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Sample records for histoacryl tissue adhesive

  1. EVALUATION OF COMPLICATOINS AND BENEFITS OF HISTOACRYL TISSUE GLUE IN SURGICAL WOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Zafarghandy

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available - Healing of surgical wounds and their complications such as infection or scar formation are of major concern in surgery. Tissue glues are advanced to reduce these problems. In a prospective study, we have evaluated surgical wound healing in 76 patients whose surgical wounds were repaired by tissue glues (Histoacryl. This study was performed in four leaching hospitals (Sina, Shariaty, Shohada, Razi. The major parameters co/isidered for this study were complete wound healing in the first postoperative week, early wound complications, late wound complications, and their relation with some other factors such as wound size and glue application techniques. In our study, complete wound healing in less than one week was seen in 81.9% of patients, whereas 18.1% had a longer course. Early complications consisted of (5.6% infection and (2.8% hematoma. Late complications included hypertrophy (O.48% and widening (18.1% of scars. Tliere was a significant correlation between wound size and healing time (P<0.05, but not between faulty techniques and scar formation. 

  2. [Comparative animal experiments of different tissue adhesives. I. Tensile strength studies. II. Histologic and morphometric studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, E; Buntrock, P; Köhler, S

    1989-01-01

    This paper for the first time presents the results of extensive histological and histomorphometric studies investigating the tensile strength of tissue adhesives in model experiments on animals. The material used in comparative studies were TISSEEL, a human adhesive based on fibrinogen, HISTOACRYL-blue, a cyanoacrylate, and KL-3, a type of urethane adhesive. All the materials used in these studies were shown to be principally suitable as tissue adhesives. TISSEEL, the biological adhesive, was obviously superior to all the other adhesives whereas the two synthetic adhesives HISTOACRYL-blue and KL-3 were found to be roughly equal in their properties. The animal model described in the present paper is recommended for use as a standard technique for testing the suitability of new tissue adhesives.

  3. Endoscopic treatment of congenital H-Type and recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula with electrocautery and histoacryl glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzifa, K T; Maxwell, E L; Chait, P; James, A L; Forte, V; Ein, S H; Friedburg, J

    2006-05-01

    Congenital H-Type tracheoesophageal fistulae (H-Type TEF) and recurrent fistulae after primary repair of esophageal atresia represent a difficult problem in diagnosis and management. The treatment traditionally involved an open technique via a cervical or thoracic route, approaches with high morbidity and mortality rates of up to 50%. Endoscopic closure of fistulae has been reported with various techniques such as tissue adhesives, electrocautery, sclerosants and laser. However, the published case series contain a small number of patients with usually short-term follow-up. The aim of this paper is to present the experience of a decade at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, using diathermy and histoacryl tissue adhesive and discuss the indications and limitations of this technique. Since 1995, 192 patients have been managed in this institution with tracheoesophageal fistulae of which 10 patients have been treated endoscopically. The fistulae were both of H-Type and recurrent tracheoesophageal fistulae following surgery for esophageal atresia and fistula division. One fistula occurred following trauma. The procedure was undertaken under general anesthesia in the image guided therapy suite under fluoroscopic control. Flexible ball electrocautery and injection of histoacryl glue were used either on their own or in combination. Fistula closure was achieved in 9 out of 10 fistulae. Four patients had a second endoscopic procedure. No major respiratory or other complications were encountered in association with the procedure. Follow-up has been between 3 months and 9 years. We conclude, endoscopic treatment of tracheoesophageal fistulae with electrocautery and histoacryl glue has been a safe and successful technique of managing H-Type and recurrent tracheoesophageal fistulae. In this paper, we discuss the indications and the surgical steps of the procedure. We highlight that diathermy should be carefully controlled and applied preferably in the small non

  4. US FDA perspective on the regulations of medical-grade polymers: cyanoacrylate polymer medical device tissue adhesives.

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    Mattamal, George J

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a brief description of the uses and clinical applications of medical-grade polymers, in particular synthetic cyanoacrylate adhesive/glue devices that have been cleared and/or approved as medical devices by the US FDA since the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 were enacted. This includes Class I cyanoacrylate devices (e.g., liquid bandages), Class II cyanoacrylate devices (e.g., dental cements), and Class III (premarket approval) cyanoacrylate devices such as Dermabond, Indermil Tissue Adhesive, Histoacryl and Histoacryl Blue Topical Skin Adhesive, and Trufill n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate Embolic Agent. By citing an example of FDA approved Class III devices in the cyanoacrylate technology, the article provides a brief discussion of the FDA approval process of medical devices. It includes the FDA issues regarding the published guidance document for 'Cyanoacrylate Topical Tissue Adhesives' that will provide guidance to regulatory personnel and manufacturers in the preparation of investigational device exception applications and in the development of valid scientific evidence to support premarket approval applications for cyanocrylate tissue adhesives intended for topical approximation of skin and others. The article provides a short regulatory description of the US FDA; under what laws its operates, how the FDA evaluates new devices for marketing, and how the device regulatory system works, for example, Class I, Class II, and Class III cyanoacrylate medical devices.

  5. 21 CFR 878.4010 - Tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue adhesive. 878.4010 Section 878.4010 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4010 Tissue adhesive. (a) Tissue adhesive for the topical approximation of skin—(1) Identification. A tissue adhesive for the topical...

  6. Intraluminal occlusion of the seminal duct by laser and Histoacryl: Two non-invasive alternatives for vasectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, B.; Sroka, R.; Koelle, S.; Becker, A. J.; Khoder, W.; Pongratz, T.; Stief, C. G.; Trottmann, M.

    2014-03-01

    Introduction and objective: Vasectomy is a well-established method in family control. Even though it is a safe and low risk operation, this surgery is invasive and difficult to reverse. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate new non-invasive methods for occlusion of the seminal duct. Material and Methods: Seminal duct tissue was obtained from patients (n=30) suffering from prostate cancer and therefore undergoing prostatectomy. In a first set of experiments, the seminal duct was occluded by intraluminal application of Histoacryl® (Braun Aesculap AG, Tuttlingen, Germany). In a 2nd set of experiments, endoluminal laser induced occlusion was performed. Four different laser wavelengths (1940nm, 1470nm, 1064nm, 940nm) and different sets of laser parameters (e.g. power, exposure duration, fibre diameter, energy applied) were compared. Effectiveness of occlusion of the seminal duct was proven by post-treatment irrigation flow measurement, as well as by morphological analyses. To evaluate a potential damage of the surrounding tissue, external temperature was measured using a thermometer during laser application. Results: Intraluminal application of Histoacryl® induced an immediate and complete occlusion of the seminal duct. The underlying connective tissue maintained its functional integrity after this treatment. By laser light application to a Histoacryl® block, a hole could be created into the block thus indicating the possibility of recanalization. Treatment with laser energy resulted in shrinkage of the ductal lumen. The laser application generally caused necrosis in the epithelium and induced formation of vacuoles in the underlying connective tissue. As described for endoluminal varicose treatment, this distinct local reaction might result in an intense inflammation leading to a functional occlusion of the vas deferens. Conclusions: Both laser-induced occlusion and application of Histoacryl® are fast and simple techniques which may be able to achieve a

  7. Degradable Adhesives for Surgery and Tissue Engineering.

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    Bhagat, Vrushali; Becker, Matthew L

    2017-10-09

    This review highlights the research on degradable polymeric tissue adhesives for surgery and tissue engineering. Included are a comprehensive listing of specific uses, advantages, and disadvantages of different adhesive groups. A critical evaluation of challenges affecting the development of next generation materials is also discussed, and insights into the outlook of the field are explored.

  8. Tissue adhesives for closure of surgical incisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumville, Jo C; Coulthard, Paul; Worthington, Helen V; Riley, Philip; Patel, Neil; Darcey, James; Esposito, Marco; van der Elst, Maarten; van Waes, Oscar J F

    2014-11-28

    Sutures (stitches), staples and adhesive tapes have been used for many years as methods of wound closure, but tissue adhesives have entered clinical practice more recently. Closure of wounds with sutures enables the closure to be meticulous, but the sutures may show tissue reactivity and can require removal. Tissue adhesives offer the advantages of an absence of risk of needlestick injury and no requirement to remove sutures later. Initially, tissue adhesives were used primarily in emergency room settings, but this review looks at the use of tissue adhesives in the operating room/theatre where surgeons are using them increasingly for the closure of surgical skin incisions. To determine the effects of various tissue adhesives compared with conventional skin closure techniques for the closure of surgical wounds. In March 2014 for this second update we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. We did not restrict the search and study selection with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. Only randomised controlled trials were eligible for inclusion. We conducted screening of eligible studies, data extraction and risk of bias assessment independently and in duplicate. We expressed results as random-effects models using mean difference for continuous outcomes and risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes. We investigated heterogeneity, including both clinical and methodological factors. This second update of the review identified 19 additional eligible trials resulting in a total of 33 studies (2793 participants) that met the inclusion criteria. There was low quality evidence that sutures were significantly better than tissue adhesives for reducing the risk of wound breakdown (dehiscence; RR 3.35; 95% CI 1.53 to 7

  9. Dextran and gelatin based photocrosslinkable tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Nie, Jun; Yang, Dongzhi

    2012-11-06

    A two-component tissue adhesive based on biocompatible and bio-degradable polymers (oxidized urethane dextran (Dex-U-AD) and gelatin) was prepared and photocrosslinked under the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The adhesive could adhere to surface of gelatin, which simulated the human tissue steadily. The structures of above Dex-U-AD were characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR spectroscopy and XRD. The adhesion property of result products was evaluated by lap-shear test. The maximum adhesion strength could reach to 4.16±0.72 MPa which was significantly higher than that of fibrin glue. The photopolymerization process of Dex-U-AD/gelatin was monitored by real time infrared spectroscopy (RTIR). It took less than 5 min to complete the curing process. The cytotoxicity of Dex-U-AD/gelatin also was evaluated which indicated that Dex-U-AD/gelatin gels were nontoxic to L929 cell. The relationship between all the above-mentioned properties and degree of oxidization of Dex-U-AD was assessed. The obtained products have the potential to serve as tissue adhesive in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They ...

  11. Biocompatible nanostructured solid adhesives for biological soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masahiro; Nakai, Akira; Hara, Emilio Satoshi; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2017-07-15

    Over the past few years, the development of novel adhesives for biological soft tissue adhesion has gained significant interest. Such adhesives should be non-toxic and biocompatible. In this study, we synthesized a novel solid adhesive using nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HAp) and evaluated its physical adhesion properties through in vitro testing with synthetic hydrogels and mouse soft tissues. The results revealed that HAp-nanoparticle dispersions and HAp-nanoparticle-assembled nanoporous plates showed efficient adhesion to hydrogels. Interestingly, the HAp plates showed different adhesive properties depending upon the shape of their nanoparticles. The HAp plate made up of 17nm-sized nanoparticles showed an adhesive strength 2.2times higher than that of the conventional fibrin glue for mouse skin tissues. The present study indicates a new application of inorganic biomaterials (bioceramics) as a soft tissue adhesive. Organic adhesives such as fibrin glues or cyanoacrylate derivatives have been commonly used clinically. However, their limited biocompatibility and/or low adhesion strength are some drawbacks that impair their clinical application. In this study, we synthesized a novel solid adhesive with biocompatible and biodegradable HAp nanoparticles without the aid of organic molecules, and showed a rapid and strong adhesion of mouse soft tissues compared to conventional fibrin glues. Given the importance of wet adhesion in biomedicine and biotechnology applications, our results will help not only in developing an efficient approach to close incised soft tissues, but also in finding novel ways to integrate soft tissues with synthetic hydrogels (such as drug reservoirs). Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tunable denture adhesives using biomimetic principles for enhanced tissue adhesion in moist environments.

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    Gill, Simrone K; Roohpour, Nima; Topham, Paul D; Tighe, Brian J

    2017-11-01

    Nature provides many interesting examples of adhesive strategies. Of particular note, the protein glue secreted by marine mussels delivers high adhesion in wet and dynamic environments owing to existence of catechol moieties. As such, this study focuses on denture fixatives, where a non-zinc-containing commercial-based formulation has been judiciously modified by a biomimetic catechol-inspired polymer, poly(3,4-dihydroxystyrene/styrene-alt-maleic acid) in a quest to modulate adhesive performance. In vitro studies, in a lap-shear configuration, revealed that the catechol-modified components were able to enhance adhesion to both the denture base and hydrated, functional oral tissue mimic, with the resulting mode of failure prominently being adhesive rather than cohesive. These characteristics are desirable in prosthodontic fixative applications, for which temporary adhesion must be maintained, with ultimately an adhesive failure from the mucosal tissue surface preferred. These insights provide an experimental platform in the design of future biomimetic adhesive systems. Mussel adhesive proteins have proven to be promising biomimetic adhesive candidates for soft tissues and here for the first time we have adapted marine adhesive technology into a denture fixative application. Importantly, we have incorporated a soft tissue mimic in our in vitro adhesion technique that more closely resembles the oral mucosa than previously studied substrates. The novel biomimetic-modified adhesives showed the ability to score the highest adhesive bonding out of all the formulations included in this study, across all moisture levels. This paper will be of major interest to the Acta Biomaterialia readership since the study has illustrated the potential of biomimetic principles in the design of effective prosthodontic tissue adhesives in a series of purpose-designed in vitro experiments in the context of the challenging features of the oral environment. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia

  13. A biodegradable and biocompatible gecko-inspired tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Ferreira, Lino; Sundback, Cathryn; Nichol, Jason W; Chan, Edwin P; Carter, David J D; Bettinger, Chris J; Patanavanich, Siamrut; Chignozha, Loice; Ben-Joseph, Eli; Galakatos, Alex; Pryor, Howard; Pomerantseva, Irina; Masiakos, Peter T; Faquin, William; Zumbuehl, Andreas; Hong, Seungpyo; Borenstein, Jeffrey; Vacanti, Joseph; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2008-02-19

    There is a significant medical need for tough biodegradable polymer adhesives that can adapt to or recover from various mechanical deformations while remaining strongly attached to the underlying tissue. We approached this problem by using a polymer poly(glycerol-co-sebacate acrylate) and modifying the surface to mimic the nanotopography of gecko feet, which allows attachment to vertical surfaces. Translation of existing gecko-inspired adhesives for medical applications is complex, as multiple parameters must be optimized, including: biocompatibility, biodegradation, strong adhesive tissue bonding, as well as compliance and conformability to tissue surfaces. Ideally these adhesives would also have the ability to deliver drugs or growth factors to promote healing. As a first demonstration, we have created a gecko-inspired tissue adhesive from a biocompatible and biodegradable elastomer combined with a thin tissue-reactive biocompatible surface coating. Tissue adhesion was optimized by varying dimensions of the nanoscale pillars, including the ratio of tip diameter to pitch and the ratio of tip diameter to base diameter. Coating these nanomolded pillars of biodegradable elastomers with a thin layer of oxidized dextran significantly increased the interfacial adhesion strength on porcine intestine tissue in vitro and in the rat abdominal subfascial in vivo environment. This gecko-inspired medical adhesive may have potential applications for sealing wounds and for replacement or augmentation of sutures or staples.

  14. A biodegradable and biocompatible gecko-inspired tissue adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Ferreira, Lino; Sundback, Cathryn; Nichol, Jason W.; Chan, Edwin P.; Carter, David J. D.; Bettinger, Chris J.; Patanavanich, Siamrut; Chignozha, Loice; Ben-Joseph, Eli; Galakatos, Alex; Pryor, Howard; Pomerantseva, Irina; Masiakos, Peter T.; Faquin, William; Zumbuehl, Andreas; Hong, Seungpyo; Borenstein, Jeffrey; Vacanti, Joseph; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    There is a significant medical need for tough biodegradable polymer adhesives that can adapt to or recover from various mechanical deformations while remaining strongly attached to the underlying tissue. We approached this problem by using a polymer poly(glycerol-co-sebacate acrylate) and modifying the surface to mimic the nanotopography of gecko feet, which allows attachment to vertical surfaces. Translation of existing gecko-inspired adhesives for medical applications is complex, as multiple parameters must be optimized, including: biocompatibility, biodegradation, strong adhesive tissue bonding, as well as compliance and conformability to tissue surfaces. Ideally these adhesives would also have the ability to deliver drugs or growth factors to promote healing. As a first demonstration, we have created a gecko-inspired tissue adhesive from a biocompatible and biodegradable elastomer combined with a thin tissue-reactive biocompatible surface coating. Tissue adhesion was optimized by varying dimensions of the nanoscale pillars, including the ratio of tip diameter to pitch and the ratio of tip diameter to base diameter. Coating these nanomolded pillars of biodegradable elastomers with a thin layer of oxidized dextran significantly increased the interfacial adhesion strength on porcine intestine tissue in vitro and in the rat abdominal subfascial in vivo environment. This gecko-inspired medical adhesive may have potential applications for sealing wounds and for replacement or augmentation of sutures or staples. PMID:18287082

  15. Measuring shear strength of soft-tissue adhesives.

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    Wang, Muzhou; Kornfield, Julia A

    2012-04-01

    A method for evaluating strength of adhesives for hydrogels and soft tissues is presented. Quantitative measurements of shear strength for applications in tissue engineering and biomedicine are performed in torsion using a rheometer. Small, disk shaped specimens of soft biological tissues and/or hydrogels (8 mm diameter, 1-2 mm thick) are mounted onto rheometer tools and then bonded together using the adhesive to be tested. The torsional loading geometry imposes simple shear without deforming the planar adhesive bond, in contrast to the lap-shear test. It retains the advantages of the napkin ring test while reducing artifacts due to cutting and handling soft specimens. The method is demonstrated by measuring the shear strength of two types of biomedical adhesives (cyanoacrylate and polyethylene glycol-based) between model hydrogels (gelatin) and tissues (corneal stroma and skin). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The photocrosslinkable tissue adhesive based on copolymeric dextran/HEMA.

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    Wang, Tao; Mu, Xueyan; Li, Haibo; Wu, Weilong; Nie, Jun; Yang, Dongzhi

    2013-02-15

    We developed a copolymeric bioadhesive system with the potential to be used as a tissue adhesive based on biopolymer dextran. Copolymeric hydrogels comprising a urethane dextran (Dex-U) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) were prepared and crosslinked under the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. In this study, the photopolymerization process was monitored by real time infrared spectroscopy (RTIR). The adhesion strength was evaluated by lap-shear-test. The surface tension, viscosity of the solutions and the cytotoxicity assays were investigated. Compared to Dex-U system, the addition of HEMA remarkably improved the properties of Dex-H system especially the adhesion strength and the nontoxicity. And materials variation could be tailored to match the need of tissues. The copolymeric tissue adhesives demonstrated promising adhesion strength and nontoxicity. The maximum adhesion strength reached to 4.33±0.47 Mpa which was 86 times higher than that of Tisseel. The obtained products have the potential to serve as tissue adhesive in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Adhesion molecule-modified biomaterials for neural tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreyas S Rao

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion molecules (AMs represent one class of biomolecules that promote central nervous system regeneration. These tethered molecules provide cues to regenerating neurons that recapitulate the native brain environment. Improving cell adhesive potential of non-adhesive biomaterials is therefore a common goal in neural tissue engineering. This review discusses common AMs used in neural biomaterials and the mechanism of cell attachment to these AMs. Methods to modify materials with AMs are discussed and compared. Additionally, patterning of AMs for achieving specific neuronal responses is explored.

  18. Evaluation of Tissue Adhesive as Alternative To Conventional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: To assess effectiveness of tissue adhesive in comparison to subcuticular 3-0 vicryl sutures in closure of inguinal hernia repair with respect to, time required for closure of skin incision, postoperative complications like wound disruption, wound discharge, wound infection and scar osmesis. The study was carried out ...

  19. Nanoparticle solutions as adhesives for gels and biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Séverine; Prevoteau, Alexandre; Elzière, Paul; Hourdet, Dominique; Marcellan, Alba; Leibler, Ludwik

    2014-01-01

    Adhesives are made of polymers because, unlike other materials, polymers ensure good contact between surfaces by covering asperities, and retard the fracture of adhesive joints by dissipating energy under stress. But using polymers to `glue' together polymer gels is difficult, requiring chemical reactions, heating, pH changes, ultraviolet irradiation or an electric field. Here we show that strong, rapid adhesion between two hydrogels can be achieved at room temperature by spreading a droplet of a nanoparticle solution on one gel's surface and then bringing the other gel into contact with it. The method relies on the nanoparticles' ability to adsorb onto polymer gels and to act as connectors between polymer chains, and on the ability of polymer chains to reorganize and dissipate energy under stress when adsorbed onto nanoparticles. We demonstrate this approach by pressing together pieces of hydrogels, for approximately 30 seconds, that have the same or different chemical properties or rigidities, using various solutions of silica nanoparticles, to achieve a strong bond. Furthermore, we show that carbon nanotubes and cellulose nanocrystals that do not bond hydrogels together become adhesive when their surface chemistry is modified. To illustrate the promise of the method for biological tissues, we also glued together two cut pieces of calf's liver using a solution of silica nanoparticles. As a rapid, simple and efficient way to assemble gels or tissues, this method is desirable for many emerging technological and medical applications such as microfluidics, actuation, tissue engineering and surgery.

  20. Interactions of polysaccharide-based tissue adhesives with clinically relevant fibroblast and macrophage cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sujata K; Arthur, Samuel D; Chenault, H Keith; Kodokian, George K

    2007-11-01

    The effects of polysaccharide-based tissue adhesives on cell survival and inflammatory cell activation were determined using in vitro mouse cell cultures. Cytotoxicity of tissue adhesives was evaluated by placing adhesives in direct contact with 3T3 fibroblast cells. Polysaccharide-based tissue adhesives composed of dextran aldehyde and star PEG amine were non-cytotoxic to fibroblasts; in contrast, a commercial adhesive composed of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate was highly cytotoxic to fibroblasts. The inflammatory potential of tissue adhesives was evaluated by exposing J774 macrophage cells to adhesives, and measuring TNF-alpha release from macrophages. Polysaccharide-based tissue adhesives did not elicit inflammatory TNF-alpha release from macrophages. These results suggest that polysaccharide-based tissue adhesives are non-cytotoxic and non-inflammatory; the results are therefore significant in the design of in vitro cell culture systems to study biomaterials.

  1. A critical evaluation of bifidobacterial adhesion to the host tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Westermann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacteria are common inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract that, despite a long history of research, have not shown any pathogenic potential whatsoever. By contrast, some bifidobacteria are associated with a number of health-related benefits for the host. The reported beneficial effects of bifidobacteria include competitive exclusion of pathogens, alleviation of symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease, and modulation of intestinal and systemic immune responses. Based on these effects, bifidobacteria are widely used as probiotics by pharmaceutical and dairy industries. In order to exert a beneficial effect bifidobacteria have to, at least transiently, colonize the host in a sufficient population size. Besides other criteria such as resistance to manufacturing processes and intestinal transit, potential probiotic bacteria are tested for adhesion to the host structures including intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, mucus and extracellular matrix (ECM components. In the present review article, we summarize the current knowledge on bifidobacterial structures that mediate adhesion to host tissue and compare these to similar structures of pathogenic bacteria. This reveals that most of the adhesive structures and mechanisms involved in adhesion of bifidobacteria to host tissue are similar or even identical to those employed by pathogens to cause disease. It is thus reasonable to assume that these structures and mechanisms are equally important for commensal or probiotic bacteria and play a similar role in the beneficial effects exerted by bifidobacteria.

  2. Use of tissue adhesives versus sutures on minor surgery for incision closure: randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Barros da Silva Pinto de Oliveira, Diogo

    2016-01-01

    Sutures, staples and adhesive tapes have been used for many years as methods of wound closure, but tissue adhesives have entered clinical practice more recently Closure of wounds with sutures enables the closure to be meticulous, but the sutures may show tissue reactivity and can require removal. Tissue adhesives offer the advantages of an absence of risk of needlestick injury and no requirement to remove sutures later. Initially, tissue adhesives were used primarily in emergency room setting...

  3. 75 FR 68972 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of Tissue Adhesive With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... Devices; Classification of Tissue Adhesive With Adjunct Wound Closure Device Intended for Topical... Administration (FDA) is classifying the tissue adhesive with adjunct wound closure device intended for topical... Document: Tissue Adhesive With Adjunct Wound Closure Device Intended for the Topical Approximation of Skin...

  4. Tissue Adhesives for Battlefield Hemorrhage Control. Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    antibiotics, a mix- 6 DAMD17-94-C-4039 ture of benzathine- procaine penicillin (40,000 U/kg), were injected intramuscularly for 2 days. Food and water were...wound had healed with a small amount of fibrous tissue without recognizable inflammatory cell infiltrates . When adhesives remained, they elicited...days old scalpel wound treated with FM. The wound is triangular in shape and filled with exudate with a mild cell infiltration along the wound edge. No

  5. Multifunctional nanoparticles as a tissue adhesive and an injectable marker for image-guided procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwangsoo; Choi, Jin Woo; Ko, Giho; Baik, Seungmin; Kim, Dokyoon; Park, Ok Kyu; Lee, Kyoungbun; Cho, Hye Rim; Han, Sang Ihn; Lee, Soo Hong; Lee, Dong Jun; Lee, Nohyun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2017-07-01

    Tissue adhesives have emerged as an alternative to sutures and staples for wound closure and reconnection of injured tissues after surgery or trauma. Owing to their convenience and effectiveness, these adhesives have received growing attention particularly in minimally invasive procedures. For safe and accurate applications, tissue adhesives should be detectable via clinical imaging modalities and be highly biocompatible for intracorporeal procedures. However, few adhesives meet all these requirements. Herein, we show that biocompatible tantalum oxide/silica core/shell nanoparticles (TSNs) exhibit not only high contrast effects for real-time imaging but also strong adhesive properties. Furthermore, the biocompatible TSNs cause much less cellular toxicity and less inflammation than a clinically used, imageable tissue adhesive (that is, a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol). Because of their multifunctional imaging and adhesive property, the TSNs are successfully applied as a hemostatic adhesive for minimally invasive procedures and as an immobilized marker for image-guided procedures.

  6. Tissue Transglutaminase Is an Integrin-Binding Adhesion Coreceptor for Fibronectin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sergey S. Akimov; Dmitry Krylov; Laurie F. Fleischman; Alexey M. Belkin

    2000-01-01

    ... adhesion-dependent phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. These effects are specific for tissue transglutaminase and are not shared by its functional homologue, a catalytic subunit of factor XIII...

  7. Mussel-inspired soft-tissue adhesive based on poly(diol citrate) with catechol functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yali; Ji, Ting; Liang, Kai; Zhu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Marine mussels tightly adhering to various underwater surfaces inspires human to design adhesives for wet tissue adhesion in surgeries. Characterization of mussel adhesive plaques describes a matrix of proteins containing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), which provides strong adhesion in aquatic conditions. Several synthetic polymer systems have been developed based on this DOPA chemistry. Herein, a citrate-based tissue adhesives (POEC-d) was prepared by a facile one-pot melt polycondensation of two diols including 1,8-octanediol and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), citric acid (CA) and dopamine, and the effects of hydrophilic and soft PEO on the properties of adhesives were studied. It was found that the obtained adhesives exhibited water-soluble when the mole ratio of PEO to 1,8-octanediol was 70%, and the equilibrium swelling percentage of cured adhesive was about 144%, and degradation rate was in the range of 1-2 weeks. The cured adhesives demonstrated soft rubber-like behavior. The lap shear adhesion strength measured by bonding wet pig skin was in the range of 21.7-33.7 kPa, which was higher than that of commercial fibrin glue (9-15 kPa). The cytotoxicity tests showed the POEC-d adhesives had a low cytotoxicity. Our results supports that POEC-d adhesives, which combined strong wet adhesion with good biodegradability, acceptable swelling ratio, good elasticity and low cytotoxicity, have potentials in surgeries where surgical tissue adhesives, sealants, and hemostatic agents are used.

  8. Clinical inquiries. How does tissue adhesive compare with suturing for superficial lacerations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukerman, Douglas F; Sebastianelli, Wayne J; Nashelsky, Joan

    2005-04-01

    Tissue adhesives are effective and yield results comparable to those with conventional suturing of superficial, linear, and low-tension lacerations. The cosmetic outcome is similar; wound complications, such as infection and dehiscence, may be lower with tissue adhesives. Wound closure of superficial lacerations by tissue adhesives is quicker and less painful compared with conventional suturing (strength of recommendation: A, systematic reviews of randomized trials).

  9. The evaluation of fibrin tissue adhesive for skin closure following eyelid surgery

    OpenAIRE

    De Silva, Julian

    2011-01-01

    The use of fibrin tissue adhesives in clinical practice has grown over the past 10 years, and there has been increased use of adhesives in different surgical subspecialties. Conventional suture closure of periorbital tissues is effective however may result in complications, which has led to the search for other techniques and innovations. Although tissue adhesives have been used in clinical practice there is a paucity of randomized controlled studies that have evaluated their adva...

  10. A new postoperative otoplasty dressing technique using cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Miriam; Foehn, Matthias; Wedler, Volker

    2010-04-01

    There are many techniques for cosmetic surgery of the ears and also many different procedures for postoperative treatment. The postoperative dressing is described as important for a successful outcome. We present our method of postoperative dressing in the form of liquid bonding. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives as liquid bonding agents are used for fixation of the pinna at the mastoid area. After 10-14 days the bonding can be easily removed. No huge dressings, tapes, or plasters are necessary. The patients are satisfied with the light dressing; they do not feel ashamed to appear in public. We have found this dressing technique to be simple and economical, especially because of the use of the bonding for skin closure before. It can be used after otoplasty with an anterior or a posterior approach.

  11. Encapsulation of cell-adhesive RGD peptides into a polymeric physical hydrogel to prevent postoperative tissue adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Ni, Jian; Chen, Liang; Yu, Lin; Xu, Jianwei; Ding, Jiandong

    2012-08-01

    Peptides containing the sequence of arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD), a famous adhesion moiety, can specifically conjugate integrins in cell membranes, and are usually applied to enhance cell adhesion after linking to solid substrates in tissue engineering or to nanoparticles in targeting delivery. This paper reveals, however, that free RGD peptides can assist in preventing tissue adhesion by blocking focal adhesion between cells and surfaces of barrier devices. In order to avoid a rapid peptide loss after straightforward injection of a peptide solution, we employed a thermosensitive injectable hydrogel composed of a biodegradable block copolymer poly(ε-caprolactone-co-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone-co-lactide) (PCLA-PEG-PCLA) to encapsulate peptides cyclo(-RGDfK-). A sustainable release for one week was achieved in vitro. The rabbit model of sidewall defect and bowel abrasion was selected to examine the in vivo anti-adhesion efficacy. It reveals a significant reduction of postoperative peritoneal adhesion in the group of RGD-loaded PCLA-PEG-PCLA hydrogels. We interpret this excellent efficacy by the combination of two effects: first, our hydrogel affords a physical barrier to prevent adhesion between injured abdominal wall and cecum; second, the RGD molecules as integrin blockers released from the hydrogel assist the anti-adhesion. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A method to screen and evaluate tissue adhesives for joint repair applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehne Tilo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue adhesives are useful means for various medical procedures. Since varying requirements cause that a single adhesive cannot meet all needs, bond strength testing remains one of the key applications used to screen for new products and study the influence of experimental variables. This study was conducted to develop an easy to use method to screen and evaluate tissue adhesives for tissue engineering applications. Method Tissue grips were designed to facilitate the reproducible production of substrate tissue and adhesive strength measurements in universal testing machines. Porcine femoral condyles were used to generate osteochondral test tissue cylinders (substrates of different shapes. Viability of substrates was tested using PI/FDA staining. Self-bonding properties were determined to examine reusability of substrates (n = 3. Serial measurements (n = 5 in different operation modes (OM were performed to analyze the bonding strength of tissue adhesives in bone (OM-1 and cartilage tissue either in isolation (OM-2 or under specific requirements in joint repair such as filling cartilage defects with clinical applied fibrin/PLGA-cell-transplants (OM-3 or tissues (OM-4. The efficiency of the method was determined on the basis of adhesive properties of fibrin glue for different assembly times (30 s, 60 s. Seven randomly generated collagen formulations were analyzed to examine the potential of method to identify new tissue adhesives. Results Viability analysis of test tissue cylinders revealed vital cells (>80% in cartilage components even 48 h post preparation. Reuse (n = 10 of test substrate did not significantly change adhesive characteristics. Adhesive strength of fibrin varied in different test settings (OM-1: 7.1 kPa, OM-2: 2.6 kPa, OM-3: 32.7 kPa, OM-4: 30.1 kPa and was increasing with assembly time on average (2.4-fold. The screening of the different collagen formulations revealed a substance with significant

  13. A method to screen and evaluate tissue adhesives for joint repair applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Tissue adhesives are useful means for various medical procedures. Since varying requirements cause that a single adhesive cannot meet all needs, bond strength testing remains one of the key applications used to screen for new products and study the influence of experimental variables. This study was conducted to develop an easy to use method to screen and evaluate tissue adhesives for tissue engineering applications. Method Tissue grips were designed to facilitate the reproducible production of substrate tissue and adhesive strength measurements in universal testing machines. Porcine femoral condyles were used to generate osteochondral test tissue cylinders (substrates) of different shapes. Viability of substrates was tested using PI/FDA staining. Self-bonding properties were determined to examine reusability of substrates (n = 3). Serial measurements (n = 5) in different operation modes (OM) were performed to analyze the bonding strength of tissue adhesives in bone (OM-1) and cartilage tissue either in isolation (OM-2) or under specific requirements in joint repair such as filling cartilage defects with clinical applied fibrin/PLGA-cell-transplants (OM-3) or tissues (OM-4). The efficiency of the method was determined on the basis of adhesive properties of fibrin glue for different assembly times (30 s, 60 s). Seven randomly generated collagen formulations were analyzed to examine the potential of method to identify new tissue adhesives. Results Viability analysis of test tissue cylinders revealed vital cells (>80%) in cartilage components even 48 h post preparation. Reuse (n = 10) of test substrate did not significantly change adhesive characteristics. Adhesive strength of fibrin varied in different test settings (OM-1: 7.1 kPa, OM-2: 2.6 kPa, OM-3: 32.7 kPa, OM-4: 30.1 kPa) and was increasing with assembly time on average (2.4-fold). The screening of the different collagen formulations revealed a substance with significant higher adhesive

  14. Can tissue adhesives and platelet-rich plasma prevent pharyngocutaneous fistula formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryılmaz, Aylin; Demirci, Buket; Gunel, Ceren; Kacar Doger, Firuzan; Yukselen, Ozden; Kurt Omurlu, Imran; Basal, Yesim; Agdas, Fatih; Basak, Sema

    2016-02-01

    One of the frequently encountered disorders of wound healing following laryngectomy is pharyngocutaneous fistula. However, although studies have been performed with the aim of prevention of pharyngocutaneous fistulae, there are very few studies with tissue adhesives and platelet-rich plasma. In this study, our aim was to investigate the histopathologic changes in wound healing caused by various tissue adhesives and platelet-rich plasma, together with their effects on prevention of pharyngocutaneous fistula. 40 male rats were randomly divided into five groups: control, platelet-rich plasma, fibrin tissue adhesive, protein-based albumin glutaraldehyde and synthetic tissue adhesive groups. The pharyngotomy procedure was performed and was sutured. Except the control group, tissue adhesives and platelet-rich plasma were applied. Then, the skin was sutured. On the seventh day, the rats were sacrificed. The skin was opened and pharyngotomy site was assessed in terms of fistulae. The pharyngeal suture line was evaluated histopathologically by using Ehrlich Hunt scale. Inflammatory infiltration was found to be higher in "platelet-rich plasma" group than "fibrin tissue adhesive" and "synthetic tissue adhesive" groups. The fibroblastic activity of "platelet-rich plasma", "fibrin tissue adhesive" and "protein-based albumin glutaraldehyde" groups was higher than the control group. The positive changes created by platelet-rich plasma and fibrin tissue adhesive at the histopathologic level were found together with no detected fistula. Among the study groups, there was no statistical difference for pharyngeal fistula development. This result may be obtained by the small number of animal experiments. These results shed light on the suggestion that platelet-rich plasma and fibrin tissue adhesive can be used in clinical studies to prevent pharyngocutaneous fistula. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Penetration of urea-formaldehyde adhesives in wood tissue, part I: Radial penetration of UF adhesives into beech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović-Grmuša Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive penetration plays an important role in wood adhesion, since wood is a porous material. The degree of penetration mostly depends on the wood factors, resin type and formulation and processing parameters. Tangentially cut 5 mm thick beech wood (Fagus moesiaca plies, 100 mm long (parallel to grain and 30 mm wide, were prepared for this study. The urea-formaldehyde (UF adhesive was applied to the surface of one ply. Two plies were assembled into sample so that the grains of two plies were parallel. Samples were pressed in a hydraulic press at 120°C and 0,7 MPa for 15 min. Microtome test-specimens were cut of each sample. 20 μm thick microtomes were cut by sliding microtome apparatus, exposing a bondline with a cross-sectional surface. The lack of more exhausting research on the penetration of urea-formaldehyde adhesives in wood is evident. Since ureaformaldehyde (UF glue resins were the most important type of adhesives in the wood industry in the last 60 years (Dunky, 2000, the objective of this research was microscopic detection of UF adhesive penetration in wood tissue. Four types of UF resins with different levels of polycondensation were used in this research. Safranin was added in resins, since epi-fluorescence microscope was used in this research for measuring the adhesive penetration.

  16. A mussel-inspired double-crosslinked tissue adhesive intended for internal medical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Changjiang; Fu, Jiayin; Zhu, Wenzhen; Wang, Dong-An

    2016-03-01

    It has been a great challenge to develop aldehyde-free tissue adhesives that can function rapidly and controllably on wet internal tissues with fine adhesion strength, sound biocompatibility and degradability. To this end, we have devised a mussel-inspired easy-to-use double-crosslink tissue adhesive (DCTA) comprising a dopamine-conjugated gelatin macromer, a rapid crosslinker (namely, Fe(3+)), and a long-term acting crosslinker (namely, genipin). As a mussel-inspired gluing macromer, dopamine is grafted onto gelatin backbone via an one-step reaction, the catechol groups of which are capable of performing strong wet adhesion on tissue surfaces. By addition of genipin and Fe(3+), the formation of catechol-Fe(3+) complexation and accompanying spontaneous curing of genipin-primed covalent crosslinking of gluing macromers in one pot endows DCTA with the double-crosslink adhesion mechanism. Namely, the reversible catechol-Fe(3+) crosslinking executes an controllable and instant adhesive curing; while genipin-induced stable covalent crosslinking promises it with long-term effectiveness. This novel DCTA exhibits significantly higher wet tissue adhesion capability than the commercially available fibrin glue when applied on wet porcine skin and cartilage. In addition, this DCTA also demonstrates fine elasticity, sound biodegradability, and biocompatibility when contacting in vitro cultured cells and blood. In vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability are checked and confirmed via trials of subcutaneous implantation in nude mice model. This newly developed DCTA may be a highly promising product as a biological glue for internal medical use including internal tissue adhesion, sealing, and hemostasis. There is a great demand for ideal tissue adhesives that can be widely used in gluing wet internal tissues. Here, we have devised a mussel-inspired easy-to-use double-crosslink tissue adhesive (DCTA) that meets the conditions as an ideal tissue adhesive. It is composed of gelatin

  17. Hypothermia Increases Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression and Decreases Post-Operative Intra-Abdominal Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Chien-Chang; Wang, Hsuan-Mao; Chou, Tzung-Hsin; Wu, Meng-Che; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia during operation decreases postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. We sought to determine the most appropriate duration of hypothermia, and whether hypothermia affects the expression of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Methods 80 male BALB/c mice weighing 25?30 g are randomized into one of five groups: adhesion model with infusion of 15?C saline for 15 minutes (A); 30 minutes (B); 45 minute (C); adhesion model without infusion of cold saline (D)...

  18. [Use of tissue adhesives and collagen membranes in clinical cases. Critical remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, F

    1977-01-01

    On the base of his own 7 years clinical experience the author discusses with some critical remarks the possibilities and indications for applying tissue adhesive and adhesives together with collagen membranes in the treatment of injuries to the chest, abdomen and blood vessels.

  19. Corrugated round fibers to improve cell adhesion and proliferation in tissue engineering scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettahalli Narasimha, M.S.; Arkesteijn, I.T.M.; Wessling, Matthias; Poot, Andreas A.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Optimal cell interaction with biomaterial scaffolds is one of the important requirements for the development of successful in vitro tissue-engineered tissues. Fast, efficient and spatially uniform cell adhesion can improve the clinical potential of engineered tissue. Three-dimensional (3-D) solid

  20. The effectiveness of isobutyl cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive for the treatment of corneal perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlik, Daria E; Seldomridge, Dianna L; Adelman, Ron A; Semchyshyn, Terry M; Afshari, Natalie A

    2005-11-01

    To study the results of treatment of corneal perforations with isobutyl cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive. Retrospective case series. The charts of 20 patients (22 eyes) with corneal perforation healed with application of adhesive alone. The mean interval of time needed for healing was 33.4 days. Visual acuity improved in seven eyes (77.8%) and remained stable in two (22.2%). Seven eyes (31.8%) proceeded to penetrating keratoplasty (PK) with the adhesive in place. Of these, visual acuity improved in five (71.4%), remained stable in one (14.3%), and decreased in one (14.3%). Six eyes (27.3%) required more than one application of adhesive. Isobutyl cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive is highly effective at treating corneal perforations. Approximately half of the perforations healed and visual acuity improved in most of these eyes.

  1. Cell-cell adhesion in the cnidaria: insights into the evolution of tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magie, Craig R; Martindale, Mark Q

    2008-06-01

    Cell adhesion is a major aspect of cell biology and one of the fundamental processes involved in the development of a multicellular animal. Adhesive mechanisms, both cell-cell and between cell and extracellular matrix, are intimately involved in assembling cells into the three-dimensional structures of tissues and organs. The modulation of adhesive complexes could therefore be seen as a central component in the molecular control of morphogenesis, translating information encoded within the genome into organismal form. The availability of whole genomes from early-branching metazoa such as cnidarians is providing important insights into the evolution of adhesive processes by allowing for the easy identification of the genes involved in adhesion in these organisms. Discovery of the molecular nature of cell adhesion in the early-branching groups, coupled with comparisons across the metazoa, is revealing the ways evolution has tinkered with this vital cellular process in the generation of the myriad forms seen across the animal kingdom.

  2. First-order transition between adhesion states in a system mimicking cell-tissue interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenberg, Z.; Lorz, B.; Sackmann, E.; Boulbitch, A.

    2001-06-01

    We establish a model of cell-tissue interaction consisting of vesicles carrying lipopolymers (to mimic the glycocalix) and mobile specific ligands of the blood platelet integrin αIIbβ3 covering the substrate. We find the phase diagram with a first-order transition between a gravity-controlled weak state of the vesicle-substrate adhesion and a strong-adhesion state governed by receptor-ligand interaction. Adhesion energy ɛadh is measured as a function of ligand and repeller concentration by interferometric contour analysis on the basis of a new refined model of soft shell adhesion (accounting for the membrane bending and stretching at the adhesion rim of the ellipsoidal vesicle). At ligand densities comparable to integrin density, ɛadh decreases sharply. Increasing the repeller content weakens the adhesion strength.

  3. A Bio-Inspired Swellable Microneedle Adhesive for Mechanical Interlocking with Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung Yun; O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D.; Sisk, Geoffroy C.; Park, Kyeng Min; Cho, Woo Kyung; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving significant adhesion to soft tissues while minimizing tissue damage poses a considerable clinical challenge. Chemical-based adhesives require tissue-specific reactive chemistry, typically inducing a significant inflammatory response. Staples are fraught with limitations including high-localized tissue stress and increased risk of infection, and nerve and blood vessel damage. Here, inspired by the endoparasite Pomphorhynchus laevis which swells its proboscis to attach to its host’s intestinal wall, we have developed a biphasic microneedle array that mechanically interlocks with tissue through swellable microneedle tips, achieving ~ 3.5 fold increase in adhesion strength compared to staples in skin graft fixation, and removal force of ~ 4.5 N/cm2 from intestinal mucosal tissue. Comprising a poly(styrene)-block-poly(acrylic acid) swellable tip and non-swellable polystyrene core, conical microneedles penetrate tissue with minimal insertion force and depth, yet high adhesion strength in their swollen state. Uniquely, this design provides universal soft tissue adhesion with minimal damage, less traumatic removal, reduced risk of infection and delivery of bioactive therapeutics. PMID:23591869

  4. A bio-inspired swellable microneedle adhesive for mechanical interlocking with tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung Yun; O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D.; Sisk, Geoffroy C.; Park, Kyeng Min; Cho, Woo Kyung; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving significant adhesion to soft tissues while minimizing tissue damage poses a considerable clinical challenge. Chemical-based adhesives require tissue-specific reactive chemistry, typically inducing a significant inflammatory response. Staples are fraught with limitations including high-localized tissue stress and increased risk of infection, and nerve and blood vessel damage. Here inspired by the endoparasite Pomphorhynchus laevis, which swells its proboscis to attach to its host’s intestinal wall, we have developed a biphasic microneedle array that mechanically interlocks with tissue through swellable microneedle tips, achieving ~3.5-fold increase in adhesion strength compared with staples in skin graft fixation, and removal force of ~4.5 N cm-2 from intestinal mucosal tissue. Comprising a poly(styrene)-block-poly(acrylic acid) swellable tip and non-swellable polystyrene core, conical microneedles penetrate tissue with minimal insertion force and depth, yet high adhesion strength in their swollen state. Uniquely, this design provides universal soft tissue adhesion with minimal damage, less traumatic removal, reduced risk of infection and delivery of bioactive therapeutics.

  5. Biocompatibility of a novel cyanoacrylate based tissue adhesive: cytotoxicity and biochemical property evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ju Lee

    Full Text Available Cyanoacrylate (CA is most widely used as a medical and commercial tissue adhesive because of easier wound closure, good cosmetic results and little discomfort. But, CA-based tissue adhesives have some limitations including the release of cytotoxic chemicals during biodegradation. In previous study, we made prepolymerized allyl 2-CA (PACA based tissue adhesive, resulting in longer chain structure. In this study, we investigated a biocompatibility of PACA as alternative tissue adhesive for medical application, comparing with that of Dermabond® as commercial tissue adhesive. The biocompatibility of PACA was evaluated for short-term (24 hr and long-term (3 and 7 days using conventional cytotoxicity (WST, neutral red, LIVE/DEAD and TUNEL assays, hematoxylin-eosin (H&E and Masson trichrome (MT staining. Besides we examined the biochemical changes in cells and DNA induced by PACA and Dermabond® utilizing Raman spectroscopy which could observe the denaturation and conformational changes in protein, as well as disintegration of the DNA/RNA by cell death. In particular, we analyzed Raman spectrum using the multivariate statistical methods including principal component analysis (PCA and support vector machine (SVM. As a result, PACA and Dermabond® tissue adhesive treated cells and tissues showed no difference of the cell viability values, histological analysis and Raman spectral intensity. Also, the classification analysis by means of PCA-SVM classifier could not discriminate the difference between the PACA and Dermabond® treated cells and DNA. Therefore we suggest that novel PACA might be useful as potential tissue adhesive with effective biocompatibility.

  6. A novel injectable tissue adhesive based on oxidized dextran and chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Biji; Soman, Dawlee; Payanam, Umashanker; Laurent, Alexandre; Labarre, Denis; Jayakrishnan, Athipettah

    2017-04-15

    A surgical adhesive that can be used in different surgical situations with or without sutures is a surgeons' dream and yet none has been able to fulfill many such demanding requirements. It was therefore a major challenge to develop an adhesive biomaterial that stops bleeding and bond tissues well, which at the same time is non-toxic, biocompatible and yet biodegradable, economically viable and appealing to the surgeon in terms of the simplicity of application in complex surgical situations. With this aim, we developed an in situ setting adhesive based on biopolymers such as chitosan and dextran. Dextran was oxidized using periodate to generate aldehyde functions on the biopolymer and then reacted with chitosan hydrochloride. Gelation occurred instantaneously upon mixing these components and the resulting gel showed good tissue adhesive properties with negligible cytotoxicity and minimal swelling in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Rheology analysis confirmed the gelation process by demonstrating storage modulus having value higher than loss modulus. Adhesive strength was in the range 200-400gf/cm 2 which is about 4-5 times more than that of fibrin glue at comparable setting times. The adhesive showed burst strength in the range of 400-410mm of Hg which should make the same suitable as a sealant for controlling bleeding in many surgical situations even at high blood pressure. Efficacy of the adhesive as a hemostat was demonstrated in a rabbit liver injury model. Histological features after two weeks were comparable to that of commercially available BioGlue®. The adhesive also demonstrated its efficacy as a drug delivery vehicle. The present adhesive could function without the many toxicity and biocompatibility issues associated with such products. Though there are many tissue adhesives available in market, none are free of shortcomings. The newly developed surgical adhesive is a 2-component adhesive system based on time-tested, naturally occurring polysaccharides

  7. Development of a fast curing tissue adhesive for meniscus tear repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochyńska, Agnieszka Izabela; Hannink, Gerjon; Janssen, Dennis; Buma, Pieter; Grijpma, Dirk W

    2017-01-01

    Isocyanate-terminated adhesive amphiphilic block copolymers are attractive materials to treat meniscus tears due to their tuneable mechanical properties and good adhesive characteristics. However, a drawback of this class of materials is their relatively long curing time. In this study, we evaluate the use of an amine cross-linker and addition of catalysts as two strategies to accelerate the curing rates of a recently developed biodegradable reactive isocyanate-terminated hyper-branched adhesive block copolymer prepared from polyethylene glycol (PEG), trimethylene carbonate, citric acid and hexamethylene diisocyanate. The curing kinetics of the hyper-branched adhesive alone and in combination with different concentrations of spermidine solutions, and after addition of 2,2-dimorpholinodiethylether (DMDEE) or 1,4-diazabicyclo [2.2.2] octane (DABCO) were determined using FTIR. Additionally, lap-shear adhesion tests using all compositions at various time points were performed. The two most promising compositions of the fast curing adhesives were evaluated in a meniscus bucket handle lesion model and their performance was compared with that of fibrin glue. The results showed that addition of both spermidine and catalysts to the adhesive copolymer can accelerate the curing rate and that firm adhesion can already be achieved after 2 h. The adhesive strength to meniscus tissue of 3.2-3.7 N was considerably higher for the newly developed compositions than for fibrin glue (0.3 N). The proposed combination of an adhesive component and a cross-linking component or catalyst is a promising way to accelerate curing rates of isocyanate-terminated tissue adhesives.

  8. Mechanical Characterization of a Bi-functional Tetronic Hydrogel Adhesive for Soft Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lindsey; Stone, Roland; Webb, C. Kenneth; Mefford, O. Thompson; Nagatomi, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of tissue adhesives and sealants for surgical use are currently available, attaining a useful balance in high strength, high compliance, and low swelling has proven difficult. Recent studies have demonstrated that a 4-arm poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PPO-PEO) block copolymer, Tetronic, can be chemically modified to form a hydrogel tissue adhesive21–23. Building on the success of these studies, the present study explored bi-functionalization of Tetronic with acrylates for chemical crosslinking of the hydrogel and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) for reaction with tissue amines. The adhesive bond strengths of various uni- and bi-functional Tetronic blends (T1107 ACR: T1107 ACR/NHS) determined by lap shear testing ranged between 8 and 74 kPa, with the 75:25 (T1107 ACR: T1107 ACR/NHS) blend displaying the highest value. These results indicated that addition of NHS led to improvement of tissue bond strength over acrylation alone Furthermore, ex vivo pressure tests using the rat bladder demonstrated that the bi-functional Tetronic adhesive exhibited high compliance and maintained pressures under hundreds of filling and emptying cycles. Together, the results of the present study provided evidence that the bi-functional Tetronic adhesive with a proper blend ratio may be used to achieve an accurate balance in bulk and tissue bond strengths, as well as the compliance and durability for soft tissue such as the bladder. PMID:25111445

  9. Poly(vinyl alcohol) acetoacetate-based tissue adhesives are non-cytotoxic and non-inflammatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sujata K; Arthur, Samuel D

    2008-08-01

    Polymer-based tissue adhesives composed of poly(vinyl alcohol) acetoacetate (PVOH acac) and cross-linking amines were investigated for their effects on cell survival and inflammatory cell activation using in vitro mouse cell cultures. Cytotoxicity of tissue adhesives was evaluated by placing adhesives in direct contact with 3T3 fibroblast cells. Tissue adhesives formulated from PVOH acac and 3-aminopropyltrialkoxysilane (APS) were non-cytotoxic to fibroblasts; adhesives formulated from PVOH acac and aminated poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH amine) were also non-cytotoxic to fibroblasts. In contrast, a commercial adhesive composed of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate was highly cytotoxic to fibroblasts. The inflammatory potential of tissue adhesives was evaluated by exposing J774 macrophage cells to adhesives, and measuring TNF-alpha release from macrophages. PVOH acac-based tissue adhesives did not elicit inflammatory TNF-alpha release from macrophages. These results suggest that PVOH acac-based tissue adhesives are non-cytotoxic and non-inflammatory. Such tissue adhesives represent a promising technology for a variety of medical applications, including surgical wound closure and tissue engineering, and the results are also significant in the design of in vitro cell culture systems to study biomaterials.

  10. Design of Xylose-Based Semisynthetic Polyurethane Tissue Adhesives with Enhanced Bioactivity Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Sevgi; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Vardi, Nigar; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Karaaslan, Merve Goksin; Gulgen, Selam; Taslidere, Elif; Koytepe, Suleyman; Ates, Burhan

    2016-02-01

    Developing biocompatible tissue adhesives with high adhesion properties is a highly desired goal of the tissue engineering due to adverse effects of the sutures. Therefore, our work involves synthesis, characterization, adhesion properties, protein adsorption, in vitro biodegradation, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility properties of xylose-based semisynthetic polyurethane (NPU-PEG-X) bioadhesives. Xylose-based semisynthetic polyurethanes were developed by the reaction among 4,4'-methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate) (MCI), xylose and polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG). Synthesized polyurethanes (PUs) showed good thermal stability and high adhesion strength. The highest values in adhesion strength were measured as 415.0 ± 48.8 and 94.0 ± 2.8 kPa for aluminum substrate and muscle tissue in 15% xylose containing PUs (NPU-PEG-X-15%), respectively. The biodegradation of NPU-PEG-X-15% was also determined as 19.96 ± 1.04% after 8 weeks of incubation. Relative cell viability of xylose containing PU was above 86%. Moreover, 10% xylose containing NPU-PEG-X (NPU-PEG-X-10%) sample has favorable tissue response, and inflammatory reaction between 1 and 6 weeks implantation period. With high adhesiveness and biocompatibility properties, NPU-PEG-X can be used in the medical field as supporting materials for preventing the fluid leakage after abdominal surgery or wound closure.

  11. Development of biodegradable hyper-branched tissue adhesives for the repair of meniscus tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochynska, A.; Tienen, T.G. van; Hannink, G.J.; Buma, P.; Grijpma, D.W.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus tears are one of the most commonly occurring injuries of the knee joint. Current meniscus repair techniques are challenging and do not bring fully satisfactory results. Tissue adhesives are a promising alternative, since they are easy to apply and cause minimal tissue trauma. In this study,

  12. A novel injectable tissue adhesive based on oxidized dextran and chitosan

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishnan, Biji; Soman, Dawlee; Payanam, Umashanker; Laurent, Alexandre; Labarre, Denis

    2017-01-01

    A surgical adhesive that can be used in different surgical situations with or without sutures is a surgeons' dream and yet none has been able to fulfill many such demanding requirements. It was therefore a major challenge to develop an adhesive biomaterial that stops bleeding and bond tissues well, which at the same time is non-toxic, biocompatible and yet biodegradable, economically viable and appealing to the surgeon in terms of the simplicity of application in complex surgical situations. ...

  13. Hypothermia Increases Tissue Plasminogen Activator Expression and Decreases Post-Operative Intra-Abdominal Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Tse Gabriel Lee

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia during operation decreases postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. We sought to determine the most appropriate duration of hypothermia, and whether hypothermia affects the expression of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA.80 male BALB/c mice weighing 25-30 g are randomized into one of five groups: adhesion model with infusion of 15°C saline for 15 minutes (A; 30 minutes (B; 45 minute (C; adhesion model without infusion of cold saline (D; and sham operation without infusion of cold saline (E. Adhesion scores and tPA levels in the peritoneum fluid levels were analyzed on postoperative days 1, 7, and 14.On day 14, the cold saline infusion groups (A, B, and C had lower adhesion scores than the without infusion of cold saline group (D. However, only group B (cold saline infusion for 30 minutes had a significantly lower adhesion scores than group D. Also, group B was found to have 3.4 fold, 2.3 fold, and 2.2 fold higher levels of tPA than group D on days 1, 7, and 14 respectively.Our results suggest that cold saline infusion for 30 minutes was the optimum duration to decrease postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion formation. The decrease in the adhesion formations could be partly due to an increase in the level of tPA.

  14. Mechanical characterization of a bifunctional Tetronic hydrogel adhesive for soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lindsey; Stone, Roland; Webb, Kenneth; Mefford, Thompson; Nagatomi, Jiro

    2015-03-01

    Although a number of tissue adhesives and sealants for surgical use are currently available, attaining a useful balance in high strength, high compliance, and low swelling has proven difficult. Recent studies have demonstrated that a four-arm poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer, Tetronic, can be chemically modified to form a hydrogel tissue adhesive (Cho et al., Acta Biomater 2012;8:2223-2232; Barrett et al., Adv Health Mater 2012;1-11; Balakrishnan, Evaluating mechanical performance of hydrogel-based adhesives for soft tissue applications. Clemson University, All Theses, Paper 1574: Tiger Prints; 2013). Building on the success of these studies, this study explored bifunctionalization of Tetronic with acrylates for chemical crosslinking of the hydrogel and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) for reaction with tissue amines. The adhesive bond strengths of various uni and bifunctional Tetronic blends (T1107 ACR: T1107 ACR/NHS) determined by lap shear testing ranged between 8 and 74 kPa, with the 75:25 (T1107 ACR: T1107 ACR/NHS) blend displaying the highest value. These results indicated that addition of NHS led to improvement of tissue bond strength over acrylation alone. Furthermore, ex vivo pressure tests using the rat bladder demonstrated that the bifunctional Tetronic adhesive exhibited high compliance and maintained pressures under hundreds of filling and emptying cycles. Together, the results of this study provided evidence that the bifunctional Tetronic adhesive with a proper blend ratio may be used to achieve an accurate balance in bulk and tissue bond strengths, as well as the compliance and durability for soft tissue such as the bladder. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Use of tissue adhesives in sport? A new application in international ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branfield, A S

    2004-02-01

    In the tough, competitive environment of international ice hockey, it is vital that a player who sustains a minor facial laceration is returned to play as soon as possible. A method of wound closure that is fast to apply, water resistant, and effective was sought. Dermabond, a cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive, was selected for use during the 2002 International Ice Hockey Federation World Championships for the closure of selected facial wounds. The wounds were all closed using prescribed aseptic techniques. The results are presented and discussed. The tissue adhesive met the criteria set out.

  16. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  17. Novel gelatin/alginate soft tissue adhesives loaded with drugs for pain management: structure and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Benny; Shefy-Peleg, Adaya; Zilberman, Meital

    2014-01-01

    Interest in tissue adhesives as alternatives for conventional wound closing applications, such as sutures and staples, has increased in the last few decades due to numerous possible advantages, including less discomfort and lower cost. Novel tissue adhesives based on gelatin, with alginate as a polymeric additive and crosslinked by carbodiimide were developed and loaded with two types of drugs for pain relief, bupivacaine and ibuprofen, in order to improve the therapeutic effect. The release of the drugs from the adhesive matrix was found to be controlled mainly by the adhesive's characteristics, i.e. swelling and hydrophilic group concentration. The drug characteristics, i.e. hydrophilicity and electrical interactions between the drug and the polymeric components, were also found to have some effect. Incorporation of bupivacaine was found to improve the bonding strength of the adhesive due to its inert nature and the reinforcing effect of its fibrous crystals, whereas incorporation of ibuprofen was found to have an adverse effect on the bonding strength, probably due to its reaction with the other adhesive components which increased the crosslinking density. Overall, the novel drug-eluting gelatin-based bioadhesives investigated in this research, especially those loaded with bupivacaine, demonstrated a promising potential for use in wound closing applications.

  18. Biodegradable Nanoparticles Enhanced Adhesiveness of Mussel-Like Hydrogels at Tissue Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Nikhil; Hakamivala, Amirhossein; Xu, Cancan; Hariharan, Prashant; Radionov, Boris; Huang, Zhong; Liao, Jun; Tang, Liping; Zimmern, Philippe; Nguyen, Kytai T; Hong, Yi

    2017-12-04

    Popular bioadhesives, such as fibrin, cyanoacrylate, and albumin-glutaraldehyde based materials, have been applied for clinical applications in wound healing, drug delivery, and bone and soft tissue engineering; however, their performances are limited by weak adhesion strength and rapid degradation. In this study a mussel-inspired, nanocomposite-based, biodegradable tissue adhesive is developed by blending poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) or N-hydroxysuccinimide modified PLGA nanoparticles (PLGA-NHS) with mussel-inspired alginate-dopamine polymer (Alg-Dopa). Adhesive strength measurement of the nanocomposites on porcine skin-muscle constructs reveals that the incorporation of nanoparticles in Alg-Dopa significantly enhances the tissue adhesive strength compared to the mussel-inspired adhesive alone. The nanocomposite formed by PLGA-NHS nanoparticles shows higher lap shear strength of 33 ± 3 kPa, compared to that of Alg-Dopa hydrogel alone (14 ± 2 kPa). In addition, these nanocomposites are degradable and cytocompatible in vitro, and elicit in vivo minimal inflammatory responses in a rat model, suggesting clinical potential of these nanocomposites as bioadhesives. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. In vitro evaluation of tissue adhesives composed of hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate

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    Miyuki Matsuda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the hydrophobic group content in gelatin on the bonding strength of novel tissue–penetrating tissue adhesives was evaluated. The hydrophobic groups introduced into gelatin were the saturated hexanoyl, palmitoyl, and stearoyl groups, and the unsaturated oleoyl group. A collagen casing was employed as an adherend to model soft tissue for the in vitro determination of bonding strength of tissue adhesives composed of various hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate. The adhesive composed of stearoyl-modified gelatin (7.4% stearoyl; 10Ste and disuccinimidyl tartrate showed the highest bonding strength. The bonding strength of the adhesives decreased as the degree of substitution of the hydrophobic groups increased. Cell culture experiments demonstrated that fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled 10Ste was integrated onto the surface of smooth muscle cells and showed no cytotoxicity. These results suggest that 10Ste interacted with the hydrophobic domains of collagen casings, such as hydrophobic amino acid residues and cell membranes. Therefore, 10Ste–disuccinimidyl tartrate is a promising adhesive for use in aortic dissection.

  20. Mussel-inspired tough hydrogels with self-repairing and tissue adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zijian; Duan, Lijie; Yang, Yongqi; Hu, Wei; Gao, Guanghui

    2018-01-01

    The mussel-inspired polymeric hydrogels have been attractively explored owing to their self-repairing or adhesive property when the catechol groups of dopamine could chelate metal ions. However, it was a challenge for self-repairing hydrogels owning high mechanical properties. Herein, a synergistic strategy was proposed by combining catechol-Fe3+ complexes and hydrophobic association. The resulting hydrogels exhibited seamless self-repairing behavior, tissue adhesion and high mechanical property. Moreover, the pH-dependent stoichiometry of catechol-Fe3+ and temperature-sensitive hydrophobic association endue hydrogels with pH/thermo responsive characteristics. Subsequently, the self-repairing rate and mechanical property of hydrogels were investigated at different pH and temperature. This bio-inspired strategy would build an avenue for designing and constructing a new generation of self-repairing, tissue-adhesive and tough hydrogel.

  1. Ostomy creation with fewer sutures using tissue adhesives (cyanoacrylates) in inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, M; Ikeuchi, H; Bando, T; Sasaki, H; Chohno, T; Horio, Y; Takesue, Y

    2017-10-19

    Introduction Fistula formation around the ostomy site is a stoma-related complication often requiring surgical intervention. This complication may be caused by sutures or may develop as a complication of inflammatory bowel disease. Before conducting a clinical trial, we set out to investigate the safety of ostomy creation with fewer sutures using tissue adhesives in this pilot study. Methods Patients with inflammatory bowel disease who required surgery with ostomy creation at the Hyogo College of Medicine between January 2014 and December 2015 were enrolled. Safety was assessed by evaluating the incidence of stoma-related complications. Ostomy was restricted to loop ileostomy and was created with two sutures and tissue adhesives. Results A total of 14 patients were enrolled. Mean body mass index was 18.9 ± 2.0 kg/m2. There were no cases of ostomy retraction and no severe adverse events were observed. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrates that ostomy creation using tissue adhesives is safe. Although retraction and adverse events were not observed, even in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who generally exhibit delayed wound healing, the body mass index was extremely low in this series. This study does not strongly recommend ostomy creation with tissue adhesives; further studies are needed to clarify the efficacy and safety of the procedure.

  2. In vivo qualitative analysis of the biocompatibility of different cyanoacrylate-based adhesives

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    Rafael Tobias Moretti Neto

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanocrylates have been widely used in the medical and dental fields for several years. In Dentistry, cyanoacrylates have been used for suturing, pulp capping, as retrofilling material in endodontic surgeries, and as cervical plug for pulpless teeth bleaching. The biocompatibility of these adhesives has been the topic of many researches and subcutaneous implantation is an effective methodology for these studies. The present study evaluated the biocompatibility of three different cyanoacrylate-based adhesives. Thirty-six Wistar rats were used, divided into four groups of 9 animals each: A (control - distilled water, B - cyanoacrylate ester (Super Bonder, C - n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (Histoacryl and D - alpha-cyanoacrylate (Three Bond. The materials were dispensed in sponges of polyvinyl chloride, the animals were incised and the sponges were inserted in the subcutaneous tissue and sutured. Each group was sub-divided according to the time of sacrifice of the animals: 7, 21 and 45 days. Subjective analysis of the histologic material showed that all groups presented some degree of irritability, but the inflammatory reaction decreased with the experimental time in all groups. Group D showed an inflammatory reaction which was closer to that of the control group and was considered to have good biocompatibility. Groups B and C were similar and presented more aggressive inflammatory reactions when compared to the control group. Based on the results, it was concluded that alpha-cyanoacrylate (Three Bond was the most biocompatible adhesive because it caused the lowest levels of inflammation.

  3. Adhesive arachnoiditis in mixed connective tissue disease: a rare neurological manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maria Usman; Devlin, James Anthony Joseph; Fraser, Alexander

    2016-12-16

    The overall incidence of neurological manifestations is relatively low among patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). We recently encountered a case of autoimmune adhesive arachnoiditis in a young woman with 7 years history of MCTD who presented with severe back pain and myeloradiculopathic symptoms of lower limbs. To the best of our knowledge, adhesive arachnoiditis in an MCTD patient has never been previously reported. We report here this rare case, with the clinical picture and supportive ancillary data, including serology, cerebral spinal fluid analysis, electrophysiological evaluation and spinal neuroimaging, that is, MRI and CT (CT scan) of thoracic and lumbar spine. Her neurological deficit improved after augmenting her immunosuppressant therapy. Our case suggests that adhesive arachnoiditis can contribute to significant neurological deficits in MCTD and therefore requires ongoing surveillance. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Gelatin-alginate novel tissue adhesives and their formulation-strength effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Benny; Pinkas, Oded; Foox, Maytal; Zilberman, Meital

    2013-11-01

    Interest in tissue adhesives as alternatives for conventional wound-closing applications such as sutures and staples has increased in the last few decades due to numerous possible advantages, including less discomfort and lower cost. Novel tissue adhesives based on gelatin, with alginate as a polymeric additive and crosslinked by carbodiimide, were recently developed by our research group. The effects of the formulation parameters on the adhesives' function were investigated in the current study. We examined the effects of gelatin and alginate concentrations and their viscosities on the ability of the bioadhesives to bind soft tissues. The effect of the crosslinking agent's concentration was studied as well. A qualitative model describing these effects in terms of adherence mechanisms was developed. Our results show that the adherence properties of our new bioadhesives are achieved by a combination of two main mechanisms: mechanical interlocking and chemical adsorption. The former mechanism is probably more dominant. The polymer's molecular weight and concentration affect the mechanical interlocking through mobility and penetration ability, entanglement of the three-dimensional structure and crosslinking density. The crosslinking agent's concentration as well as the polymer's concentration affect the crosslinking density and contribute to higher strength, achieved through both the mechanical interlocking and the chemical adsorption mechanisms. Understanding the effects of the adhesives' components and their viscosities on the bonding strength enabled us to elucidate the bonding strength mechanisms. This can lead to proper selection of the adhesive formulation and may enable tailoring the bioadhesives to the desired applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Time Course of Cell Sheet Adhesion to Porcine Heart Tissue after Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dehua; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Haraguchi, Yuji; Gao, Shuai; Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Umezu, Mitsuo; Yamato, Masayuki; Liu, Zhongmin; Okano, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Multilayered cell sheets have been produced from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for investigating their adhesion properties onto native porcine heart tissue. Once MSCs reached confluence after a 7-day culture on a temperature-responsive culture dish, a MSCs monolayer spontaneously detached itself from the dish, when the culture temperature was reduced from 37 to 20°C. The basal extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins of the single cell sheet are preserved, because this technique requires no proteolytic enzymes for harvesting cell sheet, which become a basic building block for assembling a multilayer cell sheet. The thickness of multilayered cell sheets made from three MSC sheets was found to be approximately 60 μm. For investigating the adhesion properties of the basal and apical sides, the multilayered cell sheets were transplanted onto the surface of the heart's left ventricle. Multilayered cell sheets were histological investigated at 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after transplantation by hematoxylin eosin (HE) and azan dyes to determine required time for the adhesion of the multilayered sheets following cell-sheet transplantation. The results showed that only the basal side of multilayered cell sheets significantly enhanced the sheets adhesion onto the surface of heart 30 minutes after transplantation. This study concluded that (1) cell sheets had to be transplanted with its basal side onto the surface of heart tissue and (2) at least 30 minutes were necessary for obtaining the histological adhesion of the sheets to the heart tissue. This study provided clinical evidence and parameters for the successful application of MSC sheets to the myocardium and allowed cell sheet technology to be adapted clinical cell-therapy for myocardial diseases.

  6. Wound closure and tissue adhesives in clear corneal incision cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Amy Y; Gupta, Preeya K; Kim, Terry

    2018-01-01

    Achieving secure wound closure in clear corneal incision cataract surgery remains highly desired for its role in reducing infection risk and leak-related complications, including hypotony, corneal edema, and lens dislocation. Although classic techniques of stromal hydration or wound suturing represent traditional approaches, the introduction of newer and more effective ocular surface adhesives has increased the options that are available. This review aims to provide an update on the peer-reviewed literature regarding wound closure and the currently available and investigational tissue adhesives used to seal clear corneal incisions in cataract surgery. Stromal hydration and sutured closure of clear corneal incisions remain viable options for wound closure. Wound sealants, particularly polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based hydrogels, have been found to provide watertight wound seal with less foreign-body sensation and surgically induced astigmatism compared with sutures, and less adverse effects and greater ease of use compared with cyanoacrylate and fibrin glues. Stromal hydration, sutured closure, and use of a corneal adhesive are all wound closure options for clear corneal incisions. Of the currently available tissue adhesives, PEG hydrogel sealants have become the most widely accepted, with an improved side-effect and biocompatibility profile.

  7. Antibacterial properties of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive: Does the polymerization reaction play a role?

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    Romero Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To ascertain if the polymerization reaction also contributes additionally to the antibacterial effects of two commonly used cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives. Materials and Methods: Fresh liquid ethyl-cyanoacrylate (EC and N-butyl-cyanoacrylate (BC adhesives were applied onto 6-mm sterile filter paper discs. In the first group, the adhesive-soaked discs were immediately placed onto confluent monolayer cultures of bacteria, allowing the polymerization reaction to proceed while in culture. In the second group, the adhesive-soaked disc was allowed to first polymerize prior to being placed onto the bacterial cultures. Four types of bacteria were studied: Staphylococcus aureus , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Escherichia coli , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . Immediately after the discs were applied, the cultures were incubated at 35° C for 24 h. Bacterial inhibitory halos were measured in the cultures at the end of the incubation period. Results: For EC, exposure of the bacteria to the cyanoacrylate polymerization reaction increased the bacterial inhibitory halos in Streptococcus pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. For BC, it increased the bacterial inhibitory halos in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae . No inhibitory halos were observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bactericidal effect was higher in actively polymerizing EC, compared to previously polymerized EC in Staphylococcus aureus , Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli ; however, no such differences were observed for BC. Conclusions: The polymerization reaction may also be an important factor in the antibacterial properties of EC and BC.

  8. Bacterial adhesion to antibiotic-loaded guided tissue regeneration membranes - a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Fang; Wu, Kai-Ming; Chen, Yen-Ting; Hung, Shan-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of sites undergoing guided tissue regeneration (GTR) therapy may reduce the efficiency of periodontal regeneration. This study compared bacterial adhesion onto various GTR membranes incorporated with antibiotics. Three barrier membranes, including expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membrane, collagen membrane, and glycolide fiber membrane, were loaded with tetracycline or amoxicillin. The adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans onto the GTR membranes with or without antibiotics was analyzed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The SEM analysis showed no apparent alteration in the physical structure of the membranes loaded with antibiotics. Both S. mutans and A. actinomycetemcomitans attached best on the collagen membranes, followed by the ePTFE membranes, and then the glycolide fiber membranes without antibiotics. Moreover, higher numbers of bacteria were observed on the fibril areas than on the laminar areas of the ePTFE membranes. The amounts of attached bacteria on the GTR membranes increased after longer incubation. Incorporation of tetracycline or amoxicillin greatly reduced the adhesion of S. mutans and A. actinomycetemcomitans onto all of the GTR membranes examined. Incorporation of tetracycline or amoxicillin greatly reduced adhesion of S. mutans or A. actinomycetemcomitans on the ePTFE, glycolide fiber, or collagen membranes. This finding indicates that it is valuable and effective to use the antibiotic-loaded GTR membranes for periodontal regeneration therapy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Cyanoacrylate Adhesive as an Alternative Tool for Membrane Fixation in Guided Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Maria Lúcia Rubo de; Cunha, Paula de Oliveira; Damante, Carla Andreotti; Santana, Adriana C P; Greghi, Sebastião L A; Zangrando, Mariana S R

    2015-06-01

    To report a well succeeded use of cyanoacrylate adhesive for fixating a resorbable membrane during a guided tissue regeneration procedure (GTR). The immobilization of membranes in GTR is essential for establishing proper environment for cell differentiation and tissue regeneration. However, some membranes are very difficult to be kept in position by sutures and its fixation by mini screws or pins may be time consuming and expensive. A 47-year-old woman presenting a vertical bone defect at the palatal aspect of the left central incisor was treated by GTR using particulate autogenous bone graft associated to a collagen membrane. The membrane was glued to the bone surrounding the defect and to the tooth surface with cyanoacrylate adhesive. The postoperative period was uneventful and 4 years later, excellent results in terms of radiographic filling of the defect and reduction of the probing depth were seen. For illustrative purposes, histological findings obtained during a previous experiment in calvaria of guinea pigs is shown, characterizing a foreign body granuloma and proving that the cyanoacrylate adhesive is a safe tool in GTR. The use of a membrane glued with cyanoacrylate to immobilize membranes in GTR is viable and safe from both technical and biological standpoints and may be advantageous for clinical and research purposes. The alternative method for membrane fixation shown in this case report can contribute to simplify the technique in GTR procedures.

  10. Studying the Kinetics of n-Butyl-Cyanoacrylate Tissue Adhesive and Its Oily Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedvedova, Marie; Kresalek, Vojtech; Vaskova, Hana; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-10-01

    This study deals with the measurement of the kinetics of tissue adhesives used for supporting the hemostasis and wound closure during surgical intervention. There are available several types of adhesives of different composition which is closely related with their application. When selecting an appropriate adhesive, the time of curing could play an important role because some applications may require very fast polymerization for prompt vessel or wound closure; conversely, some situations need slower solidification because of longer manipulation with the glue during surgery. The terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is used for studying the kinetics of the n-butyl-cyanoacrylate glue in this study. An oily substance is added to the glue samples to slow the reaction rate. The technique of attenuated total reflection is used in this application; the defined amount of glue sample or its mixture is applied on the silicon crystal and the terahertz response is measured in time. This time dependences are analyzed to find time constants for mathematical description of the glue kinetics. Further, the investigated samples were analyzed using light microscopy and Raman spectroscopy for description of the structures and compositions.

  11. Comparison of sutures and cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives for wound repair in a rat model of corneal laceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuhoglu, Fadime; Altiparmak, Ugur E; Hazirolan, Dicle O; Kasim, Remzi; Duman, Sunay

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cicatricial repair of a corneal artificial perforation in rats with 10-0 nylon suture, N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) adhesive, or NBCA + methacryloxysulfolane (NBCA-MS) adhesive through microscopic and histological assays. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups each containing 5 rats: (1) control group (corneal trauma without suturing and tissue adhesives), (2) suture group, (3) NBCA group and (4) NBCA-MS group. A central full-thickness 2-mm laceration was performed in the left eyes of the studied rats in all 4 groups. The presence of corneal edema, corneal neovascularization and tissue adhesive/suture were evaluated. On the 21st day, the rats were sacrificed and histological examination was performed to determine irregularity of corneal layers, superficial epithelization, polymorphonuclear leucocytes and neovascularization. Tissue adhesives were as effective as suturing in closing full-thickness corneal wounds and no difference in postoperative healing was observed clinically. As for the histological results, suture-treated eyes had persistent corneal irregularity that can limit visual acuity and may also lead to astigmatism. The use of tissue adhesives constitutes a viable alternative clinical procedure to conventional sutures. Possible influences on astigmatism are hypothetical, as no objective measure of astigmatism was performed in the test animals. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Expression of endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT in adult human lung

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    Takeuchi Toru

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT is the secondary lymphoid tissue in bronchial mucosa and is involved in the development of bronchopulmonary immune responses. Although migration of lymphocytes from blood vessels into secondary lymphoid tissues is critical for the development of appropriate adaptive immunity, the endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that recruit specific subsets of lymphocytes into human BALT are not known. The aim of this study was to determine which adhesion molecules are expressed on lymphocytes and high endothelial venules (HEVs in human BALT. Methods We immunostained frozen sections of BALT from lobectomy specimens from 17 patients with lung carcinoma with a panel of monoclonal antibodies to endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules. Results Sections of BALT showed B cell follicles surrounded by T cells. Most BALT CD4+ T cells had a CD45RO+ memory phenotype. Almost all BALT B cells expressed α4 integrin and L-selectin. In contrast, 43% of BALT T cells expressed α4 integrin and 20% of BALT T cells expressed L-selectin. Almost all BALT lymphocytes expressed LFA-1. HEVs, which support the migration of lymphocytes from the bloodstream into secondary lymphoid tissues, were prominent in BALT. All HEVs expressed peripheral node addressin, most HEVs expressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and no HEVs expressed mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1. Conclusion Human BALT expresses endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that may be important in recruiting naive and memory/effector lymphocytes to BALT during protective and pathologic bronchopulmonary immune responses.

  13. Expression of endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in adult human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Nakaaki; Xu, Baohui; Nishijima, Hiroo; Aoyama, Kohji; Kusumoto, Mayumi; Takeuchi, Toru; Tei, Chuwa; Michie, Sara A; Matsuyama, Takami

    2009-10-22

    Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) is the secondary lymphoid tissue in bronchial mucosa and is involved in the development of bronchopulmonary immune responses. Although migration of lymphocytes from blood vessels into secondary lymphoid tissues is critical for the development of appropriate adaptive immunity, the endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that recruit specific subsets of lymphocytes into human BALT are not known. The aim of this study was to determine which adhesion molecules are expressed on lymphocytes and high endothelial venules (HEVs) in human BALT. We immunostained frozen sections of BALT from lobectomy specimens from 17 patients with lung carcinoma with a panel of monoclonal antibodies to endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules. Sections of BALT showed B cell follicles surrounded by T cells. Most BALT CD4+ T cells had a CD45RO+ memory phenotype. Almost all BALT B cells expressed alpha4 integrin and L-selectin. In contrast, 43% of BALT T cells expressed alpha4 integrin and 20% of BALT T cells expressed L-selectin. Almost all BALT lymphocytes expressed LFA-1. HEVs, which support the migration of lymphocytes from the bloodstream into secondary lymphoid tissues, were prominent in BALT. All HEVs expressed peripheral node addressin, most HEVs expressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and no HEVs expressed mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1. Human BALT expresses endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that may be important in recruiting naive and memory/effector lymphocytes to BALT during protective and pathologic bronchopulmonary immune responses.

  14. Evaluation of Fibrin Sealants and Tissue Adhesives in Oral Surgery for Patients with Bleeding Disorders

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    Gülsüm Ak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of two local haemostatic agents administered together with preoperative dose of replacement therapy for oral surgical procedures in patients with bleeding disorders METHODS: Twenty-one patients were divided into three groups randomly. Patients in Group 1 (n=7 received preoperative replacement therapy with postoperative fibrin sealant application in the surgical site. Patients in Group 2 (n=7 received preoperative replacement therapy with postoperative tissue adhesive application in the surgical site. Patients in Group 3 (n=7 were given total dose of replacement therapy pre- and postoperatively. RESULTS: No postoperative bleeding was observed in 17 patients including five patients in Group 1 (71.42%, six patients in Group 2 (85.71% and six patients in Group 3 (85.71%. Haemorrhagic complication was observed in only four patients among all groups. CONCLUSION: We conclude that utilization of fibrin sealants and tissue adhesives in oral surgery is beneficial due to the lessened amount of factor concentrates used for replacement therapy and the rapid haemostasis at the operation side to perform serial surgical procedures in the same session.

  15. Expression of endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules in bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in adult human lung.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamata, N.; Xu, B.; Nishijima, H.; Aoyama, K.; Kusumoto, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Tei, C.; Michie, S. A.; Matsuyama, T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) is the secondary lymphoid tissue in bronchial mucosa and is involved in the development of bronchopulmonary immune responses. Although migration of lymphocytes from blood vessels into secondary lymphoid tissues is critical for the development of appropriate adaptive immunity, the endothelia and lymphocyte adhesion molecules that recruit specific subsets of lymphocytes into human BALT are not known. The aim of this study was to determine w...

  16. Uso de adesivos teciduais em cirurgia digestiva Tissue adhesives in digestive surgery

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    Cleber Soares-Júnior

    2010-09-01

    application of adhesives in digestive surgery procedures. METHOD: Review of papers available at Medline/Pubmed database using the follow headings: adhesive, gastrointestinal tract, surgical anastomosis, fistula. It was chosen recent articles on the subject which showed adhesives as strategy to reduce morbidity and mortality related to digestive surgery. CONCLUSION: Tissue adhesives appears to be safe in the clinical setting and are been used with increasing frequency in a variety of surgical field for its unique hemostatic and adhesive abilities, gaining increasing acceptance among surgeons. Studies suggest that surgical adhesive can be useful to reinforce and improve intestinal anastomotic healing, increase anastomotic bursting pressures and tensile strength. The potentially harmful tissue effects of the preparations might compromise the use of these substances. Because of the heterogeneity and lack of high level evidence, new studies have to be performed.

  17. Microencapsulation of 2-octylcyanoacrylate tissue adhesive for self-healing acrylic bone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, Alice B. W.; Chyan, William J.; Reichert, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the first phase of developing self-healing acrylic bone cement: the preparation and characterization of polyurethane (PUR) microcapsules containing a medical cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive. Capsules were prepared by interfacial polymerization of a toluene-2,4-diisocyanate-based polyurethane prepolymer with 1,4-butanediol to encapsulate 2-octylcyanoacrylate (OCA). Various capsule characteristics, including: resultant morphology, average size and size distribution, shell thickness, content and reactivity of encapsulated agent, and shelf life are investigated and their reliance on solvent type and amount, surfactant type and amount, temperature, pH, agitation rate, reaction time, and mode of addition of the oil phase to the aqueous phase are presented. Capsules had average diameters ranging from 74 to 222 μm and average shell thicknesses ranging from 1.5 to 6 μm. The capsule content was determined via thermogravimetric analysis and subsequent analysis of the capsules following up to 8 weeks storage revealed minimal loss of core contents. Mechanical testing of OCA-containing capsules showed individual capsules withstood compressive forces up to a few tenths of Newtons, and the contents released from crushed capsules generated tensile adhesive forces of a few Newtons. Capsules were successfully mixed into the poly(- methyl methacrylate) bone cement, surviving the mixing process, exposure to methyl methacrylate monomer, and the resulting exothermic matrix curing. PMID:22807313

  18. Adhesion-governed buckling of thin-film electronics on soft tissues

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    Bo Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stretchable/flexible electronics has attracted great interest and attention due to its potentially broad applications in bio-compatible systems. One class of these ultra-thin electronic systems has found promising and important utilities in bio-integrated monitoring and therapeutic devices. These devices can conform to the surfaces of soft bio-tissues such as the epidermis, the epicardium, and the brain to provide portable healthcare functionalities. Upon contractions of the soft tissues, the electronics undergoes compression and buckles into various modes, depending on the stiffness of the tissue and the strength of the interfacial adhesion. These buckling modes result in different kinds of interfacial delamination and shapes of the deformed electronics, which are very important to the proper functioning of the bio-electronic devices. In this paper, detailed buckling mechanics of these thin-film electronics on elastomeric substrates is studied. The analytical results, validated by experiments, provide a very convenient tool for predicting peak strain in the electronics and the intactness of the interface under various conditions.

  19. Adhesive properties of laminated alginate gels for tissue engineering of layered structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Lee, Christopher S D; Cabodi, Mario; Stroock, Abraham D; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2008-06-01

    A significant challenge in tissue engineering is the creation of tissues with stratified morphology or embedded microstructures. This study investigated methods to fabricate composite gels from separately deposited alginate layers and examined the effects of processing methods on the mechanics of adhesion. Laminated alginate gels were created through a three step process which included: treatment of the interfaces with citrate; annealing of the gels to allow for molecular rearrangement of the alginate chains; and exposure to a CaCl(2) to crosslink the alginate sheets. Process variables included volume and concentration of applied citrate, annealing time, incubation time in CaCl(2), and CaCl(2) concentration. Laminated sheets were tested in lap-shear geometry to characterize failure phenomena and mechanical properties. The site of failure within the gel depended on the integrity of the interface, with weaker gels delaminating and gels with mechanical properties similar to that of bulk gels failing randomly throughout the thickness. Citrate volume, citrate concentration, CaCl(2) incubation time, and CaCl(2) concentration altered the mechanical properties of the laminated alginate sheets, while annealing time had little effect on all measured parameters. This study demonstrates the integration of separately fabricated alginate layers to create mechanically or chemically anisotropic or heterogeneous structures. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mussel mimetic tissue adhesive for fetal membrane repair: initial in vivo investigation in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelio, A; Dekoninck, P; Perrini, M; Brubaker, C E; Messersmith, P B; Mazza, E; Deprest, J; Zimmermann, R; Ehrbar, M; Ochsenbein-Koelble, N

    2013-12-01

    Iatrogenic preterm prelabour rupture of fetal membranes (iPPROM) remains the main complication after invasive interventions into the intrauterine cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sealing capability and tissue interaction of mussel-mimetic tissue adhesive (mussel glue) in comparison to fibrin glue on punctured fetal membranes in vivo. A mid-gestational rabbit model was used for testing the materials. The fetal sacs of pregnant rabbits at day 23 were randomly assigned into experimental groups: unoperated (negative control), unclosed puncture (positive control), commercially available fibrin glue (FG) with decellularized amnion scaffold (DAM), mussel glue (MG) with DAM, or mussel glue alone. Evaluation was done at term (30 days' gestation) assessing fetal survival, fetal membrane integrity and histology of the membranes. Fetal survival was not significantly lower in any of the treatment groups compared to the negative control. All plugging materials could be found at the end of the pregnancy and no adverse effects on the fetus or the pregnant does could be observed. Sac integrity was higher in all treatment groups compared to the positive control group but significant only in the FG+DAM group. Cellular infiltration could be seen in fibrin glue and DAM in contrast to mussel glue which was only tightly adhering to the surrounding tissue. These cells were mostly of mesenchymal phenotype staining positive for vimentin. CD68 positive macrophages were found clustered around all the plugging materials, but their numbers were only significantly increased for the mussel glue alone group compared to negative controls. Mussel glues performance in sealing fetal membranes in the rabbit model was comparable to that of fibrin glue. Taking into account its other favorable properties, it is a noteworthy candidate for a clinically applicable fetal membrane sealant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modifications of the organic and mineral fractions of dental tissues following conditioning by self-etching adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieng-Sarr, Farimata; Sharrock, Patrick; Dabsie, Firas; Grégoire, Geneviève

    2011-02-01

    Our objective was to analyse the acid strengths and concentrations in contemporary self-etch adhesives and test whether the adhesion/decalcification concept functions the same way for all products. The self-etching adhesives were dissolved in a 50% water-ethanol solvent, these were reacted with biological apatite (HA) in the form of powder of human dentine in order to quantify calcium release and study the reaction products as a function of acid strengths and concentrations. The four self-etching adhesives investigated were AdheSE One (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), Adper Easy Bond (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), Optibond All-In-One (KERR, Orange, CA, USA), Xeno V (Dentsply De Trey, Konstanz, Germany). Acid concentrations were found to span the range from 1 to 2 mmol/l, and the acid dissociation constants varied between apparent pKa values of 3.4 and 4.2. The pH values changed with time from values near 2.8 to 3.6, confirming the buffering action of HA. The stronger acids dissolved more calcium ions but left less organic matter attached to the tissue particles. Thermogravimetric and infrared analysis demonstrated that the weaker acids tended to bind to HA surfaces and increased significantly the organic to mineral ratios of the powders. Self-etching adhesives can be differentiated and classified in two types: weak acids attach to the mineral phase and leach little calcium; strong acids bind to the calcium ions, demineralize more and tend to debond from the dentinal hard tissues by forming more soluble calcium salts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a fast curing tissue adhesive for meniscus tear repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochynska, Agnieszka Izabela; Hannink, Gerjon; Janssen, Dennis; Buma, Pieter; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    Isocyanate-terminated adhesive amphiphilic block copolymers are attractive materials to treat meniscus tears due to their tuneable mechanical properties and good adhesive characteristics. However, a drawback of this class of materials is their relatively long curing time. In this study, we evaluate

  3. Development of a fast curing tissue adhesive for meniscus tear repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochynska, Agnieszka; Hannink, G.; Jansen, D; Buma, P.; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    2017-01-01

    Isocyanate-terminated adhesive amphiphilic block copolymers are attractive materials to treat meniscus tears due to their tuneable mechanical properties and good adhesive characteristics. However, a drawback of this class of materials is their relatively long curing time. In this study, we evaluate

  4. INFLUENCE OF SOLUBLE PLACENTAL TISSUE-DERIVED MOLECULES UPON EXPRESSION OF ADHESION MOLECULES BY EA.HY926 ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Stepanova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.  Leukocyte  recruitment  to  placental  tissue  is  an  important  factor  of  its  development.  In  this respect, adhesion molecules at the endothelial cell surface represent a key determining factor of leukocyte adhesion and their trans-endothelial migration. The goal of investigation was to evaluate changed expression of adhesion molecules on the endothelial cells induced by supernates of placental tissue cultures. Placental tissue supernatants produced by the first- and third-trimester placental tissue from normal pregnancy, as well as from women with gestosis, induced higher expression of CD31, CD9, CD62E, CD62P, CD34, CD54, CD51/61, CD49d  and  integrin  β7  expression  by  endothelial  cells,  as  compared  with  their  baseline  levels.  However, the  supernates  from  pre-eclamptic  placental  tissue (3rd  trimester  caused  an  increased  CD9  expression by  endothelial  cells,  as  compared  with  effects  of placental  supernates  from  eclampsia-free  cases.  Our data  contribute  to  understanding  a  possible  role  of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in recruitment of leukocytes to placental tissue and possible participation of adhesion molecules in pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia. The work was supported by a grant from Russian Ministry of Education and Science ГК №02.740.11.0711 and Presidential grant № НШ-3594.2010.7 and МД-150.2011.7. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 6, pp 589-596

  5. Electrochemical evidence for asialoglycoprotein receptor – mediated hepatocyte adhesion and proliferation in three dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasanthan, Kirthanashri S.; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Parthasarathy, Meera, E-mail: meera_p@scbt.sastra.edu

    2015-08-26

    Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is one of the recognition motifs on the surface of hepatocytes, which promote their adhesion to extracellular matrix in liver tissue and appropriate artificial surfaces. ASGPR-mediated adhesion is expected to minimize trans-differentiation of hepatocytes in vitro that is generally observed in integrin-mediated adhesion. The aim of the present study is to verify the role of ASGPR in hepatocyte adhesion and proliferation in scaffolds for hepatic tissue engineering. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) is emerging as a suitable non-invasive analytical tool due to its high sensitivity and capability to correlate the morphology and activity of live cells. HepG2 cells and rat primary hepatocytes cultured in Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/Gelatin hydrogel scaffolds with and without galactose (a ligand for ASGPR) modification are studied using SECM. Systematic investigation of live cells cultured for different durations in scaffolds of different compositions (9:1 and 8:2 PVA:Gelatin with and without galactose) reveals significant improvement in cell–cell communication and proliferation on galactose incorporated scaffolds, thereby demonstrating the positive influence of ASGPR-mediated adhesion. In this work, we have also developed a methodology to quantify the respiratory activity and intracellular redox activity of live cells cultured in porous tissue engineering scaffolds. Using this methodology, SECM results are compared with routine cell culture assays viz., MTS ((1-Oxyl-2,2,5,5,-tetramethyl-Δ3-pyrroline-3-methyl) Methanethiosulfonate) and Albumin assays to demonstrate the better sensitivity of SECM. In addition, the present study demonstrates SECM as a reliable and sensitive tool to monitor the activity of live cells cultured in scaffolds for tissue engineering, which could be used on a routine basis. - Highlights: • A methodology for electrochemical imaging of polymer scaffolds is proposed. • The new methodology allows

  6. Evaluation of tensile strength of tissue adhesives and sutures for clear corneal incisions using porcine and bovine eyes, with a novel standardized testing platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaja S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Simon Kaja, Daryl L Goad, Fatima Ali, Ashley Abraham, R Luke Rebenitsch, Savak Teymoorian, Rohit Krishna, Peter KoulenVision Research Center and Department of Ophthalmology, University of Missouri-Kansas City, School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USABackground: Tissue adhesives for ophthalmologic applications were proposed almost 50 years ago, yet to date no adequate tissue glues have been identified that combine strong sealing properties with adequate safety and absence of postsurgical side effects. In recent years, cataract surgeries and Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty procedures have significantly increased the number of clear corneal incisions performed. One of the obstacles to discovery and development of novel tissue adhesives has been the result of nonstandardized testing of potential tissue glues.Methods: We developed an instrument capable of controlling intraocular pressure in explanted porcine and bovine eyes in order to evaluate sealants, adhesives, and surgical closure methods used in ophthalmic surgery in a controlled, repeatable, and validated fashion. We herein developed and validated our instrument by testing the adhesive properties of cyanoacrylate glue in both porcine and bovine explant eyes.Results: The instrument applied and maintained intraocular pressure through a broad range of physiological intraocular pressures. Cyanoacrylate-based glues showed significantly enhanced sealing properties of clear corneal incisions compared with sutured wounds.Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of our instrument for reliable and standardized testing of tissue adhesive for ophthalmological surgery.Keywords: manometer, intraocular pressure, applanation tonometry, clear corneal incision, tissue adhesive, ocular surgery

  7. Adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes in ex vivo perfused placental tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pehrson, Caroline; Mathiesen, Line; Heno, Kristine K

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Placental malaria occurs when Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta. Placental parasite isolates bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) by expression of VAR2CSA on the surface of infected erythrocytes, but may sequester by other VAR2CSA mediated mechanisms......, such as binding to immunoglobulins. Furthermore, other parasite antigens have been associated with placental malaria. These findings have important implications for placental malaria vaccine design. The objective of this study was to adapt and describe a biologically relevant model of parasite adhesion in intact...... placental tissue. RESULTS: The ex vivo placental perfusion model was modified to study adhesion of infected erythrocytes binding to CSA, endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) or a transgenic parasite where P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 expression had been shut down. Infected erythrocytes...

  8. Fast Absorbing Gut Suture versus Cyanoacrylate Tissue Adhesive in the Epidermal Closure of Linear Repairs Following Mohs Micrographic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, June; Singh Maan, Harjot; Cool, Alicia J; Hanlon, Allison M; Leffell, David J

    2015-02-01

    Cyanoacrylate topical adhesives and fast absorbing gut sutures are increasingly utilized by dermatologic surgeons as they provide satisfactory surgical outcomes while eliminating an additional patient visit for suture removal. To date, no head-to-head studies have compared the wound healing characteristics of these epidermal closure techniques in the repair of facial wounds after Mohs micrographic surgery. To compare the cosmetic outcome of epidermal closure by cyanoacrylate topical adhesive with fast absorbing gut suture in linear repairs of the face following Mohs micrographic surgery. Fourteen patients with wound length greater than 3cm who underwent Mohs micrographic surgery for nonmelanoma skin cancer of the face were enrolled in this randomized right-left comparative study. Following placement of dermal sutures, half of the wound was randomly selected for closure with cyanoacrylate and the contralateral side with fast absorbing gut suture. Using photographs from the three-month postoperative visit, six blinded individuals rated the overall cosmetic outcome. The present study shows no significant difference in cosmetic outcomes between cyanoacrylate and fast absorbing gut suture for closure of linear facial wounds resulting from Mohs micrographic surgery. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive may not be as effective in achieving optimal cosmesis for wounds on the forehead or of longer repair lengths. The majority of patients did not have a preference for wound closure techniques, but when a preference was given, cyanoacrylate was significantly favored over sutures. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive and fast absorbing gut suture both result in comparable aesthetic outcomes for epidermal closure of linear facial wounds following Mohs micrographic surgery. Consideration should be given to factors such as need for eversion, hemostasis, and wound tension when selecting an epidermal wound closure method. (ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT01298167, http

  9. Soft tissue cell adhesion to titanium abutments after different cleaning procedures: preliminary results of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canullo, L; Penarrocha-Oltra, D; Marchionni, S; Bagán, L; Peñarrocha-Diago, M-A; Micarelli, C

    2014-03-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to assess soft tissue cell adhesion to implant titanium abutments subjected to different cleaning procedures and test if plasma cleaning can enhance cell adhesion at an early healing time. Eighteen patients with osseointegrated and submerged implants were included. Before re-opening, 18 abutments were divided in 3 groups corresponding to different clinical conditions with different cleaning processes: no treatment (G1), laboratory customization and cleaning by steam (G2), cleaning by plasma of Argon (G3). Abutments were removed after 1 week and scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze cell adhesion to the abutment surface quantitatively (percentage of area occupied by cells) and qualitatively (aspect of adhered cells and presence of contaminants). Mean percentages of area occupied by cells were 17.6 ± 22.7%, 16.5 ± 12.9% and 46.3 ± 27.9% for G1, G2 and G3 respectively. Differences were statistically significant between G1 and G3 (p=0.030), close to significance between G2 and G3 (p=0.056), and non-significant between G1 and G2 (p=0.530). The proportion of samples presenting adhered cells was homogeneous among the 3 groups (p-valor = 1.000). In all cases cells presented a flattened aspect; in 2 cases cells were less efficiently adhered and in 1 case cells presented filipodia. Three cases showed contamination with cocobacteria. Within the limits of the present study, plasma of Argon may enhance cell adhesion to titanium abutments, even at the early stage of soft tissue healing. Further studies with greater samples are necessary to confirm these findings.

  10. Chemical functionalization of bioceramics to enhance endothelial cells adhesion for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcard, Françoise; Staedler, Davide; Comas, Horacio; Juillerat, Franziska Krauss; Sturzenegger, Philip N; Heuberger, Roman; Gonzenbach, Urs T; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine

    2012-09-27

    To control the selective adhesion of human endothelial cells and human serum proteins to bioceramics of different compositions, a multifunctional ligand containing a cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptide, a tetraethylene glycol spacer, and a gallate moiety was designed, synthesized, and characterized. The binding of this ligand to alumina-based, hydroxyapatite-based, and calcium phosphate-based bioceramics was demonstrated. The conjugation of this ligand to the bioceramics induced a decrease in the nonselective and integrin-selective binding of human serum proteins, whereas the binding and adhesion of human endothelial cells was enhanced, dependent on the particular bioceramics.

  11. Bacterial adhesion to antibiotic-loaded guided tissue regeneration membranes – A scanning electron microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Fang Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Incorporation of tetracycline or amoxicillin greatly reduced adhesion of S. mutans or A. actinomycetemcomitans on the ePTFE, glycolide fiber, or collagen membranes. This finding indicates that it is valuable and effective to use the antibiotic-loaded GTR membranes for periodontal regeneration therapy.

  12. Soft Tissue Mobilization to Resolve Chronic Pain and Dysfunction Associated With Postoperative Abdominal and Pelvic Adhesions: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yui Y; Smith, Ryan W; Koppenhaver, Shane

    2015-12-01

    Case report. Common complications from abdominal and pelvic surgery include adhesions and chronic pain. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis is sometimes used to reduce adhesions and related pain. Physical therapy interventions, such as soft tissue mobilization (STM), may be used for this condition; however, evidence to support its effectiveness is lacking. A 28-year-old woman with a history of 5 abdominal/pelvic surgeries presented with right-sided lower abdominal and anterior hip pain, which had been present since she had undergone a laparoscopic appendectomy with a right ovarian cystectomy surgery 1 year earlier. As an active-duty member in the US Navy, due to pain and weakness, she was unable to perform required curl-ups for her fitness test. Though she had been previously treated both surgically with laparoscopic adhesiolysis and nonsurgically with physical therapy consisting of stretching and strengthening exercises, her pain and function did not improve. She was again evaluated and treated with physical therapy and, based on the examination findings, STM was used to address her pain and dysfunction, which were thought to be related to intra-abdominal adhesions. Following 5 sessions of physical therapy over a 3-week period that included STM and therapeutic exercises, followed by 5 additional sessions over a 4-week period that focused on therapeutic exercises, the patient reported substantially decreased pain, improved function, and a full return to previous level of activity, including unrestricted physical training in a military setting. The outcomes for this patient suggest that STM may be effective as a conservative treatment option for pain and dysfunction related to intra-abdominal adhesions from abdominal/pelvic surgery. Studies with a higher level of evidence, including potential comparison between STM and traditional laparoscopic adhesiolysis, are needed to further determine benefits of nonsurgical care for this condition.

  13. Tissue-engineered endothelial cell layers on surface-modified Ti for inhibiting in vitro platelet adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiupeng Wang, Fupo He, Xia Li, Atsuo Ito, Yu Sogo, Osamu Maruyama, Ryo Kosaka and Jiandong Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A tissue-engineered endothelial layer was prepared by culturing endothelial cells on a fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2–l-ascorbic acid phosphate magnesium salt n-hydrate (AsMg–apatite (Ap coated titanium plate. The FGF-2–AsMg–Ap coated Ti plate was prepared by immersing a Ti plate in supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions supplemented with FGF-2 and AsMg. The FGF-2–AsMg–Ap layer on the Ti plate accelerated proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, and showed slightly higher, but not statistically significant, nitric oxide release from HUVECs than on as-prepared Ti. The endothelial layer maintained proper function of the endothelial cells and markedly inhibited in vitro platelet adhesion. The tissue-engineered endothelial layer formed on the FGF-2–AsMg–Ap layer is promising for ameliorating platelet activation and thrombus formation on cardiovascular implants.

  14. Clinical and Histological Evaluation of Direct Pulp Capping on Human Pulp Tissue Using a Dentin Adhesive System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Nowicka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study presents a clinical and histological evaluation of human pulp tissue responses after direct capping using a new dentin adhesive system. Methods. Twenty-eight caries-free third molar teeth scheduled for extraction were evaluated. The pulps of 22 teeth were mechanically exposed and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: Single Bond Universal or calcium hydroxide. Another group of 6 teeth acted as the intact control group. The periapical response was assayed, and a clinical examination was performed. The teeth were extracted after 6 weeks, and a histological analysis was performed. The pulp status was assessed, and the thickness of the dentin bridge was measured and categorized using a histological scoring system. Results. The clinical phase was asymptomatic for Single Bond Universal patients. Patients in the calcium hydroxide group reported mild symptoms of pain, although the histological examination revealed that dentin bridges with or without limited pulpitis had begun forming in each tooth. The universal adhesive system exhibited nonsignificantly increased histological signs of pulpitis (P>0.05 and a significantly weaker thin mineralized tissue layer (P<0.001 compared with the calcium hydroxide group. Conclusion. The results suggest that Single Bond Universal is inappropriate for human pulp capping; however, further long-term studies are needed to determine the biocompatibility of this agent.

  15. A soft tissue adhesive based on aldehyde-sodium alginate and amino-carboxymethyl chitosan preparation through the Schiff reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Yuan, Liu; Sheng, Nai-an; Gu, Zi-qi; Feng, Wen-hao; Yin, Hai-yue; Morsi, Yosry; Mo, Xiu-mei

    2017-09-01

    Sodium alginate and carboxymethyl chitosan have been extensively applied in tissue engineering and other relative fields due to their low price and excellent biocompatibility. In this paper, we oxidized sodium alginate with sodium periodate to convert 1,2-hydroxyl groups into aldehyde groups to get aldehyde-sodium alginate (ASA). Carboxymethyl chitosan was modified with ethylenediamine (ED) in the presence of water-soluble N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) to introduce additional amino groups to get amino-carboxymethyl chitosan (A-CS). Upon mixing the A-SA and A-CS aqueous solutions together, a gel rapidly formed based on the Schiff's base reaction between aldehyde groups in A-SA and amino groups in A-CS. FTIR analysis confirmed the characteristic peak of Schiff's base group in the hydrogel. It was confirmed that the gelation time be dependent on the aldehyde group content in A-SA and amino group content in A-CS. The fasted hydrogel formation takes place within 10 min. The data of bonding strength and cytotoxicity measurement also showed that the hydrogel had good adhesion and biocompatibility. All these results support that this gel has the potential as soft tissue adhesive.

  16. Evaluation of tensile strength of tissue adhesives and sutures for clear corneal incisions using porcine and bovine eyes, with a novel standardized testing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaja, Simon; Goad, Daryl L; Ali, Fatima; Abraham, Ashley; Rebenitsch, R Luke; Teymoorian, Savak; Krishna, Rohit; Koulen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Tissue adhesives for ophthalmologic applications were proposed almost 50 years ago, yet to date no adequate tissue glues have been identified that combine strong sealing properties with adequate safety and absence of postsurgical side effects. In recent years, cataract surgeries and Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty procedures have significantly increased the number of clear corneal incisions performed. One of the obstacles to discovery and development of novel tissue adhesives has been the result of nonstandardized testing of potential tissue glues. We developed an instrument capable of controlling intraocular pressure in explanted porcine and bovine eyes in order to evaluate sealants, adhesives, and surgical closure methods used in ophthalmic surgery in a controlled, repeatable, and validated fashion. We herein developed and validated our instrument by testing the adhesive properties of cyanoacrylate glue in both porcine and bovine explant eyes. The instrument applied and maintained intraocular pressure through a broad range of physiological intraocular pressures. Cyanoacrylate-based glues showed significantly enhanced sealing properties of clear corneal incisions compared with sutured wounds. This study shows the feasibility of our instrument for reliable and standardized testing of tissue adhesive for ophthalmological surgery.

  17. A biological tissue adhesive and dissolvent system for intraocular tumor plaque radiotherapy: an in vivo animal model experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zloto, Ofira; Alezra, Dror; Sagiv, Oded; Belkin, Michael; Dai, Vicktoria Vishnevskia; Moroz, Iris; Greenberg, Gahl; Ben-Artsi, Elad; Fabian, Ido Didi

    2015-11-01

    To examine a novel biological adhesive and dissolvent system for plaque placement and removal using fibrin glue and urokinase, respectively, in an in vivo animal model. The study was performed on 23 rabbit eyes. Of these, eight underwent a technical feasibility study and ultrasonographic plaque displacement measurements, nine were examined clinically and by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology for tissue reaction to the biological substances used, and in six the impact of fibrin glue as an orbital space occupier on intraocular pressure was assessed. In an additional ex vivo experiment, the glue's radiation attenuating properties were tested using an oncology EDR2 film. Plaque horizontal movement throughout follow-up (7-10 days) was negligible (0.5 ± 0.2 mm), and there was no tilting whatsoever. In the tissue response experiment, no adverse effects were recorded after application of fibrin or urokinase throughout the 21-day follow-up period. Interestingly, a circumscribed local inflammatory response was noted in tissue surrounding the fibrin glue, and persisted at 21 days. In the orbital space-occupying experiment, application of 1 cc fibrin glue did not cause a significant elevation in intraocular pressure (IOP) (P = 0.06), and in the ex vivo experiment, there was no significant difference between radiation readings with and without glue separation of the radioactive sources and film (P = 0.065). The adhesive and dissolvent system was feasible and safe for plaque placement and removal. It may be superior to conventional surgical plaque placement methods in eliminating the relatively common risk of plaque tilting and complications due to scleral suturing.

  18. Surface Modification using Plasma treatments and Adhesion Peptide for Durable Tissue-Engineered Heart Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Young mee; Kim, Soo Hyun [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Artificial heart valves are used in valvular heart diseases, but these valves have disadvantages that they cannot grow, repair and remodel. In current study, the strategies to development of in vitro cultured functional tissue by tissue engineering is available to heart valve disease. In the point of using viable autolougous cells, tissue engineered heart valves have some advantage to include that they can repair, remodel, and grow. Because heart valve is placed under the strong shear stress condition by pumping of heart, the durability of tissue-engineered heart valves is now questionable. The purpose of the study is to evaluate of the durability of tissue engineered heart valve with surface modified scaffolds under hemodynamic conditions

  19. Proteomic Profiling of Neuroblastoma Cells Adhesion on Hyaluronic Acid-Based Surface for Neural Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hui Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment of neuron cells plays a crucial role in regulating neural development and regeneration. Hyaluronic acid (HA biomaterial has been applied in a wide range of medical and biological fields and plays important roles in neural regeneration. PC12 cells have been reported to be capable of endogenous NGF synthesis and secretion. The purpose of this research was to assess the effect of HA biomaterial combining with PC12 cells conditioned media (PC12 CM in neural regeneration. Using SH-SY5Y cells as an experimental model, we found that supporting with PC12 CM enhanced HA function in SH-SY5Y cell proliferation and adhesion. Through RP-nano-UPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses, we identified increased expression of HSP60 and RanBP2 in SH-SY5Y cells grown on HA-modified surface with cotreatment of PC12 CM. Moreover, we also identified factors that were secreted from PC12 cells and may promote SH-SY5Y cell proliferation and adhesion. Here, we proposed a biomaterial surface enriched with neurotrophic factors for nerve regeneration application.

  20. Comparison of contracture, adhesion, tissue ingrowth, and histologic response characteristics of permanent and absorbable barrier meshes in a porcine model of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeken, C R; Matthews, B D

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the mesh contracture, adhesion, tissue ingrowth, and histologic characteristics of a novel absorbable barrier mesh (Ventrio™ ST Hernia Patch) compared to existing permanent (Ventrio™ Hernia Patch) and absorbable barrier meshes (Sepramesh™ IP Composite and PROCEED™ Surgical Mesh). Standard laparoscopic technique was utilized to bilaterally implant meshes in 20 female Yorkshire pigs (n = 5 pigs/group). Meshes were fixated to the intact peritoneum with SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation devices. Mesh contracture, adhesion coverage, and adhesion tenacity were evaluated after 4 weeks. T-Peel testing and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining were utilized to assess tissue ingrowth and host response. A significantly greater percent area contracture was demonstrated for PROCEED™ (26.9%) compared to Ventrio™ ST (8.8%), Ventrio™ (14.5%) and Sepramesh™ (9.2%). Ventrio™ ST demonstrated similar adhesion area, tenacity, and tissue ingrowth compared to all other meshes. Histological scoring revealed a comparable host inflammatory response for all meshes, with a few exceptions. A greater number of giant cells were observed in Ventrio™ ST and Sepramesh™ near the multifilament polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers; a greater number of macrophages were observed in PROCEED™ compared to Ventrio™; and a greater number of neutrophils were observed in PROCEED™, compared to Sepramesh™ (P Hernia Patch demonstrated comparable contracture, adhesion, tissue ingrowth, and histologic characteristics compared to existing permanent and absorbable barrier meshes. Host inflammatory and fibrotic responses for all four meshes were minimal and representative of a biocompatible response.

  1. Effect of transcervical resection of adhesion combined with low-dose aspirin on uterine artery blood flow and Smad2/3 in endometrial tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Wen Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of transcervical resection of adhesion combined with lowdose aspirin on uterine artery blood flow and Smad2/3 in endometrial tissue. Methods: A total of 78 patients with severe intrauterine adhesions who received transcervical resection of adhesion in our hospital between June 2012 and October 2014 were prospectively studied and randomly divided into two groups, observation group received postoperative estrogenprogestogen combined with low-dose aspirin therapy, and control group received postoperative estrogen-progestogen therapy. Ultrasound examination was conducted before and after treatment to determine uterine artery and endometrial blood flow parameters, intrauterine adhesion tissue was collected to detect the expression levels of Smad2 and Smad3 as well as downstream molecules, and serum was collected to determine the levels of cytokines. Results: On the ovulation day after 3 cycles of treatment, uterine artery RI and PI of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group, and endometrial VI, FI and VFI were significantly higher than those of control group; uPA expression level in intrauterine adhesion tissue of observation group was significantly higher than that of control group, Smad2, Smad3, PAI-1, ADAM15 and ADAM17 expression levels were significantly lower than those of control group, and serum TGF-β, VEGF, CTGF, IGF-I and TNF-α levels were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusions: Transcervical resection of adhesion combined with low-dose aspirin therapy can improve the postoperative uterine artery and endometrial blood flow state, inhibit extracellular matrix deposition mediated by Smad2/3 signaling pathway and prevent intrauterine re-adhesion in patients with intrauterine adhesions.

  2. Laser Assisted Soldering: Effects of Hydration on Solder-Tissue Adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, E.K.; Welch, A.J. [The University of Texas, Biomedical Engineering Laser Laboratory, Austin, Texas (United States); Brown, D.T. [North Carolina State University, Department of Biochemistry, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Kovach, I.S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Wound stabilization is critical in early wound healing. Other than superficial skin wounds, most tissue repair is exposed to a hydrated environment postoperatively. To simulate the stability of laser-soldered tissue in a wet environment, we studied the effects of hydration on laser soldered rat dermis and baboon articular cartilage. In this {ital in vitro} study, we used a solder composed of human serum albumin, sodium hyaluronate, and Indocyanine Green. A 2 {mu}L solder droplet was deposited on each tissue specimen and then the solder was irradiated with a scanning laser beam (808 nm and 27thinspW/cm{sup 2}). After photocoagulation, each tissue specimen was cut into two halves dividing the solder. One half was reserved as control while the other half was soaked in saline for a designated period before fixation (1 h, 1, 2, and 7 days). All tissue specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM examinations revealed nonuniform coagulation across the solder thickness for most of the specimens, likely a result of the temperature gradient generated by laser heating. Closer to the laser beam, the uppermost region of the solder formed a dense coagulum. The solder aggregated into small globules in the region anterior to the solder-tissue interface. All cartilage specimens soaked in saline suffered coagulum detachment from tissue surface. We noted a high concentration of the protein globules in the detached coagulum. These globules were likely responsible for solder detachment from the cartilage surface. Solder adhered better to the dermis than to cartilage. The dermal layer of the skin, composed of collagen matrix, provided a better entrapment of the solder than the smooth surface of articular cartilage. Insufficient laser heating of solder formed protein globules. Unstable solder-tissue fusion was likely a result of these globules being detached from tissue substrate when the specimen was submerged in a hydrated environment. The solder-tissue bonding

  3. Endothelial cell-surface tissue transglutaminase inhibits neutrophil adhesion by binding and releasing nitric oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Thung-S.; Lindberg, Robert A.; Zhou, Hua-Lin; Haroon, Zishan A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Hausladen, Alfred; Juang, Y.-L.; Stamler, Jonathan S.; Greenberg, Charles S.

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial cells in response to cytokines displays anti-inflammatory activity by preventing the adherence, migration and activation of neutrophils. The molecular mechanism by which NO operates at the blood-endothelium interface to exert anti-inflammatory properties is largely unknown. Here we show that on endothelial surfaces, NO is associated with the sulfhydryl-rich protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2), thereby endowing the membrane surfaces with anti-inflamm...

  4. Heterologous expression of Streptococcus mutans Cnm in Lactococcus lactis promotes intracellular invasion, adhesion to human cardiac tissues and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freires, Irlan A; Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Kitten, Todd; Simpson-Haidaris, P J; Swartz, Michael; Knight, Peter A; Rosalen, Pedro L; Lemos, José A; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2017-01-02

    In S. mutans, the expression of the surface glycoprotein Cnm mediates binding to extracellular matrix proteins, endothelial cell invasion and virulence in the Galleria mellonella invertebrate model. To further characterize Cnm as a virulence factor, the cnm gene from S. mutans strain OMZ175 was expressed in the non-pathogenic Lactococcus lactis NZ9800 using a nisin-inducible system. Despite the absence of the machinery necessary for Cnm glycosylation, Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses demonstrated that Cnm was effectively expressed and translocated to the cell wall of L. lactis. Similar to S. mutans, expression of Cnm in L. lactis enabled robust binding to collagen and laminin, invasion of human coronary artery endothelial cells and increased virulence in G. mellonella. Using an ex vivo human heart tissue colonization model, we showed that Cnm-positive strains of either S. mutans or L. lactis outcompete their Cnm-negative counterparts for tissue colonization. Finally, Cnm expression facilitated L. lactis adhesion and colonization in a rabbit model of infective endocarditis. Collectively, our results provide unequivocal evidence that binding to extracellular matrices mediated by Cnm is an important virulence attribute of S. mutans and confirm the usefulness of the L. lactis heterologous system for further characterization of bacterial virulence factors.

  5. Host tissue destruction by Entamoeba histolytica: molecules mediating adhesion, cytolysis, and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf D. Horstmann

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite causing human amoebisis, has recently been found to comprise two genetically distinct forms, potentially pathogenic and constitutively nonpathogenic ones. Host tissue destruction by pathogenic forms is belived to result from cell functions mediaed by a lectin-type adherence receptor, a pore-forming peptide involved in host cell lysis, and abundant expression of cysteine proteinase(s. Isolation and molecular cloning of these amoeba products have provided the tools for structural analyses and manipulations of cell functions including comparisons between pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms.

  6. CCN2/connective tissue growth factor is essential for pericyte adhesion and endothelial basement membrane formation during angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith Hall-Glenn

    Full Text Available CCN2/Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF is a matricellular protein that regulates cell adhesion, migration, and survival. CCN2 is best known for its ability to promote fibrosis by mediating the ability of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ to induce excess extracellular matrix production. In addition to its role in pathological processes, CCN2 is required for chondrogenesis. CCN2 is also highly expressed during development in endothelial cells, suggesting a role in angiogenesis. The potential role of CCN2 in angiogenesis is unclear, however, as both pro- and anti-angiogenic effects have been reported. Here, through analysis of Ccn2-deficient mice, we show that CCN2 is required for stable association and retention of pericytes by endothelial cells. PDGF signaling and the establishment of the endothelial basement membrane are required for pericytes recruitment and retention. CCN2 induced PDGF-B expression in endothelial cells, and potentiated PDGF-B-mediated Akt signaling in mural (vascular smooth muscle/pericyte cells. In addition, CCN2 induced the production of endothelial basement membrane components in vitro, and was required for their expression in vivo. Overall, these results highlight CCN2 as an essential mediator of vascular remodeling by regulating endothelial-pericyte interactions. Although most studies of CCN2 function have focused on effects of CCN2 overexpression on the interstitial extracellular matrix, the results presented here show that CCN2 is required for the normal production of vascular basement membranes.

  7. Insight on stem cell preconditioning and instructive biomaterials to enhance cell adhesion, retention, and engraftment for tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells are a promising solution for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the limited survival and engraftment of transplanted cells due to a hostile ischemic environment is a bottleneck for effective utilization and commercialization. Within this environment, the majority of transplanted cells undergo apoptosis prior to participating in lineage differentiation and cellular integration. Therefore, in order to maximize the clinical utility of stem/progenitor cells, strategies must be employed to increase their adhesion, retention, and engraftment in vivo. Here, we reviewed key strategies that are being adopted to enhance the survival, retention, and engraftment of transplanted stem cells through the manipulation of both the stem cells and the surrounding environment. We describe how preconditioning of cells or cell manipulations strategies can enhance stem cell survival and engraftment after transplantation. We also discuss how biomaterials can enhance the function of stem cells for effective tissue regeneration. Biomaterials can incorporate or mimic extracellular function (ECM) function and enhance survival or differentiation of transplanted cells in vivo. Biomaterials can also promote angiogenesis, enhance engraftment and differentiation, and accelerate electromechanical integration of transplanted stem cells. Insight gained from this review may direct the development of future investigations and clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mussel-mimetic tissue adhesive for fetal membrane repair: a standardized ex vivo evaluation using elastomeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, C M; Buerzle, W; Brubaker, C E; Messersmith, P B; Mazza, E; Ochsenbein-Koelble, N; Zimmermann, R; Ehrbar, M

    2011-07-01

    Iatrogenic preterm premature rupture of membranes (iPPROM), the main complication of invasive interventions in the prenatal period, seriously limits the benefit of diagnostic or surgical prenatal procedures. This study aimed to evaluate preventive plugging of punctured fetal membranes in an ex vivo situation using a new mussel-mimetic tissue adhesive (mussel glue) to inhibit leakage. A novel biomechanical test device that tests the closure of injured membranes under near-physiological conditions was used. Mussel glue, a poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel, was used to seal membrane defects of up to 3 mm in mechanically well-defined elastomeric membranes with three different degrees of stiffness. Elastomeric test membranes were successfully employed for testing mussel glue under well-defined conditions. Mussel glue plugs were distended by up to 94%, which translated to an improved sealing efficiency on elastomeric membranes with high stiffness. For the stiffest membrane tested, a critical burst pressure of 48 mbar (36 mmHg) was accomplished in this ex vivo setting. Mussel glue appears to efficiently seal membrane defects under well-standardized ex vivo conditions. As repaired membranes resist pressures measured in amniotic cavities, mussel glue might represent a novel sealing method for iatrogenic membrane defects. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Multifunctional Hydrogel with Good Structure Integrity, Self-Healing, and Tissue-Adhesive Property Formed by Combining Diels-Alder Click Reaction and Acylhydrazone Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Du, Jie; Wang, Gang; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2015-11-04

    Hydrogel, as a good cartilage tissue-engineered scaffold, not only has to possess robust mechanical property but also has to have an intrinsic self-healing property to integrate itself or the surrounding host cartilage. In this work a double cross-linked network (DN) was designed and prepared by combining Diels-Alder click reaction and acylhydrazone bond. The DA reaction maintained the hydrogel's structural integrity and mechanical strength in physiological environment, while the dynamic covalent acylhydrazone bond resulted in hydrogel's self-healing property and controlled the on-off switch of network cross-link density. At the same time, the aldehyde groups contained in hydrogel further promote good integration of the hydrogel to surrounding tissue based on aldehyde-amine Schiff-base reaction. This kind of hydrogel has good structural integrity, autonomous self-healing, and tissue-adhesive property and simultaneously will have a good application in tissue engineering and tissue repair field.

  10. Fast in situ generated ɛ-polylysine-poly (ethylene glycol) hydrogels as tissue adhesives and hemostatic materials using an enzyme-catalyzed method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Wei; Feng, Xiao-hai; Li, Sha; Yu, Dong-feng; Chang, Jia-cong; Chi, Bo; Xu, Hong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, novel bio-inspired in situ hydrogels as tissue adhesives and hemostatic materials were designed and prepared based on ɛ-polylysine-grafted poly(ethylene glycol) and tyramine via enzymatic cross-linking. The enzymatic cross-linked method enabled fast gelation within seconds, which facilitated its therapeutic applications. By changing the cross-linking conditions, the storage modulus of the hydrogels could be tunable and the mechanical strength influenced the tissue adhesiveness of the hydrogels. Besides, the hydrogels showed fine network structures with appropriate pore sizes, which were thought to be a contributing factor to the strong adhesiveness. Benefiting from the strong mechanical properties and fine network structures, the ɛ-polylysine-grafted poly(ethylene glycol) and tyramine hydrogels exhibited superior wound-healing and hemostatic ability compared to conventional and commercially available medical materials. Moreover, indirect cytotoxicity assessment indicated that the ɛ-polylysine-grafted poly(ethylene glycol) and tyramine hydrogels were nontoxic to the L929 cell. These results demonstrated that the enzymatic cross-linked in situ ɛ-polylysine hydrogels hold high potential for tissue sealants and hemostatic materials. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Cytotoxicity of Cyanoacrylate-Based Tissue Adhesives and Short-Term Preclinical In Vivo Biocompatibility in Abdominal Hernia Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Pascual

    Full Text Available Cyanoacrylate(CA-based tissue adhesives, although not widely used, are a feasible option to fix a mesh during abdominal hernia repair, due to its fast action and great bond strength. Their main disadvantage, toxicity, can be mitigated by increasing the length of their alkyl chain. The objective was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility in hernia repair of CAs currently used in clinical practice (Glubran(n-butyl and Ifabond(n-hexyl and a longer-chain CA (OCA(n-octyl, that has never been used in the medical field.Formaldehyde release and cytotoxicity of unpolymerized(UCAs and polymerized CAs(PCAs were evaluated by macroscopic visual assessment, flow cytometry and Alamar Blue assays. In the preclinical evaluation, partial defects were created in the rabbit abdominal wall and repaired by fixing polypropylene prostheses using the CAs. At 14 days post-surgery, animals were euthanized for morphology, macrophage response and cell damage analyses.Formaldehyde release was lower as the molecular weight of the monomer increased. The longest side-chain CA(OCA showed the highest cytotoxicity in the UCA condition. However, after polymerization, was the one that showed better behavior on most occasions. In vivo, all CAs promoted optimal mesh fixation without displacements or detachments. Seroma was evident with the use of Glubran, (four of six animals: 4/6 and Ifabond (2/6, but it was reduced with the use of OCA (1/6. Significantly greater macrophage responses were observed in groups where Glubran and Ifabond were used vs. sutures and OCA. TUNEL-positive cells were significantly higher in the Glubran and OCA groups vs. the suture group.Although mild formaldehyde release occurred, OCA was the most cytotoxic during polymerization but the least once cured. The CAs promoted proper mesh fixation and have potential to replace traditional suturing techniques in hernia repair; the CAs exhibited good tissue integration and effective short

  12. Biologically engineered protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels: A cell-adhesive and plasmin-degradable biosynthetic material for tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstenberg, Sven

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the research presented in this dissertation was to create a biomimetic artificial material that exhibits functions of extracellular matrix relevant for improved nerve regeneration. Neural adhesion peptides were photoimmobilized on highly crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-based substrates that were otherwise non-adhesive. Neurons adhered in two-dimensional patterns for eleven hours, but no neurites extended. To enable neurite extension and nerve regeneration in three dimensions, and to address the need for specifically cell adhesive and cell degradable materials for clinical applications in tissue repair in general, an artificial protein was recombinantly expressed and purified that consisted of a repeating amino acid sequence based on fibrinogen and anti-thrombin III. The recombinant protein contained integrin-binding RGD sites, plasmin degradation sites, heparin binding sites, and six thiol-containing cysteine residues as grafting sites for poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate via Michael-type conjugate addition. The resulting protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol)acrylates were crosslinked by photopolymerization to form hydrogels. Although three-dimensional, RGD mediated and serine protease-dependent ingrowth of human fibroblasts into protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels occurred, only surface neurite outgrowth was observed from chick dorsal root ganglia. Axonal outgrowth depended on the concentration of matrix-bound heparin, suggesting that improved mechanical strength of the hydrogels and possible immobilization of neuroactive factors due to the presence of heparin promoted neurite outgrowth. Together, the above results show that specific biological functions can be harnessed by protein-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels to serve as matrices for tissue repair and regeneration. In particular, the two design objectives, specific cell adhesion and degradability by cell-associated proteases, were fulfilled by the material. In the future, this and

  13. [The ultrastructural study of bonding interface between two adhesive systems and three types of dental hard tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chun-zi; Jiang, Yong; Li, Shi-yang; Lin, Yuan; Fan, Xiao-min; Yu, Qing

    2011-06-01

    To compare of the morphological ultrastructure of the 7th generation self-etching adhesive Adper Easy One and two-step total etch adhesive Adper Singlebond 2 after being bonded with the composite resin. Buccal and lingual box-like holes were made in 20 isolated human molars (5mm in diameter, 3mm in depth), and cuted to pieces from surface of middle part of root (5mm in length, 3mm in width). They were equally divided into 2 groups with 10 root slices and 10 crowns each. The cavities of crown and root pieces were respectively bonded with adhesives of Adper Singlebond 2 and Adper Easy One, and were vertically cuted open from the midline after filling with composite resin to get 20 specimens in each group. Ten specimens of root and crown were randomly selected from each group for 5000 times of thermocycling, and the remaining specimens were soaked in distilled water at room temperature for 1 month. Then all the specimens were polished with sand paper, fixed dehydrated, vacuum dried and sprayed, and the bonding interfaces of the filling edge of profile were scanned by scanning electron microscope(SEM). SEM photos showed that in the group of total etching Adper Singlebond 2 bonding placed at room temperature, the enamel, cementum and the resin bonded closely with the adhesive after thermocycling. In the group of self etching Adper Easy One bonding placed at room temperature, the adhesive bonded to the enamel, small cracks were occasionally seen, and resin penetration blend within the resin in dentinal tubules, and enamel bonded well to the cementum. The specimens after thermocycling bonded enamel loosely with distinct cracks,while the dentinal tubules and resin penetration integrated and cementum bonded well to the dentin. Ultra-micro structure observation by SEM shows that Adper Singlebond 2 total etch adhesive has better bonding to enamel than the self-etching adhesive Adper Easy One, but the bonding to dentin and cementum has no significant difference.

  14. Indirect coating of RGD peptides using a poly-L-lysine spacer enhances jaw periosteal cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into osteogenic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardjomandi, N; Klein, C; Kohler, K; Maurer, A; Kalbacher, H; Niederländer, J; Reinert, S; Alexander, D

    2012-08-01

    The aim of our study was to generate a biofunctionalized, three-dimensional (3D) biomaterial to enhance jaw periosteal cell (JPC) adhesion and differentiation into osteogenic tissue. Therefore, open-cell polylactic acid (OPLA) scaffolds were coated covalently with different RGD peptides (a conserved recognition sequence of the most ECM proteins--arginine-glycine-asparagine) and different coating variants. The linear and cyclic RGD peptides were either applied directly or indirectly via a poly-L-lysine (PLL) spacer. JPCs were analyzed on coated constructs in 2D and 3D cultures and showed enhanced rates for indirectly coated scaffolds using the PLL spacer. By gene expression, we detected significantly increased levels of osteogenic marker genes, such as alkaline phosphatase, RUNX2, and AMELY in JPCs seeded onto PLL/linear RGD constructs compared to the otherwise-coated constructs. An analysis of the JPC mineralization capacity revealed the highest amounts of calcium-phosphate precipitates in cells growing within the PLL/linear scaffolds. Additionally, the JPC adhesion behavior on OPLA scaffolds seems to be mediated by ITGB3, ITGB1, and ITGAV, as shown by blocking assays. We concluded that coating of OPLA constructs with linear RGD peptides via PLL represents a suitable approach for functionalizing the polymer surface and enhancing adhesion, proliferation, and mineralization of JPCs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fast Absorbing Gut Suture versus Cyanoacrylate Tissue Adhesive in the Epidermal Closure of Linear Repairs Following Mohs Micrographic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, June; Singh Maan, Harjot; Cool, Alicia J.; Hanlon, Allison M.; Leffell, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cyanoacrylate topical adhesives and fast absorbing gut sutures are increasingly utilized by dermatologic surgeons as they provide satisfactory surgical outcomes while eliminating an additional patient visit for suture removal. To date, no head-to-head studies have compared the wound healing characteristics of these epidermal closure techniques in the repair of facial wounds after Mohs micrographic surgery. Objective: To compare the cosmetic outcome of epidermal closure by cyanoacr...

  16. 3D quantitative imaging of unprocessed live tissue reveals epithelial defense against bacterial adhesion and subsequent traversal requires MyD88.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie Tam

    Full Text Available While a plethora of in vivo models exist for studying infectious disease and its resolution, few enable factors involved in the maintenance of health to be studied in situ. This is due in part to a paucity of tools for studying subtleties of bacterial-host interactions at a cellular level within live organs or tissues, requiring investigators to rely on overt outcomes (e.g. pathology in their research. Here, a suite of imaging technologies were combined to enable 3D and temporal subcellular localization and quantification of bacterial distribution within the murine cornea without the need for tissue processing or dissection. These methods were then used to demonstrate the importance of MyD88, a central adaptor protein for Toll-Like Receptor (TLR mediated signaling, in protecting a multilayered epithelium against both adhesion and traversal by the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa ex vivo and in vivo.

  17. The efficacy of a lysine-based dendritic hydrogel does not differ from those of commercially available tissue sealants and adhesives: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Camacho, Juan C; Ghobril, Cynthia; Anez-Bustillos, Lorenzo; Grinstaff, Mark W; Rodríguez, Edward K; Nazarian, Ara

    2015-05-13

    Hemostatic agents, tissue adhesives and sealants may contribute to a reduction in hemorrhage-associated morbidity and mortality. Towards this end, we have recently developed a lysine-based dendritic hydrogel (PEG-LysNH2) that can potentially be used in the management of severe trauma and/or intraoperative bleeding. As a first step in demonstrating the potential utility of this approach, our objective was to ascertain the ability of the PEG-LysNH2 to adhere to and seal injured tissues, as well as to maintain the seal under physiological conditions. The efficacy of the PEG-LysNH2 in sealing injured tissues was evaluated using an ex-vivo pressure testing system. A 2.5 mm incision was made on intact ex-vivo tissues and then sealed with the PEG-LysNH2. Application of the PEG-LysNH2 was followed by 1) step-wise pressure increase to a maximum of 250 mmHg and 2) fluctuating pressures, between 100-180 mmHg with a rate of 3 Hz, over a 24-hour period. The performance of the PEG-LysNH2 was compared to those of commercially available sealants and adhesives. During gradual pressure increase, mean pressures at 30 seconds (P30) ranged between 206.36 - 220.17 mmHg for the sealants, and they were greater than control and suture groups (p conventional injury repair methods (sutures) and did not differ from those of commercially available products when sealing small incisions.

  18. Release of tensile strain on engineered human tendon tissue disturbs cell adhesions, changes matrix architecture, and induces an inflammatory phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    -inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors...

  19. [Adhesion molecules and cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierres, A; Benoliel, A M; Bongrand, P

    1999-12-01

    This review was aimed at summarizing recent advances in the understanding of cell adhesion in order to discuss the possible relevance of new knowledge to the exploration of cancer patients and elaboration of therapeutic strategies. During the last 10 years, many adhesion molecules were identified, thus allowing to determine their tissue distribution and functional regulation. The concept of adhesiveness was refined. It is now well known that adhesive rate (i.e., the minimal contact time required for bond formation) and binding strength (i.e., the minimal force required to detach bound cells) are distinct parameters. They may be regulated independently, and influence the cell behavior in different ways. It is now possible to achieve accurate control of tumor cell adhesiveness, either by inhibiting an adhesive mechanism (through monoclonal antibodies, competitive ligands, or inhibition of receptor expression with antisense strategy or gene knock-out) or by promoting a binding mechanism (with receptor transfection or pro-inflammatory stimulation). Recent progress opens new possibilities for diagnosis and treatment. First, the interpretation of experimental data may be improved. Cell adhesive behavior is not entirely accounted for by the density of membrane adhesion receptors. Indeed, adhesion is influenced by receptor connection to the cytoskeleton and structure of the cell coat. An adhesion receptor may be anti-metastatic through an increase in tumor cohesion and cell differentiation, or pro-metastatic, through facilitation of cell migration towards a target tissue. New therapeutic strategies may include anti-adhesive procedure aimed at preventing metastasis formation. The potential importance of a better control of inflammatory processes is also emphasized in view of the influence of these processes on the expression of adhesion molecules.

  20. Adhesion between biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite: Relevance to synthetic bone-like materials and tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuendorf, R E; Saiz, E; Tomsia, A P; Ritchie, R O

    2008-09-01

    Many studies are currently underway on the quest to make synthetic bone-like materials with composites of polymeric materials and hydroxyapatite (HA). In the present work, we use wetting experiments and surface tension measurements to determine the work of adhesion between biodegradable polymers and HA, with specific reference to the role of humid environments. All the polymers are found to exhibit low contact angles (polymer-HA bonds, scale directly with the results from the wetting experiments. Short-time aging (up to 30h) in a humid environment, however, has a dramatic influence on such HA/polymer interfacial strengths; specifically, water diffusion through the organic/inorganic interface and degradation of the polymer results in a marked decrease, by some 80-90%, in the bond strengths. These results cast doubt on the use of biodegradable polymers/ceramic composites for load-bearing synthetic bone-like materials, as desired optimal mechanical properties are unlikely to be met in realistic physiological environments.

  1. Carbohydrate mediated bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Roland J

    2011-01-01

    In the process of adhesion, bacteria often carry proteins on their surface, adhesins, that bind to specific components of tissue cells or the extracellular matrix. In many cases these components are carbohydrate structures. The carbohydrate binding specificities of many bacteria have been uncovered over the years. The design and synthesis of inhibitors of bacterial adhesion has the potential to create new therapeutics for the prevention and possibly treatment of bacterial infections. Unfortunately, the carbohydrate structures often bind only weakly to the adhesion proteins, although drug design approaches can improve the situation. Furthermore, in some cases linking carbohydrates covalently together, to create so-called multivalent systems, can also significantly enhance the inhibitory potency. Besides adhesion inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy, the adhesion proteins can also be used for detection. Novel methods to do this are being developed. These include the use of microarrays and glyconanoparticles. New developments in these areas are discussed.

  2. Effect of dental adhesives on the exudative phase of the inflammatory process in subcutaneous tissue of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagem-Filho Halim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The vascular changes in the subcutaneous connective tissue of rats induced by dentin bonding systems (one step was studied and compared to those induced by saline solution (negative control and Furacin (positive control, during the exudative phase of the inflammatory process. Twenty mg/kg of Evan's blue were injected intravenously in the vein of the rats' penises; 0.1 ml of each substance tested was inoculated in the subcutaneous tissue. After a 3 hour period the animals were sacrificed and their skins were excised and punched out with a standard steel 2.5 cm in diameter. The specimens were immediately immersed in 8 ml of formamide and taken to a double boiler for 72 hours at 37ºC, to remove the dye. The liquid containing the overflowed dye was filtered, analyzed in the spectrophotometer (620 nm and classified according to the criteria established by Nagem-Filho, Pereira (1976. After statistical analysis, the irritative potential of the substances was ranked as follows: Furacin (severe > Single Bond and Bond 1 (moderate - no significant differences between the dentin bonding systems tested > saline solution (not significant as regards the irritation degree.

  3. Platelet-derived chemokines CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)7, connective tissue-activating peptide III, and CXCL4 differentially affect and cross-regulate neutrophil adhesion and transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Birgit I; Petersen, Frank; Flad, Hans-Dieter; Brandt, Ernst

    2002-09-01

    In this study, we have examined the major platelet-derived CXC chemokines connective tissue-activating peptide III (CTAP-III), its truncation product neutrophil-activating peptide 2 (CXC chemokine ligand 7 (CXCL7)), as well as the structurally related platelet factor 4 (CXCL4) for their impact on neutrophil adhesion to and transmigration through unstimulated vascular endothelium. Using monolayers of cultured HUVEC, we found all three chemokines to promote neutrophil adhesion, while only CXCL7 induced transmigration. Induction of cell adhesion following exposure to CTAP-III, a molecule to date described to lack neutrophil-stimulating capacity, depended on proteolytical conversion of the inactive chemokine into CXCL7 by neutrophils. This was evident from experiments in which inhibition of the CTAP-III-processing protease and simultaneous blockade of the CXCL7 high affinity receptor CXCR-2 led to complete abrogation of CTAP-III-mediated neutrophil adhesion. CXCL4 at substimulatory dosages modulated CTAP-III- as well as CXCL7-induced adhesion. Although cell adhesion following exposure to CTAP-III was drastically reduced, CXCL7-mediated adhesion underwent significant enhancement. Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in response to CXCL7 or IL-8 (CXCL8) was subject to modulation by CTAP-III, but not CXCL4, as seen by drastic desensitization of the migratory response of neutrophils pre-exposed to CTAP-III, which was paralleled by selective down-modulation of CXCR-2. Altogether our results demonstrate that there exist multiple interactions between platelet-derived chemokines in the regulation of neutrophil adhesion and transendothelial migration.

  4. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  5. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  6. Interaction of L-lysine and soluble elastin with the semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase in the context of its vascular-adhesion and tissue maturation functions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2010-04-01

    The copper-containing quinoenzyme semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.21; SSAO) is a multifunctional protein. In some tissues, such as the endothelium, it also acts as vascular-adhesion protein 1 (VAP-1), which is involved in inflammatory responses and in the chemotaxis of leukocytes. Earlier work had suggested that lysine might function as a recognition molecule for SSAO\\/VAP-1. The present work reports the kinetics of the interaction of L-lysine and some of its derivatives with SSAO. Binding was shown to be saturable, time-dependent but reversible and to cause uncompetitive inhibition with respect to the amine substrate. It was also specific, since D-lysine, L-lysine ethyl ester and epsilon-acetyl-L-lysine, for example, did not bind to the enzyme. The lysine-rich protein soluble elastin bound to the enzyme relatively tightly, which may have relevance to the reported roles of SSAO in maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM) and in the maturation of elastin. Our data show that lysyl residues are not oxidized by SSAO, but they bind tightly to the enzyme in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that binding in vivo of SSAO to lysyl residues in physiological targets might be regulated in the presence of H(2)O(2), formed during the oxidation of a physiological SSAO substrate, yet to be identified.

  7. Immunohistochemical Expression Profiles of Cell Adhesion Molecules, Matrix Metalloproteinases and their Tissue Inhibitors in Central and Peripheral Neoplastic Foci of Feline Mammary Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisamai, S; Rungsipipat, A; Kunnasut, N; Suriyaphol, G

    Feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is a common cancer with high metastatic potential and high mortality rate. Loss of cell-cell interactions and degradation of the extracellular matrix by proteinases enhances tumour invasion and metastasis. Peripheral neoplastic foci (PNF) are defined as the presence of discrete tumour cell clusters, splitting off from central neoplastic foci (CNF) and lodging around these CNF. PNF therefore locate at the tumour-host interface at the site of invasion. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunohistochemically the expression of cell adhesion molecules (e-cadherin [CDH-1], syndecan 1 [SDC-1] and nectin-2), matrix metalloproteinases (matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-2, MMP-7 and MMP-9) and their tissue inhibitors (tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase [TIMP]-1 and TIMP-2) together with the cellular proliferation marker, Ki67, in CNF and PNF of FMCs of different clinical stages and histological grades. Compared with control sections from areas of mammary gland hyperplasia, lower expression of MMP-7 and TIMP-2 was observed in all stages. Increased expression of TIMP-1 was observed in PNF in early-stage disease with no metastasis, while marked expression of CDH-1 and Ki67 occurred in late-stage FMC. In addition, the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in PNF of tumours with high histological grade (grade III) was higher than in low-grade tumours. The observed divergent protein expression in PNF could potentially form the basis of acting as novel markers in FMC. Potential markers may include the expression of TIMP-1 in PNF in early stage lesions, the expression of CDH-1 and Ki67 in late stages and the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in high-grade tumours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of Nd:YAG laser on the bond strength of self-etching and conventional adhesive systems to dental hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimoto, A K; Cunha, L A; Yui, K C K; Huhtala, M F R L; Barcellos, D C; Prakki, A; Gonçalves, S E P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Nd:YAG laser on the shear bond strength to enamel and dentin of total and self-etch adhesives when the laser was applied over the adhesives, before they were photopolymerized, in an attempt to create a new bonding layer by dentin-adhesive melting. One-hundred twenty bovine incisors were ground to obtain flat surfaces. Specimens were divided into two substrate groups (n=60): substrate E (enamel) and substrate D (dentin). Each substrate group was subdivided into four groups (n=15), according to the surface treatment accomplished: X (Xeno III self-etching adhesive, control), XL (Xeno III + laser Nd:YAG irradiation at 140 mJ/10 Hz for 60 seconds + photopolymerization, experimental), S (acid etching + Single Bond conventional adhesive, Control), and SL (acid etching + Single Bond + laser Nd:YAG at 140 mJ/10 Hz for 60 seconds + photopolymerization, experimental). The bonding area was delimited with 3-mm-diameter adhesive tape for the bonding procedures. Cylinders of composite were fabricated on the bonding area using a Teflon matrix. The teeth were stored in water at 37°C/48 h and submitted to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min in a universal testing machine. Results were analyzed with three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; substrate, adhesive, and treatment) and Tukey tests (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed significant differences for the substrate, adhesive system, and type of treatment: lased or unlased (padhesive showed significantly higher shear bond strength compared with Single Bond total-etch adhesive; Nd:YAG laser irradiation showed significantly higher shear bond strength compared with control (unlased). Nd:YAG laser application prior to photopolymerization of adhesive systems significantly increased the bond strength to dentin.

  9. The use of bovine serum albumin-glutaraldehyde tissue adhesive (BioGlue®) for tumor bed closure following open partial nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahouth, Z; Halachmi, S; Shprits, S; Burbara, Y; Avitan, O; Masarwa, I; Moskovitz, B; Nativ, O

    2017-10-01

    To report the results of the use of Bovine Serum Albumin-Glutaraldehyde tissue adhesive (BioGlue®) for tumor bed closure in open nephron-sparing surgery (NSS). The cohort included 255 patients with enhancing renal mass who underwent open NSS. We used open flank approach, with in-situ hypothermia and enucleation of the tumor. For tumor bed closure, we used the BioGlue ® sealant for tumor bed filling, without suturing the edges. Mean patients' age was 65.4 years. 5.1% of patients had pre-operative chronic renal failure. Mean renal mass diameter was 4.2±1.6cm and mean R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score was 8.0±1.6. Mean ischemia time was 21.8±7.6. Mean estimated blood loss was 42±82ml and only two patients required blood transfusion. Urine leak and pseudo-aneurysm were recorded in two and one patient, respectively. None of the operations were converted to radical nephrectomy. The average change between post-operative and pre-operative eGFR (Δ=-1.7ml/min) was insignificant in a mean follow-up of 30.1±29.6 months. The 10-year recurrence-free survival rate was 99% and the 10-year overall survival rate was 85%. The use of BioGlue ® alone for hemostasis after NSS is a feasible and safe alternative to classical suturing. Its use enables satisfactory functional outcome and could potentially reduce ischemia time. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  11. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  12. Denture Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Denture Adhesives Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Manufacturers (February 23, 2011) (PDF - 22KB) More in Dental Devices Denture Adhesives Multiple-Use Dental Dispenser Devices Dental Amalgam About ...

  13. Adhesion prevention in gynaecological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Deborah; Lefebvre, Guylaine

    2010-06-01

    To review the etiology and incidence of and associative factors in the formation of adhesions following gynaecological surgery. To review evidence for the use of available means of adhesion prevention following gynaecological surgery. Women undergoing pelvic surgery are at risk of developing abdominal and/or pelvic adhesive disease postoperatively. Surgical technique and commercial adhesion prevention systems may decrease the risk of postoperative adhesion formation. The outcomes measured are the incidence of postoperative adhesions, complications related to the formation of adhesions, and further intervention relative to adhesive disease. Medline, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library were searched for articles published in English from 1990 to March 2009, using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, cohort studies, and meta-analyses specifically addressing postoperative adhesions, adhesion prevention, and adhesive barriers. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to March 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. Meticulous surgical technique is a means of preventing adhesions. This includes minimizing tissue trauma, achieving optimal hemostasis, minimizing the risk of infection, and avoiding contaminants (e.g., fecal matter) and the use of foreign materials (e.g., talcum powder) when possible. (II-2). 2. The risk of adhesions increases with the total number of abdominal and pelvic surgeries performed on one patient; every

  14. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  15. Lymphocyte Homing to Bronchus-associated Lymphoid Tissue (BALT) Is Mediated by L-selectin/PNAd, α4β1 Integrin/VCAM-1, and LFA-1 Adhesion Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baohui; Wagner, Norbert; Pham, Linh Nguyen; Magno, Vincent; Shan, Zhongyan; Butcher, Eugene C.; Michie, Sara A.

    2003-01-01

    Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) participates in airway immune responses. However, little is known about the lymphocyte–endothelial adhesion cascades that recruit lymphocytes from blood into BALT. We show that high endothelial venules (HEVs) in BALT express substantial levels of VCAM-1, in marked contrast to HEVs in other secondary lymphoid tissues. BALT HEVs also express the L-selectin ligand PNAd. Anti–L-selectin, anti-PNAd, and anti–LFA-1 mAbs almost completely block the homing of B and T lymphocytes into BALT, whereas anti–α4 integrin and anti–VCAM-1 mAbs inhibit homing by nearly 40%. α4β7 integrin and MAdCAM-1 are not involved. Importantly, we found that mAbs against α4 integrin and VCAM-1 significantly block the migration of total T cells (80% memory phenotype) but not naive T and B cells to BALT. These results suggest that an adhesion cascade, which includes L-selectin/PNAd, α4β1 integrin/VCAM-1, and LFA-1, targets specific lymphocyte subsets to BALT. This high level of involvement of α4β1 integrin/VCAM-1 is unique among secondary lymphoid tissues, and may help unify lymphocyte migration pathways and immune responses in BALT and other bronchopulmonary tissues. PMID:12756264

  16. Lymphocyte homing to bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) is mediated by L-selectin/PNAd, alpha4beta1 integrin/VCAM-1, and LFA-1 adhesion pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baohui; Wagner, Norbert; Pham, Linh Nguyen; Magno, Vincent; Shan, Zhongyan; Butcher, Eugene C; Michie, Sara A

    2003-05-19

    Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) participates in airway immune responses. However, little is known about the lymphocyte-endothelial adhesion cascades that recruit lymphocytes from blood into BALT. We show that high endothelial venules (HEVs) in BALT express substantial levels of VCAM-1, in marked contrast to HEVs in other secondary lymphoid tissues. BALT HEVs also express the L-selectin ligand PNAd. Anti-L-selectin, anti-PNAd, and anti-LFA-1 mAbs almost completely block the homing of B and T lymphocytes into BALT, whereas anti-alpha4 integrin and anti-VCAM-1 mAbs inhibit homing by nearly 40%. alpha4beta7 integrin and MAdCAM-1 are not involved. Importantly, we found that mAbs against alpha4 integrin and VCAM-1 significantly block the migration of total T cells (80% memory phenotype) but not naive T and B cells to BALT. These results suggest that an adhesion cascade, which includes L-selectin/PNAd, alpha4beta1 integrin/VCAM-1, and LFA-1, targets specific lymphocyte subsets to BALT. This high level of involvement of alpha4beta1 integrin/VCAM-1 is unique among secondary lymphoid tissues, and may help unify lymphocyte migration pathways and immune responses in BALT and other bronchopulmonary tissues.

  17. Cell-matrix adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrier, Allison L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2007-12-01

    The complex interactions of cells with extracellular matrix (ECM) play crucial roles in mediating and regulating many processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and signaling during morphogenesis, tissue homeostasis, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Many of these interactions involve transmembrane integrin receptors. Integrins cluster in specific cell-matrix adhesions to provide dynamic links between extracellular and intracellular environments by bi-directional signaling and by organizing the ECM and intracellular cytoskeletal and signaling molecules. This mini review discusses these interconnections, including the roles of matrix properties such as composition, three-dimensionality, and porosity, the bi-directional functions of cellular contractility and matrix rigidity, and cell signaling. The review concludes by speculating on the application of this knowledge of cell-matrix interactions in the formation of cell adhesions, assembly of matrix, migration, and tumorigenesis to potential future therapeutic approaches. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Exploring cancer metastasis prevention strategy: interrupting adhesion of cancer cells to vascular endothelia of potential metastatic tissues by antibody-coated nanomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingjing; Dong, Haiyan; Chen, Hongning; Zhao, Rongli; Sinko, Patrick J; Shen, Weiyu; Wang, Jichuang; Lu, Yusheng; Yang, Xiang; Xie, Fangwei; Jia, Lee

    2015-02-03

    Cancer metastasis caused by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) accounts for 90% cancer-related death worldwide. Blocking the circulation of CTCs in bloodstream and their hetero-adhesion to vascular endothelia of the distant metastatic organs may prevent cancer metastasis. Nanomaterial-based intervention with adhesion between CTCs and endothelia has not been reported. Driven by the novel idea that multivalent conjugation of EpCAM and Slex antibodies to dendrimer surface may enhance the capacity and specificity of the nanomaterial conjugates for capturing and down-regulating colorectal CTCs, we conjugated the dendrimer nanomaterial with the EpCAM and Slex antibodies, and examined the capacity of the dual antibody-coated nanomaterial for their roles in interrupting CTCs-related cancer metastasis. The antibody-coated nanomaterial was synthesized and characterized. The conjugates specifically bound and captured colon cancer cells SW620. The conjugate inhibited the cells' viability and their adhesion to fibronectin (Fn)-coated substrate or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a concentration-dependent manner. In comparison with SW480 and LoVo cell lines, the activity and adhesion of SW620 to Fn-coated substrate and HUVECs were more specifically inhibited by the dual antibody conjugate because of the higher levels of EpCAM and Slex on SW620 cell surface. The hetero-adhesion between SW620 and Fn-coated substrate, or HUVECs was inhibited by about 60-70%. The dual conjugate showed the inhibition capacity more significant than its corresponding single antibody conjugates. The present study provides the new evidence that coating nanomaterials with more than one antibody against CTCs may effectively interfere with the interaction between SW620 and HUVECs.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF STRUCTURAL ADHESIVES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contents: (A) Structural adhesives for metals; development of better adhesives; development of heat resistance adhesives; development of room...temperature setting adhesives; recent investigations of metal-bonding adhesives; development of production processes and design criteria for metal adhesives... development of non-destructive inspection methods for adhesive bonded structures. (B) European papers; British developments in the field of

  20. Ultramorphology of pre-treated adhesive interfaces between self-adhesive resin cement and tooth structures

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira,Carolina Nemesio de Barros; DALEPRANE,Bruno; MIRANDA,Giovani Lana Peixoto de; Magalhães,Cláudia Silami de; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Convencional resin cements can be used in combination with a total-etch system in a conventional mode or as self-adhesive resin cements. The latter are less technique sensitive and able to bond to dental tissues without previous treatment or adhesive layer and requires only a single step to be applied to dental structures. Objective To compare qualitatively the adhesive interfaces of two self-adhesive resin cements and one conventional resin cement after different toot...

  1. Autologous fibrin adhesive in experimental tubal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, S; Rusia, U; Agarwal, S; Agarwal, N

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate autologous fibrin in rabbit oviduct anastomosis versus 7-0 vikryl, a conventional suture material used in tubal anastomosis. Thrombin was added to the autologous fibrinogen at the site of anastomosis to obtain a tissue adhesive. The anastomotic time, pregnancy rate, and litter size were evaluated. Three months later, a relaparotomy was done to evaluate patency and degree of adhesions, and a tubal biopsy was taken from the site of anastomosis. Analysis of results showed a statistically significant (P < .001) shortened anastomotic time and superior histopathological union in the tissue adhesive group. Patency rate, pregnancy rate, and degree of adhesions were comparable in both groups.

  2. Investigation of the Viability, Adhesion, and Migration of Human Fibroblasts in a Hyaluronic Acid/Gelatin Microgel-Reinforced Composite Hydrogel for Vocal Fold Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heris, Hossein K; Daoud, Jamal; Sheibani, Sara; Vali, Hojatollah; Tabrizian, Maryam; Mongeau, Luc

    2016-01-21

    The potential use of a novel scaffold biomaterial consisting of cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA)-gelatin (Ge) composite microgels is investigated for use in treating vocal fold injury and scarring. Cell adhesion integrins and kinematics of cell motion are investigated in 2D and 3D culture conditions, respectively. Human vocal fold fibroblast (hVFF) cells are seeded on HA-Ge microgels attached to a HA hydrogel thin film. The results show that hVFF cells establish effective adhesion to HA-Ge microgels through the ubiquitous expression of β1 integrin in the cell membrane. The microgels are then encapsulated in a 3D HA hydrogel for the study of cell migration. The cells within the HA-Ge microgel-reinforced composite hydrogel (MRCH) scaffold have an average motility speed of 0.24 ± 0.08 μm min(-1) . The recorded microscopic images reveal features that are presumably associated with lobopodial and lamellipodial cell migration modes within the MRCH scaffold. Average cell speed during lobopodial migration is greater than that during lamellipodial migration. The cells move faster in the MRCH than in the HA-Ge gel without microgels. These findings support the hypothesis that HA-Ge MRCH promotes cell adhesion and migration; thereby they constitute a promising biomaterial for vocal fold repair. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Adhesive polymer films for the prevention of postsurgical adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Esser, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Current clinically used lipophilic anti-adhesive films, like SurgiWrap®, have to be fixed to the affected tissue using sutures due to their limited adhesiveness and only degrade very slowly within months and years due to the hydrophobicity and the high molecular weight of the used PLA, which effectively inhibits the uptake of water. The aim of this work was to prepare films that have a much faster degradation pathway due to a hydrogel nature and ideally adhere to the tissue by themselves. The...

  4. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  5. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  6. The effects of cannabinoids and cannabispiro compounds on Escherichia coli adhesion to tissue culture cells and on leukocyte functions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, J; Petri, I; Berek, I; Shoyama, Y; Nishioka, I

    1987-01-01

    delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabidiolic acid, tetrahydrocannabidiolic acid, cannabispirol, acetylcannabispirol, cannabispirone, and cannabispirenone in a low concentration did not affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli on cultured HEp-2 cells. Cannabinoids at 10(-6) M increased the chemiluminescence of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, while the cannabispiro compounds failed to enhance the oxidative burst of leukocytes. In lymphocyte and granulocyte function tests (E- and EA-rosette formation, blast transformation of T-lymphocytes in the presence of phytohaemagglutinin and concanavalin-A, ADCC and phagocytosis) all compounds displayed immunosuppressive effect at 1.5 X 10(-5) M. Tetrahydrocannabidiolic acid exerted the weakest immunosuppression on human leukocyte functions.

  7. Randomized study of the effectiveness of closing laparoscopic trocar wounds with octylcyanoacrylate, adhesive papertape or poliglecaprone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maartense, S.; Bemelman, W. A.; Dunker, M. S.; de Lint, C.; Pierik, E. G. J. M.; Busch, O. R. C.; Gouma, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Several methods for skin closure are used, i.e. sutures, adhesive papertape and tissue adhesives. Little is known about the efficacy of these techniques in laparoscopic surgery. This study was performed to analyse the efficacy of octylcyanoacrylate, a new tissue adhesive, adhesive

  8. Adhesive plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of navicular bursa adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holowinski, Maureen E; Solano, Mauricio; Maranda, Louise; García-López, José M

    2012-01-01

    Adhesions occur in the navicular bursa between the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) and other structures. Our objectives were to describe the appearance of navicular bursa adhesions on high-field magnetic resonance (MR) images, to compare these findings to findings at navicular bursoscopy, and to determine the prevalence of lesions in the remainder of the podotrochlear apparatus. Sixteen forelimbs from 14 horses that underwent MR imaging and navicular bursoscopy were evaluated. Adhesions were considered type 1 when characterized by a discontinuity in the navicular bursa fluid signal between two structures, type 2 when the navicular bursa fluid signal was disrupted and ill-defined tissue was present between two structures, and type 3 when the fluid signal was disrupted and well-defined tissue was present between two structures. Twenty-six adhesions were suspected on MR images and nineteen were visualized at surgery. The positive predictive value was 50% for type 1 adhesions, 67% for type 2 adhesions, and 100% for type 3 adhesions. Additional lesions were detected in the navicular bursa in 15 limbs, the DDFT in 13, the navicular bone in 15, the collateral sesamoidean ligaments in 9, and the distal sesamoidean impar ligament in 8. A discontinuity in the navicular bursa fluid signal with well-defined tissue between two structures detected on high-field MR images is diagnostic for a navicular bursa adhesion. Additional lesions in the podotrochlear apparatus are common in horses with navicular bursa adhesions. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  10. Bioinspired Adhesive Hydrogel Driven by Adenine and Thymine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Qin; Gao, Zijian; Hou, Ruibin; Gao, Guanghui

    2017-05-24

    Bioinspired strategies have drawn much attention for designing intelligent hydrogels with promising performance. Herein, we present a bioinspired adhesive hydrogel driven by adenine and thymine, which are the basic units of DNA. The adhesive hydrogel exhibited promising adhesive property for the surface of various solid materials, including muscle tissues, plastics, rubbers, glasses, metals, ceramics, carnelians, and woods. The maximum peeling strength of hydrogels was 330 N m-1 on aluminum, superior to that of PAAm hydrogels with 70 N m-1. The strong adhesive behavior remained more than 30 times repeated peeling tests. Moreover, the swelling behavior, morphological structure, mechanical strength, and peeling adhesive strength were also investigated and confirmed the formation and various characteristics of adhesive hydrogels driven by adenine and thymine. Thus, the biomimetic strategy to design promising adhesive hydrogels can provide various opportunities in tissue engineering, such as wound dressing, bioglues, and tissue adhesives.

  11. Adhesive organ regeneration in Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerer, Birgit; Hennebert, Elise; Flammang, Patrick; Salvenmoser, Willi; Ladurner, Peter

    2016-06-02

    Flatworms possess pluripotent stem cells that can give rise to all cell types, which allows them to restore lost body parts after injury or amputation. This makes flatworms excellent model systems for studying regeneration. In this study, we present the adhesive organs of a marine flatworm as a simple model system for organ regeneration. Macrostomum lignano has approximately 130 adhesive organs at the ventral side of its tail plate. One adhesive organ consists of three interacting cells: one adhesive gland cell, one releasing gland cell, and one modified epidermal cell, called an anchor cell. However, no specific markers for these cell types were available to study the regeneration of adhesive organs. We tested 15 commercially available lectins for their ability to label adhesive organs and found one lectin (peanut agglutinin) to be specific to adhesive gland cells. We visualized the morphology of regenerating adhesive organs using lectin- and antibody staining as well as transmission electron microscopy. Our findings indicate that the two gland cells differentiate earlier than the connected anchor cells. Using EdU/lectin staining of partially amputated adhesive organs, we showed that their regeneration can proceed in two ways. First, adhesive gland cell bodies are able to survive partial amputation and reconnect with newly formed anchor cells. Second, adhesive gland cell bodies are cleared away, and the entire adhesive organ is build anew. Our results provide the first insights into adhesive organ regeneration and describe ten new markers for differentiated cells and tissues in M. lignano. The position of adhesive organ cells within the blastema and their chronological differentiation have been shown for the first time. M. lignano can regenerate adhesive organs de novo but also replace individual anchor cells in an injured organ. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of organogenesis in flatworms and enable further molecular investigations of cell

  12. Bacterial endotoxin adhesion to different types of orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Coutinho ROMUALDO

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial endotoxin (LPS adhesion to orthodontic brackets is a known contributing factor to inflammation of the adjacent gingival tissues. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems, comparing two commercial brands. Material and Methods Forty specimens were fabricated from Transbond XT and Light Bond composite and bonding agent components (n=10/component, then contaminated by immersion in a bacterial endotoxin solution. Contaminated and non-contaminated acrylic resin samples were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. LPS quantification was performed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate QCL-1000™ test. Data obtained were scored and subjected to the Chi-square test using a significance level of 5%. Results There was endotoxin adhesion to all materials (p0.05. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 among commercial brands. Affinity of endotoxin was significantly greater for the bonding agents (p=0.0025. Conclusions LPS adhered to both orthodontic adhesive systems. Regardless of the brand, the endotoxin had higher affinity for the bonding agents than for the composites. There is no previous study assessing the affinity of LPS for orthodontic adhesive systems. This study revealed that LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems. Therefore, additional care is recommended to orthodontic applications of these materials.

  13. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  14. Adesivo de cianoacrilato no tratamento de afinamentos e perfurações corneais: técnica e resultados Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive in cases with corneal thinning and perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Felberg

    2003-06-01

    were treated with cyanoacrylate adhesive (Super Bonder® - Loctite, Brazil at the Department of Ophthalmology of the "Santa Casa de São Paulo", Brazil. We evaluated best corrected visual acuity (BCVA before and after adhesive application, conditions that led to corneal thinning or perforation, measurement of thinning or perforation in millimeters, need for corneal patches or keratoplasty, number of applications, interval in which the adhesive was kept, and adverse reactions. RESULTS: BCVA remained unchanged in 15 (68% cases. Regarding wound size, 63% were less than of a 2 mm diameter and the remaining had a diameter up to 3.2 mm. Infection was the most frequent (50% indication for adhesive application. Twelve (54% patients did not need surgical procedures to maintain ocular integrity (e.g. patch or keratoplasty. Eleven (50% patients received only one application of cyanoacrylate. CONCLUSION: Application of cyanoacrylate as a tissue adhesive is a safe and easy method. It is very useful in maintaining ocular integrity after corneal perforations and thinning.

  15. Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis adhesion to MDBK cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chiapparrone, María L; Morán, Pedro E; Echevarría, Hilda M; Soto, Pedro; Paolicchi, Fernando A; Catena, María

    2014-01-01

    ..., adhesion, chemotaxis or tissue tropism 4 . Campylobacter fetus is highly adapted to mucosal surfaces. Bacterial adhesion is an important initial step in infection. Pathogens use surface-located adhesins to interact with specific host cell receptors. Although some bacterial structures involved in the adhesion process are still unknown, there is evidence that ...

  16. Cyanoacrylate adhesive technique in wound edge approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahlow, J A; Lantz, P E

    1993-11-01

    Cyanoacrylate, the adhesive component of many commercially available strong-binding glues, has been used by the medical profession for various purposes, including tissue adhesion and repair, embolization, sclerotherapy, and hemostasis. Mortuary science professionals rely on cyanoacrylate's adhesive property to aid in body restoration techniques following embalming. Forensic applications include the use of cyanoacrylate fumes for latent fingerprint detection. An additional application for this sticky chemical is currently unrecognized by many within the forensic community. Specifically, cyanoacrylate's adhesive property makes possible the relatively simple, efficient, and rapid approximation of disrupted skin and tissue when warranted during a forensic autopsy. The final result is aesthetically pleasing and lends itself to subsequent photographic documentation especially when patterned injuries are encountered. We discuss the technique, benefits, and limitations of the cyanoacrylate adhesive method in this setting and present several cases wherein the technique has produced satisfying results.

  17. Work of separation - A method to assess intraperitoneal adhesion and healing of parietal peritoneum in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Long-Xiang; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Sun, Yu-Long

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion grades and adhesion breaking strength are widely used to assess severity of intraperitoneal adhesion in animal models. However, the results of adhesion grades have the large deviations due to vary personal experience. Adhesion breaking strength ignores the details of adhesion. This study introduced work of separation, the energy consumption during breakage of adhesion, to better evaluate intraperitoneal adhesion. The intraperitoneal adhesion was induced by traumas created at rat cecum and adjacent abdominal wall. The wounds were coated with or without sodium hyaluronate. On day 14 after surgery, the intraperitoneal adhesion was assessed by adhesion density grade, adhesion area grade, adhesion breaking strength and work of separation. The healing of parietal peritoneum was evaluated with histology, adhesion breaking strength and work of separation. The severity of adhesion evaluated with work of separation was consistent with those obtained from the grades of adhesion density, adhesion area and adhesion breaking strength. Work of separation had a linear correlation with adhesion breaking strength. Furthermore, the results of histological examination and work of separation demonstrated that adhesion significantly delayed healing process of abdominal wall muscles. Work of separation can quantify all intraperitoneal adhesions rather than the major one by other methods. It is a more precise method to evaluate postoperative adhesions, especially those including adipose tissue. This study proved that work of separation could be a reliable method to assess intraperitoneal adhesion and tissue healing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enzymatically degradable mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Carrie E; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2011-12-12

    Mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogels represent innovative candidate medical sealants or glues. In the present work, we describe an enzyme-degradable mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogel formulation, achieved by incorporating minimal elastase substrate peptide Ala-Ala into the branched poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromonomer structure. The system takes advantage of neutrophil elastase expression upregulation and secretion from neutrophils upon recruitment to wounded or inflamed tissue. By integrating adhesive degradation behaviors that respond to cellular cues, we expand the functional range of our mussel-inspired adhesive hydrogel platforms. Rapid (adhesion of the proteolytically active, catechol-terminated precursor macromonomer was achieved by addition of sodium periodate oxidant. Rheological analysis and equilibrium swelling studies demonstrated that the hydrogel is appropriate for soft tissue-contacting applications. Notably, hydrogel storage modulus (G') achieved values on the order of 10 kPa, and strain at failure exceeded 200% strain. Lap shear testing confirmed the material's adhesive behavior (shear strength: 30.4 ± 3.39 kPa). Although adhesive hydrogel degradation was not observed during short-term (27 h) in vitro treatment with neutrophil elastase, in vivo degradation proceeded over several months following dorsal subcutaneous implantation in mice. This work represents the first example of an enzymatically degradable mussel-inspired adhesive and expands the potential biomedical applications of this family of materials.

  19. Efficiency of sirolimus in prevention of adhesions around vascular

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    muhip kanko

    response of tissues against conditions such as infection and traumatic events. Adhesions developing ... Tissue trauma, bleeding and infection play a significant role in the formation of adhesions. In order to ... were used. All the animals were fasted 8 hours prior to the operation and fed by normal diet 6 hours post- operatively ...

  20. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  1. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  2. Utilización del adhesivo tisular tisuacryl en Estomatología: Revisión bibliográfica Utilization of tisuacryl tissue adhesive in dentistry: Bibliographic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mildres Barroso Palomino

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo presenta una revisión de la literatura nacional e internacional actualizada, así como experiencias realizadas en el campo de la Estomatología con los cianoacrilatos, haciendo énfasis en el adhesivo tisular tisuacryl , que es producido por el Centro de Biomateriales de la Universidad de La Habana. Se exponen resultados relevantes observados con su utilización como: sustituto de la sutura, apósito periodontal, en los autoinjertos gingivales, en el selle de alvéolos posextracción dentaria, en la toma de biopsias en la cavidad bucal y en el tratamiento de la estomatitis aftosa recurrente. Se detallan los avances logrados con esta terapia y la aceptación por parte de los pacientes que lo reciben.An updated review of the national and international literature, as well as the experiences obtained in the field of Stomatology with the cyanoacrylates are presented, making emphasis on the tisuacryl tissue adhesive, which is produced by the Center of Biomaterials of the University of Havana. The significant results attained with its use as a suture substitute and a periodontal dressing, and in the gingival autografts, the closure of the sockets after dental extraction, the taking of biopsies in the oral cavity, and the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, are exposed. The advances achieved with this therapy and the patient's acceptance are stressed.

  3. Current state and use of biological adhesives in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neil V; Meislin, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Bone and tissue adhesives are common and beneficial supplements to standard methods of musculoskeletal tissue suture repair. Knowledge and development of biologically derived or inspired adhesives useful in orthopedic surgery are rapidly advancing. Recent literature demonstrates the increased adjunct or primary use of biological adhesives in the repair of musculoskeletal soft tissues, chondral fractures, and osteochondral fractures. Adhesives offer more benefits and enhancements to tissue healing than current fixation methods afford, including improved biocompatibility, resorbability, and non-immunogenicity. Further investigation is required to determine the extent of the role that these bioadhesives can play in orthopedic surgery. The largest group of biologically derived adhesives and sealants is fibrin sealants, which include first- and second-generation commercially available fibrin sealants, autologous fibrin sealants, and variants. Other groups include gelatin-resorcin aldehydes, protein-aldehyde systems, collagen-based adhesives, polysaccharide- based adhesives, mussel adhesive proteins, and various biologically inspired or biomimetic glues. Potential uses include applications in orthopedic-related blood conservation, arthroplasty, articular cartilage disorders, sports medicine, spine surgery, trauma, and tumors. The development of an adhesive with universal application is likely unfeasible, given the unique characteristics of various musculoskeletal tissues. However, the literature demonstrates the overall underuse of adhesives and indicates the rising probability of the development of a successful variety of bioadhesives for use in orthopedic surgery. As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the difference between adhesives and sealants. 2. Recognize fibrin adhesives commonly used in practice today and identify other biological adhesives with rising potential. 3. Analyze how fibrin sealants work relative to fibrin and

  4. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  5. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at the roof of the pulp chamber on teeth that were occlusally ablated using a rapidly-scanned CO2 laser operating at 9.3 μm with a pulse duration of 10 to 15 μs and repetition rate of 300 Hz over a 2 min time course. The adhesion strength of laser treated enamel and dentin surfaces was measured for various laser scanning parameters with and without post-ablation acid etching using the single-plane shear test. The mechanical strength of laser-ablated dentin surfaces were determined via the four-point bend test and compared to control samples prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin or enamel laser treated surfaces, the surfaces were uniformly ablated, and there were no cracks visible. Four-point bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d. = 4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d. = 2.7) for control (p > 0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths approaching 30 MPa for both enamel and dentin under certain irradiation conditions. These values were slightly lower than nonirradiated acid-etched control samples. Additional studies are needed to determine if the slightly lower bond strength than the acid-etched control samples is clinically significant. These measurements demonstrate that enamel and dentin surfaces can be rapidly ablated by CO2 lasers with minimal

  6. Chapter 9:Wood Adhesion and Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2013-01-01

    The recorded history of bonding wood dates back at least 3000 years to the Egyptians (Skeist and Miron 1990, River 1994a), and adhesive bonding goes back to early mankind (Keimel 2003). Although wood and paper bonding are the largest applications for adhesives, some of the fundamental aspects leading to good bonds are not fully understood. Better understanding of these...

  7. AN ANALYTICAL STUDY IN ADHESIVE BOWEL OBSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Anand Raja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Peritoneal adhesions can be defined as abnormal fibrous bands between organs or tissues or both in the abdominal cavity that are normally separated. Adhesions may be acquired or congenital; however, most are acquired as a result of peritoneal injury, the most common cause of which is abdominopelvic surgery. Less commonly, adhesions may form as the result of inflammatory conditions, intraperitoneal infection or abdominal trauma. The extent of adhesion formation varies from one patient to another and is most dependent on the type and magnitude of surgery performed as well as whether any postoperative complications develop. Fortunately, most patients with adhesions do not experience any overt clinical symptoms. For others, adhesions may lead to any one of a host of problems and can be the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective study of 50 patients admitted in Government Royapettah Hospital with adhesive bowel obstruction between September 2008 to September 2010. All patients were admitted and managed either conservatively or surgically. RESULTS 1. Adhesive bowel disease is the most common cause for bowel obstruction followed by hernias. 2. Increased incidence is noted in females. 3. Increased incidence of adhesions was documented in gynaecological and colorectal surgeries. 4. Below umbilical incisions have higher propensity for adhesion formation. 5. Laparotomies done for infective aetiology have higher adhesion risks. 6. Most of adhesive obstructions can be managed conservatively. 7. Adhesiolysis preferably laparoscopic can be done. For gangrenous bowel resection and anastomosis or ostomy done. 8. Given the above risk factors, adhesive bowel disease can be prevented to a certain extent. CONCLUSION The formation of peritoneal adhesions continues to plague patients, surgeons and society. Although, research in this area is ongoing, there is currently no method that is 100% effective in

  8. Quantitative methods for analyzing cell-cell adhesion in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-05-01

    During development cell-cell adhesion is not only crucial to maintain tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, it also activates signalling pathways important for the regulation of different cellular processes including cell survival, gene expression, collective cell migration and differentiation. Importantly, gene mutations of adhesion receptors can cause developmental disorders and different diseases. Quantitative methods to measure cell adhesion are therefore necessary to understand how cells regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and how aberrations in cell-cell adhesion contribute to disease. Different in vitro adhesion assays have been developed in the past, but not all of them are suitable to study developmentally-related cell-cell adhesion processes, which usually requires working with low numbers of primary cells. In this review, we provide an overview of different in vitro techniques to study cell-cell adhesion during development, including a semi-quantitative cell flipping assay, and quantitative single-cell methods based on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) or dual micropipette aspiration (DPA). Furthermore, we review applications of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based molecular tension sensors to visualize intracellular mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion sites. Finally, we describe a recently introduced method to quantitate cell-generated forces directly in living tissues based on the deformation of oil microdroplets functionalized with adhesion receptor ligands. Together, these techniques provide a comprehensive toolbox to characterize different cell-cell adhesion phenomena during development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-06-06

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  10. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  11. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  12. Biomimetic adhesive materials containing cyanoacryl group for medical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sueng Hwan; Sohn, Jeong Sun

    2014-10-17

    For underwater adhesives with biocompatible and more flexible bonds using biomimetic adhesive groups, DOPA-like adhesive molecules were modified with cyanoacrylates to obtain different repeating units and chain length copolymers. The goal of this work is to copy the mechanisms of underwater bonding to create synthetic water-borne underwater medical adhesives through blending of the modified DOPA and a triblock copolymer (PEO-PPO-PEO) for practical application to repair wet living tissues and bones, and in turn, to use the synthetic adhesives to test mechanistic hypotheses about the natural adhesive. The highest values in stress and modulus of the biomimetic adhesives prepared in wet state were 165 kPa and 33 MPa, respectively.

  13. Novel aspects in the regulation of the leukocyte adhesion cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Chavakis, Emmanouil; Choi, Eun Young; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2009-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment plays a major role in the immune response to infectious pathogens and during inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. The process of leukocyte extravasation from the blood into the inflamed tissue requires a complex cascade of adhesive events between the leukocytes and the endothelium including leukocyte rolling, adhesion and transendothelial migration. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions are mediated by tightly regulated binding interactions between adhesion receptors on b...

  14. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  15. [Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, M; Ghanem, N

    1999-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is a painful stiff shoulder due to the thickening of the capsule and synovium. The main observed changes are hyperhaemia of the synovium and a capsular fibrosis similar to that of Dupuytren's disease. Stiffness involves mainly flexion, lateral rotation and abduction. In most cases, a spontaneous healing is observed within 12 to 30 months. When the capsulitis is disabling and pain still present, a joint distension followed by rehabilitation can be indicated. When the disability is important and mainly due to stiffness, a manipulation under anesthesia with or without arthroscopic release of soft tissues can be indicated.

  16. Mechanotransduction at cadherin-mediated adhesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leckband, D.; le Duc, Q.; Wang, N.; de Rooij, J.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-to-cell junctions are crucial mechanical and signaling hubs that connect cells within tissues and probe the mechanics of the surrounding environment. Although the capacity of cell-to-extracellular-matrix (ECM) adhesions to sense matrix mechanics and proportionally modify cell functions is well

  17. Converging and Unique Mechanisms of Mechanotransduction at Adhesion Sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Mitchell K L; de Rooij, Johan

    The molecular mechanisms by which physical forces control tissue development are beginning to be elucidated. Sites of adhesion between both cells and the extracellular environment [extracellular matrix (ECM) or neighboring cells] contain protein complexes capable of sensing fluctuations in tensile

  18. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  19. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  20. Gecko adhesion: evolutionary nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Gravish, Nick

    2008-05-13

    If geckos had not evolved, it is possible that humans would never have invented adhesive nanostructures. Geckos use millions of adhesive setae on their toes to climb vertical surfaces at speeds of over 1ms-1. Climbing presents a significant challenge for an adhesive in requiring both strong attachment and easy rapid removal. Conventional pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are either strong and difficult to remove (e.g. duct tape) or weak and easy to remove (e.g. sticky notes). The gecko adhesive differs dramatically from conventional adhesives. Conventional PSAs are soft viscoelastic polymers that degrade, foul, self-adhere and attach accidentally to inappropriate surfaces. In contrast, gecko toes bear angled arrays of branched, hair-like setae formed from stiff, hydrophobic keratin that act as a bed of angled springs with similar effective elastic modulus to that of PSAs. Setae are self-cleaning and maintain function for months during repeated use in dirty conditions. Setae are an anisotropic 'frictional adhesive' in that adhesion requires maintenance of a proximally directed shear load, enabling either a tough bond or spontaneous detachment. Gecko-like synthetic adhesives may become the glue of the future-and perhaps the screw of the future as well.

  1. Adhesion Molecules in CNS Disorders: Biomarker and Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingyi; Chen, Sheng; Klebe, Damon; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence has been provided regarding the crucial role of leukocyte extravasation and subsequent inflammatory response in several central nervous system (CNS) disorders. The infiltrated leukocytes release pro-inflammatory mediators and activate resident cells, leading to tissue injury. Leukocyte-endothelia interaction is critical for leukocyte extravasation and migration from the intravascular space into the tissue during inflammation. The basic physiology of leukocyte-endothelia interaction has been investigated extensively. Traditionally, three kinds of adhesion molecules, selectin, integrin, and immunoglobulin families, are responsible for this multiple-step interaction. Furthermore, blocking adhesion molecule function by genetic knockout, antagonizing antibodies, or inhibitory pharmacological drugs provides neuroprotection, which is associated with a reduction in leukocyte accumulation with in the tissue. Detection of the soluble form of adhesion molecules has also been proven to predict outcomes in CNS disorders. Lately, vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1), a novel adhesion molecule and endothelial cell surface enzyme, has been implicated as a brake during leukocyte extravasation. In this review, we summarize the functions of traditional adhesion molecules as well as VAP-1 in the leukocyte adhesion cascade. We also discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of adhesion molecules in CNS disorders. PMID:23469854

  2. Adhesion of tumor cells to matrices and endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Clara M; McGettrick, Helen M; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, G Ed

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion of tumor cells to matrix components and endothelial cells is essential for tumor metastasis. Investigation of the adhesion molecules required and the signals which induce tumor cell adhesion and migration are crucial in order to increase our understanding of this process. This chapter describes protocols which may be used to study tumor cell adhesion to purified matrix elements and tissue sections. It also details methods used to investigate cell adhesion to endothelial cells, both under static and flow conditions. In addition, there is a section detailing the use of endothelial cell cultures on three-dimensional collagen gels which are useful when studying adhesion to endothelial cells and onward invasion through a protein matrix.

  3. Adhesive compositions and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Scott D.; Sendijarevic, Vahid; O' Connor, James

    2017-12-05

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesive compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesives derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure:. In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive polyurethane compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  4. adhesive intestinal obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-01

    Jun 1, 2006 ... ABSTRACT. Background: Adhesions after abdominal and pelvic surgery are a major cause of intestinal obstruction in the western world and the pathology is steadily gaining prominence in our practice. Objective: To determine the magnitude of adhesive intestinal obstruction; to determine the types.

  5. Functionally Graded Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    commonly used fillers (6). Titanium dioxide is used to add pigment to an adhesive (7). Fumed silica is employed as a rheology modifier (8). The goal of...provide pigment , increase volume, lower cost, modify 2 strength, and alter adhesive properties (3). Calcium carbonate and talc are inexpensive

  6. Soy protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  7. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  8. Biophysics of cadherin adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckband, Deborah; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2012-01-01

    Since the identification of cadherins and the publication of the first crystal structures, the mechanism of cadherin adhesion, and the underlying structural basis have been studied with a number of different experimental techniques, different classical cadherin subtypes, and cadherin fragments. Earlier studies based on biophysical measurements and structure determinations resulted in seemingly contradictory findings regarding cadherin adhesion. However, recent experimental data increasingly reveal parallels between structures, solution binding data, and adhesion-based biophysical measurements that are beginning to both reconcile apparent differences and generate a more comprehensive model of cadherin-mediated cell adhesion. This chapter summarizes the functional, structural, and biophysical findings relevant to cadherin junction assembly and adhesion. We emphasize emerging parallels between findings obtained with different experimental approaches. Although none of the current models accounts for all of the available experimental and structural data, this chapter discusses possible origins of apparent discrepancies, highlights remaining gaps in current knowledge, and proposes challenges for further study.

  9. Enterorrafias em plano aposicional convencionale com adesivo à base de cianoacrilato no cólon descendente de eqüinos Conventional appositional pattern and cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive in descending colon enterorrhaphy in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Acosta Duarte

    2002-08-01

    tissue adhesive of cyanoacrilate in the equine descending colon and to compare with an apposition pattern. Fifteen horses were used. Surgical intervention was done using laparotomy by the left flank, with the animals in right lateral recumbent position, under inhaler anesthesia. After exteriorization of the descending colon, two five-centimeter-long enterotomies were done, 20cm apart one from the other. The horses were randomly distributed in five groups of three animals each. After human methods of euthanasia, necropsy was done with complete examination and documentation of sutured areas of the descending colon on post operation (days 3,7,14,35 and 70, one group at each time. The butyl-2-cyanoacrilate and the suture thread poliglactin 910 both showed that they are appropriate to be used in enterorrhaphies of this organ. The suture thread poliglactin 910 caused more intense initial inflamation compared to the cyanoacrilate, and later, both caused granulomatous inflammatory of the sort of foreign body. This was observed, firstly, in the suture thread poliglactin 910 (on day seven and starting from the day 35 around cyanoacrilate.

  10. Effect of "phase change" complex on postoperative adhesion prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Xia, Dong-Lin; Shen, Ling-Ling; He, Hong; Chen, Chao; Wang, Yu-Fei; Chen, Yan-Pei; Guo, Ling-Yan; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2016-05-01

    Postsurgical peritoneal adhesion is a major clinical problem. Numerous anti-adhesion products have been studied, but none could be easily used to provide a physical barrier. In this study, we developed a "phase change" anti-adhesion barrier for reducing peritoneal adhesion by cross-linked copolymerization of O-carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) and CaCl2 and addition of cyclosporin A (CsA). The CMC-CaCl2-CsA compound was characterized by equilibrium swelling rate, weight loss, releasing effect, and coagulation test, and its biosafety was characterized by acute oral toxicity, hemolysis, and cytotoxicity. Intestinal adhesion model was applied on 64 Sprague-Dawley rats, which received CMC, CMC-CaCl2, or CMC-CaCl2-CsA treatment. At postoperative days 7 and 14, the rats were euthanized, and adhesions were graded by an investigator blinded to the treatment groups, using a predetermined adhesion scoring system. The cecum and adhesion tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and antibodies for matrix metalloproteinase-9 and TIMP-1 for further histopathologic examination. The phase change anti-adhesive material exhibited effective blood clotting and were nontoxic in clotting experiments and acute toxicity test. The degradation rate could be adjusted using phosphate-buffered solution with varying pH. Adhesions were significantly reduced in the CMC-CaCl2-CsA treatment group compared with the control group (P treatment group at 7 days after surgery. "Phase-change" adhesive can undergo changes after application, and it inhibits the formation of abdominal adhesions after surgery. The material is convenient for using by surgeons and provides an effective tool for intestinal adhesion prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mussel adhesion - essential footwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J Herbert

    2017-02-15

    Robust adhesion to wet, salt-encrusted, corroded and slimy surfaces has been an essential adaptation in the life histories of sessile marine organisms for hundreds of millions of years, but it remains a major impasse for technology. Mussel adhesion has served as one of many model systems providing a fundamental understanding of what is required for attachment to wet surfaces. Most polymer engineers have focused on the use of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (Dopa), a peculiar but abundant catecholic amino acid in mussel adhesive proteins. The premise of this Review is that although Dopa does have the potential for diverse cohesive and adhesive interactions, these will be difficult to achieve in synthetic homologs without a deeper knowledge of mussel biology; that is, how, at different length and time scales, mussels regulate the reactivity of their adhesive proteins. To deposit adhesive proteins onto target surfaces, the mussel foot creates an insulated reaction chamber with extreme reaction conditions such as low pH, low ionic strength and high reducing poise. These conditions enable adhesive proteins to undergo controlled fluid-fluid phase separation, surface adsorption and spreading, microstructure formation and, finally, solidification. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Handbook of adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Packham, D E

    2006-01-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require.This second edition includ

  13. Histoacryl injection in the management of fourth branchial fistula

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J Laryngol Otol 1995; 109:999–1000. 6 Chaudhary N, Gupta A, Motwani G, Kumar S. Fistula of the fourth branchial pouch. Am J Otolaryngol Head Neck Med Surg 2003; 24:250–252. 7 Franciosi JP, Sell LL, Conley SF, Bolender DL. Pyriform sinus malformations: a cadaveric representation. J Pediatr Surg 2002; 37:533–538.

  14. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  15. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  16. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  17. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation...

  18. Adhesion on Nanoorganized Multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolla Kazzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured multilayers composed of alternate organic (alkyldithiol and metallic (gold layers are grafted onto glass plates and prepared in order to modify the mechanical and local dissipative properties of a thin surface layer of the substrate. The adhesion phenomenon between a polyisoprene elastomer and these layers is presented and verified by two theories, namely, Johnson, Kendall, Roberts (JKR and linear elastic fracture mechanics. The increase in adhesion with contact time following a power law has been clearly noted.

  19. The influence of tobacco smoking on adhesion molecule profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer RM

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sequential interactions between several adhesion molecules and their ligands regulate lymphocyte circulation and leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory foci. Adhesion molecules are, therefore, central and critical components of the immune and inflammatory system. We review the evidence that tobacco smoking dysregulates specific components of the adhesion cascade, which may be a common factor in several smoking-induced diseases. Smoking causes inappropriate leukocyte activation, leukocyte-endothelial adhesion, and neutrophil entrapment in the microvasculature, which may help initiate local tissue destruction. Appropriate inflammatory reactions may thus be compromised. In addition to smoke-induced alterations to membrane bound endothelial and leukocyte adhesion molecule expression, which may help explain the above phenomena, smoking has a profound influence on circulating adhesion molecule profiles, most notably sICAM-1 and specific sCD44 variants. Elevated concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules may simply reflect ongoing inflammatory processes. However, increasing evidence suggests that specific soluble adhesion molecules are immunomodulatory, and that alterations to soluble adhesion molecule profiles may represent a significant risk factor for several diverse diseases. This evidence is discussed herein.

  20. The influence of tobacco smoking on adhesion molecule profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer RM

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sequential interactions between several adhesion molecules and their ligands regulate lymphocyte circulation and leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory foci. Adhesion molecules are, therefore, central and critical components of the immune and inflammatory system. We review the evidence that tobacco smoking dysregulates specific components of the adhesion cascade, which may be a common factor in several smoking-induced diseases. Smoking causes inappropriate leukocyte activation, leukocyte-endothelial adhesion, and neutrophil entrapment in the microvasculature, which may help initiate local tissue destruction. Appropriate inflammatory reactions may thus be compromised. In addition to smoke-induced alterations to membrane bound endothelial and leukocyte adhesion molecule expression, which may help explain the above phenomena, smoking has a profound influence on circulating adhesion molecule profiles, most notably sICAM-1 and specific sCD44 variants. Elevated concentrations of soluble adhesion molecules may simply reflect ongoing inflammatory processes. However, increasing evidence suggests that specific soluble adhesion molecules are immunomodulatory, and that alterations to soluble adhesion molecule profiles may represent a significant risk factor for several diverse diseases. This evidence is discussed herein.

  1. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Khalili, Amelia; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events. PMID:26251901

  2. The effect of Kombucha on post-operative intra-abdominal adhesion formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Mohammadi, Hussein Benagozar

    2009-04-01

    Peritoneal adhesions are fibrous bands of tissues formed between organs that are normally separated and/or between organs and the internal body wall after peritoneal injury. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of intra-peritoneal administration of Kombucha on intra-peritoneal adhesions. Eighty Wistar rats were subjected to standardized lesion by scraping model and were randomly divided into two groups. Group I received no treatment, and Group II received 15 ml of Kombucha solution intra-peritoneally. On the post-operative 14th day adhesion intensity score, inflammatory cell reaction and number of adhesion bands were determined. In the control group, there were no rats with grade 0 and I adhesions. In the group II, there were 26 rats (78.8%) with grade 0-2 adhesions. Adhesion intensity was significantly less in group II (PKombucha might be useful for preventing peritoneal adhesions.

  3. Tenomodulin expression in the periodontal ligament enhances cellular adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuske Komiyama

    Full Text Available Tenomodulin (Tnmd is a type II transmembrane protein characteristically expressed in dense connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments. Its expression in the periodontal ligament (PDL has also been demonstrated, though the timing and function remain unclear. We investigated the expression of Tnmd during murine tooth eruption and explored its biological functions in vitro. Tnmd expression was related to the time of eruption when occlusal force was transferred to the teeth and surrounding tissues. Tnmd overexpression enhanced cell adhesion in NIH3T3 and human PDL cells. In addition, Tnmd-knockout fibroblasts showed decreased cell adhesion. In the extracellular portions of Tnmd, the BRICHOS domain or CS region was found to be responsible for Tnmd-mediated enhancement of cell adhesion. These results suggest that Tnmd acts on the maturation or maintenance of the PDL by positively regulating cell adhesion via its BRICHOS domain.

  4. Pycnogenol prevents peritoneal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbaz, Ahmet; Aynioglu, Oner; Isik, Hatice; Gun, Banu Dogan; Cengil, Osman; Erol, Onur

    2015-12-01

    This study tested the ability of pycnogenol, an extract from the bark of the French maritime pine (Pinus pinaster), to prevent intra-abdominal adhesions. Thirty female Wistar albino rats were separated randomly into three equal groups: Group (1) the control group, which underwent surgery, but was given no drug; Group (2) given 10 mg/kg of pycnogenol dissolved in normal saline intraperitoneally for 10 days after surgery; and Group (3) given 0.1 mL of normal saline for 10 days intraperitoneally after surgery. On post-operative day 10, all of the animals were killed and any adhesions were evaluated macroscopically and histopathologically. The macroscopic adhesion scores (mean ± SD) for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were 2.5 ± 0.53, 0.60 ± 0.70, and 2.0 ± 0.82, respectively. The macroscopic adhesion score was significantly lower in Group 2 than in Groups 1 and 3 (p Pycnogenol was found to be effective at preventing surgery-related adhesions in an animal model.

  5. Mounting ground sections of teeth: Cyanoacrylate adhesive versus Canada balsam

    OpenAIRE

    Manogna R.L. Vangala; Amrutha Rudraraju; Subramanyam, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hard tissues can be studied by either decalcification or by preparing ground sections. Various mounting media have been tried and used for ground sections of teeth. However, there are very few studies on the use of cyanoacrylate adhesive as a mounting medium. Aims: The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of cyanoacrylate adhesive (Fevikwik™) as a mounting medium for ground sections of teeth and to compare these ground sections with those mounted with Canada balsam. Mat...

  6. [The application of universal adhesives in dental bonding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingmei; Lei, Wenlong; Yang, Hongye; Huang, Cui

    2016-03-01

    The bonding restoration has become an important clinical technique for the development of dental bonding technology. Because of its easy operation and the maximum preservation of tooth tissues, bonding repair is widely used in dental restoration. The recent multi-mode universal adhesives have brought new progress in dental bonding restoration. In this article the universal adhesives were reviewed according to its definition, development, improvement, application features and possible problems.

  7. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  8. Micromorphological characterization of adhesive interface of sound dentin and total-etch and self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobac, Milan; Stojanac, Igor; Ramić, Bojana; Premović, Milica; Petrović, Ljubomir

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal in restorative dentistry has always been to achieve strong and permanent bond between the dental tissues and filling materials. It is not easy to achieve this task because the bonding process is different for enamel and dentin-dentin is more humid and more organic than enamel. It is moisture and organic nature of dentin that make this hard tissue very complex to achieve adhesive bond. One of the first and most widely used tools for examining the adhesive bond between hard dental tissues and composite restorative materials is scanning electron microscopy. The aim of this study was scanning electron microscopy analyzes the interfacial micro morphology of total-etch and self-etch adhesives. Micro morphological characteristics of interface between total-etch adhesive (Prime & Bond NT) in combination with the corresponding composite (Ceram X Mono) were compared with those of self-etching adhesive (AdheSE One) in, combination with the corresponding composite (Tetric EvoCeram). The specimens were observed under 1000 x magnification of scanning electron microscopy (JEOL, JSM-6460 Low Vacuum). Measurement of the thickness of the hybrid layer of the examined com posite systems was performed with the software of the device used (NIH Image Analyser). Micromorphological analysis of interface showed that the hybrid layer in sound dentin was well formed, its average thickness being 2.68 microm, with a large number of resin tags and a large amount of lateral branches for specimens with a composite system Prime & Bond NT-Ceram X Mono. However, the specimens' with composite systems Adhese One-Tetric EvoCeram did not show the presence of hybrid layer and the resin tags were poorly represented. The results of this study suggest that total-etch adhesives bond better with sound dentin than self-etch adhesive.

  9. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott [Dublin, CA; Rader, Daniel John [Albuquerque, NM; Walton, Christopher [Berkeley, CA; Folta, James [Livermore, CA

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  10. Micro-Raman spectroscopic studies on the adhesive-dentine interface and the degree of conversion of dental adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Miletic, Vesna

    2010-01-01

    A series of studies on monomer to polymer conversion in adhesive systems was undertaken using micro-Raman spectroscopy. A database of micro-Raman spectra was compiled for identification of tooth tissues and materials. The degree of conversion was assessed as a function of time and light source. Linear and two-dimensional micro- Raman characterisations of the adhesive-dentine and resin-based composite-adhesivedentine interfaces were performed. The degree of monomer to polymer co...

  11. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  12. Myoferlin depletion elevates focal adhesion kinase and paxillin phosphorylation and enhances cell-matrix adhesion in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, B N; Li, R; Ackerman, W E; Ghadiali, S N; Powell, H M; Kniss, D A

    2015-04-15

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of malignant death among women. A crucial feature of metastatic cancers is their propensity to lose adhesion to the underlying basement membrane as they transition to a motile phenotype and invade surrounding tissue. Attachment to the extracellular matrix is mediated by a complex of adhesion proteins, including integrins, signaling molecules, actin and actin-binding proteins, and scaffolding proteins. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is pivotal for the organization of focal contacts and maturation into focal adhesions, and disruption of this process is a hallmark of early cancer invasive potential. Our recent work has revealed that myoferlin (MYOF) mediates breast tumor cell motility and invasive phenotype. In this study we demonstrate that noninvasive breast cancer cell lines exhibit increased cell-substrate adhesion and that silencing of MYOF using RNAi in the highly invasive human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 also enhances cell-substrate adhesion. In addition, we detected elevated tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK (FAK(Y397)) and paxillin (PAX(Y118)), markers of focal adhesion protein activation. Morphometric analysis of PAX expression revealed that RNAi-mediated depletion of MYOF resulted in larger, more elongated focal adhesions, in contrast to cells transduced with a control virus (MDA-231(LVC) cells), which exhibited smaller focal contacts. Finally, MYOF silencing in MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited a more elaborate ventral cytoskeletal structure near focal adhesions, typified by pronounced actin stress fibers. These data support the hypothesis that MYOF regulates cell adhesions and cell-substrate adhesion strength and may account for the high degree of motility in invasive breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  14. Ultramorphology of pre-treated adhesive interfaces between self-adhesive resin cement and tooth structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Nemesio de Barros PEREIRA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Convencional resin cements can be used in combination with a total-etch system in a conventional mode or as self-adhesive resin cements. The latter are less technique sensitive and able to bond to dental tissues without previous treatment or adhesive layer and requires only a single step to be applied to dental structures. Objective To compare qualitatively the adhesive interfaces of two self-adhesive resin cements and one conventional resin cement after different tooth surface treatments under scanning electron microscopy. Material and method 42 crowns of bovine incisors were sectioned and flattened exposing enamel (E or dentine (D substrate. Subgroups were defined according to conditioning type and time: E1—no treatment, E2—37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds, E3—37% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds; D1—no treatment, D2—37% phosphoric acid for 5 seconds; D3—11.5% polyacrylic acid for 15 seconds. A resin block was bonded to each substrate using the self-adhesive resin cements RelyX U100 (3M ESPE and RelyX U200 (3M ESPE. As a reference hybrid layer, six resin blocks were luted with RelyX ARC and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive system (3M ESPE (enamel—EA; dentine—DA. After aging for 7 days in a moist environment at 37±1°C, samples were prepared for microscopy analysis. Result and Discussion In the ARC specimens, there was hybrid layer formation in both EA and DA. U100 E1 showed gaps at the adhesive interface, while E2 and E3 showed interaction for both self-adhesive cements. There was superficial interaction with bothU100 and U200 in D1, while in D2 and D3, resin tags were only observed in the case of U100. Conclusion It was concluded that substrate conditioning may enhance the interaction between self-adhesive resin cements and dental tissues, although this is not the case for RelyX U200 and dentine.

  15. Impact of static cold storage VS hypothermic machine preservation on ischemic kidney graft: inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules as markers of ischemia/reperfusion tissue damage. Our preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco; Soldini, Gabriele; Ietto, Giuseppe; Chiappa, Corrado; Maritan, Emanuele; Villa, Francesca; Carcano, Giulio; Dionigi, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    At the present time, deceased heart-beating donor kidney allografts are usually stored cold. Extended-criteria donor (ECD) grafts show higher sensitivity to ischemia-reperfusion damage than standard kidneys. The increasing use of marginal organs in clinical transplantation urgently requires a more effective preservation system. Pulsatile hypothermic machine perfusion has shown major advantages over static cold storage in terms of reduced organ injury during preservation and improved early graft function. This preliminary study aims to compare pulsatile hypothermic machine perfusion and static cold storage of kidney allografts, outlining differences in the levels of early inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-1β) and soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (sICAM-1) in perfusion and preservation liquid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Surgical Associates Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Wood Composite Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  17. Adhesive tape exfoliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal graphite can be cleaved by the use of an adhesive tape. This was also the initial route for obtaining graphene, a one-layer thick graphite slab. In this letter a few simple and fun considerations are presented in an attempt to shed some light on why this procedure is successful...

  18. The contribution of adhesion signaling to lactogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Bethanie; Cutler, Mary Lou

    2010-10-01

    The mammary gland undergoes hormonally controlled cycles of pubertal maturation, pregnancy, lactation, and involution, and these processes rely on complex signaling mechanisms, many of which are controlled by cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. The adhesion of epithelial cells to the extracellular matrix initiates signaling mechanisms that have an impact on cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation throughout lactation. The control of integrin expression on the mammary epithelial cells, the composition of the extracellular matrix and the presence of secreted matricellular proteins all contribute to essential adhesion signaling during lactogenesis. In vitro and in vivo studies, including the results from genetically engineered mice, have shed light on the regulation of these processes at the cell and tissue level and have led to increased understanding of the essential signaling components that are regulated in temporal and cell specific manner during lactogenesis. Recent studies suggest that a secreted matricellular protein, CTGF/CCN2, may play a role in lactogenic differentiation through binding to β1 integrin complexes, enhancing the production of extracellular matrix components and contributions to cell adhesion signaling.

  19. Egg Albumen as a Fast and Strong Medical Adhesive Glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaige; Liu, Yuqing; Bu, Shousan; Wu, Tianyi; Chang, Qiang; Singh, Gurankit; Cao, Xiaojian; Deng, Chuang; Li, Bingyun; Luo, Gaoxing; Xing, Malcolm

    2017-10-01

    Sutures penetrate tissues to close wounds. This process leads to inflammatory responses, prolongs healing time, and increases operation complexity. It becomes even worse when sutures are applied to stress-sensitive and fragile tissues. By bonding tissues via forming covalent bonds, some medical adhesives are not convenient to be used by surgeons and have side effects to the tissues. Here egg albumen adhesive (EAA) is reported with ultrahigh adhesive strength to bond various types of materials and can be easily used without any chemical and physical modifications. Compared with several commercial medical glues, EAA exhibits stronger adhesive property on porcine skin, glass, polydimethylsiloxane. The EAA also shows exceptional underwater adhesive strength. Finally, wound closure using EAA on poly(caprolactone) nanofibrous sheet and general sutures is investigated and compared in a rat wound model. EAA also does not show strong long-term inflammatory response, suggesting that EAA has potential as a medical glue, considering its abundant source, simple fabrication process, inherent nontoxicity, and low cost. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Shear lag sutures: Improved suture repair through the use of adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderman, Stephen W; Kormpakis, Ioannis; Gelberman, Richard H; Birman, Victor; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Genin, Guy M; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2015-09-01

    Suture materials and surgical knot tying techniques have improved dramatically since their first use over five millennia ago. However, the approach remains limited by the ability of the suture to transfer load to tissue at suture anchor points. Here, we predict that adhesive-coated sutures can improve mechanical load transfer beyond the range of performance of existing suture methods, thereby strengthening repairs and decreasing the risk of failure. The mechanical properties of suitable adhesives were identified using a shear lag model. Examination of the design space for an optimal adhesive demonstrated requirements for strong adhesion and low stiffness to maximize the strength of the adhesive-coated suture repair construct. To experimentally assess the model, we evaluated single strands of sutures coated with highly flexible cyanoacrylates (Loctite 4903 and 4902), cyanoacrylate (Loctite QuickTite Instant Adhesive Gel), rubber cement, rubber/gasket adhesive (1300 Scotch-Weld Neoprene High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive), an albumin-glutaraldehyde adhesive (BioGlue), or poly(dopamine). As a clinically relevant proof-of-concept, cyanoacrylate-coated sutures were then used to perform a clinically relevant flexor digitorum tendon repair in cadaver tissue. The repair performed with adhesive-coated suture had significantly higher strength compared to the standard repair without adhesive. Notably, cyanoacrylate provides strong adhesion with high stiffness and brittle behavior, and is therefore not an ideal adhesive for enhancing suture repair. Nevertheless, the improvement in repair properties in a clinically relevant setting, even using a non-ideal adhesive, demonstrates the potential for the proposed approach to improve outcomes for treatments requiring suture fixation. Further study is necessary to develop a strongly adherent, compliant adhesive within the optimal design space described by the model. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier

  1. Pathogenesis of postoperative adhesion formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrekers, B.W.J.; Kooistra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current views on the pathogenesis of adhesion formation are based on the "classical concept of adhesion formation", namely that a reduction in peritoneal fibrinolytic activity following peritoneal trauma is of key importance in adhesion development. Methods: A non-systematic literature

  2. Adhesive bonding of wood materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles B. Vick

    1999-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood components has played an essential role in the development and growth of the forest products industry and has been a key factor in the efficient utilization of our timber resource. The largest use of adhesives is in the construction industry. By far, the largest amounts of adhesives are used to manufacture building materials, such as plywood,...

  3. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  4. Clock upregulates intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression and promotes mononuclear cells adhesion to endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yinghua; Meng, Dan; Sun, Ning; Zhu, Zhu; Zhao, Ran; Lu, Chao; Chen, Sifeng; Hua, Luchun; Qian, Ruizhe

    2014-01-10

    Clock is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that plays important role in circadian rhythms of various physiological functions. Previous study showed that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was reduced in the liver tissues of Clock mutant mice. However, how Clock regulates ICAM-1 expression and whether Clock affects cell adhesion function remain unknown. In the present study, we found that exogenous expression of Clock upregulated the gene expressions of ICAM-1 and other adhesion-related genes including VCAM1 and CCL-2, and increased the transcriptional activity of ICAM-1 in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell lines. In contrast, loss of Clock decreased these gene expressions and ICAM-1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that Clock binds to the E-box-like enhancer of ICAM-1 gene. ICAM-1 gene showed rhythmic expression in endothelial cells after serum shock in vitro, suggesting ICAM-1 may be a Clock-controlled gene. Clock regulates the adhesion of mononuclear cells to endothelial cells via ICAM-1. Together, our findings show that Clock is a positive regulator of ICAM-1, and promotes the adhesion of mononuclear cells to endothelial cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An In Vitro Evaluation of Leakage of Two Etch and Rinse and Two Self-Etch Adhesives after Thermocycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Sabine; Bolette, Amandine; Seidel, Laurence; Guéders, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Our experiment evaluated the microleakage in resin composite restorations bonded to dental tissues with different adhesive systems. 40 class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of each tooth with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in cementum (root dentin). The teeth were restored with Z100 resin composite bonded with different adhesive systems: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP), a 3-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (SB1), a 2-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, AdheSE One (ADSE-1), a 1-step Self-Etch adhesive, and AdheSE (ADSE), a 2-step Self-Etch adhesive. Teeth were thermocycled and immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution. When both interfaces were considered, SBMP has exhibited significantly less microleakage than other adhesive systems (resp., for SB1, ADSE-1 and ADSE, P = 0.0007, P adhesives, microleakage was found greater at enamel than at dentin interfaces (for ADSE, P = 0.024 and for ADSE-1, P adhesive systems, there was no significant difference between enamel and dentin interfaces; (3) SBMP was found significantly better than other adhesives both at enamel and dentin interfaces. In our experiment Etch and Rinse adhesives remain better than Self-Etch adhesives at enamel interface. In addition, there was no statistical difference between 1-step (ADSE-1) and 2-step (ADSE) Self-Etch adhesives. PMID:22675358

  6. An in vitro evaluation of leakage of two etch and rinse and two self-etch adhesives after thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Sabine; Bolette, Amandine; Seidel, Laurence; Guéders, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    Our experiment evaluated the microleakage in resin composite restorations bonded to dental tissues with different adhesive systems. 40 class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of each tooth with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in cementum (root dentin). The teeth were restored with Z100 resin composite bonded with different adhesive systems: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP), a 3-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (SB1), a 2-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, AdheSE One (ADSE-1), a 1-step Self-Etch adhesive, and AdheSE (ADSE), a 2-step Self-Etch adhesive. Teeth were thermocycled and immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution. When both interfaces were considered, SBMP has exhibited significantly less microleakage than other adhesive systems (resp., for SB1, ADSE-1 and ADSE, P = 0.0007, P Etch adhesives, microleakage was found greater at enamel than at dentin interfaces (for ADSE, P = 0.024 and for ADSE-1, P Etch and Rinse adhesive systems, there was no significant difference between enamel and dentin interfaces; (3) SBMP was found significantly better than other adhesives both at enamel and dentin interfaces. In our experiment Etch and Rinse adhesives remain better than Self-Etch adhesives at enamel interface. In addition, there was no statistical difference between 1-step (ADSE-1) and 2-step (ADSE) Self-Etch adhesives.

  7. Adhesion of dendritic cells to endothelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alun Brown, K

    2001-01-01

    Many of the interdigitating dendritic cells (DC) that reside in lymph nodes arise from the migration of tissue interstitial DC such as Langerhans cells in the skin (1). Although this migration appears to be stimulated by cytokines (2), relatively little is known of the mechanisms underlying the maintenance and expansion of DC in the skin. Langerhans cells are bone-marrow derived (3), and their replacement in the epidermis following transportation of antigen to lymphoid tissue is likely to depend upon the tissue extravasation of circulating DC. Moreover, the continuous passage of DC across blood vessel walls could be responsible for the increase in DC numbers in tumors (4) and sites of chronic inflammation (5,6). Thus, germane to both homeostasis and pathological disturbance would be the interaction of circulating DC with blood vessel walls, and their subsequent entry into the surrounding tissue. The first stage in leukocyte migration across blood vessel walls is binding to vascular endothelium, and for lymphocytes, monocytes and neutrophils this event is governed by adhesion molecules on their surface recognizing corresponding endothelial ligands commonly referred to as vascular adhesion molecules (7). Despite the plethora of information concerning the molecular nature of the attachment of the major leukocyte subpopulations to endothelium, relatively few studies have been undertaken with DC. Understanding the controlling features of DC-endo-thelial cell interaction would be relevant to the clinical application of DC in immunodeficient disorders and malignancies (8,9) and to antagonizing their entry into sites of chronic inflammatory lesions.

  8. Amine-functionalized polypyrrole: Inherently cell adhesive conducting polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Y; Schmidt, Christine E

    2015-06-01

    Electrically conducting polymers (CPs) have been recognized as novel biomaterials that can electrically communicate with biological systems. For their tissue engineering applications, CPs have been modified to promote cell adhesion for improved interactions between biomaterials and cells/tissues. Conventional approaches to improve cell adhesion involve the surface modification of CPs with biomolecules, such as physical adsorption of cell adhesive proteins and polycationic polymers, or their chemical immobilization; however, these approaches require additional multiple modification steps with expensive biomolecules. In this study, as a simple and effective alternative to such additional biomolecule treatment, we synthesized amine-functionalized polypyrrole (APPy) that inherently presents cell adhesion-supporting positive charges under physiological conditions. The synthesized APPy provides electrical activity in a moderate range and a hydrophilic surface compared to regular polypyrrole (PPy) homopolymers. Under both serum and serum-free conditions, APPy exhibited superior attachment of human dermal fibroblasts and Schwann cells compared to PPy homopolymer controls. Moreover, Schwann cell adhesion onto the APPy copolymer was at least similar to that on poly-l-lysine treated PPy controls. Our results indicate that amine-functionalized CP substrates will be useful to achieve good cell adhesion and potentially electrically stimulate various cells. In addition, amine functionality present on CPs can further serve as a novel and flexible platform to chemically tether various bioactive molecules, such as growth factors, antibodies, and chemical drugs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cadherin-mediated cell sorting not determined by binding or adhesion specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Niessen, Carien M; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    Cadherin adhesion molecules play important roles in the establishment of tissue boundaries. Cells expressing different cadherins sort out from each other in cell aggregation assays. To determine the contribution of cadherin binding and adhesion specificity to the sorting process, we examined the adhesion of cells to different purified cadherin proteins. Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing one of four different cadherins were allowed to bind to the purified cadherin extracellular domai...

  10. Osteopontin adsorption to Gram-positive cells reduces adhesion forces and attachment to surfaces under flow

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, M. F.; G. Zeng; T. R. Neu; Meyer, Rikke L.; Baelum, V.; Schlafer, S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bovine milk protein osteopontin (OPN) may be an efficient means to prevent bacterial adhesion to dental tissues and control biofilm formation. This study sought to determine to what extent OPN impacts adhesion forces and surface attachment of different bacterial strains involved in dental caries or medical device–related infections. It further investigated if OPN’s effect on adhesion is caused by blocking the accessibility of glycoconjugates on bacterial surfaces. Bacterial adhes...

  11. Inhibition of Leukocyte Adhesion by Developmental Endothelial Locus-1 (Del-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Eun Young

    2009-01-01

    The leukocyte adhesion to endothelium is pivotal in leukocyte recruitment which takes place during inflammatory, autoimmune and infectious conditions. The interaction between leukocytes and endothelium requires an array of adhesion molecules expressed on leukocytes and endothelial cells, thereby promoting leukocyte recruitment into sites of inflammation and tissue injury. Intervention with the adhesion molecules provides a platform for development of anti-inflammatory therapeutics. This revie...

  12. The cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin2 regulates brush border length and organization in Drosophila renal tubules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Rainey, Stephanie M.; Veland, Iben Rønn

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms rely on cell adhesion molecules to coordinate cell-cell interactions, and to provide navigational cues during tissue formation. In Drosophila, Fasciclin 2 (Fas2) has been intensively studied due to its role in nervous system development and maintenance; yet, Fas2 is most...... role for this well-known cell adhesion molecule, and propose that Fas2-mediated intermicrovillar homophilic adhesion complexes help stabilize the brush border....

  13. Adhesion determinants of the Streptococcus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschioni, Monica; Pansegrau, Werner; Barocchi, Michèle A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Streptococci are clinically important Gram‐positive bacteria that are capable to cause a wide variety of diseases in humans and animals. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA sequences of the streptococcal species reveal a clustering pattern, reflecting, with a few exceptions, their pathogenic potential and ecological preferences. Microbial adhesion to host tissues is the initial critical event in the pathogenesis of most infections. Streptococci use multiple adhesins to attach to the epithelium, and their expression is regulated in response to environmental and growth conditions. Bacterial adhesins recognize and bind cell surface molecules and extracellular matrix components through specific domains that for certain adhesin families have been well defined and found conserved across the streptococcal species. In this review, we present the different streptococcal adhesin families categorized on the basis of their adhesive properties and structural characteristics, and, when available, we focus the attention on conserved functional domains. PMID:21255337

  14. Management of adhesive capsulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stupay KL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristen L Stupay,1 Andrew S Neviaser2 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a condition of capsular contracture that reduces both active and passive glenohumeral motion. The cause of adhesive capsulitis is not known but it is strongly associated with endocrine abnormalities such as diabetes. Diverse terminology and the absence of definitive criteria for diagnosis make evaluating treatment modalities difficult. Many treatment methods have been reported, most with some success, but few have been proved to alter the natural course of this disease. Most afflicted patients will achieve acceptable shoulder function without surgery. Those who remain debilitated after 8–12 months are reasonable candidates for invasive treatments. Here, the various treatment methods and the data to support their use are reviewed. Keywords: frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, periarthritis, painful shoulder 

  15. Adhesion between cerebroside bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, K; Snyder, D S; McIntosh, T J

    1999-11-16

    The structure, hydration properties, and adhesion energy of the membrane glycolipid galactosylceramide (GalCer) were studied by osmotic stress/X-ray diffraction analysis.(1) Fully hydrated GalCer gave a repeat period of 67 A, which decreased less than 2 A with application of applied osmotic pressures as large as 1.6 x 10(9) dyn/cm(2). These results, along with the invariance of GalCer structure obtained by a Fourier analysis of the X-ray data, indicated that there was an extremely narrow fluid space (less than the diameter of a single water molecule) between fully hydrated cerebroside bilayers. Electron density profiles showed that the hydrocarbon chains from apposing GalCer monolayers partially interdigitated in the center of the bilayer. To obtain information on the adhesive properties of GalCer bilayers, we incorporated into the bilayer various mole ratios of the negatively charged lipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) to provide known electrostatic repulsion between the bilayers. Although 17 and 20 mol % DPPG swelled (disjoined) the GalCer bilayers by an amount predictable from electrostatic double-layer theory, 5, 10, 13, and 15 mol % DPPG did not disjoin the bilayers. By calculating the magnitude of the electrostatic pressure necessary to disjoin the bilayers, we estimated the adhesion energy for GalCer bilayers to be about -1.5 erg/cm(2), a much larger value than that previously measured for phosphatidylcholine bilayers. The observed discontinuous disjoining with increased electrostatic pressure and this relatively large value for adhesion energy indicated the presence of an attractive interaction, in addition to van der Waals attraction, between cerebroside bilayers. Possible attractive interactions are hydrogen bond formation and hydrophobic interactions between the galactose headgroups of apposing GalCer bilayers.

  16. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  17. Cell adhesion on nanotopography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Irene; Kimura, Masahiro; Stockton, Rebecca; Jacobson, Bruce; Russell, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Cell adhesion, a key element in understanding the cell-biomaterial interactions, underpins proper cell growth, function and survival. Understanding the parameters influencing cell adhesion is critical for applications in biosensors, implants and bioreactors. A gradient surface is used to study the effect of the surface topography on cell adhesion. A gradient surface is generated by block copolymer and homopolymer blends. The two homopolymers will phase separate on the micron scale and gradually decrease to nano-scale by the microphase separation of the diblock. Gradient surfaces offer a unique opportunity to probe lateral variations in the topography and interactions. Using thin films of mixtures of diblock copolymers of PS-b-MMA with PS and PMMA homopolymers, where the concentration of the PS-b-MMA varies across the surface, a gradient in the size scale of the morphology, from the nanoscopic to microscopic, was produced. By UV exposure, the variation in morphology translated into a variation in topography. The extent of cell spreading and cytoskeleton formation was investigated and marked dependence on the length scale of the surface topography was found.

  18. [Fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam; Staszewski, Jacek; Sadowska, Marta; Bogusławska-Walecka, Romana

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a rare disease with insidious course. It causes damage of the spinal cord and nerve roots. The causes of adhesive arachnoiditis include earlier traumatic injury of the spinal cord, surgery, intrathecal administration of therapeutic substances (e.g. anaesthetics, chemotherapy) or contrast media, bleeding, and inflammation. It can also be idiopathic or iatrogenic. We present the case of a 42-year-old patient with fulminant adhesive arachnoiditis which was provoked by spinal surgery and caused severe neurological disability with profound, progressive, flaccid paraparesis and bladder dysfunction. The electromyography (EMG) showed serious damage of nerves of both lower limbs at the level of motor roots L2-S2 and damage of the motor neuron at the level of Th11-Th12 on the right side. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral and thoracic part of the spinal cord demonstrated cystic liquid spaces in the lumen of the dural sac in the bottom part of the cervical spine and at the Th2-Th10 level, modelling the lateral and anterior surface of the cord. Because of the vast lesions, surgery could not be performed. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation brought only a small clinical improvement.

  19. Development of phosphorylated adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilow, N.; Giants, T. W.; Jenkins, R. K.; Campbell, P. L.

    1983-01-01

    The synthesis of epoxy prepolymers containing phosphorus was carried out in such a manner as to provide adhesives containing at least 5 percent of this element. The purpose of this was to impart fire retardant properties to the adhesive. The two epoxy derivatives, bis(4-glycidyl-oxyphenyl)phenylphosphine oxide and bis(4-glycidyl-2-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphonate, and a curing agent, bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide, were used in conjunction with one another and along with conventional epoxy resins and curing agents to bond Tedlar and Polyphenylethersulfone films to Kerimid-glass syntactic foam-filled honeycomb structures. Elevated temperatures are required to cure the epoxy resins with the phosphorus-contaning diamine; however, when Tedlar is being bonded, lower curing temperatures must be used to avoid shrinkage and the concomitant formation of surface defects. Thus, the phosphorus-containing aromatic amine curing agent cannot be used alone, although it is possible to use it in conjunction with an aliphatic amine which would allow lower cure temperatures to be used. The experimental epoxy resins have not provided adhesive bonds quite as strong as those provided by Epon 828 when compared in peel tests, but the differences are not very significant. It should be noted, if optimum properties are to be realized. In any case the fire retardant characteristics of the neat resin systems obtained are quite pronounced, since in most cases the self-extinguishing properties are evident almost instantly when specimens are removed from a flame.

  20. Platelet-independent adhesion of calcium-loaded erythrocytes to von Willebrand factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, M.W.J. (Michel W.J.); R. Bierings (Ruben); Meems, H. (Henriet); F.P.J. Mul (F. P J); D. Geerts (Dirk); A.P.J. Vlaar (Alexander); J. Voorberg (Jan); P.L. Hordijk (Peter )

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAdhesion of erythrocytes to endothelial cells lining the vascular wall can cause vaso-occlusive events that impair blood flow which in turn may result in ischemia and tissue damage. Adhesion of erythrocytes to vascular endothelial cells has been described in multiple hemolytic disorders,

  1. Development of Non-Cell Adhesive Vascular Grafts Using Supramolecular Building Blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Almen, Geert C.; Talacua, Hanna; Ippel, Bastiaan D.; Mollet, Björne B.; Ramaekers, Mellany; Simonet, Marc; Smits, Anthal I. P. M.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.; Kluin, Jolanda; Dankers, Patricia Y. W.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free approaches to in situ tissue engineering require materials that are mechanically stable and are able to control cell-adhesive behavior upon implantation. Here, the development of mechanically stable grafts with non-cell adhesive properties via a mix-and-match approach using

  2. Dental adhesives of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2002-01-01

    The current trend in the development of dentin adhesives attempts to simplify bonding steps and make them more user-friendly. However, optimizing speed and efficiency should be accomplished without major tradeoffs in the quality or durability of resin bonds. Although dentin adhesives have improved tremendously over the past decade, postoperative sensitivity, incomplete marginal seal, premature bond degradation, biocompatibility, and compromised bonding to abnormal substrates are still considered potential problems associated with their use. Advances in different scientific disciplines will enrich the pool from which ideas may be drawn in designing future dentin adhesives. It is probably on the molecular level that we will see the greatest expansion of horizons. With the advances in biomimetics, future dentin adhesive monomers may contain domains derived from protein-based, underwater bioadhesives secreted by aquatic animals such as mussels and barnacles, making them less dependent on the surface energy of the bonding substrates as well as less susceptible to hydrolytic degradation. As adhesive joints produced by contemporary adhesives are brittle in nature, future adhesive design may incorporate biomimetic intermediate-strength domains that can undergo stepwise reversible unfolding in response to varying functional stress levels before ultimate catastrophic failure of the adhesive joint occurs. These domains may also re-establish folded configurations on stress relaxation, making the adhesive both strong and tough. Using the concept of controlled release, future adhesives may contain fluorescent biosensors that can detect pH changes around leaking restorations. They may even have the capacity to heal autonomously, in response to microcracks formed by functional stresses within the adhesive joint. The ability to self-diagnose and self-repair will increase the life expectancy of adhesive restorations. Future dentin adhesives may also assume a more instrumental role

  3. The tripeptide feG inhibits leukocyte adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison Joseph S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tripeptide feG (D-Phe-D-Glu-Gly is a potent anti-inflammatory peptide that reduces the severity of type I immediate hypersensitivity reactions, and inhibits neutrophil chemotaxis and adhesion to tissues. feG also reduces the expression of β1-integrin on circulating neutrophils, but the counter ligands involved in the anti-adhesive actions of the peptide are not known. In this study the effects of feG on the adhesion of rat peritoneal leukocytes and extravasated neutrophils to several different integrin selective substrates were evaluated. Results The adhesion of peritoneal leukocytes and extravasated neutrophils from rats to adhesive proteins coated to 96-well plates was dependent upon magnesium (Mg2+ ion, suggestive of integrin-mediated adhesion. feG inhibited leukocyte adhesion, but only if the cells were stimulated with PAF (10-9M, indicating that feG's actions in vitro require cell activation. In the dose range of 10-10M to 10-12M feG inhibited the adhesion of peritoneal leukocytes to fibrinogen and fibronectin, but not IgG, vitronectin or ICAM-1. feG inhibited the binding of extravasated neutrophils to heparin, IgG, fibronectin and CD16 antibody. Antigen-challenge of sensitized rats reduced the adhesion of peritoneal leukocytes to most substrates and abolished the inhibitory effects of feG. However, pretreating the animals with intraperitoneal feG (100 μg/kg 18 h before collecting the cells from the antigen-challenged animal restored the inhibition of adhesion by in vitro feG of peritoneal leukocytes and extravasated neutrophils to fibronectin. Conclusion The modulation of leukocyte adhesion by feG appears to involve actions on αMβ2 integrin, with a possible interaction with the low affinity FcγRIII receptor (CD16. The modulation of cell adhesion by feG is dual in nature. When administered in vivo, feG prevents inflammation-induced reductions in cell adhesion, as well as restoring its inhibitory effect in vitro

  4. Bromelain: a natural proteolytic for intra-abdominal adhesion prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbaz, Ahmet; Aynioglu, Oner; Isik, Hatice; Ozmen, Ulku; Cengil, Osman; Gun, Banu Dogan; Gungorduk, Kemal

    2015-02-01

    Peritoneal adhesions are pathological fibrous connections between peritoneal surfaces resulting from incomplete peritoneal repair. Adhesions cause various health problems ranging from pelvic pain and bowel obstruction to infertility. To date, no effective agent exists for intra-abdominal adhesion prevention. Bromelain is the crude extract of the pineapple and it has fibrinolytic, antithrombotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Bromelain has been shown to be effective for removing necrotic tissues and has been found to be effective for treating various wounds, inflammatory conditions, and thrombotic pathologies. In the present study, we evaluated bromelain as a novel agent for preventing intra-abdominal adhesions. Group 1 (control group): Adhesions were produced by cecal abrasion method, and no treatment was applied. Group 2 (i.p. bromelain-treated group): After adhesion formation, 10 mg/kg/BW of bromelain dissolved in 1 mL saline solution was applied intraperitoneally for 10 days. Group 3 (i.p. saline-treated group): After adhesion formation, 1 mL saline solution was applied intraperitoneally for 10 days. On postoperative day 10, all animals were sacrificed. All 30 rats survived surgery. Throughout the follow-up period, no complications were observed. Statistically significant differences were found between the groups with regards to macroscopic adhesion scores, inflammation, fibrosis and neo-vascularization (p bromelain-treated group. Bromelain, acting through its barrier, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and proteolytic effects and without increasing bleeding tendency or having any adverse effects on wound healing, may be a suitable agent for intra-abdominal adhesion prevention. Copyright © 2015 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Adhesive sealing of dentin surfaces in vitro: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nawareg, Manar M; Zidan, Ahmed Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Agee, Kelli; Chiba, Ayaka; Tagami, Jungi; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of the use of dental adhesives to form a tight seal of freshly prepared dentin to protect the pulp from bacterial products, during the time between crown preparation and final cementum of full crowns. The evolution of these “immediate dentin sealants” follows the evolution of dental adhesives, in general. That is, they began with multiple-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives, and then switched to the use of simplified adhesives. Methods Literature was reviewed for evidence that bacteria or bacterial products diffusing across dentin can irritate pulpal tissues before and after smear layer removal. Smear layers can be solubilized by plaque organisms within 7–10 days if they are directly exposed to oral fluids. It is likely that smear layers covered by temporary restorations may last more than one month. As long as smear layers remain in place, they can partially seal dentin. Thus, many in vitro studies evaluating the sealing ability of adhesive resins use smear layer-covered dentin as a reference condition. Surprisingly, many adhesives do not seal dentin as well as do smear layers. Results Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that resin-covered dentin allows dentinal fluid to cross polymerized resins. The use of simplified single bottle adhesives to seal dentin was a step backwards. Currently, most authorities use either 3-step adhesives such as Scotchbond Multi-Purposea or OptiBond FLb or two-step self-etching primer adhesives, such as Clearfil SEc, Unifil Bondd or AdheSEe, respectfully. PMID:26846037

  6. Automated analysis of cell-matrix adhesions in 2D and 3D environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Joshua A; Diggins, Nicole L; Hummel, Stephen; Georgescu, Walter; Quaranta, Vito; Webb, Donna J

    2015-01-29

    Cell-matrix adhesions are of great interest because of their contribution to numerous biological processes, including cell migration, differentiation, proliferation, survival, tissue morphogenesis, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Adhesions are dynamic structures that are classically defined on two-dimensional (2D) substrates, though the need to analyze adhesions in more physiologic three-dimensional (3D) environments is being increasingly recognized. However, progress has been greatly hampered by the lack of available tools to analyze adhesions in 3D environments. To address this need, we have developed a platform for the automated analysis, segmentation, and tracking of adhesions (PAASTA) based on an open source MATLAB framework, CellAnimation. PAASTA enables the rapid analysis of adhesion dynamics and many other adhesion characteristics, such as lifetime, size, and location, in 3D environments and on traditional 2D substrates. We manually validate PAASTA and utilize it to quantify rate constants for adhesion assembly and disassembly as well as adhesion lifetime and size in 3D matrices. PAASTA will be a valuable tool for characterizing adhesions and for deciphering the molecular mechanisms that regulate adhesion dynamics in 3D environments.

  7. Matrix adhesion polarizes heart progenitor induction in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Jennifer; Cooley, James; Islam, A. F. M. Tariqul; Cota, Christina D.; Davidson, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Cell-matrix adhesion strongly influences developmental signaling. Resulting impacts on cell migration and tissue morphogenesis are well characterized. However, the in vivo impact of adhesion on fate induction remains ambiguous. Here, we employ the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis to delineate an essential in vivo role for matrix adhesion in heart progenitor induction. In Ciona pre-cardiac founder cells, invasion of the underlying epidermis promotes localized induction of the heart progenitor lineage. We found that these epidermal invasions are associated with matrix adhesion along the pre-cardiac cell/epidermal boundary. Through targeted manipulations of RAP GTPase activity, we were able to manipulate pre-cardiac cell-matrix adhesion. Targeted disruption of pre-cardiac cell-matrix adhesion blocked heart progenitor induction. Conversely, increased matrix adhesion generated expanded induction. We were also able to selectively restore cell-matrix adhesion and heart progenitor induction through targeted expression of Ci-Integrin β2. These results indicate that matrix adhesion functions as a necessary and sufficient extrinsic cue for regional heart progenitor induction. Furthermore, time-lapse imaging suggests that cytokinesis acts as an intrinsic temporal regulator of heart progenitor adhesion and induction. Our findings highlight a potentially conserved role for matrix adhesion in early steps of vertebrate heart progenitor specification. PMID:23444358

  8. Expression pattern and regulation of genes differ between fibroblasts of adhesion and normal human peritoneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saed Ghassan M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injury to the peritoneum during surgery is followed by a healing process that frequently results in the attachment of adjacent organs by a fibrous mass, referred commonly as adhesions. Because injuries to the peritoneum during surgery are inevitable, it is imperative that we understand the mechanisms of adhesion formation to prevent its occurrence. This requires thorough understanding of the molecular sequence that results in the attachment of injured peritoneum and the development of fibrous tissue. Recent data show that fibroblasts from the injured peritoneum may play a critical role in the formation of adhesion tissues. Therefore, identifying changes in gene expression pattern in the peritoneal fibroblasts during the process may provide clues to the mechanisms by which adhesion develop. Methods In this study, we compared expression patterns of larger number of genes in the fibroblasts isolated from adhesion and normal human peritoneum using gene filters. Contributions of TGF-beta1 and hypoxia in the altered expression of specific genes were also examined using a semiquantitative RT-PCR technique. Results Results show that several genes are differentially expressed between fibroblasts of normal and adhesion peritoneum and that the peritoneal fibroblast may acquire a different phenotype during adhesion formation. Genes that are differentially expressed between normal and adhesion fibroblasts encode molecules involved in cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration and factors regulating cytokines, transcription, translation and protein/vesicle trafficking. Conclusions Our data substantiate that adhesion formation is a multigenic phenomenon and not all changes in gene expression pattern between normal and adhesion fibroblasts are the function of TGF-beta1 and hypoxia that are known to influence adhesion formation. Analysis of the gene expression data in the perspective of known functions of genes connote to

  9. A Method To Determine Adhesion Of Suppository Mass On Excised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A method to determine adhesion of suppository mass to intestinal tissue was developed using excised pig intestine. The method which employs the principe of drainage unto and subsequent detachment from the mucosa, of an adherent suppository mass is simple, inexpensive and accurate. Fully optimised, it can be used ...

  10. Simulated microgravity does not alter epithelial cell adhesion to matrix and other molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, J. M.; Brown, K.; Ishii, S.; Ford, R.; Goodwin, T. J.; Spaulding, G.

    1994-01-01

    Microgravity has advantages for the cultivation of tissues with high fidelity; however, tissue formation requires cellular recognition and adhesion. We tested the hypothesis that simulated microgravity does not affect cell adhesion. Human colorectal carcinoma cells were cultured in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) under low shear stress with randomization of the gravity vector that simulates microgravity. After 6 - 7 days, cells were assayed for binding to various substrates and compared to cells grown in standard tissue culture flasks and static suspension cultures. The RWV cultures bound as well to basement membrane proteins and to Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA), an intercellular adhesion molecule, as control cultures did. Thus, microgravity does not alter epithelial cell adhesion and may be useful for tissue engineering.

  11. Lateral mobility of individual integrin nanoclusters orchestrates the onset for leukocyte adhesion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, G.J.; Eich, C.; Torreno-Pina, J.A.; Diez-Ahedo, R.; Perez-Samper, G.; Zanten, T.S. van; Figdor, C.G.; Cambi, A.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Integrins are cell membrane adhesion receptors involved in morphogenesis, immunity, tissue healing, and metastasis. A central, yet unresolved question regarding the function of integrins is how these receptors regulate both their conformation and dynamic nanoscale organization on the membrane to

  12. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    3.3 UNDERWATER LAP - SHEAR ADHESION 4 3.4 FULL POLYMER CLAW PROTOTYPE 6 ± NEXT STEPS 7 4.1 BIOFOULED SURFACES 7 4.2 RHEOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS 7...tested underwater, the lap shear adhesion was ~200x stronger than commercial underwater adhesives after 1 hour. This month also marked the...calibrated to apply a force in the 3.4-3.7 lb. range over a 0.5 sq. in. area. 3.3 Underwater Lap - Shear Adhesion The most important test of the improved

  13. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  14. Mouse lung adhesion assay for Bordetella pertussis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, K.A.; Freer, J.H. (Department of Microbiology, Alexander Stone Building, Bearsden, Glasgow, Scotland)

    1982-03-01

    The ability of Bordetella pertussis to adhere to cell surfaces has been demonstrated by adhesion to tissue culture cells and adhesion to chicken, hamster or rabbit trachea in organ culture. In this report a mouse lung assay for adhesion is described and the results obtained using two virulent strains of B. pertussis and their avirulent counterparts. These were a C modulation of one of the original virulent strains and a phase IV variant of the other virulent strain. Organisms were radiolabelled by adding 1 ..mu..Ci (37 K Bq) of (/sup 14/C)glutamic acid per 10 ml of culture medium before inoculation and incubation for 5 days. The lungs were washed by perfusion in situ with at least two volumes (1 ml) of sterile 1% (w/v) casamino acids. The percentage of the inoculated organisms retained in the lungs was determined, after removal of the lungs, by one of the following two methods: viable count or radioactive count. Results for both methods were expressed as the percentage of the inoculum retained in the lungs plus or minus one standard deviation.

  15. Multi-scale models for cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghao; Chen, Jiawen; Xie, Zhong-Ru

    2014-03-01

    The interactions of membrane receptors during cell adhesion play pivotal roles in tissue morphogenesis during development. Our lab focuses on developing multi-scale models to decompose the mechanical and chemical complexity in cell adhesion. Recent experimental evidences show that clustering is a generic process for cell adhesive receptors. However, the physical basis of such receptor clustering is not understood. We introduced the effect of molecular flexibility to evaluate the dynamics of receptors. By delivering new theory to quantify the changes of binding free energy in different cellular environments, we revealed that restriction of molecular flexibility upon binding of membrane receptors from apposing cell surfaces (trans) causes large entropy loss, which dramatically increases their lateral interactions (cis). This provides a new molecular mechanism to initialize receptor clustering on the cell-cell interface. By using the subcellular simulations, we further found that clustering is a cooperative process requiring both trans and cis interactions. The detailed binding constants during these processes are calculated and compared with experimental data from our collaborator's lab.

  16. Molecular architecture of a complex between an adhesion protein from the malaria parasite and intracellular adhesion molecule 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Alan; Turner, Louise; Christoffersen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to human tissues or endothelium is central to the pathology caused by the parasite during malaria. It contributes to the avoidance of parasite clearance by the spleen and to the specific pathologies of cerebral and placental malaria...

  17. Studies on the Adhesive Property of Snail Adhesive Mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newar, Janu; Ghatak, Archana

    2015-11-10

    Many gastropod molluscs are known to secrete mucus which allow these animals to adhere to a substrate while foraging over it. While the mucus is known to provide strong adhesion to both dry and wet surfaces, including both horizontal and vertical ones, no systematic study has been carried out to understand the strength of such adhesion under different conditions. We report here results from preliminary studies on adhesion characteristics of the mucus of a snail found in eastern India, Macrochlamys indica. When perturbed, the snail was found to secrete its adhesive mucus, which was collected and subjected to regular adhesion tests. The hydrated mucus was used as such, and also as mixed with buffer of different pH. These experiments suggest that the mucus was slightly alkaline, and showed the maximum adhesion strength of 9 kPa when present in an alkaline buffer. Preliminary studies indicate that adhesive force is related to the ability of the mucus to incorporate water. In alkaline condition, the gel like mass that it forms, incorporate water from a wet surface and enable strong adhesion.

  18. Current aspects on bonding effectiveness and stability in adhesive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, M V; de Almeida Neves, A; Mine, A; Coutinho, E; Van Landuyt, K; De Munck, J; Van Meerbeek, B

    2011-06-01

    Improved dental adhesive technology has extensively influenced modern concepts in restorative dentistry. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which basically relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Nowadays, the interaction of adhesives with the dental substrate is based on two different strategies, commonly described as an etch-and-rinse and a self-etch approach. In an attempt to simplify the bonding technique, manufacturers have decreased the number of steps necessary for the accomplishment of the bonding procedure. As a consequence, two-step etch-and-rinse and one-step (self-etch) adhesives were introduced and gained rapid popularity in the dental market due to their claimed user-friendliness and lower technique sensitivity. However, many concerns have been raised on the bonding effectiveness of these simplified adhesives, especially in terms of durability, although this tends to be very material dependent. In order to blend all the adhesive components into one single solution, one-step adhesives were made more acidic and hydrophilic. Unfortunately, these properties induce a wide variety of seemingly unrelated problems that may jeopardize the effectiveness and stability of adhesion to the dental substrate. Being more susceptible to water sorption and thus nanoleakage, these adhesives are more prone to bond degradation and tend to fail prematurely as compared to their multi-step counterparts. Incidentally, another factor that may interfere with the bonding effectiveness of adhesives is the technique used for caries removal and cavity preparation. Several tools are on the market today to effectively remove carious tissue, thereby respecting the current trend of minimum intervention. Despite their promising performance, such techniques modify the tooth substrate in different aspects, possibly affecting bonding effectiveness. Altogether, we may conclude that not only the

  19. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  20. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-05

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  1. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    properties of native tissue (adhesive cues, mass transport, surface texture and composition). Types of biomaterials. Generally speaking, three major types of biomaterials have been ..... Some of them are universal, whereas others are specific for certain cell types. Growth factors can accelerate the reproduction of MSCs and.

  2. Distance-dependent adhesion of vascular cells on biofunctionalized nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biela Sarah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM adhesion regulates fundamental cellular functions and is crucial for cell-material contact. Adhesion is influenced by many factors like affinity and specificity of the receptor-ligand interaction or overall ligand concentration and density. To investigate molecular details of cell-ECM and cadherins (cell-cell interaction in vascular cells functional nanostructured surfaces were used Ligand-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs with 6-8 nm diameter, are precisely immobilized on a surface and separated by non-adhesive regions so that individual integrins or cadherins can specifically interact with the ligands on the AuNPs. Using 40 nm and 90 nm distances between the AuNPs and functionalized either with peptide motifs of the extracellular matrix (RGD or REDV or vascular endothelial-cadherins (VEC, the influence of distance and ligand specificity on spreading and adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs and smooth muscle cells (SMCs was investigated. We demonstrate that RGD-dependent adhesion of vascular cells is similar to other cell types and that the distance dependence for integrin binding to ECM-peptides is also valid for the REDV motif. VEC-ligands decrease adhesion significantly on the tested ligand distances. These results may be helpful for future improvements in vascular tissue engineering and for development of implant surfaces.

  3. Towards a computational model of leukocyte adhesion cascade: Leukocyte rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khismatullin, Damir

    2005-11-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes into sites of acute and chronic inflammation is a vital component of the innate immune response in humans and plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and atherosclerosis. Leukocytes extravasate into the inflamed tissue through a multi-step process called "leukocyte adhesion cascade", which involves initial contact of a leukocyte with activated endothelium (tethering), leukocyte rolling, firm adhesion, and transendothelial migration. Recently we developed a fully three-dimensional CFD model of receptor-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The model treats the leukocyte as a viscoelastic cell with the nucleus located in the intracellular space and cylindrical microvilli distributed over the cell membrane. Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is assumed to be mediated by adhesion molecules expressed on the tips of cell microvilli and on endothelium. We show that the model can predict both shape changes and velocities of rolling leukocytes under physiological flow conditions. Results of this study also indicate that viscosity of the cytoplasm is a critical parameter of leukocyte adhesion, affecting the cell's ability to roll on endothelium. This work is supported by NIH Grant HL- 57446 and NCSA Grant BCS040006 and utilized the NCSA IBM p690.

  4. Effect of nitro-functionalization on the cross-linking and bioadhesion of biomimetic adhesive moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencer, Morgan; Murley, Meridith; Liu, Yuan; Lee, Bruce P

    2015-01-12

    Dopamine mimics the exceptional moisture-resistant adhesive properties of the amino acid, DOPA, found in adhesive proteins secreted by marine mussels. The catechol side chain of dopamine was functionalized with a nitro-group, and the effect of the electron withdrawing group modification on the cross-linking chemistry and bioadhesive properties of the adhesive moiety was evaluated. Both nitrodopamine and dopamine were covalently attached as a terminal group onto an inert, 4-armed poly(ethylene glygol) (PEG-ND and PEG-D, respectively). PEG-ND and PEG-D exhibited different dependence on the concentration of NaIO4 and pH, which affected the curing rate, mechanical properties, and adhesive performance of these biomimetic adhesives differently. PEG-ND cured instantly and its bioadhesive properties were minimally affected by the change in pH (5.7-8) within the physiological range. Under mildly acidic conditions (pH 5.7 and 6.7), PEG-ND outperformed PEG-D in lap shear adhesion testing using wetted pericardium tissues. However, nitrodopamine only formed dimers, which resulted in the formation of loosely cross-linked network and adhesive with reduced cohesive properties. UV-vis spectroscopy further confirmed nitrodopamine's ability for rapid dimer formation. The ability for nitrodopamine to rapidly cure and adhere to biological substrates in an acidic pH make it suitable for designing adhesive biomaterials targeted at tissues that are more acidic (i.e., subcutaneous, dysoxic, or tumor tissues).

  5. Nanofibers and nanoparticles from the insect-capturing adhesive of the Sundew (Drosera for cell attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Mingjun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for naturally occurring nanocomposites with diverse properties for tissue engineering has been a major interest for biomaterial research. In this study, we investigated a nanofiber and nanoparticle based nanocomposite secreted from an insect-capturing plant, the Sundew, for cell attachment. The adhesive nanocomposite has demonstrated high biocompatibility and is ready to be used with minimal preparation. Results Atomic force microscopy (AFM conducted on the adhesive from three species of Sundew found that a network of nanofibers and nanoparticles with various sizes existed independent of the coated surface. AFM and light microscopy confirmed that the pattern of nanofibers corresponded to Alcian Blue staining for polysaccharide. Transmission electron microscopy identified a low abundance of nanoparticles in different pattern form AFM observations. In addition, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of Ca, Mg, and Cl, common components of biological salts. Study of the material properties of the adhesive yielded high viscoelasticity from the liquid adhesive, with reduced elasticity observed in the dried adhesive. The ability of PC12 neuron-like cells to attach and grow on the network of nanofibers created from the dried adhesive demonstrated the potential of this network to be used in tissue engineering, and other biomedical applications. Conclusions This discovery demonstrates how a naturally occurring nanofiber and nanoparticle based nanocomposite from the adhesive of Sundew can be used for tissue engineering, and opens the possibility for further examination of natural plant adhesives for biomedical applications.

  6. Biomimetic Hybrid Nanofiber Sheets Composed of RGD Peptide-Decorated PLGA as Cell-Adhesive Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Kim, Min Jeong; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Jin Su; Oh, Jin-Woo; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-05-29

    In biomedical applications, there is a need for tissue engineering scaffolds to promote and control cellular behaviors, including adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In particular, the initial adhesion of cells has a great influence on those cellular behaviors. In this study, we concentrate on developing cell-adhesive substrates applicable for tissue engineering scaffolds. The hybrid nanofiber sheets were prepared by electrospinning poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and M13 phage, which was genetically modified to enhance cell adhesion thru expressing RGD peptides on their surface. The RGD peptide is a specific motif of extracellular matrix (ECM) for integrin receptors of cells. RGD peptide-decorated PLGA (RGD-PLGA) nanofiber sheets were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, immunofluorescence staining, contact angle measurement and differential scanning calorimetry. In addition, the initial adhesion and proliferation of four different types of mammalian cells were determined in order to evaluate the potential of RGD-PLGA nanofiber sheets as cell-adhesive substrates. Our results showed that the hybrid nanofiber sheets have a three-dimensional porous structure comparable to the native ECM. Furthermore, the initial adhesion and proliferation of cells were significantly enhanced on RGD-PLGA sheets. These results suggest that biomimetic RGD-PLGA nanofiber sheets can be promising cell-adhesive substrates for application as tissue engineering scaffolds.

  7. 21 CFR 880.5240 - Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. 880... Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5240 Medical adhesive tape and adhesive bandage. (a) Identification. A medical adhesive tape or adhesive bandage is a device intended for medical purposes that consists...

  8. Biomimetic emulsions reveal the effect of homeostatic pressure on cell-cell adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Viasnoff, Virgile; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts in tissues are continuously subject to mechanical forces due to homeostatic pressure and active cytoskeleton dynamics. While much is known about the molecular pathways of adhesion, the role of mechanics is less well understood. To isolate the role of pressure we present a dense packing of functionalized emulsion droplets in which surface interactions are tuned to mimic those of real cells. By visualizing the microstructure in 3D we find that a threshold compression force is necessary to overcome electrostatic repulsion and surface elasticity and establish protein-mediated adhesion. Varying the droplet interaction potential maps out a phase diagram for adhesion as a function of force and salt concentration. Remarkably, fitting the data with our theoretical model predicts binder concentrations in the adhesion areas that are similar to those found in real cells. Moreover, we quantify the adhesion size dependence on the applied force and thus reveal adhesion strengthening with increasing homeos...

  9. Segment-Specific Adhesion as a Driver of Convergent Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroomans, Renske M. A.; Hogeweg, Paulien; ten Tusscher, Kirsten H. W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Convergent extension, the simultaneous extension and narrowing of tissues, is a crucial event in the formation of the main body axis during embryonic development. It involves processes on multiple scales: the sub-cellular, cellular and tissue level, which interact via explicit or intrinsic feedback mechanisms. Computational modelling studies play an important role in unravelling the multiscale feedbacks underlying convergent extension. Convergent extension usually operates in tissue which has been patterned or is currently being patterned into distinct domains of gene expression. How such tissue patterns are maintained during the large scale tissue movements of convergent extension has thus far not been investigated. Intriguingly, experimental data indicate that in certain cases these tissue patterns may drive convergent extension rather than requiring safeguarding against convergent extension. Here we use a 2D Cellular Potts Model (CPM) of a tissue prepatterned into segments, to show that convergent extension tends to disrupt this pre-existing segmental pattern. However, when cells preferentially adhere to cells of the same segment type, segment integrity is maintained without any reduction in tissue extension. Strikingly, we demonstrate that this segment-specific adhesion is by itself sufficient to drive convergent extension. Convergent extension is enhanced when we endow our in silico cells with persistence of motion, which in vivo would naturally follow from cytoskeletal dynamics. Finally, we extend our model to confirm the generality of our results. We demonstrate a similar effect of differential adhesion on convergent extension in tissues that can only extend in a single direction (as often occurs due to the inertia of the head region of the embryo), and in tissues prepatterned into a sequence of domains resulting in two opposing adhesive gradients, rather than alternating segments. PMID:25706823

  10. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  11. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes...... to collagen type II increased after removal from native cartilage up to the third day in monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. Following dedifferentiation after the second passage, adhesion to collagen types I (-84%) and II (-46%) decreased, whereas adhesion to fibrinogen (+59%) and fibronectin (+43......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...

  12. Biological adhesives and fastening devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2012-04-01

    Sea creatures are a leading source to some of the more interesting discoveries in adhesives. Because sea water naturally breaks down even the strongest conventional adhesive, an alternative is important that could be used in repairing or fabricating anything that might have regular contact with moisture such as: Repairing broken and shattered bones, developing a surgical adhesive, use in the dental work, repairing and building ships, and manufacturing plywood. Some of nature's prototypes include the common mussel, limpet, some bacteria and abalone. As we learn more about these adhesives we are also developing non adhesive fasteners, such as mimicked after studying the octopus, burdock burrs (i.e. Velcro®) and the gecko.

  13. Unusual adhesive production system in the barnacle Lepas anatifera: an ultrastructural and histochemical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Jaimie-Leigh; von Byern, Janek; Flammang, Patrick; Klepal, Waltraud; Power, Anne Marie

    2012-12-01

    Adhesives that are naturally produced by marine organisms are potential sources of inspiration in the search for medical adhesives. Investigations of barnacle adhesives are at an early stage but it is becoming obvious that barnacles utilize a unique adhesive system compared to other marine organisms. The current study examined the fine structure and chemistry of the glandular system that produces the adhesive of the barnacle Lepas anatifera. All components for the glue originated from large single-cell glands (70-180 μm). Staining (including immunostaining) showed that L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and phosphoserine were not present in the glue producing tissues, demonstrating that the molecular adhesion of barnacles differs from all other permanently gluing marine animals studied to date. The glandular tissue and adhesive secretion primarily consisted of slightly acidic proteins but also included some carbohydrate. Adhesive proteins were stored in cytoplasmic granules adjacent to an intracellular drainage canal (ICC); observations implicated both merocrine and apocrine mechanisms in the transport of the secretion from the cell cytoplasm to the ICC. Inside the ICC, the secretion was no longer contained within granules but was a flocculent material which became "clumped" as it traveled through the canal network. Hemocytes were not seen within the adhesive "apparatus" (comprising of the glue producing cells and drainage canals), nor was there any structural mechanism by which additions such as hemocytes could be made to the secretion. The unicellular adhesive gland in barnacles is distinct from multicellular adhesive systems observed in marine animals such as mussels and tubeworms. Because the various components are not physically separated in the apparatus, the barnacle adhesive system appears to utilize completely different and unknown mechanisms for maintaining the liquid state of the glue within the body, as well as unidentified mechanisms for the conversion of

  14. Adhesion testing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  15. Efectividad del adhesivo tisular Tisuacryl® para el cierre de heridas cutáneas en cirugía laparoscópica Effectiveness of the Tisuacryl® as tissue adhesive for closure of cutaneous wounds in laparoscopy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba Roque González

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. Uno de los beneficios de la utilización de procedimientos laparoscópicos en cirugía es reducir la morbilidad relacionada con el traumatismo quirúrgico. Es conocido que el empleo del adhesivo tisular Tisuacryl® en el cierre de heridas cutáneas favorece la hemostasia, la recuperación rápida del tejido y la disminución del edema posquirúrgico, y evita complicaciones como infección y reacción del tejido a un cuerpo extraño. Fue objetivo de esta investigación evaluar la efectividad y seguridad de la utilización del Tisuacryl® para la síntesis de los puertos de entrada en pacientes intervenidos por cirugías mínimamente invasivas, sin necesidad de aplicar sutura. MÉTODOS. Se aplicó el adhesivo tisular a 100 pacientes que acudieron al Centro Nacional de Cirugía de Mínimo Acceso para realizarse diferentes procedimientos quirúrgicos. Como variables para evaluar la efectividad y seguridad del tratamiento se tomaron la dehiscencia de la herida, aparición de infección, tiempo de síntesis de la herida y estética de la cicatriz. Los pacientes se evaluaron en el posoperatorio inmediato y en consulta externa a los 7 y 21 días de la cirugía. RESULTADOS. Se lograron excelentes resultados en cuanto al afrontamiento y la estética de las heridas. Además, los pacientes no refirieron molestias ocasionadas por el material, ni se produjeron casos de infección. CONCLUSIONES. Los resultados de la investigación realizada demuestran que el Tisuacryl® puede utilizarse con alta efectividad para el cierre de las heridas de 5 mm y 10 mm en la cirugía laparoscópica, sustituyendo a las suturas.INTRODUCTION. One of the more beneficial uses of laparoscopy procedures in surgery is to decrease the morbidity related to surgical trauma. It is known that the use of the Tisuacryl® tissue adhesive for closure of cutaneous wounds favors the hemostasis, a fast tissue recovery and decrease of postsurgical edema avoiding complications

  16. Dynamics of Nanoparticle Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, J.-M. Y.; Dobrynin, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical analysis of nanoparticle pulling off from adhesive substrates. Our theoretical model of nanoparticle detachment is based on the Kramers solution of the stochastic barrier crossing in effective one dimensional potential well. The activation energy, ΔE , for nanoparticle detachment first decreases linearly with increasing the magnitude of the applied force, f, then it follows a power law ΔE ~(f * - f)3/2 as magnitude of the pulling force f approaches a critical detachment force value, f*. These two different regimes in activation energy dependence on magnitude of the applied force are confirmed by analyzing nanoparticle detachment in effective one dimensional potential obtained by Weighted Histogram Analysis Method. Simulations show that detachment of nanoparticle proceeds through neck formation such that magnitude of the activation energy is determined by balancing surface energy of the neck connecting particle to a substrate with elastic energy of nanoparticle deformation. In this regime the activation energy at zero applied force, ΔE0 , for nanoparticle with radius, Rp, shear modulus, G, surface energy, γp, and work of adhesion, W, is a universal function of the dimensionless parameter δ ~γpW - 2 / 3(GRp)-1/3 . Simulation data are described by a scaling function ΔE0 ~γp5 / 2 Rp1 / 2 G - 3 / 2δ - 3 . 75 . Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticle detachment show that the Kramers approach fails in the vicinity of the critical detachment force f* where activation energy barrier becomes smaller than kB T . NSF DMR-1004576

  17. Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael P; Kim, Seok; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    The complex structures that allow geckos to repeatably adhere to surfaces consist of multilevel branching fibers with specialized tips. We present a novel technique for fabricating similar multilevel structures from polymer materials and demonstrate the fabrication of arrays of two- and three-level structures, wherein each level terminates in flat mushroom-type tips. Adhesion experiments are conducted on two-level fiber arrays on a 12-mm-diameter glass hemisphere, which exhibit both increased adhesion and interface toughness over one-level fiber samples and unstructured control samples. These adhesion enhancements are the result of increased surface conformation as well as increased extension during detachment.

  18. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Shirtcliffe

    Full Text Available Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted, texture (smooth, rough or granular or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  19. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  20. Epithelial adhesion molecules and the regulation of intestinal homeostasis during neutrophil transepithelial migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumagin, Ronen; Parkos, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesion molecules play essential roles in regulating cellular function and maintaining mucosal tissue homeostasis. Some form epithelial junctional complexes to provide structural support for epithelial monolayers and act as a selectively permeable barrier separating luminal contents from the surrounding tissue. Others serve as docking structures for invading viruses and bacteria, while also regulating the immune response. They can either obstruct or serve as footholds for the immune cells recruited to mucosal surfaces. Currently, it is well appreciated that adhesion molecules collectively serve as environmental cue sensors and trigger signaling events to regulate epithelial function through their association with the cell cytoskeleton and various intracellular adapter proteins. Immune cells, particularly neutrophils (PMN) during transepithelial migration (TEM), can modulate adhesion molecule expression, conformation, and distribution, significantly impacting epithelial function and tissue homeostasis. This review discusses the roles of key intestinal epithelial adhesion molecules in regulating PMN trafficking and outlines the potential consequences on epithelial function. PMID:25838976

  1. Investigation of bioinspired gecko fibers to improve adhesion of HeartLander surgical robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Giuseppe; Glass, Paul; Wood, Nathan; Aksak, Burak; Menciassi, Arianna; Sitti, Metin; Riviere, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    HeartLander is a medical robot proposed for minimally invasive epicardial intervention on the beating heart. To date, all prototypes have used suction to gain traction on the epicardium. Gecko-foot-inspired micro-fibers have been proposed for repeatable adhesion to surfaces. In this paper, a method for improving the traction of HeartLander on biological tissue is presented. The method involves integration of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives on the inner surfaces of the suction chambers of HeartLander. Experiments have been carried out on muscle tissue ex vivo assessing the traction performance of the modified HeartLander with bio-inspired adhesive. The adhesive fibers are found to improve traction on muscle tissue by 57.3 %.

  2. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre P. Eleniste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases.

  3. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  4. Structural adhesives directory and databook

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Jo

    1996-01-01

    A worldwide directory of commercially available adhesive products for use in a wide range of engineering disciplines. Along with product names and suppliers, basic property data are tabulated and cross-referenced. The book is subdivided according to class of adhesive, with introductions to each class followed by comparison tables and datasheets for each adhesive. The datasheets contain detailed information, from product codes to environmental properties and are therefore of interest across a broad readership. Standardized data will aid the user in cross-comparison between different manufacturers and in easily identifying the required information.

  5. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, Donghai [Manhattan, KS; Zhong, Zhikai [Manhattan, KS; Yang, Guang [Shanghai, CN

    2008-08-26

    The present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  6. A local adhesive finger splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macionis, V

    2001-09-01

    A new design of a local static finger splint is proposed. The splint is made by enveloping a length of wire into double-sided adhesive tape. The skin of the region to be immobilized is covered with an adhesive skin dressing, to which the splint is then adhered. This method of attachment gives more freedom in choosing a site of splint application and prevents access obstruction to the wound, blocking of tactile areas, and circulation impairment. The splint is light, low profile, and malleable at ambient temperature. The adhesive splint was used in 5 patients to maintain the first web space open or to immobilize stiff interphalangeal joints in flexion overnight.

  7. Converging and Unique Mechanisms of Mechanotransduction at Adhesion Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mitchell K L; de Rooij, Johan

    2016-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which physical forces control tissue development are beginning to be elucidated. Sites of adhesion between both cells and the extracellular environment [extracellular matrix (ECM) or neighboring cells] contain protein complexes capable of sensing fluctuations in tensile forces. Tension-dependent changes in the dynamics and composition of these complexes mark the transformation of physical input into biochemical signals that defines mechanotransduction. It is becoming apparent that, although the core constituents of these different adhesions are distinct, principles and proteins involved in mechanotransduction are conserved. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of overlapping and distinct aspects of mechanotransduction between integrin and cadherin adhesion complexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adhesion International 1987. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Adhesion Society, Inc. (10th) Held in Williamsburg, Virginia on 23-27 February 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    principal inorganic (mineral) phase of calcified tissues. The outer enamel layer of teeth t Presented at the Tenth Annual Meeting of The Adhesion Society...Tolan, P. J. Pearce and C. E. M. Morris 309 SESSION OF ISRAEL Correlation Between the Total Morphology of an Epoxy System and Some of its Properties Dov...indicated as contributing to this adhesion. More recently, Venables9 and his team have studied the detailed morphology of the surfaces of aluminium and

  9. An In Vitro Evaluation of Leakage of Two Etch and Rinse and Two Self-Etch Adhesives after Thermocycling

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Geerts; Amandine Bolette; Laurence Seidel; Audrey Guéders

    2012-01-01

    Our experiment evaluated the microleakage in resin composite restorations bonded to dental tissues with different adhesive systems. 40 class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of each tooth with coronal margins in enamel and apical margins in cementum (root dentin). The teeth were restored with Z100 resin composite bonded with different adhesive systems: Scotchbond Multipurpose (SBMP), a 3-step Etch and Rinse adhesive, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (SB1), a 2-step Etch and Ri...

  10. Adhesive capsulitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Anthony

    2011-02-15

    Adhesive capsulitis is a common, yet poorly understood, condition causing pain and loss of range of motion in the shoulder. It can occur in isolation or concomitantly with other shoulder conditions (e.g., rotator cuff tendinopathy, bursitis) or diabetes mellitus. It is often self-limited, but can persist for years and may never fully resolve. The diagnosis is usually clinical, although imaging can help rule out other conditions. The differential diagnosis includes acromioclavicular arthropathy, autoimmune disease (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis), biceps tendinopathy, glenohumeral osteoarthritis, neoplasm, rotator cuff tendinopathy or tear (with or without impingement), and subacromial and subdeltoid bursitis. Several treatment options are commonly used, but few have high-level evidence to support them. Because the condition is often self-limited, observation and reassurance may be considered; however, this may not be acceptable to many patients because of the painful and debilitating nature of the condition. Nonsurgical treatments include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), oral prednisone, and intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Home exercise regimens and physical therapy are often prescribed. Surgical treatments include manipulation of the joint under anesthesia and capsular release.

  11. Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ted T; García, José R; Paez, Julieta I; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; Del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J

    2015-03-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have recently been realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell-adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials.

  12. Allergic Stomatitis From Orthodontic Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark R; Wong, Priscilla H; Dickson, Scott D; Coop, Christopher A

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of a type IV hypersensitivity reaction causing oral stomatitis, presumed to be the result of common dental adhesives. The case was diagnosed using patch testing to the dental adhesives that were used in the patient. Both of the adhesives tested contained a form of acrylate that is being seen more frequently in the literature as a cause of type IV hypersensitivity reactions. Metals can cause allergic reactions; however, other contact items need to be considered as a cause of oral allergic reactions. Cases of allergic stomatitis are rising and there is question if all-in-one adhesives may be contributing to this rise. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. The role of adhesive molecules in endometrial cancer: part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Wojciechowski

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The carcinogenesis is a result of both functional and structural disorders in the tissue. It initiates as a mutation in a gene encoding protein that is essential for cellular function. The subsequent cascade of events leads to accumulation of mutations and loss of cellular function. The cell loses its tissue-specific morphology, disconnects from other cells and extracellular matrix and migrates – the invasion begins. It is now clear that adhesive molecules are a key player in this cascade. These proteins of the cell membrane surface are responsible for attachment of the cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix. These interactions are crucial for both structural and functional tissue organization. Lack of this homeostasis destroys the tissue architecture, impairs its function and results in invasion. Abnormal expression of adhesive molecules was reported in all examined cancers, including endometrial cancer.Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in developed countries. Although in many cases it is diagnosed and treated in early stages, and thus with good results, some patients cannot be cured. A complete knowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease will be helpful in identifying patients with negative prognostic factors, increased risk of recurrence and, perhaps, finding other therapeutic options. In the paper we are trying to sum up the up-to-date knowledge of the role of adhesive molecules in pathogenesis of endometrial cancer.

  14. Cell Adhesion as Dynamic Interplay of Lock-and-Key, Generic and Elastic Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann, E.; Goennenwein, S.

    The selectivity of cell-cell and cell-tissue adhesion is determined by specific short range forces between cell surface proteins. Long range entropic interfacial forces (mediated by repeller molecules and membrane undulations) and adhesion-induced elastic stresses in the cell envelope serve the fine control of the strength and duration of adhesion. The initial step of cell adhesion exhibits typical features of a first order wetting transition resulting in the formation of tight adhesion domains by lateral phase separation of receptors. External lift forces can cause shrinking and unbinding of adhesion sites if the receptors are immobile but induce domain growth if they are mobile. Strong adhesion domains (resisting nano-Newton forces) can form by commitment of some 10,000 receptors enabling cells to control adhesion strength rapidly by varying the receptor and repeller densities on cell surfaces through endocytosis and exocytosis. The adhesion domains can function as constraint reaction spaces facilitating the local assembly of actin stress fibers and control cell signalling processes as shown for the activation of immunological responses by immunological synapses.

  15. Practical limitations of bioresorbable membranes in the prevention of intra-abdominal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Rizal; Morrill, Jonathan M; Lynch, Ryan C; Reed, Karen L; Gower, Adam C; Leeman, Susan E; Stucchi, Arthur F; Becker, James M

    2009-01-01

    Intra-abdominal adhesions are a significant source of postoperative morbidity. Bioresorbable barriers composed of hyaluronic acid and carboxymethylcellulose (HA/CMC) reduce adhesion formation by physically separating injured or healing peritoneal surfaces. To assess whether the efficacy of a physical barrier can extend beyond the site of application, we evaluated the effectiveness of an HA/CMC barrier in preventing adhesions distal to the site of placement. Adhesions were induced in rats by creating peritoneal ischemic buttons on either side of a midline incision. An HA/CMC barrier (Seprafilm Genzyme) was intraoperatively placed either under the midline incision, unilaterally over half the ischemic buttons, or bilaterally over all ischemic buttons. Control buttons received no HA/CMC. On day 7 adhesions were scored. In similar experiments, peritoneal fluid was collected at 24 h to assess the effects of HA/CMC on tissue plasminogen activator activity. Placement of HA/CMC under the midline incision did not reduce adhesion formation to distal ischemic buttons (72 +/- 7%) compared to controls (80 +/- 8%). Unilateral placement of HA/CMC significantly (p CMC also significantly (p CMC did not affect peritoneal tPA activity. Effective adhesion reduction by the physical barrier HA/CMC appears to be limited to the site of application in this rat model. Despite the presence of a bioresorbable membrane at predicted sites of adhesion formation in the peritoneal cavity, adhesions readily form to distal unprotected sites.

  16. Cadherin-mediated cell sorting not determined by binding or adhesion specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    Cadherin adhesion molecules play important roles in the establishment of tissue boundaries. Cells expressing different cadherins sort out from each other in cell aggregation assays. To determine the contribution of cadherin binding and adhesion specificity to the sorting process, we examined the adhesion of cells to different purified cadherin proteins. Chinese hamster ovary cell lines expressing one of four different cadherins were allowed to bind to the purified cadherin extracellular domains of either human E-cadherin or Xenopus C-cadherin, and the specificity of adhesion was compared with cell-sorting assays. None of the different cadherin-expressing cells exhibited any adhesive specificity toward either of the two purified cadherin substrates, even though these cadherins differ considerably in their primary sequence. In addition, all cells exhibited similar strengthening of adhesion on both substrates. However, this lack of adhesive specificity did not determine whether different cadherin-expressing cells would sort from each other, and the tendency to sort was not predictable by the extent of sequence diversity in their extracellular domains. These results show that cadherins are far more promiscuous in their adhesive-binding capacity than had been expected and that the ability to sort out must be determined by mechanisms other than simple adhesive-binding specificity. PMID:11790800

  17. Effect of thermal shock loadings on stability of dentin-composite polymer material adhesive interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Shlyapnikova, Olga A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Gribov, Andrey N.

    2015-03-01

    In the past several decades the problem of longevity and durability of adhesive interfaces between hard tooth tissues and composite resin-based materials are of great interest among dental researchers and clinicians. These parameters are partially determined by adhesive system mechanical properties. In the present research project nanoindentation has been examined to test hardness of dental adhesive systems. A series of laboratory experiments was performed to study the effect of light curing time and oxygen inhibition phenomenon on light-cured adhesive material hardness. An adhesive system AdperTM Single Bond (3M ESPE) was selected as a material for testing. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the maximum values of hardness were observed after the material had been light-cured for 20 seconds, as outlined in guidelines for polymerization time of the adhesive system. The experimental studies of oxygen inhibition influence on adhesive system hardness pointed out to the fact that the dispersive layer removal led to increase in adhesive system hardness. A long - time exposure of polymerized material of adhesive system at open air at room temperature resulted in no changes in its hardness, which was likely to be determined by the mutual effect of rival processes of air oxygen inhibition and directed light curing.

  18. T-cell adhesion induced by proteoglycan-immobilized cytokine MIP-1 beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Adams, D H; Hubscher, S; Hirano, H; Siebenlist, U; Shaw, S

    1993-01-07

    Lymphocyte migration from blood into tissue depends on integrin-mediated adhesion to endothelium. Adhesion requires not only integrin ligands on the endothelium, but also activation signals because T-cell integrins cannot bind well until they are activated. The physiological 'triggers' for T-cell adhesion are unknown, but cytokines may be good candidates as they are released during inflammation and trigger adhesion in neutrophils and monocytes. We have identified a cytokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1 beta), that induces both chemotaxis and adhesion of T cells; MIP-1 beta is most effective at augmenting adhesion of CD8+ T cells to the vascular cell adhesion molecule VCAM-1. We reasoned that, as cytokines in vivo will be rapidly washed away, MIP-1 beta might be bound to endothelial surfaces and so induce adhesion in its immobilized form. Here we show that: (1) MIP-1 beta is present on lymph node endothelium; (2) immobilized MIP-1 beta induces binding of T cells to VCAM-1 in vitro. MIP-1 beta was immobilized by binding to proteoglycan: a conjugate of heparin with bovine serum albumin and cellular proteoglycan CD44 were both effective. We propose that MIP-1 beta and other cytokines with glycosaminoglycan-binding sites will bind to and be presented by endothelial proteoglycans to trigger adhesion selectively not only of lymphocyte subsets, but also of other cell types.

  19. Surgical applications of cyanoacrylate adhesives: a review of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter A; Smith, Derek R; Kedjarune, Ureporn

    2007-04-01

    Cyanoacrylate (CA) and its homologues have a variety of medical and commercial applications as biological adhesives and sealants. Homologues of CA are being widely promoted in surgery as a tissue adhesive to replace traditional suturing techniques. Potential benefits of using CA adhesives include better cosmetic results, more rapid wound closure, and perhaps most significantly, the potential for significant reductions in percutaneous injuries from suture needles, which would in turn also reduce the risk of transmission of infectious diseases. Nevertheless, certain concerns have been raised regarding the potential toxicity of CA within patients, as well as among health professionals who are occupationally exposed when using CA compounds. Reported toxicity of CA in the workplace may result in dermatological, allergic and respiratory conditions. To help reduce the occupational burden, therefore, medical staff using CA adhesives should avoid direct contact with the compound and use appropriate personal protective measures at all times. Maintaining higher levels of humidity, optimizing room ventilation and using special air conditioning filters in surgical suites and operating theatres may also be useful in minimizing the exposure to volatile CA adhesives.

  20. An Overview of Dental Adhesive Systems and the Dynamic Tooth-Adhesive Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedran-Russo, Ana; Leme-Kraus, Ariene A; Vidal, Cristina M P; Teixeira, Erica C

    2017-10-01

    From the conception of resin-enamel adhesion to today's contemporary dental adhesive systems, clinicians are no longer afraid of exploring the many advantages brought by adhesive restorative concepts. To maximize the performance of adhesive-based restorative procedures, practitioners must be familiar with the mechanism of adhesion, clinical indications, proper handling, the inherent limitations of the materials and the biological challenges. This review provides an overview of the current status of restorative dental adhesives, their mechanism of adhesion, mechanisms of degradation of dental adhesive interfaces, how to maximize performance, and future trends in adhesive dentistry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  2. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the

  3. Cell adhesion assay to determine the interaction between NGL-3 with LAR cell adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    In the cell adhesion assay, two groups of cells expressing different cell adhesion molecules are mixed together to determine whether the adhesion molecules can interact with each other and whether their interaction mediates cell adhesion. We used this assay to determine the interaction of NGL-3 with other synaptic cell adhesion molecules including LAR.

  4. Characterization of the in vitro binding and inhibition kinetics of primary amine oxidase/vascular adhesion protein-1 by glucosamine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2012-04-01

    Primary-amine oxidase (PrAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of endogenous and exogenous primary amines and also functions, in some tissues, as an inflammation-inducible endothelial factor, known as vascular adhesion protein-1. VAP-1 mediates the slow rolling and adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells in a number of inflammatory conditions, including inflammation of the synovium.

  5. Cell division orientation is coupled to cell-cell adhesion by the E-cadherin/LGN complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gloerich, Martijn; Bianchini, Julie M.; Siemers, Kathleen A.; Cohen, Daniel J.; Nelson, W. James

    2017-01-01

    Both cell-cell adhesion and oriented cell division play prominent roles in establishing tissue architecture, but it is unclear how they might be coordinated. Here, we demonstrate that the cell-cell adhesion protein E-cadherin functions as an instructive cue for cell division orientation. This is

  6. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Craig Bernard; Rochelle M. Rodrigo; Austin J. Keith; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Ali Dhinojwala

    2017-01-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system?s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard su...

  7. The adhesion molecule Necl-3/SynCAM-2 localizes to myelinated axons, binds to oligodendrocytes and promotes cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballivet Marc

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell adhesion molecules are plasma membrane proteins specialized in cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Two related adhesion molecules, Necl-1 and Necl-2/SynCAM, were recently described and shown to fulfill important functions in the central nervous system. The purpose of the work was to investigate the distribution, and the properties of Necl-3/SynCAM-2, a previously uncharacterized member of the Necl family with which it shares a conserved modular organization and extensive sequence homology. Results We show that Necl-3/SynCAM-2 is a plasma membrane protein that accumulates in several tissues, including those of the central and peripheral nervous system. There, Necl-3/SynCAM-2 is expressed in ependymal cells and in myelinated axons, and sits at the interface between the axon shaft and the myelin sheath. Several independent assays demonstrate that Necl-3/SynCAM-2 functionally and selectively interacts with oligodendrocytes. We finally prove that Necl-3/SynCAM-2 is a bona fide adhesion molecule that engages in homo- and heterophilic interactions with the other Necl family members, leading to cell aggregation. Conclusion Collectively, our manuscripts and the works on Necl-1 and SynCAM/Necl-2 reveal a complex set of interactions engaged in by the Necl proteins in the nervous system. Our work also support the notion that the family of Necl proteins fulfils key adhesion and recognition functions in the nervous system, in particular between different cell types.

  8. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings.

  9. Adhesive coatings based on melanin-like nanoparticles for surgical membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, Francesca; Travan, Andrea; Turco, Gianluca; Borgogna, Massimiliano; Marsich, Eleonora; Pasqua, Mattia; Paoletti, Sergio; Donati, Ivan

    2017-07-01

    Adhesive coatings for implantable biomaterials can be designed to prevent material displacement from the site of implant. In this paper, a strategy based on the use of melanin-like nanoparticles (MNPs) for the development of adhesive coatings for polysaccharidic membranes was devised. MNPs were synthesized in vitro and characterized in terms of dimensions and surface potential, as a function of pH and ionic strength. The in vitro biocompatibility of MNPs was investigated on fibroblast cells, while the antimicrobial properties of MNPs in suspension were evaluated on E. coli and S. aureus cultures. The manufacturing of the adhesive coatings was carried out by spreading MNPs over the surface of polysaccharidic membranes; the adhesive properties of the nano-engineered coating to the target tissue (intestinal serosa) were studied in simulated physiological conditions. Overall, this study opens for novel approaches in the design of naturally inspired nanostructured adhesive systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanosensing in cell–matrix adhesions – Converting tension into chemical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hytönen, Vesa P. [BioMediTech, University of Tampere, Biokatu 6, FI-33520 Tampere (Finland); Fimlab Laboratories, Biokatu 4, FI-33520 Tampere (Finland); Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard [University of Geneva, Department of Cell Physiology and Metabolism, Centre Médical Universitaire, 1. Rue Michel-Servet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); University of Geneva, Diabetes Center, Medical Faculty, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2016-04-10

    Cell-matrix adhesions have since long been recognized to be critical for the survival and proliferation of cells. In fact, these adhesive structures do not only physically anchor cells, but they also induce vital intracellular signaling at cell-matrix adhesion sites. Recent progress in the cell adhesion field is now starting to provide data and ideas how this so far enigmatic signaling process is induced and regulated by intracellular acto-myosin tension, or stiffness of the extracellular matrix. Understanding how cells are using this mechanosignaling system will be key to control biological processes such as development, cancer growth, metastasis formation and tissue regeneration. In this review, we illustrate and discuss the mechanosignaling mechanisms important in the regulation of cell-matrix adhesions at the molecular level.

  11. Percutaneous embolization of bony pelvic neoplasms with tissue adhesive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, F.S.; Rosch, J.; Bird, C.B.

    1983-04-01

    Eight patients with tumors of the bony pelvis underwent embolization with isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate (IBCA). Five patients had primary bone tumors, of which 2 were malignant and 3 were benign; 3 patients had metastases to the bony pelvis from the thyroid gland, kidney, and femur, respectively. Embolization was performed to minimize blood loss during resection of a giant-cell tumor in one patient and insertion of a hip prosthesis in another who had metastatic renal carcinoma. It was also done prior to scheduled surgery in one of the patients with aneurysmal bone cyst, but healing was sufficient to cancel the operation; in the other patient, embolization was the only therapy. Palliative embolization was performed in 4 patients with malignant tumors after other means failed to control pain or slow progression. IBCA appears to be an efficient means of occluding the vessels feeding selected primary bone tumors and metastases.

  12. A Biodegradable and Biocompatible Gecko-Inspired Tissue Adhesive

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alborz Mahdavi; Lino Ferreira; Cathryn Sundback; Jason W. Nichol; Edwin P. Chan; David J. D. Carter; Chris J. Bettinger; Siamrut Patanavanich; Loice Chignozha; Eli Ben-Joseph; Alex Galakatos; Howard Pryor; Irina Pomerantseva; Peter T. Masiakos; William Faquin; Andreas Zumbuehl; Seungpyo Hong; Jeffrey Borenstein; Joseph Vacanti; Robert Langer; Jeffrey M. Karp

    2008-01-01

    .... We approached this problem by using a polymer poly(glycerol-co-sebacate acrylate) and modifying the surface to mimic the nanotopography of gecko feet, which allows attachment to vertical surfaces...

  13. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  14. Nylon-3 copolymers that generate cell-adhesive surfaces identified by library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Ryul; Stahl, Shannon S; Gellman, Samuel H; Masters, Kristyn S

    2009-11-25

    Polymers in the nylon-3 family contain subunits derived from beta-amino acids, which are linked to one another via amide bonds. Thus, the nylon-3 backbone is homologous to the alpha-amino acid-based backbone of proteins. This molecular-level homology suggests that nylon-3 materials might be intrinsically protein-mimetic. The experiments described here explore this prospect in the context of cell adhesion, with tissue engineering as a long-range goal. We have evaluated a small library of sequence-random nylon-3 copolymers for the ability to render surfaces attractive to NIH 3T3 fibroblast adhesion and spreading. Library screening was accomplished in a high-throughput, parallel mode via attachment of the copolymers in a two-dimensional array to a modified glass surface. Significant variations in fibroblast adhesion and spreading were observed as a function of nylon-3 subunit identity and proportion. Several of the nylon-3 copolymers supported cell adhesion and morphology that was comparable, or even superior, to that achieved on positive control substrates such as tissue culture polystyrene and collagen-coated glass. Moreover, studies conducted under serum-free conditions demonstrated that specific nylon-3 derivatives supported cell adhesion independently of serum protein adsorption. Although cell adhesion was diminished in the absence of serum, particular copolymers demonstrated an ability to support substantially greater cell adhesion than any of the other conditions, including the positive controls. The nylon-3 copolymers that were most effective at promoting adhesion to a modified glass surface proved also to be effective at promoting adhesion when attached to a PEG-based hydrogel, demonstrating the potential for these copolymers to be used in tissue engineering applications.

  15. Nylon-3 Co-Polymers that Generate Cell-Adhesive Surfaces Identified by Library Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Ryul; Stahl, Shannon S.; Gellman, Samuel H.; Masters, Kristyn S.

    2010-01-01

    Polymers in the nylon-3 family contain subunits derived from β-amino acids, which are linked to one another via amide bonds. Thus, the nylon-3 backbone is homologous to the α-amino acid-based backbone of proteins. This molecular-level homology suggests that nylon-3 materials might be intrinsically protein-mimetic. The experiments described here explore this prospect in the context of cell adhesion, with tissue engineering as a long-range goal. We have evaluated a small library of sequence-random nylon-3 copolymers for the ability to render surfaces attractive to NIH 3T3 fibroblast adhesion and spreading. Library screening was accomplished in a high-throughput, parallel mode via attachment of the copolymers in a two-dimensional array to a modified glass surface. Significant variations in fibroblast adhesion and spreading were observed as a function of nylon-3 subunit identity and proportion. Several of the nylon-3 copolymers supported cell adhesion and morphology that was comparable, or even superior, to that achieved on positive control substrates such as tissue culture polystyrene and collagen-coated glass. Moreover, studies conducted under serum-free conditions demonstrated that specific nylon-3 derivatives supported cell adhesion independently of serum protein adsorption. Although cell adhesion was diminished in the absence of serum, particular copolymers demonstrated an ability to support substantially greater cell adhesion than any of the other conditions, including the positive controls. The nylon-3 copolymers that were most effective at promoting adhesion to a modified glass surface proved also to be effective at promoting adhesion when attached to a PEG-based hydrogel, demonstrating the potential for these copolymers to be used in tissue engineering applications. PMID:19886604

  16. Adhesion of Blended Polymer Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszel, Christopher; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander L.; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    The adhesive energy of blended and monolithic PCL and PCL-N6 surfaces was measured by blister method and linked to the surface composition of the blended samples. It was shown that PCL does not adhere to N6 after heat-treatment at 55 C, while the monolithic PCL films adhered to the blended samples solely via the PCL islands at the surface. The surface concentration of PCL in the blended samples was established using the novel staining method. It was shown that the surface concentration of PCL differs from its bulk content in the blended samples. The measurements also revealed that the surface concentration of PCL is practically linearly proportionality to the normalized adhesion energy between the blended PCL-N6 samples and monolithic PCL films. Several statistical characteristics of the surfaces of the blended samples were used to characterize their uniformity/non-uniformity. It was shown that increasing the surface uniformity of the adhering component in the blended samples (PCL), one increases the adhesion energy. Moreover, at about 70% of PCL at the surface, the adhesion energy of blended samples to monolithic PCL films could reach the value characterization of the adhesion between two monolithic PCL samples. This work is supported by the Nonwovens Institute, Grant No. 14-163.

  17. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogárová Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is to calculate the exact amount of adhesive, which is required to guarantee the resistance against wind suction. In this problematic we can not find help neither in technical data sheets provided by the manufactures. Some of these data sheets contain at least information about amount of adhesive depending on location in roof plane and building height, but they do not specify the strength of such connection. It was therefore resorted to select several representatives polyurethane adhesives and their subsequent testing on specimens simulating the flat roof segment. The paper described the test methodology and results for two types of polyurethane adhesives.

  18. Post-translational modification-regulated leukocyte adhesion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Jia Tong; Su, I-Hsin

    2016-06-14

    Leukocytes undergo frequent phenotypic changes and rapidly infiltrate peripheral and lymphoid tissues in order to carry out immune responses. The recruitment of circulating leukocytes into inflamed tissues depends on integrin-mediated tethering and rolling of these cells on the vascular endothelium, followed by transmigration into the tissues. This dynamic process of migration requires the coordination of large numbers of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins whose functional activities are typically regulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs). Our recent studies have shown that the lysine methyltransferase, Ezh2, critically regulates integrin signalling and governs the adhesion dynamics of leukocytes via direct methylation of talin, a key molecule that controls these processes by linking integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we will discuss the various modes of leukocyte migration and examine how PTMs of cytoskeletal/adhesion associated proteins play fundamental roles in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte migration. Furthermore, we will discuss molecular details of the adhesion dynamics controlled by Ezh2-mediated talin methylation and the potential implications of this novel regulatory mechanism for leukocyte migration, immune responses, and pathogenic processes, such as allergic contact dermatitis and tumorigenesis.

  19. Directed melanocyte migration: the role of Stem cell factor, cytoskeleton and focal adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard

    2002-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are critical for the development of multicellular organisms and the maintenance of tissue integrity. This thesis explores the roles of the growth factor "Stem Cell factor and its receptor c-kit, in the process of cell migration and developmental patterning. In addition changes of the cytoskeleton and adhesion receptors of the family of integrins were analysed by live cell imaging and quantitative dynamic analysis. The thesis focusses on the specific contributions o...

  20. Adhesion and Spreading of Human Fibroblasts on Superhydrophobic Fep-Teflon

    OpenAIRE

    Busscher, H. J.; Stokroos, I.; Golverdingen, J. G.; Shakenraad, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Adhesion and spreading of human fibroblasts was studied on hydrophobized and hydrophilized FEPTeflon, and compared with adhesion and spreading on untreated FEP-Teflon and Tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). Superhydrophobic FEP-Teflon was prepared by ion etching followed by oxygen glow-discharge. Hydrophilic PEP-Teflon was prepared by ion etching only. Water contact angles of the modified surfaces were 140- 1500 and 5-10° for the hydrophobic and the hydrophilic variant, respectively. (Untreate...

  1. Effects of saline lavage temperature on peritoneal fibrinolysis and adhesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Yavuz Savaş; Tarhan, Ömer Rıdvan; Kaya, Selçuk; Gökçe Ceylan, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal lavage with saline at room temperature causes peritoneal hypothermia, vasoconstriction, hypoxia, and acidosis, which are effects that are known to reduce fibrinolysis. Decreased fibrinolysis causes permanent adhesions. Normothermic lavage may prevent this deleterious process and reduce peritoneal adhesions. A rat model of cecal abrasion was used. Control animals received no medication while hypothermic or normothermic saline lavage were administered intraperitoneally to the experimental groups (n=24 for each group). Cardinal parameters of peritoneal fibrinolysis (tissue plasminogen activator [tPA] and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 [PAI-1]) were determined in peritoneal tissue samples on postoperative day 1, 3, and 10. On postoperative day 10, adhesions were graded. In the sham group (n=8), following laparotomy, peritoneal samples were taken to determine basal values of tPA and PAI-1 in healthy peritoneum. Cecal abrasion increased PAI-1 levels about tenfold on postoperative day 1 and caused adhesions. Normothermic saline lavage prevented this traumatic PAI-1 increase and stabilized it to baseline values throughout the experiment and reduced peritoneal adhesion formation. Hypothermic lavage also caused an inhibition of PAI-1 rise but adhesion, prevention was not significant. Our results suggest that normothermic saline lavage reduces adhesions by improving peritoneal fibrinolysis.

  2. Experimental Investigation on the Morphology and Adhesion Mechanism of Leech Posterior Suckers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huashan Feng

    Full Text Available The posterior sucker of a leech represents a fascinating natural system that allows the leech to adhere to different terrains and substrates. However, the mechanism of adhesion and desorption has not yet to be elucidated. In order to better understand how the adhesion is performed, we analyzed the surface structure, adsorption movements, the muscles' distribution, physical characteristics, and the adsorption force of the leech posterior suckers by experimental investigation. Three conclusions can be drawn based on the obtained experimental results. First, the adhesion by the posterior sucker is wet adhesion, because the surface of the posterior sucker is smooth and the sealing can only be achieved on wet surfaces. Second, the deformation texture, consisting of soft collagen tissues and highly ductile epidermal tissues, plays a key role in adhering to rough surfaces. Finally, the adhesion and desorption is achieved by the synergetic operation of six muscle fibers working in different directions. Concrete saying, directional deformation of the collagen/epithermal interface driven by spatially-distributed muscle fibers facilitates the excretion of fluids in the sucker venter, thus allowing liquid sealing. Furthermore, we found that the adhesion strength is directly related to the size of the contact surface which is generated and affected by the sucker deformation. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers potential cues for developing innovative bio-inspired artificial adhesion systems.

  3. Experimental Investigation on the Morphology and Adhesion Mechanism of Leech Posterior Suckers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huashan; Chai, Ningli; Dong, Wenhao

    2015-01-01

    The posterior sucker of a leech represents a fascinating natural system that allows the leech to adhere to different terrains and substrates. However, the mechanism of adhesion and desorption has not yet to be elucidated. In order to better understand how the adhesion is performed, we analyzed the surface structure, adsorption movements, the muscles' distribution, physical characteristics, and the adsorption force of the leech posterior suckers by experimental investigation. Three conclusions can be drawn based on the obtained experimental results. First, the adhesion by the posterior sucker is wet adhesion, because the surface of the posterior sucker is smooth and the sealing can only be achieved on wet surfaces. Second, the deformation texture, consisting of soft collagen tissues and highly ductile epidermal tissues, plays a key role in adhering to rough surfaces. Finally, the adhesion and desorption is achieved by the synergetic operation of six muscle fibers working in different directions. Concrete saying, directional deformation of the collagen/epithermal interface driven by spatially-distributed muscle fibers facilitates the excretion of fluids in the sucker venter, thus allowing liquid sealing. Furthermore, we found that the adhesion strength is directly related to the size of the contact surface which is generated and affected by the sucker deformation. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers potential cues for developing innovative bio-inspired artificial adhesion systems.

  4. [Evaluation of postsurgical adhesion prevention using different formulated sodium hyaluronate membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Yin, Di; Wang, Chunren

    2013-02-01

    The rat abdominal wall defect and cecal abrasion model was adopted in this study to investigate the anti-adhesion effect of different formulated sodium hyaluronate membranes. Both injured surfaces of abdominal wall and cecum in experiment groups A, B, and C were covered using the corresponding formulated membrane A (composed of sodium hyaluronate and chitosan), membrane B (sodium hyaluronate), and membrane C (composed of sodium hyaluronate and carboxymethyl chitosan), respectively. And no material was used in the surgical as control group. Seven days after the surgery, the grade and score of abdominal adhesion of rats were evaluated according to Phillips' and Nair's classification methods respectively. Then tissue samples were collected and prepared for histological examination. The rank sum tests of scores of adhesion between groups were carried out. It showed that there was no significant difference of adhesion scores among experimental group A and control group (P > 0.05). But the differences were statistically significant (P hyaluronate membranes. The histological examination showed in group A that there was heavy inflammatory cell invasion and necrosis in the newly formed adhesive fibrous tissue, especially in the zone of remaining membrane A. Normal injury healing process was observed in rat abdominal wall and cecal surface covered using membrane B or C. The A formulation sodium hyaluronate membrane had poor biocompatibility which resulted in no anti-adhesion effect. The prevention of adhesion formation by B formulation and C formulation sodium hyaluronate membranes were confirmed in this experiment and would be worthy of further exploitation.

  5. Effect of Resveratrol on the Prevention of Intra-Abdominal Adhesion Formation in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangbing Wei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intra-abdominal adhesions are a very common complication following abdominal surgery. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the inhibition of inflammation at the sites of peritoneal injury can prevent the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions. Resveratrol is a natural extract with a broad range of anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, we propose that resveratrol can reduce the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions after surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol on intra-abdominal adhesion prevention in a rat model with surgery-induced peritoneal adhesions. Materials and Methods: The cecum wall and its opposite parietal peritoneum were abraded following laparotomy to induce intra-abdominal adhesion formation. Varying doses of resveratrol were administered to the animals. On the eighth day after surgery, the adhesion score was assessed using a visual scoring system. Picrosirius red staining and a hydroxyproline assay were used to assess the amount of collagen deposition in the adhesion tissues. The levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1 were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Western blotting was performed to determine the protein expression of TGF-β1, fibrinogen, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA in rat peritoneal adhesion tissue. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to quantify the mRNA expression of TGF-β1, fibrinogen, and α-SMA. Results: Resveratrol significantly reduced intra-abdominal adhesion formation and fibrin deposition in the rat model. Furthermore, resveratrol significantly reduced the serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β1. The protein and mRNA expression of TGF-β1, fibrinogen, and α-SMA in the rat peritoneum and adhesion tissues were also down-regulated due to resveratrol intervention. Conclusion: Resveratrol can effectively prevent the formation of postoperative intra

  6. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Combined with a Sodium Hyaluronate Gel Inhibits Postoperative Intra-Abdominal Adhesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangbing Wei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion is a very common complication after abdominal surgery. One clinical problem that remains to be solved is to identify an ideal strategy to prevent abdominal adhesions. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF has been proven to improve the proliferation of mesothelial cells, which may enhance fibrinolytic activity to suppress postoperative adhesions. This study investigated whether the combined administration of KGF and a sodium hyaluronate (HA gel can prevent intra-abdominal adhesions by improving the orderly repair of the peritoneal mesothelial cells. The possible prevention mechanism was also explored. The cecum wall and its opposite parietal peritoneum were abraded after laparotomy to induce intra-abdominal adhesion formation. Animals were randomly allocated to receive topical application of HA, KGF, KGF + HA, or normal saline (Control. On postoperative day 7, the adhesion score was assessed with a visual scoring system. Masson’s trichrome staining, picrosirius red staining and hydroxyproline assays were used to assess the magnitude of adhesion and tissue fibrosis. Cytokeratin, a marker of the mesothelial cells, was detected by immunohistochemistry. The levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 in the abdominal fluid were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs. Western blotting was performed to examine the expression of the TGF-β1, fibrinogen and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA proteins in the rat peritoneal adhesion tissue. The combined administration of KGF and HA significantly reduced intra-abdominal adhesion formation and fibrin deposition and improved the orderly repair of the peritoneal mesothelial cells in the rat model. Furthermore, the combined administration of KGF and HA significantly increased the tPA levels but reduced the levels of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and TGF-β1 in the abdominal fluid. The

  7. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Combined with a Sodium Hyaluronate Gel Inhibits Postoperative Intra-Abdominal Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guangbing; Zhou, Cancan; Wang, Guanghui; Fan, Lin; Wang, Kang; Li, Xuqi

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion is a very common complication after abdominal surgery. One clinical problem that remains to be solved is to identify an ideal strategy to prevent abdominal adhesions. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) has been proven to improve the proliferation of mesothelial cells, which may enhance fibrinolytic activity to suppress postoperative adhesions. This study investigated whether the combined administration of KGF and a sodium hyaluronate (HA) gel can prevent intra-abdominal adhesions by improving the orderly repair of the peritoneal mesothelial cells. The possible prevention mechanism was also explored. The cecum wall and its opposite parietal peritoneum were abraded after laparotomy to induce intra-abdominal adhesion formation. Animals were randomly allocated to receive topical application of HA, KGF, KGF + HA, or normal saline (Control). On postoperative day 7, the adhesion score was assessed with a visual scoring system. Masson’s trichrome staining, picrosirius red staining and hydroxyproline assays were used to assess the magnitude of adhesion and tissue fibrosis. Cytokeratin, a marker of the mesothelial cells, was detected by immunohistochemistry. The levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in the abdominal fluid were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Western blotting was performed to examine the expression of the TGF-β1, fibrinogen and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) proteins in the rat peritoneal adhesion tissue. The combined administration of KGF and HA significantly reduced intra-abdominal adhesion formation and fibrin deposition and improved the orderly repair of the peritoneal mesothelial cells in the rat model. Furthermore, the combined administration of KGF and HA significantly increased the tPA levels but reduced the levels of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and TGF-β1 in the abdominal fluid. The expression

  8. Studying cytokinesis in Drosophila epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, D; Bellaïche, Y

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial tissue cohesiveness is ensured through cell-cell junctions that maintain both adhesion and mechanical coupling between neighboring cells. During development, epithelial tissues undergo intensive cell proliferation. Cell division, and particularly cytokinesis, is coupled to the formation of new adhesive contacts, thereby preserving tissue integrity and propagating cell polarity. Remarkably, the geometry of the new interfaces is determined by the combined action of the dividing cell and its neighbors. To further understand the interplay between the dividing cell and its neighbors, as well as the role of cell division for tissue morphogenesis, it is important to analyze cytokinesis in vivo. Here we present methods to perform live imaging of cell division in Drosophila epithelial tissues and discuss some aspects of image processing and analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  10. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. CRYOPRESERVATION EFFECTS ON RECOMBINANT MYOBLASTS ENCAPSULATED IN ADHESIVE ALGINATE HYDROGELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Hajira F.; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2013-01-01

    Cell encapsulation in hydrogels is widely used in tissue engineering applications, including encapsulation of islets or other insulin-secreting cells in pancreatic substitutes. Use of adhesive, bio-functionalized hydrogels is receiving increasing attention, as cell-matrix interactions in 3-D can be important for various cell processes. With pancreatic substitutes, studies have indicated benefits of 3-D adhesion on the viability and/or function of insulin-secreting cells. As long-term storage of microencapsulated cells is critical for their clinical translation, cryopreservation of cells in hydrogels is actively being investigated. Previous studies have examined the cryopreservation response of cells encapsulated in non-adhesive hydrogels using conventional freezing and/or vitrification (ice-free cryopreservation), however, none have systematically compared the two cryopreservation methods with cells encapsulated within an adhesive 3-D environment. The latter would be significant, as evidence suggests adhesion influences cellular response to cryopreservation. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the response to conventional freezing and vitrification of insulin-secreting cells encapsulated in an adhesive biomimetic hydrogel. Recombinant insulin-secreting C2C12 myoblasts were encapsulated in oxidized RGD-alginate and cultured 1 or 4 days post-encapsulation, cryopreserved, and assessed up to 3 days post-warming for metabolic activity and insulin secretion, and one day post-warming for cell morphology. Besides certain transient differences of the vitrified group relative to the Fresh control, both conventional freezing and vitrification maintained metabolism, secretion and morphology of the recombinant C2C12 cells. Thus, due to a simpler procedure and slightly superior results, conventional freezing is recommended over vitrification for the cryopreservation of C2C12 cells in oxidized RGD-modified alginate. PMID:23499987

  12. Multi-scale finite element modeling of Eustachian tube function: influence of mucosal adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, J E; Swarts, J D; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-12-01

    The inability to open the collapsible Eustachian tube (ET) leads to the development of chronic Otitis Media (OM). Although mucosal inflammation during OM leads to increased mucin gene expression and elevated adhesion forces within the ET lumen, it is not known how changes in mucosal adhesion alter the biomechanical mechanisms of ET function. In this study, we developed a novel multi-scale finite element model of ET function in adults that utilizes adhesion spring elements to simulate changes in mucosal adhesion. Models were created for six adult subjects, and dynamic patterns in muscle contraction were used to simulate the wave-like opening of the ET that occurs during swallowing. Results indicate that ET opening is highly sensitive to the level of mucosal adhesion and that exceeding a critical value of adhesion leads to rapid ET dysfunction. Parameter variation studies and sensitivity analysis indicate that increased mucosal adhesion alters the relative importance of several tissue biomechanical properties. For example, increases in mucosal adhesion reduced the sensitivity of ET function to tensor veli palatini muscle forces but did not alter the insensitivity of ET function to levator veli palatini muscle forces. Interestingly, although changes in cartilage stiffness did not significantly influence ET opening under low adhesion conditions, ET opening was highly sensitive to changes in cartilage stiffness under high adhesion conditions. Therefore, our multi-scale computational models indicate that changes in mucosal adhesion as would occur during inflammatory OM alter the biomechanical mechanisms of ET function. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bonding to dental substrates is based on three different strategies: 1) etch-and-rinse, 2) self-etch and 3) resin-modified glass-ionomer approach as possessing the unique properties of self-adherence to the tooth tissue. More recently, a new family of dentin adhesives has been introduced (universal or multi-mode adhesives), which may be used either as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the current knowledge for each adhesive system according to their classification that have been advocated by many authorities in most operative/restorative procedures. As noted by several valuable studies that have contributed to understanding of bonding to various substrates helps clinicians to choose the appropriate dentin bonding agents for optimal clinical outcomes.

  14. Classification review of dental adhesive systems: from the IV generation to the universal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofan, Eshrak; Sofan, Afrah; Palaia, Gaspare; Tenore, Gianluca; Romeo, Umberto; Migliau, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Summary Adhesive dentistry has undergone great progress in the last decades. In light of minimal-invasive dentistry, this new approach promotes a more conservative cavity design, which relies on the effectiveness of current enamel-dentine adhesives. Adhesive dentistry began in 1955 by Buonocore on the benefits of acid etching. With changing technologies, dental adhesives have evolved from no-etch to total-etch (4th and 5th generation) to self-etch (6th, 7th and 8th generation) systems. Currently, bonding to dental substrates is based on three different strategies: 1) etch-and-rinse, 2) self-etch and 3) resin-modified glass-ionomer approach as possessing the unique properties of self-adherence to the tooth tissue. More recently, a new family of dentin adhesives has been introduced (universal or multi-mode adhesives), which may be used either as etch-and-rinse or as self-etch adhesives. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the current knowledge for each adhesive system according to their classification that have been advocated by many authorities in most operative/restorative procedures. As noted by several valuable studies that have contributed to understanding of bonding to various substrates helps clinicians to choose the appropriate dentin bonding agents for optimal clinical outcomes. PMID:28736601

  15. Mussel-Inspired Thermoresponsive Polypeptide-Pluronic Copolymers for Versatile Surgical Adhesives and Hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dedai; Wang, Hongsen; Li, Ting'e; Li, Yunfei; Dou, Fajuan; Sun, Shaobo; Guo, Hongyun; Liao, Shiqi; Yang, Zhiwang; Wei, Qiangbing; Lei, Ziqiang

    2017-05-24

    Inspired by marine mussel adhesive proteins, polymers with catechol side groups have been extensively explored in industrial and academic research. Here, Pluronic L-31 alcoholate ions were used as the initiator to prepare a series of polypeptide-Pluronic-polypeptide triblock copolymers via ring-opening polymerization of l-DOPA-N-carboxyanhydride (DOPA-NCA), l-arginine-NCA (Arg-NCA), l-cysteine-NCA (Cys-NCA), and ε-N-acryloyl lysine-NCA (Ac-Lys-NCA). These copolymers demonstrated good biodegradability, biocompatibility, and thermoresponsive properties. Adhesion tests using porcine skin and bone as adherends demonstrated lap-shear adhesion strengths up to 106 kPa and tensile adhesion strengths up to 675 kPa. The antibleeding activity and tissue adhesive ability were evaluated using a rat model. These polypeptide-Pluronic copolymer glues showed superior hemostatic properties and superior effects in wound healing and osteotomy gaps. Complete healing of skin incisions and remodeling of osteotomy gaps were observed in all rats after 14 and 60 days, respectively. These copolymers have potential uses as tissue adhesives, antibleeding, and tissue engineering materials.

  16. Adhesion dynamics for cellulose nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Niklas; Lönnberg, Hanna; Hult, Anders; Malmström, Eva; Rutland, Mark W

    2009-10-01

    The efficiency of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) as a matrix polymer for cellulose nanocomposites has been investigated at the macromolecular contact level using atomic force microscopy in a colloidal probe configuration. Model cellulose microspheres grafted with PCL were prepared via ring-opening polymerization. Force measurements between the functionalized particles revealed the adhesion to be highly dependent on the contact time because of a diffusion-controlled mechanism. Moreover, an increase of the temperature to 60 degrees C (close to T(m) for the PCL graft) greatly enhanced the adhesion at the polymer-polymer interface, demonstrating the importance of entanglements in the annealing of composite materials.

  17. Silicone-Based Adhesives with Highly Tunable Adhesion Force for Skin-Contact Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong Kuk; Ryu, Jin Hwa; Baek, In-Bok; Kim, Yarkyeon; Jang, Won Ick; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Yoon, Yong Sun; Kim, Seung Hwan; Hong, Seong-Gu; Byun, Sangwon; Yu, Han Young

    2017-11-01

    A fundamental approach to fabricating silicone-based adhesives with highly tunable adhesion force for the skin-contact applications is presented. Liquid blends consisting of vinyl-multifunctional polydimethylsiloxane (V-PDMS), hydride-terminated PDMS (H-PDMS), and a tackifier composed of a silanol-terminated PDMS/MQ resin mixture and the MQ resin are used as the adhesive materials. The peel adhesion force of addition-cured adhesives on the skin is increased by increasing the H-PDMS molecular weights and the tackifier content, and decreasing the H-PDMS/V-PDMS ratio. There is an inverse relationship between the adhesion force and the Young's modulus. The low-modulus adhesives with a low H-PDMS/V-PDMS ratio exhibit enhanced adhesion properties. The low-modulus adhesives with the high MQ resin content show significantly enhanced adhesion properties. These adhesives exhibit a wide range of modulus (2-499 kPa), and their adhesion force (0.04-5.38 N) is superior to commercially available soft silicone adhesives (0.82-2.79 N). The strong adhesives (>≈2 N) provide sufficient adhesion for fixing the flexible electrocardiogram (ECG) device to the skin in most daily activity. The human ECG signals are successfully recorded in real time. These results suggest that the silicone-based adhesives should be useful as an atraumatic adhesive for the skin-contact applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Longevity of Self-etch Dentin Bonding Adhesives Compared to Etch-and-rinse Dentin Bonding Adhesives: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarwa, Nader; Mohamed, Ahmed; Abou-Rabii, Iyad; Abu Zaghlan, Rawan; Steier, Liviu

    2016-06-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to compare longevity of Self-Etch Dentin Bonding Adhesives to Etch-and-Rinse Dentin Bonding Adhesives. The following databases were searched for PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library complemented by a manual search of the Journal of Adhesive Dentistry. The MESH keywords used were: "etch and rinse," "total etch," "self-etch," "dentin bonding agent," "bond durability," and "bond degradation." Included were in-vitro experimental studies performed on human dental tissues of sound tooth structure origin. The examined Self-Etch Bonds were of two subtypes; Two Steps and One Step Self-Etch Bonds, while Etch-and-Rinse Bonds were of two subtypes; Two Steps and Three Steps. The included studies measured micro tensile bond strength (μTBs) to evaluate bond strength and possible longevity of both types of dental adhesives at different times. The selected studies depended on water storage as the aging technique. Statistical analysis was performed for outcome measurements compared at 24 h, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months of water storage. After 24 hours (p-value = 0.051), 3 months (p-value = 0.756), 6 months (p-value=0.267), 12 months (p-value=0.785) of water storage self-etch adhesives showed lower μTBs when compared to the etch-and-rinse adhesives, but the comparisons were statistically insignificant. In this study, longevity of Dentin Bonds was related to the measured μTBs. Although Etch-and-Rinse bonds showed higher values at all times, the meta-analysis found no difference in longevity of the two types of bonds at the examined aging times. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cytotoxic effect of a dentin bonding agent: AdheSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banava S.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: An important requirement for a dentin bonding agent is biological compatibility. Since dentin bonding agents are placed in cavity preparations with subgingival extensions, with direct contact to gingival and mucosal tissues, tissue response to these materials must be investigated. The aim of this study was to examine the cytotoxicity of AdheSE, a self etching adhesive, on human gingival fibroblasts."nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, primary human gingival fibroblasts were exposed to different dilutions of primer & bond of AdheSE (Vivadent, Liechtenstein. The toxicity of the primer was tested in 30 seconds, 300 seconds and 24 hours. The cytotoxicity of the bond was analyzed in uncured mode after 20 seconds, 5 minutes and 24 hours. In cured mode, tested materials were analyzed after 24 and 48 hours. Cytotoxic effects were evaluated using MTT, cell counting and DNA condensation assays. Data were analyzed by two way repeated measure ANOVA with p<0.05 as the level of significance."nResults: MTT Assay revealed that uncured AdheSE Bond was toxic only in 10-1 dilution and the difference with control group was significant (P<0.05. By increasing the time to 300sec. and 24h, dilutions of 10-2 and 10-4 were the most cytotoxic respectively. Cytotoxicity of uncured primer after 30 sec. and 300 sec. began from 10-2 and after 24h began from 10-2 and reached to 10-1. AdheSE in cured mode showed significant difference with control group in 1:2 (P<0.001,1:4 & 1:6 (P<0.01 dilutions. In cell counting assay only the 1:2 dilution was significantly more toxic than control group. Apoptosis (a morphological and biochemical distinct form of cell death that regulates cell turnover comprised in less than 5% of total death in both cured and uncured adhesives."nConclusions: Based on the results of this study, by increasing the exposure time, smaller amounts of bonding could be cytotoxic. Cytotoxicity was related to material

  20. Reproductive outcome following treatment of intrauterine adhesions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The reproductive outcome following treatment of intrauterine adhesions in this centre is not encouraging and needs improvement. Adoption of more successful treatment modalities like hysteroscopic adhesiolysis is advocated. . Keywords: Reproductive outcome; Intrauterine adhesions; Abuja Nigerian Journal of ...

  1. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Ryan; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-11-21

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  2. Adhesion of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, J.S.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Souza, E.J.; Schick, B.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of pillar dimensions and stiffness of biocompatible and biodegradable micropatterned surfaces on adhesion on different compliant substrates. The micropatterned adhesives were based on biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid

  3. Rapidly light-activated surgical protein glue inspired by mussel adhesion and insect structural crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun Young; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Bum Jin; Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Jung, Gyu Yong; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-10-01

    Currently approved surgical tissue glues do not satisfy the requirements for ideal bioadhesives due to limited adhesion in wet conditions and severe cytotoxicity. Herein, we report a new light-activated, mussel protein-based bioadhesive (LAMBA) inspired by mussel adhesion and insect dityrosine crosslinking chemistry. LAMBA exhibited substantially stronger bulk wet tissue adhesion than commercially available fibrin glue and good biocompatibility in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Besides, the easily tunable, light-activated crosslinking enabled an effective on-demand wound closure and facilitated wound healing. Based on these outstanding properties, LAMBA holds great potential as an ideal surgical tissue glue for diverse medical applications, including sutureless wound closures of skin and internal organs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...

  5. Bio-Inspired Controllable Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    well as many species of insect, have evolved a robust reversible adhesion mechanism, enabling them to traverse rough, smooth, vertical or inverted...such as enabling microrobotics to explore extraterrestrial surfaces or harsh climates otherwise not accessible to man. Current work is also

  6. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dongre, Prajakta; Driscoll, Mark; Amidon, Thomas; Bujanovic, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    ... (SEC). The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1), ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin...

  7. intrauterine adhesions in abuja, nigeria.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pain or with recurrent abortions 3, and therefore an important cause of ... therapeutic endoscopy at National Hospital, Abuja,. Nigeria, this paper .... pain. Recurrent 2 2 (100) - - - l (50) abortion. Normal 1 1 (100) - - - - menses. 166 Nigerian Jaurnal of Clinical Practice. Dec. 2006, Vol. 9(2). Intrauterine adhesions. E.R. Efetie.

  8. Intestinal Obstruction from an Adhesion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intestinal Obstruction from an Adhesion. Bahd Mimicking Peritonitis due to a _. Complicated Induced Unsafe Abortion: A Case Report. ABSTRACT. Miss EN. a 19—year old nullipara presented at the Accidents and Emergency unit of the Ebonyi State University. Teaching Hospital (EBSUTH), Abakaliki on the 17/5/06 with ...

  9. Ovalbumin as a Wood Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Holly Satori; Zhu Rongxian; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Use of proteins to bond wood dominated industrial production until the middle of the 20th century (1). The ensuing creation of the plywood and glulam beam industries allowed for more efficient use of wood resources than is possible with solid wood products. Many protein sources have been used as adhesives, including plant (soybean) and animal (blood, fish scales,...

  10. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins.

  11. Impact of RGD micro-patterns on cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, C; Lazare, S; Guillemot, F; Durrieu, M C

    2010-01-01

    In order to avoid the problems related to biomaterial use (inflammation, infections, aseptic loosening, etc.), a new approach consisting of associating the material and autologous cells before implantation is being developed, thus requiring a perfect cooperation between the material's surface and the cell. To improve cell adhesion to biomaterials, a suitable method is to functionalize their surface by pro-adhesive ligand grafting. The aim of this study was to covalently graft RGD containing peptides onto a poly-(ethylene terephthalate) surface in well-defined microstructures in order to control MC3T3 cell adhesion. We followed two different routes for obtaining micro-patterned materials: (1) a photoablation technique using an excimer laser and (2) a photolithography process. The resulting patterns were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, optical profilometry and high resolution mu-imager. The biological evaluation of cell adhesion onto the micro-patterned surfaces was carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Cells seeded onto photolithographical or photoablated micro-patterned PET exhibited an alignment with the RGD domains and appear to be connecting through pseudopods extending towards each other. Whatever the technique used to create micro-patterns, a cell alignment occurs once the thickness of the RGD line reaches approximately 100 microm. These results prove the importance of microstructured surfaces for the elaboration of tissue engineered biomaterials.

  12. Adhesion receptors as therapeutic targets for circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahe; King, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis contributes to >90% of cancer-associated mortality. Though primary tumors can be removed by surgical resection or chemo/radiotherapy, metastatic disease is a great challenge to treatment due to its systemic nature. As metastatic "seeds," circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are believed to be responsible for dissemination from a primary tumor to anatomically distant organs. Despite the possibility of physical trapping of CTCs in microvessels, recent advances have provided insights into the involvement of a variety of adhesion molecules on CTCs. Such adhesion molecules facilitate direct interaction with the endothelium in specific tissues or indirectly through leukocytes. Importantly, significant progress has been made in understanding how these receptors confer enhanced invasion and survival advantage during hematogenous circulation of CTCs through recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, platelets, and other cells. This review highlights the identification of novel adhesion molecules and how blocking their function can compromise successful seeding and colonization of CTCs in new microenvironment. Encouraged by existing diagnostic tools to identify and isolate CTCs, strategic targeting of these adhesion molecules to deliver conventional chemotherapeutics or novel apoptotic signals is discussed for the neutralization of CTCs in the circulation.

  13. Adhesion receptors as therapeutic targets for circulating tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahe eLi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis contributes to >90% of cancer-associated mortality. Though primary tumors can be removed by surgical resection or chemo/radiotherapy, metastatic disease is a great challenge to treatment due to its systemic nature. As metastatic seeds, circulating tumor cells (CTCs are believed to be responsible for dissemination from a primary tumor to anatomically distant organs. Despite the possibility of physical trapping of CTCs in microvessels, recent advances have provided insights into the involvement of a variety of adhesion molecules on CTCs. Such adhesion molecules facilitate direct interaction with the endothelium in specific tissues or indirectly through leukocytes. Importantly, significant progress has been made in understanding how these receptors confer enhanced invasion and survival advantage during hematogenous circulation of CTCs through recruitment of macrophages, neutrophils, platelets, and other cells. This review highlights the identification of novel adhesion molecules and how blocking their function can compromise successful seeding and colonization of CTCs in new microenvironment. Encouraged by existing diagnostic tools to identify and isolate CTCs, strategic targeting of these adhesion molecules to deliver conventional chemotherapeutics or novel apoptotic signals is discussed for the neutralization of CTCs in the circulation.

  14. Peritoneal adhesions after laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Mais, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopy has the potential to reduce peritoneal trauma and post-operative peritoneal adhesion formation, only one randomized controlled trial and a few comparative retrospective clinical studies have addressed this issue. Laparoscopy reduces de novo adhesion formation but has no efficacy in reducing adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis. Moreover, several studies have suggested that the reduction of de novo post-operative adhesions does not seem to have a significant clinical im...

  15. Transverse Reinforcement of Adhesive Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, S.; Shakirov, A.

    2015-05-01

    The shear of single-lap adhesive joints causes significant peel stresses in the adhesive layer, which is a particularly urgent problem for low-modulus polyurethane compositions. An experimental and computational analysis of various methods for increasing the load-bearing capacity of the joints by their strengthening with metallic z-elements was carried out. This strengthening hinders their delamination by the action of peel stresses, which allows one to reduce the overall dimensions and weight of adhesive joints. Two main strengthening methods were considered: with steel tapping screws (of diameter 2.5 mm) and blind aluminum rivets (of diameter 4.0 mm). The peculiarity of the strengthening lies in the fact that z-elements of minimum available diameter were used for reducing the effect of stress concentrations on the strength of the joints. The test of specimens for each type of strengthening showed an average increase in the ultimate load by 40% for the threaded reinforcements and by 10% for the rivets. During an analysis of stress state of the joints by the FEM, the nonlinear behavior of constituent materials and stress concentration in the region of reinforcing elements were taken into account. The mechanical properties of the adhesive layer and the GFRP covering were determined in separate experiments. The analysis showed that the weight of the reinforced adhesive joints could be lowered by 20-25% relative to that of unreinforced ones without reducing their load-bearing capacity. An additional effect caused by using the threaded reinforcing elements was a more than threefold increase in their rigidity as compared with that of analogous nonreinforced ones.

  16. Aspirin augments hyaluronidase induced adhesion inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative adhesions occur after virtually all abdomino-pelvic surgery and are the leading cause of intestinal obstruction and other gynaecologic problems. We used an animal model to test the efficacy of combined administration of aspirin and hyaluronidase on adhesion formation. Adhesions were induced using ...

  17. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics). PMID:28287647

  18. Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces polyurethane adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseland, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    Nonwoven glass fiber mat reinforces the adhesive properties of a polyurethane adhesive that fastens hardware to exterior surfaces of aluminum tanks. The mat is embedded in the uncured adhesive. It ensures good control of the bond line and increases the peel strength.

  19. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  20. 21 CFR 878.4380 - Drape adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drape adhesive. 878.4380 Section 878.4380 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4380 Drape adhesive. (a) Identification. A drape adhesive is a device intended to be placed on the skin to attach a surgical drape. (b...

  1. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that tumors arising from tissues such as kidney, pancreas, liver and stomach are particularly refractory to treatment. Searching for new anticancer drugs using cells in culture has yielded some effective therapies, but these refractory tumors remain intractable. Studies that comp......It is well known that tumors arising from tissues such as kidney, pancreas, liver and stomach are particularly refractory to treatment. Searching for new anticancer drugs using cells in culture has yielded some effective therapies, but these refractory tumors remain intractable. Studies...... that compare cells grown in suspension to similar cells grown attached to one another as aggregates have suggested that it is adhesion to the extracellular matrix of the basal membrane that confers resistance to apoptosis and, hence, resistance to cytotoxins. The genes whose expression correlates with poor...... survival might, therefore, act through such a matrix-to-cell suppression of apoptosis. Indeed, correlative mining of gene expression and patient survival databases suggests that poor survival in patients with metastatic cancer correlates highly with tumor expression of a common theme: the genes involved...

  2. Initial Homotypic Cell Pair Adhesion in Regenerating Hydra Facilitates Subsequent Adhesion of Homotypic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Y.; Hariyama, T.; Tsukahara, Y.

    In Hydra vulgaris at the level of dissociated single cells endodermal cells adhere to each other more readily than to ectodermal cells at the initial adhesion. The time required for adhesion to occur between two adjacent cells is shorter for both endodermal and ectodermal homotypic cell adhesions once the initial adhesion of the first pair of cells has been established. It is confirmed that contact of an aggregated pair with additional homotypic cells facilitates the occurrence of homotypic adhesions; heterotypic adhesions are discouraged. This suggests that adhesion of homotypic cells contributes to an increased readiness for subsequent homotypic cells to adhere.

  3. Microdissection of stained archival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S K; Douglas-Jones, A G; Morgan, J M

    1997-08-01

    In many tissues the preinvasive stage of neoplastic progression can be identified histologically as dysplasia or in situ disease. There is much interest in defining the molecular events associated with the early stages of neoplasia. Retrieval of histologically recognisable preinvasive neoplastic tissue uncontaminated by inflammatory or stromal cells is important for genetic studies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. A novel method for microdissection is described in which 10 microns sections are dewaxed, stained with haematoxylin and eosin, dried, covered with Sellotape, and the tissue cut out using a scalpel blade under direct visual control. The method is quick, eliminates problems of operator tremor, preserves the architecture of the micro-dissected tissue (for photographic documentation) and requires no special equipment. The presence of Sellotape and adhesive in the reaction mixture has no detrimental effect on the ability to extract DNA or to perform PCR.

  4. Mounting ground sections of teeth: Cyanoacrylate adhesive versus Canada balsam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangala, Manogna Rl; Rudraraju, Amrutha; Subramanyam, R V

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues can be studied by either decalcification or by preparing ground sections. Various mounting media have been tried and used for ground sections of teeth. However, there are very few studies on the use of cyanoacrylate adhesive as a mounting medium. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of cyanoacrylate adhesive (Fevikwik™) as a mounting medium for ground sections of teeth and to compare these ground sections with those mounted with Canada balsam. Ground sections were prepared from twenty extracted teeth. Each section was divided into two halves and mounted on one slide, one with cyanoacrylate adhesive (Fevikwik™) and the other with Canada balsam. Scoring for various features in the ground sections was done by two independent observers. Statistical analysis using Student's t-test (unpaired) of average scores was performed for each feature observed. No statistically significant difference was found between the two for most of the features. However, cyanoacrylate was found to be better than Canada balsam for observing striae of Retzius (P enamel lamellae (P < 0.036), dentinal tubules (P < 0.0057), interglobular dentin (P < 0.0001), sclerotic dentin - transmitted light (P < 0.00001), sclerotic dentin - polarized light (P < 0.0002) and Sharpey's fibers (P < 0.0004). This initial study shows that cyanoacrylate is better than Canada balsam for observing certain features of ground sections of teeth. However, it remains to be seen whether it will be useful for studying undecalcified sections of carious teeth and for soft tissue sections.

  5. Fibrin adhesive derived from snake venom in periodontal surgery: histologicalanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica D. S. Barbosa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A new fibrin adhesive made of buffalo plasma-derived fibrinogen and a thrombin-like snake venom enzyme, has been successfully used to immobilize free gingival grafts. This case series histologically compared sutured grafts (control group with others immobilized by using the fibrin adhesive (experimental group. CASE DESCRIPTION: The grafts were placed in the contralateral mandibular bicuspids of 15 patients, so that each subject received one treatment of each type. Five biopsies of each group were collected at 7, 14 and 45 days of healing, which were histologically and morphometrically analyzed as regards the relative volume density of the different connective tissue components. RESULTS: The sites in the control group presented a higher inflammatory cell density at 7 days and a tendency towards a lower collagen density. In the experimental group, the grafts had an appearance of more advanced healing. Tissue maturity characteristics progressed until 14 and 45 days, but no difference between groups could be noted at these times. Conclusions: Within the limits of the present study, it may be suggested that the alternative fibrin adhesive tested could represent an alternative to sutures in gingival grafts procedures.

  6. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braceras, Iñigo; Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana; Muñoz, Roberto; Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia; de Maeztu, Miguel Ángel

    2014-08-01

    Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40-80 keV), fluence (1-2 e17 ion/cm2) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted surfaces, without surface chemistry modification, are in the same range and that such modifications, in certain conditions, do have a statistically significant effect on bone tissue forming cell adhesion.

  7. Remote Control of Multimodal Nanoscale Ligand Oscillations Regulates Stem Cell Adhesion and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Heemin; Wong, Dexter Siu Hong; Yan, Xiaohui; Jung, Hee Joon; Kim, Sungkyu; Lin, Sien; Wei, Kongchang; Li, Gang; Dravid, Vinayak P; Bian, Liming

    2017-10-24

    Cellular adhesion is regulated by the dynamic ligation process of surface receptors, such as integrin, to adhesive motifs, such as Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD). Remote control of adhesive ligand presentation using external stimuli is an appealing strategy for the temporal regulation of cell-implant interactions in vivo and was recently demonstrated using photochemical reaction. However, the limited tissue penetration of light potentially hampers the widespread applications of this method in vivo. Here, we present a strategy for modulating the nanoscale oscillations of an integrin ligand simply and solely by adjusting the frequency of an oscillating magnetic field to regulate the adhesion and differentiation of stem cells. A superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) was conjugated with the RGD ligand and anchored to a glass substrate by a long flexible poly(ethylene glycol) linker to allow the oscillatory motion of the ligand to be magnetically tuned. In situ magnetic scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy imaging confirmed the nanoscale motion of the substrate-tethered RGD-grafted SPION. Our findings show that ligand oscillations under a low oscillation frequency (0.1 Hz) of the magnetic field promoted integrin-ligand binding and the formation and maturation of focal adhesions and therefore the substrate adhesion of stem cells, while ligands oscillating under high frequency (2 Hz) inhibited integrin ligation and stem cell adhesion, both in vitro and in vivo. Temporal switching of the multimodal ligand oscillations between low- and high-frequency modes reversibly regulated stem cell adhesion. The ligand oscillations further induced the stem cell differentiation and mechanosensing in the same frequency-dependent manner. Our study demonstrates a noninvasive, penetrative, and tunable approach to regulate cellular responses to biomaterials in vivo. Our work not only provides additional insight into the design considerations of biomaterials to

  8. Exenatide Alters Gene Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM), Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule (ICAM), and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM) in the Hippocampus of Type 2 Diabetic Model Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumuslu, Esen; Cine, Naci; Ertan Gökbayrak, Merve; Mutlu, Oguz; Komsuoglu Celikyurt, Ipek; Ulak, Guner

    2016-07-28

    BACKGROUND Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, ameliorates the symptoms of diabetes through stimulation of insulin secretion. Exenatide is a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor. Cell adhesion molecules are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and are involved in synaptic rearrangements in the mature brain. MATERIAL AND METHODS The present study demonstrated the effects of exenatide treatment (0.1 µg/kg, subcutaneously, twice daily for 2 weeks) on the gene expression levels of cell adhesion molecules, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in the brain tissue of diabetic BALB/c male mice by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/nicotinamide (STZ-NA) injection to male mice. RESULTS The results of this study revealed that hippocampal gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were found to be up-regulated in STZ-NA-induced diabetic mice compared to those of controls. A significant decrease in the gene expression levels of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were determined after 2 weeks of exenatide administration. CONCLUSIONS Cell adhesion molecules may be involved in the molecular mechanism of diabetes. Exenatide has a strong beneficial action in managing diabetes induced by STZ/NA by altering gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM.

  9. Strong tissue glue with tunable elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmansky, Regina; McAlvin, Brian J; Nyska, Abraham; Dohlman, Jenny C; Chiang, Homer H; Hashimoto, Michinao; Kohane, Daniel S; Mizrahi, Boaz

    2017-04-15

    Many bio-adhesive materials adhere weakly to tissue due to their high water content and weak structural integrity. Others provide desirable adhesive strength but suffer from rigid structure and lack of elasticity after administration. We have developed two water-free, liquid four-armed PEG pre-polymers modified with NHS or with NH 2 end groups which upon mixing changed from liquids to an elastic solid. The sealant and adhesive properties increased with the amount of the %v/v PEG 4 -NHS pre-polymer, and achieved adhesive properties comparable to those of cyanoacrylate glues. All mixtures showed minimal cytotoxicity in vitro. Mixtures of 90%v/v PEG 4 -NHS were retained in the subcutaneous space in vivo for up to 14days with minimal inflammation. This material's combination of desirable mechanical properties and biocompatibility has potential in numerous biomedical applications. Many bio-adhesive materials adhere weakly to tissue (e.g. hydrogels) due to their high water content and weak structural integrity. Others provide desirable mechanical properties but suffer from poor biocompatibility (e.g. cyanoacrylates). This study proposes a new concept for the formation of super strong and tunable tissue glues. Our bio-materials' enhanced performance is the product of new neat (without water or other solvents) liquid polymers that solidify after administration while allowing interactions with the tissue. Moreover, the elastic modulus of these materials could easily be tuned without compromising biocompatibility. This system could be an attractive alternative to sutures and staples since it can be applied more quickly, causes less pain and may require less equipment while maintaining the desired adhesion strength. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of adhesive molecules in endometrial cancer: part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Malinowski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The carcinogenesis is a result of both functional and structural disorders in the tissue. It initiates as a mutationin a gene encoding protein that is essential for cellular function. The subsequent cascade of eventsleads to accumulation of mutations and loss of cellular function. The cell loses its tissue-specific morphology,disconnects from other cells and extracellular matrix and migrates – the invasion begins. It is now clear thatadhesive molecules are a key player in this cascade. These proteins of the cell membrane surface are responsiblefor attachment of the cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix. These interactions are crucial forboth structural and functional tissue organization. Lack of this homeostasis destroys the tissue architectureand impairs its function and results in invasion. Abnormal expression of adhesive molecules was reported in allexamined cancers, including endometrial cancer.Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in developed countries. Although in many casesdiagnosed and treated in early stages, and thus with good results, some patients cannot be cured. Completeknowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease will be helpful in identifying the patients with negative prognosticfactors, increased risk of recurrence and, perhaps, to find other therapeutic options. In the paper we are trying tosum up the up-to-date knowledge of the role of adhesive molecules in pathogenesis of endometrial cancer.

  11. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  12. Adhesive Behavior of Single Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Yohei; Ishikawa, Atsunori; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2010-06-01

    We examined the adhesion of a carbon nanotube (CNT) tip using a manipulation technique with a transmission electron microscope. In addition, we estimated the maximum normal adhesion possibility of a CNT-based gecko tape. The adhesive behavior of a single isolated CNT to Au solid surfaces has high normal strength (6.84 nN), which has a linear relation to the cross section of a CNT, indicating the mechanism: van der Waals force was inferred from the contact of two flat surfaces. Adhesion measurements conducted on several surface materials verify that the surface chemistry affects adhesive properties of CNT tips.

  13. A review of high-temperature adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of high temperature adhesives and polyphenylquinoxalines (PPQ) is reported. Thermoplastic polyimides and linear PPQ adhesive are shown to have potential for bonding both metals and composite structures. A nadic terminated addition polyimide adhesive, LARC-13, and an acetylene terminated phenylquinoxaline (ATPQ) were developed. Both of the addition type adhesives are shown to be more readily processable than linear materials but less thermooxidatively stable and more brittle. It is found that the addition type adhesives are able to perform, at elevated temperatures up to 595 C where linear systems fail thermoplastically.

  14. Tissue tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue tests are widely used in horticulture practice and have in comparison with soil or substrate testing advantages as well disadvantages in comparison with soil testing. One of the main advantages of tissue tests is the certainty that analysed nutrients in plant tissues are really present in the

  15. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  16. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  17. Conformal adhesion enhancement on biomimetic microstructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavan, Hamed; Zhao, Boxin

    2011-06-21

    Inspired by the superior adhesive ability of the gecko foot pad, we report an experimental study of conformal adhesion of a soft elastomer thin film on biomimetic micropatterned surfaces (micropillars), showing a remarkable adhesion enhancement due to the surface patterning. The adhesion of a low-surface-energy poly(dimethylsiloxane) tape to a SU-8 micropatterned surface was found be able to increase by 550-fold as the aspect ratio increases from 0 to 6. The dependency of the adhesion enhancement on the aspect ratio is highly nonlinear. A series of peeling experiment coupled with optical interference imaging were performed to investigate the adhesion enhancement as a function of the height of the micropillars and the associated delamination mechanisms. Local elastic energy dissipation, side-wall friction, and plastic deformations were analyzed and discussed in terms of their contributions to the adhesion enhancement. We conclude that the local adhesion and friction events of pulling micropillars out of the embedded polymer film play a primary role in the observed adhesion enhancement. The technical implications of this local friction-based adhesion enhancement mechanism were discussed for the effective assembly of similar or dissimilar material components at small scales. The combined use of the micro/nanostructured surfaces with the van der Waals interactions seem to be a potentially more universal solution than the conventional adhesive bonding technology, which depends on the chemical and viscoelastic properties of the materials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Adhesion of liquid droplets to rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ri; Alizadeh, Azar; Shang, Wen

    2010-10-01

    We study the adhesion of liquid droplets to rough surfaces, focusing on how adhesion changes with surface chemistry and roughness. For hydrophobic surfaces (equilibrium contact angle θ(e)>90°), although increasing surface roughness augments apparent contact angle, it does not necessarily always reduce adhesion. In a domain defined by roughness and equilibrium contact angle, this study identifies regions where adhesion increases or decreases with increasing roughness. The two regions do not border at θ(e)=90°. It is found that making surfaces with low roughness ratio (close to 1) does not reduce adhesion unless the surface material is highly hydrophobic (θ(e)>120°). In other words, to reduce adhesion for existing hydrophobic materials (90°adhesion, the geometry of microstructures should be designed such that wetted fraction decreases with increasing roughness ratio. This study is of particular importance for the design of textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for leukocyte adhesion deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E Graham

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Leukocyte adhesion deficiency is a rare primary immune disorder caused by defects of the CD18 beta-integrin molecule on immune cells. The condition usually presents in early infancy and is characterized by deep tissue infections, leukocytosis with impaired formation of pus, and delayed...... wound healing. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation offers the possibility of curative therapy, and with patient numbers at any individual center being limited, we surveyed the transplant experience at 14 centers worldwide. METHODS: The course of 36 children with a confirmed diagnosis...... of leukocyte adhesion deficiency who underwent hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation between 1993 and 2007 was retrospectively analyzed. Data were collected by the registries of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies/European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the Center for International...

  20. Cell adhesion molecules and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Emma Kate; Ballester Roig, Maria Neus; Mongrain, Valérie

    2017-03-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play essential roles in the central nervous system, where some families are involved in synaptic development and function. These synaptic adhesion molecules (SAMs) are involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, and the formation of neuronal networks. Recent findings from studies examining the consequences of sleep loss suggest that these molecules are candidates to act in sleep regulation. This review highlights the experimental data that lead to the identification of SAMs as potential sleep regulators, and discusses results supporting that specific SAMs are involved in different aspects of sleep regulation. Further, some potential mechanisms by which SAMs may act to regulate sleep are outlined, and the proposition that these molecules may serve as molecular machinery in the two sleep regulatory processes, the circadian and homeostatic components, is presented. Together, the data argue that SAMs regulate the neuronal plasticity that underlies sleep and wakefulness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Sodium polyacrylate potentiates the anti-adhesion effect of a cellulose-derived polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K; Lindman, B; Bengmark, S; Larsson, K; Holmdahl, L

    2001-08-01

    Available methods for postoperative adhesion prevention are insufficient. A previous study demonstrated that LM-200, a bioadhesive cellulose derivative was effective in reducing adhesions. Increasing the viscosity of a polymer solution enhances the tissue separating properties. Theoretically, a combination of sodium polyacrylate (PA) and LM-200 would give more viscous solutions than LM-200 alone, and thus be more efficacious. Therefore the efficacy of various combinations of LM-200 and PA was investigated. A lesion was created in the peritoneum of mice. The solutions to be tested, or saline, were given intraperitoneally. One week post-operatively, adhesion formation was quantified and expressed as a percentage of the original lesion covered with adhesions. PA (0.01 and 0.03 wt%) given separately did not differ in adhesion reducing effect from LM-200 (p = 0.3710 and 0.3481) but PA (0.1 wt%) resulted in significantly less adhesion formation (p = 0.0004). The effect of LM-200 increased significantly when adding PA (0.01 wt%) (p = 0.0007) or PA (0.03 wt%) (p < 0.0001). When adding PA (0.1 wt%) the effect was even more pronounced (p < 0.0001). The combination of a bioadhesive cellulose derivative and the polymer PA, was effective in reducing postoperative adhesion formation and a dose-dependent increase in efficacy was obtained compared to using the two components separately.

  2. Effect of hypoxia on integrin-mediated adhesion of endothelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ralf; Friedrich, Denise; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Böhm, Michael; Friedrich, Erik B

    2012-10-01

    Homing of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is crucial for neoangiogenesis, which might be negatively affected by hypoxia. We investigated the influence of hypoxia on fibronectin binding integrins for migration and cell-matrix-adhesion. AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) were examined as possible effectors of hypoxia. Human EPCs were expanded on fibronectin (FN) and integrin expression was profiled by flow cytometry. Cell-matrix-adhesion- and migration-assays on FN were performed to examine the influence of hypoxia and AMPK-activation. Regulation of AMPK and ILK was shown by Western blot analysis. We demonstrate the presence of integrin β(1), β(2) and α(5) on EPCs. Adhesion to FN is reduced by blocking β(1) and α(5) (49% and 2% of control, P effect. Corresponding effects were shown for migration. Hypoxia and AMPK-activation decrease adhesion on FN. Although total AMPK-expression remains unchanged, phospho-AMPK increases eightfold. The EPCs require α(5) for adhesion on FN. Hypoxia and AMPK-activation decrease adhesion. As α(5) is the major adhesive factor for EPCs on FN, this suggests a link between AMPK and α(5)-integrins. We found novel evidence for a connection between hypoxia, AMPK-activity and integrin activity. This might affect the fate of EPCs in ischaemic tissue. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Fracture toughness of two dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Kimberly; Söderholm, Karl-Johan M

    2010-12-01

    Test the hypothesis that a self-etching adhesive is more likely to fail at the dentin-adhesive interface than an etch-and-rinse adhesive. Forty-eight composite-dentin short rod chevron-notched specimens were prepared. XP Bond and G Bond were used as adhesives. After 7 days in distilled water at 37°C, each specimen was tested (cross-head speed=0.05 mm/min). Fractured surfaces were inspected and characterized as interfacial failures, composite failures or a combination of interfacial and composite failures. The fracture toughness values (K(IC)) of the two adhesives were compared (Student's t-test and Weibull statistics). Of the specimens bonded with XP Bond, 50% failed at the dentin-adhesive interface, 42% at both the dentin-adhesive and composite interface and 8% in the composite alone. Of the specimens bonded with G Bond, 41% failed at the dentin-adhesive interface, 53% at both the dentin-adhesive and composite interface and 6% in the composite alone. The K(IC) values of the two adhesives differed significantly (pBond had a K(IC) of 0.77±0.11 MNm(-3/2) (n=17), while G Bond a K(IC) of 0.62±0.21 MNm(-3/2) (n=12). The high percentage of mixed failures did not support the hypothesis that the dentin-adhesive interface is clearly less resistant to fracture than the adhesive-composite interface. The finding that cracks occurred in 6-8% in the composite suggests that defects within the composite or at the adhesive-composite interface are important variables to consider in adhesion testing. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transient adhesion of neutrophils to endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, S K; Detmers, P A; Levin, S M; Wright, S D

    1989-05-01

    Fluorescently labeled polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were used to measure adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) cultured in vitro. Stimulation of PMN with phorbol dibutyrate (PDB), TNF, or C5a caused an increase in adhesion followed by a return to prestimulation levels of adhesion of longer times of incubation. Maximal adhesion of PMN to EC occurred rapidly in response to C5a (5 min) and more slowly with TNF or PDB (15 min). PMN stimulated to adhere with C5a detached from EC by 15 min. PMN from CD11/CD18-deficient patients and PMN incubated with anti-CD18 mAbs failed to bind to EC despite maximal stimulation. Anti-CD11a/CD18 and anti-CD11b/CD18 each partially inhibited adhesion, and a combination of these two reagents completely blocked adhesion. The adhesion we measured was therefore completely dependent on CD11/CD18, and CD11a/CD18 and CD11b/CD18 each contributed to adhesion. Stimuli that enhanced adhesion of PMN to EC also enhanced expression of CD11b/CD18 on the cell surface, but the time course of expression correlated poorly with changes in adhesivity. To determine if changes in the expression of CD11b/CD18 are necessary for the changes in adhesivity, we used enucleate cytoplasts that did not increase expression of CD11b/CD18. Cytoplasts showed a normal rise and fall in adhesivity in response to PDB. We conclude that the transient adhesion of stimulated PMN to naive EC is regulated by changes in the nature of existing CD11/CD18 molecules on the PMN surface. Changes in expression of CD11b/CD18 may contribute to enhancement of adhesivity, but a definite role for this phenomenon has yet to be established.

  5. Polymer Claw: Instant Underwater Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 REDD -2012-413 POLYMER CLAW: INSTANT UNDERWATER ADHESIVE Progress Report #8 Prepared for: Dr. Reggie Beach...Report: October 23, 2012 2.ol X\\oZ\\olc] The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723 REDD -2012...2- 10/23/12 The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723 REDD -2012-413 1 Summary When

  6. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans which can participate in diverse cell surface interactions, involving extracellular matrix macromolecules, growth factors, protease inhibitors, and even viral entry. Currently, all extracellular interactions are believed to be mediated by distinct...... structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...

  7. Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1, Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1, and Cluster of Differentiation 146 Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocaoglu-Emre, F Sinem; Saribal, Devrim; Yenmis, Guven; Guvenen, Guvenc

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a multisystemic, chronic disease accompanied by microvascular complications involving various complicated mechanisms. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and cluster of differentiation-146 (CD146) are mainly expressed by endothelial cells, and facilitate the adhesion and transmigration of immune cells, leading to inflammation. In the present study, we evaluated the levels of soluble adhesion molecules in patients with microvascular complications of T2DM. Serum and whole blood samples were collected from 58 T2DM patients with microvascular complications and 20 age-matched healthy subjects. Levels of soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble VCAM-1 (sVCAM-1) were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, while flow cytometry was used to determine CD146 levels. Serum sICAM-1 levels were lower in T2DM patients with microvascular complications than in healthy controls (Pmolecule levels were not correlated with the complication type. In the study group, most of the patients were on insulin therapy (76%), and 95% of them were receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitor agents. Insulin and ACE-inhibitors have been shown to decrease soluble adhesion molecule levels via various mechanisms, so we suggest that the decreased or unchanged levels of soluble forms of cellular adhesion molecules in our study group may have resulted from insulin and ACE-inhibitor therapy, as well as tissue-localized inflammation in patients with T2DM.

  8. A review of our development of dental adhesives--effects of radical polymerization initiators and adhesive monomers on adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Endo, Takeshi

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of dental adhesives by collating information of related studies from original scientific papers, reviews, and patent literatures. Through our development, novel radical polymerization initiators, adhesive monomers, and microcapsules were synthesized, and their effects on adhesion were investigated. It was found that 5-monosubstituted barbituric acid (5-MSBA)-containing ternary initiators in conjunction with adhesive monomers contributed to effective adhesion with good polymerization reactivity. Several kinds of novel adhesive monomers bearing carboxyl group, phosphonic acid group or sulfur-containing group were synthesized, and investigated their multi-purpose bonding functions. It was suggested that the flexible methylene chain in the structure of adhesive monomers played a pivotal role in their enhanced bonding durability. It was found that the combination of acidic monomers with sulfur-containing monomer markedly improved adhesion to enamel, dentin, porcelain, alumina, zirconia, non-precious metals and precious metals. A new poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-type adhesive resin comprising microencapsulated polymerization initiators was also found to exhibit both good formulation stability and excellent adhesive property.

  9. Durability of adhesion between 4-META/MMA-TBB resin and cementum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuko; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2004-09-01

    4-META/MMA-TBB resin has shown good biocompatibility and remarkable adhesion to dentin. It seems to be suitable for use in periodontal tissues for retrograde root sealing and treatment of vertically fractured roots. For an adhesive resin to be useful clinically, it must bond not only to the dentin but also to the cementum. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term adhesion durability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to cementum kept in water at 37 degrees C. Bovine root cementum and dentin surfaces were treated with 10-3 solution before 4-META/MMA-TBB resin was applied on treated surfaces. The micro-tensile bond strength (microTBS) decreased during the first two months; dye leakage value increased during the first four months and stabilized thereafter. No significant differences in adhesion durability were recognized between the dentin and cementum.

  10. Effect of hyaluronic acid on postoperative intraperitoneal adhesion formation in the rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urman, B.; Gomel, V.; Jetha, N. (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada))

    1991-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid solution in preventing intraperitoneal (IP) adhesions. The study design was prospective, randomized and blinded and involved 83 rats. Measured serosal injury was inflicted using a CO2 laser on the right uterine horn of the rat. Animals randomized to groups 1 and 2 received either 0.4% hyaluronic acid or its diluent phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally before and after the injury. In groups 3 and 4, the same solutions were used only after the injury. Postoperative adhesions were assessed at second-look laparotomy. Histologic assessment of the fresh laser injury was carried out on uteri pretreated with hyaluronic acid, PBS, or nothing. Pretreatment with hyaluronic acid was associated with a significant reduction in postoperative adhesions and a significantly decreased crater depth. Hyaluronic acid appears to reduce postoperative IP adhesion formation by coating the serosal surfaces and decreasing the extent of initial tissue injury.

  11. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  12. Culinary Medicine-Jalebi Adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2016-02-01

    Culinary terms have been used to describe anatomy (bean-shaped kidneys), pathology (strawberry gall bladder), clinical signs (café-au-lait spots), radiological images (sausage-shaped pancreas), etc. While Indian cuisine is popular all over the world, no Indian dish finds mention in medical terminology. In intra-abdominal adhesions, sometimes, the intestinal loops are so densely adherent that it is difficult to make out proximal from distal and it is impossible to separate them without injuring the bowel resulting in spill of contents-resection is the only option (Fig. 1). Jalebi, an Indian dessert, has a single long tubular strip of fried batter filled with sugary syrup so intertwined that it is impossible to discern its ends; if broken, the syrup spills out-the best way to relish it is to chew the whole piece (Fig. 2). Because of these similarities between them, I propose to name dense intra-abdominal adhesions as 'jalebi adhesions.'

  13. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  14. Expression profile of the entire family of Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors in mouse and rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebendal Ted

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are membrane-bound receptors with long N termini. This family has 33 members in humans. Several Adhesion GPCRs are known to have important physiological functions in CNS development and immune system response mediated by large cell surface ligands. However, the majority of Adhesion GPCRs are still poorly studied orphans with unknown functions. Results In this study we performed the extensive tissue localization analysis of the entire Adhesion GPCR family in rat and mouse. By applying the quantitative real-time PCR technique we have produced comparable expression profile for each of the members in the Adhesion family. The results are compared with literature data and data from the Allen Brain Atlas project. Our results suggest that the majority of the Adhesion GPCRs are either expressed in the CNS or ubiquitously. In addition the Adhesion GPCRs from the same phylogenetic group have either predominant CNS or peripheral expression, although each of their expression profile is unique. Conclusion Our findings indicate that many of Adhesion GPCRs are expressed, and most probably, have function in CNS. The related Adhesion GPCRs are well conserved in their structure and interestingly have considerable overlap in their expression profiles, suggesting similarities among the physiological roles for members within many of the phylogenetically related clusters.

  15. Mechanical Properties and Failure Analysis of Visible Light Crosslinked Alginate-Based Tissue Sealants

    OpenAIRE

    Charron, Patrick; Fenn, Spencer L.; Poniz, Alex; Oldinski, Rachael A.

    2016-01-01

    Moderate to weak mechanical properties limit the use of naturally-derived tissue sealants for dynamic medical applications, e.g., sealing a lung leak. To overcome these limitations, we developed visible-light crosslinked alginate-based hydrogels, as either non-adhesive methacrylated alginate (Alg-MA) hydrogel controls, or oxidized Alg-MA (Alg-MA-Ox) tissue adhesive tissue sealants, which form covalent bonds with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Our study investigated the potential for vis...

  16. Dipeptidyl peptidase 9 subcellular localization and a role in cell adhesion involving focal adhesion kinase and paxillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Chen, Yiqian; Wadham, Carol; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Keane, Fiona M; Gorrell, Mark D

    2015-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 9 (DPP9) is a ubiquitously expressed member of the DPP4 gene and protease family. Deciphering the biological functions of DPP9 and its roles in pathogenesis has implicated DPP9 in tumor biology, the immune response, apoptosis, intracellular epidermal growth factor-dependent signaling and cell adhesion and migration. We investigated the intracellular distribution of DPP9 chimeric fluorescent proteins and consequent functions of DPP9. We showed that while some DPP9 is associated with mitochondria, the strongest co-localization was with microtubules. Under steady state conditions, DPP9 was not seen at the plasma membrane, but upon stimulation with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or epidermal growth factor, some DPP9 re-distributed towards the ruffling membrane. DPP9 was seen at the leading edge of the migrating cell and co-localized with the focal adhesion proteins, integrin-β1 and talin. DPP9 gene silencing and treatment with a DPP8/DPP9 specific inhibitor both reduced cell adhesion and migration. Expression of integrin-β1 and talin was decreased in DPP9-deficient and DPP9-enzyme-inactive cells. There was a concomitant decrease in the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin, indicating that DPP9 knockdown or enzyme inhibition suppressed the associated adhesion signaling pathway, causing impaired cell movement. These novel findings provide mechanistic insights into the regulatory role of DPP9 in cell movement, and may thus implicate DPP9 in tissue and tumor growth and metastasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Scalable robotic biofabrication of tissue spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehesz, A Nagy; Hajdu, Z; Visconti, R P; Markwald, R R; Mironov, V [Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Center, Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Brown, J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Beaver, W [York Technical College, Rock Hill, SC (United States); Da Silva, J V L, E-mail: mironovv@musc.edu [Renato Archer Information Technology Center-CTI, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-06-15

    Development of methods for scalable biofabrication of uniformly sized tissue spheroids is essential for tissue spheroid-based bioprinting of large size tissue and organ constructs. The most recent scalable technique for tissue spheroid fabrication employs a micromolded recessed template prepared in a non-adhesive hydrogel, wherein the cells loaded into the template self-assemble into tissue spheroids due to gravitational force. In this study, we present an improved version of this technique. A new mold was designed to enable generation of 61 microrecessions in each well of a 96-well plate. The microrecessions were seeded with cells using an EpMotion 5070 automated pipetting machine. After 48 h of incubation, tissue spheroids formed at the bottom of each microrecession. To assess the quality of constructs generated using this technology, 600 tissue spheroids made by this method were compared with 600 spheroids generated by the conventional hanging drop method. These analyses showed that tissue spheroids fabricated by the micromolded method are more uniform in diameter. Thus, use of micromolded recessions in a non-adhesive hydrogel, combined with automated cell seeding, is a reliable method for scalable robotic fabrication of uniform-sized tissue spheroids.

  18. Activation of GPR4 by Acidosis Increases Endothelial Cell Adhesion through the cAMP/Epac Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Nancy R.; Asch, Adam S.; Witte, Owen N.; Yang, Li V.

    2011-01-01

    Endothelium-leukocyte interaction is critical for inflammatory responses. Whereas the tissue microenvironments are often acidic at inflammatory sites, the mechanisms by which cells respond to acidosis are not well understood. Using molecular, cellular and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that activation of GPR4, a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, by isocapnic acidosis increases the adhesiveness of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that express GPR4 endogenously. Acidosis in combination with GPR4 overexpression further augments HUVEC adhesion with U937 monocytes. In contrast, overexpression of a G protein signaling-defective DRY motif mutant (R115A) of GPR4 does not elicit any increase of HUVEC adhesion, indicating the requirement of G protein signaling. Downregulation of GPR4 expression by RNA interference reduces the acidosis-induced HUVEC adhesion. To delineate downstream pathways, we show that inhibition of adenylate cyclase by inhibitors, 2′,5′-dideoxyadenosine (DDA) or SQ 22536, attenuates acidosis/GPR4-induced HUVEC adhesion. Consistently, treatment with a cAMP analog or a Gi signaling inhibitor increases HUVEC adhesiveness, suggesting a role of the Gs/cAMP signaling in this process. We further show that the cAMP downstream effector Epac is important for acidosis/GPR4-induced cell adhesion. Moreover, activation of GPR4 by acidosis increases the expression of vascular adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, which are functionally involved in acidosis/GPR4-mediated HUVEC adhesion. Similarly, hypercapnic acidosis can also activate GPR4 to stimulate HUVEC adhesion molecule expression and adhesiveness. These results suggest that acidosis/GPR4 signaling regulates endothelial cell adhesion mainly through the Gs/cAMP/Epac pathway and may play a role in the inflammatory response of vascular endothelial cells. PMID:22110680

  19. In situ cross-linking carbodiimide-modified chitosan hydrogel for postoperative adhesion prevention in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Long-Xiang; Luo, Jing-Wan; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Ye, Chen-Qing; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Yu-Long

    2017-12-01

    Postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion often causes many complications. Chitosan fluid has been used in clinic to prevent intra-abdominal adhesion. However, fluid can be easily diluted and cannot stay on the wound site. As hydrogel is able to form stable physical barrier to separate injured tissues, we developed a chitosan hydrogel for better prevention of intra-abdominal adhesion in this study. We synthesized a carbodiimide-derivatized chitosan gelatin (cd-CS-gelatin) hydrogel and investigated its rheological properties. A rat model was used to compare the anti-adhesion effect of chitosan hydrogel and fluid. The wounds were created with damage of the underlying muscle of the abdominal wall and the serosal layer of the cecum. They were coated with chitosan fluid or cd-CS-gelatin hydrogel. At day 14 after surgery, the animals were euthanized and intra-abdominal adhesion was assessed. The cd-CS-gelatin hydrogel solidified within 3min after the mixing of the reagents. The cecum-abdomen adhesion occurred in all rats without anti-adhesion treatment. The application of cd-CS-gelatin significantly reduced the adhesion rate from 100% to 50%, compared the chitosan fluid only to 88%. The decrease of adhesion breaking strength also manifested that cd-CS-gelatin was more effective than chitosan fluid to reduce postsurgical intra-abdominal adhesion formation. Chitosan hydrogel is more effective than chitosan fluid to prevent postoperative cecum-abdomen adhesion. It indicates that hydrogel could be a more promising state than liquid to prevent postoperative intra-abdominal adhesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The influence of pre-operative radiotherapy on the expression of p53 and adhesion molecules: correlation with treatment results in patients with squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, J.; Blom, J.; Linthorst, M.; Zwinderman, A. H.; van Krimpen, C.

    2002-01-01

    E-cadherin and the catenins are responsible for inter-cellular adhesion in epithelial tissues. E-cadherin and/or catenin expression is often altered in malignancies, leading to increased invasiveness and metastatic activity of tumour cells. Intact adhesion molecules reduce the risk on distant

  1. Carbon nanotube dry adhesives with temperature-enhanced adhesion over a large temperature range

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ming; Du, Feng; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Conventional adhesives show a decrease in the adhesion force with increasing temperature due to thermally induced viscoelastic thinning and/or structural decomposition. Here, we report the counter-intuitive behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) dry adhesives that show a temperature-enhanced adhesion strength by over six-fold up to 143?N?cm?2 (4?mm ? 4?mm), among the strongest pure CNT dry adhesives, over a temperature range from ?196 to 1,000??C. This unusual adhesion behaviour leads to temperat...

  2. A membrane slurry reduces postoperative adhesions in rat models of abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenawalt, Keith E; Colt, M Jude; Corazzini, Rubina L; Krauth, Megan C; Holmdahl, Lena

    2011-06-01

    Sodium hyaluronate and carboxymethylcellulose (HA-CMC) membrane is an effective barrier material for limiting postoperative adhesions, but can be difficult to apply in certain situations due to its physical properties. We tested whether HA-CMC membrane hydrated in saline (slurry) is an effective alternative to HA-CMC membrane for preventing surgical adhesions in rat models of abdominal surgery. All studies were performed in rat cecal abrasion or sidewall defect models of adhesion formation. Adhesions were examined 7 d after surgery. In separate studies, the effects of variations in slurry composition, volume, and site of application on anti-adhesive properties were studied and compared with untreated controls. Finally, the effectiveness of HA-CMC membrane slurry for preventing adhesions was compared with that of conventional HA-CMC membrane. Application of HA-CMC membrane slurry to traumatized tissue resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of adhesions compared with untreated controls in both rat surgery models. Slurry was equally effective when applied in low and high film-to-volume formulations, but had minimal effect when applied in a small volume or at a location distal to the injury. Comparison of HA-CMC membrane slurry and conventional HA-CMC membrane indicated similar efficacy for reducing postoperative adhesions. In rat models of abdominal surgery, HA-CMC membrane slurry reduced postoperative adhesion formation and may be an effective alternative for HA-CMC membrane in situations where its use is limited by its physical properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Soft material adhesion characterization for in vivo locomotion of robotic capsule endoscopes: Experimental and modeling results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Madalyn D; Ortega Alcaide, Joan; Rentschler, Mark E

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this work is to validate an experimental method and nondimensional model for characterizing the normal adhesive response between a polyvinyl chloride based synthetic biological tissue substrate and a flat, cylindrical probe with a smooth polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface. The adhesion response is a critical mobility design parameter of a Robotic Capsule Endoscope (RCE) using PDMS treads to provide mobility to travel through the gastrointestinal tract for diagnostic purposes. Three RCE design characteristics were chosen as input parameters for the normal adhesion testing: pre-load, dwell time and separation rate. These parameters relate to the RCE׳s cross sectional dimension, tread length, and tread speed, respectively. An inscribed central composite design (CCD) prescribed 34 different parameter configurations to be tested. The experimental adhesion response curves were nondimensionalized by the maximum stress and total displacement values for each test configuration and a mean nondimensional curve was defined with a maximum relative error of 5.6%. A mathematical model describing the adhesion behavior as a function of the maximum stress and total displacement was developed and verified. A nonlinear regression analysis was done on the maximum stress and total displacement parameters and equations were defined as a function of the RCE design parameters. The nondimensional adhesion model is able to predict the adhesion curve response of any test configuration with a mean R(2) value of 0.995. Eight additional CCD studies were performed to obtain a qualitative understanding of the impact of tread contact area and synthetic material substrate stiffness on the adhesion response. These results suggest that the nondimensionalization technique for analyzing the adhesion data is sufficient for all values of probe radius and substrate stiffness within the bounds tested. This method can now be used for RCE tread design optimization given a set of

  4. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes, Elliot W.; Eason, Eric V.; Christensen, David L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for syn...

  5. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lebesgue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc versus the non-adhesive part (the stem, and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue. This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016 [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold, likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  6. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  7. Tissue types (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  8. Adhesion and wear resistance of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies into the nature of bonding at the interface between two solids in contact or a solid and deposited film have provided a better understanding of those properties important to the adhesive wear resistance of materials. Analytical and experimental progress are reviewed. For simple metal systems the adhesive bond forces are related to electronic wave function overlap. With metals in contact with nonmetals, molecular-orbital energy, and density of states, respectively can provide insight into adhesion and wear. Experimental results are presented which correlate adhesive forces measured between solids and the electronic surface structures. Orientation, surface reconstruction, surface segregation, adsorption are all shown to influence adhesive interfacial strength. The interrelationship between adhesion and the wear of the various materials as well as the life of coatings applied to substrates are discussed. Metallic systems addressed include simple metals and alloys and these materials in contact with themselves, both oxide and nonoxide ceramics, diamond, polymers, and inorganic coating compounds, h as diamondlike carbon.

  9. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Mice Models to Study Blastocystis spp. Adhesion, Colonization and Pathology: Closer to Proving Koch's Postulates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitara S R Ajjampur

    Full Text Available Blastocystis spp. are widely prevalent extra cellular, non-motile anerobic protists that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. Although Blastocystis spp. have been associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome and urticaria, their clinical significance has remained controversial. We established an ex vivo mouse explant model to characterize adhesion in the context of tissue architecture and presence of the mucin layer. Using confocal microscopy with tissue whole mounts and two axenic isolates of Blastocystis spp., subtype 7 with notable differences in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC, isolate B (ST7-B and isolate H (more adhesive, ST7-H, we showed that adhesion is both isolate dependent and tissue trophic. The more adhesive isolate, ST7-H was found to bind preferentially to the colon tissue than caecum and terminal ileum. Both isolates were also found to have mucinolytic effects. We then adapted a DSS colitis mouse model as a susceptible model to study colonization and acute infection by intra-caecal inoculation of trophic Blastocystis spp.cells. We found that the more adhesive isolate ST7-H was also a better colonizer with more mice shedding parasites and for a longer duration than ST7-B. Adhesion and colonization was also associated with increased virulence as ST7-H infected mice showed greater tissue damage than ST7-B. Both the ex vivo and in vivo models used in this study showed that Blastocystis spp. remain luminal and predominantly associated with mucin. This was further confirmed using colonic loop experiments. We were also successfully able to re-infect a second batch of mice with ST7-H isolates obtained from fecal cultures and demonstrated similar histopathological findings and tissue damage thereby coming closer to proving Koch's postulates for this parasite.

  10. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Mice Models to Study Blastocystis spp. Adhesion, Colonization and Pathology: Closer to Proving Koch's Postulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajjampur, Sitara S R; Png, Chin Wen; Chia, Wan Ni; Zhang, Yongliang; Tan, Kevin S W

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis spp. are widely prevalent extra cellular, non-motile anerobic protists that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. Although Blastocystis spp. have been associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome and urticaria, their clinical significance has remained controversial. We established an ex vivo mouse explant model to characterize adhesion in the context of tissue architecture and presence of the mucin layer. Using confocal microscopy with tissue whole mounts and two axenic isolates of Blastocystis spp., subtype 7 with notable differences in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), isolate B (ST7-B) and isolate H (more adhesive, ST7-H), we showed that adhesion is both isolate dependent and tissue trophic. The more adhesive isolate, ST7-H was found to bind preferentially to the colon tissue than caecum and terminal ileum. Both isolates were also found to have mucinolytic effects. We then adapted a DSS colitis mouse model as a susceptible model to study colonization and acute infection by intra-caecal inoculation of trophic Blastocystis spp.cells. We found that the more adhesive isolate ST7-H was also a better colonizer with more mice shedding parasites and for a longer duration than ST7-B. Adhesion and colonization was also associated with increased virulence as ST7-H infected mice showed greater tissue damage than ST7-B. Both the ex vivo and in vivo models used in this study showed that Blastocystis spp. remain luminal and predominantly associated with mucin. This was further confirmed using colonic loop experiments. We were also successfully able to re-infect a second batch of mice with ST7-H isolates obtained from fecal cultures and demonstrated similar histopathological findings and tissue damage thereby coming closer to proving Koch's postulates for this parasite.

  11. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the di...

  12. Testing thin film adhesion strength acoustically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanshetty, Sameer I.; Wanklyn, Kevin M.; Ji, Hang

    2004-05-01

    A new method of measuring the adhesion strength of thin films to their substrates is reported. The method is based on an analogy with the common tensile test of materials. This is an acoustic method that uses acoustic microcavitation to bring about controlled erosion of the thin film. Based on the insonification pressure and the time to complete erosion, the adhesion strength is assessed. The measurements correctly rank order a set of thin film samples of known adhesion strengths.

  13. Confinement-Optimized 3-Dimensional T cell Amoeboid Motility is Modulated via Myosin IIA-Regulated Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobelli, Jordan; Friedman, Rachel S.; Conti, Mary Anne; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu; Sorensen, Caitlin M.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2010-01-01

    During trafficking through tissues, T cells fine-tune their motility to balance the extent and duration of cell-surface contacts with the need to traverse an entire organ. In vivo, Myosin-IIA-deficient T cells exhibited a triad of defects including over-adherence to high-endothelial venules, reduced interstitial migration, and inefficient completion of recirculation through lymph nodes. Spatiotemporal analysis of 3-dimensional motility in microchannels revealed that the degree of confinement and Myosin-IIA function, rather than integrin adhesion as proposed by the haptokinetic model, optimize motility rate. This occurs via a Myosin-IIA-dependent rapid ‘walking’ motility mode using multiple small and simultaneous adhesions to the substrate, which prevent spurious and prolonged adhesions. Adhesion discrimination provided by Myosin-IIA is thus necessary for optimizing motility through complex tissues. PMID:20835229

  14. Attenuation of melanoma invasion by a secreted variant of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, J.W.J. van; Wilting, R.H.; Bergers, M.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Schalkwijk, J.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Swart, G.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166/MEMD), a marker of various cancers and mesenchymal stem cells, is involved in melanoma metastasis. We have exploited a secreted NH(2)-terminal fragment, sALCAM, to test the hypothesis that ALCAM coordinates tissue growth and cell migration.

  15. ATRP synthesis of poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl choline phosphate): a multivalent universal biomembrane adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xifei; Yang, Xiaoqiang; Horte, Sonja; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Brooks, Donald E

    2013-08-07

    A new monomer, 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl choline phosphate, and its direct polymerization into a polyvalent choline phosphate are described, providing a universal biomembrane adhesive exhibiting rapid, strong attachment to any mammalian cell membrane and fast internalization, properties of great value in applications such as tissue engineering and drug delivery.

  16. Endothelial CD2AP Binds the Receptor ICAM-1 To Control Mechanosignaling, Leukocyte Adhesion, and the Route of Leukocyte Diapedesis In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, Antje; van Duijn, Trynette J.; Majolee, Jisca; Burridge, Keith; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is driven by excessive transmigration (diapedesis) of leukocytes from the blood to the tissue across the endothelial cell monolayer that lines blood vessels. Leukocyte adhesion, crawling, and transmigration are regulated by clustering of the endothelial mechanosensitive receptor

  17. Adhesive Strength of dry Adhesive Structures Depending on the Thickness of Metal Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyu Hye; Kwon, Da Som; Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Su Hee; Yoon, Ji Won; An, Tea Chang; Hwang, Hui Yun [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Recently, engineering applications have started to adopt solutions inspired by nature. The peculiar adhesive properties of gecko skin are an example, as they allow the animal to move freely on vertical walls and even on ceilings. The high adhesive forces between gecko feet and walls are due to the hierarchical microscopical structure of the skin. In this study, the effect of metal coatings on the adhesive strength of synthetic, hierarchically structured, dry adhesives was investigated. Synthetic dry adhesives were fabricated using PDMS micro-molds prepared by photolithography. Metal coatings on synthetic dry adhesives were formed by plasma sputtering. Adhesive strength was measured by pure shear tests. The highest adhesion strengths were found with coatings composed of 4 nm thick layers of Indium, 8 nm thick layers of Zinc and 6 nm thick layers of Gold, respectively.

  18. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers.

  19. An experimental study on adhesive or anti-adhesive, bio-inspired experimental nanomaterials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lepore, Emiliano; Pugno, Nicol

    The proposed book aims to better understand some of the most challenging and disputed topics that could be found in nature, such as adhesive, anti-adhesive or strong mechanisms in plants or animals...

  20. Familial adhesive arachnoiditis associated with syringomyelia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasoglou, V; Janin, N; Tebache, M; Tegos, T J; Born, J D; Collignon, L

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a rare condition, often complicated by syringomyelia. This pathologic entity is usually associated with prior spinal surgery, spinal inflammation or infection, and hemorrhage...

  1. The development of aerospace polyimide adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Few materials are available which can be used as aerospace adhesives at temperatures in the range of 300 C. The Materials Division at NASA-Langley Research Center developed several high temperature polyimide adhesives to fulfill the stringent needs of current aerospace programs. These adhesives are the result of a decade of basic research studies on the structure property relationships of both linear and addition aromatic polyimides. The development of both in house and commercially available polyimides is reviewed with regards to their potential for use as aerospace adhesives.

  2. Adhesion performance of new hydrolytically stable one-component self-etching enamel/dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten

    2010-02-01

    To demonstrate that hydrolytically stable methacrylamide monomers allow one-component self-etching adhesives with comparable adhesive properties and better storage stability than hitherto available methyacrylate-based adhesive formulations. The shear bond strength and storage stability of the new one-component self-etching, methacrylamide-based adhesive AdheSE One F (Ivoclar Vivadent) to enamel and dentin was compared to the methacrylate-based Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray), G-Bond (GC), Hybrid Bond (Sun Medical), iBond (Heraeus Kulzer), Optibond All In One (Sybron-Kerr), and the methacrylamide-based Xeno V (Dentsply). Hydrolytic stability and adhesive performance of these adhesives was evaluated by accelerated aging at 42 degrees C over 16 weeks and monthly assessment of shear bond strength to dentin. The null hypothesis was that the bond strength of one-bottle self-etching dental adhesives is independent of storage duration and that, disregarding their higher stability against hydrolysis, methacrylamide- based materials offer performance beyond shelf-life time, comparable to methacrylate-based adhesives. Statistical analysis included 1-way-ANOVA and the Tukey-B post-hoc test (p AdheSE One F) to 16.6 MPa (iBond) and on dentin from 36.1 MPa (Optibond All In One) to 20.5 MPa (G-Bond). During accelerated aging, methacrylate-based adhesives with a pH AdheSE One F and Xeno V were stable for 16 weeks regarding shear bond strength to dentin. The shelf life of one-component self-etching adhesives is determined by their chemical composition. In conventional methacrylate-based adhesives, the inherently acidic environment of such formulations leads to monomer degradation due to hydrolysis. In contrast, methacrylamide-based adhesives are stable to aqueous acid and exhibit much superior storage stability without monomer degradation-related losses in adhesion performance.

  3. A novel biocompatible adhesive incorporating plant-derived monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapperich, Catherine M; Noack, Cassandra L; Kaufman, Jessica D; Zhu, Lin; Bonnaillie, Laetitia; Wool, Richard P

    2009-11-01

    We describe a new class of biomaterials with potential for a variety of applications in tissue engineering, wound healing, and transdermal drug delivery. These materials are based on oleic methyl ester (OME), which is derived from various plant oils including soybean oil. The OME was acrylated (AOME) and subsequently copolymerized with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) to form pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs). We assessed the cytocompatibility of each PSA product using Alamar Blue and Live/Dead assays. It was found that after 2 h, human fibroblast cells attached on all four of the PSA polymers tested. After 24 h, cell spreading was seen on all materials with the exception of the polymerized AOME product (PAOME). Cells attached to the copolymer PSA products continued to proliferate for up to 2 weeks, as shown by fluorescent confocal microscopy imaging. Finally, a mechanical analysis of each of the copolymers is presented demonstrating that they have a range of mechanical properties and cell adhesiveness depending on the formulation, making them attractive candidates for use as bioactive adhesives. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Human Endometrial CD98 Is Essential for Blastocyst Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Francisco; Simón, Carlos; Quiñonero, Alicia; Ramírez, Miguel Ángel; González-Muñoz, Elena; Burghardt, Hans; Cervero, Ana; Martínez, Sebastián; Pellicer, Antonio; Palacín, Manuel; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Yáñez-Mó, María

    2010-01-01

    Background Understanding the molecular basis of embryonic implantation is of great clinical and biological relevance. Little is currently known about the adhesion receptors that determine endometrial receptivity for embryonic implantation in humans. Methods and Principal Findings Using two human endometrial cell lines characterized by low and high receptivity, we identified the membrane receptor CD98 as a novel molecule selectively and significantly associated with the receptive phenotype. In human endometrial samples, CD98 was the only molecule studied whose expression was restricted to the implantation window in human endometrial tissue. CD98 expression was restricted to the apical surface and included in tetraspanin-enriched microdomains of primary endometrial epithelial cells, as demonstrated by the biochemical association between CD98 and tetraspanin CD9. CD98 expression was induced in vitro by treatment of primary endometrial epithelial cells with human chorionic gonadotropin, 17-β-estradiol, LIF or EGF. Endometrial overexpression of CD98 or tetraspanin CD9 greatly enhanced mouse blastocyst adhesion, while their siRNA-mediated depletion reduced the blastocyst adhesion rate. Conclusions These results indicate that CD98, a component of tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, appears to be an important determinant of human endometrial receptivity during the implantation window. PMID:20976164

  5. Adhesion and migration of cells responding to microtopography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, Maruxa; Martínez, Elena; Yarwood, Stephen J; Dalby, Matthew J; Samitier, Josep

    2015-05-01

    It is known that cells respond strongly to microtopography. However, cellular mechanisms of response are unclear. Here, we study wild-type fibroblasts responding to 25 µm(2) posts and compare their response to that of FAK(-/-) fibroblasts and fibroblasts with PMA treatment to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and the small g-protein Rac. FAK knockout cells modulated adhesion number and size in a similar way to cells on topography; that is, they used more, smaller adhesions, but migration was almost completely stalled demonstrating the importance of FAK signaling in contact guidance and adhesion turnover. Little similarity, however, was observed to PKC stimulated cells and cells on the topography. Interestingly, with PKC stimulation the cell nuclei became highly deformable bringing focus on these surfaces to the study of metastasis. Surfaces that aid the study of cellular migration are important in developing understanding of mechanisms of wound healing and repair in aligned tissues such as ligament and tendon. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency: Report of Two Family Related Newborn Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Kavehmanesh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD 1 is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder resulting from deficiency of CD18, characterized by recurrent bacterial infections. We report two consanguineous patients with Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1( LAD1. These two infant boy patients were referred to us, within a short period of time, with the complaints of recurrent infections at the age of 38 and 75 days -old, respectively. Parents of two patients were first cousins and their grandmothers also were first cousins. The history of delayed umbilical cord separation was shown in both patients. Patient 1 had history of omphalitis, conjunctivitis, skin lesion of groin area and abscess formation of vaccination site, and had infective wound of eye-lid at the last admission. Patient 2 had history of omphalitis and soft tissue infection of right wrist at the last admission. Laboratory findings showed marked leukocytosis and low CD18 levels (6.6% in Patient 1 and 2.4 % in Patient 2. In Patient 1 recurrent infections were treated with antibiotic regimens and received bone marrow transplantation but Patient 2 died because of septicemia, generalized edema, ascites and progression to acute renal failure at 4 months of age. Due to considerable rate of consanguineous marriages in parents of Leukocyte adhesion deficiency patients, sequence analysis especially for prenatal diagnosis in subsequent pregnancies and genetic counseling is recommended.

  7. Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency: Report of Two Family Related Newborn Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Kavehmanesh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nLeukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD 1 is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder resulting from deficiency of CD18, characterized by recurrent bacterial infections. We report two consanguineous patients with Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1( LAD1. These two infant boy patients were referred to us, within a short period of time, with the complaints of recurrent infections at the age of 38 and 75 days -old, respectively. Parents of two patients were first cousins and their grandmothers also were first cousins. The history of delayed umbilical cord separation was shown in both patients. Patient 1 had history of omphalitis, conjunctivitis, skin lesion of groin area and abscess formation of vaccination site, and had infective wound of eye-lid at the last admission. Patient 2 had history of omphalitis and soft tissue infection of right wrist at the last admission. Laboratory findings showed marked leukocytosis and low CD18 levels (6.6% in Patient 1 and 2.4 % in Patient 2. In Patient 1 recurrent infections were treated with antibiotic regimens and received bone marrow transplantation but Patient 2 died because of septicemia, generalized edema, ascites and progression to acute renal failure at 4 months of age. Due to considerable rate of consanguineous marriages in parents of Leukocyte adhesion deficiency patients, sequence analysis especially for prenatal diagnosis in subsequent pregnancies and genetic counseling is recommended.

  8. Human endometrial CD98 is essential for blastocyst adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Domínguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the molecular basis of embryonic implantation is of great clinical and biological relevance. Little is currently known about the adhesion receptors that determine endometrial receptivity for embryonic implantation in humans. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using two human endometrial cell lines characterized by low and high receptivity, we identified the membrane receptor CD98 as a novel molecule selectively and significantly associated with the receptive phenotype. In human endometrial samples, CD98 was the only molecule studied whose expression was restricted to the implantation window in human endometrial tissue. CD98 expression was restricted to the apical surface and included in tetraspanin-enriched microdomains of primary endometrial epithelial cells, as demonstrated by the biochemical association between CD98 and tetraspanin CD9. CD98 expression was induced in vitro by treatment of primary endometrial epithelial cells with human chorionic gonadotropin, 17-β-estradiol, LIF or EGF. Endometrial overexpression of CD98 or tetraspanin CD9 greatly enhanced mouse blastocyst adhesion, while their siRNA-mediated depletion reduced the blastocyst adhesion rate. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that CD98, a component of tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, appears to be an important determinant of human endometrial receptivity during the implantation window.

  9. Histological response of human pulps capped with calcium hydroxide and a self-etch adhesive containing an antibacterial component

    OpenAIRE

    Ambalavanan Parthasarathy; Kamat, Sharad B.; Mamta Kamat; Krishnamurthy Haridas Kidiyoor

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare human pulp tissue response following direct pulp capping with calcium hydroxide and a self-etch adhesive containing antibacterial component. Materials and Methods: Sixty-six erupted sound premolars scheduled to be extracted for orthodontic reasons were selected from 17 human subjects. Pulp exposures were made. Direct pulp capping was then performed using calcium hydroxide and a self-etch adhesive containing antibacterial component in its primer. The teeth were then restor...

  10. Effect of inorganic fillers in paper on the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weixu Chen; Xiaoyan Tang; John Considine; Kevin T. Turner

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic fillers are inexpensive materials used to increase the density, smoothness and other properties of paper that are important for printing. In the current study, the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs), a common type of adhesive used in labels and tapes, to papers containing varying amounts and types of fillers is investigated. Papers with three...

  11. IL-4 increases human endothelial cell adhesiveness for T cells but not for neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, M H; Kyan-Aung, U; Haskard, D O

    1990-04-15

    The adhesion of leukocytes to vascular endothelium is the first step in their passage from the blood into inflammatory tissues. By modulating endothelial cell (EC) adhesiveness for leukocytes, cytokines may regulate leukocyte accumulation and hence the nature and progression of inflammatory responses. We have found that the T cell cytokine IL-4 increases the adhesion of T cells, but not neutrophils, to human umbilical vein EC monolayers. The increase in T cell adhesion induced by IL-4 was dose dependent (ED50 = 5 U/ml) and peaked around 33 U/ml. No increase in adhesion of neutrophils was observed at concentrations of IL-4 up to 1000 U/ml. The kinetic of the increase in T cell adhesion exhibited a steady rise peaking between 18 and 24 h before returning to basal levels by 72 h. The IL-4 specificity of the effect was confirmed by the ability of neutralizing anti-IL-4, but not anti-TNF, antibodies to abolish the effect. The increase in T cell-EC adhesion was due to an effect of IL-4 on EC inasmuch as preincubation of the T cells with IL-4 did not increase T cell binding. Furthermore, preincubation of A549 epithelial cell line monolayers with IL-4 caused no increase in T cell binding whereas A549 cells and EC showed a similarly enhanced adhesiveness for T cells after preincubation with IL-1, TNF, or IFN-gamma. EC treated with IL-4 retained their increased adhesiveness for T cells after light fixation, suggesting that IL-4 up-regulates binding by increasing the expression or accessibility of EC surface receptors for lymphocytes. Although antibodies to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (CD54) and the beta-chain (CD18) of lymphocyte function-associated Ag-1 (CD11a/CD18) partially inhibited T cell adhesion to unstimulated EC, they did not affect the increase in adhesion due to IL-4 stimulation, indicating that the increased binding resulted from the generation of an alternative binding receptor(s) on the EC membrane. These findings suggest that IL-4 may play a role in the

  12. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  13. Aire knockdown in medullary thymic epithelial cells affects Aire protein, deregulates cell adhesion genes and decreases thymocyte interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzi, Nicole; Assis, Amanda Freire; Cotrim-Sousa, Larissa Cotrim; Lopes, Gabriel Sarti; Mosella, Maritza Salas; Lima, Djalma Sousa; Bombonato-Prado, Karina F; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that even a partial reduction of Aire mRNA levels by siRNA-induced Aire knockdown (Aire KD) has important consequences to medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Aire knockdown is sufficient to reduce Aire protein levels, impair its nuclear location, and cause an imbalance in large-scale gene expression, including genes that encode cell adhesion molecules. These genes drew our attention because adhesion molecules are implicated in the process of mTEC-thymocyte adhesion, which is critical for T cell development and the establishment of central self-tolerance. Accordingly, we consider the following: 1) mTECs contribute to the elimination of self-reactive thymocytes through adhesion; 2) Adhesion molecules play a crucial role during physical contact between these cells; and 3) Aire is an important transcriptional regulator in mTECs. However, its role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion remains unclear. Because Aire controls adhesion molecule genes, we hypothesized that the disruption of its expression could influence mTEC-thymocyte interaction. To test this hypothesis, we used a murine Aire(+) mTEC cell line as a model system to reproduce mTEC-thymocyte adhesion in vitro. Transcriptome analysis of the mTEC cell line revealed that Aire KD led to the down-modulation of more than 800 genes, including those encoding for proteins involved in cell adhesion, i.e., the extracellular matrix constituent Lama1, the CAM family adhesion molecules Vcam1 and Icam4, and those that encode peripheral tissue antigens. Thymocytes co-cultured with Aire KD mTECs had a significantly reduced capacity to adhere to these cells. This finding is the first direct evidence that Aire also plays a role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Disinfection effect of dental impression tray adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensel, Tobias; Pollak, Rita; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Hey, Jeremias

    2013-03-01

    Iatrogenic infections are serious problems in dental offices. Impression tray adhesives are delivered in glass containers with a fixed brush attached inside the cap. Using the brush for application of the impression tray adhesive on a contaminated impression tray or prostheses, pathogen transmission by replacing the cap with the brush is possible. Bacterial strains (patient strains and in vitro strains) were supervaccinated on Columbia agar. The bacterial solution was diluted with TSB and aerobically grown, and starting concentration was 1 × 10(7) cfu/ml. The stock solution was placed on Columbia agar. Alginate, polyether, and silicon impression tray adhesives were applied to the center of the particular blood agar plates and incubated for 48 h. The expansion of the inhibition zone assays were measured using a microscope. Twenty-one different bacterial strains were selected in the saliva samples of 20 patients. The growth inhibition for alginate impression tray adhesive was 1.1 % (±0.3) of the patient strains. The overgrowth of polyether impression tray adhesive was 30.6 % (±9.3) and for silicon impression tray adhesive 11.8 % (±5.0). In in vitro strains, alginate impression tray adhesive performed an inhibition of 0.7 % (±0.3). The overgrowth of polyether impression tray adhesive was 7.0 % (±1.6) and for silicon impression tray adhesive was 6.5 % (±1.3). Using the fixed brush for application of the impression tray adhesive on multiple patients, a cross-contamination cannot be ruled out. An application of the impression tray adhesive with a pipette and a single-use brush would eliminate the contamination.

  15. Mechanisms of adhesion and subsequent actions of a haematopoietic stem cell line, HPC-7, in the injured murine intestinal microcirculation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean P J Kavanagh

    Full Text Available Although haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs migrate to injured gut, therapeutic success clinically remains poor. This has been partially attributed to limited local HSC recruitment following systemic injection. Identifying site specific adhesive mechanisms underpinning HSC-endothelial interactions may provide important information on how to enhance their recruitment and thus potentially improve therapeutic efficacy. This study determined (i the integrins and inflammatory cyto/chemokines governing HSC adhesion to injured gut and muscle (ii whether pre-treating HSCs with these cyto/chemokines enhanced their adhesion and (iii whether the degree of HSC adhesion influenced their ability to modulate leukocyte recruitment.Adhesion of HPC-7, a murine HSC line, to ischaemia-reperfused (IR injured mouse gut or cremaster muscle was monitored intravitally. Critical adhesion molecules were identified by pre-treating HPC-7 with blocking antibodies to CD18 and CD49d. To identify cyto/chemokines capable of recruiting HPC-7, adhesion was monitored following tissue exposure to TNF-α, IL-1β or CXCL12. The effects of pre-treating HPC-7 with these cyto/chemokines on surface integrin expression/clustering, adhesion to ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and recruitment in vivo was also investigated. Endogenous leukocyte adhesion following HPC-7 injection was again determined intravitally.IR injury increased HPC-7 adhesion in vivo, with intestinal adhesion dependent upon CD18 and muscle adhesion predominantly relying on CD49d. Only CXCL12 pre-treatment enhanced HPC-7 adhesion within injured gut, likely by increasing CD18 binding to ICAM-1 and/or CD18 surface clustering on HPC-7. Leukocyte adhesion was reduced at 4 hours post-reperfusion, but only when local HPC-7 adhesion was enhanced using CXCL12.This data provides evidence that site-specific molecular mechanisms govern HPC-7 adhesion to injured tissue. Importantly, we show that HPC-7 adhesion is a modulatable event in IR injury and

  16. Combinational Effect of Cell Adhesion Biomolecules and Their Immobilized Polymer Property to Enhance Cell-Selective Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rio Kurimoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although surface immobilization of medical devices with bioactive molecules is one of the most widely used strategies to improve biocompatibility, the physicochemical properties of the biomaterials significantly impact the activity of the immobilized molecules. Herein we investigate the combinational effects of cell-selective biomolecules and the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the polymeric substrate on selective adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs, fibroblasts (FBs, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs. To control the polymeric substrate, biomolecules are immobilized on thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-carboxyisopropylacrylamide (poly(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm-grafted glass surfaces. By switching the molecular conformation of the biomolecule-immobilized polymers, the cell-selective adhesion performances are evaluated. In case of RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide-immobilized surfaces, all cell types adhere well regardless of the surface hydrophobicity. On the other hand, a tri-Arg-immobilized surface exhibits FB-selectivity when the surface is hydrophilic. Additionally, a tri-Ile-immobilized surface exhibits EC-selective cell adhesion when the surface is hydrophobic. We believe that the proposed concept, which is used to investigate the biomolecule-immobilized surface combination, is important to produce new biomaterials, which are highly demanded for medical implants and tissue engineering.

  17. Local and systemic effects of fibrin and cyanoacrylate adhesives on lung lesions in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V.H. Carvalho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Tissue adhesives can be used to prevent pulmonary air leaks, which frequently occur after lung interventions. The objective of this study is to evaluate local and systemic effects of fibrin and cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives on lung lesions in rabbits. METHODS: Eighteen rabbits were submitted to videothoracoscopy + lung incision alone (control or videothoracoscopy + lung incision + local application of fibrin or cyanoacrylate adhesive. Blood samples were collected and assessed for leukocyte, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts and interleukin-8 levels preoperatively and at 48 hours and 28 days post-operatively. After 28 days, the animals were euthanized for gross examination of the lung surface, and lung fragments were excised for histopathological analysis. RESULTS: Fibrin and cyanoacrylate produced similar adhesion scores of the lung to the parietal pleura. Microscopic analysis revealed uniform low-cellular tissue infiltration in the fibrin group and an intense tissue reaction characterized by dense inflammatory infiltration of granulocytes, giant cells and necrosis in the cyanoacrylate group. No changes were detected in the leukocyte, neutrophil or lymphocyte count at any time-point, while the interleukin-8 levels were increased in the fibrin and cyanoacrylate groups after 48 hours compared with the pre-operative control levels (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: Both adhesive agents promoted normal tissue healing, with a more pronounced local inflammatory reaction observed for cyanoacrylate. Among the serum markers of inflammation, only the interleukin-8 levels changed post-operatively, increasing after 48 hours and decreasing after 28 days to levels similar to those of the control group in both the fibrin and cyanoacrylate groups.

  18. Targeting the bacteria-host interface: strategies in anti-adhesion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachler, Anne Marie; Orth, Kim

    2013-05-15

    Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and are increasingly problematic to treat due to the rise in antibiotic-resistant strains. It becomes more and more challenging to develop new antimicrobials that are able to withstand the ever-increasing repertoire of bacterial resistance mechanisms. This necessitates the development of alternative approaches to prevent and treat bacterial infections. One of the first steps during bacterial infection is adhesion of the pathogen to host cells. A pathogen's ability to colonize and invade host tissues strictly depends on this process. Thus, interference with adhesion (anti-adhesion therapy) is an efficient way to prevent or treat bacterial infections. As a basis to present different strategies to interfere with pathogen adhesion, this review briefly introduces general concepts of bacterial attachment to host cells. We further discuss advantages and disadvantages of anti-adhesion treatments and issues that are in need of improvement so as to make anti-adhesion compounds a more broadly applicable alternative to conventional antimicrobials.

  19. The effect of sorafenib in postoperative adhesion formation in a rat uterine horn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boztosun, A; Ozer, H; Altun, A; Kiliçkap, S; Gulturk, S; Müderris, I I; Yanik, A

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative adhesions are a serious problem. In this study, we aimed to observe the effects of sorafenib in postoperative adhesions and, to examine the effects of sorafenib on tissue levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Twenty female Wistar albino rats were randomized into two equal groups; sorafenib group (sorafenib treated) and control group; then all rats underwent laparotomy. Adhesions were developed by scalping on the anti-mesenteric surfaces of the right uterine horns. After 14 days, adhesions were investigated by using macroscopic, histopathological and immunohistochemical (for VEGF and PDGF) methods. The sorafenib group had lower scores of total adhesions [1 (0-2.5) vs 1.5 (1-4); p: 0.037], staining of VEGF [1 (0-1) vs 1 (1-3); p: 0.029] and PDGF [1 (0-2) vs 2 (1-3); p: 0.006], and vascular proliferation [1 (0-2) vs 2 (1-3); p: 0.038] than the control group. The findings of the present study show that sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, significantly reduced postoperative adhesion formation. This effect may be explained by inhibition of VEGF, PDGF, and thus vascular proliferation.

  20. Smart biomaterials: Surfaces functionalized with proteolytically stable osteoblast-adhesive peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annj Zamuner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Engineered scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration are designed to promote cell adhesion, growth, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, covalent and selective functionalization of glass and titanium surfaces with an adhesive peptide (HVP mapped on [351–359] sequence of human Vitronectin allowed to selectively increase osteoblast attachment and adhesion strength in in vitro assays, and to promote osseointegration in in vivo studies. For the first time to our knowledge, in this study we investigated the resistance of adhesion sequences to proteolytic digestion: HVP was completely cleaved after 5 h. In order to overcome the enzymatic degradation of the native peptide under physiological conditions we synthetized three analogues of HVP sequence. A retro-inverted peptide D-2HVP, composed of D amino acids, was completely stable in serum-containing medium. In addition, glass surfaces functionalized with D-2HVP increased human osteoblast adhesion as compared to the native peptide and maintained deposition of calcium. Interestingly, D-2HVP increased expression of IBSP, VTN and SPP1 genes as compared to HVP functionalized surfaces. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscope analysis showed cells with numerous filopodia spread on D-2HVP-functionalized surfaces. Therefore, the D-2HVP sequence is proposed as new osteoblast adhesive peptide with increased bioactivity and high proteolytic resistance.

  1. A GTPase controls cell-substrate adhesion in Xenopus XTC fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, M H; Mitchison, T J

    1992-09-01

    Cell-substrate adhesion is crucial at various stages of development and for the maintenance of normal tissues. Little is known about the regulation of these adhesive interactions. To investigate the role of GTPases in the control of cell morphology and cell-substrate adhesion we have injected guanine nucleotide analogs into Xenopus XTC fibroblasts. Injection of GTP gamma S inhibited ruffling and increased spreading, suggesting an increase in adhesion. To further investigate this, we made use of GRGDSP, a peptide which inhibits binding of integrins to vitronectin and fibronectin. XTC fibroblasts injected with non-hydrolyzable analogs of GTP took much more time to round up than mock-injected cells in response to treatment with GRGDSP, while GDP beta S-injected cells rounded up in less time than controls. Injection with GTP gamma S did not inhibit cell rounding induced by trypsin however, showing that cell contractility is not significantly affected by the activation of GTPases. These data provide evidence for the existence of a GTPase which can control cell-substrate adhesion from the cytoplasm. Treatment of XTC fibroblasts with the phorbol ester 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate reduced cell spreading and accelerated cell rounding in response to GRGDSP, which is essentially opposite to the effect exerted by non-hydrolyzable GTP analogs. These results suggest the existence of at least two distinct pathways controlling cell-substrate adhesion in XTC fibroblasts, one depending on a GTPase and another one involving protein kinase C.

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Adhesive Secretion from Cuvierian Tubules of Sea Cucumber Holothuria forskåli (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Baranowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The sea cucumber Holothuria forskåli possesses a specialized system called Cuvierian tubules. During mechanical stimulation white filaments (tubules are expelled and become sticky upon contact with any object. We isolated a protein with adhesive properties from protein extracts of Cuvierian tubules from H. forskåli. This protein was identified by antibodies against recombinant precollagen D which is located in the byssal threads of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. To find out the optimal procedure for extraction and purification, the identified protein was isolated by several methods, including electroelution, binding to glass beads, immunoprecipitation, and gel filtration. Antibodies raised against the isolated protein were used for localization of the adhesive protein in Cuvierian tubules. Immunostaining and immunogold electron microscopical studies revealed the strongest immunoreactivity in the mesothelium; this tissue layer is involved in adhesion. Adhesion of Cuvierian tubule extracts was measured on the surface of various materials. The extracted protein showed the strongest adhesion to Teflon surface. Increased adhesion was observed in the presence of potassium and EDTA, while cadmium caused a decrease in adhesion. Addition of antibodies and trypsin abolished the adhesive properties of the extract.

  3. A Prospective, Randomized, Single-Blind Study Comparing Cyanoacrylate Adhesives to Sutures for Wound Closure in Skin Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartenstein, Diana W; Cummins, Deborah L; Rogers, Gary S

    2017-11-01

    Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives are not more likely to result in wound dehiscence or infection than sutured closures. However, suturing is the gold standard for optimal cosmetic appearance of scars. To determine whether cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives produce a cosmetic outcome equivalent to sutures at 3 months. Secondary outcomes include time for wound closure, time spent on wound care, and surgeon and patient satisfaction. Seventy-one patients scheduled for skin cancer excision at Beverly Hospital were included in this prospective, randomized, single-blind study. Cosmetic appearance was assessed by a masked panel of dermatologists and plastic surgeons who evaluated digital photographs. Secondary outcomes were assessed by nursing recordings and patient and surgeon evaluations. There was no significant difference in wound appearance (Visual Analog Scale: p = .4693, modified Hollander Wound Evaluation Score: p = .6413) between adhesives and sutures. It was faster and easier for a surgeon to use adhesives, and subjects spent less time caring for and were more satisfied by wounds sealed with adhesives than sutures. Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives produce cosmetic outcomes that are not statistically significantly different than sutures; furthermore, they are associated with fast application, easy wound care, and patient satisfaction.

  4. Tissue Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Leemput, Koen; Puonti, Oula

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for automatically segmenting magnetic resonance images of the brain have seen tremendous advances in recent years. So-called tissue classification techniques, aimed at extracting the three main brain tissue classes (white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid), are now...... well established. In their simplest form, these methods classify voxels independently based on their intensity alone, although much more sophisticated models are typically used in practice. This article aims to give an overview of often-used computational techniques for brain tissue classification...

  5. Lotus-leaf-like structured chitosan–polyvinyl pyrrolidone films as an anti-adhesion barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jin Ik; Kang, Min Ji; Lee, Woo-Kul, E-mail: leewo@dankook.ac.kr

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Improved mechanical properties by hydrogen bond between chitosan and PVP chains. • Improved anti-adhesion effect by lotus-leaf-like structured chitosan–PVP (L-chitosan–PVP) film. • L-Chitosan–PVP film as a blood/tissue anti-adhesion barrier for post-surgical treatment. - Abstract: For postsurgical anti-adhesion barrier applications, lotus-leaf-like structured chitosan–PVP films were prepared using a solution casting method with dodecyltrichloro-immobilized SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. We evaluated whether the lotus-leaf-like structured chitosan–PVP films (L-chitosan–PVP) could be applied as postsurgical anti-adhesion barriers. A recovery test using a tensile strength testing machine and measurement of crystallinity using X-ray diffraction indicated that films with 75% PVP were the optimal composition of the chitosan–PVP films. Also, dodecyltrichloro-immobilized SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized and sprayed on the film after pretreatment with the instant bio-glue. Analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation, and anti-thrombus efficiency were performed via a WST assay, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and hemacytometry. The contact angle with the lotus-leaf-like surface was of approximately 150°. Furthermore, the L-chitosan–PVP film yielded a lower cell and platelet adhesion rate (around less than 4%) than that yielded by the untreated film. These results indicate that the lotus-leaf-like structure has a unique property and that this novel L-chitosan–PVP film can be applied as a blood/tissue-compatible, biodegradable material for implantable medical devices that need an anti-adhesion barrier.

  6. Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1, Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1, and Cluster of Differentiation 146 Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sinem Hocaoglu-Emre

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundType 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a multisystemic, chronic disease accompanied by microvascular complications involving various complicated mechanisms. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, and cluster of differentiation-146 (CD146 are mainly expressed by endothelial cells, and facilitate the adhesion and transmigration of immune cells, leading to inflammation. In the present study, we evaluated the levels of soluble adhesion molecules in patients with microvascular complications of T2DM.MethodsSerum and whole blood samples were collected from 58 T2DM patients with microvascular complications and 20 age-matched healthy subjects. Levels of soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1 and soluble VCAM-1 (sVCAM-1 were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, while flow cytometry was used to determine CD146 levels.ResultsSerum sICAM-1 levels were lower in T2DM patients with microvascular complications than in healthy controls (P<0.05. No significant differences were found in sVCAM-1 and CD146 levels between the study and the control group. Although patients were subdivided into groups according to the type of microvascular complications that they experienced, cell adhesion molecule levels were not correlated with the complication type.ConclusionIn the study group, most of the patients were on insulin therapy (76%, and 95% of them were receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-inhibitor agents. Insulin and ACE-inhibitors have been shown to decrease soluble adhesion molecule levels via various mechanisms, so we suggest that the decreased or unchanged levels of soluble forms of cellular adhesion molecules in our study group may have resulted from insulin and ACE-inhibitor therapy, as well as tissue-localized inflammation in patients with T2DM.

  7. Adhesion mechanism of a gecko-inspired oblique structure with an adhesive tip for asymmetric detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yu; Takahashi, Kunio; Sato, Chiaki

    2015-12-01

    An adhesion model of an oblique structure with an adhesive tip is proposed by considering a limiting stress for adhesion to describe the detachment mechanism of gecko foot hairs. When a force is applied to the root of the oblique structure, normal and shear stresses are generated at contact and the adhesive tip is detached from the surface when reaching the limiting stress. An adhesion criterion that considers both the normal and shear stresses is introduced, and the asymmetric detachment of the oblique structure is theoretically investigated. In addition, oblique beam array structures are manufactured, and an inclination effect of the structure on the asymmetric detachment is experimentally verified.

  8. Tuneable adhesion through novel binder technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, M.E.L.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Ingenhut, B.; Timmer, K.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Bots, T.L.; Oosterhuis, G.; Fischer, H.R.

    2011-01-01

    A reversible crosslinking mechanism enabling bonding and debonding of adhesives and coatings based on Diels-Alder chemistry is described. The Diels-Alder compounds form a covalently crosslinked network at low temperatures that break at elevated temperatures. As a result, the adhesive exhibits good

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF ULTRASONIC ASSISTED ADHESIVE JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Pauska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Joining experiments using different adhesives were carried out. In addition to the adhesive, the specimens were also treated with ultrasonic waves to improve the load carrying capacity of the joined parts. Lap joint shear tests have been conducted to quantify this improvement.

  10. Adhesive arachnoiditis in patients with spinal block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalpe, I.O.; Sortland, O.

    1982-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis was found in eight patients and spinal block was found in 7 of these in a series of 330 patients refered for thoracic myelography. This variety of adhesive arachnoiditis seems to be caused by spinal block/high CSF protein concentration.

  11. Recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Pitágoras de Mattos

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis is not an uncommon disease, usually having a monophasic course. We studied an atypical patient with recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis nine years after intrathecal anesthesia and the first attack of the disease. Also noteworthy was the favorable evolution after surgery.

  12. Influence of Blood Contamination During Multimode Adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... decontamination method prevented the decrease in µTBS when contamination occurred after light curing. Drying the blood contaminants and reapplying the adhesive may regain the dentin adhesion when contamination occurs before light curing. Alternatively, rinsing and drying contaminants followed by ...

  13. Biobased adhesives and non-conventional bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Frihart

    2010-01-01

    Biobased adhesives fall into several major classes based upon their chemical structures. Starches are used in large volume, especially in the paper products industries, but cellulosics generally do not have the strength and water resistance needed for most wood products. Several authors have covered cellulosics adhesives (Baumann and Conner 2002, Pizzi 2006). However...

  14. Age Increases Monocyte Adhesion on Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Samira; Zondler, Lisa; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Nolte, Ulla; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Gottschalk, Kay-E.

    2017-05-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to micro-injuries on arterial walls is an important early step in the occurrence and development of degenerative atherosclerotic lesions. At these injuries, collagen is exposed to the blood stream. We are interested whether age influences monocyte adhesion to collagen under flow, and hence influences the susceptibility to arteriosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we studied adhesion and rolling of human peripheral blood monocytes from old and young individuals on collagen type I coated surface under shear flow. We find that firm adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is elevated in old individuals. Pre-stimulation by lipopolysaccharide increases the firm adhesion of monocytes homogeneously in older individuals, but heterogeneously in young individuals. Blocking integrin αx showed that adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is specific to the main collagen binding integrin αxβ2. Surprisingly, we find no significant age-dependent difference in gene expression of integrin αx or integrin β2. However, if all integrins are activated from the outside, no differences exist between the age groups. Altered integrin activation therefore causes the increased adhesion. Our results show that the basal increase in integrin activation in monocytes from old individuals increases monocyte adhesion to collagen and therefore the risk for arteriosclerotic plaques.

  15. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  16. Scaling Principles for Understanding and Exploiting Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Alfred

    A grand challenge in the science of adhesion is the development of a general design paradigm for adhesive materials that can sustain large forces across an interface yet be detached with minimal force upon command. Essential to this challenge is the generality of achieving this performance under a wide set of external conditions and across an extensive range of forces. Nature has provided some guidance through various examples, e.g. geckos, for how to meet this challenge; however, a single solution is not evident upon initial investigation. To help provide insight into nature's ability to scale reversible adhesion and adapt to different external constraints, we have developed a general scaling theory that describes the force capacity of an adhesive interface in the context of biological locomotion. We have demonstrated that this scaling theory can be used to understand the relative performance of a wide range of organisms, including numerous gecko species and insects, as well as an extensive library of synthetic adhesive materials. We will present the development and testing of this scaling theory, and how this understanding has helped guide the development of new composite materials for high capacity adhesives. We will also demonstrate how this scaling theory has led to the development of new strategies for transfer printing and adhesive applications in manufacturing processes. Overall, the developed scaling principles provide a framework for guiding the design of adhesives.

  17. Mechanisms of temporary adhesion in benthic animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodou, D.; Breedveld, P.; Winter, J.C.F.; Dankelman, J.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive systems are ubiquitous in benthic animals and play a key role in diverse functions such as locomotion, food capture, mating, burrow building, and defence. For benthic animals that release adhesives, surface and material properties and external morphology have received little attention

  18. Is nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction gives good results in adults but there are scant studies on its outcome in children. This study reports outcomes and experiences with nonoperative and operative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction in children in a resource-poor country.

  19. Influence of Blood Contamination During Multimode Adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The present study evaluated the effects of blood contamination performed at different steps of bonding on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of multimode adhesives to dentin when using the self-etch approach. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five molars were randomly assigned to three adhesive groups ...

  20. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the ...

  1. Chapter 16: Soy Proteins as Wood Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Christopher G. Hunt; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Protein adhesives allowed the development of bonded wood products such as plywood and glulam in the early 20th century. Petrochemical-based adhesives replaced proteins in most wood bonding applications because of lower cost, improved production efficiencies, and enhanced durability. However, several technological and environmental factors have led to a resurgence of...

  2. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Abstract. A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction a-Si solar cells on polyimide sub- strates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and ...

  3. Predicting Failure Initiation in Structural Adhesive Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Elastoplástico de Adhesivos – Modeling, characterization and simulation of the elastoplastic behavior of adhesives. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales...adhesive and a 1018 steel”. Maestría en Ciencia de Materiales. Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C. May 2012.  Abstract: In the

  4. Adhesion of Zinc Hot-dip Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on verification of quality adhesion of zinc coating. It describes elements which affect quality and adhesive solidity within the coating. For assessment itself it will be neccessary to get know the basic elements which can affect adhesion of hot-dip coating which will be essential for choosing suitable samples for verification itself. These elements characterise acoustic responses during delamination coating. They affect elements influencing progress of signal. In research there is also a summary of existing methods for testing adhesion of coatings. As a result a new proposal of a new method comes out for purpose of quality testing of adhesion zinc hot-dip coating. The results of verification of this method are put to scientific analysis and findings lead to assessment of proposed method and its application in technical practise.The goal of this contribution is also include to proposed methodology testing adhesion zinc coating by nondestructive diagnostic method of acoustic emission (AE, which would monitor characterise progress of coating delamination of hot-dip zinc from basic material in way to adhesion tests would be practicable in situ. It can be enabled by analysis and assessment of results acquired by method AE and its application within verification of new method of adhesion anti-corrosive zinc coating.

  5. Wood structure and adhesive bond strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2006-01-01

    Much of the literature on the bonding of wood and other lignocellulosic materials has concentrated on traditional adhesion theories. This has led to misconceptions because wood is a porous material on both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. A better understanding of wood bonding can be developed by investigating the theories of adhesion and bond strength, taking...

  6. Electrostatic adhesion testing of electronic metallizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. S.; Brotzen, F. R.; Callahan, D. L.; Dunn, C. F.

    1997-06-01

    A novel technique is developed to measure quantitatively the adhesion strength of metallizations deposited on substrates such as silicon. Electrostatic adhesion testing employs electrostatic forces to generate delaminating stresses in thin metallic films. The interfacial adhesion strength is readily calculated from the electrode geometry and the applied electrostatic field at failure. Unlike other adhesion tests, this technique does not require any mechanical contact and is virtually independent of the plastic deformation of the film. Furthermore, this test provides direct strength measurements as opposed to work or energy of adhesion measurements obtained by the common peel test. The adhesion strengths of several metallizations (Cu, Al) are characterized using the electrostatic technique. The distribution of stress-at-failure data follows Weibull failure statistics. Field emission scanning electron microscopy reveals that the films are delaminated in a microblister-type mode. It is shown that electrostatic adhesion testing is effective in providing quantitative values for the adhesion strengths and failure probabilities of thin-film metallizations.

  7. The bio-tribological properties of anti-adhesive agents commonly used during tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonagle, Lorcan; Jones, Michael D; Dowson, Duncan; Theobald, Peter S

    2012-05-01

    Frictional resistance to tendon gliding is minimized by surrounding loose areolar tissue. During periods of prolonged immobilization, for example, post-tendon-repair, adhesions can form between these two adjacent tissues, thereby limiting tendon function. Anti-adhesive agents can be applied during surgery to prevent adhesion formation, whilst reportedly providing some reduction in friction during in vitro tendon-bony pulley investigations. This bio-tribological study evaluates whether application of these agents can improve the lubrication between the tendon and surrounding tissue, thus potentially reducing the risk of re-rupturing the tendon at the repair site. The use of bovine synovial fluid (BSF) enabled an approximation of the in vivo lubrication regime, and subsequent comparison of the performance of three synthetic agents (50 mg/ml 5-fluorouracil; 5 mg/ml hyaluronic acid; ADCON-T/N). Coefficient of friction data was recorded and then compared with the Stribeck curve. BSF generated a fluid film that separated the two surfaces, giving rise to optimal lubrication conditions. This efficient regime was also generated following application of each anti-adhesion agent. The use of phosphate-buffered saline solution in generating only a boundary lubrication regime highlighted the effectiveness of the agents in reducing friction. Hyaluronic acid (5 mg/ml) was marginally deemed the most effective anti-adhesive agent at lubricating the tendon. Subsequently, it is concluded that the application of anti-adhesive agents post-surgery has secondary, tribological benefits that serve to reduce friction, and thus potentially the risk of failure, at the tendon repair site. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  8. Development of In Situ Gelling and Bio Adhesive 5-Fluorouracil Enema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Fang, Xia-Qin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) enema with good bio adhesion and temperature sensitivity was developed using in situ gelling technology. The preparation was formulated as a free-flowing liquid before use, while a layer of gel film was quickly formed when administered in the rectum, with a large contact surface area. It also demonstrated good biocompatibility, appropriate gel strength and bio adhesive force with excellent adhesion to rectal mucosa and prolonged action time, allowing more effective drug absorption and diffusion to surrounding tissues. Poloxamer 407 and poloxamer 188 were applied to adjust the gelling temperature. With the addition of carbopol and polycarbophil (bio adhesive substances), the solubility of 5-FU and gel strength increased, the temperature of gelation and the surface area of drug contact on mucous epithelium decreased. Decreased adhesive force between the preparation and the mucous membrane of the rectum was demonstrated with improving carbopol and polycarbophil’s concentration. In vitro release demonstrated that 5-FU in situ gelling enema with different bases had a rapid and almost complete drug release. We used an optimized formulation of P407/P188/polycarbophil/5-FU (17/2.5/0.2/1.0) for animal experiments. The result showed that the drug evenly covered the surface of the rectum and there was no leakage in 6 hours. The in situ gelling enema showed significantly higher rectal tissue levels of 5-FU compared with suppository and intravenous administration, indicating that 5-FU could be well absorbed due to the enlarged releasing area, longer retention time and larger amount of dissolved active ingredients. Systemically, 5-FU levels in the enema group were similar to those in the suppository group and significantly lower than the intravenous group. The enema was not associated with morphological damage to rectal tissue. These results suggest that the bio adhesive and in situ gelling enema could be a more effective rectal

  9. Genetics Home Reference: leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Printable PDF Open All Close ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 is a disorder that causes ...

  10. Interpenetrating Polymer Network (IPN) Adhesives for Electron Beam Cure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sands, James

    2000-01-01

    Electron beam (e-beam)-processed polymer adhesives have historically performed poorly compared to traditional adhesive technologies due to a lack of toughness engineered into these new types of adhesive materials...

  11. Carbon nanotube dry adhesives with temperature-enhanced adhesion over a large temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Du, Feng; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit; Dai, Liming

    2016-11-01

    Conventional adhesives show a decrease in the adhesion force with increasing temperature due to thermally induced viscoelastic thinning and/or structural decomposition. Here, we report the counter-intuitive behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) dry adhesives that show a temperature-enhanced adhesion strength by over six-fold up to 143 N cm-2 (4 mm × 4 mm), among the strongest pure CNT dry adhesives, over a temperature range from -196 to 1,000 °C. This unusual adhesion behaviour leads to temperature-enhanced electrical and thermal transports, enabling the CNT dry adhesive for efficient electrical and thermal management when being used as a conductive double-sided sticky tape. With its intrinsic thermal stability, our CNT adhesive sustains many temperature transition cycles over a wide operation temperature range. We discover that a `nano-interlock' adhesion mechanism is responsible for the adhesion behaviour, which could be applied to the development of various dry CNT adhesives with novel features.

  12. Evaluation of Advanced Adhesives for Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, P.; Rodriguez, N.; Dickinson, T.; Huy Nguyen, D.; Park, E.; Foyos, J.; Hernandez, V.; Ogren, J.; Berg, M.; Es-Said, O. S.

    2008-08-01

    Polymer adhesives are finding increased use in panel joining applications in aircraft and aerospace structures where the applied stresses permit their use and where a uniform stress distribution is needed. One such adhesive, Hysol EA-9394™, was compared to three other formulations in this study. The new formulations were Hysol EA-9396, Hysol EA-9396 filled with nickel nanofibers and mixed by machine (Jamesbury Blender), and Hysol EA-9396 filled with nickel nanofibers and hand mixed in the laboratory. The comparison consisted of measuring shear lap strengths of aluminum test pieces bonded together with the candidate adhesives. The mechanical tests were supplemented by a Weibull analysis of the strength data and by a visual inspection of the failure mode (adhesive/cohesive). The lap shear strengths (fracture stress values) of all three Hysol EA-9396 adhesives were greater than that of the baseline Hysol EA-9394 polymer.

  13. Ratcheting in a nonlinear viscoelastic adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemme, David; Smith, Lloyd

    2017-11-01

    Uniaxial time-dependent creep and cycled stress behavior of a standard and toughened film adhesive were studied experimentally. Both adhesives exhibited progressive accumulation of strain from an applied cycled stress. Creep tests were fit to a viscoelastic power law model at three different applied stresses which showed nonlinear response in both adhesives. A third order nonlinear power law model with a permanent strain component was used to describe the creep behavior of both adhesives and to predict creep recovery and the accumulation of strain due to cycled stress. Permanent strain was observed at high stress but only up to 3% of the maximum strain. Creep recovery was under predicted by the nonlinear model, while cycled stress showed less than 3% difference for the first cycle but then over predicted the response above 1000 cycles by 4-14% at high stress. The results demonstrate the complex response observed with structural adhesives, and the need for further analytical advancements to describe their behavior.

  14. Viscosity and adhesion strength of cream-type denture adhesives and mouth moisturizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Hiroshi; Kurogi, Tadafumi; Shimizu, Takaharu; Nishimura, Masahiro; Murata, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated adhesion strength to acrylic resins under various experimental conditions and viscosity of 4 cream-type denture adhesives and 2 mouth moisturizers. The viscosity was determined by a sine-wave vibro viscometer. The adhesion strength tests were performed with 2 resin plates at a universal tester. In Method A, various constant thicknesses of material layer were tested and tensile strength was measured, while in Method B a constant load was applied before measurement. Five tests were carried out for each measurement. With Method A, adhesion strength increased exponentially as the layer got thin. Effect of the material thicknesses (contribution ratio ρ=79.0%) was much larger than that of material type (ρ=15.3%). Materials with higher viscosity had greater levels of adhesion strength in Method A, whereas those with the higher viscosity had lower levels of adhesion strength in Method B. Adhesion strength was significantly affected by the experimental condition prior to applying tension.

  15. Mechanically Reinforced Catechol-Containing Hydrogels with Improved Tissue Gluing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Feng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In situ forming hydrogels with catechol groups as tissue reactive functionalities are interesting bioinspired materials for tissue adhesion. Poly(ethylene glycol (PEG–catechol tissue glues have been intensively investigated for this purpose. Different cross-linking mechanisms (oxidative or metal complexation and cross-linking conditions (pH, oxidant concentration, etc. have been studied in order to optimize the curing kinetics and final cross-linking degree of the system. However, reported systems still show limited mechanical stability, as expected from a PEG network, and this fact limits their potential application to load bearing tissues. Here, we describe mechanically reinforced PEG–catechol adhesives showing excellent and tunable cohesive properties and adhesive performance to tissue in the presence of blood. We used collagen/PEG mixtures, eventually filled with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. The composite hydrogels show far better mechanical performance than the individual components. It is noteworthy that the adhesion strength measured on skin covered with blood was >40 kPa, largely surpassing (>6 fold the performance of cyanoacrylate, fibrin, and PEG–catechol systems. Moreover, the mechanical and interfacial properties could be easily tuned by slight changes in the composition of the glue to adapt them to the particular properties of the tissue. The reported adhesive compositions can tune and improve cohesive and adhesive properties of PEG–catechol-based tissue glues for load-bearing surgery applications.

  16. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  17. Multibody simulation of adhesion pili

    CERN Document Server

    Zakrisson, Johan; Servin, Martin; Axner, Ove; Lacoursiere, Claude; Andersson, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    We present a coarse grained rigid multibody model of a subunit assembled helix-like polymer, e.g., adhesion pili expressed by bacteria, that is capable of describing the polymers force-extension response. With building blocks representing individual subunits the model appropriately describes the complex behavior of pili expressed by the gram-negative uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria under the action of an external force. Numerical simulations show that the dynamics of the model, which include both the effects of unwinding and rewinding, are in good quantitative agreement with the characteristic force-extension response as observed experimentally for type 1 and P pili. By tuning the model, it is also possible to reproduce the force-extension response in the presence of anti-shaft antibodies, which dramatically changes the mechanical properties. Thus, the model and the results in this work give enhanced understanding of how a pilus unwinds under action of external forces and provide new perspective of th...

  18. Lateral adhesion drives reintegration of misplaced cells into epithelial monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstralh, Dan T; Lovegrove, Holly E; St Johnston, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Cells in simple epithelia orient their mitotic spindles in the plane of the epithelium so that both daughter cells are born within the epithelial sheet. This is assumed to be important to maintain epithelial integrity and prevent hyperplasia, because misaligned divisions give rise to cells outside the epithelium. Here we test this assumption in three types of Drosophila epithelium; the cuboidal follicle epithelium, the columnar early embryonic ectoderm, and the pseudostratified neuroepithelium. Ectopic expression of Inscuteable in these tissues reorients mitotic spindles, resulting in one daughter cell being born outside the epithelial layer. Live imaging reveals that these misplaced cells reintegrate into the tissue. Reducing the levels of the lateral homophilic adhesion molecules Neuroglian or Fasciclin 2 disrupts reintegration, giving rise to extra-epithelial cells, whereas disruption of adherens junctions has no effect. Thus, the reinsertion of misplaced cells seems to be driven by lateral adhesion, which pulls cells born outside the epithelial layer back into it. Our findings reveal a robust mechanism that protects epithelia against the consequences of misoriented divisions.

  19. Cancer cell metastasis; perspectives from the focal adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefteris C Zacharia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In almost all cancers, most patients die from metastatic disease and not from the actual primary tumor. That is why addressing the problem of metastasis is of utmost importance for the successful treatment and improved survival of cancer patients. Metastasis is a complex process that ultimately leads to cancer cells spreading from the tumor to distant sites of the body. During this process, cancer cells tend to lose contact with the extracellular matrix (ECM and neighboring cells within the primary tumor, and are thus able to invade surrounding tissues. Hence, ECM, and the ECM-associated adhesion proteins play a critical role in the metastatic process. This review will focus on recent literature regarding interesting and novel molecules at the cell-ECM adhesion sites, namely migfilin, mitogen-inducible gene-2 (Mig-2 and Ras suppressor-1 (RSU-1, that are also critically involved in cancer cell metastasis, emphasizing on data from experiments performed in vitro in breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines as well as human breast cancer tissue samples.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion but not plasticity is affected by high substrate stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Kal Van Tam, Koichiro Uto, Mitsuhiro Ebara, Stefania Pagliari, Giancarlo Forte and Takao Aoyagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The acknowledged ability of synthetic materials to induce cell-specific responses regardless of biological supplies provides tissue engineers with the opportunity to find the appropriate materials and conditions to prepare tissue-targeted scaffolds. Stem and mature cells have been shown to acquire distinct morphologies in vitro and to modify their phenotype when grown on synthetic materials with tunable mechanical properties. The stiffness of the substrate used for cell culture is likely to provide cells with mechanical cues mimicking given physiological or pathological conditions, thus affecting the biological properties of cells. The sensitivity of cells to substrate composition and mechanical properties resides in multiprotein complexes called focal adhesions, whose dynamic modification leads to cytoskeleton remodeling and changes in gene expression. In this study, the remodeling of focal adhesions in human mesenchymal stem cells in response to substrate stiffness was followed in the first phases of cell–matrix interaction, using poly-ε-caprolactone planar films with similar chemical composition and different elasticity. As compared to mature dermal fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells showed a specific response to substrate stiffness, in terms of adhesion, as a result of differential focal adhesion assembly, while their multipotency as a bulk was not significantly affected by matrix compliance. Given the sensitivity of stem cells to matrix mechanics, the mechanobiology of such cells requires further investigations before preparing tissue-specific scaffolds.

  1. Does penile tourniquet application alter bacterial adhesion to rat urethral cells: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boybeyi-Turer, Ozlem; Kacmaz, Birgul; Arat, Esra; Atasoy, Pınar; Kisa, Ucler; Gunal, Yasemin Dere; Aslan, Mustafa Kemal; Soyer, Tutku

    2017-06-28

    To investigate the effects of penile tourniquet (PT) application on bacterial adhesion to urothelium. Fifty-six rats were allocated into control group (CG), sham group (SG), PT group (PTG). No intervention was applied in CG. A 5mm-length urethral repair was performed in SG and PTG. In PTG, a 10-min duration of PT was applied during the procedure and the tissue oxygenation monitor was used to adjust the same degree of ischemia in all subjects. Samples were examined for wound healing parameters and tissue levels of inflammatory markers, eNOS, e-selectin, and ICAM-1antibodies. The adhesion of Escherichia coli to urothelium was investigated with in vitro adhesion assay. Inflammation was higher and wound healing was worse in SG than CG and in PTG in comparison to CG and SG (pcaused endothelial corruption and prevented cell proliferation in cell culture. The PT application does not improve wound healing and increases bacterial adhesion molecules in penile tissue. The in vitro assays showed that PT causes severe endothelial damage and inhibits endothelial cell proliferation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. FRAP Analysis Reveals Stabilization of Adhesion Structures in the Epidermis Compared to Cultured Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Henry P.; Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Lechler, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Proper development and tissue maintenance requires cell-cell adhesion structures, which serve diverse and crucial roles in tissue morphogenesis. Epithelial tissues have three main types of cell-cell junctions: tight junctions, which play a major role in barrier formation, and adherens junctions and desmosomes, which provide mechanical stability and organize the underlying cytoskeleton. Our current understanding of adhesion function is hindered by a lack of tools and methods to image junctions in mammals. To better understand the dynamics of adhesion in tissues we have created a knock-in ZO-1-GFP mouse and a BAC-transgenic mouse expressing desmoplakin I-GFP. We performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments to quantify the turnover rates of the tight junction protein ZO-1, the adherens junction protein E-cadherin, and the desmosomal protein desmoplakin in the epidermis. Proteins at each type of junction are remarkably stable in the epidermis, in contrast to the high observed mobility of E-cadherin and ZO-1 at adherens junctions and tight junctions, respectively, in cultured cells. Our data demonstrate that there are additional mechanisms for stabilizing junctions in tissues that are not modeled by cell culture. PMID:23977053

  3. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Tissue Engineered Bone Tissue Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bressan Eriberto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering strategies are emerging as attractive alternatives to autografts and allografts in bone tissue reconstruction, in particular thanks to their association with nanotechnologies. Nanostructured biomaterials, indeed, mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM of the natural bone, creating an artificial microenvironment that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. At the same time, the possibility to easily isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from different adult tissues together with their multi-lineage differentiation potential makes them an interesting tool in the field of bone tissue engineering. This review gives an overview of the most promising nanostructured biomaterials, used alone or in combination with MSCs, which could in future be employed as bone substitutes. Recent works indicate that composite scaffolds made of ceramics/metals or ceramics/polymers are undoubtedly more effective than the single counterparts in terms of osteoconductivity, osteogenicity and osteoinductivity. A better understanding of the interactions between MSCs and nanostructured biomaterials will surely contribute to the progress of bone tissue engineering.

  4. Ultrastructural localisation of sialoadhesin (siglec-1) on macrophages in rodent lymphoid tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schadee-Eestermans, I. L.; Hoefsmit, E. C.; van de Ende, M.; Crocker, P. R.; van den Berg, T. K.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies it has been demonstrated that sialoadhesin is a macrophage-restricted adhesion receptor for lymphocytes and myeloid cells. It is under normal circumstances expressed by subpopulations of macrophages in lymphoid and haemopoietic tissues. In this study different

  5. Adhesion protein protocols [Methods in molecular biology, v. 96

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dejana, Elisabetta; Corada, Monica

    1999-01-01

    "An international corps of expert investigators describe their optimized techniques for both the identification of new cell adhesion proteins and for the characterization of novel adhesive structures...

  6. Peritoneal adhesions after laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mais, Valerio

    2014-05-07

    Although laparoscopy has the potential to reduce peritoneal trauma and post-operative peritoneal adhesion formation, only one randomized controlled trial and a few comparative retrospective clinical studies have addressed this issue. Laparoscopy reduces de novo adhesion formation but has no efficacy in reducing adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis. Moreover, several studies have suggested that the reduction of de novo post-operative adhesions does not seem to have a significant clinical impact. Experimental data in animal models have suggested that CO₂ pneumoperitoneum can cause acute peritoneal inflammation during laparoscopy depending on the insufflation pressure and the surgery duration. Broad peritoneal cavity protection by the insufflation of a low-temperature humidified gas mixture of CO₂, N₂O and O₂ seems to represent the best approach for reducing peritoneal inflammation due to pneumoperitoneum. However, these experimental data have not had a significant impact on the modification of laparoscopic instrumentation. In contrast, surgeons should train themselves to perform laparoscopy quickly, and they should complete their learning curves before testing chemical anti-adhesive agents and anti-adhesion barriers. Chemical anti-adhesive agents have the potential to exert broad peritoneal cavity protection against adhesion formation, but when these agents are used alone, the concentrations needed to prevent adhesions are too high and could cause major post-operative side effects. Anti-adhesion barriers have been used mainly in open surgery, but some clinical data from laparoscopic surgeries are already available. Sprays, gels, and fluid barriers are easier to apply in laparoscopic surgery than solid barriers. Results have been encouraging with solid barriers, spray barriers, and gel barriers, but they have been ambiguous with fluid barriers. Moreover, when barriers have been used alone, the maximum protection against adhesion formation has been no

  7. Peritoneal adhesions after laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mais, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopy has the potential to reduce peritoneal trauma and post-operative peritoneal adhesion formation, only one randomized controlled trial and a few comparative retrospective clinical studies have addressed this issue. Laparoscopy reduces de novo adhesion formation but has no efficacy in reducing adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis. Moreover, several studies have suggested that the reduction of de novo post-operative adhesions does not seem to have a significant clinical impact. Experimental data in animal models have suggested that CO2 pneumoperitoneum can cause acute peritoneal inflammation during laparoscopy depending on the insufflation pressure and the surgery duration. Broad peritoneal cavity protection by the insufflation of a low-temperature humidified gas mixture of CO2, N2O and O2 seems to represent the best approach for reducing peritoneal inflammation due to pneumoperitoneum. However, these experimental data have not had a significant impact on the modification of laparoscopic instrumentation. In contrast, surgeons should train themselves to perform laparoscopy quickly, and they should complete their learning curves before testing chemical anti-adhesive agents and anti-adhesion barriers. Chemical anti-adhesive agents have the potential to exert broad peritoneal cavity protection against adhesion formation, but when these agents are used alone, the concentrations needed to prevent adhesions are too high and could cause major post-operative side effects. Anti-adhesion barriers have been used mainly in open surgery, but some clinical data from laparoscopic surgeries are already available. Sprays, gels, and fluid barriers are easier to apply in laparoscopic surgery than solid barriers. Results have been encouraging with solid barriers, spray barriers, and gel barriers, but they have been ambiguous with fluid barriers. Moreover, when barriers have been used alone, the maximum protection against adhesion formation has been no greater than

  8. Regulation of T-lymphocyte motility, adhesion and de-adhesion by a cell surface mechanism directed by low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and endogenous thrombospondin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talme, Toomas; Bergdahl, Eva; Sundqvist, Karl-Gösta

    2014-01-01

    T lymphocytes are highly motile and constantly reposition themselves between a free-floating vascular state, transient adhesion and migration in tissues. The regulation behind this unique dynamic behaviour remains unclear. Here we show that T cells have a cell surface mechanism for integrated regulation of motility and adhesion and that integrin ligands and CXCL12/SDF-1 influence motility and adhesion through this mechanism. Targeting cell surface-expressed low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) with an antibody, or blocking transport of LRP1 to the cell surface, perturbed the cell surface distribution of endogenous thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) while inhibiting motility and potentiating cytoplasmic spreading on intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and fibronectin. Integrin ligands and CXCL12 stimulated motility and enhanced cell surface expression of LRP1, intact TSP-1 and a 130 000 MW TSP-1 fragment while preventing formation of a de-adhesion-coupled 110 000 MW TSP-1 fragment. The appearance of the 130 000 MW TSP-1 fragment was inhibited by the antibody that targeted LRP1 expression, inhibited motility and enhanced spreading. The TSP-1 binding site in the LRP1-associated protein, calreticulin, stimulated adhesion to ICAM-1 through intact TSP-1 and CD47. Shear flow enhanced cell surface expression of intact TSP-1. Hence, chemokines and integrin ligands up-regulate a dominant motogenic pathway through LRP1 and TSP-1 cleavage and activate an associated adhesion pathway through the LRP1–calreticulin complex, intact TSP-1 and CD47. This regulation of T-cell motility and adhesion makes pro-adhesive stimuli favour motile responses, which may explain why T cells prioritize movement before permanent adhesion. PMID:24877199

  9. Application of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel membrane as anti-adhesive interposition after spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraizumi, Y; Transfeldt, E E; Fujimaki, E; Nambu, M

    1995-11-01

    Three inflammatory and adhesive changes inside the spinal canal were analyzed histopathologically in cats. To investigate the usefulness of a polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel sheet as an interposition over the dura to prevent inflammatory and adhesive reaction after laminectomy. A major concern after laminectomy is scar tissue formation that may result in extradural compression or make subsequent surgery to the same area difficult and hazardous. Wide laminectomy was performed at L5 in 30 adult cats. The dura was covered with a polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel sheet, free fat graft, or without interposition as a control. Animals were killed at 3 or 12 weeks. In the control group, adhesion of the exposed dura was apparent. Thick, fibrous connective tissue was observed between the dura and the paravertebral muscles. In the fat graft group, the dura was separated from the scar tissue by living grafted fat. However, the dura was adherent to the grafted fat and fibroblasts migrated into the interstitial space. In the polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel group, only a thin synovium-like layer was formed around the polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel sheet. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel is made of water and alcohol, and has been shown to be nontoxic to tissues. This is permeable to low molecular weight, but impermeable to large cells such as fibroblasts. Thus, the polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel sheet prevents migration of inflammatory cells and subsequently reduces intraspinal canal scar tissue formation and adhesive reaction. Other beneficial properties are extreme elasticity and low friction, which eliminate mechanical reaction to the spinal cord. The polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel sheet is believed to be useful in eliminating scar tissue formation and does not interfere with the dynamic gliding movement of the spinal cord and nerve roots.

  10. Improving controllable adhesion on both rough and smooth surfaces with a hybrid electrostatic/gecko-like adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffatto, Donald; Parness, Aaron; Spenko, Matthew

    2014-04-06

    This paper describes a novel, controllable adhesive that combines the benefits of electrostatic adhesives with gecko-like directional dry adhesives. When working in combination, the two technologies create a positive feedback cycle whose adhesion, depending on the surface type, is often greater than the sum of its parts. The directional dry adhesive brings the electrostatic adhesive closer to the surface, increasing its effect. Similarly, the electrostatic adhesion helps engage more of the directional dry adhesive fibrillar structures, particularly on rough surfaces. This paper presents the new hybrid adhesive's manufacturing process and compares its performance to three other adhesive technologies manufactured using a similar process: reinforced PDMS, electrostatic and directional dry adhesion. Tests were performed on a set of ceramic tiles with varying roughness to quantify its effect on shear adhesive force. The relative effectiveness of the hybrid adhesive increases as the surface roughness is increased. Experimental data are also presented for different substrate materials to demonstrate the enhanced performance achieved with the hybrid adhesive. Results show that the hybrid adhesive provides up to 5.1× greater adhesion than the electrostatic adhesive or directional dry adhesive technologies alone.

  11. Closure of diastema and gingival recontouring using direct adhesive restorations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Araujo, Edson Medeiros; Fortkamp, Saulo; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges in clinical esthetic dentistry is closing anterior diastemas without creating "black triangles" between the teeth. The success of a restorative treatment in anterior teeth depends on the esthetic integration between soft tissues and hard tissues. The conditioning of the interdental papilla is a simple, direct, predictable, and low-cost alternative. This paper reports a case on diastema closure in anterior teeth that was successfully treated using gingival recontouring and composite resin restorations. The closure of diastemas in anterior teeth using direct adhesive restorations and gingival recontouring is a viable option for the clinician because it restores esthetic harmony between soft and hard tissues.

  12. Tissue Classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The project began as a e ort to support InLight and Lumidigm. With the sale of the companies to a non-New Mexico entity, the project then focused on supporting a new company Medici Technologies. The Small Business (SB) is attempting to quantify glucose in tissue using a series of short interferometer scans of the nger. Each scan is produced from a novel presentation of the nger to the device. The intent of the project is to identify and, if possible, implement improved methods for classi cation, feature selection, and training to improve the performance of predictive algorithms used for tissue classi cation.

  13. Adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-based adhesives containing calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion property (i.e. viscosity, loop tack and peel strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25 and ENR 50 grade-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied in the presence of calcium carbonate. The range of calcium carbonate loaded was from 10 to 50 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr. Coumarone-indene resin was used as the tackifier and its concentration was fixed at 80 phr. Toluene was chosen as the solvent throughout the investigation. The substrates (PET film/paper were coated with the adhesive using a SHEEN hand coater at a coating thickness of 60 µm. Viscosity of the adhesive was measured by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results show that viscosity of ENR-based adhesives increases gradually with increase in calcium carbonate loading due to the concentration effect of the filler. However, for loop tack and peel strength, it passes through a maximum at 30 phr calcium carbonate, an observation which is attributed to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate at this adhesive composition. ENR 25-based adhesive consistently exhibits higher adhesion property than ENR 50 for all calcium carbonate loadings studied.

  14. Stroma regulates increased epithelial lateral cell adhesion in 3D culture: a role for actin/cadherin dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen F Chambers

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell shape and tissue architecture are controlled by changes to junctional proteins and the cytoskeleton. How tissues control the dynamics of adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is unclear. We have studied epithelial tissue architecture using 3D culture models and found that adult primary prostate epithelial cells grow into hollow acinus-like spheroids. Importantly, when co-cultured with stroma the epithelia show increased lateral cell adhesions. To investigate this mechanism further we aimed to: identify a cell line model to allow repeatable and robust experiments; determine whether or not epithelial adhesion molecules were affected by stromal culture; and determine which stromal signalling molecules may influence cell adhesion in 3D epithelial cell cultures.The prostate cell line, BPH-1, showed increased lateral cell adhesion in response to stroma, when grown as 3D spheroids. Electron microscopy showed that 9.4% of lateral membranes were within 20 nm of each other and that this increased to 54% in the presence of stroma, after 7 days in culture. Stromal signalling did not influence E-cadherin or desmosome RNA or protein expression, but increased E-cadherin/actin co-localisation on the basolateral membranes, and decreased paracellular permeability. Microarray analysis identified several growth factors and pathways that were differentially expressed in stroma in response to 3D epithelial culture. The upregulated growth factors TGFβ2, CXCL12 and FGF10 were selected for further analysis because of previous associations with morphology. Small molecule inhibition of TGFβ2 signalling but not of CXCL12 and FGF10 signalling led to a decrease in actin and E-cadherin co-localisation and increased paracellular permeability.In 3D culture models, paracrine stromal signals increase epithelial cell adhesion via adhesion/cytoskeleton interactions and TGFβ2-dependent mechanisms may play a key role. These findings indicate a role for stroma in maintaining adult

  15. Adhesion Circle: A New Approach To Better Characterize Directional Gecko-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Lehmann, Samuel; Shao, Jinyou; Sameoto, Dan

    2017-01-25

    The number of different designs of directional gecko-inspired adhesives has proliferated over the past 15 years, but some basic characterization tools are still nonstandardized, which can make direct comparisons of different adhesives in the literature difficult. By far the most common type of test for directional adhesives, the load-drag-pull (LDP) test is useful but can miss substantial information on the exact behavior of gecko-inspired adhesives in a variety of loading conditions. Other test techniques, including angled approaches and pull-offs, have been employed by a few groups but they are not as widely adopted; peel tests can be employed but require a larger amount of adhesive material to use in the test, which is not always practical given some current manufacturing constraints. Very few tests have looked at the effect of off-main axis loads on the performance of directional adhesives, however, and this quality of performance may be very important in applications where direct control over displacements or angle of pull-off in pitch and yaw of the peeling interface may not be practical or possible. To address this overlooked area of characterization, we introduce a new test concept for anisotropic adhesives, the adhesion circle, and also compare how the radial normal adhesion performance is altered depending on whether the pull-off comes after a displacement drag or when pulled at a constant angle from vertical after a preload. Testing directional adhesive designs made with different geometries shows that unexpected behaviors at pull-off angles not in the direction of the strong-weak axis can sometimes be seen. The complete adhesion circle tests should help better design directional adhesives for scaled up performance, and can be completed with relatively simple hardware that is typically used in most current directional adhesive tests.

  16. Effectiveness and biological compatibility of different generations of dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João M F; Rodrigues, José R; Camargo, Carlos H R; Fernandes, Virgilio Vilas Boas; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schweikl, Helmut; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Besides possessing good mechanical properties, dental materials should present a good biological behavior and should not injure the involved tissues. Bond strength and biocompatibility are both highly significant properties of dentin adhesives. For that matter, these properties of four generations of adhesive systems (Multi-Purpose/Single Bond/SE Plus/Easy Bond) were evaluated. Eighty bovine teeth had their dentin exposed (500- and 200-μm thickness). Adhesive was applied on the dentin layer of each specimen. Following that, the microshearing test was performed for all samples. A dentin barrier test was used for the cytotoxicity evaluation. Cell cultures (SV3NeoB) were collected from testing materials by means of 200- or 500-μm-thick dentin slices and placed in a cell culture perfusion chamber. Cell viability was measured 24 h post-exposition by means of a photometrical test (MTT test). The best bonding performance was shown by the single-step adhesive Easy Bond (21 MPa, 200 μm; 27 MPa, 500 μm) followed by Single Bond (15.6 MPa, 200 μm; 23.4 MPa, 500 μm), SE Plus (18.2 MPa, 200 μm; 20 MPa, 500 μm), and Multi-Purpose (15.2 MPa, 200 μm; 17.9 MPa, 500 μm). Regarding the cytotoxicity, Multi-Purpose slightly reduced the cell viability to 92% (200 μm)/93% (500 μm). Single Bond was reasonably cytotoxic, reducing cell viability to 71% (200 μm)/64% (500 μm). The self-etching adhesive Scotchbond SE decreased cell viability to 85% (200 μm)/71% (500 μm). Conversely, Easy Bond did not reduce cell viability in this test, regardless of the dentin thickness. Results showed that the one-step system had the best bond strength performance and was the least toxic to pulp cells. In multiple-step systems, a correct bonding technique must be done, and a pulp capping strategy is necessary for achieving good performance in both properties. The study showed a promising system (one-step self-etching), referring to it as a good alternative for specific cases, mainly due to its

  17. Preferential adsorption of cell adhesive proteins from complex media on self-assembled monolayers and its effect on subsequent cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Yusuke; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-10-01

    We examined the effect of surface chemistry on adsorption of fibronectin (Fn) and vitronectin (Vn) and subsequent cell adhesion, employing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols carrying terminal methyl (CH3), hydroxyl groups (OH), carboxylic acid (COOH), and amine (NH2). More Fn and Vn adsorbed to COOH- and NH2-SAMs than to CH3- and OH-SAMs from a mixture with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and from 2% fetal bovine serum. Adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) on CH3- and OH-SAMs preadsorbed with Fn and BSA decreased with decreasing adsorbed Fn; however, HUVECs adhered to COOH- and NH2-SAMs even in the presence of BSA at 1000-fold more than Fn in a mixture because of the preferential adsorption of Fn and/or displacement of preadsorbed BSA with Fn and Vn in a serum-containing medium. SAMs coated with a mixture of Vn and BSA exhibited adhesion of HUVECs regardless of surface functional groups. A well-organized focal adhesion complex and actin stress fibers were observed only for COOH- and NH2-SAMs when SAMs were preadsorbed with Vn and BSA. These results suggest that COOH- and NH2-SAMs allow for both cell adhesion and cell spreading because of the high density of cell-binding domains derived from adsorbed Vn. Adsorption of cell adhesive proteins including fibronectin (Fn) and vitronectin (Vn) plays an important role in cell adhesion to artificial materials. However, for the development of biomaterials that contact with biological fluids, it is important to understand adsorption of Fn and Vn in complex media containing many kinds of proteins. Here, we focused on adsorption of Fn and Vn from complex media including mixed solution with albumin and fetal bovine serum, and its role on cell adhesion using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Our result demonstrates that SAMs carrying carboxylic acid or amine allow for both cell adhesion and cell spreading because of preferentially adsorbed Vn. The result provides insights into surface design of

  18. Adhesion patterns in early cell spreading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhkov, Pavel; Prass, Marcus; Gummich, Meike; Kuehn, Jac-Simon; Oettmeier, Christina; Doebereiner, Hans-Guenther, E-mail: hgd@uni-bremen.d [Institut fuer Biophysik, Universitaet Bremen, D-28334 Bremen (Germany)

    2010-05-19

    Mouse embryonic fibroblasts explore the chemical suitability before spreading on a given substrate. We find this early phase of cell spreading to be characterized by transient adhesion patches with a typical mean size of (1.0 {+-} 0.4) {mu}m and a lifetime of (33 {+-} 12) s. Eventually, these patches fuse to initiate extensive spreading of the cell. We monitor cell adhesion using reflection interference contrast and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Digital time lapse movies are analysed employing spatio-temporal correlation functions of adhesion patterns. Correlation length and time can be scaled to obtain a master curve at the fusion point.

  19. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000°C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off with the help of an electrically...... controlled arm. Higher sintering temperatures resulted in greater adhesion strengths, with a sharp increase observed near the melting point of the ash. Repetition of experiments with fixed operation conditions revealed considerable variation in the obtained adhesion strengths, portraying the stochastic...

  20. Adhesion Between Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    Different adhesion methods of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) layers were studied with respect to adhesional force and the resulting rheology of the two-layered PDMS films were investigated. The role of adhesion between PDMS layers on the performances of two-layer structures was studied with peel...... strength test and by SEM pictures. The rheology of the double-layered compared to the monolayer films changed in some cases which indicates that the adhesion process needs to be carefully introduced in order not to alter the final properties....