Smart Precision Forest in Conifer Plantation in Japan Using Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, M.; Deng, S.; Takenaka, Y.; Cheung, K.; Oono, K.; Horisawa, M.; Hyyppä, J.; Yu, X.; Liang, X.; Wang, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Currently, the authors are planning to launch a consortium effort toward Japan's first smart precision forestry project using laser data and to develop this technology throughout the country. Smart precision forestry information gathered using the Nagano model (laser scanning from aircraft, drone, and backpack) is being developed to improve the sophistication of forest information, reduce labor-intensive work, maintain sustainable timber productivity, and facilitate supply chain management by laser sensing information in collaboration with industry, academia, and government. In this paper, we outline the research project and the technical development situation of unmanned aerial vehicle laser scanning.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF SMART PRECISION FOREST IN CONIFER PLANTATION IN JAPAN USING LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Katoh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the authors are planning to launch a consortium effort toward Japan’s first smart precision forestry project using laser data and to develop this technology throughout the country. Smart precision forestry information gathered using the Nagano model (laser scanning from aircraft, drone, and backpack is being developed to improve the sophistication of forest information, reduce labor-intensive work, maintain sustainable timber productivity, and facilitate supply chain management by laser sensing information in collaboration with industry, academia, and government. In this paper, we outline the research project and the technical development situation of unmanned aerial vehicle laser scanning.

  12. DTAF: an efficient probe to study cyanobacterial-plant interaction using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of microscopic techniques have been utilized to study cyanobacterial associations with plant roots, but confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the least used due to the unavailability of a suitable fluorescent dye. Commonly used lectins have problems with their binding ability with

  13. DTAF: an efficient probe to study cyanobacterial-plant interaction using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of microscopic techniques have been utilized to study cyanobacterial associations with plant roots, but confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the least used due to the unavailability of a suitable fluorescent dye. Commonly used lectins have problems with their binding ability with

  14. RAYSAW: a log sawing simulator for 3D laser-scanned hardwood logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Laser scanning of hardwood logs provides detailed high-resolution imagery of log surfaces. Characteristics such as sweep, taper, and crook, as well as most surface defects, are visible to the eye in the scan data. In addition, models have been developed that predict interior knot size and position based on external defect information. Computerized processing of...

  15. Application of Mobile Laser Scanning for Lean and Rapid Highway Maintenance and Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning (MTLS) is an emerging technology that combines the use of a laser scanner(s), the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) on a vehicle to collect geo-spatial data. The overal...

  16. Imaging inclusion complex formation in starch granules using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria A.

    The tendency of amylose to form inclusion complexes with guest molecules has been an object of wide interest due to its fundamental role in food processing. Here we investigated the features of starch granules from several botanical sources using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and

  17. 3D Laser Scanning Assisted by Ordinary Plane Mirror for Non-direct Viewing Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Fan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial 3D laser scanning is one of principal methods to get the geometric information of object surface,and the integrity of the scanned object is a basic requirement in data acquisition. In order to solve the missing point cloud problem due to the scanning dead angle caused by confined working space,this paper proposes a method using ordinary plane mirror to obtain laser scanning data for non-direct viewing area according to the plane mirror reflection principle,analyzes the influence mechanism of the ordinary plane mirror on the propagation path and distance of laser beam,deduces the coordinate equation of the object point corresponding to the image point reflected by ordinary plane mirror in laser scanning. Given the laser scanning characteristic,this paper introduces a mirror reflection system included target balls and ordinary plane mirror,and expounds the system construction,system calibration and constructing method of system coordinate system. The feasibility and precision of the method are verified by experiments.

  18. Automatic Registration of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Point Clouds using Panoramic Reflectance Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, Z.; Li, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, Q.; Zlatanova, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds using panoramic reflectance images. The approach follows a two-step procedure that includes both pair-wise registration and global registration. The pair-wise registration consists of

  19. Measurement of longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient of thin films by a laser-scanning vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kui; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2003-02-01

    A laser scanning vibrometer (LSV) was used for the first time to measure the piezoelectric coefficient of ferroelectric thin films based on the converse piezoelectric effect. The significant advantages of the use of the LSV for this purpose were demonstrated. Several key points were discussed in order to achieve reliable and accurate results.

  20. Dynamic experimentation on the confocal laser scanning microscope : application to soft-solid, composite food materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Pomfret, S.J.; Normand, V.; Ferdinando, D.; Veerman, C.; Frith, W.J.; Norton, I.T.

    2001-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is used to follow the dynamic structural evolution of several phase-separated mixed biopolymer gel composites. Two protein/polysaccharide mixed gel systems were examined: gelatin/maltodextrin and gelatin/agarose. These materials exhibit 'emulsion-like'

  1. Application of 3D Laser Scanning Technology in Complex Rock Foundation Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junjie, Ma; Dan, Lu; Zhilong, Liu

    2017-12-01

    Taking the complex landform of Tanxi Mountain Landscape Bridge as an example, the application of 3D laser scanning technology in the mapping of complex rock foundations is studied in this paper. A set of 3D laser scanning technologies are formed and several key engineering problems are solved. The first is 3D laser scanning technology of complex landforms. 3D laser scanning technology is used to obtain a complete 3D point cloud data model of the complex landform. The detailed and accurate results of the surveying and mapping decrease the measuring time and supplementary measuring times. The second is 3D collaborative modeling of the complex landform. A 3D model of the complex landform is established based on the 3D point cloud data model. The super-structural foundation model is introduced for 3D collaborative design. The optimal design plan is selected and the construction progress is accelerated. And the last is finite-element analysis technology of the complex landform foundation. A 3D model of the complex landform is introduced into ANSYS for building a finite element model to calculate anti-slide stability of the rock, and provides a basis for the landform foundation design and construction.

  2. Computer-Controlled 3D Laser Scanning Microscope Based On Optical Disk Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, P.; Neveux, L.; Chiaramello, M.; Monteil, P.; Ostrowsky, D. B...

    1987-08-01

    We describe RASCALS* (RAster SCAn Laser System) a 2D and 3D scanning laser microscope and outline it's performance. This system, based on optical disk technology and a PC compatible computer offers an interesting cost/performance ratio compared to existing laser scanning microscopes.

  3. An attempt of the metadata standard creation for the technology of mobile laser scanning in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, P.; Parzyński, Z.; Uchański, J.; Uchański, Ł.

    2011-12-01

    Authors of the paper are presenting the attempt of the metadata standard creation for the technology of Mobile Laser Scanning. The research leading to the result presented in the publication was based on practical aspects of works realized within the usage of Mobile Laser Scanning measurements on the territory of Poland and theoretical issues concerned at Warsaw University of Technology in the area of metadata and standard creation. Usage of Mobile Laser Scanning gives the great advantage of acquisition impressive sets of data in short period of time finding their potential in the fields heritage preservation, architecture, deformation monitoring and industrial applications. In relation to the variety of applications and elements which needs to be concerned as the crucial parts of data sets like precise characteristic of the quality of acquired data authors attempt to create a metadata standard enabling potential prioritization and selection of data into normative which could in the future became a basis for regular normative creation considering this sort of measurements. Until now no sort of Laser Scanning tools has received its own standard despite the fact it is getting more and more necessary also by the fact of its growing popularization and variety of usage in different fields of life.

  4. INITIAL TESTS AND ACCURACY ASSESMENT OF A COMPACT MOBILE LASER SCANNING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Julge

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning (MLS is a faster and cost-effective alternative to static laser scanning, even though there is a slight trade-off in accuracy. This contribution describes a compact mobile laser scanning system mounted on a vehicle. The technical parameters of the used system components, i.e. a small LIDAR sensor Velodyne VLP-16 and a dual antenna GNSS/INS system Advanced Navigation Spatial Dual, are reviewed, along with the integration of these components for spatial data acquisition. Calculation principles of 3D coordinates from the real-time data of all the involved sensors are discussed. The field tests were carried out in a controlled environment of a parking lot and at different velocities. Experiments were carried out to test the ability of the GNSS/INS system to cope with difficult conditions, e.g. sudden movements due to cornering or swerving. The accuracy of the resulting MLS point cloud is evaluated with respect to high-accuracy static terrestrial laser scanning data. Problems regarding combining LIDAR, GNSS and INS sensors are outlined, as well as the initial accuracy assessments. Initial tests revealed errors related to insufficient quality of inertial data and a need for the trajectory post-processing calculations. Although this study was carried out while the system was mounted on a car, there is potential for operating the system on an unmanned aerial vehicle, all-terrain vehicle or in a backpack mode due to its relatively compact size.

  5. Nondestructive estimates of above-ground biomass using terrestrial laser scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calders, K.; Newnham, G.; Burt, A.; Murphy, S.; Raumonen, P.; Herold, M.; Culvenor, D.; Avitabile, V.; Disney, M.; Armston, J.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Allometric equations are currently used to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) based on the indirect relationship with tree parameters. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can measure the canopy structure in 3D with high detail. In this study, we develop an approach to estimate AGB from TLS data, which

  6. Boosting the predictive accuracy of urban hedonic house price models through airborne laser scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbich, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370530349; Jochem, A.; Mücke, W.; Höfle, B.

    This paper introduces an integrative approach to hedonic house price modeling which utilizes high density 3D airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. In general, it is shown that extracting exploratory variables using 3D analysis – thus explicitly considering high-rise buildings, shadowing effects, etc.

  7. 3-D Reconstruction of Neurons from Multichannel Confocal Laser Scanning Image Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterlood, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used

  8. Calibrated Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning for 3D Object Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanar M. Abed

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation of urban features is considered a major research challenge in the fields of photogrammetry and remote sensing. However, the dense datasets now readily available through airborne laser scanning (ALS offer increased potential for 3D object segmentation. Such potential is further augmented by the availability of full-waveform (FWF ALS data. FWF ALS has demonstrated enhanced performance in segmentation and classification through the additional physical observables which can be provided alongside standard geometric information. However, use of FWF information is not recommended without prior radiometric calibration, taking into account all parameters affecting the backscatter energy. This paper reports the implementation of a radiometric calibration workflow for FWF ALS data, and demonstrates how the resultant FWF information can be used to improve segmentation of an urban area. The developed segmentation algorithm presents a novel approach which uses the calibrated backscatter cross-section as a weighting function to estimate the segmentation similarity measure. The normal vector and the local Euclidian distance are used as criteria to segment the point clouds through a region growing approach. The paper demonstrates the potential to enhance 3D object segmentation in urban areas by integrating the FWF physical backscattered energy alongside geometric information. The method is demonstrated through application to an interest area sampled from a relatively dense FWF ALS dataset. The results are assessed through comparison to those delivered from utilising only geometric information. Validation against a manual segmentation demonstrates a successful automatic implementation, achieving a segmentation accuracy of 82%, and out-performs a purely geometric approach.

  9. Morphological confocal laser scanning microscope evaluation of four different "etch and rinse" adhesives in post endodontic restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigo, Luca; Lajolo, Carlo; Castagnola, Raffaella; Angerame, Daniele; Somma, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a morphometric evaluation of the resin-root canal dentine interface of four "etch and rinse" adhesive systems. Forty human teeth were restored through a fiber post insertion using: Group 1: XP Bond adhesive; Group 2: Prime & Bond NT; Group 3: Surgi Prime Bond adhesive; Group 4: Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus. Two cross-sections (apical and coronal) were obtained and analyzed in morphological confocal laser scanning microscope. The numbers of resin tags (RT) and the thickness of the hybrid layer (HL) were evaluated. Quantitative variables were tested by a Shapiro-Wilk test. Parametric variables by an Anova test. Group 4 produced the thickest HL and Group 1 showed the thinnest. Considering RT, Group 1 produced the highest density, while Group 3 the lowest density. All the adhesives produced good results in terms of HL thickness and RT density.

  10. Penetration of tamoxifen citrate loaded ethosomes and liposomes across human skin: a comparative study with confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwa, Khomendra K; Suresh, Preeti K; Rudrapal, Mithun; Verma, Vinod K

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, ethosomal and liposomal formulations containing tamoxifen citrate were prepared and evaluated for their penetration properties in human cadaver skin using Franz diffusion cell and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). The results clearly revealed that ethosomal vesicles showed a better drug permeation profile than that of liposomal vesicles. In addition, low fluorescence intensity in CLSM was recorded with liposomes as compared to ethosomes, indicating lower cumulative amount of drug permeation from liposomal vesicles. Furthermore, CLSM showed uniform fluorescence intensity across the entire depth of skin in ethosomal treatment, indicating high penetrability of ethosomal vesicles through human cadaver skin. In contrast, low penetrability of conventional liposomal vesicles was recorded as penetration was limited to the 7(th) section (i.e. upper epidermis layer) of skin as evident from visualization of intact liposomal vesicles in CLSM.

  11. Monitoring gully change: A comparison of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning using a case study from Aratula, Queensland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Nicholas R.; Armston, John D.; Muir, Jasmine; Stiller, Issac

    2017-04-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technologies capture spatially detailed estimates of surface topography and when collected multi-temporally can be used to assess geomorphic change. The sensitivity and repeatability of ALS measurements to characterise geomorphic change in topographically complex environments such as gullies; however, remains an area lacking quantitative research. In this study, we captured coincident ALS and TLS datasets to assess their ability and synergies to detect geomorphic change for a gully located in Aratula, southeast Queensland, Australia. We initially used the higher spatial density and ranging accuracy of TLS to provide an assessment of the Digital Elevation Models (DEM) derived from ALS within a gully environment. Results indicated mean residual errors of 0.13 and 0.09 m along with standard deviation (SD) of residual errors of 0.20 and 0.16 m using pixel sizes of 0.5 and 1.0 m, respectively. The positive mean residual errors confirm that TLS data consistently detected deeper sections of the gully than ALS. We also compared the repeatability of ALS and TLS for characterising gully morphology. This indicated that the sensitivity to detect change using ALS is substantially lower than TLS, as expected, and that the ALS survey characteristics influence the ability to detect change. Notably, we found that using one ALS transect (mean density of 5 points / m2) as opposed to three transects increased the SD of residual error by approximately 30%. The supplied classification of ALS ground points was also demonstrated to misclassify gully features as non-ground, with minimum elevation filtering found to provide a more accurate DEM of the gully. The number and placement of terrestrial laser scans were also found to influence the derived DEMs. Furthermore, we applied change detection using two ALS data captures over a four year period and four TLS field surveys over an eight month period. This demonstrated that

  12. Shining new light on braided rivers: capturing grain-to-reach scale morphodynamics with terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasington, J.; Williams, R. D.; Vericat, D.; Hicks, M.; Goodsell, B.

    2011-12-01

    The last decade has witnessed a technological revolution in the acquisition of geospatial data. These developments have profound implications for the practice of river science, creating a step-change in the dimensionality, resolution and precision of measurement of fluvial forms and processes. The pace of change has been remarkable; typical datasets of channel geometry have grown from cross-sections containing a few hundred survey observations, to airborne lidar surveys incorporating millions of points. With wide-area terrestrial laser scans comprising tens of billions observations now set to emerge, our data perspectives have been expanded by seven orders of magnitude. Such rapid modernization brings with it new challenges and necessitates the development of novel data management strategies, original algorithms to process dense 3d data, higher dimensional spatial metrics and innovative simulation methods to make optimal use of this rich vein of information. In this paper we describe a field-to-product methodology which aims to address these challenges and has been used to generate an unparalleled dataset capturing the morphological evolution of a labile gravel-bed braided river through a continuous sequence of floods between Oct 2009 and May 2010. These data were generated using a data-fusion approach that combines close-range terrestrial laser scanning with bathymetric data derived from non-metric aerial photography. Surveys were acquired over a 2.5 x 0.7 km reach of the Rees River; a piedmont braided system draining a highland catchment of Southern Alps of NZ. During a 10 month field campaign through the summer flood season, this study reach was resurveyed systematically after each competent flood event. Multi-scale DEMs were derived that capture the spatial distribution of facies and morphological changes at high precision. Results indicate that over 80% of the reach was subject to significant erosion or deposition, with a complex pattern of response to the

  13. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taekjun Oh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach.

  14. Automated inspection of gaps on the free-form shape parts by laser scanning technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sen; Xu, Jian; Tao, Lei; An, Lu; Yu, Yan

    2018-01-01

    In industrial manufacturing processes, the dimensional inspection of the gaps on the free-form shape parts is critical and challenging, and is directly associated with subsequent assembly and terminal product quality. In this paper, a fast measuring method for automated gap inspection based on laser scanning technologies is presented. The proposed measuring method consists of three steps: firstly, the relative position is determined according to the geometric feature of measuring gap, which considers constraints existing in a laser scanning operation. Secondly, in order to acquire a complete gap profile, a fast and effective scanning path is designed. Finally, the range dimension of the gaps on the free-form shape parts including width, depth and flush, correspondingly, is described in a virtual environment. In the future, an appliance machine based on the proposed method will be developed for the on-line dimensional inspection of gaps on the automobile or aerospace production line.

  15. Forest Resource Measurements by Combination of Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Drone Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, K.; Katoh, M.; Horisawa, M.

    2017-10-01

    Using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), forest attributes such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree location can be measured accurately. However, due to low penetration of laser pulses to tree tops, tree height measurements are typically underestimated. In this study, data acquired by TLS and drones were combined; DBH and tree locations were determined by TLS, and tree heights were measured by drone use. The average tree height error and root mean square error (RMSE) of tree height were 0.8 and 1.2 m, respectively, for the combined method, and -0.4 and 1.7 m using TLS alone. The tree height difference was compared using airborne laser scanning (ALS). Furthermore, a method to acquire 100 % tree detection rate based on TLS data is suggested in this study.

  16. A Case Study of UAS Borne Laser Scanning for Measurement of Tree Stem Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wieser

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diameter at breast height (DBH is one of the most important parameter in forestry. With increasing use of terrestrial and airborne laser scanning in forestry, new exceeding possibilities to directly derive DBH emerge. In particular, high resolution point clouds from laser scanners on board unmanned aerial systems (UAS are becoming available over forest areas. In this case study, DBH estimation from a UAS point cloud based on modeling the relevant part of the tree stem with a cylinder, is analyzed with respect to accuracy and completeness. As reference, manually measured DBHs and DBHs from terrestrial laser scanning point clouds are used for comparison. We demonstrate that accuracy and completeness of the cylinder fit are depending on the stem diameter. Stems with DBH > 20 cm feature almost 100% successful reconstruction with relative differences to the reference DBH of 9% (DBH 20–30 cm down to 1.8% for DBH > 40 cm.

  17. Research and Development of High-speed Laser Scanning Galvanometer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Ching Ho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study developed and controlled laser scanning mechanism and circuit design, in order to reduce the vibratory magnitude resulted from high-speed operation. The principle of mechanism design is that the output end mirror can swing within ± 3° when the laser scanning mechanism is in operation, the accuracy value is ± 0.2°. The static simulation and dynamic measurement were carried out for mutual validation. The vibration generated in the operation of machine causes dynamic unbalance, influencing the stability of machine. In order to overcome and improve the dynamic unbalance generated when the mechanism is in motion, different solutions were proposed, such as changing the output end mass, to add elastic material in or to change constant speed control of input end motor to variable speed control.

  18. Revisit laser scanning fluorescence microscopy performance under fluorescence-lifetime-limited regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Antony C.; Wong, Terence T. W.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-03-01

    Continuing desire for higher-speed laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and progressive advancement in ultrafast and sensitive photodetectors might imply that our conventional understanding of LSFM is not adequate when approaching to the intrinsic speed limit — fluorescence lifetime. In this regard, we here revisit the theoretical framework of LSFM and evaluate its general performance in lifetime-limited and noise-limited regimes. Our model suggests that there still exists an order-of-magnitude gap between the current LSFM speed and the intrinsic limit. An imaging frame rate of > 100 kHz could be viable with the emerging laser-scanning techniques using ultrafast wavelength-swept sources, or optical time-stretch.

  19. Automatic concrete cracks detection and mapping of terrestrial laser scan data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Rabah

    2013-12-01

    The current paper submits a method for automatic concrete cracks detection and mapping from the data that was obtained during laser scanning survey. The method of cracks detection and mapping is achieved by three steps, namely the step of shading correction in the original image, step of crack detection and finally step of crack mapping and processing steps. The detected crack is defined in a pixel coordinate system. To remap the crack into the referred coordinate system, a reverse engineering is used. This is achieved by a hybrid concept of terrestrial laser-scanner point clouds and the corresponding camera image, i.e. a conversion from the pixel coordinate system to the terrestrial laser-scanner or global coordinate system. The results of the experiment show that the mean differences between terrestrial laser scan and the total station are about 30.5, 16.4 and 14.3 mms in x, y and z direction, respectively.

  20. FOREST RESOURCE MEASUREMENTS BY COMBINATION OF TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING AND DRONE USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Cheung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, forest attributes such as diameter at breast height (DBH and tree location can be measured accurately. However, due to low penetration of laser pulses to tree tops, tree height measurements are typically underestimated. In this study, data acquired by TLS and drones were combined; DBH and tree locations were determined by TLS, and tree heights were measured by drone use. The average tree height error and root mean square error (RMSE of tree height were 0.8 and 1.2 m, respectively, for the combined method, and –0.4 and 1.7 m using TLS alone. The tree height difference was compared using airborne laser scanning (ALS. Furthermore, a method to acquire 100 % tree detection rate based on TLS data is suggested in this study.

  1. Standalone Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Efficiently Capturing Aec Buildings for As-Built Bim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassier, M.; Vergauwen, M.; Van Genechten, B.

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing popularity of as-built building models for the architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, the demand for highly accurate and dense point cloud data is rising. The current data acquisition methods are labour intensive and time consuming. In order to compete with indoor mobile mapping systems (IMMS), surveyors are now opting to use terrestrial laser scanning as a standalone solution. However, there is uncertainty about the accuracy of this approach. The emphasis of this paper is to determine the scope for which terrestrial laser scanners can be used without additional control. Multiple real life test cases are evaluated in order to identify the boundaries of this technique. Furthermore, this research presents a mathematical prediction model that provides an indication of the data accuracy given the project dimensions. This will enable surveyors to make informed discussions about the employability of terrestrial laser scanning without additional control in mid to large-scale projects.

  2. Fundus autofluorescence in patients with macular holes imaged with a laser scanning ophthalmoscope

    OpenAIRE

    von Ruckmann, A.; Fitzke, F.; Gregor, Z.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To demonstrate the usefulness of a recently developed technique of imaging fundus autofluorescence and to compare it with the results of fluorescein angiography in the diagnosis and staging of macular holes.
METHODS—The intensity and distribution of fundus autofluorescence was studied in 51 patients with idiopathic macular holes and pseudoholes using a confocal laser scanning ophthalmoscope (cLSO) and the images were compared with those obtained by fundus fluorescein angiography.
RESULTS—...

  3. Assessing Metrics for Estimating Fire Induced Change in the Forest Understorey Structure Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Vaibhav; Reinke, Karin; Jones, Simon; Wallace, Luke; Holden, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying post-fire effects in a forested landscape is important to ascertain burn severity, ecosystem recovery and post-fire hazard assessments and mitigation planning. Reporting of such post-fire effects assumes significance in fire-prone countries such as USA, Australia, Spain, Greece and Portugal where prescribed burns are routinely carried out. This paper describes the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to estimate and map change in the forest understorey following a prescribed bu...

  4. Automatic Construction of Hypotheses for Linear Objects in Digital and Laser Scanning Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintino Dalmolin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an automatic road hypotheses approach using digital image and laser scanning image combining various Digital Image Processing techniques. The semantic objects, in this work, are linear features, such as, roads and streets. The aim of this paper is extract automatically road hypotheses on image space and object space for use the information in automatic absolute orientation process. The results show that methodology is efficiency and the roads hypotheses are generate and validate.

  5. Analysis of Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Photogrammetry Data for Documentation of Historical Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuçak, R. A.; Kiliç, F.; Kisa, A.

    2016-10-01

    Historical artifacts living from the past until today exposed to many destructions non-naturally or naturally. For this reason, The protection and documentation studies of Cultural Heritage to inform the next generations are accelerating day by day in the whole world. The preservation of historical artifacts using advanced 3D measurement technologies becomes an efficient tool for mapping solutions. There are many methods for documentation and restoration of historic structures. In addition to traditional methods such as simple hand measurement and tachometry, terrestrial laser scanning is rapidly becoming one of the most commonly used techniques due to its completeness, accuracy and fastness characteristics. This study evaluates terrestrial laser scanning(TLS) technology and photogrammetry for documenting the historical artifacts facade data in 3D Environment. PhotoModeler software developed by Eos System was preferred for Photogrammetric method. Leica HDS 6000 laser scanner developed by Leica Geosystems and Cyclone software which is the laser data evaluation software belonging to the company is preferred for Terrestrial Laser Scanning method. Taking into account the results obtained with this software product is intended to provide a contribution to the studies for the documentation of cultural heritage.

  6. 3D laser scanning and modelling of the Dhow heritage for the Qatar National Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherelt, A.; Cooper, J. P.; Zazzaro, C.

    2014-08-01

    Curating boats can be difficult. They are complex structures, often demanding to conserve whether in or out of the water; they are usually large, difficult to move on land, and demanding of gallery space. Communicating life on board to a visiting public in the terra firma context of a museum can be difficult. Boats in their native environment are inherently dynamic artifacts. In a museum they can be static and divorced from the maritime context that might inspire engagement. New technologies offer new approaches to these problems. 3D laser scanning and digital modeling offers museums a multifaceted means of recording, monitoring, studying and communicating watercraft in their care. In this paper we describe the application of 3D laser scanning and subsequent digital modeling. Laser scans were further developed using computer-generated imagery (CGI) modeling techniques to produce photorealistic 3D digital models for development into interactive, media-based museum displays. The scans were also used to generate 2D naval lines and orthographic drawings as a lasting curatorial record of the dhows held by the National Museum of Qatar.

  7. Retrieval of Gap Fraction and Effective Plant Area Index from Phase-Shift Terrestrial Laser Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyare Pueschel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of canopy structure is crucial for modeling eco-physiological processes. Two commonly used metrics for characterizing canopy structure are the gap fraction and the effective Plant Area Index (PAIe. Both have been successfully retrieved with terrestrial laser scanning. However, a systematic assessment of the influence of the laser scan properties on the retrieval of these metrics is still lacking. This study investigated the effects of resolution, measurement speed, and noise compression on the retrieval of gap fraction and PAIe from phase-shift FARO Photon 120 laser scans. We demonstrate that FARO’s noise compression yields gap fractions and PAIe that deviate significantly from those based on scans without noise compression and strongly overestimate Leaf Area Index (LAI estimates based on litter trap measurements. Scan resolution and measurement speed were also shown to impact gap fraction and PAIe, but this depended on leaf development phase, stand structure, and LAI calculation method. Nevertheless, PAIe estimates based on various scan parameter combinations without noise compression proved to be quite stable.

  8. AUTOMATIC RECOGNITION OF PIPING SYSTEM FROM LARGE-SCALE TERRESTRIAL LASER SCAN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kawashima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, changes in plant equipment have been becoming more frequent because of the short lifetime of the products, and constructing 3D shape models of existing plants (as-built models from large-scale laser scanned data is expected to make their rebuilding processes more efficient. However, the laser scanned data of the existing plant has massive points, captures tangled objects and includes a large amount of noises, so that the manual reconstruction of a 3D model is very time-consuming and costs a lot. Piping systems especially, account for the greatest proportion of plant equipment. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to propose an algorithm which can automatically recognize a piping system from terrestrial laser scan data of the plant equipment. The straight portion of pipes, connecting parts and connection relationship of the piping system can be recognized in this algorithm. Eigenvalue analysis of the point clouds and of the normal vectors allows for the recognition. Using only point clouds, the recognition algorithm can be applied to registered point clouds and can be performed in a fully automatic way. The preliminary results of the recognition for large-scale scanned data from an oil rig plant have shown the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  9. Determination Of Optimal Stope Strike Length On Steep Orebodies Through Laser Scanning At Lubambe Copper Zambia

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    Kalume H

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lubambe Copper Mine is located in Chililabombwe Zambia and is a joint copper mining venture with three partners that include African Rainbow Minerals 40 Vale 40 and the Government of Zambia 20. The current mining method utilises Longitudinal Room and Pillar Mining LRP on 70m long panels strike length. However these long panels have resulted in unprecedented levels of dilution mainly from the collapse of hanging wall laminated ore shale OS2 leading to reduced recoveries. Observations made underground show high variability in geological and geotechnical conditions of the rock mass with factors such as weathering on joints lamina spaced joints and stress changes induced by mining all contributing to weakening and early collapse of the hanging wall. Therefore a study was undertaken to establish the optimal stope strike length of steep ore bodies at Lubambe. The exercise involved the use of Faro Laser Scanner every four stope rings blasted with time when the scan was performed noted. The spatial coherence of lasers makes them ideal measuring tools in situations where measurements need to be taken in inaccessible areas. Recent advances in laser scanning coupled with the exponential increase in processing power have greatly improved the methods used to estimate stope tonnages extracted from massive inaccessible stopes. The collected data was then used to construct digital three dimensional models of the stope contents. Sections were cut every metre with deformations taken and analysed with respect to time. Deformation rates from the hanging wall was reducing from 0.14thr to 0.07thr between rings 1 to 8. This reduction was as a result of slot blasting that involved drilling and blasting a number of holes at the same time. Between rings 8 to 25 deformation was constant averaging 0.28thr and between rings 26 and 28 a sharp increase in deformation rate was experienced from as low as 0.16thr to 6.33thr. This sharp increase defines the optimal stope length

  10. In situ microspatial imaging using two-photon and confocal laser scanning microscopy of bacteria and extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS) within marine stromatolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Decho, Alan W

    2002-03-01

    The combination of a hydrophilic embedding resin, Nanoplast, with fluorescent probes, and subsequent imaging using two-photon and confocal laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM and CLSM) has allowed in imaging of the in situ microspatial arrangements of microbial cells and their extracellular polymeric secretion (EPS) within marine stromatolites. Optical sectioning by 2P-LSM and CLSM allowed imaging of endolithic cyanobacteria cells, Solentia sp., seen within carbonate sand grains. 2P-LSM allowed very clear imaging with a high resolution of bacteria using DAPI, which normally require UV excitation and reduced photo-bleaching of fluorescent probes.

  11. Combining laser scan and photogrammetry for 3D object modeling using a single digital camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2009-07-01

    In the fields of industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation, physical objects are usually digitalized by reverse engineering through some 3D scanning methods. Laser scan and photogrammetry are two main methods to be used. For laser scan, a video camera and a laser source are necessary, and for photogrammetry, a digital still camera with high resolution pixels is indispensable. In some 3D modeling tasks, two methods are often integrated to get satisfactory results. Although many research works have been done on how to combine the results of the two methods, no work has been reported to design an integrated device at low cost. In this paper, a new 3D scan system combining laser scan and photogrammetry using a single consumer digital camera is proposed. Nowadays there are many consumer digital cameras, such as Canon EOS 5D Mark II, they usually have features of more than 10M pixels still photo recording and full 1080p HD movie recording, so a integrated scan system can be designed using such a camera. A square plate glued with coded marks is used to place the 3d objects, and two straight wood rulers also glued with coded marks can be laid on the plate freely. In the photogrammetry module, the coded marks on the plate make up a world coordinate and can be used as control network to calibrate the camera, and the planes of two rulers can also be determined. The feature points of the object and the rough volume representation from the silhouettes can be obtained in this module. In the laser scan module, a hand-held line laser is used to scan the object, and the two straight rulers are used as reference planes to determine the position of the laser. The laser scan results in dense points cloud which can be aligned together automatically through calibrated camera parameters. The final complete digital model is obtained through a new a patchwise energy functional method by fusion of the feature points, rough volume and the dense points cloud. The design

  12. Three-Dimensional Digital Documentation of Heritage Sites Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Y. H.; Kim, J. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Three-dimensional digital documentation is an important technique for the maintenance and monitoring of cultural heritage sites. This study focuses on the three-dimensional digital documentation of the Magoksa Temple, Republic of Korea, using a combination of terrestrial laser scanning and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry. Terrestrial laser scanning mostly acquired the vertical geometry of the buildings. In addition, the digital orthoimage produced by UAV photogrammetry had higher horizontal data acquisition rate than that produced by terrestrial laser scanning. Thus, the scanning and UAV photogrammetry were merged by matching 20 corresponding points and an absolute coordinate system was established using seven ground control points. The final, complete threedimensional shape had perfect horizontal and vertical geometries. This study demonstrates the potential of integrating terrestrial laser scanning and UAV photogrammetry for three-dimensional digital documentation. This new technique is expected to contribute to the three-dimensional digital documentation and spatial analysis of cultural heritage sites.

  13. Generating an optimal DTM from airborne laser scanning data for landslide mapping in a tropical forest environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Razak, K.A.; Santangelo, M.; Westen, C. J. van; Straatsma, M.W.; Jong, S.M. de

    2013-01-01

    Landslide inventory maps are fundamental for assessing landslide susceptibility, hazard, and risk. In tropical mountainous environments, mapping landslides is difficult as rapid and dense vegetation growth obscures landslides soon after their occurrence. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have

  14. Generating an optimal DTM from airborne laser scanning data for landslide mapping in a tropical forest environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Razak, K.A.; Santangelo, Michele; van Westen, C.J.; Straatsma, M.; de Jong, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Landslide inventory maps are fundamental for assessing landslide susceptibility, hazard, and risk. In tropical mountainous environments, mapping landslides is difficult as rapid and dense vegetation growth obscures landslides soon after their occurrence. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have been

  15. Remodelling of the palatal dome following rapid maxillary expansion (RME): laser scan-quantifications during a low growth period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchitsch, A P; Winsauer, H; Wendl, B; Pichelmayer, M; Kuljuh, E; Szalay, A; Muchitsch, M

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate changes in the palatal vault after rapid maxillary expansion (RME) with bonded splint appliances. The sample comprised 24 children (12 boys and 12 girls) with mixed dentition (mean age 8.3 years; range 6.4-10.4 years). Following expansion, the splint appliance was used as a retainer for 6 months and then removed. Study casts were taken before RME (T0) and when the appliance was removed (T1). Then, 3D laser scans were taken to build complete 3D jaw models. Frontal cross sections were constructed at 53-63, 55-65 and 16-26, exported as coordinates, and finite element calculated to quantify their area, width and height. Maxillary length was also determined. Paired t-tests indicated statistically significant increases in the average palatal width (T1-T0=6.53-6.79 mm) and cross-sectional area (T1-T0=20.39-21.39 mm2) after RME (p0.99 (pmaxillary expansion distinctly increased mean palatal widths and cross-sectional areas. However, palatal height (55-65) and maxillary length decreased to a small extent. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Laser-scanning velocimetry: A confocal microscopy method for quantitative measurement of cardiovascular performance in zebrafish embryos and larvae

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    Linney Elwood

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebrafish Danio rerio is an important model system for drug discovery and to study cardiovascular development. Using a laser-scanning confocal microscope, we have developed a non-invasive method of measuring cardiac performance in zebrafish embryos and larvae that obtains cardiovascular parameters similar to those obtained using Doppler echocardiography in mammals. A laser scan line placed parallel to the path of blood in the dorsal aorta measures blood cell velocity, from which cardiac output and indices of vascular resistance and contractility are calculated. Results This technique, called laser-scanning velocimetry, was used to quantify the effects of pharmacological, developmental, and genetic modifiers of cardiac function. Laser-scanning velocimetry was applied to analyze the cardiovascular effects of morpholino knockdown of osmosensing scaffold for MEKK3 (OSM, which when mutated causes the human vascular disease cerebral cavernous malformations. OSM-deficient embryos had a constricted aortic arch and markedly increased peak cell velocity, a characteristic indicator of aortic stenosis. Conclusion These data validate laser-scanning velocimetry as a quantitative tool to measure cardiovascular performance for pharmacological and genetic analysis in zebrafish, which requires no specialized equipment other than a laser-scanning confocal microscope.

  17. Semi-Automatic Registration of Airborne and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data Using Building Corner Matching with Boundaries as Reliability Check

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    Liang Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Data registration is a prerequisite for the integration of multi-platform laser scanning in various applications. A new approach is proposed for the semi-automatic registration of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data with buildings without eaves. Firstly, an automatic calculation procedure for thresholds in density of projected points (DoPP method is introduced to extract boundary segments from terrestrial laser scanning data. A new algorithm, using a self-extending procedure, is developed to recover the extracted boundary segments, which then intersect to form the corners of buildings. The building corners extracted from airborne and terrestrial laser scanning are reliably matched through an automatic iterative process in which boundaries from two datasets are compared for the reliability check. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed approach provides both high reliability and high geometric accuracy (average error of 0.44 m/0.15 m in horizontal/vertical direction for corresponding building corners for the final registration of airborne laser scanning (ALS and tripod mounted terrestrial laser scanning (TLS data.

  18. CdSe/CdS-quantum rods: fluorescent probes for in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Jelena; Krapf, Lisa; Wolter, Christopher; Schmidtke, Christian; Merkl, Jan-Philip; Jochum, Tobias; Kornowski, Andreas; Schüth, Anna; Gebert, Andreas; Hüttmann, Gereon; Vossmeyer, Tobias; Weller, Horst

    2014-08-01

    CdSe/CdS-Quantum-dots-quantum-rods (QDQRs) with an aspect ratio of ~6 are prepared via the seeded growth method, encapsulated within a shell of crosslinked poly(isoprene)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PI-b-PEG) diblock copolymer, and transferred from the organic phase into aqueous media. Their photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 78% is not compromised by the phase transfer. Within a period of two months the PLQY of QDQRs in aqueous solution at neutral pH decreases only slightly (to ~65%). The two-photon (TP) action cross sections of QDQRs (~105 GM) are two orders of magnitude higher than those of CdSe/CdS/ZnS-core/shell/shell quantum dots (QDs, ~103 GM) with comparable diameter (~5 nm). After applying PI-b-PEG encapsulated QDQRs onto the small intestinal mucosa of mice in vivo, their strong red fluorescence can easily be observed by two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) and clearly distinguished from autofluorescent background. Our results demonstrate that PI-b-PEG encapsulated CdSe/CdS-QDQRs are excellent probes for studying the uptake and fate of nanoparticles by two-photon imaging techniques in vivo.CdSe/CdS-Quantum-dots-quantum-rods (QDQRs) with an aspect ratio of ~6 are prepared via the seeded growth method, encapsulated within a shell of crosslinked poly(isoprene)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PI-b-PEG) diblock copolymer, and transferred from the organic phase into aqueous media. Their photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of 78% is not compromised by the phase transfer. Within a period of two months the PLQY of QDQRs in aqueous solution at neutral pH decreases only slightly (to ~65%). The two-photon (TP) action cross sections of QDQRs (~105 GM) are two orders of magnitude higher than those of CdSe/CdS/ZnS-core/shell/shell quantum dots (QDs, ~103 GM) with comparable diameter (~5 nm). After applying PI-b-PEG encapsulated QDQRs onto the small intestinal mucosa of mice in vivo, their strong red fluorescence can easily be observed by two-photon laser

  19. THE BENEFITS OF TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING AND HYPERSPECTRAL DATA FUSION PRODUCTS

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    S. J. Buckley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Close range hyperspectral imaging is a developing method for the analysis and identification of material composition in many applications, such as in within the earth sciences. Using compact imaging devices in the field allows near-vertical topography to be imaged, thus bypassing the key limitations of viewing angle and resolution that preclude the use of airborne and spaceborne platforms. Terrestrial laser scanning allows 3D topography to be captured with high precision and spatial resolution. The combination of 3D geometry from laser scanning, and material properties from hyperspectral imaging allows new fusion products to be created, adding new information for solving application problems. This paper highlights the advantages of terrestrial lidar and hyperspectral integration, focussing on the qualitative and quantitative aspects, with examples from a geological field application. Accurate co-registration of the two data types is required. This allows 2D pixels to be linked to the 3D lidar geometry, giving increased quantitative analysis as classified material vectors are projected to 3D space for calculation of areas and examination of spatial relationships. User interpretation of hyperspectral results in a spatially-meaningful manner is facilitated using visual methods that combine the geometric and mineralogical products in a 3D environment. Point cloud classification and the use of photorealistic modelling enhance qualitative validation and interpretation, and allow image registration accuracy to be checked. A method for texture mapping of lidar meshes with multiple image textures, both conventional digital photos and hyperspectral results, is described. The integration of terrestrial laser scanning and hyperspectral imaging is a valuable means of providing new analysis methods, suitable for many applications requiring linked geometric and chemical information.

  20. ANALYSIS OF MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA AND MULTI-VIEW IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION

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    C. Briese

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The combination of laser scanning (LS, active, direct 3D measurement of the object surface and photogrammetry (high geometric and radiometric resolution is widely applied for object reconstruction (e.g. architecture, topography, monitoring, archaeology. Usually the results are a coloured point cloud or a textured mesh. The geometry is typically generated from the laser scanning point cloud and the radiometric information is the result of image acquisition. In the last years, next to significant developments in static (terrestrial LS and kinematic LS (airborne and mobile LS hardware and software, research in computer vision and photogrammetry lead to advanced automated procedures in image orientation and image matching. These methods allow a highly automated generation of 3D geometry just based on image data. Founded on advanced feature detector techniques (like SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform very robust techniques for image orientation were established (cf. Bundler. In a subsequent step, dense multi-view stereo reconstruction algorithms allow the generation of very dense 3D point clouds that represent the scene geometry (cf. Patch-based Multi-View Stereo (PMVS2. Within this paper the usage of mobile laser scanning (MLS and simultaneously acquired image data for an advanced integrated scene reconstruction is studied. For the analysis the geometry of a scene is generated by both techniques independently. Then, the paper focuses on the quality assessment of both techniques. This includes a quality analysis of the individual surface models and a comparison of the direct georeferencing of the images using positional and orientation data of the on board GNSS-INS system and the indirect georeferencing of the imagery by automatic image orientation. For the practical evaluation a dataset from an archaeological monument is utilised. Based on the gained knowledge a discussion of the results is provided and a future strategy for the integration of

  1. Using terrestrial laser scanning data to drive decimetric resolution urban inundation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewtrell, Timothy; Duncan, Alastair; Horritt, Matthew; Bates, Paul

    2010-05-01

    The availability of LiDAR data has led to the proliferation a wide variety of research streams from DEM segmentation (Mason et al., 2007) to mapping the vertical profile of vegetation (Blair et al., 1999) and floodplain inundation modelling (Bates et al., 2003). As the specifications of LiDAR systems have improved, the vertical accuracy and spatial resolution of airborne systems have increased to ~5-10 cm and ~25 cm respectively (Baltsavias, 1999), giving highly resolved digital surface models (DSMs) of the urban environment (Mason et al., 2007). More recently, terrestrial laser scanners have started to be employed to capture even higher accuracy (i.e. ~1-3cm horizontal resolution) 3D point cloud data for applications in engineering, transportation, urban planning, among others (Lichti et al., 2008). Such very high resolution terrestrial laser scanning data have, however, yet to be used in urban hydraulic models, despite the fact that anecdotal and modelling evidence of the hydraulic process at work during urban floods suggests that features with very small horizontal and vertical length scales (i.e. walls, kerbs, steps, road cambers and storm drains) can have a significant impact on the flow development. In this paper we therefore investigate the potential utility of terrestrial laser scanning data for improving flood risk assessments in urban areas. To do this two key problems have to be dealt with. First, we require methods to process terrestrial laser scanning data in order to extract hydraulically relevant information. As such a number of processing steps are presented and a variety of resolution DEMs are derived. Second, we need to employ highly computationally efficient hydraulic algorithms in order to build models at the scale of the terrestrial laser scanner data and still simulate flows over spatial domains that are not trivially small. In this study, two state-of-the-art numerical models are used to demonstrate complex urban flood flows for pluvial and

  2. FROM THE CONTINUOS TO THE DISCRETE MODEL: A LASER SCANNING APPLICATION TO CONSERVATION PROJECTS

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    A. Cardaci

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to demonstrate the usage of laser scanning (in particular through a methodology based on the integrated use of the software "FARO© Scene" and "GEXCEL JRC-3D Reconstructor" as a valid alternative to traditional surveying techniques, especially when finalized to the restoration and conservation repair of historical buildings. The need to recreate the complex and often irregular shapes of the ancient architecture, by acting quickly and also being accurate, as well as the subsequent implementation of FEM (Finite Element Method for structural analysis, have made nowadays the laser scanning survey a very useful technique. The point cloud obtained by laser scanning can be a flexible tool for every need; not a finished product, but a huge database from which it is possible to extract different information at different times. The use of numerical methods in data processing allows wide opportunities of further investigations starting from the fitting equations. The numerical model lends by itself to the possibility of usage in many applications, such as modelization and structure analysis software. This paper presents the case study of the Church of the Assumption and Saint Michael the Archangel, located in Borgo di Terzo (Italy, a magnificent 18th century's building that presented several structural problems like as the overturning of the façade, the cracking of part of the vaulted ceiling. The survey, carried out by laser scanner (FARO© Photon 120 allowed the reconstruction of the exact geometry of the church, offering the basis for performing structural analysis supported by a realistic model (and not an idealized regular one, useful also in the design of repair interventions.

  3. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  4. Research on Mechanical Properties of Concrete Constructs Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Measurement

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    Hao Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS technology is broadly accepted as a structural health monitoring device for reinforced concrete (RC composite structures. Both experiments and numerical analysis are considered. In this submit, measurements were conducted for the composite concrete beams. The emphasis in numerical simulation is given on finite element methods (FEM which is corrected by the response surface methodology (RSM. Aspects considered are effects of material parameters and variation in geometry. This paper describes our recent progress on FEM modeling of damages in concrete composite structures based on the TLS measurement. We also focus on the research about mechanical properties of concrete constructs here.

  5. Documenting Bronze Age Akrotiri on Thera Using Laser Scanning, Image-Based Modelling and Geophysical Prospection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinks, I.; Wallner, M.; Kucera, M.; Verhoeven, G.; Torrejón Valdelomar, J.; Löcker, K.; Nau, E.; Sevara, C.; Aldrian, L.; Neubauer, E.; Klein, M.

    2017-02-01

    The excavated architecture of the exceptional prehistoric site of Akrotiri on the Greek island of Thera/Santorini is endangered by gradual decay, damage due to accidents, and seismic shocks, being located on an active volcano in an earthquake-prone area. Therefore, in 2013 and 2014 a digital documentation project has been conducted with support of the National Geographic Society in order to generate a detailed digital model of Akrotiri's architecture using terrestrial laser scanning and image-based modeling. Additionally, non-invasive geophysical prospection has been tested in order to investigate its potential to explore and map yet buried archaeological remains. This article describes the project and the generated results.

  6. USE OF A LASER SCANNING SYSTEM FOR PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION AND SCENE ASSESSMENT OF FIRE RESCUE UNITS

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    Zdeněk MAREK

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a study focused on usability of a 3D laser scanning system by fire rescue units during emergencies, respectively during preparations for inspection and tactical exercises. The first part of the study focuses on an applicability of a 3D scanner in relation to an accurate evaluation of a fire scene through digitization and creation of virtual walk-through of the fire scene. The second part deals with detailed documentation of access road to the place of intervention, including a simulation of the fire vehicle arrival.

  7. VOXEL-BASED APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING URBAN TREE VOLUME FROM TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING DATA

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    C. Vonderach

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of single trees and the determination of related parameters has been recognized in recent years, e.g. for forest inventories or management. For urban areas an increasing interest in the data acquisition of trees can be observed concerning aspects like urban climate, CO2 balance, and environmental protection. Urban trees differ significantly from natural systems with regard to the site conditions (e.g. technogenic soils, contaminants, lower groundwater level, regular disturbance, climate (increased temperature, reduced humidity and species composition and arrangement (habitus and health status and therefore allometric relations cannot be transferred from natural sites to urban areas. To overcome this problem an extended approach was developed for a fast and non-destructive extraction of branch volume, DBH (diameter at breast height and height of single trees from point clouds of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS. For data acquisition, the trees were scanned with highest scan resolution from several (up to five positions located around the tree. The resulting point clouds (20 to 60 million points are analysed with an algorithm based on voxel (volume elements structure, leading to an appropriate data reduction. In a first step, two kinds of noise reduction are carried out: the elimination of isolated voxels as well as voxels with marginal point density. To obtain correct volume estimates, the voxels inside the stem and branches (interior voxels where voxels contain no laser points must be regarded. For this filling process, an easy and robust approach was developed based on a layer-wise (horizontal layers of the voxel structure intersection of four orthogonal viewing directions. However, this procedure also generates several erroneous "phantom" voxels, which have to be eliminated. For this purpose the previous approach was extended by a special region growing algorithm. In a final step the volume is determined layer-wise based on the

  8. Feasibility of Machine Learning Methods for Separating Wood and Leaf Points from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Hollaus, M.; Pfeifer, N.

    2017-09-01

    Classification of wood and leaf components of trees is an essential prerequisite for deriving vital tree attributes, such as wood mass, leaf area index (LAI) and woody-to-total area. Laser scanning emerges to be a promising solution for such a request. Intensity based approaches are widely proposed, as different components of a tree can feature discriminatory optical properties at the operating wavelengths of a sensor system. For geometry based methods, machine learning algorithms are often used to separate wood and leaf points, by providing proper training samples. However, it remains unclear how the chosen machine learning classifier and features used would influence classification results. To this purpose, we compare four popular machine learning classifiers, namely Support Vector Machine (SVM), Na¨ıve Bayes (NB), Random Forest (RF), and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), for separating wood and leaf points from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data. Two trees, an Erytrophleum fordii and a Betula pendula (silver birch) are used to test the impacts from classifier, feature set, and training samples. Our results showed that RF is the best model in terms of accuracy, and local density related features are important. Experimental results confirmed the feasibility of machine learning algorithms for the reliable classification of wood and leaf points. It is also noted that our studies are based on isolated trees. Further tests should be performed on more tree species and data from more complex environments.

  9. FEASIBILITY OF MACHINE LEARNING METHODS FOR SEPARATING WOOD AND LEAF POINTS FROM TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING DATA

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    D. Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Classification of wood and leaf components of trees is an essential prerequisite for deriving vital tree attributes, such as wood mass, leaf area index (LAI and woody-to-total area. Laser scanning emerges to be a promising solution for such a request. Intensity based approaches are widely proposed, as different components of a tree can feature discriminatory optical properties at the operating wavelengths of a sensor system. For geometry based methods, machine learning algorithms are often used to separate wood and leaf points, by providing proper training samples. However, it remains unclear how the chosen machine learning classifier and features used would influence classification results. To this purpose, we compare four popular machine learning classifiers, namely Support Vector Machine (SVM, Na¨ıve Bayes (NB, Random Forest (RF, and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM, for separating wood and leaf points from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS data. Two trees, an Erytrophleum fordii and a Betula pendula (silver birch are used to test the impacts from classifier, feature set, and training samples. Our results showed that RF is the best model in terms of accuracy, and local density related features are important. Experimental results confirmed the feasibility of machine learning algorithms for the reliable classification of wood and leaf points. It is also noted that our studies are based on isolated trees. Further tests should be performed on more tree species and data from more complex environments.

  10. Rilievo laser scanning a lunga distanza su frana mediante ILRIS LR

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    Arianna Pesci

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available I sistemi laser a scansione terrestre caratterizzati da una lunga portata, cioè capaci di rilevare su  distanze  fino a 3 km, sono oggi sempre più utilizzati nel monitoraggio del territorio e nel controllo del dissesto o, in generale, delle variazioni morfologiche. Laser scanning survey of landslides by means of long distance ILRIS LRTerrestrial laser scanning (TLS is a remote sensing technique for high density acquisition of the physical surface of scanned, currently used in geologic surveys, engineering practice, cultural heritage, and mobile mapping. The very long range scanners, allow the acquisition from distances of the order of about 1  km  with  material  characterized  by  medium/high  reflecting properties.  At  present,  the  efforts  in  technological  advancements are highly aimed at the extension of maximum range, at the reduction of acquisition time, and so on. The ILRIS LR laser  scanner,  provided  by  Optech,  is  used  to  survey  a  very dense populated landslide area in the Tuscany Apennines, in the frame of a scientific experiment planned by INGV to test its performances.

  11. Rilievo laser scanning a lunga distanza su frana mediante ILRIS LR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Pesci

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available I sistemi laser a scansione terrestre caratterizzati da una lunga portata, cioè capaci di rilevare su  distanze  fino a 3 km, sono oggi sempre più utilizzati nel monitoraggio del territorio e nel controllo del dissesto o, in generale, delle variazioni morfologiche.   Laser scanning survey of landslides by means of long distance ILRIS LR Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS is a remote sensing technique for high density acquisition of the physical surface of scanned, currently used in geologic surveys, engineering practice, cultural heritage, and mobile mapping. The very long range scanners, allow the acquisition from distances of the order of about 1  km  with  material  characterized  by  medium/high  reflecting properties.  At  present,  the  efforts  in  technological  advancements are highly aimed at the extension of maximum range, at the reduction of acquisition time, and so on. The ILRIS LR laser  scanner,  provided  by  Optech,  is  used  to  survey  a  very dense populated landslide area in the Tuscany Apennines, in the frame of a scientific experiment planned by INGV to test its performances.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus 3-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Breast Volume Assessment After Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Benjamin H L; Watson, David I; Fosh, Beverley; Yip, Jia Miin; Kleinig, Pakan; Dean, Nicola Ruth

    2017-04-01

    There are several methods available for measuring breast volume in the clinical setting, but the comparability and accuracy of different methods is not well described. The ideal breast volume measurement technique should be low cost, comfortable for the patient, have no ionizing radiation and be non-invasive. Prospective cohort study comparing a 3-dimensional (3D) laser scanner versus noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for breast volume assessment. Subjects were women undergoing breast reconstruction with autologous fat graft. Both types of scan were performed the day before fat grafting and at 6 months postoperatively. Pearson correlations and Bland-Altman tests were performed to compare the assessment methods. Eighteen patients underwent preoperative breast MRI and 3D laser scanning. Eighteen patients also underwent assessment 6 months after surgery. The total number of breasts scanned for comparison was 36, with a total of 72 comparisons for analysis. There was a strong linear association between the 2 methods using a Pearson correlation (r = 0.79; P breast volume. Given the convenience of laser scanning and potential for lower cost compared with MRI, this technique should be considered for quantifying outcomes after complex breast reconstruction when the equipment is available.

  13. Entropy-Based Registration of Point Clouds Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Smartphone GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maolin Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning point clouds is a crucial but unresolved topic that is of great interest in many domains. This study combines terrestrial laser scanner with a smartphone for the coarse registration of leveled point clouds with small roll and pitch angles and height differences, which is a novel sensor combination mode for terrestrial laser scanning. The approximate distance between two neighboring scan positions is firstly calculated with smartphone GPS coordinates. Then, 2D distribution entropy is used to measure the distribution coherence between the two scans and search for the optimal initial transformation parameters. To this end, we propose a method called Iterative Minimum Entropy (IME to correct initial transformation parameters based on two criteria: the difference between the average and minimum entropy and the deviation from the minimum entropy to the expected entropy. Finally, the presented method is evaluated using two data sets that contain tens of millions of points from panoramic and non-panoramic, vegetation-dominated and building-dominated cases and can achieve high accuracy and efficiency.

  14. 3D modeling of close-range objects: photogrammetry or laser scanning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remondino, Fabio; Guarnieri, Alberto; Vettore, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Photogrammetry has dealt since many years with the 3D reconstruction of objects from images. It provides for accurate sensor calibration and object modeling using analog or digital imageries, it is very portable and many commercial software is available for image processing and 3D modeling. On the other hand, laser scanning technology and all the related reverse engineering software are becoming a very promising alternative for many kind of surveying and modeling applications. Laser scanners allow to acquire very quickly a huge amount of 3D data which can be often combined with color high-resolution digital images. Among the plenty of works so far presented, in particular on the use of laser scanning for cultural heritage survey, some modeling and accuracy related issues have been not yet solved and discussed in details. In this contribution we report about two case studies realized with photogrammetry and laser scanner and we provide some advices and suggestions about the more suitable 3D modeling method for a given object, taking into account its size and shape complexity, the required accuracy and the target application.

  15. 3D maxillofacial soft-tissue model in laser scanned head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Haidong; Hughes, Steven

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to incorporate thickness data into a soft tissue model in a laser scanned head data base, for use in FEA modeling of the behavior of the soft tissue layer under mechanical loads. Using a magnetic-based, spatial acquisition system (Polhemus) into which is incorporated an ultrasound sensor the position and orientation of tissue thickness vectors are obtained. By combining this with 3D high resolution head shape data from our laser scanner, a model of the head complete with soft tissue thickness is to be developed. We have implemented an initial version of software for the integration of laser scanning and facial soft tissue thickness measurement. The package displays facial images and performs basic imaging processing. The co-ordinate systems of the two methods are matched with the help of markers fixed on known head landmarks and a 3D digitiser (Polhemus). The computed source locations can be instantly superimposed on the facial images during the analysis.

  16. Assessment of Light Environment Variability in Broadleaved Forest Canopies Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry Van der Zande

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Light availability inside a forest canopy is of key importance to many ecosystem processes, such as photosynthesis and transpiration. Assessment of light availability and within-canopy light variability enables a more detailed understanding of these biophysical processes. The changing light-vegetation interaction in a homogeneous oak (Quercus robur L. stand was studied at different moments during the growth season using terrestrial laser scanning datasets and ray tracing technology. Three field campaigns were organized at regular time intervals (24 April 2008; 07 May 2008; 23 May 2008 to monitor the increase of foliage material. The laser scanning data was used to generate 3D representations of the forest stands, enabling structure feature extraction and light interception modeling, using the Voxel-Based Light Interception Model (VLIM. The VLIM is capable of estimating the relative light intensity or Percentage of Above Canopy Light (PACL at any arbitrary point in the modeled crown space. This resulted in a detailed description of the dynamic light environments inside the canopy. Mean vertical light extinction profiles were calculated for the three time frames, showing significant differences in light attenuation by the canopy between April 24 on the one hand, and May 7 and May 23 on the other hand. The proposed methodology created the opportunity to link these within-canopy light distributions to the increasing amount of photosynthetically active leaf material and its distribution in the considered 3D space.

  17. Effective Detection of Sub-Surface Archeological Features from Laser Scanning Point Clouds and Imagery Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryskowska, A.; Kedzierski, M.; Walczykowski, P.; Wierzbicki, D.; Delis, P.; Lada, A.

    2017-08-01

    The archaeological heritage is non-renewable, and any invasive research or other actions leading to the intervention of mechanical or chemical into the ground lead to the destruction of the archaeological site in whole or in part. For this reason, modern archeology is looking for alternative methods of non-destructive and non-invasive methods of new objects identification. The concept of aerial archeology is relation between the presence of the archaeological site in the particular localization, and the phenomena that in the same place can be observed on the terrain surface form airborne platform. One of the most appreciated, moreover, extremely precise, methods of such measurements is airborne laser scanning. In research airborne laser scanning point cloud with a density of 5 points/sq. m was used. Additionally unmanned aerial vehicle imagery data was acquired. Test area is located in central Europe. The preliminary verification of potentially microstructures localization was the creation of digital terrain and surface models. These models gave an information about the differences in elevation, as well as regular shapes and sizes that can be related to the former settlement/sub-surface feature. The paper presents the results of the detection of potentially sub-surface microstructure fields in the forestry area.

  18. Terrestrial Laser Scanning Intensity Correction by Piecewise Fitting and Overlap-Driven Adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Xu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning sensors deliver not only three-dimensional geometric information of the scanned objects but also the intensity data of returned laser pulse. Recent studies have demonstrated potential applications of intensity data from Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS. However, the distance and incident angle effects distort the TLS raw intensity data. To overcome the distortions, a new intensity correction method by combining the piecewise fitting and overlap-driven adjustment approaches was proposed in this study. The distance effect is eliminated by the piecewise fitting approach. The incident angle effect is eliminated by overlap-driven adjustment using the Oren–Nayar model that employs the surface roughness parameter of the scanned object. The surface roughness parameter at a certain point in an overlapped region of the multi-station scans is estimated by using the raw intensity data from two different stations at the point rather than estimated by averaging the surface roughness at other positions for each kind of object, which eliminates the estimation deviation. Experimental results obtained by using a TLS sensor (Riegl VZ-400i demonstrate that the proposed method is valid and the deviations of the retrieved reflectance values from those measured by a spectrometer are all less than 3%.

  19. QUANTIFICATION OF BIOFILMS IN MULTI-SPECTRAL DIGITAL1 VOLUMES FROM CONFOCAL LASER-SCANNING MICROSCOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Rodenacker

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Populations of bacteria in sludge flocs and biofilm marked by fluorescence marked with fluorescent probes are digitised with a confocal laser scanning microscope. These data are used to analyse the microbial community structure, to obtain information on the localisation of specific bacterial groups and to examine gene expression. This information is urgently required for an in-depth understanding of the function and, more generally, the microbial ecology of biofilms. Methods derived from quantitative image analysis are applied to digitised data from confocal laser scanning microscopes to obtain quantitative descriptions of volumetric, topological (and topographical properties of different compartments of the components under research. In addition to free-moving flocs, also biofilms attached to a substratum in an experimental environment are analysed. Growth form as well as interaction of components are quantitatively described. Classical measurements of volume and intensity (shape, distribution and distance dependent interaction measurements using methods from mathematical morphology are performed. Mainly image (volume processing methods are outlined. Segmented volumes are globally and individually (in terms of 3Dconnected components measured and used for distance mapping transform as well as for estimation of geodesic distances from the substrate. All transformations are applied on the 3D data set. Resulting distance distributions are quantified and related to information on the identity and activity of the probe-identified bacteria.

  20. Highly Accurate Tree Models Derived from Terrestrial Laser Scan Data: A Method Description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hackenberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for fitting cylinders into a point cloud, derived from a terrestrial laser-scanned tree. Utilizing high scan quality data as the input, the resulting models describe the branching structure of the tree, capable of detecting branches with a diameter smaller than a centimeter. The cylinders are stored as a hierarchical tree-like data structure encapsulating parent-child neighbor relations and incorporating the tree’s direction of growth. This structure enables the efficient extraction of tree components, such as the stem or a single branch. The method was validated both by applying a comparison of the resulting cylinder models with ground truth data and by an analysis between the input point clouds and the models. Tree models were accomplished representing more than 99% of the input point cloud, with an average distance from the cylinder model to the point cloud within sub-millimeter accuracy. After validation, the method was applied to build two allometric models based on 24 tree point clouds as an example of the application. Computation terminated successfully within less than 30 min. For the model predicting the total above ground volume, the coefficient of determination was 0.965, showing the high potential of terrestrial laser-scanning for forest inventories.

  1. Compact Multipurpose Mobile Laser Scanning System — Initial Tests and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Glennie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a prototype compact mobile laser scanning system that may be operated from a backpack or unmanned aerial vehicle. The system is small, self-contained, relatively inexpensive, and easy to deploy. A description of system components is presented, along with the initial calibration of the multi-sensor platform. The first field tests of the system, both in backpack mode and mounted on a helium balloon for real-world applications are presented. For both field tests, the acquired kinematic LiDAR data are compared with highly accurate static terrestrial laser scanning point clouds. These initial results show that the vertical accuracy of the point cloud for the prototype system is approximately 4 cm (1σ in balloon mode, and 3 cm (1σ in backpack mode while horizontal accuracy was approximately 17 cm (1σ for the balloon tests. Results from selected study areas on the Sacramento River Delta and San Andreas Fault in California demonstrate system performance, deployment agility and flexibility, and potential for operational production of high density and highly accurate point cloud data. Cost and production rate trade-offs place this system in the niche between existing airborne and tripod mounted LiDAR systems.

  2. EFFECTIVE DETECTION OF SUB-SURFACE ARCHEOLOGICAL FEATURES FROM LASER SCANNING POINT CLOUDS AND IMAGERY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fryskowska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The archaeological heritage is non-renewable, and any invasive research or other actions leading to the intervention of mechanical or chemical into the ground lead to the destruction of the archaeological site in whole or in part. For this reason, modern archeology is looking for alternative methods of non-destructive and non-invasive methods of new objects identification. The concept of aerial archeology is relation between the presence of the archaeological site in the particular localization, and the phenomena that in the same place can be observed on the terrain surface form airborne platform. One of the most appreciated, moreover, extremely precise, methods of such measurements is airborne laser scanning. In research airborne laser scanning point cloud with a density of 5 points/sq. m was used. Additionally unmanned aerial vehicle imagery data was acquired. Test area is located in central Europe. The preliminary verification of potentially microstructures localization was the creation of digital terrain and surface models. These models gave an information about the differences in elevation, as well as regular shapes and sizes that can be related to the former settlement/sub-surface feature. The paper presents the results of the detection of potentially sub-surface microstructure fields in the forestry area.

  3. In Vitro Assessment of Enamel Permeability in Primary Teeth with and without Early Childhood Caries Using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niviethitha, Sabarinathan; Muthu, Murugan Satta; Kavitha, Swaminathan

    To compare the permeability of the enamel of primary teeth from individuals free of Early Childhood Caries (ECC) with that from individuals affected with ECC by assessment of dye penetration using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope (LSCM). Experimental in vitro study. Exfoliated primary maxillary anterior teeth (n = 44) were collected and divided into two groups (n=22 per group): samples with ECC (Group 1) and without ECC (Group 2). The samples were immersed in Rhodamine B dye solution for 1 day, cut longitudinally into 3 sections, observed using LSCM. Dye penetration depths in the incisal, middle, cervical thirds and on labial, lingual surfaces were recorded. Data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney test (α = 5%, p < .005). The overall mean penetration depth for group 1 (100.6 μm ± 58.48 μm) was significantly higher than that of group 2 (31.55 μm ± 23.40 μm, p < .000). Mean penetration depth in the incisal, middle, and cervical thirds and on the labial and lingual surfaces of group 1 also presented significantly higher scores than in group 2 (p < .005). There was significantly more dye penetration in the ECC group than in the non-ECC group. This could be related to a higher level of enamel permeability in teeth affected with ECC.

  4. Evaluation of penetration depth of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate into root dentinal tubules using confocal laser scanning microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadhana, Sekar; Latha, Jothi; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the penetration depth of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) into root dentinal tubules and the influence of passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Twenty freshly extracted anterior teeth were decoronated and instrumented using Mtwo rotary files up to size 40, 4% taper. The samples were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10), that is, conventional syringe irrigation (CSI) and PUI. CHX was mixed with Rhodamine B dye and was used as the final irrigant. The teeth were sectioned at coronal, middle and apical levels and viewed under CLSM to record the penetration depth of CHX. The data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The mean penetration depths of 2% CHX in coronal, middle and apical thirds were 138 µm, 80 µm and 44 µm in CSI group, respectively, whereas the mean penetration depths were 209 µm, 138 µm and 72 µm respectively in PUI group. Statistically significant difference was present between CSI group and PUI group at all three levels (p Penetration depth of 2% CHX into root dentinal tubules is deeper in coronal third when compared to middle and apical third. PUI aided in deeper penetration of 2% CHX into dentinal tubules when compared to conventional syringe irrigation at all three levels.

  5. An Integrated Flexible Self-calibration Approach for 2D Laser Scanning Range Finders Applied to the Hokuyo UTM-30LX-EW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mader

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a flexible approach for the geometric calibration of a 2D infrared laser scanning range finder. It does not require spatial object data, thus avoiding the time-consuming determination of reference distances or coordinates with superior accuracy. The core contribution is the development of an integrated bundle adjustment, based on the flexible principle of a self-calibration. This method facilitates the precise definition of the geometry of the scanning device, including the estimation of range-measurement-specific correction parameters. The integrated calibration routine jointly adjusts distance and angular data from the laser scanning range finder as well as image data from a supporting DSLR camera, and automatically estimates optimum observation weights. The validation process carried out using a Hokuyo UTM-30LX-EW confirms the correctness of the proposed functional and stochastic contexts and allows detailed accuracy analyses. The level of accuracy of the observations is computed by variance component estimation. For the Hokuyo scanner, we obtained 0.2% of the measured distance in range measurement and 0.2 deg for the angle precision. The RMS error of a 3D coordinate after the calibration becomes 5 mm in lateral and 9 mm in depth direction. Particular challenges have arisen due to a very large elliptical laser beam cross-section of the scanning device used.

  6. Sealing ability of three root-end filling materials prepared using an erbium: Yttrium aluminium garnet laser and endosonic tip evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjappa, A Salin; Ponnappa, KC; Nanjamma, KK; Ponappa, MC; Girish, Sabari; Nitin, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Aims: (1) To compare the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine, and Chitra-calcium phosphate cement (CPC) when used as root-end filling, evaluated under confocal laser scanning microscope using Rhodamine B dye. (2) To evaluate effect of ultrasonic retroprep tip and an erbium:yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser on the integrity of three different root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: The root canals of 80 extracted teeth were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha. The apical 3 mm of each tooth was resected and 3 mm root-end preparation was made using ultrasonic tip (n = 30) and Er:YAG laser (n = 30). MTA, Biodentine, and Chitra-CPC were used to restore 10 teeth each. The samples were coated with varnish and after drying, they were immersed in Rhodamine B dye for 24 h. The teeth were then rinsed, sectioned longitudinally, and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a post-hoc Tukey's test at P ultrasonics, the difference was found to be statistically significant (P ultrasonics. PMID:26180420

  7. Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis of ectopic sublingual gland-like tissue inside the hamster submandibular gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Keiichi; Utsumi, Michiya; Ohno, Norikazu

    2013-12-01

    Based on its histochemical properties, the secretory portion of the hamster submandibular gland has been classified as seromucous cells. The presence of endogenous peroxidase (PO) reaction was shown in the nuclear envelope, cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. The 3,3'-diaminobenzidene, tetrahydrochloride (DAB) method revealed bipartite secretory granules containing a PO-positive dense core surrounded by a less dense halo in these cells. In the present investigation, serous and mucous-like cells were found in resin-embedded semi-thin sections of the DAB-reacted hamster submandibular gland. These sections were already on glass slides for routine light microscopic observations, therefore electron microscopic analysis could be unrealizable. We then used reflectance-mode confocal laser scanning microscopy to visualize additional sites of PO activity as detected in these sections. Using this approach, we found mucous cells with PO activity-negative secretory granules and seromucous cells with PO activity-positive spot-like secretory granules of the regular sublingual gland most frequently adjacent to the serous cells with typical electron-dense secretory granules. These cells clearly differ from the seromucous cells with bipartite secretory granules and the granular duct cells with typical electron-dense secretory granules of the hamster submandibular gland. Additionally, secretory endpieces of the ectopic sublingual gland-like tissue empty into the duct of the hamster submandibular gland lobule. Thus, our findings suggest that a mass of sublingual gland tissue extends into the hamster submandibular gland during its development, and PO may be synthesized and secreted into the same duct. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Use of the confocal laser scanning method for determining corneal topography and corneal tissue effects in refractive corneal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, N; Brinkmann, R; Schirner, G

    1996-06-01

    Refraction of the cornea head been generally measured with ophthalmometers or computer disk keratometers. We therefore used a confocal laser scanning system for measurement of the corneal topography. Enucleated tonicized pig eyes were measured before and after laser thermokeratoplasty (LTK). The topographical data were used to determine refraction and refractive change; the data were stored digitally. The single images and their differences were displayed on a PC. Unlike conventional ophthalmometry, confocal laser scanning can demonstrate the topographical shape, showing the overall topography of the cornea and local corneal effects, e.g., coagulation, mechanical lesions or high-energy laser effects. Topographical laser scanning has proven to be a generally useful method of determining refraction and surface alterations in corneal refractive surgery.

  9. An application of the ground laser scanning to recognise terrain surface deformation over a shallowly located underground excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilecka, Elżbieta; Szwarkowski, Dariusz

    2017-11-01

    In the Upper Silesian Coal Basin area, there are post-mining sites of shallow exploitation of metal ores and hard coal deposits that reveal discontinuous deformations. Most often, these areas are heavily urbanised and the appearing deformations may be dangerous to the existing building infrastructure. The work, described in this article, presents the results of the research, which aimed to rate the usefulness of laser scanning to recognize discontinuous deformations on surface areas located over shallow mining excavations. Two laser scanning measurements were taken over the course of a few months. The surface area images were compared to identify changes in its deformation, especially those areas located above mining excavations. The tests carried out by the laser scanning method showed that some of the identified discontinuous deformations could have been connected to the shallowly located mining excavations.

  10. The reality of virtual anthropology: Comparing digitizer and laser scan data collection methods for the quantitative assessment of the cranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algee-Hewitt, Bridget F B; Wheat, Amber D

    2016-05-01

    The use of geometric morphometry to study cranial variation has steadily grown in appeal over the past decade in biological anthropology. Publication trends suggest that the most popular methods for three-dimensional data acquisition involve landmark-based coordinate data collection using a digitizer. Newer laser scan approaches are seeing increasing use, owing to the benefits that densely sampled data offer. While both of these methods have their utility, research that investigates their compatibility is lacking. The purpose of this project is to compare, quantitatively, craniometrics collected with a digitizer against data extracted from laser scans using the same individuals and laboratory conditions. Three-dimensional (x,y,z) coordinates and traditional inter-landmark distances (ILDs) were obtained with a Microscribe digitizer and 360° color models produced from NextEngine laser scans for 38 adult crania representing five cemeteries from the ADBOU skeletal collection in Denmark. Variance-based tests were performed to evaluate the disagreement between data collected with a digitizer and from laser scan models. Consideration was given to differences among landmarks by type, between ILDs calculated from landmark coordinates, and in morphology for the cemetery populations. Further, the reliability of laser scan data collection was assessed by intra-observer error tests. Researchers should be aware of the potential error associated with the use of Types II and III landmarks and the limitations on reliability imposed by object-to-scanner placement. This project reveals how laser scans can provide a valuable digital archive of cranial material that can be reasonably exploited for the "virtual" collection of coordinates and the calculation of ILDs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 3D laser scanning in plant and pipeline engineering; 3D-Laserscanning im Anlagen- und Rohrleitungsbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, T. [Kaeser und Reiner, Ingenieurbuero fuer Vermessung und Geoinformation, Fellbach (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    3D laser scanning has been in use for a number of years now in the fields of surveying, building and factory planning. Laser scanning can, however, provide a highly supportive and helpful tool for the plant and piping designer, too. The benefits of this technology are relevant wherever the geometry of existing systems and subsystems needs to be registered and recorded. This may be the case in planning changes (basic and detail engineering), collision checks, documentation, plant relocations and visual?display projects. (orig.)

  12. Application of laser scanning technique in earthquake protection of Istanbul's historical heritage buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çaktı, Eser; Ercan, Tülay; Dar, Emrullah

    2017-04-01

    Istanbul's vast historical and cultural heritage is under constant threat of earthquakes. Historical records report repeated damages to the city's landmark buildings. Our efforts towards earthquake protection of several buildings in Istanbul involve earthquake monitoring via structural health monitoring systems, linear and non-linear structural modelling and analysis in search of past and future earthquake performance, shake-table testing of scaled models and non-destructive testing. More recently we have been using laser technology in monitoring structural deformations and damage in five monumental buildings which are Hagia Sophia Museum and Fatih, Sultanahmet, Süleymaniye and Mihrimah Sultan Mosques. This presentation is about these efforts with special emphasis on the use of laser scanning in monitoring of edifices.

  13. LASER SCANNING APPLICATION FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN POSTURE DISTORTION DURING MASS EXAMINATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Voinov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of human posture distortion in the early stages is an important task, which makes it possible to adjust the onset of the disease with just exercise and without the use of drugs. Existing methods for monitoring of human posture assessment do not meet modern requirements for speed of data acquisition and processing. Real time evaluation of human posture distortion in static and dynamic modes is possible by using a laser scanner. The paper deals with a three-dimensional laser scanning method for determining human posture. The device designed on the basis of its examination gives the possibility for real-time static and dynamic modes. Characteristic feature of the laser scanner is the presence of automated servo rotatable measuring head in two planes (vertical and horizontal with a density of up to tens of measurement points per square centimeter.

  14. Concrete Crack Measurement and Analysis Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has become one of the potential technologies for an object three-dimensional (3D information acquisition. The using vibration analysis for early detection of cracks has gained popularity over the years and in the last decade substantial progress has been made in that direction. However, the crack detection using TLS is also a good method. In the experimental part of this study, the effect of crack width and location on modal properties of the beam was investigated. The recent paper provides a method for automatic concrete cracks detection from the data that was obtained by TLS. The method of cracks detection is achieved by six steps. The objective of this study is to analyze the crack of concrete beams both experimentally and using MATLAB analysis. Besides this, information about the width, location and percentage of cracks in cracked concrete beams can be obtained using this technique.

  15. Recognition and Reconstruction of Zebra Crossings on Roads from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zebra crossings provide guidance and warning to pedestrians and drivers, thereby playing an important role in traffic safety management. Most previous studies have focused on detecting zebra stripes but have not provided full information about the areas, which is critical to both driver assistance systems and guide systems for blind individuals. This paper presents a stepwise procedure for recognizing and reconstructing zebra crossings using mobile laser scanning data. First, we propose adaptive thresholding based on road surface partitioning to reduce the impact of intensity unevenness and improve the accuracy of road marking extraction. Then, dispersion degree filtering is used to reduce the noise. Finally, zebra stripes are recognized according to the rectangular feature and fixed size, which is followed by area reconstruction according to arrangement patterns. We test our method on three datasets captured by an Optech Lynx mobile mapping system. The total recognition rate of 90.91% demonstrates the effectiveness of the method.

  16. Damage Detection on Thin-walled Structures Utilizing Laser Scanning and Standing Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Se Hyeok; Jeon, Jun Young; Kim, Du Hwan; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam Nat’l Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, To; Han, Soon Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This paper describes wavenumber filtering for damage detection using single-frequency standing wave excitation and laser scanning sensing. An embedded piezoelectric sensor generates ultrasonic standing waves, and the responses are measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer and mirror tilting device. After scanning, newly developed damage detection techniques based on wavenumber filtering are applied to the full standing wave field. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed techniques, several experiments were performed on composite plates with delamination and aluminum plates with corrosion damage. The results demonstrated that the developed techniques could be applied to various structures to localize the damage, with the potential to improve the damage detection capability at a high interrogation speed.

  17. Application of a self-compensation mechanism to a rotary-laser scanning measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Siyang; Lin, Jiarui; Ren, Yongjie; Shi, Shendong; Zhu, Jigui

    2017-11-01

    In harsh environmental conditions, the relative orientations of transmitters of rotary-laser scanning measuring systems are easily influenced by low-frequency vibrations or creep deformation of the support structure. A self-compensation method that counters this problem is presented. This method is based on an improved workshop Measurement Positioning System (wMPS) with inclinometer-combined transmitters. A calibration method for the spatial rotation between the transmitter and inclinometer with an auxiliary horizontal reference frame is presented. It is shown that the calibration accuracy can be improved by a mechanical adjustment using a special bubble level. The orientation-compensation algorithm of the transmitters is described in detail. The feasibility of this compensation mechanism is validated by Monte Carlo simulations and experiments. The mechanism mainly provides a two-degrees-of-freedom attitude compensation.

  18. SINGLE TREE DETECTION FROM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA USING A MARKED POINT PROCESS BASED METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tree detection and reconstruction is of great interest in large-scale city modelling. In this paper, we present a marked point process model to detect single trees from airborne laser scanning (ALS data. We consider single trees in ALS recovered canopy height model (CHM as a realization of point process of circles. Unlike traditional marked point process, we sample the model in a constraint configuration space by making use of image process techniques. A Gibbs energy is defined on the model, containing a data term which judge the fitness of the model with respect to the data, and prior term which incorporate the prior knowledge of object layouts. We search the optimal configuration through a steepest gradient descent algorithm. The presented hybrid framework was test on three forest plots and experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Mapping Snow Depth with Automated Terrestrial Laser Scanning - Investigating Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. S.; Gigele, T.; Fromm, R.

    2017-11-01

    This contribution presents an automated terrestrial laser scanning (ATLS) setup, which was used during the winter 2016/17 to monitor the snow depth distribution on a NW-facing slope at a high-alpine study site. We collected data at high temporal [(sub-)daily] and spatial resolution (decimetre-range) over 0.8 km² with a Riegl LPM-321, set in a weather-proof glass fibre enclosure. Two potential ATLS-applications are investigated here: monitoring medium-sized snow avalanche events, and tracking snow depth change caused by snow drift. The results show the ATLS data's high explanatory power and versatility for different snow research questions.

  20. MAPPING SNOW DEPTH WITH AUTOMATED TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING – INVESTIGATING POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Adams

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents an automated terrestrial laser scanning (ATLS setup, which was used during the winter 2016/17 to monitor the snow depth distribution on a NW-facing slope at a high-alpine study site. We collected data at high temporal [(sub-daily] and spatial resolution (decimetre-range over 0.8 km² with a Riegl LPM-321, set in a weather-proof glass fibre enclosure. Two potential ATLS-applications are investigated here: monitoring medium-sized snow avalanche events, and tracking snow depth change caused by snow drift. The results show the ATLS data’s high explanatory power and versatility for different snow research questions.

  1. Human hand-transmitted vibration measurements on pedestrian controlled tractor operators by a laser scanning vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboli, R; Miccoli, G; Rossi, G L

    1999-06-01

    A first application of a new measurement technique to detect vibration transmitted to the human body in working conditions is presented. The technique is based on the use of a laser scanning vibrometer. It was previously developed, analysed and tested using laboratory test benches with electrodynamical exciters, and comparisons with traditional measurement techniques based on accelerometers were made. First, results of tests performed using a real machine generating vibration are illustrated. The machine used is a pedestrian-controlled tractor working in a fixed position. Reference measurements by using the accelerometer have been simultaneously performed while scanning the hand surface by the laser-based measurement system. Results achieved by means of both measurement techniques have been processed, analysed, compared and used to calculate transmissibility maps of the hands of three subjects.

  2. As- built inventory of the office building with the use of terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyborski, Marek; Tysiąc, Paweł

    2018-01-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is an efficient tool for building inventories. Based on the red- laser beam technology it is possible to provide the high accuracy data with complete spatial information about a scanned object. In this article, authors present the solution of use a TLS in as-built inventory of the office building. Based on the provided data, it is possible to evaluate the correctness of built details of a building and provide information for further construction works, for example an area needed for Styrofoam installation. The biggest problem in this research is that an error which equals over 1cm could generate costs, which could be a problem to cover by a constructor. Based on a complicated place of the construction works (centre of a city) it was a challenge to maintain the accuracy.

  3. As- built inventory of the office building with the use of terrestrial laser scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przyborski Marek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS is an efficient tool for building inventories. Based on the red- laser beam technology it is possible to provide the high accuracy data with complete spatial information about a scanned object. In this article, authors present the solution of use a TLS in as-built inventory of the office building. Based on the provided data, it is possible to evaluate the correctness of built details of a building and provide information for further construction works, for example an area needed for Styrofoam installation. The biggest problem in this research is that an error which equals over 1cm could generate costs, which could be a problem to cover by a constructor. Based on a complicated place of the construction works (centre of a city it was a challenge to maintain the accuracy.

  4. GIS MODELING OF FOREST COVER ON THE BASIS OF AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Rizaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The canopy height models (CHM derived on the basis of laser scanning technology become popular due to the several important factors. On the one hand, it demonstrates an accuracy of discrete laser points, while on the other hand there is a wide range of image processing methods for their analysis and extraction forest parameters. The remarkable feature of the CHM is that it contains the artifacts representing the local minima (or pits within tree crowns. Currently there is no clear explanation for existence of these artifacts: they can appear from the data acquisition to the data processing. These artifacts are very unwanted, because they might badly influence the processing of the CHM, such as segmentation of crowns and calculation of forest parameters. In this paper, we propose an original approach to remove these artifacts during creating CHM in a GIS environment.

  5. Analysis of the melanin distribution in different ethnic groups by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, C.; Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Zastrow, L.; Sterry, W.; Koch, S.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSM) is able to visualize differences in melanin content and distribution in different Skin Phototypes. The investigations were carried out on six healthy volunteers with Skin Phototypes II, IV, and VI. Representative skin samples of Skin Phototypes II, V, and VI were obtained for histological analysis from remaining tissue of skin grafts and were used for LSM-pathologic correlation. LSM evaluation showed significant differences in melanin distribution in Skin Phototypes II, IV, and VI, respectively. Based on the differences in overall reflectivity and image brightness, a visual evaluation scheme showed increasing brightness of the basal and suprabasal layers with increasing Skin Phototypes. The findings correlated well with histological analysis. The results demonstrate that LSM may serve as a promising adjunctive tool for real time assessment of melanin content and distribution in human skin, with numerous clinical applications and therapeutic and preventive implications.

  6. Use of laser-scan technology to analyse topography and flow in a weir pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Dresel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of laser-scan techniques provides opportunity for detailed terrain analysis in hydrologic studies. Ground based scans were used to model the ground surface elevation in the area of a stream gauge weir over an area of 240 m2 at a resolution of 0.05 m. The terrain model was used to assess the possibility of flow bypassing the weir and to calculate stream flow during filling of the weir pool, prior to flow through the weir notch. The mapped surface shows a subtle low-lying area at the south end of the structure where flow could bypass the weir. The flow calculations quantify low-flows that do not reach the weir notch during small rain events and flow at the beginning of larger events in the ephemeral stream.

  7. Characterization of sastrugi fields with TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scan) and simple digital photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellot, Hervé; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Ito, Yoichi; Deschatres, Michael; Amory, Charles

    2014-05-01

    Wind driven snow continually alters the snow surface and determines the surface roughness through the formation of obstacles such as sastrugi, barcans, ripples... In turn, surface roughness is responsible for a decrease in the kinetic energy available for snow erosion. It is therefore important to know the relationship between the complex geometry of sastrugi-like roughness elements and the aerodynamic roughness. Some relationships, based for example on geometrical characteristics of sastrugi fields, are available in the literature. In the present paper, two different methods for exploring snow surface morphology on a limited area (around 10 m²) are introduced. These are the well-known high-accuracy TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scan) and a low-cost method consisting in 3D reconstruction software using simple digital photos of the scene. Preliminary results obtained at Lac Blanc Pass, in the French Alps, during winter 2013-2014 are introduced. Raw data and geometrical characteristics extracted from the DEM are compared.

  8. Building Facade Documentation Using Laser Scanning and Photogrammetry and Data Implementation Into Bim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltýnová, M.; Matoušková, E.; Šedina, J.; Pavelka, K.

    2016-06-01

    A project started last year called MORE-CONNECT, which focuses on the renovation of buildings (especially building facades) using prefabricated elements. The aim of this project is to create a competitive solution consisting of a technology and processes which enable fast, cost-effective renovation with minimal difficulties to inhabitants. Significant cost savings in renovation costs lies in the usage of prefabricated elements and the reduction of construction works on site. The precision of the prefabricated element depends on the precision of the construction, project and building documentation. This article offers an overview of the possible methods for building documentation and spatial data transfer into BIM (Building Information Modelling) software. The description of methods focuses on laser scanning and photogrammetry (including RPAS based), its advantages, disadvantages and limitations according to the documented building, level of renovation, situation on site etc. The next part involves spatial data transfer into BIM software. A proposed solution is tested in a case study.

  9. Fluorescence Readout of a Patch Clamped Membrane by Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Matthias; Walz, Michael; Beta, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe how to shield a patch of a cell membrane against extracellularly applied chemoattractant stimuli. Classical patch clamp methodology is applied to allow for controlled shielding of a membrane patch by measuring the seal resistivity. In Dictyostelium cells, a seal resistivity of 50 MΩ proved to be tight enough to exclude molecules from diffusing into the shielded membrane region. This allowed for separating a shielded and a non-shielded region of a cell membrane to study the spatiotemporal dynamics of intracellular chemotactic signaling events at the interface between shielded and non-shielded areas. The spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling events in the membrane was read out by means of appropriate fluorescent markers using laser scanning confocal microscopy.

  10. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy for in vivo imaging of epidermal reactions to two experimental irritants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suihko, C.; Serup, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Fibre-optic fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a novel non-invasive technique for in vivo imaging of skin. The cellular structure of the epidermis can be studied. A fluorophore, e.g. fluorescein sodium, is introduced by an intradermal injection or applied...... dermatitis reactions caused by established model irritants, e.g. sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and pelargonic acid (PA). Methods: Twelve healthy individuals volunteered. The flexor aspect of the right and the left forearm was exposed to SLS in water and PA in isopropanol and occluded under Finn Chambers...... for 24 h. The reactions were rated clinically and, following epicutaneous and intra-dermal application of fluorescein sodium, studied by fluorescence CLSM, magnification x 1000. Results: Both irritants disturbed the epidermal intercellular borders, which became blurred, thickened and variably altered...

  11. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Pinkard

    Full Text Available Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM, the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems.

  12. Trypan blue as a fluorochrome for confocal laser scanning microscopy of arbuscular mycorrhizae in three mangroves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, T; Majumdar, A; Das, P; Sarafis, V; Ghose, M

    2008-06-01

    Roots of three mangroves, Acanthus ilicifolius, Ceriops tagal and Excoecaria agallocha, collected from forests of the Sundarbans of India were stained with trypan blue to observe arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. Spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi isolated from rhizospheric soil, collected together with the root samples, also were stained for testing the suitability of the dye as a fluorochrome. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images were constructed. A. ilicifolius and E. agallocha exhibited "Arum" type colonization with highly branched arbuscules, whereas C. tagal showed "Paris" type association with clumped and collapsed arbuscules. We demonstrated that trypan blue is a suitable fluorochrome for staining arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal spores, fungal hyphae, arbuscules and vesicles, which presumably have a considerable amount of surface chitin. It appears that as the integration of chitin into the fungal cell wall changes, its accessibility to trypan blue dye also changes.

  13. REGISTRATION OF LASER SCANNING POINT CLOUDS AND AERIAL IMAGES USING EITHER ARTIFICIAL OR NATURAL TIE FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rönnholm

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Integration of laser scanning data and photographs is an excellent combination regarding both redundancy and complementary. Applications of integration vary from sensor and data calibration to advanced classification and scene understanding. In this research, only airborne laser scanning and aerial images are considered. Currently, the initial registration is solved using direct orientation sensors GPS and inertial measurements. However, the accuracy is not usually sufficient for reliable integration of data sets, and thus the initial registration needs to be improved. A registration of data from different sources requires searching and measuring of accurate tie features. Usually, points, lines or planes are preferred as tie features. Therefore, the majority of resent methods rely highly on artificial objects, such as buildings, targets or road paintings. However, in many areas no such objects are available. For example in forestry areas, it would be advantageous to be able to improve registration between laser data and images without making additional ground measurements. Therefore, there is a need to solve registration using only natural features, such as vegetation and ground surfaces. Using vegetation as tie features is challenging, because the shape and even location of vegetation can change because of wind, for example. The aim of this article was to compare registration accuracies derived by using either artificial or natural tie features. The test area included urban objects as well as trees and other vegetation. In this area, two registrations were performed, firstly, using mainly built objects and, secondly, using only vegetation and ground surface. The registrations were solved applying the interactive orientation method. As a result, using artificial tie features leaded to a successful registration in all directions of the coordinate system axes. In the case of using natural tie features, however, the detection of correct heights was

  14. Robust Locally Weighted Regression For Ground Surface Extraction In Mobile Laser Scanning 3D Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nurunnabi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A new robust way for ground surface extraction from mobile laser scanning 3D point cloud data is proposed in this paper. Fitting polynomials along 2D/3D points is one of the well-known methods for filtering ground points, but it is evident that unorganized point clouds consist of multiple complex structures by nature so it is not suitable for fitting a parametric global model. The aim of this research is to develop and implement an algorithm to classify ground and non-ground points based on statistically robust locally weighted regression which fits a regression surface (line in 2D by fitting without any predefined global functional relation among the variables of interest. Afterwards, the z (elevation-values are robustly down weighted based on the residuals for the fitted points. The new set of down weighted z-values along with x (or y values are used to get a new fit of the (lower surface (line. The process of fitting and down-weighting continues until the difference between two consecutive fits is insignificant. Then the final fit represents the ground level of the given point cloud and the ground surface points can be extracted. The performance of the new method has been demonstrated through vehicle based mobile laser scanning 3D point cloud data from urban areas which include different problematic objects such as short walls, large buildings, electric poles, sign posts and cars. The method has potential in areas like building/construction footprint determination, 3D city modelling, corridor mapping and asset management.

  15. Automated matching of multiple terrestrial laser scans for stem mapping without the use of artificial references

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbin; Liang, Xinlian; Hyyppä, Juha; Yu, Xiaowei; Lehtomäki, Matti; Pyörälä, Jiri; Zhu, Lingli; Wang, Yunsheng; Chen, Ruizhi

    2017-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning has been widely used to analyze the 3D structure of a forest in detail and to generate data at the level of a reference plot for forest inventories without destructive measurements. Multi-scan terrestrial laser scanning is more commonly applied to collect plot-level data so that all of the stems can be detected and analyzed. However, it is necessary to match the point clouds of multiple scans to yield a point cloud with automated processing. Mismatches between datasets will lead to errors during the processing of multi-scan data. Classic registration methods based on flat surfaces cannot be directly applied in forest environments; therefore, artificial reference objects have conventionally been used to assist with scan matching. The use of artificial references requires additional labor and expertise, as well as greatly increasing the cost. In this study, we present an automated processing method for plot-level stem mapping that matches multiple scans without artificial references. In contrast to previous studies, the registration method developed in this study exploits the natural geometric characteristics among a set of tree stems in a plot and combines the point clouds of multiple scans into a unified coordinate system. Integrating multiple scans improves the overall performance of stem mapping in terms of the correctness of tree detection, as well as the bias and the root-mean-square errors of forest attributes such as diameter at breast height and tree height. In addition, the automated processing method makes stem mapping more reliable and consistent among plots, reduces the costs associated with plot-based stem mapping, and enhances the efficiency.

  16. Estimating individual tree mid- and understory rank-size distributions from airborne laser scanning in semi-arid forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson L. Swetnam; Donald A. Falk; Ann M. Lynch; Stephen R. Yool

    2014-01-01

    Limitations inherent to airborne laser scanning (ALS) technology and the complex sorting and packing relationships of forests complicate accurate remote sensing of mid- and understory trees, especially in denser forest stands. Self-similarities in rank-sized individual tree distributions (ITD), e.g. bole diameter or height, are a well-understood property of natural,...

  17. Analysis of a marine phototrophic biofilm by confocal laser scanning microscopy using the new image quantification software PHLIP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, L.N.; de Brouwer, J.F.C.; Almeida, J.S.; Stal, L.J.; Xavier, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Background Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the method of choice to study interfacial biofilms and acquires time-resolved three-dimensional data of the biofilm structure. CLSM can be used in a multi-channel modus where the different channels map individual biofilm components. This

  18. Microradiography and confocal laser scanning microscopy applied to enamel lesions formed in vivo with and without fluoride varnish treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Duschner, H; Ruben, J; Arends, J

    The aim of the present investigation was to combine 2 techniques suitable for lesion characterization: quantitative microradiography (TMR) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) on in vivo induced lesions with and without a fluoride varnish (Duraphat(R)) treatment. Orthodontic bands were

  19. Three-Dimensional Mapping of AN Ancient Cave Paintings Using Close-Range Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Z.; Ariff, M. F. M.; Idris, K. M.; Yusoff, A. R.; Idris, K. M.; Aspuri, A.; Abbas, M. A.; Zainuddin, K.; Ghani, A. R. A.; Saeman, A. A. Bin

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the used of close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning technologies as an innovative technology for acquiring the three-dimensional data of an ancient cave paintings. The close-range photogrammetry technology used in the research was divided in two categories which are the UAV-based close-range photogrammetry and the terrestrialbased close-range photogrammetry. The UAV-based technology involved with the used of calibrated Phantom 4 System while the terrestrial-based technology involved with the calibrated Sony F828 digital camera and pPhotoModeler software. Both stereo and convergent image acquisition techniques were used to acquire the images of the paintings. The ancient cave paintings were also recorded using terrestrial laser scanning technology. In the research, the FARO Focus 3D terrestrial laser scanner was used to capture the three-dimensional point clouds and images of the paintings. The finding shows that both close-range photogrammetry and laser scanning technologies provide excellent solutions to map and to record the ancient paintings. As compared to the conventional method, both close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning technology provide a noncontact solution for data acquisition and the data was recorded in digital format for better protection and security.

  20. Measurement of shape property distributions of quartzite aggregate from different crushers using 3D laser scanning system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mgangira, MB

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available four crushers. In this paper, a description is provided on the quantification of particle shapes using data from a 3-D laser scanning device. The images from the laser were fully utilized in quantifying the shape descriptors in order to identify...

  1. Not all trees sleep the same - High temporal resolution terrestrial laser scanning shows differences in nocturnal plant movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlinszky, András; Barfod, Anders; Molnár, Bence

    2017-01-01

    Circadian leaf movements are widely known in plants, but nocturnal movement of tree branches were only recently discovered by using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), a high resolution three-dimensional surveying technique. TLS uses a pulsed laser emitted in a regular scan pattern for rapid measur...

  2. Penetrability of AH plus and MTA fillapex after endodontic treatment and retreatment: a confocal laser scanning microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Daniela; Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Busanello, Fernanda Hoffmann; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the penetrability of two endodontic sealers (AH Plus and MTA Fillapex) into dentinal tubules, submitted to endodontic treatment and subsequently to endodontic retreatment. Thirty ex vivo incisors were prepared using ProTaper rotary system up to F3 instrument and divided in three groups according to the endodontic sealer used for root canal filling: AH Plus (AHP), MTA Fillapex (MTAF), and control group (CG) without using EDTA previously to the root canal filling. Rhodamine B dye (red) was incorporated to the sealers in order to provide the fluorescence which will enable confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) assessment. All specimens were filled with gutta-percha cones using the lateral compaction technique. The specimens were submitted to endodontic retreatment using ProTaper Retreatment system, re-prepared up to F5 instruments and filled with gutta-percha cones and the same sealer used during endodontic retreatment. Fluorescein dye (green) was incorporated to the sealer in order to distinguish from the first filling. The roots were sectioned 2 mm from the apex and assessed by CLSM. No difference was found between the two experimental groups (P > 0.05). On the other hand, in the control group the sealers were not capable to penetrate into dentinal tubules after endodontic treatment (P > 0.05). In retreatment cases, none of the sealers were able to penetrate into dentin tubules. It can be concluded that sealer penetrability is high during endodontic treatment. However, MTA Fillapex and AH Plus do not penetrate into dentinal tubules after endodontic retreatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Augmenting comprehension of geological relationships by integrating 3D laser scanned hand samples within a GIS environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, A. S.; Fotopoulos, G.; Hall, B.; Amolins, K.

    2017-06-01

    Geological observations can be made on multiple scales, including micro- (e.g. thin section), meso- (e.g. hand-sized to outcrop) and macro- (e.g. outcrop and larger) scales. Types of meso-scale samples include, but are not limited to, rocks (including drill cores), minerals, and fossils. The spatial relationship among samples paired with physical (e.g. granulometric composition, density, roughness) and chemical (e.g. mineralogical and isotopic composition) properties can aid in interpreting geological settings, such as paleo-environmental and formational conditions as well as geomorphological history. Field samples are collected along traverses in the area of interest based on characteristic representativeness of a region, predetermined rate of sampling, and/or uniqueness. The location of a sample can provide relative context in seeking out additional key samples. Beyond labelling and recording of geospatial coordinates for samples, further analysis of physical and chemical properties may be conducted in the field and laboratory. The main motivation for this paper is to present a workflow for the digital preservation of samples (via 3D laser scanning) paired with the development of cyber infrastructure, which offers geoscientists and engineers the opportunity to access an increasingly diverse worldwide collection of digital Earth materials. This paper describes a Web-based graphical user interface developed using Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS for digitized meso-scale 3D scans of geological samples to be viewed alongside the macro-scale environment. Over 100 samples of virtual rocks, minerals and fossils populate the developed geological database and are linked explicitly with their associated attributes, characteristic properties, and location. Applications of this new Web-based geological visualization paradigm in the geosciences demonstrate the utility of such a tool in an age of increasing global data sharing.

  4. Application of a plasma-jet for skin antisepsis: analysis of the thermal action of the plasma by laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, O.; Richter, H.; Patzelt, A.; Alborova, A.; Humme, D.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Hartmann, B.; Hinz, P.; Kramer, A.; Koch, S.

    2010-06-01

    Recently, it was reported that a plasma-jet could be efficiently applied for the antisepsis of wounds. In this case, the discharge in an argon gas stream was used to produce a so-called ``cold plasma'' on the skin surface. The thermal action of the plasma on the skin was investigated in the present study by means of laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and by histological analysis. Consequently, the plasma beam was moved with a definite velocity at an optimal distance over the skin surface. The structural changes of the tissue were analyzed. It was found by LSM that a thermal damage could be detected only in the upper cell layers of the stratum corneum (SC) at moving velocities of the plasma beam, usually applied in clinical practice. Deeper parts of the SC were not damaged. The structural changes were so superficial that they could be detected only by LSM but not by analysis of the histological sections.

  5. Image processing for precise three-dimensional registration and stitching of thick high-resolution laser-scanning microscopy image stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtin, Chloé; Frindel, Carole; Rousseau, David; Ito, Kei

    2017-11-08

    The possible depth of imaging of laser-scanning microscopy is limited not only by the working distances of objective lenses but also by image degradation caused by attenuation and diffraction of light passing through the specimen. To tackle this problem, one can either flip the sample to record images from both sides of the specimen or consecutively cut off shallow parts of the sample after taking serial images of certain thickness. Multiple image substacks acquired in these ways should be combined afterwards to generate a single stack. However, subtle movements of samples during image acquisition cause mismatch not only in the translation along x-, y-, and z-axes and rotation around z-axis but also tilting around x- and y-axes, making it difficult to register the substacks precisely. In this work, we developed a novel approach called 2D-SIFT-in-3D-Space using Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) to achieve robust three-dimensional matching of image substacks. Our method registers the substacks by separately fixing translation and rotation along x-, y-, and z-axes, through extraction and matching of stable features across two-dimensional sections of the 3D stacks. To validate the quality of registration, we developed a simulator of laser-scanning microscopy images to generate a virtual stack in which noise levels and rotation angles are controlled with known parameters. We illustrate quantitatively the performance of our approach by registering an entire brain of Drosophila melanogaster consisting of 800 sections. Our approach is also demonstrated to be extendable to other types of data that share large dimensions and need of fine registration of multiple image substacks. This method is implemented in Java and distributed as ImageJ/Fiji plugin. The source code is available via Github (http://www.creatis.insa-lyon.fr/site7/fr/MicroTools). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELS FROM MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA IN MORAVIAN KARST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tyagur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last ten years, mobile laser scanning (MLS systems have become a very popular and efficient technology for capturing reality in 3D. A 3D laser scanner mounted on the top of a moving vehicle (e.g. car allows the high precision capturing of the environment in a fast way. Mostly this technology is used in cities for capturing roads and buildings facades to create 3D city models. In our work, we used an MLS system in Moravian Karst, which is a protected nature reserve in the Eastern Part of the Czech Republic, with a steep rocky terrain covered by forests. For the 3D data collection, the Riegl VMX 450, mounted on a car, was used with integrated IMU/GNSS equipment, which provides low noise, rich and very dense 3D point clouds. The aim of this work is to create a digital terrain model (DTM from several MLS data sets acquired in the neighbourhood of a road. The total length of two covered areas is 3.9 and 6.1 km respectively, with an average width of 100 m. For the DTM generation, a fully automatic, robust, hierarchic approach was applied. The derivation of the DTM is based on combinations of hierarchical interpolation and robust filtering for different resolution levels. For the generation of the final DTMs, different interpolation algorithms are applied to the classified terrain points. The used parameters were determined by explorative analysis. All MLS data sets were processed with one parameter set. As a result, a high precise DTM was derived with high spatial resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 m. The quality of the DTMs was checked by geodetic measurements and visual comparison with raw point clouds. The high quality of the derived DTM can be used for analysing terrain changes and morphological structures. Finally, the derived DTM was compared with the DTM of the Czech Republic (DMR 4G with a resolution of 5 x 5 m, which was created from airborne laser scanning data. The vertical accuracy of the derived DTMs is around 0.10 m.

  7. Long-range laser scanning and 3D imaging for the Gneiss quarries survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Filippo Luca; Spataro, Alessio; Pozzoni, Maurizio; Ambrosi, Christian; Cannata, Massimiliano; Günther, Felix; Corboud, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In Canton Ticino (Southern Switzerland), the exploitation of natural stone, mostly gneisses, is an important activity of valley's economies. Nowadays, these economic activities are menaced by (i) the exploitation costs related to geological phenomena such as fractures, faults and heterogeneous rocks that hinder the processing of the stone product, (ii) continuously changing demand because of the evolving natural stone fashion and (iii) increasing administrative limits and rules acting to protect the environment. Therefore, the sustainable development of the sector for the next decades needs new and effective strategies to regulate and plan the quarries. A fundamental step in this process is the building of a 3D geological model of the quarries to constrain the volume of commercial natural stone and the volume of waste. In this context, we conducted Terrestrial Laser Scanning surveys of the quarries in the Maggia Valley to obtain a detailed 3D topography onto which the geological units were mapped. The topographic 3D model was obtained with a long-range laser scanning Riegl VZ4000 that can measure from up to 4 km of distance with a speed of 147,000 points per second. It operates with the new V-line technology, which defines the surface relief by sensing differentiated signals (echoes), even in the presence of obstacles such as vegetation. Depending on the esthetics of the gneisses, we defined seven types of natural stones that, together with faults and joints, were mapped onto the 3D models of the exploitation sites. According to the orientation of the geological limits and structures, we projected the different rock units and fractures into the excavation front. This way, we obtained a 3D geological model from which we can quantitatively estimate the volume of the seven different natural stones (with different commercial value) and waste (with low commercial value). To verify the 3D geological models and to quantify exploited rock and waste volumes the same

  8. Long term monitoring of geomorphological changes caused by torrent activity using terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, A.; Chiari, M.

    2012-04-01

    Torrential processes present a serious hazard in alpine regions. Especially sediment transport is responsible for most torrent related damages. The material incorporated in torrents is inherently complex, varying from clay sized solids to boulders of several meters of diameter. For geoscientists it is important to predict possible triggering zones and deposition areas or run out lengths. Run out analysis is an especially important component for hazard assessment in alpine watersheds, which includes prediction of potential hazard areas and mapping the distribution of hazard intensity parameters such as the thickness of the deposit. In this study terrestrial laser scanning has been applied to investigate the spatial distribution of erosion and deposition of bed load material over a 4000 m long reach of a torrent. Within the monitoring period a new open check dam was built at the study site after removing the old one. Due to the open construction it was expected, that during flood events sediment is stored behind the check dam, but during smaller flood events the deposition area should be self-emptied again. The measurements were carried out to investigate if the new check dam functioned as expected. Therefore the reach has been scanned 6 times during the last 3 years. Several monitoring activities before and after torrent events required global data registration using differential GPS. Tachymetry connected areas with missing GPS reception to GPS measured ones. Terrestrial laser scanning provided dense 3d-data. The RIEGL LMS-Z420i was chosen due to its long range, high accuracy and high scanning speed of the measurements. The accuracy of the measurement was in a range of 8 cm. The objectives of the TLS survey of the torrent deposit were to determine the volume of the deposited mass as well as to detect zones of erosion and deposition of material by the creation of high resolution DEM's. The results of the measurements taken at the test site in Carinthia, Austria are

  9. Parameterized approximation of lacunarity functions derived from airborne laser scanning point clouds of forested areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Balázs; Kania, Adam; Varga, Katalin; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2017-04-01

    Lacunarity, a measure of the spatial distribution of the empty space is found to be a useful descriptive quantity of the forest structure. Its calculation, based on laser-scanned point clouds, results in a four-dimensional data set. The evaluation of results needs sophisticated tools and visualization techniques. To simplify the evaluation, it is straightforward to use approximation functions fitted to the results. The lacunarity function L(r), being a measure of scale-independent structural properties, has a power-law character. Previous studies showed that log(log(L(r))) transformation is suitable for analysis of spatial patterns. Accordingly, transformed lacunarity functions can be approximated by appropriate functions either in the original or in the transformed domain. As input data we have used a number of laser-scanned point clouds of various forests. The lacunarity distribution has been calculated along a regular horizontal grid at various (relative) elevations. The lacunarity data cube then has been logarithm-transformed and the resulting values became the input of parameter estimation at each point (point of interest, POI). This way at each POI a parameter set is generated that is suitable for spatial analysis. The expectation is that the horizontal variation and vertical layering of the vegetation can be characterized by this procedure. The results show that the transformed L(r) functions can be typically approximated by exponentials individually, and the residual values remain low in most cases. However, (1) in most cases the residuals may vary considerably, and (2) neighbouring POIs often give rather differing estimates both in horizontal and in vertical directions, of them the vertical variation seems to be more characteristic. In the vertical sense, the distribution of estimates shows abrupt changes at places, presumably related to the vertical structure of the forest. In low relief areas horizontal similarity is more typical, in higher relief areas

  10. Digital Terrain Models from Mobile Laser Scanning Data in Moravian Karst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagur, N.; Hollaus, M.

    2016-06-01

    During the last ten years, mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems have become a very popular and efficient technology for capturing reality in 3D. A 3D laser scanner mounted on the top of a moving vehicle (e.g. car) allows the high precision capturing of the environment in a fast way. Mostly this technology is used in cities for capturing roads and buildings facades to create 3D city models. In our work, we used an MLS system in Moravian Karst, which is a protected nature reserve in the Eastern Part of the Czech Republic, with a steep rocky terrain covered by forests. For the 3D data collection, the Riegl VMX 450, mounted on a car, was used with integrated IMU/GNSS equipment, which provides low noise, rich and very dense 3D point clouds. The aim of this work is to create a digital terrain model (DTM) from several MLS data sets acquired in the neighbourhood of a road. The total length of two covered areas is 3.9 and 6.1 km respectively, with an average width of 100 m. For the DTM generation, a fully automatic, robust, hierarchic approach was applied. The derivation of the DTM is based on combinations of hierarchical interpolation and robust filtering for different resolution levels. For the generation of the final DTMs, different interpolation algorithms are applied to the classified terrain points. The used parameters were determined by explorative analysis. All MLS data sets were processed with one parameter set. As a result, a high precise DTM was derived with high spatial resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 m. The quality of the DTMs was checked by geodetic measurements and visual comparison with raw point clouds. The high quality of the derived DTM can be used for analysing terrain changes and morphological structures. Finally, the derived DTM was compared with the DTM of the Czech Republic (DMR 4G) with a resolution of 5 x 5 m, which was created from airborne laser scanning data. The vertical accuracy of the derived DTMs is around 0.10 m.

  11. Gully Morphological Characteristics in the Loess Hilly-gully Region Based on 3D Laser Scanning Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fenli

    2017-04-01

    Gully erosion plays an important role on sediment production in the Loess Hilly-gully Region. Gully morphology is strongly affected by gully erosion process and can be well used to describe gully developmental condition. The Chabagou watershed, located at hilly-gully region of the Loess Plateau, was selected to investigate gully morphological characteristics using 3D laser scanning technique (LIDAR). Thirty-one representative gullies at active stage, including different watershed locations and gully orders, were chosen to quantitatively describe gully morphology and establish empirical equations for estimating gully volume based on gully length and gully surface area. Images and point clouds datum of 31 gullies were collected and digital elevation models (DEMs) with 10 cm resolution were generated; then gully fundamental morphological characteristics covering gully length (L), gully width (WT) and gully depth (D) and some derivative morphological indicators including gully head curvature (C), gully width depth ratio (w/d), gully bottom to top width ratio (WB/WT), gully surface area (Ag) and gully volume (V g) were extracted by ArcGIS 10.1. The results showed that gully length decreased gradually from upstream to downstream in the study watershed and gully depth was greater in the downstream of watershed. Differentiation method of gully head and gully sidewalls was proposed with a mean relative error of 8.77%. Gullies in the upstream and the 2nd order were more developmental for their high values of gully head curvature. Gullies had more developmental potential from the 2nd order to the 4th order. Within the same gully orders, gullies in the downstream of watershed were more active. U-shaped cross-sections were widely distributed in the upstream of watershed and upper position of a gully; while V-shaped cross-sections were widely distributed in the downstream of watershed and lower position of a gully. Gully cross-section shapes at gully scale and watershed scale

  12. Grammar-based Automatic 3D Model Reconstruction from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q.; Helmholz, P.; Belton, D.; West, G.

    2014-04-01

    The automatic reconstruction of 3D buildings has been an important research topic during the last years. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to automatically reconstruct the 3D building models from segmented data based on pre-defined formal grammar and rules. Such segmented data can be extracted e.g. from terrestrial or mobile laser scanning devices. Two steps are considered in detail. The first step is to transform the segmented data into 3D shapes, for instance using the DXF (Drawing Exchange Format) format which is a CAD data file format used for data interchange between AutoCAD and other program. Second, we develop a formal grammar to describe the building model structure and integrate the pre-defined grammars into the reconstruction process. Depending on the different segmented data, the selected grammar and rules are applied to drive the reconstruction process in an automatic manner. Compared with other existing approaches, our proposed method allows the model reconstruction directly from 3D shapes and takes the whole building into account.

  13. High-Resolution Laser Scanning Reveals Plant Architectures that Reflect Universal Network Design Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Adam; Pedmale, Ullas V; Chory, Joanne; Navlakha, Saket

    2017-07-26

    Transport networks serve critical functions in biological and engineered systems, and yet their design requires trade-offs between competing objectives. Due to their sessile lifestyle, plants need to optimize their architecture to efficiently acquire and distribute resources while also minimizing costs in building infrastructure. To understand how plants resolve this design trade-off, we used high-precision three-dimensional laser scanning to map the architectures of tomato, tobacco, or sorghum plants grown in several environmental conditions and through multiple developmental time points, scanning in total 505 architectures from 37 plants. Using a graph-theoretic algorithm that we developed to evaluate design strategies, we find that plant architectures lie along the Pareto front between two simple length-based objectives-minimizing total branch length and minimizing nutrient transport distance-thereby conferring a selective fitness advantage for plant transport processes. The location along the Pareto front can distinguish among species and conditions, suggesting that during evolution, natural selection may employ common network design principles despite different optimization trade-offs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Study of Subtropical Forestry Index Retrieval Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Hemispherical Photography

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    Ting Yun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to retrieve gap fraction, leaf inclination angle, and leaf area index (LAI of subtropical forestry canopy, here we acquired forestry detailed information by means of hemispherical photography, terrestrial laser scanning, and LAI-2200 plant canopy analyzer. Meanwhile, we presented a series of image processing and computer graphics algorithms that include image and point cloud data (PCD segmentation methods for branch and leaf classification and PCD features, such as normal vector, tangent plane extraction, and hemispherical projection method for PCD coordinate transformation. In addition, various forestry mathematical models were proposed to deduce forestry canopy indexes based on the radiation transfer model of Beer-Lambert law. Through the comparison of the experimental results on many plot samples, the terrestrial laser scanner- (TLS- based index estimation method obtains results similar to digital hemispherical photograph (HP and LAI-2200 plant canopy analyzer taken of the same stands and used for validation. It indicates that the TLS-based algorithm is able to capture the variability in LAI of forest stands with a range of densities, and there is a high chance to enhance TLS as a calibration tool for other devices.

  15. Determination of the thickness and structure of the skin barrier by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Knorr, F.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, Ch

    2008-04-01

    Normal skin barrier function is an essential aspect of skin homeostasis and regeneration. Dynamic inflammatory, proliferative and neoplastic skin processes such as wound healing, psoriasis and contact dermatitis are associated with a significant disruption of the skin barrier. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in evaluating cosmetic and pharmacologic products for their ability to restore these protective properties. The gold standard for characterization of barrier function has been the measurement of the transepidermal water loss, however the disadvantage of this method is its interference with several endogenous and exogenous factors such as hydration, perspiration and topically applied substances. This study was aimed to test the clinical applicability of a fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM) for a systematic morphologic analysis of the structure, integrity and thickness of the stratum corneum in 10 otherwise healthy volunteers. The influence of skin treatment with commercial moisturizing cream on skin barrier function was evaluated in serial non-invasive examinations. Our findings showed that in vivo LSM may represent a simple and efficient method for the characterization of skin barrier properties, such as the thickness and hydration of the stratum corneum.

  16. Use of Naturally Available Reference Targets to Calibrate Airborne Laser Scanning Intensity Data

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    Paula Litkey

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the possibility of calibrating airborne laser scanning (ALS intensity data, using land targets typically available in urban areas. For this purpose, a test area around Espoonlahti Harbor, Espoo, Finland, for which a long time series of ALS campaigns is available, was selected. Different target samples (beach sand, concrete, asphalt, different types of gravel were collected and measured in the laboratory. Using tarps, which have certain backscattering properties, the natural samples were calibrated and studied, taking into account the atmospheric effect, incidence angle and flying height. Using data from different flights and altitudes, a time series for the natural samples was generated. Studying the stability of the samples, we could obtain information on the most ideal types of natural targets for ALS radiometric calibration. Using the selected natural samples as reference, the ALS points of typical land targets were calibrated again and examined. Results showed the need for more accurate ground reference data, before using natural samples in ALS intensity data calibration. Also, the NIR camera-based field system was used for collecting ground reference data. This system proved to be a good means for collecting in situ reference data, especially for targets with inhomogeneous surface reflection properties.

  17. Terrestrial radar and laser scanning for deformation monitoring: first steps towards assisted radar scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wujanz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Deformation analysis based on multi-temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS surveys has been applied for many years in commercial and academic problem domains. Downsides of this technique are the sequential data acquisition as well as its limited accuracy compared to terrestrial InSAR or InRAR based technologies that are currently gaining attention of the geodetic community. A drawback of these instruments is its relative operation method while beneficially measurements within the entire field of view can be carried out simultaneously at high frequencies. At first comparative studies between TLS and InRAR scanning are presented which have been carried out at a quarry. Over the course of roughly two hours six epochs have been measured where geometric changes of different degrees have been purposely made. In order to ensure comparability concerning the outcome, both instrument coordinate systems have been transformed into a common coordinate system by applying corner cube reflectors. At last an assisted ground based RADAR approach is presented where advantages of both applied techniques are incorporated.

  18. Studies of the microstructure of polymer-modified bitumen emulsions using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, A; Haverkamp, R G; Robertson, T; Bryant, J; Bearsley, S

    2001-12-01

    Polymer-modified bitumen emulsions present a safer and more environmentally friendly binder for enhancing the properties of roads. Cationic bitumen emulsion binders containing polymer latex were investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The latex was incorporated into the bitumen emulsion by using four different addition methods and all emulsions were processed with a conventional colloid mill. The emulsion binder films were studied after evaporation of the emulsion aqueous phase. We show how the microstructure and distribution of the polymer varies within the bitumen binder depending on latex addition method, and that the microstructure of the binder remains intact when exposed to elevated temperature. It was found that a distinctly fine dispersion of polymer results when the polymer is blended into the bitumen before the emulsifying process (a monophase emulsion). In contrast, bi-phase emulsion binders produced by either post-adding the latex to the bitumen emulsion, or by adding the latex into the emulsifier solution phase before processing, or by comilling the latex with the bitumen, water and emulsifier all resulted in a network formation of bitumen particles surrounded by a continuous polymer film. The use of emulsified binders appears to result in a more evenly distributed polymer network compared to the use of hot polymer-modified binders, and they therefore have greater potential for consistent binder cohesion strength, stone retention and therefore improved pavement performance.

  19. HIGH RESOLUTION AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING AND HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING WITH A SMALL UAV PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gallay

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of unmanned airborne systems (UAS have become diverse with the recent development of lightweight remote sensing instruments. In this paper, we demonstrate our custom integration of the state-of-the-art technologies within an unmanned aerial platform capable of high-resolution and high-accuracy laser scanning, hyperspectral imaging, and photographic imaging. The technological solution comprises the latest development of a completely autonomous, unmanned helicopter by Aeroscout, the Scout B1-100 UAV helicopter. The helicopter is powered by a gasoline two-stroke engine and it allows for integrating 18 kg of a customized payload unit. The whole system is modular providing flexibility of payload options, which comprises the main advantage of the UAS. The UAS integrates two kinds of payloads which can be altered. Both payloads integrate a GPS/IMU with a dual GPS antenna configuration provided by OXTS for accurate navigation and position measurements during the data acquisition. The first payload comprises a VUX-1 laser scanner by RIEGL and a Sony A6000 E-Mount photo camera. The second payload for hyperspectral scanning integrates a push-broom imager AISA KESTREL 10 by SPECIM. The UAS was designed for research of various aspects of landscape dynamics (landslides, erosion, flooding, or phenology in high spectral and spatial resolution.

  20. Area-Based Approach for Mapping and Monitoring Riverine Vegetation Using Mobile Laser Scanning

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    Harri Kaartinen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation plays an important role in stabilizing the soil and decreasing fluvial erosion. In certain cases, vegetation increases the accumulation of fine sediments. Efficient and accurate methods are required for mapping and monitoring changes in the fluvial environment. Here, we develop an area-based approach for mapping and monitoring the vegetation structure along a river channel. First, a 2 × 2 m grid was placed over the study area. Metrics describing vegetation density and height were derived from mobile laser-scanning (MLS data and used to predict the variables in the nearest-neighbor (NN estimations. The training data were obtained from aerial images. The vegetation cover type was classified into the following four classes: bare ground, field layer, shrub layer, and canopy layer. Multi-temporal MLS data sets were applied to the change detection of riverine vegetation. This approach successfully classified vegetation cover with an overall classification accuracy of 72.6%; classification accuracies for bare ground, field layer, shrub layer, and canopy layer were 79.5%, 35.0%, 45.2% and 100.0%, respectively. Vegetation changes were detected primarily in outer river bends. These results proved that our approach was suitable for mapping riverine vegetation.

  1. In vivo laser scanning microscopic investigation of the decontamination of hazardous substances from the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Schanzer, S.; Richter, H.; Gross, I.; Menting, K. H.; Frazier, L.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stimulation of the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin is a topic of intensive dermatological and pharmacological research. In this context, it was found that in addition to the intercellular penetration, the follicular penetration also represents an efficient penetration pathway. The hair follicles act as a long-term reservoir for topically applied substances. They are surrounded by all important target structures, such as blood capillaries, stem and dendritic cells. Therefore, the hair follicles, as well as the skin, need to be protected from hazardous substances. The traditional method of decontamination after respective accidental contacts consists of an intensive washing of the skin. However, during this mechanical procedure, the substances can be pushed even deeper into the hair follicles. In the present study, absorbent materials were applied to remove a fluorescent model substance from the skin without inducing mechanical stress. The results were compared to the decontamination effects obtained by intensive washing. Investigations were performed by means of in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The comparison revealed that decontamination with absorbent materials is more effective than decontamination with washing processes.

  2. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy of capillaries in normal and psoriatic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archid, Rami; Patzelt, Alexa; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Ulrich, Martina; Stockfleth, Eggert; Philipp, Sandra; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2012-10-01

    An important and most likely active role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been attributed to changes in cutaneous blood vessels. The purpose of this study was to use confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) to investigate dermal capillaries in psoriatic and normal skin. The structures of the capillary loops in 5 healthy participants were compared with those in affected skin of 13 psoriasis patients. The diameters of the capillaries and papillae were measured for each group with CLSM. All investigated psoriasis patients showed elongated, widened, and tortuous microvessels in the papillary dermis, whereas all healthy controls showed a single capillary loop in each dermal papilla. The capillaries of the papillary loop and the dermal papilla were significantly enlarged in the psoriatic skin lesions (diameters 24.39±2.34 and 146.46±28.52 μm, respectively) in comparison to healthy skin (diameters 9.53±1.8 and 69.48±17.16 μm, respectively) (P<0.001). CLSM appears to represent a promising noninvasive technique for evaluating dermal capillaries in patients with psoriasis. The diameter of the vessels could be seen as a well-quantifiable indicator for the state of psoriatic skin. CLSM could be useful for therapeutic monitoring to delay possible recurrences.

  3. CO-REGISTRATION OF DSMs GENERATED BY UAV AND TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Persad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An approach for the co-registration of Digital Surface Models (DSMs derived from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs and Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS is proposed. Specifically, a wavelet-based feature descriptor for matching surface keypoints on the 2.5D DSMs is developed. DSMs are useful in wide-scope of various applications such as 3D building modelling and reconstruction, cultural heritage, urban and environmental planning, aircraft navigation/path routing, accident and crime scene reconstruction, mining as well as, topographic map revision and change detection. For these listed applications, it is not uncommon that there will be a need for automatically aligning multi-temporal DSMs which may have been acquired from multiple sensors, with different specifications over a period of time, and may have various overlaps. Terrestrial laser scanners usually capture urban facades in an accurate manner; however this is not the case for building roof structures. On the other hand, vertical photography from UAVs can capture the roofs. Therefore, the automatic fusion of UAV and laser-scanning based DSMs is addressed here as it serves various geospatial applications.

  4. Assessing Metrics for Estimating Fire Induced Change in the Forest Understorey Structure Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

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    Vaibhav Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying post-fire effects in a forested landscape is important to ascertain burn severity, ecosystem recovery and post-fire hazard assessments and mitigation planning. Reporting of such post-fire effects assumes significance in fire-prone countries such as USA, Australia, Spain, Greece and Portugal where prescribed burns are routinely carried out. This paper describes the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS to estimate and map change in the forest understorey following a prescribed burn. Eighteen descriptive metrics are derived from bi-temporal TLS which are used to analyse and visualise change in a control and fire-altered plot. Metrics derived are Above Ground Height-based (AGH percentiles and heights, point count and mean intensity. Metrics such as AGH50change, mean AGHchange and point countchange are sensitive enough to detect subtle fire-induced change (28%–52% whilst observing little or no change in the control plot (0–4%. A qualitative examination with field measurements of the spatial distribution of burnt areas and percentage area burnt also show similar patterns. This study is novel in that it examines the behaviour of TLS metrics for estimating and mapping fire induced change in understorey structure in a single-scan mode with a minimal fixed reference system. Further, the TLS-derived metrics can be used to produce high resolution maps of change in the understorey landscape.

  5. Modeling Main Body of Overcrossing Bridge Based on Vehicle-Borne Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Chen, M.; Wei, Z.; Zhong, R.

    2017-09-01

    Vehicle-borne laser scanning (VBLS) is widely used to collect urban data for various mapping and modelling systems. This paper proposes a strategy of feature extraction and 3d model reconstruction for main body of overcrossing bridges based on VBLS point clouds. As the bridges usually have a large span, and the clouds data is often affected by obstacles, we have to use round-trip cloud data to avoid missing part. To begin with, pick out the cloud of the bridge body by an interactive clip-box, and group points by scan-line, then sort the points by scanning angle on each scan line. Since the position under the vehicle have a fixed scan-angle, a virtual path can be obtained. Secondly, extract horizontal line segments perpendicular to the virtual path along adjacent scan-lines, and then cluster line segments into long line-strings, which represent the top and bottom edge. Finally, regularize the line-strings and build 3d surface model of the bridge body. Experimental studies have demonstrated its efficiency and accuracy in case of building bridge model. Modelling the stairs at the both end of the bridge will be the direction of the next step.

  6. Combined Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning and IR Thermography Applied to a Historical Building

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    Antonio Costanzo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of architectural heritage usually requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a variety of specialist expertise and techniques. Nevertheless, destructive techniques should be avoided, wherever possible, in order to preserve the integrity of the historical buildings, therefore the development of non-destructive and non-contact techniques is extremely important. In this framework, a methodology for combining the terrestrial laser scanning and the infrared thermal images is proposed, in order to obtain a reconnaissance of the conservation state of a historical building. The proposed case study is represented by St. Augustine Monumental Compound, located in the historical centre of the town of Cosenza (Calabria, South Italy. Adopting the proposed methodology, the paper illustrates the main results obtained for the building test overlaying and comparing the collected data with both techniques, in order to outline the capabilities both to detect the anomalies and to improve the knowledge on health state of the masonry building. The 3D model, also, allows to provide a reference model, laying the groundwork for implementation of a monitoring multisensor system based on the use of non-destructive techniques.

  7. Towards Automated Characterization of Canopy Layering in Mixed Temperate Forests Using Airborne Laser Scanning

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    Reik Leiterer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Canopy layers form essential structural components, affecting stand productivity and wildlife habitats. Airborne laser scanning (ALS provides horizontal and vertical information on canopy structure simultaneously. Existing approaches to assess canopy layering often require prior information about stand characteristics or rely on pre-defined height thresholds. We developed a multi-scale method using ALS data with point densities >10 pts/m2 to determine the number and vertical extent of canopy layers (canopylayer, canopylength, seasonal variations in the topmost canopy layer (canopytype, as well as small-scale heterogeneities in the canopy (canopyheterogeneity. We first tested and developed the method on a small forest patch (800 ha and afterwards tested transferability and robustness of the method on a larger patch (180,000 ha. We validated the approach using an extensive set of ground data, achieving overall accuracies >77% for canopytype and canopyheterogeneity, and >62% for canopylayer and canopylength. We conclude that our method provides a robust characterization of canopy layering supporting automated canopy structure monitoring.

  8. Landslide monitoring using multitemporal terrestrial laser scanning for ground displacement analysis

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    Maurizio Barbarella

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the analysis of the temporal evolution of landslides and of related hydrogeological hazards, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS seems to be a very suitable technique for morphological description and displacement analysis. In this note we present some procedures designed to solve specific issues related to monitoring. A particular attention has been devoted to data georeferencing, both during survey campaigns and while performing statistical data analysis. The proper interpolation algorithm for digital elevation model generation has been chosen taking into account the features of the landslide morphology and of the acquired datasets. For a detailed analysis of the different dynamics of the hillslope, we identified some areas with homogeneous behaviour applying in a geographic information system (GIS environment a sort of rough segmentation to the grid obtained by differentiating two surfaces. This approach has allowed a clear identification of ground deformations, obtaining detailed quantitative information on surficial displacements. These procedures have been applied to a case study on a large landslide of about 10 hectares, located in Italy, which recently has severely damaged the national railway line. Landslide displacements have been monitored with TLS surveying for three years, from February 2010 to June 2012. Here we report the comparison results between the first and the last survey.

  9. COMPARISON OF LASER SCANNING, PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND SFM-MVS PIPELINE APPLIED IN STRUCTURES AND ARTIFICIAL SURFACES

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    D. Skarlatos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The merging of photogrammetry and computer vision has raised discussions regarding its ability to produce very dense point clouds, comparable, under circumstances to terrestrial laser scanning (TLS. This paper approaches this issue in terms of accuracy, density, methodology and ease to use. Three tests have been conducted to evaluate the process as well as data density, quality, registration and methodology. At the first test a 300 mm sphere with texture has been used as a reference object is order to address data quality using image based techniques. Menci's Zscan was tested against the Bundler-PMVS work flow. The second test is a flat building facade, where Zscan, TLS and Bundler-PMVS are compared directly. The last test was contacted in an electricity power station which was an extremely complex structure. Two TLS stations were compared against 212 Bundler-PMVS photos. Quantitative comparisons based on several criteria are presented. For small and medium size objects and distances Bundler-PMVS seems to have an advantage in terms of methodology and accuracy. In large scale objects TLS is better in terms of quality and processing time.

  10. REVEALING THE SECRETS OF STONEHENGE THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF LASER SCANNING, PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND VISUALISATION TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Bryan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Stonehenge is perhaps the most famous prehistoric monument in the world. Begun as a simple earthwork enclosure, it was built in several stages with the unique lintelled stone circle being erected in the Neolithic period in around 2,500 BC. Today Stonehenge, together with Avebury and other associated sites, form the heart of a World Heritage Site (WHS with a unique and dense concentration of outstanding prehistoric monuments. In 2011 English Heritage (EH embarked on a new survey of the monument. Undertaken by the Greenhatch Group, a commercial survey company based near Derby, a combination of laser scanning and photogrammetric approaches were used to generate the required scale and detailed level of output required by English Heritage. This paper will describe the background to this project and its context within previous survey activities at this World Heritage Site. It will explain the data acquisition technology and processes undertaken on site, the datasets derived from post-processing and their filtering and analysis within both subsequent research projects. Alongside a description of how the data is currently being exploited and proposed future applications within the conservation and management of the site, it will finish by considering the impact of developing geospatial imaging technologies.

  11. Revealing the Secrets of Stonehenge Through the Application of Laser Scanning, Photogrammetry and Visualisation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, P. G.; Abbott, M.; Dodson, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    Stonehenge is perhaps the most famous prehistoric monument in the world. Begun as a simple earthwork enclosure, it was built in several stages with the unique lintelled stone circle being erected in the Neolithic period in around 2,500 BC. Today Stonehenge, together with Avebury and other associated sites, form the heart of a World Heritage Site (WHS) with a unique and dense concentration of outstanding prehistoric monuments. In 2011 English Heritage (EH) embarked on a new survey of the monument. Undertaken by the Greenhatch Group, a commercial survey company based near Derby, a combination of laser scanning and photogrammetric approaches were used to generate the required scale and detailed level of output required by English Heritage. This paper will describe the background to this project and its context within previous survey activities at this World Heritage Site. It will explain the data acquisition technology and processes undertaken on site, the datasets derived from post-processing and their filtering and analysis within both subsequent research projects. Alongside a description of how the data is currently being exploited and proposed future applications within the conservation and management of the site, it will finish by considering the impact of developing geospatial imaging technologies.

  12. Comparison between optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy for turbid sample imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    U-Thainual, Paweena; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) in theory provides lateral resolution equivalent to the optical diffraction limit. Scattering media, such as biological turbid media, attenuates the optical signal and also alters the diffraction-limited spot size of the focused beam. The ORPAM signal is generated only from a small voxel in scattering media with dimensions equivalent to the laser spot size after passing through scattering layers and is detected by an acoustic transducer, which is not affected by optical scattering. Thus, both ORPAM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) reject scattered light. A multimodal optical microscopy platform that includes ORPAM and CLSM was constructed, and the lateral resolution of both modes was measured using patterned thin metal film with and without a scattering barrier. The effect of scattering media on the lateral resolution was studied using different scattering coefficients and was compared to computational results based on Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that degradation of lateral resolution due to optical scattering was not significant for either ORPAM or CLSM. The depth discrimination capability of ORPAM and CLSM was measured using microfiber embedded in a light scattering phantom material. ORPAM images demonstrated higher contrast compared to CLSM images partly due to reduced acoustic signal scattering.

  13. VIRTUAL RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ALMAQAH TEMPLE OF YEHA IN ETHIOPIA BY TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING

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    M. Lindstaedt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In autumn 2009 the Almaqah Temple of Yeha in Ethiopia has been recorded by terrestrial laser scanning and digital photogrammetry in cooperation between the Sana'a Branch of the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute and the HafenCity University Hamburg. The temple dates from the 7th Century BC and is one of the best preserved buildings of Sabaean architecture in Africa. As a basis for all future project works a geodetic network was established in UTM-coordinates by GPS measurements. The geodata collected will form the basis for all future work on the temple. The deformations of the facades were determined for restoration issues and the existing parts of the temple were modelled by meshing (3D triangulation. Using the scanned point cloud and a technical analysis of the building the Propylon, which is no longer existent today, was virtually reconstructed. In future, the data will also be included in the master plan for touristic development of the region of Axum and Yeha in northern Ethiopia.

  14. Subcellular localization of flavonol aglycone in hepatocytes visualized by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Rie; Shirai, Yasuhito; Saito, Naoaki; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2009-04-01

    Flavonoids are widely distributed in the plant kingdom and show various biological activities. The bioavailability of flavonoids in biological samples has conventionally been quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, but with these analytical techniques it is difficult to estimate the subcellular localization of flavonoids in intact cells. In this study, we attempted to examine the localization of flavonoids in cultured cells using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope and mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Five flavonol aglycones showed autofluorescence in the cells under the conditions (Ex. 488 nm to Em. 515-535 nm), whereas three flavonol glycosides and eight compounds belonging to other flavonoid subclasses, i.e., flavones, flavanones, and catechins, did not. The autofluorescence of galangin and kaempferol appeared stronger in the nucleus than cytoplasm, suggesting that they are incorporated into the cells and accumulated in the nucleus. The proposed method provided evidence that flavonol aglycones are incorporated into, and accumulated in the nucleus of, hepatocytes.

  15. Spectral analysis of irregular roughness artifacts measured by atomic force microscopy and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhang; Luo, Tingting; Ma, Chengfu; Huang, Wenhao; Gao, Sitian

    2014-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM) measurements on a series of specially designed roughness artifacts were performed and the results characterized by spectral analysis. As demonstrated by comparisons, both AFM and LSM can image the complex structures with high resolution and fidelity. When the surface autocorrelation length increases from 200 to 500 nm, the cumulative power spectral density spectra of the design, AFM and LSM data reach a better agreement with each other. The critical wavelength of AFM characterization is smaller than that of LSM, and the gap between the measured and designed critical wavelengths is reduced with an increase in the surface autocorrelation length. Topography measurements of surfaces with a near zero or negatively skewed height distribution were determined to be accurate. However, obvious discrepancies were found for surfaces with a positive skewness owing to more severe dilations of either the solid tip of the AFM or the laser tip of the LSM. Further surface parameter evaluation and template matching analysis verified that the main distortions in AFM measurements are tip dilations while those in LSM are generally larger and more complex.

  16. Precise plant height monitoring and biomass estimation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning in paddy rice

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    N. Tilly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing crop management is a major topic in the field of precision agriculture as the growing world population puts pressure on the efficiency of field production. Accordingly, methods to measure plant parameters with the needed precision and within-field resolution are required. Studies show that Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS is a suitable method to capture small objects like crop plants. In this contribution, the results of multi-temporal surveys on paddy rice fields with the TLS system Riegl LMS-Z420i are presented. Three campaigns were carried out during the key vegetative stage of rice plants in the growing period 2012 to monitor the plant height. The TLS-derived point clouds are interpolated to visualize plant height above ground as crop surface models (CSMs with a high resolution of 0.01 m. Spatio-temporal differences within the data of one campaign and between consecutive campaigns can be detected. The results were validated against manually measured plant heights with a high correlation (R2 = 0.71. Furthermore, the dependence of actual biomass from plant height was evaluated. To the present, no method for the non-destructive determination of biomass is found yet. Thus, plant parameters, like the height, have to be used for biomass estimations. The good correlation (R2 = 0.66 leads to the assumption that biomass can be estimated from plant height measurements. The results show that TLS can be considered as a very promising tool for precision agriculture.

  17. Error analysis of terrestrial laser scanning data by means of spherical statistics and 3D graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuartero, Aurora; Armesto, Julia; Rodríguez, Pablo G; Arias, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a complete analysis of the positional errors of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data based on spherical statistics and 3D graphs. Spherical statistics are preferred because of the 3D vectorial nature of the spatial error. Error vectors have three metric elements (one module and two angles) that were analyzed by spherical statistics. A study case has been presented and discussed in detail. Errors were calculating using 53 check points (CP) and CP coordinates were measured by a digitizer with submillimetre accuracy. The positional accuracy was analyzed by both the conventional method (modular errors analysis) and the proposed method (angular errors analysis) by 3D graphics and numerical spherical statistics. Two packages in R programming language were performed to obtain graphics automatically. The results indicated that the proposed method is advantageous as it offers a more complete analysis of the positional accuracy, such as angular error component, uniformity of the vector distribution, error isotropy, and error, in addition the modular error component by linear statistics.

  18. Can Low-Resolution Airborne Laser Scanning Data Be Used to Model Stream Rating Curves?

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    Steve W. Lyon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This pilot study explores the potential of using low-resolution (0.2 points/m2 airborne laser scanning (ALS-derived elevation data to model stream rating curves. Rating curves, which allow the functional translation of stream water depth into discharge, making them integral to water resource monitoring efforts, were modeled using a physics-based approach that captures basic geometric measurements to establish flow resistance due to implicit channel roughness. We tested synthetically thinned high-resolution (more than 2 points/m2 ALS data as a proxy for low-resolution data at a point density equivalent to that obtained within most national-scale ALS strategies. Our results show that the errors incurred due to the effect of low-resolution versus high-resolution ALS data were less than those due to flow measurement and empirical rating curve fitting uncertainties. As such, although there likely are scale and technical limitations to consider, it is theoretically possible to generate rating curves in a river network from ALS data of the resolution anticipated within national-scale ALS schemes (at least for rivers with relatively simple geometries. This is promising, since generating rating curves from ALS scans would greatly enhance our ability to monitor streamflow by simplifying the overall effort required.

  19. Automated Analysis of Barley Organs Using 3D Laser Scanning: An Approach for High Throughput Phenotyping

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    Stefan Paulus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rise of laser scanning the 3D geometry of plant architecture is easy to acquire. Nevertheless, an automated interpretation and, finally, the segmentation into functional groups are still difficult to achieve. Two barley plants were scanned in a time course, and the organs were separated by applying a histogram-based classification algorithm. The leaf organs were represented by meshing algorithms, while the stem organs were parameterized by a least-squares cylinder approximation. We introduced surface feature histograms with an accuracy of 96% for the separation of the barley organs, leaf and stem. This enables growth monitoring in a time course for barley plants. Its reliability was demonstrated by a comparison with manually fitted parameters with a correlation R2 = 0:99 for the leaf area and R2 = 0:98 for the cumulated stem height. A proof of concept has been given for its applicability for the detection of water stress in barley, where the extension growth of an irrigated and a non-irrigated plant has been monitored.

  20. Automatic fracture detection based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning data: A new method and case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ting; Xiao, Ancheng; Wu, Lei; Mao, Liguang

    2017-09-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), widely known as light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology, is increasingly used to obtain rapidly three-dimensional (3-D) geometry or highly detailed digital terrain models with millimetric point precision and accuracy. In this contribution, we proposed a simple and unbiased approach to identify fractures directly from 3-D surface model of natural outcrops generated from TLS data and thus acquire surface density, which can provide important supplement data for fracture related research. One outcrop from the Shizigou anticline in the Qaidam Basin (NW China) is taken as the case to validate the method and obtain optimal parameters, according to the references of surface density measured in the field and from the photos taken by high-resolution camera. The results show that with suitable parameters, the proposed method can identify most structural fractures quickly, providing a solution of extracting structural fractures from virtual outcrops based on TLS data. Furthermore, it will help a lot in analyzing the development of fractures and other related fields.

  1. Starch/carrageenan/milk proteins interactions studied using multiple staining and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matignon, A; Moulin, G; Barey, P; Desprairies, M; Mauduit, S; Sieffermann, J M; Michon, C

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of the interactions between modified waxy maize starch, kappa carrageenan and skim milk on the microstructure of their mixed systems using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). A multiple staining of the components was set up with a view to improving starch covalent staining. In starch/carrageenan pasted mixtures, carrageenan was found to adsorb on and penetrate slightly into the starch granules, whereas no interactions were observed between starch and milk proteins. In ternary mixtures, interactions between starch granules and carrageenan were no longer observed, even when milk proteins were added after starch swelling in the carrageenan solution, thus showing preferential interactions between carrageenan/milk proteins in comparison to carrageenan/starch granules. Modifying the blending order of the components led to microstructure differences depending on several parameters such as starch/carrageenan interactions, carrageenan/milk proteins network structure, level of starch granules disruption and amylopectin contribution to the microstructure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Change Analysis of Laser Scans of Laboratory Rock Slopes Subject to Wave Attack Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Lindenbergh, R.; Hofland, B.; Kramer, R.

    2017-09-01

    For better understanding how coastal structures with gentle slopes behave during high energy events, a wave attack experiment representing a storm of 3000 waves was performed in a flume facility. Two setups with different steepness of slope were compared under the same conditions. In order to quantify changes in the rock slopes after the wave attack, a terrestrial laser scanner was used to obtain 3D coordinates of the rock surface before and after each experiment. Next, through a series of processing steps, the point clouds were converted to a suitable 2D raster for change analysis. This allowed to estimate detailed and quantitative change information. The results indicate that the area around the artificial coast line, defined as the intersection between sloped surface and wave surface, is most strongly affected by wave attacks. As the distances from the sloped surface to the waves are shorter, changes for the mildly sloped surface, slope 1 (1 : 10), are distributed over a larger area compared to the changes for the more steeply sloped surface, slope 2 (1 : 5). The results of this experiment show that terrestrial laser scanning is an effective and feasible method for change analysis of rock slopes in a laboratory setting. Most striking results from a process point of view is that the transport direction of the rocks change between the two different slopes: from seaward transport for the steeper slope to landward transport for the milder slope.

  3. Classification of Defoliated Trees Using Tree-Level Airborne Laser Scanning Data Combined with Aerial Images

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    Juha Hyyppa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and rising temperatures have been observed to be related to the increase of forest insect damage in the boreal zone. The common pine sawfly (Diprion pini L. (Hymenoptera, Diprionidae is regarded as a significant threat to boreal pine forests. Defoliation by D. pini can cause severe growth loss and tree mortality in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. (Pinaceae. In this study, logistic LASSO regression, Random Forest (RF and Most Similar Neighbor method (MSN were investigated for predicting the defoliation level of individual Scots pines using the features derived from airborne laser scanning (ALS data and aerial images. Classification accuracies from 83.7% (kappa 0.67 to 88.1% (kappa 0.76 were obtained depending on the method. The most accurate result was produced using RF with a combination of data from the two sensors, while the accuracies when using ALS and image features separately were 80.7% and 87.4%, respectively. Evidently, the combination of ALS and aerial images in detecting needle losses is capable of providing satisfactory estimates for individual trees.

  4. Noninvasive in vivo detection and quantification of Demodex mites by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, E C; Maier, T; Hoffmann, V S; Hegyi, J; Ruzicka, T; Berking, C

    2012-11-01

    In many Demodex-associated skin diseases Demodex mites are present in abundance and seem to be at least partially pathogenic. So far all diagnostic approaches such as scraping or standardized superficial skin biopsy are (semi-)invasive and may cause discomfort to the patient. To see whether confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) - a noninvasive method for the visualization of superficial skin layers - is able to detect and quantify D. folliculorum in facial skin of patients with rosacea. Twenty-five patients (34-72 years of age) with facial rosacea and 25 age- and sex-matched normal controls were examined by CLSM. Mosaics of 8 × 8 mm and 5 × 5 mm were created by scanning horizontal layers of lesional skin and quantification of mites per follicle and per area as well as follicles per area was performed. In all patients D. folliculorum could be detected by CLSM and presented as roundish or lengthy cone-shaped structures. CLSM allowed the quantification of Demodex mites and revealed significant differences (P Demodex mites noninvasively in facial skin of patients with rosacea. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Airborne laser scanning point clouds filtering method based on the construction of virtual ground seed points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Yanming; Cheng, Liang; Yao, Mengru; Deng, Shulin; Li, Manchun; Cai, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Filtering of airborne laser scanning (ALS) point clouds into ground and nonground points is a core postprocessing step for ALS data. A hierarchical filtering method, which has high operating efficiency and accuracy because of the combination of multiscale morphology and progressive triangulated irregular network (TIN) densification (PTD), is proposed. In the proposed method, the grid is first constructed for the ALS point clouds, and virtual seed points are set by analyzing the shape and elevation distribution of points within the grid. Then, the virtual seed points are classified as ground or nonground using the multiscale morphological method. Finally, the virtual ground seed points are utilized to generate the initial TIN, and the filter is completed by iteratively densifying the initial TIN. We used various ALS data to test the performance of the proposed method. The experimental results show that the proposed filtering method has strong applicability for a variety of landscapes and, in particular, has lower commission error than the classical PTD filtering method in urban areas.

  6. Investigating Semi-Automated Cadastral Boundaries Extraction from Airborne Laser Scanned Data

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    Xianghuan Luo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Many developing countries have witnessed the urgent need of accelerating cadastral surveying processes. Previous studies found that large portions of cadastral boundaries coincide with visible physical objects, namely roads, fences, and building walls. This research explores the application of airborne laser scanning (ALS techniques on cadastral surveys. A semi-automated workflow is developed to extract cadastral boundaries from an ALS point clouds. Firstly, a two-phased workflow was developed that focused on extracting digital representations of physical objects. In the automated extraction phase, after classifying points into semantic components, the outline of planar objects such as building roofs and road surfaces were generated by an α-shape algorithm, whilst the centerlines delineatiation approach was fitted into the lineate object—a fence. Afterwards, the extracted vector lines were edited and refined during the post-refinement phase. Secondly, we quantitatively evaluated the workflow performance by comparing results against an exiting cadastral map as reference. It was found that the workflow achieved promising results: around 80% completeness and 60% correctness on average, although the spatial accuracy is still modest. It is argued that the semi-automated extraction workflow could effectively speed up cadastral surveying, with both human resources and equipment costs being reduced

  7. A Two-Dimensional Laser Scanning Mirror Using Motion-Decoupling Electromagnetic Actuators

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    Dongho Oh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a two-dimensional (2-D laser scanning mirror with a novel actuating structure composed of one magnet and two coils. The mirror-actuating device generates decoupled scanning motions about two orthogonal axes by combining two electromagnetic actuators of the conventional moving-coil and the moving-magnet types. We implement a finite element analysis to calculate magnetic flux in the electromagnetic system and experiments using a prototype with the overall size of 22 mm (W × 20 mm (D × 15 mm (H for the mirror size of 8 mm × 8 mm. The upper moving-coil type actuator to rotate only the mirror part has the optical reflection angle of 15.7° at 10 Hz, 90° at the resonance frequency of 60 Hz at ±3 V (±70 mA and the bandwidth of 91 Hz. The lower moving-magnet type actuator has the optical reflection angle of 16.20° at 10 Hz and 50° at the resonance frequency of 60 Hz at ±5 V (±34 mA and the bandwidth of 88 Hz. The proposed compact and simple 2-D scanning mirror has advantages of large 2-D angular deflections, wide frequency bandwidth and low manufacturing cost.

  8. Detecting Changes in Forest Structure over Time with Bi-Temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

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    Timo Melkas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes to stems caused by natural forces and timber harvesting constitute an essential input for many forestry-related applications and ecological studies, especially forestry inventories based on the use of permanent sample plots. Conventional field measurement is widely acknowledged as being time-consuming and labor-intensive. More automated and efficient alternatives or supportive methods are needed. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has been demonstrated to be a promising method in forestry field inventories. Nevertheless, the applicability of TLS in recording changes in the structure of forest plots has not been studied in detail. This paper presents a fully automated method for detecting changes in forest structure over time using bi-temporal TLS data. The developed method was tested on five densely populated forest plots including 137 trees and 50 harvested trees in point clouds. The present study demonstrated that 90 percent of tree stem changes could be automatically located from single-scan TLS data. These changes accounted for 92 percent of the changed basal area. The results indicate that the processing of TLS data collected at different times to detect tree stem changes can be fully automated.

  9. Automatic Detection of Small Single Trees in the Forest-Tundra Ecotone Using Airborne Laser Scanning

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    Nadja Stumberg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A large proportion of Norway’s land area is occupied by the forest-tundra ecotone. The vegetation of this temperature-sensitive ecosystem between mountain forest and the alpine zone is expected to be highly affected by climate change and effective monitoring techniques are required. For the detection of such small pioneer trees, airborne laser scanning (ALS has been proposed as a useful tool employing laser height data. The objective of this study was to assess the capability of an unsupervised classification for automated monitoring programs of small individual trees using high-density ALS data. Field and ALS data were collected along a 1500 km long transect stretching from northern to southern Norway. Different laser and tree height thresholds were tested in various combinations within an unsupervised classification of tree and nontree raster cells employing different cell sizes. Suitable initial cell sizes for the exclusion of large treeless areas as well as an optimal cell size for tree cell detection were determined. High rates of successful tree cell detection involved high levels of commission error at lower laser height thresholds, however, exceeding the 20 cm laser height threshold, the rates of commission error decreased substantially with a still satisfying rate of successful tree cell detection.

  10. Geomorphological analysis and classification of foredune ridges based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Stefano; Giambastiani, Beatrice M. S.; Sistilli, Flavia; Scarelli, Frederico; Gabbianelli, Giovanni

    2017-10-01

    Along the North Adriatic Sea coast (Italy), vulnerability to climate change is further aggravated by anthropogenic influences, such as strong subsidence rate due to deep groundwater and gas abstraction, tourism and industry impacts. In this context, conservation and restoration of coastal sand dunes become extremely important especially because of their importance in terms of 'natural' coastal defense. This paper proposes an innovative geomorphological approach based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning - TLS, which allows us to measure and monitor morphometric dune evolution with high precision and details. Several TLS surveys were performed along the Ravenna coast (Adriatic Sea, Italy) and the resulting Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) were analyzed in order to classify the foredune ridges in three geomorphological sub-zones. The topographic, areal and volumetric variations over time of geomorphological units were calculated by GIS tools in order to identify seasonal trends or particular pattern. Meteo-marine climate conditions were also analyzed and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to correlate changes in morphology with meteo-marine forcing factors, highlighting the ones that most influence dune evolution and dynamics.

  11. Application of laser scanning microscopy for the analysis of oral biofilm dissolution by different endodontic irrigants

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    Aldo del Carpio-Perochena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multi-specie biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobials due to cellular interactions found in them. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, by confocal laser scanning microscopy, the biofilm dissolution effectiveness of different irrigant solutions on biofilms developed on infected dentin in situ. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 bovine dentin specimens infected intraorally (30/group were treated by the following solutions: 2% of chlorhexidine digluconate, 1%, 2.5% and 5.25% of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl. The solutions were utilized for 5, 15 and 30 min with 2 experimental volumes 500 μL and 1 mL. All the samples were stained using an acridine orange and the biofilm thickness before (control group and after the experiments were evaluated, utilizing a confocal microscope at ×40. The Mann-Whitney U and the nom-parametric Kruskal-Wallis Dunns tests were utilized to determine the influence of the volume and to perform the comparisons among the groups respectively. The significance level was set at P 0.05. The biofilm dissolution treated with 1% NaOCl was directly proportional to the exposure time (P 0.05. Conclusion: The higher exposure times and concentrations of NaOCl were not sufficient to dissolve 100% of the biofilm. However, all NaOCl solutions were more effective than 2% chlorhexidine digluconate to dissolve organic matter.

  12. APPLICATION OF LASER SCANNING SURVEYING TO ROCK SLOPES RISK ASSESSMENT ANALYSIS

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    M. Corsetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods for understanding rock instability mechanisms and for evaluating potential destructive scenarios are of great importance in risk assessment analysis dedicated to the establishment of appropriate prevention and mitigation actions. When the portion of the unstable rock mass is very large, effective actions to counteract the risks are complex and expensive. In these conditions, an optimal risk management cannot ignore procedures able to faster and accurately acquire i geometrical data for modeling the geometry of the rock walls and implementing reliable forecasting models and ii monitoring data able to describe the magnitude and the direction of deformation processes. These data contributes to the prediction of the behavior of a landslide if the measurements are acquired frequently and reliable numerical models can be implemented. Innovative geomatic techniques, based on GPS, Terrestrial Laser Scanning Surveying (TLS, automated total station and satellite and ground SAR Interferometry, have been recently applied to define the geometry and monitoring the displacements of unstable slopes. Among these, TLS is mainly adopted to generate detailed 3D models useful to reconstruct rock wall geometry by contributing to the estimation of geo-mechanical parameters, that is orientation, persistence and apparent spacing of rock discontinuities. Two examples of applications of TLS technique to the analysis of a large front in a quarry and of a rock shoulder of a dam are presented.

  13. Application of terrestrial laser scanning in documenting an underground coal mine pumping station

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    Rošer Janez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a new underground pumping station was constructed 41.5 m below sea level and equipped, which has now become the main underground pumping station of the Velenje Coal Mine (VCM. In this study, use of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS to acquire the 3D data of the engine room of the underground pumping station is presented. TLS is an advanced technique in spatial information data acquisition, which allows the equipment in the underground pumping station to be digitally captured with unprecedented resolution and accuracy. Integration with metric imagery allows 3D photorealistic models to be created for interpretation and visualisation. The final result shows the actual 3D image of the object recorded with a relative accuracy of a few millimetres. TLS is ideal for capturing the original state before construction commences and the final state after its completion, as well as for both observation of surface changes and detection of deformations. When we have an accurate 3D model of each component in the engine room of the underground pumping station, any maintenance, future upgrades, or modifications can be made with reference to the original state.

  14. Forest understory trees can be segmented accurately within sufficiently dense airborne laser scanning point clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamraz, Hamid; Contreras, Marco A; Zhang, Jun

    2017-07-28

    Airborne laser scanning (LiDAR) point clouds over large forested areas can be processed to segment individual trees and subsequently extract tree-level information. Existing segmentation procedures typically detect more than 90% of overstory trees, yet they barely detect 60% of understory trees because of the occlusion effect of higher canopy layers. Although understory trees provide limited financial value, they are an essential component of ecosystem functioning by offering habitat for numerous wildlife species and influencing stand development. Here we model the occlusion effect in terms of point density. We estimate the fractions of points representing different canopy layers (one overstory and multiple understory) and also pinpoint the required density for reasonable tree segmentation (where accuracy plateaus). We show that at a density of ~170 pt/m² understory trees can likely be segmented as accurately as overstory trees. Given the advancements of LiDAR sensor technology, point clouds will affordably reach this required density. Using modern computational approaches for big data, the denser point clouds can efficiently be processed to ultimately allow accurate remote quantification of forest resources. The methodology can also be adopted for other similar remote sensing or advanced imaging applications such as geological subsurface modelling or biomedical tissue analysis.

  15. Sparse Density, Leaf-Off Airborne Laser Scanning Data in Aboveground Biomass Component Prediction

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    Ville Kankare

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The demand for cost-efficient forest aboveground biomass (AGB prediction methods is growing worldwide. The National Land Survey of Finland (NLS began collecting airborne laser scanning (ALS data throughout Finland in 2008 to provide a new high-detailed terrain elevation model. Similar data sets are being collected in an increasing number of countries worldwide. These data sets offer great potential in forest mapping related applications. The objectives of our study were (i to evaluate the AGB component prediction accuracy at a resolution of 300 m2 using sparse density, leaf-off ALS data (collected by NLS derived metrics as predictor variables; (ii to compare prediction accuracies with existing large-scale forest mapping techniques (Multi-source National Forest Inventory, MS-NFI based on Landsat TM satellite imagery; and (iii to evaluate the accuracy and effect of canopy height model (CHM derived metrics on AGB component prediction when ALS data were acquired with multiple sensors and varying scanning parameters. Results showed that ALS point metrics can be used to predict component AGBs with an accuracy of 29.7%–48.3%. AGB prediction accuracy was slightly improved using CHM-derived metrics but CHM metrics had a more clear effect on the estimated bias. Compared to the MS-NFI, the prediction accuracy was considerably higher, which was caused by differences in the remote sensing data utilized.

  16. MODELING MAIN BODY OF OVERCROSSING BRIDGE BASED ON VEHICLE-BORNE LASER SCANNING DATA

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    X. Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle-borne laser scanning (VBLS is widely used to collect urban data for various mapping and modelling systems. This paper proposes a strategy of feature extraction and 3d model reconstruction for main body of overcrossing bridges based on VBLS point clouds. As the bridges usually have a large span, and the clouds data is often affected by obstacles, we have to use round-trip cloud data to avoid missing part. To begin with, pick out the cloud of the bridge body by an interactive clip-box, and group points by scan-line, then sort the points by scanning angle on each scan line. Since the position under the vehicle have a fixed scan-angle, a virtual path can be obtained. Secondly, extract horizontal line segments perpendicular to the virtual path along adjacent scan-lines, and then cluster line segments into long line-strings, which represent the top and bottom edge. Finally, regularize the line-strings and build 3d surface model of the bridge body. Experimental studies have demonstrated its efficiency and accuracy in case of building bridge model. Modelling the stairs at the both end of the bridge will be the direction of the next step.

  17. Multiple-Primitives Hierarchical Classification of Airborne Laser Scanning Data in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, H.; Lin, X. G.; Zhang, J. X.

    2017-09-01

    A hierarchical classification method for Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data of urban areas is proposed in this paper. This method is composed of three stages among which three types of primitives are utilized, i.e., smooth surface, rough surface, and individual point. In the first stage, the input ALS data is divided into smooth surfaces and rough surfaces by employing a step-wise point cloud segmentation method. In the second stage, classification based on smooth surfaces and rough surfaces is performed. Points in the smooth surfaces are first classified into ground and buildings based on semantic rules. Next, features of rough surfaces are extracted. Then, points in rough surfaces are classified into vegetation and vehicles based on the derived features and Random Forests (RF). In the third stage, point-based features are extracted for the ground points, and then, an individual point classification procedure is performed to classify the ground points into bare land, artificial ground and greenbelt. Moreover, the shortages of the existing studies are analyzed, and experiments show that the proposed method overcomes these shortages and handles more types of objects.

  18. Effective Data-Driven Calibration for a Galvanometric Laser Scanning System Using Binocular Stereo Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Junchao; Zhang, Liyan

    2018-01-12

    A new solution to the problem of galvanometric laser scanning (GLS) system calibration is presented. Under the machine learning framework, we build a single-hidden layer feedforward neural network (SLFN)to represent the GLS system, which takes the digital control signal at the drives of the GLS system as input and the space vector of the corresponding outgoing laser beam as output. The training data set is obtained with the aid of a moving mechanism and a binocular stereo system. The parameters of the SLFN are efficiently solved in a closed form by using extreme learning machine (ELM). By quantitatively analyzing the regression precision with respective to the number of hidden neurons in the SLFN, we demonstrate that the proper number of hidden neurons can be safely chosen from a broad interval to guarantee good generalization performance. Compared to the traditional model-driven calibration, the proposed calibration method does not need a complex modeling process and is more accurate and stable. As the output of the network is the space vectors of the outgoing laser beams, it costs much less training time and can provide a uniform solution to both laser projection and 3D-reconstruction, in contrast with the existing data-driven calibration method which only works for the laser triangulation problem. Calibration experiment, projection experiment and 3D reconstruction experiment are respectively conducted to test the proposed method, and good results are obtained.

  19. Use of biocytin as neuroanatomic tracer in harvested human pancreas: a confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Saturnino; Fattore, Liana; Puddu, Maria Cristina; Cappai, Antonello; Picciau, Susanna; Brotzu, Giovanni; Serra, Giuliana Paola; Petruzzo, Palmina

    2002-05-01

    To identify central neuroanatomic structure, biocytin labeling has recently been used. To date, there are no bibliographic references about the use of this molecule in investigations of the peripheral nervous system. In the present study, fresh, harvested human pancreas was used to evidence pancreatic innervations by biocytin. To investigate for the first time pancreatic innervation in harvested pancreas from human multiorgan cadaveric donors. Biocytin labeling was used as a neuroanatomic tracing method, and confocal laser scanning microscopy was used for analysis for description by means of high-resolution images. The application of biocytin-avidin staining in harvested human pancreas revealed numerous bundles of nervous fibers, intrapancreatic ganglia, few small solitary neurons, and a large number of positive supporting cells (glial-like cells). Biocytin appeared to pass through gap junctions between glial elements and neurons and among the neurons. In human pancreas, biocytin is rapidly transported in both anterograde and retrograde directions, with consequent visualization of fine details of pancreatic innervation morphology. Indeed, evidence of anterograde and retrograde transportation of biocytin has been demonstrated in the extensive labeling of pancreatic preganglionic and postganglionic fibers as well as a great number of chemical buds that wind through exocrine tissue or undetermined target cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the successful use of biocytin in neuronal retrograde and anterograde labeling in the human peripheral nervous system.

  20. Can low-resolution airborne laser scanning data be used to model stream rating curves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Steve; Nathanson, Marcus; Lam, Norris; Dahlke, Helen; Rutzinger, Martin; Kean, Jason W.; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study explores the potential of using low-resolution (0.2 points/m2) airborne laser scanning (ALS)-derived elevation data to model stream rating curves. Rating curves, which allow the functional translation of stream water depth into discharge, making them integral to water resource monitoring efforts, were modeled using a physics-based approach that captures basic geometric measurements to establish flow resistance due to implicit channel roughness. We tested synthetically thinned high-resolution (more than 2 points/m2) ALS data as a proxy for low-resolution data at a point density equivalent to that obtained within most national-scale ALS strategies. Our results show that the errors incurred due to the effect of low-resolution versus high-resolution ALS data were less than those due to flow measurement and empirical rating curve fitting uncertainties. As such, although there likely are scale and technical limitations to consider, it is theoretically possible to generate rating curves in a river network from ALS data of the resolution anticipated within national-scale ALS schemes (at least for rivers with relatively simple geometries). This is promising, since generating rating curves from ALS scans would greatly enhance our ability to monitor streamflow by simplifying the overall effort required.

  1. Application of terrestrial laser scanning in documenting an underground coal mine pumping station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rošer, Janez

    2017-07-01

    Recently, a new underground pumping station was constructed 41.5 m below sea level and equipped, which has now become the main underground pumping station of the Velenje Coal Mine (VCM). In this study, use of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to acquire the 3D data of the engine room of the underground pumping station is presented. TLS is an advanced technique in spatial information data acquisition, which allows the equipment in the underground pumping station to be digitally captured with unprecedented resolution and accuracy. Integration with metric imagery allows 3D photorealistic models to be created for interpretation and visualisation. The final result shows the actual 3D image of the object recorded with a relative accuracy of a few millimetres. TLS is ideal for capturing the original state before construction commences and the final state after its completion, as well as for both observation of surface changes and detection of deformations. When we have an accurate 3D model of each component in the engine room of the underground pumping station, any maintenance, future upgrades, or modifications can be made with reference to the original state.

  2. Sarcoglycan immunoreactivity is lacking in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. A confocal laser scanning microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, C; Santoro, G; Impellizzeri, P; Manganaro, A; Cutroneo, G; Trimarchi, E; Antonuccio, P; Anastasi, G; Zuccarello, B

    2007-01-01

    The Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex (DGC) is a large multisubunit complex that plays a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and physiology of muscle fibers. Dystrophin has been reported to be absent in the pyloric muscle of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) patients. The present study was designed to investigate the other two patterns of DGC (dystroglycan and sarcoglycan complexes) in normal pyloric muscle and their possible modifications in IHPS patients. Ten pyloric muscle biopsies were obtained from babies operated for IHPS and five control pylorus biopsy taken at autopsy from cases without gastrointestinal disease. The DGC sub-complexes (beta-dystroglican and beta, delta- sarcoglycans) were localized immunohistochemically using specific monoclonal antibodies. The results were evaluated using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Positive immunolocalization of the two DGC sub complexes was demonstrated in the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the pyloric region of control patients. Similarly, a positive immune expression of beta-dystroglican was observed in the pyloric SMCs of IHPS patients. On the other hand a negative immunoreaction for sarcoglycans was recorded within the full thickness of the pyloric SMCs of these patients. The absence of sarcoglycans within the hypertrophied pyloric muscle may be a predisposing factor in the pathogenesis of IHPS since it could alter the normal physiology of SMCs through the modifications of structural integrity of sarcolemma and signaling between the extracellular and intracellular compartment.

  3. Dynamic occlusion detection and inpainting of in situ captured terrestrial laser scanning point clouds sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi; Yang, Bisheng

    2016-09-01

    Laser point clouds captured using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in an uncontrollable urban outdoor or indoor scene suffer from irregular shaped data blanks caused by dynamic occlusion that temporarily exists, i.e., moving objects, such as pedestrians or cars, resulting in integrality and quality losses of the scene data. This paper proposes a novel automatic dynamic occlusion detection and inpainting method for sequential TLS point clouds captured from one scan position. In situ collected laser point clouds sequences are indexed by establishing a novel panoramic space partition that assigns a three dimensional voxel to each laser point according to the scanning setups. Then two stationary background models are constructed at the ray voxel level using the laser reflectance intensity and geometrical attributes of the point set inside each voxel across the TLS sequence. Finally, the background models are combined to detect the points on the dynamic object, and the ray voxels of the detected dynamic points are tracked for further inpainting by replacing the ray voxels with the corresponding background voxels from another scan. The resulting scene is free of dynamic occlusions. Experiments validated the effectiveness of the proposed method for indoor and outdoor TLS point clouds captured by a commercial terrestrial scanner. The proposed method achieves high precision and recall rate for dynamic occlusion detection and produces clean inpainted point clouds for further processing.

  4. LOW COST MULTI-SENSOR ROBOT LASER SCANNING SYSTEM AND ITS ACCURACY INVESTIGATIONS FOR INDOOR MAPPING APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the automation of 3D indoor mapping task, a low cost multi-sensor robot laser scanning system is proposed in this paper. The multiple-sensor robot laser scanning system includes a panorama camera, a laser scanner, and an inertial measurement unit and etc., which are calibrated and synchronized together to achieve simultaneously collection of 3D indoor data. Experiments are undertaken in a typical indoor scene and the data generated by the proposed system are compared with ground truth data collected by a TLS scanner showing an accuracy of 99.2% below 0.25 meter, which explains the applicability and precision of the system in indoor mapping applications.

  5. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    CERN Document Server

    Amor, Rumelo; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report that the relative intensities in each plane of excitation depend on the Stokes shift of the fluorochrome. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  6. Low Cost Multi-Sensor Robot Laser Scanning System and its Accuracy Investigations for Indoor Mapping Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Zou, X.; Tian, M.; Li, J.; Wu, W.; Song, Y.; Dai, W.; Yang, B.

    2017-11-01

    In order to solve the automation of 3D indoor mapping task, a low cost multi-sensor robot laser scanning system is proposed in this paper. The multiple-sensor robot laser scanning system includes a panorama camera, a laser scanner, and an inertial measurement unit and etc., which are calibrated and synchronized together to achieve simultaneously collection of 3D indoor data. Experiments are undertaken in a typical indoor scene and the data generated by the proposed system are compared with ground truth data collected by a TLS scanner showing an accuracy of 99.2% below 0.25 meter, which explains the applicability and precision of the system in indoor mapping applications.

  7. An adaptive approach for the segmentation and extraction of planar and linear/cylindrical features from laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Zahra; Habib, Ayman

    2014-07-01

    Laser scanning systems have been established as leading tools for the collection of high density three-dimensional data over physical surfaces. The collected point cloud does not provide semantic information about the characteristics of the scanned surfaces. Therefore, different processing techniques have been developed for the extraction of useful information from this data which could be applied for diverse civil, industrial, and military applications. Planar and linear/cylindrical features are among the most important primitive information to be extracted from laser scanning data, especially those collected in urban areas. This paper introduces a new approach for the identification, parameterization, and segmentation of these features from laser scanning data while considering the internal characteristics of the utilized point cloud - i.e., local point density variation and noise level in the dataset. In the first step of this approach, a Principal Component Analysis of the local neighborhood of individual points is implemented to identify the points that belong to planar and linear/cylindrical features and select their appropriate representation model. For the detected planar features, the segmentation attributes are then computed through an adaptive cylinder neighborhood definition. Two clustering approaches are then introduced to segment and extract individual planar features in the reconstructed parameter domain. For the linear/cylindrical features, their directional and positional parameters are utilized as the segmentation attributes. A sequential clustering technique is proposed to isolate the points which belong to individual linear/cylindrical features through directional and positional attribute subspaces. Experimental results from simulated and real datasets demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach for the extraction of planar and linear/cylindrical features from laser scanning data.

  8. Imaging hyphal growth of Physisporinus vitreus in Norway spruce wood by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)

    OpenAIRE

    Schubert, Mark; Stührk, Chris; Fuhr, Matthias J.; Schwarze, Francis W.M.R.

    2017-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy are the most common methods for analyzing wood-decay fungi. However, the 3D visualization and quantification of the filamentous structure of fungi in wood is difficult to realize by means of these traditional techniques. In the present work, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was further developed for the quantitative imaging of the 3D microscopic hyphal growth of Physisporinus vitreus, a versatile fungus for engineering value-added wood product...

  9. Reducing Costs and Increasing Productivity in Ship Maintenance Using Product Lifecycle Management, 3D Laser Scanning and 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    3D laser scanning ABOM Alteration bill of material AIT Alteration installation team ALT Actual learning time CAD Computer-aided design CNC ...for Modernization Management and Operations Manual (SL720-AA-MAN-030 ed.). b. Phase II—Preliminary Design Phase The purpose of the preliminary...and Carrier Entitled Process for Modernization Management and Operations Manual (SL720-AA-MAN-030 ed.). Figure 4. Phase II Diagram (from Seaman, 2007

  10. INCREASE OF READABILITY AND ACCURACY OF 3D MODELS USING FUSION OF CLOSE RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND LASER SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gašparović

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of laser scanning technology has opened a new page in geodesy and enabled an entirely new way of presenting data. Products obtained by the method of laser scanning are used in many sciences, as well as in archaeology. It should be noted that 3D models of archaeological artefacts obtained by laser scanning are fully measurable, written in 1:1 scale and have high accuracy. On the other hand, texture and RGB values of the surface of the object obtained by a laser scanner have lower resolution and poorer radiometric characteristics in relation to the textures captured with a digital camera. Scientific research and the goal of this paper are to increase the accuracy and readability of the 3D model with textures obtained with a digital camera. Laser scanning was performed with triangulation scanner of high accuracy, Vivid 9i (Konica Minolta, while for photogrammetric recording digital camera Nikon D90 with a lens of fixed focal length 20 mm, was used. It is important to stress that a posteriori accuracy score of the global registration of point clouds in the form of the standard deviation was ± 0.136 mm while the average distance was only ± 0.080 mm. Also research has proven that the quality projection texture model increases readability. Recording of archaeological artefacts and making their photorealistic 3D model greatly contributes to archaeology as a science, accelerates processing and reconstruction of the findings. It also allows the presentation of findings to the general public, not just to the experts.

  11. Integration of Laser Scanning and Three-dimensional Models in the Legal Process Following an Industrial Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Eyre

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Laser scanning surveys can be of considerable use in jury trials, for example, in case the location supports the use of a high-definition survey, or an object has to be altered after the accident and it has a specific influence on the case and needs to be recorded. However, consideration has to be made in its application and to ensure a fair trial, with emphasis being placed on the facts of the case and personal interpretation controlled.

  12. Image-based tracking system for vibration measurement of a rotating object using a laser scanning vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongkyu; Khalil, Hossam; Jo, Youngjoon; Park, Kyihwan

    2016-06-01

    An image-based tracking system using laser scanning vibrometer is developed for vibration measurement of a rotating object. The proposed system unlike a conventional one can be used where the position or velocity sensor such as an encoder cannot be attached to an object. An image processing algorithm is introduced to detect a landmark and laser beam based on their colors. Then, through using feedback control system, the laser beam can track a rotating object.

  13. Image-based tracking system for vibration measurement of a rotating object using a laser scanning vibrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongkyu, E-mail: akein@gist.ac.kr; Khalil, Hossam; Jo, Youngjoon; Park, Kyihwan, E-mail: khpark@gist.ac.kr [School of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Buk-gu, Gwangju, South Korea, 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-28

    An image-based tracking system using laser scanning vibrometer is developed for vibration measurement of a rotating object. The proposed system unlike a conventional one can be used where the position or velocity sensor such as an encoder cannot be attached to an object. An image processing algorithm is introduced to detect a landmark and laser beam based on their colors. Then, through using feedback control system, the laser beam can track a rotating object.

  14. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of liesegang rings in odontogenic cysts: analysis of three-dimensional image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scivetti, Michele; Lucchese, Alberta; Crincoli, Vito; Pilolli, Giovanni Pietro; Favia, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    Liesegang rings are concentric noncellular lamellar structures, occasionally found in inflammatory tissues. They have been confused with various parasites, algas, calcification, and psammoma bodies. The authors examined Liesegang rings from oral inflammatory cysts by both optical and confocal laser scanning microscopy, and perfomed a three-dimensional reconstruction. These investigations indicate that Liesegang rings are composed of multiple birefringent concentric rings, resulting from a progressive deposition of organic substances, with an unclear pathogenesis.

  15. Modeling Of A Monocular, Full-Color, Laser-Scanning, Helmet-Mounted Display for Aviator Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    image on the left and 52% for the image on right. Color Contrast Thus far, all of the modeling has been performed with white light. Changing the...depicts four simulations each with different colored symbology. The white symbology in the image was judged a “++” in Figure A2-4 for the same...USAARL Report No. 2017-10 Modeling of a Monocular, Full- Color , Laser- Scanning, Helmet-Mounted Display for Aviator Situational Awareness By Thomas

  16. Conceptual study of the use of laser scanning systems for plate dimension and shape measurement in shipbuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ian; Pan, X.; Wang, X.

    1996-08-01

    A laser scanning system is proposed to enable the measurement of dimensions of steel plates used in shipbuilding with the objective being design verification and tolerance monitoring at the early stages of assembly. When the system is combined with a second scanning-viewing system it is demonstrated that depth measurements can be obtained giving the 3D shape of the plate or structure. The precision of the two configurations is discussed and evaluated.

  17. Multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning for identifying rockslide modifications: potentialities and problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnetti, Cristina; Bertacchini, Eleonora; Capra, Alessandro; Rivola, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    The heart of this research is to provide an efficient methodology for a reliable acquisition and interpretation of Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) data in the application field of landslide monitoring. In particular, rockslides, which are characterized by vertical walls of rock and by a complex morphology, are of great concern in the study. In these cases the airborne laser scanning is not able to provide useful and reliable description and the terrestrial laser scanning might be the only possible choice to obtain a good and reliable description of the geomorphology or to identify the changes occurred over time. The last purpose is still a challenging task when long distances are involved because the accurate and punctual identification of displacements is not possible due to the laser beam divergence. The final purpose of the research is a proposal of a methodology which is based on TLS technology for identifying displacements and extracting geomorphological changes. The approach is clearly based on a multi-temporal analysis which is computed on several repetitions of TLS surveys performed on the area of interest. To achieve best results and optimize the processing strategy, different methods about point clouds alignment have been tested together with algorithms both for filtering and post-processing. The case study is the Collagna Landslide that is located in the North Appennines (Reggio Emilia, Italy) on the right flank of Biola torrent. The large scale composite landslide area is made both by a wide rock slide sector and a more limited earth slide sector that, after high precipitation rates, disrupted the National Road 63 in December 2008. An integrated monitoring system is installed since 2009 and comprises both point-based technologies such as extensometers, total station and global positioning system, and also area-based technologies such as airborne laser scanner, long-range TLS and ground-based radar. This choice allows to couple the advantages of both

  18. Importance of Laser Scanning Resolution in the Process of Recreating the Architectural Details of Historical Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowicz, Joanna A.

    2017-10-01

    The TLS method (Terrestrial Laser Scanning) may replace the traditional building survey methods, e.g. those requiring the use measuring tapes or range finders. This technology allows for collecting digital data in the form of a point cloud, which can be used to create a 3D model of a building. In addition, it allows for collecting data with an incredible precision, which translates into the possibility to reproduce all architectural features of a building. This data is applied in reverse engineering to create a 3D model of an object existing in a physical space. This study presents the results of a research carried out using a point cloud to recreate the architectural features of a historical building with the application of reverse engineering. The research was conducted on a two-storey residential building with a basement and an attic. Out of the building’s façade sticks a veranda featuring a complicated, wooden structure. The measurements were taken at the medium and the highest resolution using a ScanStation C10 laser scanner by Leica. The data obtained was processed using specialist software, which allowed for the application of reverse engineering, especially for reproducing the sculpted details of the veranda. Following digitization, all redundant data was removed from the point cloud and the cloud was subjected to modelling. For testing purposes, a selected part of the veranda was modelled by means of two methods: surface matching and Triangulated Irregular Network. Both modelling methods were applied in the case of data collected at medium and the highest resolution. Creating a model based on data obtained at medium resolution, both by means of the surface matching and the TIN method, does not allow for a precise recreation of architectural details. The study presents certain sculpted elements recreated based on the highest resolution data with superimposed TIN juxtaposed against a digital image. The resulting model is very precise. Creating good models

  19. Scale dependency of forest functional diversity assessed using imaging spectroscopy and airborne laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. D.; Morsdorf, F.; Schmid, B.; Petchey, O. L.; Hueni, A.; Schimel, D.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Forest functional traits offer a mechanistic link between ecological processes and community structure and assembly rules. However, measuring functional traits of forests in a continuous and consistent way is particularly difficult due to the complexity of in-situ measurements and geo-referencing. New imaging spectroscopy measurements overcome these limitations allowing to map physiological traits on broad spatial scales. We mapped leaf chlorophyll, carotenoids and leaf water content over 900 ha of temperate mixed forest (Fig. 1a). The selected traits are functionally important because they are indicating the photosynthetic potential of trees, leaf longevity and protection, as well as tree water and drought stress. Spatially continuous measurements on the scale of individual tree crowns allowed to assess functional diversity patterns on a range of ecological extents. We used indexes of functional richness, divergence and evenness to map different aspects of diversity. Fig. 1b shows an example of physiological richness at an extent of 240 m radius. We compared physiological to morphological diversity patterns, derived based on plant area index, canopy height and foliage height diversity. Our results show that patterns of physiological and morphological diversity generally agree, independently measured by airborne imaging spectroscopy and airborne laser scanning, respectively. The occurrence of disturbance areas and mixtures of broadleaf and needle trees were the main drivers of the observed diversity patterns. Spatial patterns at varying extents and richness-area relationships indicated that environmental filtering is the predominant community assembly process. Our results demonstrate the potential for mapping physiological and morphological diversity in a temperate mixed forest between and within species on scales relevant to study community assembly and structure from space and test the corresponding measurement schemes.

  20. Relics of Mining Activities in West Bohemia - Mapping by Airborne Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltýnová, M.; Pavelka, K.

    2013-07-01

    The part of the Czech Republic - West Bohemia is well known for mining activities, different types of raw materials have been extracted from mines near Jáchymov, Sokolov and other sites since medieval times till today. There are original maps of some sites, as well there is effort of some geologists to find and map relics of mining activities (such as digs visible in terrain) by land survey. The quality of these available maps is unfortunately questionable - due to its age or used methods. Our aim was to find resource useful for searching for these sites, than to use field survey to confirm our findings. We used available digital terrain model (DTM) based on airborne laser scanning (ALS) technology to map relics of mining activities in West Bohemia. The Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre started in 2008 project for terrain mapping using the ALS method. The aim of mapping was to get authentic and detailed DTM of the Czech Republic. About 2/3 of area is currently covered by the DTM based on ALS, this year the mapping should be complete. The dataset is characterised by the density of 1-2 points/m2 and the standard deviation in altitude of model points is up to 30 cm (in forested areas). We had DTM in form of shaded surface for one third of the Czech Republic. The shaded surface enables to highlight terrain break lines, which is suitable for archaeological research. Terrain modifications caused by human activity are characterized by terrain break lines, local tops or pits, which do not fit to local geomorphology. Visual image interpretation of the dataset is in the process.

  1. Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning to Model Fuel Characteristics in Shrub-Steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K.; Glenn, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    Biological invasion, climate change, and other anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic factors are altering ecosystem function of arid shrublands in the western U.S., with notable effects including changes in community composition and increased incidence and severity of wildfires. Wildfire itself contributes to replacement of native flora communities with fire-prone invasives (prominently cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum), a positive feedback loop which threatens long-term degradation of burned areas. Efficient methods of vegetation inventory over large areas are essential to study and manage changes in ecological paradigms, and furthermore to anticipate and control wildfire. However, the application of remote sensing information from aerial or satellite platforms to shrub-steppe ecosystems is limited by spectral signal mixing and coarseness of data relative to low-stature vegetation. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technology provides rapid collection of high-resolution structural information at ranges up to hundreds of meters, offering an opportunity to efficiently record vegetation characteristics in large swaths. We tested the ability of TLS to quantify abundance and biomass of different vegetation stem diameter classes in shrub-steppe plots in southwestern Idaho, with classes selected to emulate timelag fuel classes commonly used in fuel inventories and fire modeling. We used data from destructively-sampled reference quadrats within scans for training and evaluation of TLS-derived estimates. We demonstrate TLS as an effective standalone tool for shrubland vegetation inventory, while future applications of these methods include collecting training data for interpretation of coarser remote sensing information, and providing accurate 3D simulations of fuel beds to spatially explicit wildfire models.

  2. Thermal maturity of Tasmanites microfossils from confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Kus, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, spectral properties of Tasmanites microfossils determined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM, using Ar 458 nm excitation). The Tasmanites occur in a well-characterized natural maturation sequence (Ro 0.48–0.74%) of Devonian shale (n = 3 samples) from the Appalachian Basin. Spectral property λmax shows excellent agreement (r2 = 0.99) with extant spectra from interlaboratory studies which used conventional fluorescence microscopy techniques. This result suggests spectral measurements from CLSM can be used to infer thermal maturity of fluorescent organic materials in geologic samples. Spectra of regions with high fluorescence intensity at fold apices and flanks in individual Tasmanites are blue-shifted relative to less-deformed areas in the same body that have lower fluorescence intensity. This is interpreted to result from decreased quenching moiety concentration at these locations, and indicates caution is needed in the selection of measurement regions in conventional fluorescence microscopy, where it is common practice to select high intensity regions for improved signal intensity and better signal to noise ratios. This study also documents application of CLSM to microstructural characterization of Tasmanites microfossils. Finally, based on an extant empirical relation between conventional λmax values and bitumen reflectance, λmax values from CLSM of Tasmanites microfossils can be used to calculate a bitumen reflectance equivalent value. The results presented herein can be used as a basis to broaden the future application of CLSM in the geological sciences into hydrocarbon prospecting and basin analysis.

  3. TESTING OF LAND COVER CLASSIFICATION FROM MULTISPECTRAL AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bakuła

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning provides a new opportunity for airborne data collection. It provides high-density topographic surveying and is also a useful tool for land cover mapping. Use of a minimum of three intensity images from a multiwavelength laser scanner and 3D information included in the digital surface model has the potential for land cover/use classification and a discussion about the application of this type of data in land cover/use mapping has recently begun. In the test study, three laser reflectance intensity images (orthogonalized point cloud acquired in green, near-infrared and short-wave infrared bands, together with a digital surface model, were used in land cover/use classification where six classes were distinguished: water, sand and gravel, concrete and asphalt, low vegetation, trees and buildings. In the tested methods, different approaches for classification were applied: spectral (based only on laser reflectance intensity images, spectral with elevation data as additional input data, and spectro-textural, using morphological granulometry as a method of texture analysis of both types of data: spectral images and the digital surface model. The method of generating the intensity raster was also tested in the experiment. Reference data were created based on visual interpretation of ALS data and traditional optical aerial and satellite images. The results have shown that multispectral ALS data are unlike typical multispectral optical images, and they have a major potential for land cover/use classification. An overall accuracy of classification over 90% was achieved. The fusion of multi-wavelength laser intensity images and elevation data, with the additional use of textural information derived from granulometric analysis of images, helped to improve the accuracy of classification significantly. The method of interpolation for the intensity raster was not very helpful, and using intensity rasters with both first and

  4. A generative statistical approach to automatic 3D building roof reconstruction from laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Brenner, Claus; Sester, Monika

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a generative statistical approach to automatic 3D building roof reconstruction from airborne laser scanning point clouds. In previous works, bottom-up methods, e.g., points clustering, plane detection, and contour extraction, are widely used. Due to the data artefacts caused by tree clutter, reflection from windows, water features, etc., the bottom-up reconstruction in urban areas may suffer from a number of incomplete or irregular roof parts. Manually given geometric constraints are usually needed to ensure plausible results. In this work we propose an automatic process with emphasis on top-down approaches. The input point cloud is firstly pre-segmented into subzones containing a limited number of buildings to reduce the computational complexity for large urban scenes. For the building extraction and reconstruction in the subzones we propose a pure top-down statistical scheme, in which the bottom-up efforts or additional data like building footprints are no more required. Based on a predefined primitive library we conduct a generative modeling to reconstruct roof models that fit the data. Primitives are assembled into an entire roof with given rules of combination and merging. Overlaps of primitives are allowed in the assembly. The selection of roof primitives, as well as the sampling of their parameters, is driven by a variant of Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique with specified jump mechanism. Experiments are performed on data-sets of different building types (from simple houses, high-rise buildings to combined building groups) and resolutions. The results show robustness despite the data artefacts mentioned above and plausibility in reconstruction.

  5. Assessing the capability of terrestrial laser scanning for monitoring slow moving landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokop

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Digital elevation models (DEM are widely used to determine characteristics of mass movement processes such as accumulation and deposition of material, volume estimates or the orientation of discontinuities. To create such DEMs point cloud data is provided by terrestrial laser scanning (TLS and recently used for analysis of mass movements. Therefore the reliability of TLS data was investigated in a comparative study with tachymetry. The main focus was on the possibility of determining movement patterns of landslides <100 mm. Therefore, several post processing steps are needed and the reliability of those were analyzed. The post processing steps that were investigated include: (1 The registration process is a crucial step considering long term TLS monitoring of an object and can be significantly improved using an iterative closest point (ICP algorithm; (2 Filtering methods are necessary to create DEMs in order to separate favored laser points on the terrain surface (ground points from topographically irrelevant points (non-ground-points. Therefore GIS tools were applied. Surfaces with and without vegetation cover were differentiated; (3 Displacement vectors are used to determine slope movement rates. They were created from TLS data after the computation of true orthophotos.

    Using the methodology presented it was not possible to determine movement rates <50 mm per period. However, if the quality of the point density is described and areas with very low point density are detected, reliable conclusions can be made regarding slope movement patterns and erosion and deposition of material for changes <100 mm for the investigated slope.

  6. Algorithm for the Automatic Estimation of Agricultural Tree Geometric Parameters Using Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaś, E.; Borkowski, A.; Estornell, J.

    2016-06-01

    The estimation of dendrometric parameters has become an important issue for the agricultural planning and management. Since the classical field measurements are time consuming and inefficient, Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data can be used for this purpose. Point clouds acquired for orchard areas allow to determine orchard structures and geometric parameters of individual trees. In this research we propose an automatic method that allows to determine geometric parameters of individual olive trees using ALS data. The method is based on the α-shape algorithm applied for normalized point clouds. The algorithm returns polygons representing crown shapes. For points located inside each polygon, we select the maximum height and the minimum height and then we estimate the tree height and the crown base height. We use the first two components of the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) as the estimators for crown diameters. The α-shape algorithm requires to define the radius parameter R. In this study we investigated how sensitive are the results to the radius size, by comparing the results obtained with various settings of the R with reference values of estimated parameters from field measurements. Our study area was the olive orchard located in the Castellon Province, Spain. We used a set of ALS data with an average density of 4 points m-2. We noticed, that there was a narrow range of the R parameter, from 0.48 m to 0.80 m, for which all trees were detected and for which we obtained a high correlation coefficient (> 0.9) between estimated and measured values. We compared our estimates with field measurements. The RMSE of differences was 0.8 m for the tree height, 0.5 m for the crown base height, 0.6 m and 0.4 m for the longest and shorter crown diameter, respectively. The accuracy obtained with the method is thus sufficient for agricultural applications.

  7. Individual Tree Crown Delineation from Airborne Laser Scanning for Diseased Larch Forest Stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Barnes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Airborne laser scanning (ALS can be utilised to derive canopy height models (CHMs for individual tree crown (ITC delineation. In the case of forest areas subject to defoliation and dieback as a result of disease, increased irregularities across the canopy can add complications to the segmentation of ITCs. Research has yet to address this issue in order to suggest appropriate techniques to apply under conditions of forest stands that are infected by phytopathogens. This study aimed to find the best method of ITC delineation for larch canopies affected by defoliation as a result of a Phytophthora ramorum infection. Sample plots from two study sites in Wales, United Kingdom, were selected for ITC segmentation assessment across a range of infection levels and stand characteristics. The performance of two segmentation algorithms (marker-controlled watershed and region growing were tested for a series of CHMs generated by a standard normalised digital surface model and a pit-free algorithm, across a range of spatial resolutions (0.15 m, 0.25 m and 0.5 m. The results show that the application of a pit-free CHM generation method produced improved segmentation accuracies in moderately and heavily infected larch forest, compared to the standard CHM. The success of ITC delineations was also influenced by CHM resolution. Across all plots the CHMs with a 0.25 m pixel size performed consistently well. However, lower and higher CHM resolutions also provided improved delineation accuracies in plots dominated by larger and smaller canopies respectively. The selected segmentation method also influenced the success of ITC delineations, with the marker-controlled watershed algorithm generating significantly more accurate results than the region growing algorithm (p < 0.10. The results demonstrate that ITCs in forest stands infected with Phytophthora ramorum can be successfully delineated from ALS when a pit-free algorithm is applied to CHM generation.

  8. Modeling Vehicle Collision Angle in Traffic Crashes Based on Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Nengchao; Huang, Gang; Wu, Chaozhong; Duan, Zhicheng; Li, Pingfan

    2017-02-28

    In road traffic accidents, the analysis of a vehicle's collision angle plays a key role in identifying a traffic accident's form and cause. However, because accurate estimation of vehicle collision angle involves many factors, it is difficult to accurately determine it in cases in which less physical evidence is available and there is a lack of monitoring. This paper establishes the mathematical relation model between collision angle, deformation, and normal vector in the collision region according to the equations of particle deformation and force in Hooke's law of classical mechanics. At the same time, the surface reconstruction method suitable for a normal vector solution is studied. Finally, the estimation model of vehicle collision angle is presented. In order to verify the correctness of the model, verification of multi-angle collision experiments and sensitivity analysis of laser scanning precision for the angle have been carried out using three-dimensional (3D) data obtained by a 3D laser scanner in the collision deformation zone. Under the conditions with which the model has been defined, validation results show that the collision angle is a result of the weighted synthesis of the normal vector of the collision point and the weight value is the deformation of the collision point corresponding to normal vectors. These conclusions prove the applicability of the model. The collision angle model proposed in this paper can be used as the theoretical basis for traffic accident identification and cause analysis. It can also be used as a theoretical reference for the study of the impact deformation of elastic materials.

  9. Effect of calcium on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm architecture: a confocal laser scanning microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sudhir K; Rao, T Subba

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial adhesion is a threshold event in the formation of biofilms. Several studies on molecular and biochemical aspects have highlighted that the protein matrix of the biofilm is of interest in developing strategies to combat biofouling. The prevalent role of biofilm associated protein (Bap) of Staphylococcus aureus in early adhesion and the putative presence of Ca(2+) binding EF hand motif in Bap was the motivation for this study. Biofilm assays (S. aureus strains V329 and M556) were done in micro-titer plates and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to study the biofilm architecture. The results showed that Ca(2+) did not influence planktonic growth of the cultures; however, it modulated the biofilm architecture of S. aureus V329 in a dose dependent manner. Strain M556 was found to be a weak biofilm former and showed no significant change in the presence of Ca(2+). When tested with increasing NaCl concentration, there was no reversal of the Bap-dependent Ca(2+) inhibition of S. aureus V329 biofilm. This indicates that the interaction of Bap and Ca(2+) is not mere electrostatic. CLSM images of V329 biofilm showed reduction in biofilm thickness as well as altered biofilm topography with varying Ca(2+) concentrations. The inhibition effect of Ca(2+) on strain V329 biofilm disappeared in the presence of chelating agent EDTA at a non-inhibiting concentration (0.15 mM). The paper elaborates the role of Ca(2+) in biofilm architecture of S. aureus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neutral Red as a Probe for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy Studies of Plant Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUBROVSKY, JOSEPH G.; GUTTENBERGER, MARTIN; SARALEGUI, ANDRES; NAPSUCIALY-MENDIVIL, SELENE; VOIGT, BORIS; BALUŠKA, FRANTIŠEK; MENZEL, DIEDRIK

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Neutral red (NR), a lipophilic phenazine dye, has been widely used in various biological systems as a vital stain for bright-field microscopy. In its unprotonated form it penetrates the plasma membrane and tonoplast of viable plant cells, then due to protonation it becomes trapped in acidic compartments. The possible applications of NR for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies were examined in various aspects of plant root biology. • Methods NR was used as a fluorochrome for living roots of Phaseolus vulgaris, Allium cepa, A. porrum and Arabidopsis thaliana (wild-type and transgenic GFP-carrying lines). The tissues were visualized using CLSM. The effect of NR on the integrity of the cytoskeleton and the growth rate of arabidopsis primary roots was analysed to judge potential toxic effects of the dye. • Key Results The main advantages of the use of NR are related to the fact that NR rapidly penetrates root tissues, has affinity to suberin and lignin, and accumulates in the vacuoles. It is shown that NR is a suitable probe for visualization of proto- and metaxylem elements, Casparian bands in the endodermis, and vacuoles in cells of living roots. The actin cytoskeleton and the microtubule system of the cells, as well as the dynamics of root growth, remain unchanged after short-term application of NR, indicating a relatively low toxicity of this chemical. It was also found that NR is a useful probe for the observation of the internal structures of root nodules and of fungal hyphae in vesicular–arbuscular mycorrhizas. • Conclusions Ease, low cost and absence of tissue processing make NR a useful probe for structural, developmental and vacuole-biogenetic studies of plant roots with CLSM. PMID:16520341

  11. Segmentation of Heritage Building by Means of Geometric and Radiometric Components from Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitelkadi, K.; Tahiri, D.; Simonetto, E.; Sebari, I.; Polidori, L.

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays, the terrestrial laser scanning represents an integral source of data for cultural heritage 3D storage and access through digital communication tools. The achievement of 3D models requires the implementation of several tasks such as segmentation. Segmentation is the key step during the point cloud processing where all homogeneous areas are identified, which describe a building facade. Usually, a large part of the segmentation approach focuses on the geometric information contained in the point cloud data by exploiting mathematical representation of a parametric surface. However, due to the complexity of the architecture, such segmentation does not suffice. Henceforth, other approaches turn to the use of color and laser intensity components. Although a variety of algorithms have been developed in this sense, problems of over-segmentation or under-segmentation are observed. In this context, we propose a new approach for point cloud segmentation aiming at a more accurate result. This approach relies on all the components of a colored point - both geometric and radiometric - combining the RGB values, laser intensity and geometric data. Our process begins with the extraction of homogeneous planar segments using the RANSAC algorithm. Next, the result is subjected to a radiometric-based segmentation, first through color similarity as one of the homogeneity criteria of a region growing algorithm, then through the use of intensity similarity for segment fusion. Experiments are performed on a facade presenting an example of Moroccan classical architecture located in Casablanca's Medina. Results show the importance of integrating all point cloud components, both geometric and radiometric.

  12. Modeling Vehicle Collision Angle in Traffic Crashes Based on Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengchao Lyu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In road traffic accidents, the analysis of a vehicle’s collision angle plays a key role in identifying a traffic accident’s form and cause. However, because accurate estimation of vehicle collision angle involves many factors, it is difficult to accurately determine it in cases in which less physical evidence is available and there is a lack of monitoring. This paper establishes the mathematical relation model between collision angle, deformation, and normal vector in the collision region according to the equations of particle deformation and force in Hooke’s law of classical mechanics. At the same time, the surface reconstruction method suitable for a normal vector solution is studied. Finally, the estimation model of vehicle collision angle is presented. In order to verify the correctness of the model, verification of multi-angle collision experiments and sensitivity analysis of laser scanning precision for the angle have been carried out using three-dimensional (3D data obtained by a 3D laser scanner in the collision deformation zone. Under the conditions with which the model has been defined, validation results show that the collision angle is a result of the weighted synthesis of the normal vector of the collision point and the weight value is the deformation of the collision point corresponding to normal vectors. These conclusions prove the applicability of the model. The collision angle model proposed in this paper can be used as the theoretical basis for traffic accident identification and cause analysis. It can also be used as a theoretical reference for the study of the impact deformation of elastic materials.

  13. Airborne Laser Scanning of Forest Stem Volume in a Mountainous Environment

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    Klemens Schadauer

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Airborne laser scanning (ALS is an active remote sensing technique that uses the time-of-flight measurement principle to capture the three-dimensional structure of the earth’s surface with pulsed lasers that transmit nanosecond-long laser pulses with a high pulse repetition frequency. Over forested areas most of the laser pulses are reflected by the leaves and branches of the trees, but a certain fraction of the laser pulses reaches the forest floor through small gaps in the canopy. Thus it is possible to reconstruct both the three-dimensional structure of the forest canopy and the terrain surface. For the retrieval of quantitative forest parameters such as stem volume or biomass it is necessary to use models that combine ALS with inventory data. One approach is to use multiplicative regression models that are trained with local inventory data. This method has been widely applied over boreal forest regions, but so far little experience exists with applying this method for mapping alpine forest. In this study the transferability of this approach to a 128 km2 large mountainous region in Vorarlberg, Austria, was evaluated. For the calibration of the model, inventory data as operationally collected by Austrian foresters were used. Despite these inventory data are based on variable sample plot sizes, they could be used for mapping stem volume for the entire alpine study area. The coefficient of determination R2 was 0.85 and the root mean square error (RMSE 90.9 m3ha-1 (relative error of 21.4% which is comparable to results of ALS studies conducted over topographically less complex environments. Due to the increasing availability, ALS data could become an operational part of Austrian’s forest inventories.

  14. Biochar Erosion in a Temperate Forest Assessed with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Milutin; Bruckman, Viktor; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    Biochar amendment in soils is seen as a potential greenhouse gas mitigation strategy. There are a number of examples of successful amendment strategies in agricultural ecosystems, where biochar is mixed with the mineral topsoil by ploughing or similar manipulation techniques. The application in forest ecosystems, however, comes with the limitation that biochar can only be applied directly on the surface. Light-weight biochar particles may be prone to erosion by environmental forces, such as precipitation and wind. We therefore assessed biochar erosion patterns by using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) in combination with a time-lapse camera on a micro topography scale in a temperate spruce-dominated forest with herbaceous ground vegetation. TLS is a photogrammetric technique that utilizes the laser light detection and ranging (LiDAR) principle to provide high resolution, 3D geometrical information of the object at millimeter scale. A biochar-amended (10 t/ha) plot with the size of ca. 3m x 3m was surveyed with 4 TLS scans taken from each of 4 plot's sides. The acquired scans were co-registered using the professional targets that were installed on the plot's corners. The resulting point cloud was then used as a base for calculating digital terrain model (DTM), to spatially map vegetation heights, vegetation density and roughness. These TLS products were derived by analyzing the geometrical properties of the acquired point cloud. A time-lapse camera was installed during summer 2013, continuously observing the entire plot at 3min intervals. A single, representative, precipitation event in August was selected for a detailed image analysis of biochar particle movement. The analysis showed that areas of notable particle movement correspond to places of flow accumulation simulated from the DTM. This suggests that the very high resolution terrain information can be usefully for planning the biochar amendment on temperate forest ecosystems.

  15. COMPARISON OF DISCRETE RETURN AND WAVEFORM TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING FOR DENSE VEGETATION FILTERING

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    A. Guarnieri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the results of the comparison between two terrestrial laser scanners (TLS, a discrete return system (Riegl LMS-Z620 and an echo-digitizing system (Riegl VZ-400, employed for the survey of a dense forested area, in the italian Alps. The site is actually undergoing a strong debate among the inhabitants and local government authorities about the exploitation of the area as a huge quarry to produce building material. The dispute originates from the uncertainty about the instability of the underlying mountain slope, which was interested in 1966 by a landslide. The whole area was surveyed with the two laser scanners on February 2011 during the vegetation dormant period. A slight different processing workflow was applied to the collected datasets: the VZ-400 scans were pre-filtered by exploiting the "calibrated relative reflectance" readings and the multi-target capability provided by this laser scanning system. Next, two different spatial filters were applied to both the resulting georeferenced 3D models, in order to eliminate as much vegetation as possible: iterative filter and a custom morphological filter, developed by the authors. Achieved results show that for both datasets, the iterative and the morphological filters perform quite well for eliminating the vegetation, though some manual editing is still required since vegetation does not feature a prevalent growing direction. Furthermore, the comparison between the number of points left in the final DTMs shows that the VZ-400 provided a one order of magnitude denser point cloud wrt. the LMS-Z620. This demonstrates that a TLS with multi-target capability can potentially provide a more detailed DTM even in presence of dense vegetation.

  16. CTC staining and counting of actively respiring bacteria in natural stone using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosch, S; Mansch, R; Knötzsch, K; Bock, E

    2003-01-01

    A method was established for staining and counting of actively respiring bacteria in natural stone by using the tetrazolium salt 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyltetrazolium chloride (CTC) in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Applying 5 mM CTC for 2 h to pure cultures of representative stone-inhabiting microorganisms showed that chemoorganotrophic bacteria and fungi-in contrast to lithoautotrophic nitrifying bacteria-were able to reduce CTC to CTF, the red fluorescing formazan crystals of CTC. Optimal staining conditions for microorganisms in stone material were found to be 15 mM CTC applied for 24 h. The cells could be visualized on transparent and nontransparent mineral materials by means of CLSM. A semi-automated method was used to count the cells within the pore system of the stone. The percentage of CTC-stained bacteria was dependent on temperature and humidity of the material. At 28 degrees C and high humidity (maximum water holding capacity) in the laboratory, about 58% of the total bacterial microflora was active. On natural stone exposed for 9 years at an urban exposure site in Germany, 52-56% of the bacterial microflora was active at the east, west, and north side of the specimen, while only 18% cells were active at the south side. This is consistent with microclimatic differences on the south side which was more exposed to sunshine thus causing UV and water stress as well as higher temperatures on a microscale level. In combination with CLSM, staining by CTC can be used as a fast method for monitoring the metabolic activity of chemoorganotrophic bacteria in monuments, buildings of historic interest or any art objects of natural stone. Due to the small size of samples required, the damage to these objects and buildings can be minimized.

  17. In situ quantification of experimental ice accretion on tree crowns using terrestrial laser scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Charles A; Greene, David; Delagrange, Sylvain; Follett, Matt; Fournier, Richard; Messier, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In the eastern hardwood forests of North America ice storms are an important disturbance event. Ice storms strongly influence community dynamics as well as urban infrastructure via catastrophic branch failure; further, the severity and frequency of ice storms are likely to increase with climate change. However, despite a long-standing interest into the effects of freezing rain on forests, the process of ice accretion and thus ice loading on branches remains poorly understood. This is because a number of challenges have prevented in situ measurements of ice on branches, including: 1) accessing and measuring branches in tall canopies, 2) limitations to travel during and immediately after events, and 3) the unpredictability of ice storms. Here, utilizing a novel combination of outdoor experimental icing, manual measurements and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), we perform the first in situ measurements of ice accretion on branches at differing heights in a tree crown and with increasing duration of exposure. We found that TLS can reproduce both branch and iced branch diameters with high fidelity, but some TLS instruments do not detect ice. Contrary to the expectations of ice accretion models, radial accretion varied sharply within tree crowns. Initially, radial ice accretion was similar throughout the crown, but after 6.5 hours of irrigation (second scanning) radial ice accretion was much greater on upper branches than on lower (∼factor of 3). The slope of the change in radial ice accretion along branches increased with duration of exposure and was significantly greater at the second scanning compared to the first. We conclude that outdoor icing experiments coupled with the use of TLS provide a robust basis for evaluation of models of ice accretion and breakage in tree crowns, facilitating estimation of the limiting breaking stress of branches by accurate measurements of ice loads.

  18. In situ quantification of experimental ice accretion on tree crowns using terrestrial laser scanning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A Nock

    Full Text Available In the eastern hardwood forests of North America ice storms are an important disturbance event. Ice storms strongly influence community dynamics as well as urban infrastructure via catastrophic branch failure; further, the severity and frequency of ice storms are likely to increase with climate change. However, despite a long-standing interest into the effects of freezing rain on forests, the process of ice accretion and thus ice loading on branches remains poorly understood. This is because a number of challenges have prevented in situ measurements of ice on branches, including: 1 accessing and measuring branches in tall canopies, 2 limitations to travel during and immediately after events, and 3 the unpredictability of ice storms. Here, utilizing a novel combination of outdoor experimental icing, manual measurements and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, we perform the first in situ measurements of ice accretion on branches at differing heights in a tree crown and with increasing duration of exposure. We found that TLS can reproduce both branch and iced branch diameters with high fidelity, but some TLS instruments do not detect ice. Contrary to the expectations of ice accretion models, radial accretion varied sharply within tree crowns. Initially, radial ice accretion was similar throughout the crown, but after 6.5 hours of irrigation (second scanning radial ice accretion was much greater on upper branches than on lower (∼factor of 3. The slope of the change in radial ice accretion along branches increased with duration of exposure and was significantly greater at the second scanning compared to the first. We conclude that outdoor icing experiments coupled with the use of TLS provide a robust basis for evaluation of models of ice accretion and breakage in tree crowns, facilitating estimation of the limiting breaking stress of branches by accurate measurements of ice loads.

  19. Computing multiple aggregation levels and contextual features for road facilities recognition using mobile laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bisheng; Dong, Zhen; Liu, Yuan; Liang, Fuxun; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, updating the inventory of road infrastructures based on field work is labor intensive, time consuming, and costly. Fortunately, vehicle-based mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems provide an efficient solution to rapidly capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of road environments with high flexibility and precision. However, robust recognition of road facilities from huge volumes of 3D point clouds is still a challenging issue because of complicated and incomplete structures, occlusions and varied point densities. Most existing methods utilize point or object based features to recognize object candidates, and can only extract limited types of objects with a relatively low recognition rate, especially for incomplete and small objects. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a semantic labeling framework by combing multiple aggregation levels (point-segment-object) of features and contextual features to recognize road facilities, such as road surfaces, road boundaries, buildings, guardrails, street lamps, traffic signs, roadside-trees, power lines, and cars, for highway infrastructure inventory. The proposed method first identifies ground and non-ground points, and extracts road surfaces facilities from ground points. Non-ground points are segmented into individual candidate objects based on the proposed multi-rule region growing method. Then, the multiple aggregation levels of features and the contextual features (relative positions, relative directions, and spatial patterns) associated with each candidate object are calculated and fed into a SVM classifier to label the corresponding candidate object. The recognition performance of combining multiple aggregation levels and contextual features was compared with single level (point, segment, or object) based features using large-scale highway scene point clouds. Comparative studies demonstrated that the proposed semantic labeling framework significantly improves road facilities recognition

  20. Quantifying Effusion Rates at Active Volcanoes through Integrated Time-Lapse Laser Scanning and Photography

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    Neil Slatcher

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During volcanic eruptions, measurements of the rate at which magma is erupted underpin hazard assessments. For eruptions dominated by the effusion of lava, estimates are often made using satellite data; here, in a case study at Mount Etna (Sicily, we make the first measurements based on terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, and we also include explosive products. During the study period (17–21 July 2012, regular Strombolian explosions were occurring within the Bocca Nuova crater, producing a ~50 m-high scoria cone and a small lava flow field. TLS surveys over multi-day intervals determined a mean cone growth rate (effusive and explosive products of ~0.24 m3·s−1. Differences between 0.3-m resolution DEMs acquired at 10-minute intervals captured the evolution of a breakout lava flow lobe advancing at 0.01–0.03 m3·s−1. Partial occlusion within the crater prevented similar measurement of the main flow, but integrating TLS data with time-lapse imagery enabled lava viscosity (7.4 × 105 Pa·s to be derived from surface velocities and, hence, a flux of 0.11 m3·s−1 to be calculated. Total dense rock equivalent magma discharge estimates are ~0.1–0.2 m3·s−1 over the measurement period and suggest that simultaneous estimates from satellite data are somewhat overestimated. Our results support the use of integrated TLS and time-lapse photography for ground-truthing space-based measurements and highlight the value of interactive image analysis when automated approaches, such as particle image velocimetry (PIV, fail.

  1. Terrestrial laser scanning for biomass assessment and tree reconstruction: improved processing efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboabidallah, Ahmed; Martin, John; Lavender, Samantha; Abbott, Victor

    2017-09-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) processing for biomass mapping involves large data volumes, and often includes relatively slow 3D object fitting steps that increase the processing time. This study aimed to test new features that can speed up the overall processing time. A new type of 3D voxel is used, where the horizontal layers are parallel to the Digital Terrain Model. This voxel type allows procedures to extract tree diameters using just one layer, but still gives direct tree-height estimations. Layer intersection is used to emphasize the trunks as upright standing objects, which are detected in the spatially segmented intersection of the breast-height voxels and then extended upwards and downwards. The diameters were calculated by fitting elliptical cylinders to the laser points in the detected trunk segments. Non-trunk segments, used in sub-tree- structures, were found using the parent-child relationships between successive layers. The branches were reconstructed by skeletonizing each sub-tree branch, and the biomass was distributed statistically amongst the weighted skeletons. The procedure was applied to nine plots within the UK. The average correlation coefficients between reconstructed and directly measured tree diameters, heights and branches were R2 = 0.92, 0.97 and 0.59 compared to 0.91, 0.95, and 0.63 when cylindrical fitting was used. The average time to apply the method reduced from 5hrs:18mins per plot, for the conventional methods, to 2hrs:24mins when the same hardware and software libraries were used with the 3D voxels. These results indicate that this 3D voxel method can produce, much more quickly, results of a similar accuracy that would improve efficiency if applied to projects with large volume TLS datasets.

  2. Estimating single-tree branch biomass of Norway spruce by airborne laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauglin, Marius; Dibdiakova, Janka; Gobakken, Terje; Næsset, Erik

    2013-05-01

    The use of forest biomass for bioenergy purposes, directly or through refinement processes, has increased in the last decade. One example of such use is the utilization of logging residues. Branch biomass constitutes typically a considerable part of the logging residues, and should be quantified and included in future forest inventories. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is widely used when collecting data for forest inventories, and even methods to derive information at the single-tree level has been described. Procedures for estimation of single-tree branch biomass of Norway spruce using features derived from ALS data are proposed in the present study. As field reference data the dry weight branch biomass of 50 trees were obtained through destructive sampling. Variables were further derived from the ALS echoes from each tree, including crown volume calculated from an interpolated crown surface constructed with a radial basis function. Spatial information derived from the pulse vectors were also incorporated when calculating the crown volume. Regression models with branch biomass as response variable were fit to the data, and the prediction accuracy assessed through a cross-validation procedure. Random forest regression models were compared to stepwise and simple linear least squares models. In the present study branch biomass was estimated with a higher accuracy by the best ALS-based models than by existing allometric biomass equations based on field measurements. An improved prediction accuracy was observed when incorporating information from the laser pulse vectors into the calculation of the crown volume variable, and a linear model with the crown volume as a single predictor gave the best overall results with a root mean square error of 35% in the validation.

  3. Mapping Natura 2000 Habitat Conservation Status in a Pannonic Salt Steppe with Airborne Laser Scanning

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    András Zlinszky

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Natura 2000 Habitat Conservation Status is currently evaluated based on fieldwork. However, this is proving to be unfeasible over large areas. The use of remote sensing is increasingly encouraged but covering the full range of ecological variables by such datasets and ensuring compatibility with the traditional assessment methodology has not been achieved yet. We aimed to test Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS as a source for mapping all variables required by the local official conservation status assessment scheme and to develop an automated method that calculates Natura 2000 conservation status at 0.5 m raster resolution for 24 km2 of Pannonic Salt Steppe habitat (code 1530. We used multi-temporal (summer and winter ALS point clouds with full-waveform recording and a density of 10 pt/m2. Some required variables were derived from ALS product rasters; others involved vegetation classification layers calculated by machine learning and fuzzy categorization. Thresholds separating favorable and unfavorable values of each variable required by the national assessment scheme were manually calibrated from 10 plots where field-based assessment was carried out. Rasters representing positive and negative scores for each input variable were integrated in a ruleset that exactly follows the Hungarian Natura 2000 assessment scheme for grasslands. Accuracy of each parameter and the final conservation status score and category was evaluated by 10 independent assessment plots. We conclude that ALS is a suitable data source for Natura 2000 assessments in grasslands, and that the national grassland assessment scheme can successfully be used as a GIS processing model for conservation status, ensuring that the output is directly comparable with traditional field based assessments.

  4. Deriving Fuel Mass by Size Class in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

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    Lloyd Queen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Requirements for describing coniferous forests are changing in response to wildfire concerns, bio-energy needs, and climate change interests. At the same time, technology advancements are transforming how forest properties can be measured. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS is yielding promising results for measuring tree biomass parameters that, historically, have required costly destructive sampling and resulted in small sample sizes. Here we investigate whether TLS intensity data can be used to distinguish foliage and small branches (≤0.635 cm diameter; coincident with the one-hour timelag fuel size class from larger branchwood (>0.635 cm in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii branch specimens. We also consider the use of laser density for predicting biomass by size class. Measurements are addressed across multiple ranges and scan angles. Results show TLS capable of distinguishing fine fuels from branches at a threshold of one standard deviation above mean intensity. Additionally, the relationship between return density and biomass is linear by fuel type for fine fuels (r2 = 0.898; SE 22.7% and branchwood (r2 = 0.937; SE 28.9%, as well as for total mass (r2 = 0.940; SE 25.5%. Intensity decays predictably as scan distances increase; however, the range-intensity relationship is best described by an exponential model rather than 1/d2. Scan angle appears to have no systematic effect on fine fuel discrimination, while some differences are observed in density-mass relationships with changing angles due to shadowing.

  5. Parametric modeling and optimization of laser scanning parameters during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, K.; Ramanujam, R.; Kuppan, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parametric effect, microstructure, micro-hardness and optimization of laser scanning parameters (LSP) on heating experiments during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718 alloy. The laser source used for experiments is a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser with maximum power of 2 kW. The experimental parameters in the present study are cutting speed in the range of 50-100 m/min, feed rate of 0.05-0.1 mm/rev, laser power of 1.25-1.75 kW and approach angle of 60-90°of laser beam axis to tool. The plan of experiments are based on central composite rotatable design L31 (43) orthogonal array. The surface temperature is measured via on-line measurement using infrared pyrometer. Parametric significance on surface temperature is analysed using response surface methodology (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 3D surface graphs. The structural change of the material surface is observed using optical microscope and quantitative measurement of heat affected depth that are analysed by Vicker's hardness test. The results indicate that the laser power and approach angle are the most significant parameters to affect the surface temperature. The optimum ranges of laser power and approach angle was identified as 1.25-1.5 kW and 60-65° using overlaid contour plot. The developed second order regression model is found to be in good agreement with experimental values with R2 values of 0.96 and 0.94 respectively for surface temperature and heat affected depth.

  6. Deriving airborne laser scanning based computational canopy volume for forest biomass and allometry studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauhkonen, Jari; Næsset, Erik; Gobakken, Terje

    2014-10-01

    A computational canopy volume (CCV) based on airborne laser scanning (ALS) data is proposed to improve predictions of forest biomass and other related attributes like stem volume and basal area. An approach to derive the CCV based on computational geometry, topological connectivity and numerical optimization was tested with sparse-density, plot-level ALS data acquired from 40 field sample plots of 500-1000 m2 located in a boreal forest in Norway. The CCV had a high correspondence with the biomass attributes considered when derived from optimized filtrations, i.e. ordered sets of simplices belonging to the triangulations based on the point data. Coefficients of determination (R2) between the CCV and total above-ground biomass, canopy biomass, stem volume, and basal area were 0.88-0.89, 0.89, 0.83-0.97, and 0.88-0.92, respectively, depending on the applied filtration. The magnitude of the required filtration was found to increase according to an increasing basal area, which indicated a possibility to predict this magnitude by means of ALS-based height and density metrics. A simple prediction model provided CCVs which had R2 of 0.77-0.90 with the aforementioned forest attributes. The derived CCVs always produced complementary information and were mainly able to improve the predictions of forest biomass relative to models based on the height and density metrics, yet only by 0-1.9 percentage points in terms of relative root mean squared error. Possibilities to improve the CCVs by a further analysis of topological persistence are discussed.

  7. Multitemporal airborne laser scanning for the analysis of glacier change in South-Tyrol (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Lorenzo; Galos, Stephan; Klug, Christoph; Sailer, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    The mountain ranges in the area of the Autonomous Province of Bozen - South-Tyrol (Italy) contain numerous glaciers of various sizes and in different elevations and expositions. During the annual melt period, the runoff of these glaciers feeds the Etsch-river, which is the main water source for the extensive fruit production in the Vinschgau, an inner alpine dry valley with very low precipitation. Nevertheless, relatively little is still known about the current state of the glaciers in this area, except from the glacier inventories for 1983, 1997 and 2005/2006 and few glaciers which are subject to mass-balance studies. The study area encompasses the glaciers within the main part of the Ortler-Cevedale group (Sulden and Martell valleys), which is the most heavily glaciated region in South-Tyrol, the glaciers of the upper Ulten valley and the glaciers of the Schnals valley at the alpine main ridge. For this study, two sets of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data are used to calculate the recent changes in glacier area and volume. ALS data from 2005 is available from the Autonomous Province of Bozen, while another data acquisition campaign was conducted in context of the project MALS (Multitemporal Airborne Laserscanning South-Tyrol) in autumn 2011. The extents of all glaciers in the study areas have been delineated for both dates, based on digital terrain models (DTM), hillshades and intensity information. Those results are used to calculate changes in the glaciated areas. The geodetic mass balance for al studied glaciers is calculated as well. Therefore, changes in glacier volume between 2005 and 2011 and their altitudinal distribution are calculated from the differences of the ALS-based DTM. The results of the mass-balance calculations for the single glaciers are interpreted with respect to their spatial distribution, taking topographic parameters such as altitudinal distribution of glacier area, slope into account.

  8. Quantification of overnight movement of birch (Betula pendula branches and foliage with short interval terrestrial laser scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eetu ePuttonen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to determine circadian movements of silver birch (Petula Bendula branches and foliage detected with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS. The study consisted of two geographically separate experiments conducted in Finland and in Austria. Both experiments were carried out at the same time of the year and under similar outdoor conditions. Experiments consisted of 14 (Finland and 77 (Austria individual laser scans taken between sunset and sunrise. The resulting point clouds were used in creating a time series of branch movements. In the Finnish data, the vertical movement of the whole tree crown was monitored due to low volumetric point density. In the Austrian data, movements of manually selected representative points on branches were monitored. The movements were monitored from dusk until morning hours in order to avoid daytime wind effects. The results indicated that height deciles of the Finnish birch crown had vertical movements between -10.0 and 5.0 cm compared to the situation at sunset. In the Austrian data, the maximum detected representative point movement was 10.0 cm. The temporal development of the movements followed a highly similar pattern in both experiments, with the maximum movements occurring about an hour and a half before (Austria or around (Finland sunrise. The results demonstrate the potential of terrestrial laser scanning measurements in support of chronobiology.

  9. [Quantitative analysis of the palatal features affected by digit-sucking habit using a laser scanning system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yingjie; Ge, Lihong; Miao, Jiangxia

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the influence of digit-sucking habit on palatal features in pre-school children by using a laser scanning system. Forty pre-school children were chosen according to the results of questionnaires, among which 20 with digit-sucking habit(digit-sucking group) and 20 without any oral habits(control group). Impression of the upper jaw was taken from each child. After laser scanning the plaster casts, and three-dimensional reconstruction by the computer, parameters of anterior and posterior palatal length, width and height were measured, ratios of height/width, length/width and width ratio of anterior and posterior palatal were analyzed. The differences of palatal features between two groups were analyzed by t test. There was statistical significance between digit-sucking group and control group in posterior palatal width, anterior palatal length and anterior palatal height. The ratios of height/width and length/width in both posterior and anterior areas were statistically significant (P features were relatively deeper, narrower and more protrusive in digit-sucking group. The digit-sucking habit may have some deleterious impacts on the palatal features in pre-school children with primary dentition. And it is practical to measure the spacial palatal features by using laser scanning system to some extent.

  10. Evaluation of accuracy of photogrammetric methods and laser scanning for measuring of parameters of cracks natural separateness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobolevskyi R.V.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The modern approach of evaluation of errors of surface digital photogrammetric survey is considered. The possibilities of taking into account the impact of error of the system of treatment of digital representation and parameters of digital matrix on exactness of determination of actual coordinates of points are considered. The methods of quality assessment identifying cracks on the results of photogrammetric surveys and the estimation accuracy of the length and area of cracks are offered. The calculations of theoretical step of scanning for different categories of cracks using laser scanners VZ-400, VZ-1000, VZ-4000 of the RIEGL Company are executed. The order of determination of limits of area of laser scanning is reasonably depending on the parameters of cracks and technical descriptions of the laser scanner. According to the results of the calculations the method of determining the optimal parameters of laser scanning for different types of cracks is proved. Reasonable rational directions of the use of digital surface photogrammetric surveys and laser scanning in the study of multilevel fractured deposits of minerals are substantiated.

  11. A LOW BUDGET MOBILE LASER SCANNING SOLUTION USING ON BOARD SENSORS AND FIELD BUS SYSTEMS OF TODAY'S CONSUMER AUTOMOBILES

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    D. M. M. Vock

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning systems (MLS offer a great potential for acquiring detailed point cloud data of urban and suburban surroundings with minimum effort. In this paper a new solution for MLSs is presented, requiring solely a combination of a profile laser scanning device and systems that are included in today's serialized end consumer vehicles. While today's mobile laser scan systems require different and expensive additional hardware that needs to be mounted onto the vehicle, the devices included within vehicle electronics offer good alternatives without additional costs.The actual scan consists of a continuous profile scan together with information gathered from on-board sensor modules. In a post- processing step, the sensor data is used to reconstruct the car's trajectory for the period of the scan and, based on this information, the track of the scan device for every measured laser pixel. Synchronization of pixel data and vehicle movement is realized via a timestamp signal which is transmitted to the car's field bus system and the scan device. To generate the final point cloud scenario, the trajectory is interpolated for every single scan point and used to convert its local position within the profile into the global coordinate system (Fig.1, Left.

  12. Detection of morphological changes in cliff face surrounding a waterfall using terrestrial laser scanning and unmanned aerial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Obanawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Waterfall or bedrock knickpoint appears as an erosional front in bedrock rivers forming deep v-shaped valley downstream. Following the rapid fluvial erosion of waterfall, rockfalls and gravita-tional collapses often occur in surrounding steep cliffs. Although morphological changes of such steep cliffs are sometimes visually observed, quantitative and precise measurements of their spatio-temporal distribution have been limited due to the difficulties in direct access to such cliffs if with classical measurement methods. However, for the clarification of geomorphological processes oc-curring in the cliffs, multi-temporal mapping of the cliff face at a high resolution is necessary. Re-mote sensing approaches are therefore suitable for the topographic measurements and detection of changes in such inaccessible cliffs. To achieve accurate topographic mapping of cliffs around a wa-terfall, here we perform multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), as well as structure-from-motion multi-view stereo (SfM-MVS) photogrammetry based on unmanned aerial system (UAS). The study site is Kegon Falls in central Japan, having a vertical drop of surface water from top of its overhanging cliff, as well as groundwater outflows from its lower portions. The bedrock is composed of alternate layers of andesite lava and conglomerates. Minor rockfalls in the cliffs are often ob-served by local people. The latest major rockfall occurred in 1986, causing ca. 8-m upstream propa-gation of the waterfall lip. This provides a good opportunity to examine the changes in the surround-ing cliffs following the waterfall recession. Multi-time point clouds were obtained by TLS measure-ment over years, and the three-dimensional changes of the rock surface were detected, uncovering the locus of small rockfalls and gully developments. Erosion seems particularly frequent in relatively weak the conglomerates layer, whereas small rockfalls seems to have occurred in the andesite layers. Also, shadows in the

  13. Categorizing Wetland Vegetation by Airborne Laser Scanning on Lake Balaton and Kis-Balaton, Hungary

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    Norbert Pfeifer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Outlining patches dominated by different plants in wetland vegetation provides information on species succession, microhabitat patterns, wetland health and ecosystem services. Aerial photogrammetry and hyperspectral imaging are the usual data acquisition methods but the application of airborne laser scanning (ALS as a standalone tool also holds promises for this field since it can be used to quantify 3-dimensional vegetation structure. Lake Balaton is a large shallow lake in western Hungary with shore wetlands that have been in decline since the 1970s. In August 2010, an ALS survey of the shores of Lake Balaton was completed with 1 pt/m2 discrete echo recording. The resulting ALS dataset was processed to several output rasters describing vegetation and terrain properties, creating a sufficient number of independent variables for each raster cell to allow for basic multivariate classification. An expert-generated decision tree algorithm was applied to outline wetland areas, and within these, patches dominated by Typha sp. Carex sp., and Phragmites australis. Reed health was mapped into four categories: healthy, stressed, ruderal and die-back. The output map was tested against a set of 775 geo-tagged ground photographs and had a user’s accuracy of > 97% for detecting non-wetland features (trees, artificial surfaces and low density Scirpus stands, > 72% for dominant genus detection and > 80% for most reed health categories (with 62% for one category. Overall classification accuracy was 82.5%, Cohen’s Kappa 0.80, which is similar to some hyperspectral or multispectral-ALS fusion studies. Compared to hyperspectral imaging, the processing chain of ALS can be automated in a similar way but relies directly on differences in vegetation structure and actively sensed reflectance and is thus probably more robust. The data acquisition parameters are similar to the national surveys of several European

  14. The neuromuscular system of Pycnophyes kielensis (Kinorhyncha: Allomalorhagida investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy

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    Andreas Altenburger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinorhynchs are ecdysozoan animals with a phylogenetic position close to priapulids and loriciferans. To understand the nature of segmentation within Kinorhyncha and to infer a probable ancestry of segmentation within the last common ancestor of Ecdysozoa, the musculature and the nervous system of the allomalorhagid kinorhynch Pycnophyes kielensis were investigated by use of immunohistochemistry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and 3D reconstruction software. Results The kinorhynch body plan comprises 11 trunk segments. Trunk musculature consists of paired ventral and dorsal longitudinal muscles in segments 1–10 as well as dorsoventral muscles in segments 1–11. Dorsal and ventral longitudinal muscles insert on apodemes of the cuticle inside the animal within each segment. Strands of longitudinal musculature extend over segment borders in segments 1–6. In segments 7–10, the trunk musculature is confined to the segments. Musculature of the digestive system comprises a strong pharyngeal bulb with attached mouth cone muscles as well as pharyngeal bulb protractors and retractors. The musculature of the digestive system shows no sign of segmentation. Judged by the size of the pharyngeal bulb protractors and retractors, the pharyngeal bulb, as well as the introvert, is moved passively by internal pressure caused by concerted action of the dorsoventral muscles. The nervous system comprises a neuropil ring anterior to the pharyngeal bulb. Associated with the neuropil ring are flask-shaped serotonergic somata extending anteriorly and posteriorly. A ventral nerve cord is connected to the neuropil ring and runs toward the anterior until an attachment point in segment 1, and from there toward the posterior with one ganglion in segment 6. Conclusions Segmentation within Kinorhyncha likely evolved from an unsegmented ancestor. This conclusion is supported by continuous trunk musculature in the anterior segments 1–6, continuous

  15. Application of terrestrial laser scanning to the development and updating of the base map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapa, Przemysław; Mitka, Bartosz

    2017-06-01

    The base map provides basic information about land to individuals, companies, developers, design engineers, organizations, and government agencies. Its contents include spatial location data for control network points, buildings, land lots, infrastructure facilities, and topographic features. As the primary map of the country, it must be developed in accordance with specific laws and regulations and be continuously updated. The base map is a data source used for the development and updating of derivative maps and other large scale cartographic materials such as thematic or topographic maps. Thanks to the advancement of science and technology, the quality of land surveys carried out by means of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) matches that of traditional surveying methods in many respects. This paper discusses the potential application of output data from laser scanners (point clouds) to the development and updating of cartographic materials, taking Poland's base map as an example. A few research sites were chosen to present the method and the process of conducting a TLS land survey: a fragment of a residential area, a street, the surroundings of buildings, and an undeveloped area. The entire map that was drawn as a result of the survey was checked by comparing it to a map obtained from PODGiK (pol. Powiatowy Ośrodek Dokumentacji Geodezyjnej i Kartograficznej - Regional Centre for Geodetic and Cartographic Records) and by conducting a field inspection. An accuracy and quality analysis of the conducted fieldwork and deskwork yielded very good results, which provide solid grounds for predicating that cartographic materials based on a TLS point cloud are a reliable source of information about land. The contents of the map that had been created with the use of the obtained point cloud were very accurately located in space (x, y, z). The conducted accuracy analysis and the inspection of the performed works showed that high quality is characteristic of TLS surveys. The

  16. Practical aspects of registration the transformation of a river valley by beavers using terrestrial laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszkowski, Sebastian; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brykała, Dariusz; Gierszewski, Piotr; Kaczmarek, Halina; Kordowski, Jarosław; Słowiński, Michał

    2016-04-01

    Activity of beavers (Castor fiber) often significantly affects the environment in which they life. The most commonly observed effect of their being in environment is construction of beaver dams and formation a pond upstream. However, in case of a sudden break of a dam and beaver pond drainage, the valley below the dam may also undergo remodelling. The nature and magnitude of these changes depends on the quantity of water and its energy as well as on the geological structure of the valley. The effects of such events can be riverbank erosion, and the deposition of the displaced of erosion products in the form of sandbars or fans. The material can also be accumulated in local depressions or delivered to water bodies. Such events may occur multiple times in the same area. To assess their impact on the environment it is important to quantify the displaced material. The study of such transformations was performed within a small valley of the river of Struga Czechowska (Tuchola Pinewood Forest, Poland). The valley is mainly cut in sands and gravels. Its steep banks are overgrown with bushes and trees. The assessment of changes in morphology were based on the event of the beaver pond drainage of 2015. The study uses the measurements from the terrestrial laser scanning (scanner Riegl VZ-4000). The measurements were performed before and after the event. Each of the two models obtained for comparison was made up of more than 20 measurement stations. Point clouds were joined by Multi-Station Adjustment without placing in the terrain any objects of reference. During measurements attention was paid to the changes in morphology of both riverbed and valley surrounding. The paper presents the example of the recorded changes as well as the measurement procedure. Moreover, the aspects of fieldwork and issues related to post-processing, such as merging, filtering of point clouds and detection of changes, are also presented. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of

  17. Compact multisensor laser scanning head for processing and monitoring microspot welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Moustapha; Julliard, Karin; Grossmann, Sylvain; Olivetta, Lino; Sidler, Thomas C.; Salathe, Rene-Paul; Schwob, Hans-Peter; Blom, Toon; Hoving, Willem

    2000-11-01

    In order to improve the reliability of micro-spot welding of metal parts in production such as e.g. in electron guns for TV picture tubes, real-time information about the evolution of the welding process should be available to allow on-line modification of the laser parameters. Such information can be derived from a set of sensors that are mounted on a laser-scanning head. Different sensors are used to monitor the optical fiber output power to determine the evolution of temperature during the spot welding process, to measure plasma emission and back-reflected laser light. A vision channel and a CCD camera are used to control the position of the laser spot on the parts to be processed. The compact scanning head is composed of a tip/tilt laser scanner, a collimating lens and a focusing lens. The scanner is fast steering, with a bandwidth of 700Hz, and can tilt by +/- 3.5 degree(s) with a repeatability better than 50(mu) rad. The settling time for maximum deflection is less that 10ms. The scanning lens is a newly developed focusing lens designed to replace commercial cumbersome scanning lenses such as F-(theta) lenses, which have large volume, weight and price. This lens is based on the well-known Cooke triplet design and guarantees a constant shape of the spot all over the scan surface and is specially well suited for high power beam delivery. The scan field achieved by the system is limited to 25mm x 25mm. The laser used for this application is a pulsed Nd:YAG laser delivered by an optical fiber to the optical head. However, the system can be adapted to different types of lasers. Laser micro-spot welding on copper substrate has been performed in the frame of the Brite-Euram project MAIL. Smaller tolerances (a factor of 2 less) on the spot diameters were obtained in the case of a sensor controlled operation compared to the case where sensor control is not used.

  18. ALGORITHM FOR THE AUTOMATIC ESTIMATION OF AGRICULTURAL TREE GEOMETRIC PARAMETERS USING AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hadaś

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of dendrometric parameters has become an important issue for the agricultural planning and management. Since the classical field measurements are time consuming and inefficient, Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS data can be used for this purpose. Point clouds acquired for orchard areas allow to determine orchard structures and geometric parameters of individual trees. In this research we propose an automatic method that allows to determine geometric parameters of individual olive trees using ALS data. The method is based on the α-shape algorithm applied for normalized point clouds. The algorithm returns polygons representing crown shapes. For points located inside each polygon, we select the maximum height and the minimum height and then we estimate the tree height and the crown base height. We use the first two components of the Principal Component Analysis (PCA as the estimators for crown diameters. The α-shape algorithm requires to define the radius parameter R. In this study we investigated how sensitive are the results to the radius size, by comparing the results obtained with various settings of the R with reference values of estimated parameters from field measurements. Our study area was the olive orchard located in the Castellon Province, Spain. We used a set of ALS data with an average density of 4 points m−2. We noticed, that there was a narrow range of the R parameter, from 0.48 m to 0.80 m, for which all trees were detected and for which we obtained a high correlation coefficient (> 0.9 between estimated and measured values. We compared our estimates with field measurements. The RMSE of differences was 0.8 m for the tree height, 0.5 m for the crown base height, 0.6 m and 0.4 m for the longest and shorter crown diameter, respectively. The accuracy obtained with the method is thus sufficient for agricultural applications.

  19. Detection and Segmentation of Small Trees in the Forest-Tundra Ecotone Using Airborne Laser Scanning

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    Marius Hauglin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to expected climate change and increased focus on forests as a potential carbon sink, it is of interest to map and monitor even marginal forests where trees exist close to their tolerance limits, such as small pioneer trees in the forest-tundra ecotone. Such small trees might indicate tree line migrations and expansion of the forests into treeless areas. Airborne laser scanning (ALS has been suggested and tested as a tool for this purpose and in the present study a novel procedure for identification and segmentation of small trees is proposed. The study was carried out in the Rollag municipality in southeastern Norway, where ALS data and field measurements of individual trees were acquired. The point density of the ALS data was eight points per m2, and the field tree heights ranged from 0.04 to 6.3 m, with a mean of 1.4 m. The proposed method is based on an allometric model relating field-measured tree height to crown diameter, and another model relating field-measured tree height to ALS-derived height. These models are calibrated with local field data. Using these simple models, every positive above-ground height derived from the ALS data can be related to a crown diameter, and by assuming a circular crown shape, this crown diameter can be extended to a crown segment. Applying this model to all ALS echoes with a positive above-ground height value yields an initial map of possible circular crown segments. The final crown segments were then derived by applying a set of simple rules to this initial “map” of segments. The resulting segments were validated by comparison with field-measured crown segments. Overall, 46% of the field-measured trees were successfully detected. The detection rate increased with tree size. For trees with height >3 m the detection rate was 80%. The relatively large detection errors were partly due to the inherent limitations in the ALS data; a substantial fraction of the smaller trees was hit by no or just a few

  20. Methodological considerations of terrestrial laser scanning for vegetation monitoring in the sagebrush steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kyle E.; Glenn, Nancy; Spaete, Lucas; Shinneman, Douglas; Pilliod, David S.; Arkle, Robert; McIlroy, Susan; Derryberry, DeWayne R.

    2017-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) provides fast collection of high-definition structural information, making it a valuable field instrument to many monitoring applications. A weakness of TLS collections, especially in vegetation, is the occurrence of unsampled regions in point clouds where the sensor’s line-of-sight is blocked by intervening material. This problem, referred to as occlusion, may be mitigated by scanning target areas from several positions, increasing the chance that any given area will fall within the scanner’s line-of-sight from at least one position. Because TLS collections are often employed in remote regions where the scope of sampling is limited by logistical factors such as time and battery power, it is important to design field protocols which maximize efficiency and support increased quantity and quality of the data collected. This study informs researchers and practitioners seeking to optimize TLS sampling methods for vegetation monitoring in dryland ecosystems through three analyses. First, we quantify the 2D extent of occluded regions based on the range from single scan positions. Second, we measure the efficacy of additional scan positions on the reduction of 2D occluded regions (area) using progressive configurations of scan positions in 1 ha plots. Third, we test the reproducibility of 3D sampling yielded by a 5-scan/ha sampling methodology using redundant sets of scans. Analyses were performed using measurements at analysis scales of 5 to 50 cm across the 1-ha plots, and we considered plots in grass and shrub-dominated communities separately. In grass-dominated plots, a center-scan configuration and 5 cm pixel size sampled at least 90% of the area up to 18 m away from the scanner. In shrub-dominated plots, sampling at least 90% of the area was only achieved within a distance of 12 m. We found that 3 and 5 scans/ha are needed to sample at least ~ 70% of the total area (1 ha) in the grass and shrub-dominated plots

  1. Local Topography Effect on Plant Area Index Profile Calculation from Small Footprint Airborne Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Wang, T.; Skidmore, A. K.; Heurich, M.

    2016-12-01

    The plant area index (PAI) profile is a quantitative description of how plants (including leaves and woody materials) are distributed vertically, as a function of height. PAI profiles can be used for many applications including biomass estimation, radiative transfer modelling, fire fuel modelling and wildlife habitat assessment. With airborne laser scanning (ALS), forest structure underneath the canopy surface can be detected. PAI profiles can be calculated through estimates of the vertically resolved gap fraction from ALS data. In this process, a gridding or aggregation step is often involved. Most current research neglects local topographic change, and utilizes a height normalization algorithm to achieve a local or relative height, implying a flat local terrain assumption inside the grid or aggregation area. However, in mountainous forest, this assumption is often not valid. Therefore, in this research, the local topographic effect on the PAI profile calculation was studied. Small footprint discrete multi-return ALS data was acquired over the Bavarian Forest National Park under leaf-off and leaf-on conditions. Ground truth data, including tree height, canopy cover, DBH as well as digital hemispherical photos, were collected in 30 plots. These plots covered a wide range of forest structure, plant species, local topography condition and understory coverage. PAI profiles were calculated both with and without height normalization. The difference between height normalized and non-normalized profiles were evaluated with the coefficient of variation of root mean squared difference (CV-RMSD). The derived metric PAI values from PAI profiles were also evaluated with ground truth PAI from the hemispherical photos. Results showed that change in local topography had significant effects on the PAI profile. The CV-RMSD between PAI profile results calculated with or without height normalization ranged from 24.5% to 163.9%. Height normalization (neglecting topography change) can

  2. Roughness Mapping on Various Vertical Scales Based on Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning Data

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    Wolfgang Wagner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Roughness is an important input parameter for modeling of natural hazards such as floods, rock falls and avalanches, where it is basically assumed that flow velocities decrease with increasing roughness. Seeing roughness as a multi-scale level concept (i.e., ranging from fine-scale soil characteristics to description of understory and lower tree layer various roughness raster products were derived from the original full-waveform airborne laser scanning (FWF-ALS point cloud using two different types of roughness parameters, the surface roughness (SR and the terrain roughness (TR. For the calculation of the SR, ALS terrain points within a defined height range to the terrain surface are considered. For the parameterization of the SR, two approaches are investigated. In the first approach, a geometric description by calculating the standard deviation of plane fitting residuals of terrain points is used. In the second one, the potential of the derived echo widths are analyzed for the parameterization of SR. The echo width is an indicator for roughness and the slope of the target. To achieve a comparable spatial resolution of both SR layers, the calculation of the standard deviation of detrended terrain points requires a higher terrain point density than the SR parameterization using the echo widths. The TR describes objects (i.e., point clusters close but explicitly above the terrain surface, with 20 cm defined as threshold height value for delineation of the surface layer (i.e., forest floor layer. Two different empirically defined vegetation layers below the canopy layer were analyzed (TR I: 0.2 m to 1.0 m; TR II: 0.2 m to 3.0 m. A 1 m output grid cell size was chosen for all roughness parameters in order to provide consistency for further integration of high-resolution optical imagery. The derived roughness parameters were then jointly classified, together with a normalized Digital Surface Model (nDSM showing the height of objects (i

  3. Application of Integrated Photogrammetric and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data to Cultural Heritage Surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapa, Przemyslaw; Mitka, Bartosz; Zygmunt, Mariusz

    2017-12-01

    The terrestrial laser scanning technology has a wide spectrum of applications, from land surveying, civil engineering and architecture to archaeology. The technology is capable of obtaining, in a short time, accurate coordinates of points which represent the surface of objects. Scanning of buildings is therefore a process which ensures obtaining information on all structural elements a building. The result is a point cloud consisting of millions of elements which are a perfect source of information on the object and its surrounding. The photogrammetric techniques allow documenting an object in high resolution in the form of orthophoto plans, or are a basis to develop 2D documentation or obtain point clouds for objects and 3D modelling. Integration of photogrammetric data and TLS brings a new quality in surveying historic monuments. Historic monuments play an important cultural and historical role. Centuries-old buildings require constant renovation and preservation of their structural and visual invariability while maintaining safety of people who use them. The full process of surveying allows evaluating the actual condition of monuments and planning repairs and renovations. Huge sizes and specific types of historic monuments cause problems in obtaining reliable and full information on them. The TLS technology allows obtaining such information in a short time and is non-invasive. A point cloud is not only a basis for developing architectural and construction documentation or evaluation of actual condition of a building. It also is a real visualization of monuments and their entire environment. The saved image of object surface can be presented at any time and place. A cyclical TLS survey of historic monuments allows detecting structural changes and evaluating damage and changes that cause deformation of monument’s components. The paper presents application of integrated photogrammetric data and TLS illustrated on an example of historic monuments from southern

  4. A Research Coordination Network for Ecological Applications of Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, T. D.; Strahler, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    Enhancing the development of terrestrial laser scanning for ecological applications is the objective of a Research Coordination Network (RCN) now funded by the US National Science Foundation. The activity has two primary goals: (1) development of a low-cost lidar scanner that will provide accurate estimates of above-ground forest biomass for carbon modeling and monitoring procedures; and (2) development of a range of new ecological applications for TLS, based on rapid forest structure measurements and 3-D reconstructions of forest plots and stands. The network, first constituted in 2015, presently includes 69 participants, including researchers, professors, postdocs, and students at 32 institutions from Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Finland, Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States. It is led by a Steering Committee of 15 researchers from 12 of these institutions. A primary activity of the TLSRCN is to facilitate communication of TLS developments and applications both within the group and to the broader scientific community at meetings and workshops. In 2015, RCN participants presented 27 papers and posters at international meetings and forums, including the Annual Conference of the Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society of the UK, SilviLaser 2015, and the Fall Meeting of the AGU. Within the group, bimonthly telecons allow the exchange of recent research developments and planning for group meetings and international conference presentations. Encouraging collaborative publications is also a focus of the RCN; 9 of 11 journal papers published in 2015 that reported TLS research by participants also combined authors from more than one research group participating in the network. The TLSRCN is supported by NSF Grant DBI-1455636 to Boston University, Alan Strahler Principal Investigator. Information for researchers interested in joining the network is available on the TLSRCN web site, tlsrcn.bu.edu. The image below shows a stand of Himalayan

  5. Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning in Vegetation Studies—A Review of Point Cloud and Waveform Features for Tree Species Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina Koenig; Bernhard Höfle

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, small-footprint full-waveform airborne laser scanning has become readily available and established for vegetation studies in the fields of forestry, agriculture and urban studies. Independent of the field of application and the derived final product, each study uses features to classify a target object and to assess its characteristics (e.g., tree species). These laser scanning features describe an observable characteristic of the returned laser signal (e.g., signal amplitude...

  6. Comparison of 2 root surface area measurement methods: 3-dimensional laser scanning and cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasanapanont, Jintana; Apisariyakul, Janya; Wattanachai, Tanapan; Jotikasthira, Dhirawat [Dept. of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Sriwilas, Patiyut [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Midtboe, Marit [Dept. of Clinical Dentistry - Orthodontics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the use of 3-dimensional (3D) laser scanning and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) as methods of root surface measurement. Thirty teeth (15 maxillary first premolars and 15 mandibular first premolars) from 8 patients who required extractions for orthodontic treatment were selected. Before extraction, pre-treatment CBCT images of all the patients were recorded. First, a CBCT image was imported into simulation software (Mimics version 15.01; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium) and the root surface area of each tooth was calculated using 3-Matic (version 7.01, Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). After extraction, all the teeth were scanned and the root surface area of each extracted tooth was calculated. The root surface areas calculated using these 2 measurement methods were analyzed using the paired t-test (P<.05). Correlations between the 2 methods were determined by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess intraobserver reliability. The root surface area measurements (230.11±41.97 mm{sup 2}) obtained using CBCT were slightly greater than those (229.31±42.46 mm2) obtained using 3D laser scanning, but not significantly (P=.425). A high Pearson correlation coefficient was found between the CBCT and the 3D laser scanner measurements. The intraobserver ICC was 1.000 for 3D laser scanning and 0.990 for CBCT. This study presents a novel CBCT approach for measuring the root surface area; this technique can be used for estimating the root surface area of non-extracted teeth.

  7. Effects of Naphthalene on DNA and RNA quantity in Amoeba proteus by using confocal laser scanning microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwanmuni, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of Naphthalene which is a carcinogen on changes of DNA and RNA quantities were studied with acridine orange stained cells under a confocal laser scanning microscope. It was found that DNA and RNA in amoebae nucleus and cytoplasm, reared in 0 (control, 3 and 8.85 mg/l (24h-LD50 at 0 and 12 h. showed a statistically significant difference (p<0.05. The more naphthalene concentrations and larger incubation periods had greater effects on DNA and RNA decreases in amoebae nucleus and cytoplasm.

  8. [A new laser scan system for video ophthalmoscopy. Initial clinical experiences also in relation to digital image processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, E; Mertz, M; Hofmann, H; Wertheimer, R; Foos, C

    1990-06-01

    The clinical advantages of a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) and video imaging of fundus pictures are described. Image quality (contrast, depth of field) and imaging possibilities (confocal stop) are assessed. Imaging with different lasers (argon, He-Ne) and changes in imaging rendered possible by confocal alignment of the imaging optics are discussed. Hard copies from video images are still of inferior quality compared to fundus photographs. Methods of direct processing and retrieval of digitally stored SLO video fundus images are illustrated by examples. Modifications for a definitive laser scanning system - in regard to the field of view and the quality of hard copies - are proposed.

  9. Feasibility of Terrestrial laser scanning for collecting stem volume information from single trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Ninni; Kankare, Ville; Vastaranta, Mikko; Luoma, Ville; Pyörälä, Jiri; Tanhuanpää, Topi; Liang, Xinlian; Kaartinen, Harri; Kukko, Antero; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Yu, Xiaowei; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppä, Juha

    2017-01-01

    Interest in measuring forest biomass and carbon stock has increased as a result of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and sustainable planning of forest resources is therefore essential. Biomass and carbon stock estimates are based on the large area estimates of growing stock volume provided by national forest inventories (NFIs). The estimates for growing stock volume based on the NFIs depend on stem volume estimates of individual trees. Data collection for formulating stem volume and biomass models is challenging, because the amount of data required is considerable, and the fact that the detailed destructive measurements required to provide these data are laborious. Due to natural diversity, sample size for developing allometric models should be rather large. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has proved to be an efficient tool for collecting information on tree stems. Therefore, we investigated how TLS data for deriving stem volume information from single trees should be collected. The broader context of the study was to determine the feasibility of replacing destructive and laborious field measurements, which have been needed for development of empirical stem volume models, with TLS. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of the TLS data captured at various distance (i.e. corresponding 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of tree height) on the accuracy of the stem volume derived. In addition, we examined how multiple TLS point cloud data acquired at various distances improved the results. Analysis was carried out with two ways when multiple point clouds were used: individual tree attributes were derived from separate point clouds and the volume was estimated based on these separate values (multiple-scan A), and point clouds were georeferenced as a combined point cloud from which the stem volume was estimated (multiple-scan B). This permitted us to deal with the practical aspects of TLS data collection and data processing for development of

  10. Directional radiative transfer by SCOPE, SLC and DART using laser scan derived structural forest parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Joris; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean Philippe; van der Tol, Christiaan; Verhoef, Wout; Vekerdy, Zoltan; Su, Zhongbo

    2017-04-01

    terrestrial laser scan of the Speulderbos in the Netherlands. The comparison between DART and SCOPE/SLC models showed a good match for the simple scenarios. Calculated rMSDs showed lower than 7.5% errors for crown coverage values lower than 0.87, with the Near-Hotspot viewing angles found to be the largest contributor to this deviation. For more complex scenarios (using Multiple Crowns), the comparison between SCOPE and DART showed mixed results. Good results were obtained for crown coverage values of 0.93, with rMSD (6.77% and 5.96%), lower than the defined threshold value, except near hotspot. For scenarios with crown coverages lower than 0.93 the rMSD were too large to validate the use of SCOPE model. When considering the Soil Leaf Canopy (SLC) model, an improved version of SAIL that considers the canopy clumping, better results were obtained for these complex scenarios, with good agreement for medium crown coverage values (0.93 and 0.87) with rMSD (6.33% and 5.99; 6.66% and 7.12%). This indicates that the radiative transfer model within SCOPE might be upgraded in the future.

  11. Intercomparison of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Instruments for Assessing Forested Ecosystems: A Brisbane Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armston, J.; Newnham, G.; Strahler, A. H.; Schaaf, C.; Danson, M.; Gaulton, R.; Zhang, Z.; Disney, M.; Sparrow, B.; Phinn, S. R.; Schaefer, M.; Burt, A.; Counter, S.; Erb, A.; Goodwin, N.; Hancock, S.; Howe, G.; Johansen, K.; Li, Z.; Lollback, G.; Martel, J.; Muir, J.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E.; Scarth, P.; Tindall, D.; Walker, L.; Witte, C.; Woodgate, W.; Wu, S.

    2013-12-01

    themes include retrieval of leaf area index and related parameters; retrieval of tree diameters, above-ground biomass, and height; approaches to calibration; waveform vs. discrete return data; value of dual wavelength data; ray tracing simulations driven by scanning; and others. This effort was initiated as an activity of the Terrestrial Laser Scanning International Interest Group. The primary objective of this international collaboration is to advance the understanding and application of TLS to forest management and inventory, rapid and automated measurement of vegetation structure parameters, monitoring vegetation dynamics, calibration and validation of large area above-ground biomass mapping, and the development of new low-cost portable scanners to enable wider application of these technologies. Immediate application of the data sets and techniques developed will be through national collaborative research programs, such as NEON and TERN, which enable the techniques and infrastructure developed to be applied consistently. These collaborations and the data and techniques developed and shared openly are essential to enable consistent production of forest structural property maps in science and management applications.

  12. An interactive mapping tool for visualizing lacunarity of laser scanned point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Adam; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    Lacunarity, a measure of the spatial distribution of the empty space in a certain model or real space over large spatial scales, is found to be a useful descriptive quantity in many fields using imagery, including, among others, geology, dentistry, neurology. Its application in ecology was suggested more than 20 years ago. The main problem of its application was the lack of appropriate high resolution data. Nowadays, full-waveform laser scanning, also known as FWF LiDAR, provides the tool for mapping the vegetation in unprecedented details and accuracy. Consequently, the lacunarity concept can be revitalized, in order to study the structure of the vegetation in this sense as well. Calculation of lacunarity, even if it is done in two dimensions (2D), is still has its problems: on one hand it is a number-crunching procedure, on the other hand, it produces 4D results: at each 3D point it returns a set of data that are function of scale. These data sets are difficult to visualize, to evaluate, and to compare. In order to solve this problem, an interactive mapping tool has been conceptualized that is designed to manipulate and visualize the data, lets the user set parameters for best visualization or comparison results. The system is able to load large amounts of data, visualize them as lacunarity curves, or map view as horizontal slices or in 3D point clouds coloured according to the user's choice. Lacunarity maps are presented as a series of (usually) horizontal profiles, e.g. rasters, which cells contain color-mapped values of selected lacunarity of the point cloud. As lacunarity is usually analysed in a series of successive windows sizes, the tool can show a series of rasters with sequentially animated lacunarity maps calculated for various window sizes. A very fast switching of colour schemes is possible to facilitate rapid visual feedback to better understand underlying data patterns exposed by lacunarity functions. In the comparison mode, two sites (or two areas

  13. A 3D Analysis of Rock Block Deformation and Failure Mechanics Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Emily; Hutchinson, D. Jean; Kromer, Ryan A.; Edwards, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Many natural geological hazards are present along the Thompson River corridor in British Columbia, Canada, including one particularly hazardous rocky slope known as the White Canyon. Railway tracks used by Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific (CP) Railway companies pass through this area at the base of the Canyon slope. The geologically complex and weathered rock face exposed at White Canyon is prone to rockfalls. With a limited ditch capacity, these falling rocks have the potential to land on the tracks and therefore increase the risk of train derailment. Since 2012, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data has been collected at this site on a regular basis to enable researchers at Queen's University to study these rockfalls in greater detail. In this paper, the authors present a summary of an analysis of these TLS datasets including an examination of the pre-failure deformation patterns exhibited by failed rock blocks as well as an investigation into the influence of structural constraints on the pre-failure behavior of these blocks. Aligning rockfall source zones in an early point cloud dataset to a later dataset generates a transformation matrix describing the movement of the block from one scan to the next. This process was repeated such that the motion of the block over the entire TLS data coverage period was measured. A 3D roto-translation algorithm was then used to resolve the motion into translation and rotation components (Oppikofer et al. 2009; Kromer et al. 2015). Structural information was plotted on a stereonet for further analysis. A total of 111 rockfall events exceeding a volume of 1 m3 were analyzed using this approach. The study reveals that although some rockfall source blocks blocks do not exhibit detectable levels of deformation prior to failure, others do experience cm-level translation and rotation on the order of 1 to 6 degrees before detaching from the slope. Moreover, these movements may, in some cases, be related to the discontinuity

  14. Airborne laser scanning based quantification of dead-ice melting in recently deglaciated terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, C.; Sailer, R.; Schümberg, M.; Stötter, J.

    2012-04-01

    Dead-ice is explained as stagnant glacial ice, not influenced by glacier flow anymore. Whenever glaciers have negative mass balances and an accumulation of debris-cover on the surface, dead-ice may form. Although, there are numerous conceptual process-sediment-landform models for the melt-out of dead-ice bodies and areas of dead-ice environments at glacier margins are easily accessible, just a few quantitative studies of dead-ice melting have been carried out so far. Processes and rates of dead-ice melting are commonly believed to be controlled by climate and debris-cover properties, but there is still a lack of knowledge about this fact. This study has a focus on the quantification of process induced volumetric changes caused by dead-ice melting. The research for this project was conducted at Hintereisferner (Ötztal Alps, Austria), Gepatschferner (Ötztal Alps, Austria) and Schrankar (Stubai Alps, Austria), areas for which a good data basis of ALS (Airborne Laser Scanning) measurements is available. 'Hintereisferner' can be characterized as a typical high alpine environment in mid-latitudes, which ranges between approximately 2250 m and 3740 m a.s.l.. The Hintereisferner region has been investigated intensively since many decades. Two dead ice bodies at the orographic right side and one at the orographic left side of the Hintereisferner glacier terminus (approx. at 2500 m to 2550 m a.s.l.) were identified. Since 2001, ALS measurements have been carried out regularly at Hintereisferner resulting in a unique data record of 21 ALS flight campaigns, allowing long-term explorations of the two dead-ice areas. The second study area of 'Gepatschferner' in the Kaunertal ranges between 2060 m and 3520 m a.s.l. and is the second largest glacier of Austria. Near the glacier tongue at the orographic right side a significant dead ice body has formed. The ALS data used for quantification include a period of time of 4 years (2006 - 2010). 'Schrankar' is located in the Western

  15. Estimating Single-Tree Crown Biomass of Norway Spruce by Airborne Laser Scanning: A Comparison of Methods with and without the Use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning to Obtain the Ground Reference Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Hauglin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Several methods to conduct single-tree inventories using airborne laser scanning (ALS have been proposed, and even terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has recently emerged as a possible tool for the collection of forest inventory data. In the present study, a novel methodological framework for a combined use of ALS and TLS in an inventory was tested and compared to a method without the use of TLS. Single-tree Norway spruce crown biomass was predicted using an ALS-model with training data obtained by TLS. ALS and TLS data were collected for sets of sample trees, including 68 trees with both ALS and TLS data. In total, 29 destructively sampled trees were used to fit a TLS crown biomass model, which then was used to predict crown biomass in a separate set of 68 trees. This dataset was subsequently used to fit an ALS crown biomass model. When validating the model, using a separate dataset with accurately measured crown biomass obtained through destructive sampling, the mean error was 32% of the observed mean biomass. Corresponding crown biomass predictions derived with ALS-predicted diameters and the use of conventional and existing allometric models resulted in a mean error of 35%. Thus, in the present study, a slight improvement, in terms of prediction accuracy, was found when using training data with ground reference values obtained by TLS.

  16. 3D DOCUMENTATION OF A HISTORICAL MONUMENT USING TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING CASE STUDY: BYZANTINE WATER CISTERN, ISTANBUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Temizer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D modelling of architectural structures for monitoring, conservation and restoration alterations in heritage sites has special challenges for data acquisition and processing. The accuracy of created 3D model is very important. In general, because of the complexity of the structures, 3D modelling can be time consuming and may include some difficulties. 3D terrestrial laser scanning technique is a reliable and advantageous method for reconstruction and conservation of monuments. This technique is commonly acknowledged due to its accuracy, speed and flexibility. Terrestrial laser scanners can be used for documentation of the cultural heritage for the future. But it is also important to understand the capabilities and right conditions of use and limitations of this technology. Istanbul is a rich city with cultural monuments, buildings and cultural heritage. The presented study consists of documentation of a Byzantine water cistern situated underground the court of Sarnicli Han building. The cistern which represents a very good living example of its period has been modelled in 3D by using terrestrial laser scanning technology and the accuracy assessment of this modelling is examined.

  17. A Direct Georeferencing Method for Terrestrial Laser Scanning Using GNSS Data and the Vertical Deflection from Global Earth Gravity Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Edward; Sośnica, Krzysztof; Borkowski, Andrzej; Owczarek-Wesołowska, Magdalena; Gromczak, Anna

    2017-06-24

    Terrestrial laser scanning is an efficient technique in providing highly accurate point clouds for various geoscience applications. The point clouds have to be transformed to a well-defined reference frame, such as the global Geodetic Reference System 1980. The transformation to the geocentric coordinate frame is based on estimating seven Helmert parameters using several GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) referencing points. This paper proposes a method for direct point cloud georeferencing that provides coordinates in the geocentric frame. The proposed method employs the vertical deflection from an external global Earth gravity model and thus demands a minimum number of GNSS measurements. The proposed method can be helpful when the number of georeferencing GNSS points is limited, for instance in city corridors. It needs only two georeferencing points. The validation of the method in a field test reveals that the differences between the classical georefencing and the proposed method amount at maximum to 7 mm with the standard deviation of 8 mm for all of three coordinate components. The proposed method may serve as an alternative for the laser scanning data georeferencing, especially when the number of GNSS points is insufficient for classical methods.

  18. A Direct Georeferencing Method for Terrestrial Laser Scanning Using GNSS Data and the Vertical Deflection from Global Earth Gravity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Owczarek-Wesołowska, Magdalena; Gromczak, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning is an efficient technique in providing highly accurate point clouds for various geoscience applications. The point clouds have to be transformed to a well-defined reference frame, such as the global Geodetic Reference System 1980. The transformation to the geocentric coordinate frame is based on estimating seven Helmert parameters using several GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) referencing points. This paper proposes a method for direct point cloud georeferencing that provides coordinates in the geocentric frame. The proposed method employs the vertical deflection from an external global Earth gravity model and thus demands a minimum number of GNSS measurements. The proposed method can be helpful when the number of georeferencing GNSS points is limited, for instance in city corridors. It needs only two georeferencing points. The validation of the method in a field test reveals that the differences between the classical georefencing and the proposed method amount at maximum to 7 mm with the standard deviation of 8 mm for all of three coordinate components. The proposed method may serve as an alternative for the laser scanning data georeferencing, especially when the number of GNSS points is insufficient for classical methods. PMID:28672795

  19. Characterization of atopic skin and the effect of a hyperforin-rich cream by laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Martina C.; Richter, Heike; Kleemann, Anke; Lademann, Juergen; Tscherch, Kathrin; Rohn, Sascha; Schempp, Christoph M.

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults in an increasing manner. The treatment of AD often reduces subjective skin parameters, such as itching, dryness, and tension, but the inflammation cannot be cured. Laser scanning microscopy was used to investigate the skin surface, epidermal, and dermal characteristics of dry and atopic skin before and after treatment with an ointment rich in hyperforin, which is known for its anti-inflammatory effects. The results were compared to subjective parameters and transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum moisture, and stratum corneum lipids. Using biophysical methods, in particular laser scanning microscopy, it was found that atopic skin has distinct features compared to healthy skin. Treatment with a hyperforin-rich ointment resulted in an improvement of the stratum corneum moisture, skin surface dryness, skin lipids, and the subjective skin parameters, indicating that the barrier is stabilized and improved by the ointment. But in contrast to the improved skin surface, the inflammation in the deeper epidermis/dermis often continues to exist. This could be clearly shown by the reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) measurements. Therefore, RCM measurements could be used to investigate the progress in treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  20. Density of point clouds in mobile laser scanning. (Polish Title: Gestosc chmury punktow pochodzacej z mobilnego skanowania laserowego)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchoł, A.

    2015-12-01

    The LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) technology is becoming a more and more popular method to collect spatial information. The acquisition of 3D data by means of one or several laser scanners mounted on a mobile platform (car) could quickly provide large volumes of dense data with centimeter-level accuracy. This is, therefore, the ideal solution to obtain information about objects with elongated shapes (corridors), and their surroundings. Point clouds used by specific applications must fulfill certain quality criteria, such as quantitative and qualitative indicators (i.e. precision, accuracy, density, completeness).Usually, the client fixes some parameter values that must be achieved. In terms of the precision, this parameter is well described, whereas in the case of density point clouds the discussion is still open. Due to the specificities of the MLS (Mobile Laser Scanning), the solution from ALS (Airborne Laser Scanning) cannot be directly applied. Hence, the density of the final point clouds, calculated as the number of points divided by "flat" surface area, is inappropriate. We present in this article three different ways of determining and interpreting point cloud density on three different test fields. The first method divides the number of points by the "flat" area, the second by the "three-dimensional" area, and the last one refers to a voxel approach. The most reliable method seems to be the voxel method, which in addition to the local density values also presents their spatial distribution.

  1. The use of HaloTag-based technology in flow and laser scanning cytometry analysis of live and fixed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldfeld Anne E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combining the technologies of protein tag labeling and optical microscopy allows sensitive analysis of protein function in cells. Findings Here, we describe development of applications using protein tag technology (HaloTag (HT-based for flow and laser scanning cytometry (LSC. Cell lines, expressing recombinant surface β1-integrin-HT and HT-p65 fusion protein, and a CD4 T cell line (Jurkat infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 reporter virus expressing the unfused HT (HIV-1Lai-Halo, were stained with different HT ligands and successfully detected by flow cytometers equipped with 488 and 561 nm lasers as well as a laser scanning cytometer (equipped with 488 and 405 nm lasers alone or combined with cell cycle and viability markers. Conclusions Use of HT technology for cytometric applications has advantages over its use in microscopy as it allows for the statistical measurement of protein expression levels in individual cells within a heterogeneous cell population in combination with cell cycle analysis. Another advantage is the ability of the HaloTag to withstand long fixation and high concentration of fixative, which can be useful in research of infectious agents like HIV and/or mycobacteria.

  2. The use of HaloTag-based technology in flow and laser scanning cytometry analysis of live and fixed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Elena I; Ranjbar, Shahin; Jasenosky, Luke D; Goldfeld, Anne E; Vorobjev, Ivan A; Barteneva, Natasha S

    2011-09-09

    Combining the technologies of protein tag labeling and optical microscopy allows sensitive analysis of protein function in cells. Here, we describe development of applications using protein tag technology (HaloTag (HT)-based) for flow and laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Cell lines, expressing recombinant surface β1-integrin-HT and HT-p65 fusion protein, and a CD4 T cell line (Jurkat) infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reporter virus expressing the unfused HT (HIV-1Lai-Halo), were stained with different HT ligands and successfully detected by flow cytometers equipped with 488 and 561 nm lasers as well as a laser scanning cytometer (equipped with 488 and 405 nm lasers) alone or combined with cell cycle and viability markers. Use of HT technology for cytometric applications has advantages over its use in microscopy as it allows for the statistical measurement of protein expression levels in individual cells within a heterogeneous cell population in combination with cell cycle analysis. Another advantage is the ability of the HaloTag to withstand long fixation and high concentration of fixative, which can be useful in research of infectious agents like HIV and/or mycobacteria.

  3. Segmentation of Planar Surfaces from Laser Scanning Data Using the Magnitude of Normal Position Vector for Adaptive Neighborhoods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjae Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse approaches to laser point segmentation have been proposed since the emergence of the laser scanning system. Most of these segmentation techniques, however, suffer from limitations such as sensitivity to the choice of seed points, lack of consideration of the spatial relationships among points, and inefficient performance. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a segmentation methodology that: (1 reduces the dimensions of the attribute space; (2 considers the attribute similarity and the proximity of the laser point simultaneously; and (3 works well with both airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data. A neighborhood definition based on the shape of the surface increases the homogeneity of the laser point attributes. The magnitude of the normal position vector is used as an attribute for reducing the dimension of the accumulator array. The experimental results demonstrate, through both qualitative and quantitative evaluations, the outcomes’ high level of reliability. The proposed segmentation algorithm provided 96.89% overall correctness, 95.84% completeness, a 0.25 m overall mean value of centroid difference, and less than 1° of angle difference. The performance of the proposed approach was also verified with a large dataset and compared with other approaches. Additionally, the evaluation of the sensitivity of the thresholds was carried out. In summary, this paper proposes a robust and efficient segmentation methodology for abstraction of an enormous number of laser points into plane information.

  4. DOCUMENTING A COMPLEX MODERN HERITAGE BUILDING USING MULTI IMAGE CLOSE RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND 3D LASER SCANNED POINT CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Vianna Baptista

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrating different technologies and expertises help fill gaps when optimizing documentation of complex buildings. Described below is the process used in the first part of a restoration project, the architectural survey of Theatre Guaira Cultural Centre in Curitiba, Brazil. To diminish time on fieldwork, the two-person-field-survey team had to juggle, during three days, the continuous artistic activities and performers’ intense schedule. Both technologies (high definition laser scanning and close-range photogrammetry were used to record all details in the least amount of time without disturbing the artists' rehearsals and performances. Laser Scanning was ideal to record the monumental stage structure with all of its existing platforms, light fixtures, scenery walls and curtains. Although scanned with high-definition, parts of the exterior façades were also recorded using Close Range Photogrammetry. Tiny cracks on the marble plaques and mosaic tiles, not visible in the point clouds, were then able to be precisely documented in order to create the exterior façades textures and damages mapping drawings. The combination of technologies and the expertise of service providers, knowing how and what to document, and what to deliver to the client, enabled maximum benefits to the following restoration project.

  5. Documenting a Complex Modern Heritage Building Using Multi Image Close Range Photogrammetry and 3d Laser Scanned Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna Baptista, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    Integrating different technologies and expertises help fill gaps when optimizing documentation of complex buildings. Described below is the process used in the first part of a restoration project, the architectural survey of Theatre Guaira Cultural Centre in Curitiba, Brazil. To diminish time on fieldwork, the two-person-field-survey team had to juggle, during three days, the continuous artistic activities and performers' intense schedule. Both technologies (high definition laser scanning and close-range photogrammetry) were used to record all details in the least amount of time without disturbing the artists' rehearsals and performances. Laser Scanning was ideal to record the monumental stage structure with all of its existing platforms, light fixtures, scenery walls and curtains. Although scanned with high-definition, parts of the exterior façades were also recorded using Close Range Photogrammetry. Tiny cracks on the marble plaques and mosaic tiles, not visible in the point clouds, were then able to be precisely documented in order to create the exterior façades textures and damages mapping drawings. The combination of technologies and the expertise of service providers, knowing how and what to document, and what to deliver to the client, enabled maximum benefits to the following restoration project.

  6. Extraction of Objects from Terrestrial Laser Scans by Integrating Geometry Image and Intensity Data with Demonstration on Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagi Filin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning is becoming a standard for 3D modeling of complex scenes. Results of the scan contain detailed geometric information about the scene; however, the lack of semantic details still constitutes a gap in ensuring this data is usable for mapping. This paper proposes a framework for recognition of objects in laser scans; aiming to utilize all the available information, range, intensity and color information integrated into the extraction framework. Instead of using the 3D point cloud, which is complex to process since it lacks an inherent neighborhood structure, we propose a polar representation which facilitates low-level image processing tasks, e.g., segmentation and texture modeling. Using attributes of each segment, a feature space analysis is used to classify segments into objects. This process is followed by a fine-tuning stage based on graph-cut algorithm, which considers the 3D nature of the data. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on tree extraction and tested on scans containing complex objects in addition to trees. Results show a very high detection level and thereby the feasibility of the proposed framework.

  7. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, M. E.; Richter, H.; Zhu, Y. J.; Meinke, M. C.; Knorr, F.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Koenig, K.; Lademann, J.

    2014-07-01

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted.

  8. Estimation of regeneration coverage in a temperate forest by 3D segmentation using airborne laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Nina; Yao, Wei; Heurich, Marco; Krzystek, Peter; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2016-10-01

    Forest understory and regeneration are important factors in sustainable forest management. However, understanding their spatial distribution in multilayered forests requires accurate and continuously updated field data, which are difficult and time-consuming to obtain. Therefore, cost-efficient inventory methods are required, and airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a promising tool for obtaining such information. In this study, we examine a clustering-based 3D segmentation in combination with ALS data for regeneration coverage estimation in a multilayered temperate forest. The core of our method is a two-tiered segmentation of the 3D point clouds into segments associated with regeneration trees. First, small parts of trees (super-voxels) are constructed through mean shift clustering, a nonparametric procedure for finding the local maxima of a density function. In the second step, we form a graph based on the mean shift clusters and merge them into larger segments using the normalized cut algorithm. These segments are used to obtain regeneration coverage of the target plot. Results show that, based on validation data from field inventory and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), our approach correctly estimates up to 70% of regeneration coverage across the plots with different properties, such as tree height and tree species. The proposed method is negatively impacted by the density of the overstory because of decreasing ground point density. In addition, the estimated coverage has a strong relationship with the overstory tree species composition.

  9. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvin, M E; Richter, H; Zhu, Y J; Meinke, M C; Knorr, F; Lademann, J [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology, Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Gonchukov, S A [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Russian Federation); Koenig, K [JenLab GmbH, Schillerstr. 1, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-31

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted. (laser biophotonics)

  10. Multimodal backside imaging of a microcontroller using confocal laser scanning and optical-beam-induced current imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkeldey, Markus; Göring, Lena; Schellenberg, Falk; Brenner, Carsten; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Microscopy imaging with a single technology is usually restricted to a single contrast mechanism. Multimodal imaging is a promising technique to improve the structural information that could be obtained about a device under test (DUT). Due to the different contrast mechanisms of laser scanning microscopy (LSM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and optical beam induced current microscopy (OBICM), a combination could improve the detection of structures in integrated circuits (ICs) and helps to reveal their layout. While OBIC imaging is sensitive to the changes between differently doped areas and to semiconductor-metal transitions, CLSM imaging is mostly sensitive to changes in absorption and reflection. In this work we present the implementation of OBIC imaging into a CLSM. We show first results using industry standard Atmel microcontrollers (MCUs) with a feature size of about 250nm as DUTs. Analyzing these types of microcontrollers helps to improve in the field of side-channel attacks to find hardware Trojans, possible spots for laser fault attacks and for reverse engineering. For the experimental results the DUT is placed on a custom circuit board that allows us to measure the current while imaging it in our in-house built stage scanning microscope using a near infrared (NIR) laser diode as light source. The DUT is thinned and polished, allowing backside imaging through the Si-substrate. We demonstrate the possibilities using this optical setup by evaluating OBIC, LSM and CLSM images above and below the threshold of the laser source.

  11. An endolithic microbial community in dolomite rock in central Switzerland: characterization by reflection spectroscopy, pigment analyses, scanning electron microscopy, and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horath, T; Neu, T R; Bachofen, R

    2006-04-01

    A community of endolithic microorganisms dominated by phototrophs was found as a distinct band a few millimeters below the surface of bare exposed dolomite rocks in the Piora Valley in the Alps. Using in situ reflectance spectroscopy, we detected chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycobilins, carotenoids, and an unknown type of bacteriochlorophyll-like pigment absorbing in vivo at about 720 nm. In cross sections, the data indicated a defined distribution of different groups of organisms perpendicular to the rock surface. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses of pigments extracted with organic solvents confirmed the presence of two types of bacteriochlorophylls besides chlorophylls and various carotenoids. Spherical organisms of varying sizes and small filaments were observed in situ with scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (one- and two-photon technique). The latter allowed visualization of the distribution of phototrophic microorganisms by the autofluorescence of their pigments within the rock. Coccoid cyanobacteria of various sizes predominated over filamentous ones. Application of fluorescence-labeled lectins demonstrated that most cyanobacteria were embedded in an exopolymeric matrix. Nucleic acid stains revealed a wide distribution of small heterotrophs. Some biological structures emitting a green autofluorescence remain to be identified.

  12. The determination of firing distance applying a microscopic quantitative method and confocal laser scanning microscopy for detection of gunshot residue particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Margherita; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we applied a microscopic quantitative method based on the use of sodium rhodizonate to verify the presence of residues and their distribution on the cutis of gunshot wounds. A total of 250 skin samples were selected from cases in which the manner of death (accidental, suicide, and homicide) and the shooting distance could be reliably determined. The samples were examined under a light microscope, in transmitted bright field illumination and phase contrast mode, and with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In all skin specimens the area of each histological section was directly measured by an image analysis system. Both the number and the size of powder particles were measured. The distribution of gunshot residues (GSR) in the epidermal and subepidermal layers was also analyzed. The evaluation of the microscopic entrance wounds demonstrated different findings related to the range of fire. The data derived from the evaluation of both macroscopic and microscopic features demonstrated that the amount and the spatial distribution of GSR deposits in the skin surrounding entrance wounds strictly correlate with shooting distance.

  13. A new improved protocol for in vitro intratubular dentinal bacterial contamination for antimicrobial endodontic tests: standardization and validation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Bombarda de ANDRADE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To compare three methods of intratubular contamination that simulate endodontic infections using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Material and Methods Two pre-existing models of dentinal contamination were used to induce intratubular infection (groups A and B. These methods were modified in an attempt to improve the model (group C. Among the modifications it may be included: specimen contamination for five days, ultrasonic bath with BHI broth after specimen sterilization, use of E. faecalis during the exponential growth phase, greater concentration of inoculum, and two cycles of centrifugation on alternate days with changes of culture media. All specimens were longitudinally sectioned and stained with of LIVE/DEAD® for 20 min. Specimens were assessed using CLSM, which provided images of the depth of viable bacterial proliferation inside the dentinal tubules. Additionally, three examiners used scores to classify the CLSM images according to the following parameters: homogeneity, density, and depth of the bacterial contamination inside the dentinal tubules. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s tests were used to evaluate the live and dead cells rates, and the scores obtained. Results The contamination scores revealed higher contamination levels in group C when compared with groups A and B (p0.05. The volume of live cells in group C was higher than in groups A and B (p<0.05. Conclusion The new protocol for intratubular infection resulted in high and uniform patterns of bacterial contamination and higher cell viability in all specimens when compared with the current methods.

  14. NAVIS-An UGV indoor positioning system using laser scan matching for large-area real-time applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Liu, Jinbing; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2014-07-04

    Laser scan matching with grid-based maps is a promising tool for real-time indoor positioning of mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). While there are critical implementation problems, such as the ability to estimate the position by sensing the unknown indoor environment with sufficient accuracy and low enough latency for stable vehicle control, further development work is necessary. Unfortunately, most of the existing methods employ heuristics for quick positioning in which numerous accumulated errors easily lead to loss of positioning accuracy. This severely restricts its applications in large areas and over lengthy periods of time. This paper introduces an efficient real-time mobile UGV indoor positioning system for large-area applications using laser scan matching with an improved probabilistically-motivated Maximum Likelihood Estimation (IMLE) algorithm, which is based on a multi-resolution patch-divided grid likelihood map. Compared with traditional methods, the improvements embodied in IMLE include: (a) Iterative Closed Point (ICP) preprocessing, which adaptively decreases the search scope; (b) a totally brute search matching method on multi-resolution map layers, based on the likelihood value between current laser scan and the grid map within refined search scope, adopted to obtain the global optimum position at each scan matching; and (c) a patch-divided likelihood map supporting a large indoor area. A UGV platform called NAVIS was designed, manufactured, and tested based on a low-cost robot integrating a LiDAR and an odometer sensor to verify the IMLE algorithm. A series of experiments based on simulated data and field tests with NAVIS proved that the proposed IMEL algorithm is a better way to perform local scan matching that can offer a quick and stable positioning solution with high accuracy so it can be part of a large area localization/mapping, application. The NAVIS platform can reach an updating rate of 12 Hz in a feature-rich environment and 2 Hz

  15. Noise analysis of a white-light supercontinuum light source for multiple wavelength confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Gail [Centre for Biophotonics, Strathclyde Institute for Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 27 Taylor Street, Glasgow, G4 0NR (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-07

    Intensity correlations of a Ti : sapphire, Kr/Ar and a white-light supercontinuum were performed to quantify the typical signal amplitude fluctuations and hence ascertain the comparative output stability of the white-light supercontinuum source for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Intensity correlations across a two-pixel sample (n = 1000) of up to 98%, 95% and 94% were measured for the Ti : sapphire, Kr/Ar and white-light supercontinuum source, respectively. The white-light supercontinuum noise level is therefore acceptable for CLSM, with the added advantage of wider wavelength flexibility over traditional CLSM excitation sources. The relatively low-noise white-light supercontinuum was then used to perform multiple wavelength sequential CLSM of guinea pig detrusor to confirm the reliability of the system and to demonstrate system flexibility.

  16. Characterization by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy of the Phase Composition at Interfaces in Thick Films of Polymer Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Lattante

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM has been used as a fast, user-friendly, and noninvasive tool for characterizing the phase composition differences at the substrate and air interfaces in thick films of polymer blends. A clearly different phase composition at the blend/glass interface and at the blend/air interface has been detected. We show that PCBM preferentially accumulates at the glass/blend interface, while P3HT preferentially accumulates at the blend/air interface, by comparing the integrated signal intensity of the luminescence coming from both interfaces. Our results demonstrate that CLSM can be used conveniently for the fast identification of a preferential phase segregation at interfaces in polymer blends. This is useful in the research field on devices (like sensors or planar waveguides that are based on very thick layers (thickness higher than 1 μm.

  17. Impact of multiple sub-melt laser scans on the activation and diffusion of shallow Boron junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosseel, E.; Vandervorst, W.; Clarysse, T.

    2008-01-01

    Sub-melt laser annealing is a promising technique to achieve the required sheet resistance and junction depth specifications for the 32 nm technology node and beyond. In order to obtain a production worthy process with minimal sheet resistance variation at a macroscopic and microscopic level...... of different implantation and anneal parameters will be explored. It turns out that the observed sheet resistance decrease with increasing number of laser scans is caused on one hand by a temperature dependent increase of the activation level, and on the other hand, by a non-negligible temperature......, careful process optimization is required. While macroscopic variations can easily be addressed using the proper spatial power compensation it is more difficult to completely eliminate the micro scale non-uniformity which is intimately linked to the laser beam profile, the amount of overlaps and the scan...

  18. The Use of Mobile Laser Scanning Data and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Images for 3d Model Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Jaakkola, A.; Hyyppä, J.

    2013-08-01

    The increasing availability in multiple data sources acquired by different sensor platforms has provided the great advantages for desired result achievement. This paper proposes the use of both mobile laser scanning (MLS) data and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) images for 3D model reconstruction. Due to no available exterior orientation parameters for UAV images, the first task is to georeference these images to 3D points. In order to fast and accurate acquire 3D points which are also easy to be found the corresponding locations on UAV images, automated pole extraction from MLS was developed. After georeferencing UAV images, building roofs are acquired from those images and building walls are extracted from MLS data. The roofs and the walls are combined to achieve the complete building models.

  19. Automated terrestrial laser scanning with near-real-time change detection - monitoring of the Séchilienne landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, Ryan A.; Abellán, Antonio; Hutchinson, D. Jean; Lato, Matt; Chanut, Marie-Aurelie; Dubois, Laurent; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2017-05-01

    We present an automated terrestrial laser scanning (ATLS) system with automatic near-real-time change detection processing. The ATLS system was tested on the Séchilienne landslide in France for a 6-week period with data collected at 30 min intervals. The purpose of developing the system was to fill the gap of high-temporal-resolution TLS monitoring studies of earth surface processes and to offer a cost-effective, light, portable alternative to ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (GB-InSAR) deformation monitoring. During the study, we detected the flux of talus, displacement of the landslide and pre-failure deformation of discrete rockfall events. Additionally, we found the ATLS system to be an effective tool in monitoring landslide and rockfall processes despite missing points due to poor atmospheric conditions or rainfall. Furthermore, such a system has the potential to help us better understand a wide variety of slope processes at high levels of temporal detail.

  20. Laser Scanning and Data Integration for Three-Dimensional Digital Recording of Complex Historical Structures: The Case of Mevlana Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihan Altuntas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning method is widely used in three-dimensional (3-D modeling projects. Nevertheless it usually requires measurement data from other sources for full measurement of the shapes. In this study a 3-D model of the historical Mevlana Museum (Mevlana Mausoleum in Konya, Turkey was created using state-of-the art measurement techniques. The building was measured by terrestrial laser scanner (TLS. In addition, some shapes of the indoor area were measured by a time-of-flight camera. Thus, a 3-D model of the building was created by combining datasets of all measurements. The point cloud model was created with 2.3 cm and 2.4 cm accuracy for outdoor and indoor measurements, and then it was registered to a georeferenced system. In addition a 3-D virtual model was created by mapping the texture on a mesh derived from the point cloud.

  1. Analysis of the penetration of a caffeine containing shampoo into the hair follicles by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Schanzer, S.; Klenk, A.; Sterry, W.; Patzelt, A.

    2010-02-01

    In previous in vitro investigations, it was demonstrated that caffeine is able to stimulate the hair growth. Therefore, a penetration of caffeine into the hair follicle is necessary. In the present study, in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM) was used to investigate the penetration and storage of a caffeine containing shampoo into the hair follicles. It was shown that a 2-min contact time of the shampoo with the skin was enough to accumulate significant parts of the shampoo in the hair follicles. A penetration of the shampoo up to a depth of approx. 200 μm could be detected, which represents the detection limit of the LSM. At this depth, the close network of the blood capillaries surrounding the hair follicles commences. Even after 24 h, the substance was still detectable in the hair follicles. This demonstrates the long-term reservoir function of the hair follicles for topically applied substances such as caffeine.

  2. Real-time mapping of the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Zhivov, Andrey; Stachs, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to produce two-dimensional reconstruction maps of the living corneal sub-basal nerve plexus by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy in real time. CLSM source data (frame rate 30Hz, 384x384 pixel) were used to create large-scale maps of the scanned area by selecting the Automatic Real Time (ART) composite mode. The mapping algorithm is based on an affine transformation. Microscopy of the sub-basal nerve plexus was performed on normal and LASIK eyes as well as on rabbit eyes. Real-time mapping of the sub-basal nerve plexus was performed in large-scale up to a size of 3.2mm x 3.2mm. The developed method enables a real-time in vivo mapping of the sub-basal nerve plexus which is stringently necessary for statistically firmed conclusions about morphometric plexus alterations.

  3. Extracting the ridge set as a graph for actin filament length estimation from confocal laser scanning microscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Harald

    2012-04-01

    The progress in image acquisition techniques provides life sciences with an abundance of data. Image analysis facilitates the assessment. The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in understanding the behavior of osteoblastic cells on biomaterials. In the flat basal part of the cells, it can be visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In the microscopic images, the stained cytoskeleton appears as a dense network of bright ridges which is so far only qualitatively assessed. For its quantification, there is a need for ridge detection techniques that provide a geometrical description of this graph feature. The state of the art methods do not cope with the systematical degradation by noise, unspecific luminance, and uneven dye uptake. This work presents the key part of a ridge-tracking technique, which makes more efficient use of context information, and evaluate it by its length measurement accuracy. Two random models illustrate the performance against ground truth. Representative microscopic images confirm the applicability.

  4. Application of 3D laser scanning technology in historical building preservation: a case study of a Chinese temple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu Min; Lu, Nien Hua; Wu, Tsung Chiang

    2005-06-01

    This study applies 3D Laser scanning technology to develop a high-precision measuring system for digital survey of historical building. It outperformed other methods in obtaining abundant high-precision measuring points and computing data instantly. In this study, the Pei-tien Temple, a Chinese Taoism temple in southern Taiwan famous for its highly intricate architecture and more than 300-year history, was adopted as the target to proof the high accuracy and efficiency of this system. By using French made MENSI GS-100 Laser Scanner, numerous measuring points were precisely plotted to present the plane map, vertical map and 3D map of the property. Accuracies of 0.1-1 mm in the digital data have consistently been achieved for the historical heritage measurement.

  5. Detection of Vertical Pole-Like Objects in a Road Environment Using Vehicle-Based Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Kaartinen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate road environment information is needed in applications such as road maintenance and virtual 3D city modelling. Vehicle-based laser scanning (VLS can produce dense point clouds from large areas efficiently from which the road and its environment can be modelled in detail. Pole-like objects such as traffic signs, lamp posts and tree trunks are an important part of road environments. An automatic method was developed for the extraction of pole-like objects from VLS data. The method was able to find 77.7% of the poles which were found by a manual investigation of the data. Correctness of the detection was 81.0%.

  6. Application of primary cell cultures of laryngeal carcinoma and laser scanning cytometry in the evaluation of tumor reactivity to cisplatinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Kupisz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Unsatisfactory effects of treatment of laryngeal carcinoma patients stimulate the clinicians as well as researchers to develop new more effective treatment models and to find new reliable prognostic factors. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of the use of primary cell cultures of the laryngeal carcinoma and laser scanning cytometry (LSC in the assessment of tumor reactivity to cisplatinum. Nineteen primary cultures of laryngeal carcinoma cells established from fragments of laryngeal carcinoma infiltrations were cultured with or without cisplatin, stained with monoclonal antibodies against P53 and BCL-2 proteins and analyzed by LSC. Cisplatin added to the culture medium leads to the significant increase of P53 expression and decrease of BCL-2 expression. Moreover, changes of P53 and BCL-2 expressions were significantly correlated. Our findings of apoptosis regulatory mechanisms could be useful in patient qualification for the chemotherapeutic follow-up treatment.

  7. A New Recursive Filtering Method of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data to Preserve Ground Surface Information in Steep-Slope Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Kyeong Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Landslides are one of the critical natural hazards that cause human, infrastructure, and economic losses. Risk of catastrophic losses due to landslides is significant given sprawled urban development near steep slopes and the increasing proximity of large populations to hilly areas. For reducing these losses, a high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM is an essential piece of data for a qualitative or a quantitative investigation of slopes that may lead to landslides. Data acquired by a terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, called a point cloud, has been widely used to generate a DTM, since a TLS is appropriate for detecting small- to large-scale ground features on steep slopes. For an accurate DTM, TLS data should be filtered to remove non-ground points, but most current algorithms for extracting ground points from a point cloud have been developed for airborne laser scanning (ALS data and not TLS data. Moreover, it is a challenging task to generate an accurate DTM from a steep-slope area by using existing algorithms. For these reasons, we developed an algorithm to automatically extract only ground points from the point clouds of steep terrains. Our methodology is focused on TLS datasets and utilizes the adaptive principal component analysis–triangular irregular network (PCA-TIN approach. Our method was applied to two test areas and the results showed that the algorithm can cope well with steep slopes, giving an accurate surface model compared to conventional algorithms. Total accuracy values of the generated DTMs in the form of root mean squared errors are 1.84 cm and 2.13 cm over the areas of 5252 m2 and 1378 m2, respectively. The slope-based adaptive PCA-TIN method demonstrates great potential for TLS-derived DTM construction in steep-slope landscapes.

  8. Modelling the vertical distribution of canopy fuel load using national forest inventory and low-density airbone laser scanning data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo González-Ferreiro

    Full Text Available The fuel complex variables canopy bulk density and canopy base height are often used to predict crown fire initiation and spread. Direct measurement of these variables is impractical, and they are usually estimated indirectly by modelling. Recent advances in predicting crown fire behaviour require accurate estimates of the complete vertical distribution of canopy fuels. The objectives of the present study were to model the vertical profile of available canopy fuel in pine stands by using data from the Spanish national forest inventory plus low-density airborne laser scanning (ALS metrics. In a first step, the vertical distribution of the canopy fuel load was modelled using the Weibull probability density function. In a second step, two different systems of models were fitted to estimate the canopy variables defining the vertical distributions; the first system related these variables to stand variables obtained in a field inventory, and the second system related the canopy variables to airborne laser scanning metrics. The models of each system were fitted simultaneously to compensate the effects of the inherent cross-model correlation between the canopy variables. Heteroscedasticity was also analyzed, but no correction in the fitting process was necessary. The estimated canopy fuel load profiles from field variables explained 84% and 86% of the variation in canopy fuel load for maritime pine and radiata pine respectively; whereas the estimated canopy fuel load profiles from ALS metrics explained 52% and 49% of the variation for the same species. The proposed models can be used to assess the effectiveness of different forest management alternatives for reducing crown fire hazard.

  9. Modelling the vertical distribution of canopy fuel load using national forest inventory and low-density airbone laser scanning data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ferreiro, Eduardo; Arellano-Pérez, Stéfano; Castedo-Dorado, Fernando; Hevia, Andrea; Vega, José Antonio; Vega-Nieva, Daniel; Álvarez-González, Juan Gabriel; Ruiz-González, Ana Daría

    2017-01-01

    The fuel complex variables canopy bulk density and canopy base height are often used to predict crown fire initiation and spread. Direct measurement of these variables is impractical, and they are usually estimated indirectly by modelling. Recent advances in predicting crown fire behaviour require accurate estimates of the complete vertical distribution of canopy fuels. The objectives of the present study were to model the vertical profile of available canopy fuel in pine stands by using data from the Spanish national forest inventory plus low-density airborne laser scanning (ALS) metrics. In a first step, the vertical distribution of the canopy fuel load was modelled using the Weibull probability density function. In a second step, two different systems of models were fitted to estimate the canopy variables defining the vertical distributions; the first system related these variables to stand variables obtained in a field inventory, and the second system related the canopy variables to airborne laser scanning metrics. The models of each system were fitted simultaneously to compensate the effects of the inherent cross-model correlation between the canopy variables. Heteroscedasticity was also analyzed, but no correction in the fitting process was necessary. The estimated canopy fuel load profiles from field variables explained 84% and 86% of the variation in canopy fuel load for maritime pine and radiata pine respectively; whereas the estimated canopy fuel load profiles from ALS metrics explained 52% and 49% of the variation for the same species. The proposed models can be used to assess the effectiveness of different forest management alternatives for reducing crown fire hazard.

  10. A decade of modern cave surveying with terrestrial laser scanning: A review of sensors, method and application development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrees Mohammed Oludare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the need to survey and model caves or caverns in their correct three-dimensional geometry has increased due to two major competing motivations. One is the emergence of medium and long range terrestrial laser scanning (TLS technology that can collect high point density with unprecedented accuracy and speed, and two, the expanding sphere of multidisciplinary research in understanding the origin and development of cave, called speleogenesis. Accurate surveying of caves has always been fundamental to understanding their origin and processes that lead to their current state and as well provide tools and information to predict future. Several laser scanning surveys have been carried out in many sophisticated cave sites around the world over the last decade for diverse applications; however, no comprehensive assessment of this development has been published to date. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D scanning in caves during the last decade. It examines a bibliography of almost fifty high quality works published in various international journals related to mapping caves in their true 3D geometry with focus on sensor design, methodology and data processing, and application development. The study shows that a universal standard method for 3D scanning has been established. The method provides flexible procedures that make it adaptable to suit different geometric conditions in caves. Significant progress has also been recorded in terms of physical design and technical capabilities. Over time, TLS devices have seen a reduction in size, and become more compact and lighter, with almost full panoramic coverage. Again, the speed, resolution, and measurement accuracy of scanners have improved tremendously, providing a wealth of information for the expanding sphere of emerging applications. Comparatively, point cloud processing packages are not left out of the development. They are more efficient in terms of

  11. Development of kinematic 3D laser scanning system for indoor mapping and as-built BIM using constrained SLAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Sanghyun; Ju, Sungha; Heo, Joon

    2015-10-16

    The growing interest and use of indoor mapping is driving a demand for improved data-acquisition facility, efficiency and productivity in the era of the Building Information Model (BIM). The conventional static laser scanning method suffers from some limitations on its operability in complex indoor environments, due to the presence of occlusions. Full scanning of indoor spaces without loss of information requires that surveyors change the scanner position many times, which incurs extra work for registration of each scanned point cloud. Alternatively, a kinematic 3D laser scanning system, proposed herein, uses line-feature-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique for continuous mapping. Moreover, to reduce the uncertainty of line-feature extraction, we incorporated constrained adjustment based on an assumption made with respect to typical indoor environments: that the main structures are formed of parallel or orthogonal line features. The superiority of the proposed constrained adjustment is its reduction for uncertainties of the adjusted lines, leading to successful data association process. In the present study, kinematic scanning with and without constrained adjustment were comparatively evaluated in two test sites, and the results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed system. The accuracy of the 3D mapping result was additionally evaluated by comparison with the reference points acquired by a total station: the Euclidean average distance error was 0.034 m for the seminar room and 0.043 m for the corridor, which satisfied the error tolerance for point cloud acquisition (0.051 m) according to the guidelines of the General Services Administration for BIM accuracy.

  12. A new approach for the spatially resolved qualitative analysis of the protein distribution in hydrogel beads based on confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Matthias; Wagner, Thomas; Doumèche, Bastien; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion; Büchs, Jochen

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the spatial distribution of white egg albumin (WEA) in alginate beads, a new method based on confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was developed. In contrast to the existing CLSM methods, misleading conclusions are prevented with the application of the new method which does not

  13.   In situ identification of streptococci and other bacteria in initial dental biofilm by confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Kilian, Mogens; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has been employed as a method for studying intact natural biofilm. When combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) it is possible to analyze spatial relationships and changes of specific members of microbial populations over time. The aim...

  14. [Reconstruction of Vehicle-human Crash Accident and Injury Analysis Based on 3D Laser Scanning, Multi-rigid-body Reconstruction and Optimized Genetic Algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J; Wang, T; Li, Z D; Shao, Y; Zhang, Z Y; Feng, H; Zou, D H; Chen, Y J

    2017-12-01

    To reconstruct a vehicle-bicycle-cyclist crash accident and analyse the injuries using 3D laser scanning technology, multi-rigid-body dynamics and optimized genetic algorithm, and to provide biomechanical basis for the forensic identification of death cause. The vehicle was measured by 3D laser scanning technology. The multi-rigid-body models of cyclist, bicycle and vehicle were developed based on the measurements. The value range of optimal variables was set. A multi-objective genetic algorithm and the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm were used to find the optimal solutions, which were compared to the record of the surveillance video around the accident scene. The reconstruction result of laser scanning on vehicle was satisfactory. In the optimal solutions found by optimization method of genetic algorithm, the dynamical behaviours of dummy, bicycle and vehicle corresponded to that recorded by the surveillance video. The injury parameters of dummy were consistent with the situation and position of the real injuries on the cyclist in accident. The motion status before accident, damage process by crash and mechanical analysis on the injury of the victim can be reconstructed using 3D laser scanning technology, multi-rigid-body dynamics and optimized genetic algorithm, which have application value in the identification of injury manner and analysis of death cause in traffic accidents.

  15. Verification and Updating of the Database of Topographic Objects with Geometric Information About Buildings by Means of Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendela-Anzlik Małgorzata

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Airborne laser scanning data (ALS are used mainly for creation of precise digital elevation models. However, it appears that the informative potential stored in ALS data can be also used for updating spatial databases, including the Database of Topographic Objects (BDOT10k. Typically, geometric representations of buildings in the BDOT10k are equal to their entities in the Land and Property Register (EGiB. In this study ALS is considered as supporting data source. The thresholding method of original ALS data with the use of the alpha shape algorithm, proposed in this paper, allows for extraction of points that represent horizontal cross section of building walls, leading to creation of vector, geometric models of buildings that can be then used for updating the BDOT10k. This method gives also the possibility of an easy verification of up-to-dateness of both the BDOT10k and the district EGiB databases within geometric information about buildings. For verification of the proposed methodology there have been used the classified ALS data acquired with a density of 4 points/m2. The accuracy assessment of the identified building outlines has been carried out by their comparison to the corresponding EGiB objects. The RMSE values for 78 buildings are from a few to tens of centimeters and the average value is about 0,5 m. At the same time for several objects there have been revealed huge geometric discrepancies. Further analyses have shown that these discrepancies could be resulted from incorrect representations of buildings in the EGiB database.

  16. A novel method to analyse in vivo the physiological state and cell viability of phototrophic microorganisms by confocal laser scanning microscopy using a dual laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millach, Laia; Obiol, Aleix; Solé, Antonio; Esteve, Isabel

    2017-10-01

    Phototrophic microorganisms are very abundant in extreme environments, where are subjected to frequent and strong changes in environmental parameters. Nevertheless, little is known about the physiological effects of these changing environmental conditions on viability of these microorganisms, which are difficult to grow in solid media and have the tendency to form aggregates. For that reason, it is essential to develop methodologies that provide data in short time consuming, in vivo and with minimal manipulating the samples, in response to distinct stress conditions. In this paper, we present a novel method using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and a Dual Laser (CLSM-DL) for determining the cell viability of phototrophic microorganisms without the need of either staining or additional use of image treating software. In order to differentiate viable and nonviable Scenedesmus sp. DE2009 cells, a sequential scan in two different channels was carried out from each same xyz optical section. On the one hand, photosynthetic pigments fluorescence signal (living cells) was recorded at the red channel (625- to 785-nm fluorescence emission) exciting the samples with a 561-nm laser diode, and an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) of 20%. On the other hand, nonphotosynthetic autofluorescence signal (dead cells) was recorded at the green channel (500- to 585-nm fluorescence emission) using a 405-nm UV laser, an AOTF of 15%. Both types of fluorescence signatures were captured with a hybrid detector. The validation of the CLSM-DL method was performed with SYTOX green fluorochrome and electron microscopic techniques, and it was also applied for studying the response of distinct light intensities, salinity doses and exposure times on a consortium of Scenedesmus sp. DE2009. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. A COMPARISON OF LASER SCANNING AND STRUCTURE FROM MOTION AS APPLIED TO THE GREAT BARN AT HARMONDSWORTH, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Andrews

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The great barn at Harmondsworth near London Heathrow airport, United Kingdom (UK, was built in 1426–7 for the Bishop of Winchester. At 58 metres long and 11.4 metres wide, it is one of the largest ever known to have been built in the UK, and the largest intact medieval timber-framed barn in England. The barn is built almost entirely of oak, although the walls rest on a low masonry sill-wall. Internally the space is divided into a central "nave" with a lower aisle to each side, and is divided along its length into 12 bays. There are three doorways on the east side. For an entirely timber-framed barn, the fabric is exceptionally well preserved. Even the external weatherboarding may be partly original. Following years of neglect, however, there are a number of on-going structural and conservation problems, so in 2011 the barn was bought by English Heritage in order to allow these needs to be addressed. English Heritage is the government agency responsible for the historic sites and buildings in the care of the state of England and is also the UK government's lead advisor on the built heritage. As one of the first steps in the conservation process the English Heritage Geospatial Imaging and Imaging & Visualisation teams undertook a four-day campaign of survey data collection. This took the form of laser scanning of the interior and exterior of the barn plus the acquisition of photography of the exterior elevations to be used with structure from motion (SFM software. A comparison of the results of these complimentary yet potentially competing technologies will be given, as well as an evaluation of when they can be successfully used together. This paper will describe the procedures and problems involved with collecting the survey data and its subsequent analysis. The laser scanning was undertaken using a FARO Focus 3D phase based instrument. Approximately 60 scans were acquired in order to provide as comprehensive as possible coverage given the site

  18. a Comparison of Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion as Applied to the Great Barn at Harmondsworth, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D. P.; Bedford, J.; Bryan, P. G.

    2013-07-01

    The great barn at Harmondsworth near London Heathrow airport, United Kingdom (UK), was built in 1426-7 for the Bishop of Winchester. At 58 metres long and 11.4 metres wide, it is one of the largest ever known to have been built in the UK, and the largest intact medieval timber-framed barn in England. The barn is built almost entirely of oak, although the walls rest on a low masonry sill-wall. Internally the space is divided into a central "nave" with a lower aisle to each side, and is divided along its length into 12 bays. There are three doorways on the east side. For an entirely timber-framed barn, the fabric is exceptionally well preserved. Even the external weatherboarding may be partly original. Following years of neglect, however, there are a number of on-going structural and conservation problems, so in 2011 the barn was bought by English Heritage in order to allow these needs to be addressed. English Heritage is the government agency responsible for the historic sites and buildings in the care of the state of England and is also the UK government's lead advisor on the built heritage. As one of the first steps in the conservation process the English Heritage Geospatial Imaging and Imaging & Visualisation teams undertook a four-day campaign of survey data collection. This took the form of laser scanning of the interior and exterior of the barn plus the acquisition of photography of the exterior elevations to be used with structure from motion (SFM) software. A comparison of the results of these complimentary yet potentially competing technologies will be given, as well as an evaluation of when they can be successfully used together. This paper will describe the procedures and problems involved with collecting the survey data and its subsequent analysis. The laser scanning was undertaken using a FARO Focus 3D phase based instrument. Approximately 60 scans were acquired in order to provide as comprehensive as possible coverage given the site circumstances. A

  19. Design of an affordable fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope for medical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Christin; Knobbe, Jens; Grüger, Heinrich; Lakner, Hubert

    2012-12-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopes are a promising imaging tool in medical diagnostics due to their capability to selectively survey cross-sections of individual layers from `thick' samples. Non-invasive depth resolved investigation of neoplastic skin disorders is one example among other applications. However these microscopes are at present uncommon in medical practice. This is due to their main application area in research. The instruments dealt with here are generally complex, stationary units and are accordingly cost-intensive. It is for this reason, that we have designed a robust and portable MEMS based confocal fluorescence microscope with a field of view of 0.6mm x 0.6mm. This has been made possible by the integration of a 2D micro scanner mirror developed at Fraunhofer IPMS. A variable acquisition depth of cross-sectional images of the fluorescence specimen is enabled by an integrated z-shifter. With the use of commercially available optics an optical demonstrator set up has been realized. To characterize and to demonstrate the ability of this system test measurements were performed. The resolution of the microscope is better than 228 lp/mm determined by 1951 USAF resolution test target. Images of various biological samples are presented and optical sectioning capabilities are shown. A comparison of the measured with the predicted system performance will be given.

  20. Modeling a Shallow Rock Tunnel Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Discrete Fracture Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciari, Pedro Pazzoto; Futai, Marcos Massao

    2017-05-01

    Discontinuity mapping and analysis are extremely important for modeling shallow tunnels constructed in fractured rock masses. However, the limited exposure and variability of rock face orientation in tunnels must be taken into account. In this paper, an automatic method is proposed to generate discrete fracture networks (DFNs) using terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) geological mapping and to continuously calculate the volumetric intensities ( P 32) along a tunnel. The number of fractures intersecting rectangular sampling planes with different orientations, fitted in tunnel sections of finite lengths, is used as the program termination criteria to create multiple DFNs and to calculate the mean P 32. All traces and orientations from three discontinuity sets of the Monte Seco tunnel (Vitória Minas Railway) were mapped and the present method applied to obtain the continuous variation in P 32 along the tunnel. A practical approach to creating single and continuous DFNs (for each discontinuity set), considering the P 32 variations, is also presented, and the results are validated by comparing the trace intensities ( P 21) from the TLS mapping and DFNs generated. Three examples of 3DEC block models generated from different sections of the tunnel are shown, including the ground surface and the bedrock topographies. The results indicate that the proposed method is a practical and powerful tool for modeling fractured rock masses of uncovered tunnels. It is also promising for application during tunnel construction when TLS mapping is a daily task (for as-built tunnel controls), and the complete geological mapping (traces and orientations) is available.

  1. A Bayesian geostatistical estimation of biomass in semi-arid rangelands by combining airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A.; Glenn, N. F.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass of vegetation is critical for carbon cycle research. Estimating biomass from field survey data is laborious and/or destructive and thus retrieving biomass from remote sensing data may be advantageous. Most remote sensing biomass studies have focused on forest ecosystems, while few have focused on low stature vegetation, such as grasses in semi-arid environments. Biomass estimates for grass are significant for studying wildlife habitat, assessing fuel loads, and studying climate change response in semi-arid regions. Recent research has demonstrated the ability of small footprint airborne laser scanning (ALS) data to extract sagebrush height characteristics and the ability of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data to estimate vegetation volume over semi-arid rangelands. ALS has somewhat lower resolution than TLS, but has improved spatial coverage over TLS. Combining ALS and TLS is a powerful tool to estimate biomass on regional scales. Bayesian geostatistics, also known as Bayesian Maximum Entropy (BME), can fuse multiple data sources across scales and provide estimation uncertainties for the integration of ALS and TLS data for grass biomass. Regression models are used to approximately delineate the relationship between field biomass measurements and TLS derived height and shape metrics. We then consider TLS plot-level data at the point scale with ALS data at the area scale. The regularization method is utilized to establish the scaling relations between TLS-derived and ALS-derived metrics. The metric maps from the ALS level are reconstructed using a BME method based on regularized variograms. We gain biomass and estimation uncertainty on the regional scale by introducing updated metrics into the model. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the BME method, we develop simple independent regression models by assuming the TLS-derived metrics as ground reference data. Therefore, the regression model is used to correct the ALS-estimated values and we retrieve

  2. A 3-d laser scanning system and scan data processing method for the monitoring of tunnel deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelina, Klaus; Jansa, Josef; Hesina, Gerd; Traxler, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    The paper presents the mobile multi-sensor system Orthos Plus for the monitoring and mapping of tunnel walls, a scan data processing method for the evaluation of 3-d tunnel wall displacements from subsequent wall scans and, finally, a virtual reality tool supporting the interpretation of data. The measuring system consists of a 3-d laser scanner, a motorised total station and a digital camera that are integrated on a light metal frame that is installed on a mobile platform. It has been designed to perform tunnel measurements most efficiently and to meet the special requirements of tunnels under construction. The evaluation of 3-d displacements is based on a 3-d matching algorithm that takes advantage of the particular conditions of tunnel (shotcrete) surfaces. The virtual reality tool allows viewing of data in a 3-d virtual reality tunnel model and their animation in time and space in order supports understanding in an optimal way. The measuring system Orthos Plus has been developed in the course of a national research project, the 3-d matching method in the frame of the Austrian Christian Doppler Laboratory Spatial Data from Laser Scanning and Remote Sensing and the VR tool in the Austrian COMET K1 Competence Center VRVis Center (www.vrvis.at).

  3. Bag-of-visual-phrases and hierarchical deep models for traffic sign detection and recognition in mobile laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongtao; Li, Jonathan; Wen, Chenglu; Guan, Haiyan; Luo, Huan; Wang, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for detection and recognition of traffic signs in mobile laser scanning (MLS) data for intelligent transportation-related applications. The traffic sign detection task is accomplished based on 3-D point clouds by using bag-of-visual-phrases representations; whereas the recognition task is achieved based on 2-D images by using a Gaussian-Bernoulli deep Boltzmann machine-based hierarchical classifier. To exploit high-order feature encodings of feature regions, a deep Boltzmann machine-based feature encoder is constructed. For detecting traffic signs in 3-D point clouds, the proposed algorithm achieves an average recall, precision, quality, and F-score of 0.956, 0.946, 0.907, and 0.951, respectively, on the four selected MLS datasets. For on-image traffic sign recognition, a recognition accuracy of 97.54% is achieved by using the proposed hierarchical classifier. Comparative studies with the existing traffic sign detection and recognition methods demonstrate that our algorithm obtains promising, reliable, and high performance in both detecting traffic signs in 3-D point clouds and recognizing traffic signs on 2-D images.

  4. AN ENERGY-BASED APPROACH FOR DETECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBTLE ENTITIES WITHIN LASER SCANNING POINT-CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arav

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Airborne laser scans present an optimal tool to describe geomorphological features in natural environments. However, a challenge arises in the detection of such phenomena, as they are embedded in the topography, tend to blend into their surroundings and leave only a subtle signature within the data. Most object-recognition studies address mainly urban environments and follow a general pipeline where the data are partitioned into segments with uniform properties. These approaches are restricted to man-made domain and are capable to handle limited features that answer a well-defined geometric form. As natural environments present a more complex set of features, the common interpretation of the data is still manual at large. In this paper, we propose a data-aware detection scheme, unbound to specific domains or shapes. We define the recognition question as an energy optimization problem, solved by variational means. Our approach, based on the level-set method, characterizes geometrically local surfaces within the data, and uses these characteristics as potential field for minimization. The main advantage here is that it allows topological changes of the evolving curves, such as merging and breaking. We demonstrate the proposed methodology on the detection of collapse sinkholes.

  5. A voting-based statistical cylinder detection framework applied to fallen tree mapping in terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polewski, Przemyslaw; Yao, Wei; Heurich, Marco; Krzystek, Peter; Stilla, Uwe

    2017-07-01

    This paper introduces a statistical framework for detecting cylindrical shapes in dense point clouds. We target the application of mapping fallen trees in datasets obtained through terrestrial laser scanning. This is a challenging task due to the presence of ground vegetation, standing trees, DTM artifacts, as well as the fragmentation of dead trees into non-collinear segments. Our method shares the concept of voting in parameter space with the generalized Hough transform, however two of its significant drawbacks are improved upon. First, the need to generate samples on the shape's surface is eliminated. Instead, pairs of nearby input points lying on the surface cast a vote for the cylinder's parameters based on the intrinsic geometric properties of cylindrical shapes. Second, no discretization of the parameter space is required: the voting is carried out in continuous space by means of constructing a kernel density estimator and obtaining its local maxima, using automatic, data-driven kernel bandwidth selection. Furthermore, we show how the detected cylindrical primitives can be efficiently merged to obtain object-level (entire tree) semantic information using graph-cut segmentation and a tailored dynamic algorithm for eliminating cylinder redundancy. Experiments were performed on 3 plots from the Bavarian Forest National Park, with ground truth obtained through visual inspection of the point clouds. It was found that relative to sample consensus (SAC) cylinder fitting, the proposed voting framework can improve the detection completeness by up to 10 percentage points while maintaining the correctness rate.

  6. Effects of a topically applied wound ointment on epidermal wound healing studied by in vivo fluorescence laser scanning microscopy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard; Alborova, Alena; Krüger-Corcoran, Daniela; Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Sterry, Wolfram; Kramer, Axel; Stockfleth, Eggert; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Epidermal wound healing is a complex and dynamic regenerative process necessary to reestablish skin integrity. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (FLSM) is a noninvasive imaging technique that has previously been used for evaluation of inflammatory and neoplastic skin disorders in vivo and at high resolution. We employed FLSM to investigate the evolution of epidermal wound healing noninvasively over time and in vivo. Two suction blisters were induced on the volar forearms of the study participants, followed by removal of the epidermis. To study the impact of wound ointment on the process of reepithelization, test sites were divided into two groups, of which one test site was left untreated as a negative control. FLSM was used for serial/consecutive evaluations up to 8 days. FLSM was able to visualize the development of thin keratinocyte layers developing near the wound edge and around hair follicles until the entire epidermis has been reestablished. Wounds treated with the wound ointment were found to heal significantly faster than untreated wounds. This technique allows monitoring of the kinetics of wound healing noninvasively and over time, while offering new insights into the potential effects of topically applied drugs on the process of tissue repair.

  7. Comparison of tissue damage caused by various laser systems with tissue tolerable plasma by light and laser scan microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersee, Staffan; Lademann, Jürgen; Richter, Heike; Patzelt, Alexa; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) represents a novel therapeutic method with promising capabilities in the field of dermatological interventions, in particular disinfection but also wound antisepsis and regeneration. The energy transfer by plasma into living tissue is not easily educible, as a variety of features such as the medium’s actual molecule-stream, the ions, electrons and free radicals involved, as well as the emission of ultraviolet, visible and infrared light contribute to its increasingly well characterized effects. Thus, relating possible adversary effects, especially of prolonged exposure to a single component of the plasma’s mode of action, is difficult. Until now, severe adverse events connected to plasma exposure have not been reported when conducted according to existing therapeutic protocols. In this study, we have compared the tissue damage-potential of CO2 and dye lasers with TTP in a porcine model. After exposure of pig ear skin to the three treatment modalities, all specimens were examined histologically and by means of laser scan microscopy (LSM). Light microscopical tissue damage could only be shown in the case of the CO2 laser, whereas dye laser and plasma treatment resulted in no detectable impairment of the specimens. In the case of TTP, LSM examination revealed only an impairment of the uppermost corneal layers of the skin, thus stressing its safety when used in vivo.

  8. Porosity of natural stone and use of confocal laser scanning microscopy on calcitic marble aged in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mladenovič

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Porosity is one of the key characteristics of natural stone, which influences ondurability as well as functionality of stone as building material. Further, deterioration processes themselves are also characterized by change of porosity. Different direct and indirect techniques can be used for porosity determination. In the following paper overview of these methods, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, is given. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is indirect (microscopic technique. Despite its numerous advantages, among which 3D visualizationof pore structure is of major importance, this technique is less known in the area of building materials. An example how CLSM can be applied for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of porosity of calcitic polygonal granoblastic marble is given in this paper. Studied marble has been, despite of its poor durability, often used as building material, especially in the case of claddings. It is shown that thermal hydric factors of deterioration can influence porosity significantly,especially formation of intergranular cracks.This kind of deterioration can be successfully evaluated with use of CLSM method, if samples are suitable prepared and if suitable image analysis tools are developed.

  9. [Accuracy of different registration methods for laser-scanned dental cast data and maxillofacial cone-bean CT data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-jiao; Yuan, Fu-song; Xie, Xiao-yan; Sun, Yu-chun; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yong

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of four dominant methods of three-dimensional multisource data registration. Laser-scanned dental model and maxillofacial cone-bean CT rebuilt model were collected for one orthodontic patient before treatment. Registration process was done based on locating spheres' center, anatomic landmarks, partial characteristic region and global data separately. The registration errors were detected by the function of Geomagic Studio 12.0 software. A comparison of the registration accuracy among these four methods was done by analyzing mean error and standard deviation. The mean errors and standard deviations of methods of locating spheres' center, anatomic landmarks, partial characteristic region and global data were -(0.082 ± 0.221), -(0.104 ± 0.218), -(0.047 ± 0.138) and -(0.025 ± 0.129) mm respectively. ICP registration methods had better reliability than landmark methods. The global registration was more accurate than partial characteristic region registration and the locating spheres' center method was better than anatomic landmarks method.

  10. Reduction of the pulse duration of the ultrafast laser pulses of the Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (2PLSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshak Ali

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We provide an update of our two-photon laser scanning microscope by compressing or reducing the broadening of the pulse width of ultrafast laser pulses for dispersion precompensation, to enable the pulses to penetrate deeply inside the sample. Findings The broadening comes as the pulses pass through the optical elements. We enhanced and modified the quality and the sharpness of images by enhancing the resolution using special polarizer namely Glan Laser polarizer GL10. This polarizer consists of two prisms separated by air space. This air separation between the two prisms uses to delay the red wavelength when the light leaves the first prism to the air then to second prism. We note a considerable enhancing with using the GL polarizer, and we can see the details of the leaf structure in early stages when we trying to get focus through z-stacks of images in comparison to exactly the same measurements without using GL polarizer. Hence, with this modification we able to reduce the time of exposure the sample to the laser radiation thereby we will reduce the probability of photobleaching and phototoxicity. When the pulse width reduced, the average power of the laser pulses maintained at a constant level. Significant enhancement is found between the two kinds of images of the Two-Photon Excitation Fluorescence (TPEF. Conclusion In summary reduction the laser pulse width allowed to collect more diffraction orders which will used to form the images. The more diffraction orders the higher resolution images.

  11. An acousto-optically steered laser scanning system for measurement of action potential spread in intact heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morad, M; Dillon, S; Weiss, J

    1986-01-01

    An optical scanning device that combines a voltage-sensitive dye and an acousto-optically steered He-Ne laser beam is described. This device is capable of scanning 128 sites every 4 ms and recording and storing the fluorescence signals for a duration of up to 1 s (several beats). Comparison of an activation map constructed from laser scanning to those obtained from multiple extracellular electrodes suggests that this technique is highly reliable. Although motion-induced light scattering appears to alter the shape of the action potential, the upstroke can be distinguished quite reliably even in a vigorously contracting muscle. This technique provides high resolution (up to 50 micron) and high flexibility (i.e., the scanned sites can be concentrated over a small or very large area) in measuring the spread of activation in heart muscle. By having only one excitation and one measurement element, the approach offers simplicity and high flexibility to the user. We have shown that this system can be readily applied to the task for which it was intended--probing the mechanisms of arrhythmias in the mammalian myocardium. It has been demonstrated, for example, that arrhythmias due to automaticity can be readily distinguished from those due to reentry through the mapping capability of the laser scanner. In addition, the ability of laser scanner to measure membrane depolarization directly during arrhythmias may make this technique superior to conventional electrocardiographic mapping techniques.

  12. Evaluating the Correctness of Airborne Laser Scanning Data Heights Using Vehicle-Based RTK and VRS GPS Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Vermeer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we describe a system in which a GPS receiver mounted on the roof of a car is used to provide reference information to evaluate the elevation accuracy and georeferencing of airborne laser scanning (ALS point clouds. The concept was evaluated in the Klaukkala test area where a number of roads were traversed to collect real-time kinematic data. Two test cases were evaluated, including one case using the real-time kinematic (RTK method with a dedicated GPS base station at a known benchmark in the area and another case using the GNSSnet virtual reference station service (VRS. The utility of both GPS methods was confirmed. When all test data were included, the mean difference between ALS data and GPS-based observations was −2.4 cm for both RTK and VRS GPS cases. The corresponding dispersions were ±4.5 cm and ±5.9 cm, respectively. In addition, our examination did not reveal the presence of any significant rotation between ALS and GPS data.

  13. Automated terrestrial laser scanning with near-real-time change detection – monitoring of the Séchilienne landslide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Kromer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an automated terrestrial laser scanning (ATLS system with automatic near-real-time change detection processing. The ATLS system was tested on the Séchilienne landslide in France for a 6-week period with data collected at 30 min intervals. The purpose of developing the system was to fill the gap of high-temporal-resolution TLS monitoring studies of earth surface processes and to offer a cost-effective, light, portable alternative to ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (GB-InSAR deformation monitoring. During the study, we detected the flux of talus, displacement of the landslide and pre-failure deformation of discrete rockfall events. Additionally, we found the ATLS system to be an effective tool in monitoring landslide and rockfall processes despite missing points due to poor atmospheric conditions or rainfall. Furthermore, such a system has the potential to help us better understand a wide variety of slope processes at high levels of temporal detail.

  14. Effects of Pulse Density on Digital Terrain Models and Canopy Metrics Using Airborne Laser Scanning in a Tropical Rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endre Hofstad Hansen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Airborne laser scanning (ALS is increasingly being used to enhance the accuracy of biomass estimates in tropical forests. Although the technological development of ALS instruments has resulted in ever-greater pulse densities, studies in boreal and sub-boreal forests have shown consistent results even at relatively small pulse densities. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of reduced pulse density on (1 the digital terrain model (DTM, and (2 canopy metrics derived from ALS data collected in a tropical rainforest in Tanzania. We used a total of 612 coordinates measured with a differential dual frequency Global Navigation Satellite System receiver to analyze the effects on DTMs at pulse densities of 8, 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.025 pulses·m−2. Furthermore, canopy metrics derived for each pulse density and from four different field plot sizes (0.07, 0.14, 0.21, and 0.28 ha were analyzed. Random variation in DTMs and canopy metrics increased with reduced pulse density. Similarly, increased plot size reduced variation in canopy metrics. A reliability ratio, quantifying replication effects in the canopy metrics, indicated that most of the common metrics assessed were reliable at pulse densities >0.5 pulses·m−2 at a plot size of 0.07 ha.

  15. Precision automation of cell type classification and sub-cellular fluorescence quantification from laser scanning confocal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Craig Hall

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While novel whole-plant phenotyping technologies have been successfully implemented into functional genomics and breeding programs, the potential of automated phenotyping with cellular resolution is largely unexploited. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has the potential to close this gap by providing spatially highly resolved images containing anatomic as well as chemical information on a subcellular basis. However, in the absence of automated methods, the assessment of the spatial patterns and abundance of fluorescent markers with subcellular resolution is still largely qualitative and time-consuming. Recent advances in image acquisition and analysis, coupled with improvements in microprocessor performance, have brought such automated methods within reach, so that information from thousands of cells per image for hundreds of images may be derived in an experimentally convenient time-frame. Here, we present a MATLAB-based analytical pipeline to 1 segment radial plant organs into individual cells, 2 classify cells into cell type categories based upon random forest classification, 3 divide each cell into sub-regions, and 4 quantify fluorescence intensity to a subcellular degree of precision for a separate fluorescence channel. In this research advance, we demonstrate the precision of this analytical process for the relatively complex tissues of Arabidopsis hypocotyls at various stages of development. High speed and robustness make our approach suitable for phenotyping of large collections of stem-like material and other tissue types.

  16. Implementation of Spatial Information for Monitoring and Analysis of the Area Around the Port Using Laser Scanning Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobkowska Katarzyna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, maritime infrastructure is heavily exploited, which requires monitoring. The article presents the implementation of spatial information which are point clouds for monitoring and analysis of the area around the port (buildings and wharves. For this study, point clouds coming from terrestrial (TLS and airborne laser scanning (ALS, each of them having different accuracy, were used. An important part of the analysis was the integration of the two data sources. Through integration, the acquisition of information on areas not covered by the measurement in the presented case, one of the methods was possible for use (e.g. the roofs in case of TLS, or the lack of some of the walls of buildings in case of ALS. Another aspect was to use this data. Measurement of the shape and geometry of objects was executed. Additionally, the planeness analysis of individual elements of port infrastructure has been carried out. An interesting analysis was to determine the water level, based on relation to specific characteristics of the light reflectance.

  17. In-vivo and in-vitro selective targeting of the retinal pigment epithelium using a laser-scanning device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Clemens; Framme, Carsten; Schnell, Susanne; Schuele, Georg; Brinkmann, Ralf; Lin, Charles P.

    2002-06-01

    Laser photocoagulation is a well-established treatment modality for a variety of retinal disorders, but is difficult to use near the fovea due to thermal retinal destruction. Certain diseases, such as drusen maculopathy, are thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium. For those diseases selective targeting of the RPE, sparing the adjoining photoreceptors, might be the appropriate treatment to avoid laser scotoma, as it has been shown with application of a train of ms laser pulses by Birngruber and Roider. Our new approach is to use a conventional green cw laser and rapidly scan a small laser spot over the retina so as to produce microsecond(s) -illumination at each RPE cell. Two scanning devices were developed using acousto-optic deflectors. For the in vitro experiments the ED50 value RPE cell damage was 170 mW with 100 exposures, scanning with a speed of 1 spot diameter/3 microsecond(s) . In vivo experiments demonstrated an angiographic ED50 threshold of 66 mW for 100 exposures while scanning with an effective illumination time of 5 microsecond(s) . The ophthalmoscopic threshold was higher than a factor of 2 times the angiographic ED50. Using separated scan lines we show selectivity in the form of surviving cells in between irradiated lines. Selective destruction of RPE cells is possible using laser-scanning devices.

  18. Comparison of conventional study model measurements and 3D digital study model measurements from laser scanned dental impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugrahani, F.; Jazaldi, F.; Noerhadi, N. A. I.

    2017-08-01

    The field of orthodontics is always evolving,and this includes the use of innovative technology. One type of orthodontic technology is the development of three-dimensional (3D) digital study models that replace conventional study models made by stone. This study aims to compare the mesio-distal teeth width, intercanine width, and intermolar width measurements between a 3D digital study model and a conventional study model. Twelve sets of upper arch dental impressions were taken from subjects with non-crowding teeth. The impressions were taken twice, once with alginate and once with polivinylsiloxane. The alginate impressions used in the conventional study model and the polivinylsiloxane impressions were scanned to obtain the 3D digital study model. Scanning was performed using a laser triangulation scanner device assembled by the School of Electrical Engineering and Informatics at the Institut Teknologi Bandung and David Laser Scan software. For the conventional model, themesio-distal width, intercanine width, and intermolar width were measured using digital calipers; in the 3D digital study model they were measured using software. There were no significant differences between the mesio-distal width, intercanine width, and intermolar width measurments between the conventional and 3D digital study models (p>0.05). Thus, measurements using 3D digital study models are as accurate as those obtained from conventional study models

  19. Monitoring of the Nirano Mud Volcanoes Regional Natural Reserve (North Italy using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Santagata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, measurement instruments and techniques for three-dimensional mapping as Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS and photogrammetry from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV are being increasingly used to monitor topographic changes on particular geological features such as volcanic areas. In addition, topographic instruments such as Total Station Theodolite (TST and GPS receivers can be used to obtain precise elevation and coordinate position data measuring fixed points both inside and outside the area interested by volcanic activity. In this study, the integration of these instruments has helped to obtain several types of data to monitor both the variations in heights of extrusive edifices within the mud volcano field of the Nirano Regional Natural Reserve (Northern Italy, as well as to study the mechanism of micro-fracturing and the evolution of mud flows and volcanic cones with very high accuracy by 3D point clouds surface analysis and digitization. The large amount of data detected were also analysed to derive morphological information about mud-cracks and surface roughness. This contribution is focused on methods and analysis performed using measurement instruments as TLS and UAV to study and monitoring the main volcanic complexes of the Nirano Natural Reserve as part of a research project, which also involves other studies addressing gases and acoustic measurements, mineralogical and paleontological analysis, organized by the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in collaboration with the Municipality of Fiorano Modenese.

  20. Comparison of bacterial leakage resistance of various root canal filling materials and methods: Confocal laser-scanning microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji Hee; Chung, Jin; Na, Hee-Sam; Park, Eunjoo; Kwak, Sangwon; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the bacterial leakage resistance and root canal lining efficacy of various root canal filling materials and methods by using confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM). Sixty extracted human premolars with mature apex and single root canal were randomly divided into 2 control groups and 4 experimental groups. Group CW was filled with continuous wave technique using gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. Group GC was coated with AH-Plus sealer and then obturated with soften GuttaCore. Group GF was obturated using GuttaFlow and gutta-percha. Group EM was filled with EndoSeal MTA and gutta-percha using ultrasonic vibration. The AH-Plus, GuttaFlow, and EndoSeal were labeled with Hoechst 33342 to facilitate fluorescence. The obturated root tip was incubated with Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-stained E. faecalis for 14 days. CLSM was performed to evaluate the sealer distribution and bacterial leakage for the apical 1-, 2-, 3-mm specimens. Statistically significant differences were determined by 1-way ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc test and Pearson's correlation analysis. Group EM showed the better sealer distribution score than the other groups (p  0.05). Under the conditions of this study, different root canal filling materials and methods showed different efficacy for canal distribution and bacterial leakage resistance. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Detection of macrophage activity in atherosclerosis in vivo using multichannel, high-resolution laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Ashvin N.; Kohler, Rainer; Aikawa, Elena; Weissleder, Ralph; Jaffer, Farouc

    2006-03-01

    Molecular and cellular mechanisms of atherogenesis and its treatment are largely being unraveled by in vitro techniques. We describe methodology to directly image macrophage cell activity in vivo in a murine model of atherosclerosis using laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and a macrophage-targeted, near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) magnetofluorescent nanoparticle (MFNP). Atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E deficient (apoE -/-) mice (n=10) are injected with MFNP or 0.9% saline, and wild-type mice (n=4) are injected with MFNP as additional controls. After 24 h, common carotid arteries are surgically exposed and prepared for LSFM. Multichannel LSFM of MFNP-enhanced carotid atheroma (5×5-µm in-plane resolution) shows a strong focal NIRF signal, with a plaque target-to-background ratio of 3.9+/-1.8. Minimal NIRF signal is observed in control mice. Spectrally resolved indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence angiograms confirm the intravascular location of atheroma. On ex vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging, greater NIRF plaque signal is seen in apoE -/- MFNP mice compared to controls (p<0.01). The NIRF signal correlates well with immunostained macrophages, both by stained surface area (r=0.77) and macrophage number (r=0.86). The validated experimental methodology thus establishes a platform for investigating macrophage activity in atherosclerosis in vivo, and has implications for the detection of clinical vulnerable plaques.

  2. Scan Profiles Based Method for Segmentation and Extraction of Planar Objects in Mobile Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang Long; Belton, David; Helmholz, Petra

    2016-06-01

    The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s). The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc.) that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling) that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  3. Molecular characterization and confocal laser scanning microscopic study of Pygidiopsis macrostomum (Trematoda: Heterophyidae) parasites of guppies Poecilia vivipara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, J N; Costa, V S; Mantovani, C; Barros, E; Santos, E G N; Mafra, C L; Santos, C P

    2017-02-01

    Pygidiopsis macrostomum and Ascocotyle (Phagicola) pindoramensis (Digenea: Heterophyidae) parasitize guppies as intermediate hosts and, respectively, fish-eating mammals or birds as definitive hosts. Heterophyids have zoonotic potential, and molecular studies associated with morphological and ecological aspects have helped to clarify their taxonomy and phylogeny. Poecilia vivipara naturally parasitized by metacercariae of both species (100% prevalence) exhibit no external signs of parasitism. In this work, four new sequences of P. macrostomum (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA and ITS2 rDNA) and one new sequence of A. (P.) pindoramensis (mtDNA cox-1) are presented. Phylogeny reconstructions linked P. macrostomum to other heterophyids, but the separation of the Heterophyidae and Opisthorchiidae remains unclear. Additionally, we used indirect immunocytochemistry and the phalloidin-fluorescence techniques allied with confocal laser scanning microscopy to describe muscular and neuronal structures of P. macrostomum. A complex arrangement of muscular fibres is associated with the tegument, suckers, gut and reproductive system. Radial fibres around the ventral sucker are thick, branched and extend to the body wall. High-resolution confocal imaging revealed a typical digenean muscular arrangement and important heterophyid morphological traits. These data will support future control measures to reduce the parasitism in guppies reared in fish farming systems, especially for aquarium and experimental purposes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. EXTRACTING ROOF PARAMETERS AND HEAT BRIDGES OVER THE CITY OF OLDENBURG FROM HYPERSPECTRAL, THERMAL, AND AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bannehr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing methods are used to obtain different kinds of information about the state of the environment. Within the cooperative research project HiReSens, funded by the German BMBF, a hyperspectral scanner, an airborne laser scanner, a thermal camera, and a RGB-camera are employed on a small aircraft to determine roof material parameters and heat bridges of house tops over the city Oldenburg, Lower Saxony. HiReSens aims to combine various geometrical highly resolved data in order to achieve relevant evidence about the state of the city buildings. Thermal data are used to obtain the energy distribution of single buildings. The use of hyperspectral data yields information about material consistence of roofs. From airborne laser scanning data (ALS digital surface models are inferred. They build the basis to locate the best orientations for solar panels of the city buildings. The combination of the different data sets offers the opportunity to capitalize synergies between differently working systems. Central goals are the development of tools for the collection of heat bridges by means of thermal data, spectral collection of roofs parameters on basis of hyperspectral data as well as 3D-capture of buildings from airborne lasers scanner data. Collecting, analyzing and merging of the data are not trivial especially not when the resolution and accuracy is aimed in the domain of a few decimetre. The results achieved need to be regarded as preliminary. Further investigations are still required to prove the accuracy in detail.

  5. In vivo high-resolution structural imaging of large arteries in small rodents using two-photon laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megens, Remco T. A.; Reitsma, Sietze; Prinzen, Lenneke; Oude Egbrink, Mirjam G. A.; Engels, Wim; Leenders, Peter J. A.; Brunenberg, Ellen J. L.; Reesink, Koen D.; Janssen, Ben J. A.; Ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.; Slaaf, Dick W.; van Zandvoort, Marc A. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo (molecular) imaging of the vessel wall of large arteries at subcellular resolution is crucial for unraveling vascular pathophysiology. We previously showed the applicability of two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) in mounted arteries ex vivo. However, in vivo TPLSM has thus far suffered from in-frame and between-frame motion artifacts due to arterial movement with cardiac and respiratory activity. Now, motion artifacts are suppressed by accelerated image acquisition triggered on cardiac and respiratory activity. In vivo TPLSM is performed on rat renal and mouse carotid arteries, both surgically exposed and labeled fluorescently (cell nuclei, elastin, and collagen). The use of short acquisition times consistently limit in-frame motion artifacts. Additionally, triggered imaging reduces between-frame artifacts. Indeed, structures in the vessel wall (cell nuclei, elastic laminae) can be imaged at subcellular resolution. In mechanically damaged carotid arteries, even the subendothelial collagen sheet (~1 μm) is visualized using collagen-targeted quantum dots. We demonstrate stable in vivo imaging of large arteries at subcellular resolution using TPLSM triggered on cardiac and respiratory cycles. This creates great opportunities for studying (diseased) arteries in vivo or immediate validation of in vivo molecular imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and positron emission tomography (PET).

  6. Observation of photodynamically-induced cell destruction probed by video microscopy, laser-scanning microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueck, Angelika C.; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Gschwend, Michael H.; Koenig, Karsten; Brunner, B.; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Walt, Heinrich; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1993-07-01

    In order to study light-induced reactions during PDT, the fluorescence response of the photosensitizer meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TPPS4) was observed in different cell systems and correlated with the sensitivity to photodynamic induced destructions. RR 1022 epithelial cells from the rat were grown on microscopic slides at a high and low cell density. Using video microscopy in combination with microspectrofluorometry we observed a different fluorescence behavior for high and low cell conditions during light exposure. A fluorescence relocalization from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and an intensity increase-- correlated with the formation of a new molecular species--could be detected only for low cell density. Moreover, cell cultures at a high density showed to be less sensitive to photodynamic destructions. In addition to cell culture-experiments, we observed the light-induced reactions of TPPS4 accumulated in multicellular tumor spheroids. For these measurements laser scanning microscopy was used. Fluorescence relocalization and intensity increase could be detected only for the peripheric parts of the spheroids. The different fluorescence response seems to reflect different metabolic and physiologic states of the cells.

  7. A sensitive and versatile laser scanning confocal optical microscope for single-molecule fluorescence at 77 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, V; Hübner, C G

    2010-11-01

    We developed a cryostat suitable for a laser scanning confocal microscope which allows for a short working distance and thus the usage of an objective with a high numerical aperture ensuring high collection efficiency. The in situ preparation of a thin layer of amorphous water is realized in a part of the cryostat, a Dewar vessel, which is put onto a custom-made, liquid-nitrogen immersed spin-coater. First tests on the setup are performed on a perylenemonoimide/polymethyl methacrylate model system using a standard oil objective and a dry objective at ambient temperature as well as a dry objective at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements on doubly labeled, freeze-quenched polyproline chains show the applicability of the new method on biomolecules. The alternating laser excitation (ALEX) is modified to a line-scanning process (slow ALEX) to optimize the sorting of the labeled molecules. Photophysics and photochemistry at liquid nitrogen temperature are investigated.

  8. SCAN PROFILES BASED METHOD FOR SEGMENTATION AND EXTRACTION OF PLANAR OBJECTS IN MOBILE LASER SCANNING POINT CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s. The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc. that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  9. A rapid method for combined laser scanning confocal microscopic and electron microscopic visualization of biocytin or neurobiotin-labeled neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X J; Tolbert, L P; Hildebrand, J G; Meinertzhagen, I A

    1998-02-01

    Intracellular recording and dye filling are widely used to correlate the morphology of a neuron with its physiology. With laser scanning confocal microscopy, the complex shapes of labeled neurons in three dimensions can be reconstructed rapidly, but this requires fluorescent dyes. These dyes are neither permanent nor electron dense and therefore do not allow investigation by electron microscopy. Here we report a technique that quickly and easily converts a fluorescent label into a more stable and electron-dense stain. With this technique, a neuron is filled with Neurobiotin or biocytin, reacted with fluorophore-conjugated avidin, and imaged by confocal microscopy. To permit long-term storage or EM study, the fluorescent label is then converted to a stable electron-dense material by a single-step conversion using a commercially available ABC kit. We find that the method, which apparently relies on recognition of avidin's excess biotin binding sites by the biotin-peroxidase conjugate, is both faster and less labor intensive than photo-oxidation procedures in common use. The technique is readily adaptable to immunocytochemistry with biotinylated probes, as we demonstrate using anti-serotonin as an example.

  10. Creation of High Resolution Terrain Models of Barringer Meteorite Crater (Meteor Crater) Using Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard B.; Navard, Andrew R.; Holland, Donald E.; McKellip, Rodney D.; Brannon, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Barringer Meteorite Crater or Meteor Crater, AZ, has been a site of high interest for lunar and Mars analog crater and terrain studies since the early days of the Apollo-Saturn program. It continues to be a site of exceptional interest to lunar, Mars, and other planetary crater and impact analog studies because of its relatively young age (est. 50 thousand years) and well-preserved structure. High resolution (2 meter to 1 decimeter) digital terrain models of Meteor Crater in whole or in part were created at NASA Stennis Space Center to support several lunar surface analog modeling activities using photogrammetric and ground based laser scanning techniques. The dataset created by this activity provides new and highly accurate 3D models of the inside slope of the crater as well as the downslope rock distribution of the western ejecta field. The data are presented to the science community for possible use in furthering studies of Meteor Crater and impact craters in general as well as its current near term lunar exploration use in providing a beneficial test model for lunar surface analog modeling and surface operation studies.

  11. Further observations on cerebellar climbing fibers. A study by means of light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, O J; Castejón, H V; Alvarado, M V

    2000-12-01

    The intracortical pathways of climbing fibers were traced in several vertebrate cerebella using light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. They were identified as fine fibers up to 1(micron thick, with a characteristic crossing-over bifurcation pattern. Climbing fiber collaterals were tridimensionally visualized forming thin climbing fiber glomeruli in the granular layer. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed three types of collateral processes at the interface between granular and Purkinje cell layers. Scanning electron microscopy showed climbing fiber retrograde collaterals in the molecular layer. Asymmetric synaptic contacts of climbing fibers with Purkinje dendritic spines and stellate neuron dendrites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Correlative microscopy allowed us to obtain the basic three-dimensional morphological features of climbing fibers in several vertebrates and to show with more accuracy a higher degree of lateral collateralization of these fibers within the cerebellar cortex. The correlative microscopy approach provides new views in the cerebellar cortex information processing.

  12. The Combination of Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion Technology for Creation of Accurate Exterior and Interior Orthophotos of ST. Nicholas Baroque Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, B.; Křemen, T.

    2013-02-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning technology is used for creation of building documentation and 3D building model from its emerging at the turn of the millennium. Photogrammetry has even longer tradition in this field. Both technologies have some technical limitations if they are used for creation of a façade or even an interior orthophoto, but combination of both technologies seems profitable. Laser scanning can be used for creation of an accurate 3D model and photogrammetry for consequent application of high quality colour information. Both technologies were used in synergy to create the building plans, 2D drawing documentation of facades and interior views and the orthophotos of St. Nicholas Baroque church in Prague. The case study is described in details in the paper.

  13. Technical Note: Reliability of Suchey-Brooks and Buckberry-Chamberlain methods on 3D visualizations from CT and laser scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Chiara; Buckberry, Jo; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that the ageing method of Suchey-Brooks (pubic bone) and some of the features applied by Lovejoy et al. and Buckberry-Chamberlain (auricular surface) can be confidently performed on 3D visualizations from CT-scans. In this study, seven observers applied the Suchey......-Brooks and the Buckberry-Chamberlain methods on 3D visualizations based on CT-scans and, for the first time, on 3D visualizations from laser scans. We examined how the bone features can be evaluated on 3D visualizations and whether the different modalities (direct observations of bones, 3D visualization from CT......-scan and from laser scans) are alike to different observers. We found the best inter-observer agreement for the bones versus 3D visualizations, with the highest values for the auricular surface. Between the 3D modalities, less variability was obtained for the 3D laser visualizations. Fair inter...

  14. Reconstruction of the Magnetkoepfl rockfall event - Detecting rock fall release zones using terrestrial laser scanning, Hohe Tauern, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmeyer, I.; Keuschnig, M.; Delleske, R.; Schrott, L.

    2012-04-01

    Instability of rock faces in high mountain areas is an important risk factor for man and infrastructure, particularly within the context of climate change. Numerous rock fall events in the European Alps suggest an increasing occurrence of mass movements due to rising temperatures in recent years. Within the MOREXPERT project ('Monitoring Expert System for Hazardous Rock Walls') a new long-term monitoring site for mass movement and permafrost interaction has been initiated in the Austrian Alps. The study area is located at the Kitzsteinhorn (Hohe Tauern), a particularly interesting site for the investigation of glacier retreat and potential permafrost degradation and their respective consequences for the stability of alpine rock faces. To detect and quantify changes occurring at the terrain surface an extensive terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) monitoring campaign was started in 2011. TLS creates three-dimensional high-resolution images of the scanned area allowing precise quantification of changes in geometry and volume in steep rock faces over distances of up to several hundreds of meters. Within the TLS monitoring campaign at the Kitzsteinhorn a large number of differently dimensioned rock faces is examined (varying size, slope inclination etc.). Scanned areas include the Kitzsteinhorn northwest and south face, the Magnetkoepfl east face as well as a couple of small rock faces in the vicinity of the summit station. During the night from August 27th to August 28th 2011 a rock fall event was documented by employees of the cable car company. The release zone could not immediately be detected. The east face of the Magnetkoepfl covers approximately 70 meters in height and about 200 meters in width. It is made up of calcareous mica-schist and displays an abundance of well-developed joint sets with large joint apertures. Meteorological data from a weather station located at the same altitude (2.950m) and just 500m away from the release zone show that the rock fall event

  15. Application of 3D triangulations of airborne laser scanning data to estimate boreal forest leaf area index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majasalmi, Titta; Korhonen, Lauri; Korpela, Ilkka; Vauhkonen, Jari

    2017-07-01

    We propose 3D triangulations of airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point clouds as a new approach to derive 3D canopy structures and to estimate forest canopy effective LAI (LAIe). Computational geometry and topological connectivity were employed to filter the triangulations to yield a quasi-optimal relationship with the field measured LAIe. The optimal filtering parameters were predicted based on ALS height metrics, emulating the production of maps of LAIe and canopy volume for large areas. The LAIe from triangulations was validated with field measured LAIe and compared with a reference LAIe calculated from ALS data using logarithmic model based on Beer's law. Canopy transmittance was estimated using All Echo Cover Index (ACI), and the mean projection of unit foliage area (β) was obtained using no-intercept regression with field measured LAIe. We investigated the influence species and season on the triangulated LAIe and demonstrated the relationship between triangulated LAIe and canopy volume. Our data is from 115 forest plots located at the southern boreal forest area in Finland and for each plot three different ALS datasets were available to apply the triangulations. The triangulation approach was found applicable for both leaf-on and leaf-off datasets after initial calibration. Results showed the Root Mean Square Errors (RMSEs) between LAIe from triangulations and field measured values agreed the most using the highest pulse density data (RMSE = 0.63, the coefficient of determination (R2) = 0.53). Yet, the LAIe calculated using ACI-index agreed better with the field measured LAIe (RMSE = 0.53 and R2 = 0.70). The best models to predict the optimal alpha value contained the ACI-index, which indicates that within-crown transmittance is accounted by the triangulation approach. The cover indices may be recommended for retrieving LAIe only, but for applications which require more sophisticated information on canopy shape and volume, such as radiative transfer models, the

  16. Combining airborne laser scanning and Landsat data for statistical modeling of soil carbon and tree biomass in Tanzanian Miombo woodlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egberth, Mikael; Nyberg, Gert; Næsset, Erik; Gobakken, Terje; Mauya, Ernest; Malimbwi, Rogers; Katani, Josiah; Chamuya, Nurudin; Bulenga, George; Olsson, Håkan

    2017-12-01

    Soil carbon and biomass depletion can be used to identify and quantify degraded soils, and by using remote sensing, there is potential to map soil conditions over large areas. Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager satellite data and airborne laser scanning data were evaluated separately and in combination for modeling soil organic carbon, above ground tree biomass and below ground tree biomass. The test site is situated in the Liwale district in southeastern Tanzania and is dominated by Miombo woodlands. Tree data from 15 m radius field-surveyed plots and samples of soil carbon down to a depth of 30 cm were used as reference data for tree biomass and soil carbon estimations. Cross-validated plot level error (RMSE) for predicting soil organic carbon was 28% using only Landsat 8, 26% using laser only, and 23% for the combination of the two. The plot level error for above ground tree biomass was 66% when using only Landsat 8, 50% for laser and 49% for the combination of Landsat 8 and laser data. Results for below ground tree biomass were similar to above ground biomass. Additionally it was found that an early dry season satellite image was preferable for modelling biomass while images from later in the dry season were better for modelling soil carbon. The results show that laser data is superior to Landsat 8 when predicting both soil carbon and biomass above and below ground in landscapes dominated by Miombo woodlands. Furthermore, the combination of laser data and Landsat data were marginally better than using laser data only.

  17. Estimation of Tree Lists from Airborne Laser Scanning Using Tree Model Clustering and k-MSN Imputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörgen Wallerman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Individual tree crowns may be delineated from airborne laser scanning (ALS data by segmentation of surface models or by 3D analysis. Segmentation of surface models benefits from using a priori knowledge about the proportions of tree crowns, which has not yet been utilized for 3D analysis to any great extent. In this study, an existing surface segmentation method was used as a basis for a new tree model 3D clustering method applied to ALS returns in 104 circular field plots with 12 m radius in pine-dominated boreal forest (64°14'N, 19°50'E. For each cluster below the tallest canopy layer, a parabolic surface was fitted to model a tree crown. The tree model clustering identified more trees than segmentation of the surface model, especially smaller trees below the tallest canopy layer. Stem attributes were estimated with k-Most Similar Neighbours (k-MSN imputation of the clusters based on field-measured trees. The accuracy at plot level from the k-MSN imputation (stem density root mean square error or RMSE 32.7%; stem volume RMSE 28.3% was similar to the corresponding results from the surface model (stem density RMSE 33.6%; stem volume RMSE 26.1% with leave-one-out cross-validation for one field plot at a time. Three-dimensional analysis of ALS data should also be evaluated in multi-layered forests since it identified a larger number of small trees below the tallest canopy layer.

  18. Ground-based hyperspectral imaging and terrestrial laser scanning for fracture characterization in the Mississippian Boone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Khan, Shuhab D.; Sarmiento, Sergio; Lakshmikantha, M. R.; Zhou, Huawei

    2017-12-01

    Petroleum geoscientists have been using cores and well logs to study source rocks and reservoirs, however, the inherent discontinuous nature of these data cannot account for horizontal heterogeneities. Modern exploitation requires better understanding of important source rocks and reservoirs at outcrop scale. Remote sensing of outcrops is becoming a first order tool for reservoir analog studies including horizontal heterogeneities. This work used ground-based hyperspectral imaging, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), and high-resolution photography to study a roadcut of the Boone Formation at Bella Vista, northwest Arkansas, and developed an outcrop model for reservoir analog analyses. The petroliferous Boone Formation consists of fossiliferous limestones interbedded with chert of early Mississippian age. We used remote sensing techniques to identify rock types and to collect 3D geometrical data. Mixture tuned matched filtering classification of hyperspectral data show that the outcrop is mostly limestones with interbedded chert nodules. 1315 fractures were classified according to their strata-bounding relationships, among these, larger fractures are dominantly striking in ENE - WSW directions. Fracture extraction data show that chert holds more fractures than limestones, and both vertical and horizontal heterogeneities exist in chert nodule distribution. Utilizing ground-based remote sensing, we have assembled a virtual outcrop model to extract mineral composition as well as fracture data from the model. We inferred anisotropy in vertical fracture permeability based on the dominancy of fracture orientations, the preferential distribution of fractures and distribution of chert nodules. These data are beneficial in reservoir analogs to study rock mechanics and fluid flow, and to improve well performances.

  19. Automatic Detection and Classification of Pole-Like Objects for Urban Cartography Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data

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    Celestino Ordóñez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning (MLS is a modern and powerful technology capable of obtaining massive point clouds of objects in a short period of time. Although this technology is nowadays being widely applied in urban cartography and 3D city modelling, it has some drawbacks that need to be avoided in order to strengthen it. One of the most important shortcomings of MLS data is concerned with the fact that it provides an unstructured dataset whose processing is very time-consuming. Consequently, there is a growing interest in developing algorithms for the automatic extraction of useful information from MLS point clouds. This work is focused on establishing a methodology and developing an algorithm to detect pole-like objects and classify them into several categories using MLS datasets. The developed procedure starts with the discretization of the point cloud by means of a voxelization, in order to simplify and reduce the processing time in the segmentation process. In turn, a heuristic segmentation algorithm was developed to detect pole-like objects in the MLS point cloud. Finally, two supervised classification algorithms, linear discriminant analysis and support vector machines, were used to distinguish between the different types of poles in the point cloud. The predictors are the principal component eigenvalues obtained from the Cartesian coordinates of the laser points, the range of the Z coordinate, and some shape-related indexes. The performance of the method was tested in an urban area with 123 poles of different categories. Very encouraging results were obtained, since the accuracy rate was over 90%.

  20. RECONSTRUCTION, QUANTIFICATION, AND VISUALIZATION OF FOREST CANOPY BASED ON 3D TRIANGULATIONS OF AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING POINT DATA

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    J. Vauhkonen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D forest canopy is described and quantified using airborne laser scanning (ALS data with densities of 0.6–0.8 points m-2 and field measurements aggregated at resolutions of 400–900 m2. The reconstruction was based on computational geometry, topological connectivity, and numerical optimization. More precisely, triangulations and their filtrations, i.e. ordered sets of simplices belonging to the triangulations, based on the point data were analyzed. Triangulating the ALS point data corresponds to subdividing the underlying space of the points into weighted simplicial complexes with weights quantifying the (empty space delimited by the points. Reconstructing the canopy volume populated by biomass will thus likely require filtering to exclude that volume from canopy voids. The approaches applied for this purpose were (i to optimize the degree of filtration with respect to the field measurements, and (ii to predict this degree by means of analyzing the persistent homology of the obtained triangulations, which is applied for the first time for vegetation point clouds. When derived from optimized filtrations, the total tetrahedral volume had a high degree of determination (R2 with the stem volume considered, both alone (R2=0.65 and together with other predictors (R2=0.78. When derived by analyzing the topological persistence of the point data and without any field input, the R2 were lower, but the predictions still showed a correlation with the field-measured stem volumes. Finally, producing realistic visualizations of a forested landscape using the persistent homology approach is demonstrated.

  1. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ESTIMATION OF STREET TREES BASED ON POINT CLOUD FROM VEHICLE-BORNE LASER SCANNING SYSTEM

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    Y. Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Continuous development of urban road traffic system requests higher standards of road ecological environment. Ecological benefits of street trees are getting more attention. Carbon sequestration of street trees refers to the carbon stocks of street trees, which can be a measurement for ecological benefits of street trees. Estimating carbon sequestration in a traditional way is costly and inefficient. In order to solve above problems, a carbon sequestration estimation approach for street trees based on 3D point cloud from vehicle-borne laser scanning system is proposed in this paper. The method can measure the geometric parameters of a street tree, including tree height, crown width, diameter at breast height (DBH, by processing and analyzing point cloud data of an individual tree. Four Chinese scholartree trees and four camphor trees are selected for experiment. The root mean square error (RMSE of tree height is 0.11m for Chinese scholartree and 0.02m for camphor. Crown widths in X direction and Y direction, as well as the average crown width are calculated. And the RMSE of average crown width is 0.22m for Chinese scholartree and 0.10m for camphor. The last calculated parameter is DBH, the RMSE of DBH is 0.5cm for both Chinese scholartree and camphor. Combining the measured geometric parameters and an appropriate carbon sequestration calculation model, the individual tree’s carbon sequestration will be estimated. The proposed method can help enlarge application range of vehicle-borne laser point cloud data, improve the efficiency of estimating carbon sequestration, construct urban ecological environment and manage landscape.

  2. Carbon Sequestration Estimation of Street Trees Based on Point Cloud from Vehicle-Borne Laser Scanning System

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    Zhao, Y.; Hu, Q.

    2017-09-01

    Continuous development of urban road traffic system requests higher standards of road ecological environment. Ecological benefits of street trees are getting more attention. Carbon sequestration of street trees refers to the carbon stocks of street trees, which can be a measurement for ecological benefits of street trees. Estimating carbon sequestration in a traditional way is costly and inefficient. In order to solve above problems, a carbon sequestration estimation approach for street trees based on 3D point cloud from vehicle-borne laser scanning system is proposed in this paper. The method can measure the geometric parameters of a street tree, including tree height, crown width, diameter at breast height (DBH), by processing and analyzing point cloud data of an individual tree. Four Chinese scholartree trees and four camphor trees are selected for experiment. The root mean square error (RMSE) of tree height is 0.11m for Chinese scholartree and 0.02m for camphor. Crown widths in X direction and Y direction, as well as the average crown width are calculated. And the RMSE of average crown width is 0.22m for Chinese scholartree and 0.10m for camphor. The last calculated parameter is DBH, the RMSE of DBH is 0.5cm for both Chinese scholartree and camphor. Combining the measured geometric parameters and an appropriate carbon sequestration calculation model, the individual tree's carbon sequestration will be estimated. The proposed method can help enlarge application range of vehicle-borne laser point cloud data, improve the efficiency of estimating carbon sequestration, construct urban ecological environment and manage landscape.

  3. Airborne Laser Scanning - the Status and Perspectives for the Application in the South-East European Forestry

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    Ivan Balenović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Over the last twenty years airborne laser scanning (ALS technology, also referred to as LiDAR, has been established in a many disciplines as a fully automated and highly efficient method of collecting spatial data. In Croatia, as well as in most countries of the South-East Europe (SEE with the exception of Slovenia, the research on the application of ALS in forestry has not yet been conducted. Also, regional scientific and professional literature dealing with ALS application is scarce. Therefore, the main goal of this review paper is to present the ALS technology to the forestry community of SEE and to provide an overview of its potential application in forest inventory. The primary focus is given to discrete return ALS systems. Conclusions and Future Research Streams: Results presented in this paper show that the ALS technology has a significant potential for application in forest inventory. Moreover, the two-phase forest inventory based on the combination of ALS and field measurements has become a quite common operational method. Due to the expected advancement of the ALS technology, it may be presumed that ALS will have an even more important role in forestry in the future. Therefore, researches on application of ALS technology in SEE forestry are needed, primarily focusing to question of “if” and “to what extent” the ALS technology can improve the existing terrestrial method of forest inventory. Besides the application in the classical forest inventory, the option to apply it for estimation of the biomass, carbon stock, combustible matter, etc, should also be further investigated.

  4. Analysis of a marine phototrophic biofilm by confocal laser scanning microscopy using the new image quantification software PHLIP

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    Almeida Jonas S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is the method of choice to study interfacial biofilms and acquires time-resolved three-dimensional data of the biofilm structure. CLSM can be used in a multi-channel modus where the different channels map individual biofilm components. This communication presents a novel image quantification tool, PHLIP, for the quantitative analysis of large amounts of multichannel CLSM data in an automated way. PHLIP can be freely downloaded from http://phlip.sourceforge.net. Results PHLIP is an open source public license Matlab toolbox that includes functions for CLSM imaging data handling and ten image analysis operations describing various aspects of biofilm morphology. The use of PHLIP is here demonstrated by a study of the development of a natural marine phototrophic biofilm. It is shown how the examination of the individual biofilm components using the multi-channel capability of PHLIP allowed the description of the dynamic spatial and temporal separation of diatoms, bacteria and organic and inorganic matter during the shift from a bacteria-dominated to a diatom-dominated phototrophic biofilm. Reflection images and weight measurements complementing the PHLIP analyses suggest that a large part of the biofilm mass consisted of inorganic mineral material. Conclusion The presented case study reveals new insight into the temporal development of a phototrophic biofilm where multi-channel imaging allowed to parallel monitor the dynamics of the individual biofilm components over time. This application of PHLIP presents the power of biofilm image analysis by multi-channel CLSM software and demonstrates the importance of PHLIP for the scientific community as a flexible and extendable image analysis platform for automated image processing.

  5. Automatic Detection and Classification of Pole-Like Objects for Urban Cartography Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data.

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    Ordóñez, Celestino; Cabo, Carlos; Sanz-Ablanedo, Enoc

    2017-06-22

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is a modern and powerful technology capable of obtaining massive point clouds of objects in a short period of time. Although this technology is nowadays being widely applied in urban cartography and 3D city modelling, it has some drawbacks that need to be avoided in order to strengthen it. One of the most important shortcomings of MLS data is concerned with the fact that it provides an unstructured dataset whose processing is very time-consuming. Consequently, there is a growing interest in developing algorithms for the automatic extraction of useful information from MLS point clouds. This work is focused on establishing a methodology and developing an algorithm to detect pole-like objects and classify them into several categories using MLS datasets. The developed procedure starts with the discretization of the point cloud by means of a voxelization, in order to simplify and reduce the processing time in the segmentation process. In turn, a heuristic segmentation algorithm was developed to detect pole-like objects in the MLS point cloud. Finally, two supervised classification algorithms, linear discriminant analysis and support vector machines, were used to distinguish between the different types of poles in the point cloud. The predictors are the principal component eigenvalues obtained from the Cartesian coordinates of the laser points, the range of the Z coordinate, and some shape-related indexes. The performance of the method was tested in an urban area with 123 poles of different categories. Very encouraging results were obtained, since the accuracy rate was over 90%.

  6. Using terrestrial laser scanning for differential measurement of interannual rock glacier movement in the Argentine Dry Andes

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    Kane, Renato R.

    Argentina has recently implemented laws to protect glaciers and buried ice in the Andes to improve the sustainability of scarce, long-term water resources. Therefore, all glaciers and buried ice terrains must be located and avoided in any commercial alterations of the landscape. Buried ice in this remote and often dangerous terrain typically is located via the use of remote-sensing techniques. This thesis applies one such technique, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) in the form of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), to detect rock glacier movement that is indicative of flowing, buried ice not visible in near surface excavations. TLS surveys were completed at two locales, Los Azules and El Altar, in both AD 2013 and AD 2014 on landscapes where buried ice is suspected to have produced the current surface forms. Multiple TLS scans were co-registered with the use of benchmarks, both between scans and between years, which introduced quantifiable positional errors. Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) were derived from the point cloud data by standardizing the spacing of the points in the horizontal direction, creating 0.1 m by 0.1 m cells with elevation as the cell value. The DEMs for each year were subtracted from each other to yield a change in elevation. The surface roughness of the rock glaciers (vertical variability within each cell) was empirically determined and evaluated as a threshold for results. Both sites showed sub-decimeter interannual movements, and the direction of their movement is typical of forms with buried ice. The results of the study were validated using independent GPS data showing annual movement rates. Despite the downslope movement of these rock glaciers, the volume of ice contained within them remains unclear, and further study is required to assess the volume of water contained.

  7. The simplicity of males: dwarf males of four species of Osedax (Siboglinidae; Annelida) investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

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    Worsaae, Katrine; Rouse, Greg W

    2010-02-01

    Dwarf males of the bone-eating worms Osedax (Siboglinidae, Annelida) have been proposed to develop from larvae that settle on females rather than on bone. The apparent arrest in somatic development and resemblance of the males to trochophore larvae has been posited as an example of paedomorphosis. Here, we present the first investigation of the entire muscle and nervous system in dwarf males of Osedax frankpressi, O. roseus, O. rubiplumus, and O. "spiral" analyzed by multistaining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Sperm shape and spermiogenesis, the sperm duct and internal and external ciliary patterns were likewise visualized. The males of all four species possess morphological traits typical of newly settled siboglinid larvae: a prostomium, a peristomium with a prototroch, one elongate segment and a second shorter segment. Each segment has a ring of eight long-handled hooked chaetae. The longitudinal muscles are distributed as evenly spaced strands forming a grid with the thin outer circular muscles. Oblique protractor and retractor muscles are associated with each of the chaetal sacs. The nervous system comprises a cerebral ganglion, a prototroch nerve ring, paired dorsolateral longitudinal nerves, five ventral longitudinal nerves with paired, posterior ganglia and a terminal commissure, as well as a net of fine peripheral transverse plexuses surrounding the first segment. Internal ciliation occurs as paired ventrolateral bands along the first segment. The bands appear to lead the free mature sperm to a ciliated duct and seminal vesicle lying just behind the prototroch region. A duct then runs from the seminal vesicle into the dorsal part of the prostomium. The similarity of Osedax males to the larvae of Osedax and other siboglinid annelids as well as similarities shown here to the neuromuscular organization seen in other annelid larvae supports the hypothesis of paedomorphosis in males of Osedax.

  8. Generating an optimal DTM from airborne laser scanning data for landslide mapping in a tropical forest environment

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    Razak, Khamarrul Azahari; Santangelo, Michele; Van Westen, Cees J.; Straatsma, Menno W.; de Jong, Steven M.

    2013-05-01

    Landslide inventory maps are fundamental for assessing landslide susceptibility, hazard, and risk. In tropical mountainous environments, mapping landslides is difficult as rapid and dense vegetation growth obscures landslides soon after their occurrence. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have been used to construct the digital terrain model (DTM) under dense vegetation, but its reliability for landslide recognition in the tropics remains surprisingly unknown. This study evaluates the suitability of ALS for generating an optimal DTM for mapping landslides in the Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. For the bare-earth extraction, we used hierarchical robust filtering algorithm and a parameterization with three sequential filtering steps. After each filtering step, four interpolations techniques were applied, namely: (i) the linear prediction derived from the SCOP++ (SCP), (ii) the inverse distance weighting (IDW), (iii) the natural neighbor (NEN) and (iv) the topo-to-raster (T2R). We assessed the quality of 12 DTMs in two ways: (1) with respect to 448 field-measured terrain heights and (2) based on the interpretability of landslides. The lowest root-mean-square error (RMSE) was 0.89 m across the landscape using three filtering steps and linear prediction as interpolation method. However, we found that a less stringent DTM filtering unveiled more diagnostic micro-morphological features, but also retained some of vegetation. Hence, a combination of filtering steps is required for optimal landslide interpretation, especially in forested mountainous areas. IDW was favored as the interpolation technique because it combined computational times more reasonably without adding artifacts to the DTM than T2R and NEN, which performed relatively well in the first and second filtering steps, respectively. The laser point density and the resulting ground point density after filtering are key parameters for producing a DTM applicable to landslide identification. The results showed that the

  9. An integrated airborne laser scanning approach to forest management and cultural heritage issues: a case study at Porolissum, Romania

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    Anamaria Roman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the opportunities that arise where forest ecosystem management and cultural heritage monuments protection converge. The case study area for our analysis was the landscape surrounding the Moigrad-Porolissum Archaeological site. We emphasize that an Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS or LiDAR-Light Detection and Ranging approach to both forest management and cultural heritage conservation is an outstanding tool, assisting policy-makers and conservationists in decision making for integrated planning and management of the environment. LiDAR-derived surface models enabled a synoptic, never-seen-before view of the ancient Roman frontiers defensive systems while also revealing the present forest road network. The thorough and accurate road inventory data are very useful for updating and modifying forest base maps and registries and also for identifying the priority sectors for archaeological discharge. The ability to identify and determine optimal routes for forest management and to locate previously unmapped ancient archaeological remains aids in reducing costs and creating operational efficiencies as well as in complying with the legislation and avoiding infringements. The potential of LiDAR to demonstrate the long-term and comprehensive human impact on wooded areas is discussed. We identified a significant historical landscape change, consisting of a deforestation period, spanning over more than 160 years, during the Roman Period in Dacia (106-271 AD. The transdisciplinary analysis of the LiDAR data provides the base for combining knowledge from archaeology, forestry and environmental history in order to achieve a thorough analysis of the landscape changes and history. In the “nature versus culture” dichotomy, the landscape, outfield areas and forests are primarily perceived as nature, while in reality they are often heavily marked by human impact. LiDAR offers an efficient method for broadening our knowledge regarding the

  10. Effects of two desensitizing dentifrices on dentinal tubule occlusion with citric acid challenge: Confocal laser scanning microscopy study

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    Sneha Anil Rajguru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dentin hypersensitivity results when patent tubules are exposed to pain-inducing external stimuli. Aim: This study aims to compare the effects of two desensitizing dentifrices containing NovaMin and arginine on dentinal tubule occlusion with and without citric acid challenge in vitro using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Materials and Methods: Forty dentin discs were randomly divided into Groups I and II containing twenty specimens each, treated with NovaMin and arginine-containing dentifrices, respectively. Groups I and II were divided into subgroups A and B where IA and IIA underwent CLSM analysis to determine the percentage of tubule occlusion while IB and IIB underwent 0.3% citric acid challenge and CLSM analysis. A novel grading system was devised to categorize tubule occlusion. Results: In Group II, the percentage of occluded tubules was highest for IIA (72.25% ± 10.57% and least for IIB (42.55% ± 8.65% having statistical significance (P < 0.0005. In Group I, the difference between IA (49.9% ± 12.96% and IB (43.15% ± 12.43% was statistically insignificant (P = 0.249. On the comparison between IB and IIB statistically indifferent result was obtained (P = 0.901, whereas the difference between IA and IIA was statistically significant (P < 0.001. The results of grading system were for IA 50% of samples belonged to Grade 2, for IIA 60% - Grade 3, and for IB 70% and for IIB 90% - Grade 2. Conclusion: Dentinal tubule occlusion with arginine-containing dentifrice was significantly higher than NovaMin. However, it could not resist citric acid challenge as effectively as NovaMin. The effects of NovaMin were more sustainable as compared to arginine-containing dentifrice, thus proving to be a better desensitizing agent.

  11. Characterising Complex Ice-Tephra Spatial Feedbacks of Post-Volcanic Eruption Glacial Ablation Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

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    Vircavs, L.; Nield, J. M.; Chiverrell, R. C.; Darby, S. E.; Leyland, J.; Jacobs, B.

    2012-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions in glacio-volcanic regions regularly deposit significant quantities of volcanic ash (tephra) over nearby glaciers. This ash debris can remain for decades as it is transported through the system and has the ability to alter surface albedo, thermal insulation and ultimately surface roughness which can significantly modify the glacial response to climate perturbations. We used terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to measure daily ice-ash surface interactions for a week in July 2011 following tephra fallout from the May 2011 Grímsvötn eruption onto Svínafellsjökull, Iceland. TLS is well suited to process studies and enabled repeat measurements to be collected of ice surface topography and signal absorption at high spatial resolution in three dimensions rather than traditional transect type studies. Our data confirm ablation rates either reduce or increase under thick (insulating) and thin (reduced albedo) ash deposits, respectively. Fourier transform analysis of the TLS data identified that a three-fold increase in aerodynamic roughness was attributable to an increase in larger (>0.2m) surface features. These surface features include micro cryoconite holes, debris cones and meltwater channels. Moreover, the temporal sequence of TLS measurements revealed the importance of ash redistribution by meltwater in generating differential melting which then modifies roughness and ash patchiness, such that the net effect of these spatial ash-ice feedbacks was to reduce ablation rates by up to 59%. This reduction in ablation rates despite increases in temperature and solar radiation was confirmed by manual stake measurements and is the reverse of modelled ablation trends without surficial ash. The modulating effects of these previously undocumented ash-ice feedbacks on ablation rates are, therefore, significant and must be correctly parameterized if ash-covered glacier mass balances are to be predicted correctly.

  12. Sediment tracing and use of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) for monitoring and modelling hydrological and sedimentary processes in the Upper Guil Catchment (Queyras, French Alps)

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    Lissak, Candide; Fort, Monique; Fassetta, Gilles Arnaud; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Carlier, Benoit; Viel, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    In the frame of SAMCO (ANR 12 SENV-0004) project designed for mountain hazard mitigation in a context of Climate Change, one of our purposes is to understand the hydro-geomorphological specificities of French Alpine catchments. Part of our study deals with a better assessment of the sediment transfers, and adjacent sediment supply (i.e. from hillslope to channel, and from tributaries to the trunk river) during seasonal meteorological events, and major event inducing floods and/or avalanches. Our research focuses on the Guil River catchment (Queyras, Southern French Alps), prone to catastrophic floods (June 1957 (> R.I. 100 yr), June 2000 (R.I. 30 yr)...) with serious damages to infrastructure and buildings located in the valley bottoms. Such floods are characterized by considerable sediment transport from debris flow prone tributaries to downvalley, together with strong hillslope-channel connectivity. The "schistes lustrés" bedrock is an aggravating factor that explains the mobilization of huge volumes during floods (≈12,000 m3 aggraded during the June 2000 flood event). Confluences with debris flow prone tributaries are particularly sensitive areas.. For monitoring and modelling hydrological and sedimentary processes our approach is twofold: (i)> assessment of slopes contribution to sediment supply using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), (ii) assessment of two sub-catchment contribution to the global sediment budget of the Guil river catchment using passive integrated transponder (PIT) technique. To assess coarse sediment fluxes and delivery into the main channel network, we implemented 560 tracers in 4 selected sub-catchments. To assess small sediment delivery, 1 Airborne LiDAR and 2 TLS campaigns have been performed using Optech station over 3 specific hotspots highly affected by slope erosion and largely contributing to the Guil river sediment budget. The first location corresponds to a gorge section with direct connection of hillslope to the main channel

  13. Distribution of biomolecules in porous nitrocellulose membrane pads using confocal laser scanning microscopy and high-speed cameras.

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    Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Maan, Abid Aslam; Khan, Muhammad Kashif Iqbal; Norde, Willem; van Amerongen, Aart

    2013-04-02

    The main focus of our research was to study the distribution of inkjet printed biomolecules in porous nitrocellulose membrane pads of different brands. We produced microarrays of fluorophore-labeled IgG and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on FAST, Unisart, and Oncyte-Avid slides and compared the spot morphology of the inkjet printed biomolecules. The distribution of these biomolecules within the spot embedded in the nitrocellulose membrane was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy in the "Z" stack mode. By applying a "concentric ring" format, the distribution profile of the fluorescence intensity in each horizontal slice was measured and represented in a graphical color-coded way. Furthermore, a one-step diagnostic antibody assay was performed with a primary antibody, double-labeled amplicons, and fluorophore-labeled streptavidin in order to study the functionality and distribution of the immune complex in the nitrocellulose membrane slides. Under the conditions applied, the spot morphology and distribution of the primary labeled biomolecules was nonhomogenous and doughnut-like on the FAST and Unisart nitrocellulose slides, whereas a better spot morphology with more homogeneously distributed biomolecules was observed on the Oncyte-Avid slide. Similar morphologies and distribution patterns were observed when the diagnostic one-step nucleic acid microarray immunoassay was performed on these nitrocellulose slides. We also investigated possible reasons for the differences in the observed spot morphology by monitoring the dynamic behavior of a liquid droplet on and in these nitrocellulose slides. Using high speed cameras, we analyzed the wettability and fluid flow dynamics of a droplet on the various nitrocellulose substrates. The spreading of the liquid droplet was comparable for the FAST and Unisart slides but different, i.e., slower, for the Oncyte-Avid slide. The results of the spreading of the droplet and the penetration behavior of the liquid in the

  14. The Utility of Image-Based Point Clouds for Forest Inventory: A Comparison with Airborne Laser Scanning

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    Murray Woods

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS, also known as Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR enables an accurate three-dimensional characterization of vertical forest structure. ALS has proven to be an information-rich asset for forest managers, enabling the generation of highly detailed bare earth digital elevation models (DEMs as well as estimation of a range of forest inventory attributes (including height, basal area, and volume. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the advanced processing of high spatial resolution digital airborne imagery to generate image-based point clouds, from which vertical information with similarities to ALS can be produced. Digital airborne imagery is typically less costly to acquire than ALS, is well understood by inventory practitioners, and in addition to enabling the derivation of height information, allows for visual interpretation of attributes that are currently problematic to estimate from ALS (such as species, health status, and maturity. At present, there are two limiting factors associated with the use of image-based point clouds. First, a DEM is required to normalize the image-based point cloud heights to aboveground heights; however DEMs with sufficient spatial resolution and vertical accuracy, particularly in forested areas, are usually only available from ALS data. The use of image-based point clouds may therefore be limited to those forest areas that already have an ALS-derived DEM. Second, image-based point clouds primarily characterize the outer envelope of the forest canopy, whereas ALS pulses penetrate the canopy and provide information on sub-canopy forest structure. The impact of these limiting factors on the estimation of forest inventory attributes has not been extensively researched and is not yet well understood. In this paper, we review the key similarities and differences between ALS data and image-based point clouds, summarize the results of current research related to the comparative use

  15. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point cloud ground filtering for area of an active landslide (Doren, Western Austria)

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    Brodić, Nenad; Cvijetinović, Željko; Milenković, Milutin; Dorninger, Peter; Mitrović, Momir

    2014-05-01

    Ground filtering of point cloud is the primary step required for Digital Terrain Model (DTM) generation. The procedure is especially interesting for forested areas, since LiDAR systems can measure terrain elevation under vegetation cover with a high level of penetration. This work analyzes the potential of ALS data ground filtering for area of an active landslide. The results of ALS filtering, for example, may improve geomorphological and motion-detection studies. ALS data was collected during flight campaign 2011 under leaf-off conditions for Doren region, Vorarlberg, Western Austria. In this area, non-ground objects are mostly low vegetation such as shrubs, small trees etc. The vegetation is more dense in lower part of the landslide where erosion is smaller. Vegetation points can be removed based on the hypothesis that these are significantly higher than their neighboring points. However, in case of steep terrain, ground points may have the same heights as vegetation points, and thus, local slope should be considered. Also, if terrain roughness increases, the classification may become even more complex. Software system OPALS (Orientation and Processing of Airborne Laser Scanning data, Vienna University of Technology) was used for processing the ALS data. Labeling ground points has been made using physical and geometrical attributes (parameters) of ALS points. Also additional attributes were calculated in order to improve extraction. Since bare ground surface is usually smooth and continuous unlike vegetation, standard deviation of local elevations was used as roughness measure to differentiate these surfaces. EchoRatio (ER) was adopted as a measure of surface penetrability, while number of echoes and differentiation between echoes (EchoNumber) were also deployed in filtering. Since the ground points are measurements from bare-earth that are usually the lowest surface features in a local area, normalized height was defined as a rank of neighboring points

  16. RECORDING APPROACH OF HERITAGE SITES BASED ON MERGING POINT CLOUDS FROM HIGH RESOLUTION PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING

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    P. Grussenmeyer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Different approaches and tools are required in Cultural Heritage Documentation to deal with the complexity of monuments and sites. The documentation process has strongly changed in the last few years, always driven by technology. Accurate documentation is closely relied to advances of technology (imaging sensors, high speed scanning, automation in recording and processing data for the purposes of conservation works, management, appraisal, assessment of the structural condition, archiving, publication and research (Patias et al., 2008. We want to focus in this paper on the recording aspects of cultural heritage documentation, especially the generation of geometric and photorealistic 3D models for accurate reconstruction and visualization purposes. The selected approaches are based on the combination of photogrammetric dense matching and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS techniques. Both techniques have pros and cons and recent advances have changed the way of the recording approach. The choice of the best workflow relies on the site configuration, the performances of the sensors, and criteria as geometry, accuracy, resolution, georeferencing, texture, and of course processing time. TLS techniques (time of flight or phase shift systems are widely used for recording large and complex objects and sites. Point cloud generation from images by dense stereo or multi-view matching can be used as an alternative or as a complementary method to TLS. Compared to TLS, the photogrammetric solution is a low cost one, as the acquisition system is limited to a high-performance digital camera and a few accessories only. Indeed, the stereo or multi-view matching process offers a cheap, flexible and accurate solution to get 3D point clouds. Moreover, the captured images might also be used for models texturing. Several software packages are available, whether web-based, open source or commercial. The main advantage of this photogrammetric or computer vision based

  17. Multi-Range Conditional Random Field for Classifying Railway Electrification System Objects Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data

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    Jaewook Jung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Railways have been used as one of the most crucial means of transportation in public mobility and economic development. For safe railway operation, the electrification system in the railway infrastructure, which supplies electric power to trains, is an essential facility for stable train operation. Due to its important role, the electrification system needs to be rigorously and regularly inspected and managed. This paper presents a supervised learning method to classify Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS data into ten target classes representing overhead wires, movable brackets and poles, which are key objects in the electrification system. In general, the layout of the railway electrification system shows strong spatial regularity relations among object classes. The proposed classifier is developed based on Conditional Random Field (CRF, which characterizes not only labeling homogeneity at short range, but also the layout compatibility between different object classes at long range in the probabilistic graphical model. This multi-range CRF model consists of a unary term and three pairwise contextual terms. In order to gain computational efficiency, MLS point clouds are converted into a set of line segments to which the labeling process is applied. Support Vector Machine (SVM is used as a local classifier considering only node features for producing the unary potentials of the CRF model. As the short-range pairwise contextual term, the Potts model is applied to enforce a local smoothness in the short-range graph; while long-range pairwise potentials are designed to enhance the spatial regularities of both horizontal and vertical layouts among railway objects. We formulate two long-range pairwise potentials as the log posterior probability obtained by the naive Bayes classifier. The directional layout compatibilities are characterized in probability look-up tables, which represent the co-occurrence rate of spatial relations in the horizontal and vertical

  18. Individual tree crown approach for predicting site index in boreal forests using airborne laser scanning and hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandare, Kaja; Ørka, Hans Ole; Dalponte, Michele; Næsset, Erik; Gobakken, Terje

    2017-08-01

    Site productivity is essential information for sustainable forest management and site index (SI) is the most common quantitative measure of it. The SI is usually determined for individual tree species based on tree height and the age of the 100 largest trees per hectare according to stem diameter. The present study aimed to demonstrate and validate a methodology for the determination of SI using remotely sensed data, in particular fused airborne laser scanning (ALS) and airborne hyperspectral data in a forest site in Norway. The applied approach was based on individual tree crown (ITC) delineation: tree species, tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH), and age were modelled and predicted at ITC level using 10-fold cross validation. Four dominant ITCs per 400 m2 plot were selected as input to predict SI at plot level for Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). We applied an experimental setup with different subsets of dominant ITCs with different combinations of attributes (predicted or field-derived) for SI predictions. The results revealed that the selection of the dominant ITCs based on the largest DBH independent of tree species, predicted the SI with similar accuracy as ITCs matched with field-derived dominant trees (RMSE: 27.6% vs 23.3%). The SI accuracies were at the same level when dominant species were determined from the remotely sensed or field data (RMSE: 27.6% vs 27.8%). However, when the predicted tree age was used the SI accuracy decreased compared to field-derived age (RMSE: 27.6% vs 7.6%). In general, SI was overpredicted for both tree species in the mature forest, while there was an underprediction in the young forest. In conclusion, the proposed approach for SI determination based on ITC delineation and a combination of ALS and hyperspectral data is an efficient and stable procedure, which has the potential to predict SI in forest areas at various spatial scales and additionally to improve existing SI

  19. Does Tree Architectural Complexity Influence the Accuracy of Wood Volume Estimates of Single Young Trees by Terrestrial Laser Scanning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Hess

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimates of the wood volume or biomass of individual trees have gained considerable importance in recent years. The accuracy of wood volume estimation by terrestrial laser scanning (TLS point cloud data may differ between individual trees due to species-specific differences in tree architecture. We selected three common and ecologically important central European deciduous tree species, which differ considerably in tree architectural complexity in early ontogenetic stages: Acer pseudoplatanus (simple, Sorbus aucuparia (intermediate and Betula pendula (complex. We scanned six single young trees for each species (18 trees in total under optimal scan conditions (single tree stand, leafless state, four scanning positions, high resolution. TLS-based volume estimates were derived for the total tree as well as for the two compartments; trunk and branches, using a voxel-based bounding box method. These estimates were compared with highly accurate xyolmetric (water displacement volume measurements. Coefficients of determination between xylometric measurements and bounding box estimates were very high for total trees (R2adj = 0.99, trunks (R2adj = 0.99, and high for branches (R2adj = 0.78. The accuracy of estimations for total tree and trunk volume was highly similar among the three tree species. In contrast, significant differences were found for branch volume estimates: the accuracy was very high for Sorbus aucuparia, intermediate for Betula pendula, and low for Acer pseudoplatanus. A stepwise multiple regression showed that the accuracy of branch volume estimates was negatively related to the number of the first-order branches within diameter sizes of D ≤ 5 mm and crown surface area (R2adj = 0.61. We conclude that the accuracy in total tree and trunk volume estimates was not affected by the studied types of tree architectural complexity. The impact of the structural variability of branches and occlusion by branches was, thus, not as high as

  20. Measurement of snow depth distribution in the upper basin in the Japanese Alps using an airborne laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Sasaki, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    regardless of geographical factors such as sloping ground. As such, it enables measurement of snow depth distribution over a wide area without having to worry about the undulations of the land. In this study, airborne laser scanning was carried out on the snow surface in the upstream region of the Kamikochi-Azusa River in the Japanese Alps on March 29, 2012 and on April 4, 2013, in order to clarify the snow depth distribution.

  1. 3D digital image processing for biofilm quantification from confocal laser scanning microscopy: Multidimensional statistical analysis of biofilm modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Jerzy S.

    The dramatic increase in number and volume of digital images produced in medical diagnostics, and the escalating demand for rapid access to these relevant medical data, along with the need for interpretation and retrieval has become of paramount importance to a modern healthcare system. Therefore, there is an ever growing need for processed, interpreted and saved images of various types. Due to the high cost and unreliability of human-dependent image analysis, it is necessary to develop an automated method for feature extraction, using sophisticated mathematical algorithms and reasoning. This work is focused on digital image signal processing of biological and biomedical data in one- two- and three-dimensional space. Methods and algorithms presented in this work were used to acquire data from genomic sequences, breast cancer, and biofilm images. One-dimensional analysis was applied to DNA sequences which were presented as a non-stationary sequence and modeled by a time-dependent autoregressive moving average (TD-ARMA) model. Two-dimensional analyses used 2D-ARMA model and applied it to detect breast cancer from x-ray mammograms or ultrasound images. Three-dimensional detection and classification techniques were applied to biofilm images acquired using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Modern medical images are geometrically arranged arrays of data. The broadening scope of imaging as a way to organize our observations of the biophysical world has led to a dramatic increase in our ability to apply new processing techniques and to combine multiple channels of data into sophisticated and complex mathematical models of physiological function and dysfunction. With explosion of the amount of data produced in a field of biomedicine, it is crucial to be able to construct accurate mathematical models of the data at hand. Two main purposes of signal modeling are: data size conservation and parameter extraction. Specifically, in biomedical imaging we have four key problems

  2. SigVox - A 3D feature matching algorithm for automatic street object recognition in mobile laser scanning point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinhu; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Menenti, Massimo

    2017-06-01

    Urban road environments contain a variety of objects including different types of lamp poles and traffic signs. Its monitoring is traditionally conducted by visual inspection, which is time consuming and expensive. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems sample the road environment efficiently by acquiring large and accurate point clouds. This work proposes a methodology for urban road object recognition from MLS point clouds. The proposed method uses, for the first time, shape descriptors of complete objects to match repetitive objects in large point clouds. To do so, a novel 3D multi-scale shape descriptor is introduced, that is embedded in a workflow that efficiently and automatically identifies different types of lamp poles and traffic signs. The workflow starts by tiling the raw point clouds along the scanning trajectory and by identifying non-ground points. After voxelization of the non-ground points, connected voxels are clustered to form candidate objects. For automatic recognition of lamp poles and street signs, a 3D significant eigenvector based shape descriptor using voxels (SigVox) is introduced. The 3D SigVox descriptor is constructed by first subdividing the points with an octree into several levels. Next, significant eigenvectors of the points in each voxel are determined by principal component analysis (PCA) and mapped onto the appropriate triangle of a sphere approximating icosahedron. This step is repeated for different scales. By determining the similarity of 3D SigVox descriptors between candidate point clusters and training objects, street furniture is automatically identified. The feasibility and quality of the proposed method is verified on two point clouds obtained in opposite direction of a stretch of road of 4 km. 6 types of lamp pole and 4 types of road sign were selected as objects of interest. Ground truth validation showed that the overall accuracy of the ∼170 automatically recognized objects is approximately 95%. The results demonstrate

  3. Object-Based Point Cloud Analysis of Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning Data for Urban Vegetation Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Pfeifer

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Airborne laser scanning (ALS is a remote sensing technique well-suited for 3D vegetation mapping and structure characterization because the emitted laser pulses are able to penetrate small gaps in the vegetation canopy. The backscattered echoes from the foliage, woody vegetation, the terrain, and other objects are detected, leading to a cloud of points. Higher echo densities (> 20 echoes/m2 and additional classification variables from full-waveform (FWF ALS data, namely echo amplitude, echo width and information on multiple echoes from one shot, offer new possibilities in classifying the ALS point cloud. Currently FWF sensor information is hardly used for classification purposes. This contribution presents an object-based point cloud analysis (OBPA approach, combining segmentation and classification of the 3D FWF ALS points designed to detect tall vegetation in urban environments. The definition tall vegetation includes trees and shrubs, but excludes grassland and herbage. In the applied procedure FWF ALS echoes are segmented by a seeded region growing procedure. All echoes sorted descending by their surface roughness are used as seed points. Segments are grown based on echo width homogeneity. Next, segment statistics (mean, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation are calculated by aggregating echo features such as amplitude and surface roughness. For classification a rule base is derived automatically from a training area using a statistical classification tree. To demonstrate our method we present data of three sites with around 500,000 echoes each. The accuracy of the classified vegetation segments is evaluated for two independent validation sites. In a point-wise error assessment, where the classification is compared with manually classified 3D points, completeness and correctness better than 90% are reached for the validation sites. In comparison to many other algorithms the proposed 3D point classification works on the original

  4. Recording Approach of Heritage Sites Based on Merging Point Clouds from High Resolution Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grussenmeyer, P.; Alby, E.; Landes, T.; Koehl, M.; Guillemin, S.; Hullo, J. F.; Assali, P.; Smigiel, E.

    2012-07-01

    Different approaches and tools are required in Cultural Heritage Documentation to deal with the complexity of monuments and sites. The documentation process has strongly changed in the last few years, always driven by technology. Accurate documentation is closely relied to advances of technology (imaging sensors, high speed scanning, automation in recording and processing data) for the purposes of conservation works, management, appraisal, assessment of the structural condition, archiving, publication and research (Patias et al., 2008). We want to focus in this paper on the recording aspects of cultural heritage documentation, especially the generation of geometric and photorealistic 3D models for accurate reconstruction and visualization purposes. The selected approaches are based on the combination of photogrammetric dense matching and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) techniques. Both techniques have pros and cons and recent advances have changed the way of the recording approach. The choice of the best workflow relies on the site configuration, the performances of the sensors, and criteria as geometry, accuracy, resolution, georeferencing, texture, and of course processing time. TLS techniques (time of flight or phase shift systems) are widely used for recording large and complex objects and sites. Point cloud generation from images by dense stereo or multi-view matching can be used as an alternative or as a complementary method to TLS. Compared to TLS, the photogrammetric solution is a low cost one, as the acquisition system is limited to a high-performance digital camera and a few accessories only. Indeed, the stereo or multi-view matching process offers a cheap, flexible and accurate solution to get 3D point clouds. Moreover, the captured images might also be used for models texturing. Several software packages are available, whether web-based, open source or commercial. The main advantage of this photogrammetric or computer vision based technology is to get

  5. Tree crown structural characterization: A study using terrestrial laser scanning and three-dimensional radiative transfer modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Inian

    Spectroscopic observational data for vegetated environments, have been coupled with 3D physically-based radiative transfer models for retrievals of biochemical and biophysical indicators of vegetation health and condition. With the recent introduction of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) units, there now exists a means of rapidly measuring intricate structural details of vegetation canopies, which can also serve as input into 3D radiative transfer models. In this investigation, Intelligent Laser Ranging and Imaging System (ILRIS-3D) data was acquired of individual tree crowns in laboratory, and field-based experiments. The ILRIS-3D uses the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) principle to measure the distances of objects based on the time interval between laser pulse exitance and return, upon reflection from an object. At the laboratory-level, this exploratory study demonstrated and validated innovative approaches for retrieving crown-level estimates of Leaf Area Index (LAI) (r2 = 0.98, rmse = 0.26m2/m2), a critical biophysical parameter for vegetation monitoring and modeling. These methods were implemented and expanded in field experiments conducted in olive (Olea europaea L.) orchards in Cordoba, Spain, where ILRIS-3D observations for 24 structurally-variable trees were made. Robust methodologies were developed to characterize diagnostic architectural parameters, such as tree height (r2 = 0.97, rmse = 0.21m), crown width (r 2 = 0.98, rmse = 0.12m), crown height (r2 = 0.81, rmse = 0.11m), crown volume (r2 = 0.99, rmse = 2.6m3), and LAI (r2 = 0.76, rmse = 0.27m2/ m2). These parameters were subsequently used as direct inputs into the Forest LIGHT (FLIGHT) 3D ray tracing model for characterization of the spectral behavior of the olive crowns. Comparisons between FLIGHT-simulated spectra and measured data showed small differences in the visible (measurements were significantly correlated to TLS-derived tree crown complexity metrics. The specific implications of internal crown

  6. Dynamic behavior of binary component ion-exchange displacement chromatography of proteins visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qing-Hong; Shi, Zhi-Cong; Sun, Yan

    2012-09-28

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was introduced to visualize particle-scale binary component protein displacement behavior in Q Sepharose HP column. To this end, displacement chromatography of two intrinsic fluorescent proteins, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP), were developed using sodium saccharin (NaSac) as a displacer. The results indicated that RFP as well as eGFP could be effectively displaced in the single-component experiments by 50 mmol/L NaSac at 120 and 140 mmol/L NaCl whereas a fully developed displacement train with eGFP and RFP was only observed at 120 mmol/L NaCl in binary component displacement. At 140 mmol/L NaCl, there was a serious overlapping of the zones of the two proteins, indicating the importance of induced-salt effect on the formation of an isotachic displacement train. CLSM provided particle-scale evidence that induced-salt effect occurred likewise in the interior of an adsorbent and was synchronous to the introduction of the displacer. CLSM results at 140 mmol/L NaCl also demonstrated that both the proteins had the same fading rate at 50 mmol/L NaSac in the initial stage, suggesting the same displacement ability of NaSac to both the proteins. In the final stage, the fading rate of RFP in the adsorbent became slow, particularly at lower displacer concentrations. In the binary component displacement, the two proteins exhibited distinct fading rates as compared to the single component displacement and the remarkable lagging of the fading rate was observed in protein displacements. It suggested that the co-adsorbed proteins had significant influence on the formation of an isotachic train and the displacement chromatography of the proteins. Therefore, this research provided particle-scale insight into the dynamic behavior and complexity in the displacement of proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy of the cornea in patients with silicone oil tamponade after vitreoretinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Qihua; Wang, Xin; Lv, Jiahua; Sun, Xinghuai; Xu, Jianjiang

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the morphological changes in the cornea by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in a large case series with silicone oil endotamponade after vitreoretinal surgery and to explore the value of LSCM in the early detection of silicone keratopathy (SK). Ninety-nine patients (99 eyes) with silicone oil endotamponade after vitreoretinal surgery were included in the current study. Slit-lamp examination and measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) were performed first. Then the central corneas of the subjects' eyes were examined by in vivo LSCM. The analysis of images of each corneal layer was performed and the endothelial cellular density (ECD), endothelial cellular area (ECA), coefficient of variation of cell size (CoV), and percentage of hexagonal cells (PHC) were measured. Moreover, the total size of stromal deposits was measured, and the correlation between the size of deposits and the parameters of endothelial cells was analyzed. Clinically recognizable abnormalities involving the cornea were identified in only 12 eyes (12.1%) under slit-lamp biomicroscopy, whereas in vivo LSCM revealed morphological abnormalities in 40 eyes (40.4%). The manifestations of endothelial lesions varied from decreased cellular density, increased polymegathism and pleomorphism to hyperreflective silicone oil membrane or droplets adhering to the endothelium. Moreover, hyperreflective deposits with various shapes could be identified in both posterior and anterior stroma, along with the infiltration of Langerhans cells beneath the epithelium. The average ECD and PHC of eyes with corneal abnormalities were significantly lower than those of normal corneas, whereas the average ECA and CoV were significantly larger (all Ps < 0.001). The patients with corneal abnormalities were significantly older than those others (P = 0.003). The rate of pseudophakic and aphakic eyes having corneal abnormalities was significantly higher than that of phakic eyes (P = 0.045). Interestingly

  8. Helios: a Multi-Purpose LIDAR Simulation Framework for Research, Planning and Training of Laser Scanning Operations with Airborne, Ground-Based Mobile and Stationary Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, S.; Höfle, B.

    2016-06-01

    In many technical domains of modern society, there is a growing demand for fast, precise and automatic acquisition of digital 3D models of a wide variety of physical objects and environments. Laser scanning is a popular and widely used technology to cover this demand, but it is also expensive and complex to use to its full potential. However, there might exist scenarios where the operation of a real laser scanner could be replaced by a computer simulation, in order to save time and costs. This includes scenarios like teaching and training of laser scanning, development of new scanner hardware and scanning methods, or generation of artificial scan data sets to support the development of point cloud processing and analysis algorithms. To test the feasibility of this idea, we have developed a highly flexible laser scanning simulation framework named Heidelberg LiDAR Operations Simulator (HELIOS). HELIOS is implemented as a Java library and split up into a core component and multiple extension modules. Extensible Markup Language (XML) is used to define scanner, platform and scene models and to configure the behaviour of modules. Modules were developed and implemented for (1) loading of simulation assets and configuration (i.e. 3D scene models, scanner definitions, survey descriptions etc.), (2) playback of XML survey descriptions, (3) TLS survey planning (i.e. automatic computation of recommended scanning positions) and (4) interactive real-time 3D visualization of simulated surveys. As a proof of concept, we show the results of two experiments: First, a survey planning test in a scene that was specifically created to evaluate the quality of the survey planning algorithm. Second, a simulated TLS scan of a crop field in a precision farming scenario. The results show that HELIOS fulfills its design goals.

  9. Time-Lapse Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy for Analyzing Dynamic Molecular Interactions in the Plasma Membrane of B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Hae Won; Brzostowski, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    For decades, various Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques have been developed to measure the distance between interacting molecules. FRET imaging by the sensitized acceptor emission method has been widely applied to study the dynamical association between two molecules at a nanometer scale in live cells. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for FRET imaging by sensitized emission using a confocal laser scanning microscope to analyze the interaction of the B cell receptor (BCR) with the Lyn-enriched lipid microdomain on the plasma membrane of live cells upon antigen binding, one of the earliest signaling events in BCR-mediated B cell activation.

  10. Measurement of snow depth distribution in the Kamikochi-Azusa river basin using an airborne laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K.; Sasaki, A.

    2013-12-01

    contour lines, and then use the difference between them to clarify the snow depth. This method allows researchers to grasp the snow depth over a wide area, but it needs to be made more precise if it is to incorporate high-precision information on equivalent elevation points on the snow surface. In recent years, a measurement technology has been developed that uses laser scanners mounted on aircraft. This method enables researchers to obtain ground surface coordinate data with high precision over a wide area from the air. Using such a scanner to measure the ground surface during snow coverage and during no snow coverage, and then finding the differences between the surface elevations, has made it possible to ascertain snow depth with high precision. Airborne laser measurement enables high-precision measurements over a wide area and in a short amount of time, and measurements can be made regardless of geographical factors such as sloping ground. As such, it enables measurement of snow depth distribution over a wide area without having to worry about the undulations of the land. In this study, airborne laser scanning was carried out on the snow surface in the upstream region of the Kamikochi-Azusa River in Japan on March 29, 2012, in order to clarify the snow depth distribution.

  11. Introducing Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to Undergraduate Geology Curricula: Insights from the Indiana University G429 Field Course, Summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, B. J.; Phillips, D. A.; Meertens, C. M.; Simmons, W.

    2010-12-01

    Bruce J. Douglas, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 East 10th Street Bloomington, IN 47405, douglasb@indiana.edu David A. Phillips, UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Drive, Boulder, CO 80301, phillips@unavco.org Charles M. Meertens, UNAVCO, meertens@unavco.org William H. Simmons, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 East 10th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 During the summer of 2010, a pilot version of a week-long module designed to apply Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to various problems encountered while conducting field geology applications was embedded within the Indiana University G429 field course. The format followed that of a successful module developed to concentrate on surface and groundwater hydrology known as G429e. The TLS module was implemented with the aid of UNAVCO, which provided both equipment and professional staff to complement the faculty and staff working in G429. The students who participated in the program were all volunteers aware of the experimental nature of the module. The students' backgrounds varied from those with extensive field instrumentation and surveying experience to those with only the prior field experience provided by the first three weeks of the G429 field course. The targets selected for the TLS work were directly related to scientific questions that arose from projects previously completed by the students. This was critical in that the motivation for the work was scientifically driven and not strictly an exercise in instrument use. The activities for the week built from an initial survey in a small highly constrained location to a final project where the students had to design a plan and deploy all of the instruments, collect the various data types, and analyze the data based on a simple set of criteria, to produce a TLS data set that would allow others to explore the Judson Mead Geologic Field Station. The other problems selected included determining the magnitude and type of normal fault

  12. The evaluation of unmanned aerial system-based photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning to generate DEMs of agricultural watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo, Mohamar Moussa; Degré, Aurore; Debouche, Charles; Lisein, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    Agricultural watersheds tend to be places of intensive farming activities that permanently modify their microtopography. The surface characteristics of the soil vary depending on the crops that are cultivated in these areas. Agricultural soil microtopography plays an important role in the quantification of runoff and sediment transport because the presence of crops, crop residues, furrows and ridges may impact the direction of water flow. To better assess such phenomena, 3-D reconstructions of high-resolution agricultural watershed topography are essential. Fine-resolution topographic data collection technologies can be used to discern highly detailed elevation variability in these areas. Knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of existing technologies used for data collection on agricultural watersheds may be helpful in choosing an appropriate technology. This study assesses the suitability of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and unmanned aerial system (UAS) photogrammetry for collecting the fine-resolution topographic data required to generate accurate, high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) in a small watershed area (12 ha). Because of farming activity, 14 TLS scans (≈ 25 points m- 2) were collected without using high-definition surveying (HDS) targets, which are generally used to mesh adjacent scans. To evaluate the accuracy of the DEMs created from the TLS scan data, 1098 ground control points (GCPs) were surveyed using a real time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS). Linear regressions were then applied to each DEM to remove vertical errors from the TLS point elevations, errors caused by the non-perpendicularity of the scanner's vertical axis to the local horizontal plane, and errors correlated with the distance to the scanner's position. The scans were then meshed to generate a DEMTLS with a 1 × 1 m spatial resolution. The Agisoft PhotoScan and MicMac software packages were used to process the aerial photographs and generate a DEMPSC

  13. Analysis of relationship between apoptosis and change of Ca2+ in HepG-2 induced by CSA with laser scanning confocal technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yu-bin; Yu, Lei

    2008-12-01

    Laser scanning confoncal technology was used to study relationship between apoptosis and change of Ca2+ induced by CSA (Capparis spinosa L. total alkaloid, CSA) on human heptocarcinoma cell HepG-2. Killing effect of CSA on human heptocarcinoma cell HepG-2 was measured by MTT method, while morphological observation of HepG-2 cells was completed by fluorescence microscope. Apoptosis induced by CSA on HepG-2 cells was measured by flowcytometry. In addition, change of intracellular Ca2+ level of CSA on HepG-2 cells was observed by laser scanning confocal microscope. As a result, CSA had obvious cytotoxicity on HepG-2 in a dose-dependent manner, and its IC50 was 162.4μg/ml. CSA could induce characteristic apoptosic morphology of HepG-2 cells, and apoptosis percentage was significantly higher than control one. Migration of cells cycle from S phase to G2 phase had been blocked by CSA. Concentration of Ca2+ in HepG-2 had been increased by CSA, which was positive correlation with drug dosage. CSA had obvious effect of killing and inducing apoptosis on human heptocarcinoma cell HepG-2, and overload of Ca2+ might be invovled in these events.

  14. POINT CLOUD ANALYSIS FOR UAV-BORNE LASER SCANNING WITH HORIZONTALLY AND VERTICALLY ORIENTED LINE SCANNERS – CONCEPT AND FIRST RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Weinmann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on UAV-borne laser scanning with the objective of densely sampling object surfaces in the local surrounding of the UAV. In this regard, using a line scanner which scans along the vertical direction and perpendicular to the flight direction results in a point cloud with low point density if the UAV moves fast. Using a line scanner which scans along the horizontal direction only delivers data corresponding to the altitude of the UAV and thus a low scene coverage. For these reasons, we present a concept and a system for UAV-borne laser scanning using multiple line scanners. Our system consists of a quadcopter equipped with horizontally and vertically oriented line scanners. We demonstrate the capabilities of our system by presenting first results obtained for a flight within an outdoor scene. Thereby, we use a downsampling of the original point cloud and different neighborhood types to extract fundamental geometric features which in turn can be used for scene interpretation with respect to linear, planar or volumetric structures.

  15. D Recording, Modelling and Visualisation of the Fortification Kristiansten in Trondheim (norway) by Photogrammetric Methods and Terrestrial Laser Scanning in the Framework of Erasmus Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, T.; Lindstaedt, M.; Maziull, L.; Schreyer, K.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Holm, K.

    2015-02-01

    In this contribution the 3D recording, 3D modelling and 3D visualisation of the fortification Kristiansten in Trondheim (Norway) by digital photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning are presented. The fortification Kristiansten was built after the large city fire in the year 1681 above the city and has been a museum since 1997. The recording of the fortress took place in each case at the end of August/at the beginning of September 2010 and 2011 during two two-week summer schools with the topic "Digital Photogrammetry & Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Cultural Heritage Documentation" at NTNU Trondheim with international students in the context of ERASMUS teaching programs. For data acquisition, a terrestrial laser scanner and digital SLR cameras were used. The establishment of a geodetic 3D network, which was later transformed into the Norwegian UTM coordinate system using control points, ensured a consistent registration of the scans and an orientation of the photogrammetric images. The fortress buildings were constructed in detail from photogrammetric photographs and point clouds using AutoCAD, while the fortress area and walls were modelled by triangle meshing in Geomagic. The visualisation of the fortress was carried out 2013 with the software Cinema 4D in the context of a lecture in the Master study programme Geomatics. The 3D model was textured and afterwards presented in a video. This 3D model was finally transferred into the game engine Unity for an interactive 3D visualisation on 3D monitors.

  16. PHOTO-BASED 3D SCANNING VS. LASER SCANNING – COMPETITIVE DATA ACQUISITION METHODS FOR DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELLING OF STEEP MOUNTAIN SLOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kolecka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents how terrestrial laser scanning (TLS and terrestrial digital photogrammetry were used to create a 3D model of a steep mountain wall. Terrestrial methods of data acquisition are the most suitable for such relief, as the most effective registration is perpendicular to the surface. First, various aspects of photo-based scanning and laser scanning were discussed. The general overview of both technologies was followed by the description of a case study of the western wall of the Kościelec Mountain (2155 m. The case study area is one of the most interesting and popular rock climbing areas in the Polish High Tatra Mts. The wall is about 300 meters high, has varied relief and some parts are overhung. Triangular irregular mesh was chosen to represent the true- 3D surface with its complicated relief. To achieve a more smooth result for visualization NURBS curves and surfaces were utilized. Both 3D models were then compared to the standard DTM of the Tatra Mountains in TIN format, obtained from aerial photographs (0.2 m ground pixel size. The results sh