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Sample records for hippodamia variegata goeze

  1. Hippodamia variegata (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Found in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippodamia variegata (Goeze) (Coleoptea: Coccinellidae), a Palearctic lady beetles established in North America, is reported for the first time from the state of South Dakota, U.S.A. Implications for biological control and future research are discussed....

  2. Seasonal dynamics of: the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris, its natural enemies the seven spotted lady beetle Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus and variegated lady beetle Hippodamia variegata Goeze, and their parasitoid Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani Safura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two important lady beetle species commonly found in alfalfa fields in Iran are the variegated lady beetle Hippodamia variegata Goeze and the seven spotted lady beetle Coccinella septempunctata (Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae. These two species attack many aphid species including the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris (Hemiptera: Aphididae. In this study, the seasonal population changes of A. pisum, H. variegata, C. septempunctata and the parasitoid, Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank (Hymenoptera: Braconidae were studied in alfalfa fields in the 2012 and 2013 seasonal periods. The highest ladybird densities were noted on July 5, 2012 and on September 6, 2013 (17.2±2.8 and 13.4±1.6 individuals per 20 sweeps, respectively. Parasitism rates by D. coccinellae ranged from approximately 3 to 6% in two subsequent years, respectively. Parasitism was higher early in the growing season. Most parasitised ladybirds were females. There was no significant relationship between the temperature and relative humidity with pea aphid populations, although the aphid populations declined during the hot summer period. In contrast, the relationship between temperature and the H. variegata population was significant and positive in both years of the study. It has been shown that these lady beetle species have a major role in reducing the pea aphid populations in alfalfa fields. Due to the relatively low percentage of field parasitism by D. coccinellae, this parasite might not reduce the biocontrol efficiency of lady beetle species.

  3. Assessment of the biological control capability of Hippodamia variegata (Col.: Coccinellidae) using functional response experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madadi, Hossein; Parizi, Emad Mohajeri; Allahyari, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Lady beetles are among the most successful predators of aphids in different environments. The functional responses of different life stages of Hippodamia variegata (Goeze) towards cotton aphidswere examined in two different set-ups, a two-dimensional Petri dish set-up with detached leaves and a t...

  4. First record of Hippodamia variegata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Illinois, U.S.A., and relation to its other Midwestern collection records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippodamia variegata (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is an Afro-Eurasian lady beetle that was first discovered North America near Montreal, Canada, in 1987. Subsequent records of H. variegata have occurred over a gradually expanding area radiating from the initial detection site and also includ...

  5. Protective effects of the egg stalk of Paratrioza sinica (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) at various angles and spacings against three predaceous coccinellids, Harmonia axyridis, Coccinella septempunctata and Hippodamia variegata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pengxiang; Ma, Baoxu; Yan, Shuo; Xu, Jing; He, Jia; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Runzhi

    2018-02-01

    Paratrioza sinica is a major pest of wolfberry (Lycium barbarum). Coccinellids can effectively control various developmental stages of P. sinica but not the stalked egg. To investigate the protective role of egg stalks against the predaceous coccinellids Harmonia axyridis, Coccinella septempunctata and Hippodamia variegata, we studied the functional responses to, and effects of, two factors: the angle between the egg stalk and the leaf plane, and the spacing between egg stalks. The searching rate, handling time and theoretical maximum egg consumption of H. variegata were optimal among the three ladybug species. Egg consumption by coccinellids was maximum and minimum at stalk angles of 0° and 90°, respectively. The average reduction in the rate of egg consumption when the stalk angle was 90° relative to 0° was significantly smaller for larvae of coccinellids compared with adults, and for H. variegata compared with the other two species. Optimal spacing of eggs for consumption by predators varied with the predator species and their developmental stage, and was close to the body length of the predators. The egg stalk serves as a physical protection against predators. The evolutionary selective advantage of the egg stalk in providing protection against predators requires more attention. Appropriate selection of predators and irrigation strategies may improve control of P. sinica. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Dudleya Variegata Translocation - San Diego [ds654

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — At Mission Trails Regional Park, a translocation project of Dudleya variegata was conducted in efforts to save the population from a private property undergoing...

  7. Interactions of native and non-native lady beetle species (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) with aphid-tending ants in laboratory arenas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, C J; Alyokhin, A V; Porter, E W

    2009-06-01

    Interactions between lady beetles and the European fire ant (Myrmica rubra L.) tending potato aphids [Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas)] were compared in the laboratory. Lady beetle species native to North America (Coccinella trifasciata perplexa Mulsant, Coleomegilla maculata lengi Timberlake, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville) and non-native species of Palearctic origin [Coccinella septempunctata L., Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), Hippodamia variegata (Goeze), Propylea quatuordecimpunctata L.)] were evaluated. Harmonia axyridis consumed a significantly greater number of aphids compared with all other species but C. septempunctata. Ant stings affected H. variegata and C. septempunctata to a greater extent than other species. Ants showed a significantly greater amount of aggression toward H. convergens and H. variegata compared with P. quatuordecimpunctata. P. quatuordecimpunctata, C. trifasciata, and H. axyridis reacted significantly less to ants compared with H. variegata, H. convergens, C. maculata, and C. septempunctata. Differences in interactions with natural enemies may explain, in part, the successful establishment of some non-native coccinellids in new habitats.

  8. Bauhinia variegata var. variegata trypsin inhibitor: From isolation to potential medicinal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR (China); Bah, Clara Shui Fern [Department of Food Science, Division of Sciences, University of Otago (New Zealand); Lin, Peng [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR (China); Tsao, Sai Wah [Department of Anatomy, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR (China); Ng, Tzi Bun, E-mail: b021770@mailserv.cuhk.edu.hk [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2010-06-11

    Here we report for the first time of a new Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor (termed BvvTI) from seeds of the Camel's foot tree, Bauhinia variegata var. variegata. BvvTI shares the same reactive site residues (Arg, Ser) and exhibits a homology of N-terminal amino acid sequence to other Bauhinia protease inhibitors. The trypsin inhibitory activity (K{sub i}, 0.1 x 10{sup -9} M) of BvvTI ranks the highest among them. Besides anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity, BvvTI could significantly inhibit the proliferation of nasopharyngeal cancer CNE-1 cells in a selective way. This may partially be contributed by its induction of cytokines and apoptotic bodies. These results unveil potential medicinal applications of BvvTI.

  9. Captive breeding, reintroduction, and the conservation genetics of black and white ruffed lemurs, Varecia variegata variegata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyner, Y M; Amato, G; Desalle, R

    1999-12-01

    A character-based phylogenetic species concept approach was used to examine conservation unit status for three wild populations of black and white ruffed lemurs, Varecia vareigata variegata, from Betampona (N = 3), Manombo (N = 6), and Ranomafana (N = 14), Madagascar. Population aggregation analysis was performed on 548 bp from the control region (D-loop) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Twenty-one diagnostic sites were found to differentiate the Betampona (northern) population from the Manombo/Ranomafana (southern) populations. Additionally, individuals from the North American captive population (N = 11) and from Parc Ivoloina, Madagascar (N = 6) were examined for the same mtDNA fragment. The captive animals more closely resembled the southern populations and the Parc Ivoloina animals were more similar to the northern population. However, the inclusion of these ex situ animals reduced the number of diagnostic sites differentiating the northern and southern populations. Our genetic data were used to assess the ongoing management strategy for reintroducing individuals into the Betampona population and for introducing new founders into the ex situ population. This study demonstrates the utility of combining genetic information with a consideration of conservation priorities in evaluating the implementation of management strategies.

  10. Nootropic potential of Bauhinia variegata: A systematic study on murine model

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    Nishikant Jatav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bauhinia variegata Linn (leguminosae is one of the important medicinal herbs used traditionally to treat fever, as tonic, astringent, diarrhea, dysentery, hemorrhoids, piles, edema. Recent findings on Bauhinia variegata Linn have demonstrated its antioxidant, anti-hyperlipidemic, and hepatoprotective potential. The present work is focused to evaluate nootropic potential of Bauhinia variegata Linn in rats. Materials and Methods: The leaves of Bauhinia variegata were collected in the month of January from Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwavidyalaya Jabalpur (Madhya Pradesh. Leaves were subjected for isolation of crude flavonoids and characterized by total flavonoid content assay. Flavonoid-rich extract of Bauhinia variegata was studied for acute oral toxicity as per revised Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development guidelines No. 423. Nootropic activity was determined by elevated plus maze, rotating rod apparatus, baclofen-induced catatonia, diazepam-induced amnesia. Results: Flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata caused no alteration in locomotion in animals. In the current study, animals treated with flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata (400 mg/kg showed a significant decrease in transfer latency as compared to the control group, which indicates cognitive enhancement effect flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata. In rota rod studies, flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata increased fall of time as compared to diazepam. In baclofen-induced catatonia, administration of flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata demonstrated protective effect on rats. Over all, flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata was found to enhance the performance of murine models. Conclusion: Thus, it could be concluded that flavonoids from Bauhinia variegata possess nootropic potential. However, more systematic studies are required to determine its exact mechanism of action.

  11. Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis in a Captive Black and White Ruffed Lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) Caused by Acanthamoeba T4 Genotype.

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    Gaide, N; Pelandakis, M; Robveille, C; Albaric, O; Jouvion, G; Souchon, M; Risler, A; Abadie, J

    2015-11-01

    A mature male, black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) died in a zoological garden after a 4-day history of lethargy and non-responsive convulsions. Necropsy and histopathological examinations revealed acute necrotizing and haemorrhagic meningoencephalitis with intralesional amoebas confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Acanthamoeba T4 genotype was identified as the causative agent of the brain lesion, based on amplification and sequencing of 18S ribosomal RNA genes. The presence of free-living amoebas in water and mud from the lemur's environment was investigated by morphological and molecular analyses. The two predominant genera, representing 80% of isolated amoebas, were Naegleria spp. and Acanthamoeba spp. All Acanthamoeba isolates belonged to the T4 genotype. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of a meningoencephalitis due to Acanthamoeba T4 genotype in Lemuridae with concurrent analysis of pathological tissues and environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Initial growth of Bauhinia variegata trees under different colored shade nets and light conditions

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    Renata Bachin Mazzini-Guedes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bauhinia variegata and B. variegata var. candida, commonly known as orchid trees, are small sized trees widely used for urban forestry and landscaping. Adult plants grow under full sun; in Brazil, however, seedlings are generally cultivated in commercial nurseries under natural half-shading. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of different colored shade nets and light conditions on the initial growth of B. variegata and B. variegata var. candida. The influence of six light conditions (red net with 50% shading; blue net with 50% shading; black net with 70% shading; black net with 50% shading; black net with 30% shading; and full sun on the initial growth of B. variegata and B. variegata var. candida were evaluated along 160 days, and growth relationships were calculated. Seedlings showed more efficiency on the use of photoassimilated compounds when grown under full sun. Such condition is the most appropriate for seedling production of B. variegata and B. variegata var. candida, contradicting what has been performed in practice.

  13. Prey foraging movements by Hippodamia convergens in wheat are influenced by hunger and aphids

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    We investigated foraging movements by adult female convergent lady beetles, Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, on English grain aphids, Sitobion avenae L., on wheat, Triticum aestivum L., growing in 1.8 x 1.8 m plantings in a greenhouse with a soil floor. The wheat was planted to simulate whea...

  14. HPTLC fingerprint profile of Bauhinia variegata Linn. leaves

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    Gayathri Gunalan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop the finger print of medicinally and economically important leaves of Bauhinia variegata Linn. Methods: Ethanol extract of the leaves were developed in the mobile phase of n-Hexane: Ethyl acetate: Formic acid: Acetic acid (70:30:1.0:1.0 using standard procedures and scanned under UV at 254 nm, 366nm and under visible light. Results: The HPTLC fingerprinting of the ethanol extract has shown several peaks with different Rf values. 2.5 毺 L of ethanol extract showed 11 spots while 5 毺 L and 10 毺 L has shown 13 spots. 15毺 L concentration gave 14 spots in the above said solvent system. Conclusions: This finger print would be helpful in the identification and authentication of this species.

  15. Preliminary phytochemical screening and in vitro antibacterial activity of Bauhinia variegata Linn. against human pathogens

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    Sonam Pandey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the antimicrobial and phytochemical properties of hydromethanolic extracts of Bauhinia variegata Linn. (B. variegata (leaf, stem bark and flower to justify the traditional claim endowed upon this herbal drug as a rasayana in Ayurveda. This study thus can be further utilized to formulate the natural antioxidant which can be used as a dietary supplement to fight against several diseases such as cancer, ageing, arthrosclerosis, etc. Methods: The study showed that the number of different phytoconstituents present in the plant which makes it remarkable for its use by traditional practitioners. On the another set of experiment, the hydromethanolic extract of B. variegata (leaf, stem bark and flower were evaluated against Gram-positive and Gram-negative by using disk diffusion assay. Results: Phytochemical screening of all extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, steroids, phenolic compounds, tannins, saponin, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids and organic acids. The antibacterial activity of all the extracts (leaf, stem bark and flower of B. variegata was determined by agar well diffusion method at four different concentrations i.e., 1 000 mg/mL, 750 mg/mL, 500 mg/mL and 250 mg/mL using Gram-positive Bacillus subtilius, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus epidermidis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Shegilla flexineria, Pseudomonas auriginosa bacteria. Conclusions: These studies show that hydromethanolic extracts of B. variegata (leaf, stem bark and flower inhibited the growth of microorganism ’s in dose dependently. B. variegata leaf, stem bark and flower extracts have several phytochemical constituents who possess the antimicrobial activity. A tiny amount of data is presented, as the preliminary antimicrobial properties of the B. variegata here accessed, under the urgent necessity of new antibiotics in the market and in face of the increased resistance of infectious microorganisms to antimicrobials.

  16. Ultrastructure and molecular characterization of a microsporidium, Tubulinosema hippodamiae, from the convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville.

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    Bjørnson, S; Le, J; Saito, T; Wang, H

    2011-02-01

    Hippodamia convergens, the convergent lady beetle, is available for aphid control in home gardens and in commercial food production systems throughout the United States and Canada. Beetles received from commercial insectaries for biological control are occasionally infected with a microsporidium. The objective of this study was to describe the pathogen by means of ultrastructure, molecular characterization and tissue pathology. All stages of the microsporidium were in direct contact with the host cell cytoplasm. Early developmental stages were proximal to mature spores and both were observed throughout the tissue sections that were examined. Merogony resulted from binary fission. Early-stage sporoblasts were surrounded by a highly convoluted plasma membrane and contained an electron-dense cytoplasm and diplokaryon. Ovoid to elongated late-stage sporoblasts were surrounded by a relatively complete spore wall. The polar filament, polaroplast, and anchoring disk were readily observed within the cell cytoplasm. Mature spores were typical of terrestrial microsporidia, with a thickened endospore surrounded by a thin exospore. Spores contained well-defined internal structures, including a diplokaryon, lamellar polaroplast and a slightly anisofilar polar filament with 10-14 coils arranged in a single or double row. A prominent indentation was evident at the apical end of the spore wall proximal to the anchoring disk. Aberrant spores were also observed. These had a fully developed endospore and exospore but lacked any discernable internal spore structures, and were, instead, filled with lamellar or vesicular structures. Typical and aberrant spores measured 3.58 ± 0.2 × 2.06 ± 0.2 μm (n=10) and 3.38 ± 0.8 × 2.13 ± 0.2 μm (n=10), respectively. Spores were observed in longitudinal muscle surrounding the midgut and within the fat body, Malpighian tubules, pyloric valve epithelium, ventral nerve cord ganglia, muscles and ovaries. The hindgut epithelium was often infected

  17. Evaluation of effects of Bauhinia variegata stem bark extracts against milk-induced eosinophilia in mice.

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    Mali, Ravindra G; Dhake, Avinash S

    2011-04-01

    Bauhinia variegata Linn (family: Caesalpiniaceae), popularly known as Rakta Kanchnar, is a medium-sized tree found throughout India. The stem bark of B. variegata (BV) is used traditionally in the treatment of asthma, jaundice, tuberculosis, leprosy, and skin diseases. In the present study, we have investigated the role of aqueous (BVA) and ethanol (BVE) extracts of the plant against milk-induced leukocytosis and eosinophilia in albino mice. The results of the study revealed that pretreatment with both the extracts caused significant reduction in the total leukocyte and eosinophil counts in animals in dose-dependent manner. From these results, it can be concluded that the plant BV is having antieosinophilic activity.

  18. Analgesic Effects of Erythrina variegata L. Leaves and Soft Stems in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic extract of leaves and soft stems of Erythrina variegata (EVLSS) was investigated for analgesic activity at the doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight orally. All the doses of EVLSS significantly attenuated the writhing responses induced by intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid in mice.

  19. Germinação e sanidade de sementes de Bauhinia variegata Germination and sanity of seeds of Bauhinia variegata

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    Adriana Martinelli-Seneme

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available As bauínias são consideradas pioneiras tardias na escala de sucessão vegetal, pois têm crescimento moderadamente rápido. Podem ser utilizadas como planta forrageira, ornamental, para papel e celulose, madeira serrada e roliça e também para recuperação de áreas degradadas. Buscando-se alternativas por meio de métodos de escarificação, para uma germinação rápida e uniforme, sementes de Bauhinia variegata foram submetidas aos seguintes tratamentos pré-germinativos: escarificação mecânica com lixa 220; imersão em água quente a 80 ºC; imersão em água fria a 10 ºC durante 2 h; corte com tesoura na região oposta à micrópila; imersão em ácido sulfúrico concentrado por 5 min seguida de lavagem em água corrente; e imersão em ácido sulfúrico concentrado por 20 min, seguida de lavagem em água corrente. Em seguida, as sementes foram colocadas para germinar em caixas plásticas tipo gerbox em substrato de vermiculita sob temperatura constante de 30 ºC, com avaliações aos sete e 14 dias, e semeadas em bandejas de isopor em areia em casa de vegetação. Avaliaram-se, em casa de vegetação, a porcentagem final de emergência aos 32 dias após a semeadura e o índice de velocidade de emergência. Foi realizado, ainda, o teste de sanidade (Blotter Test com 400 sementes, pelo método de papel-filtro (Blotter test. Para o teste de germinação e índice de velocidade de emergência foram utilizadas cinco subamostras de 30 sementes de cada tratamento, sendo o experimento conduzido em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em comparação com as médias pelo teste de Tukey (P>0,05. Constatou-se que a escarificação mecânica (lixa e corte com tesoura e a imersão em água fria promoveram a germinação das sementes. No entanto, os valores foram semelhantes, estatisticamente, à testemunha; a velocidade de germinação em laboratório foi maior quando as sementes foram escarificadas com lixa ou imersas em água fria por 2 h; o

  20. Depth-related variation in epiphytic communities growing on the brown alga Lobophora variegata in a Caribbean coral reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, A.; Titlyanova, T. V.; Nugues, M. M.; Bischof, K.

    2011-12-01

    Lobophora variegata is a dominant macroalga on coral reefs across the Caribbean. Over the last two decades, it has expanded its vertical distribution to both shallow and deep reefs along the leeward coast of the island of Curaçao, Southern Caribbean. However, the ecological implications of this expansion and the role of L. variegata as a living substratum are poorly known. This study compared epiphytic algal communities on L. variegata blades along two depth transects (6-40 m). The epiphytic community was diverse with a total of 70 species of which 49 were found directly attached to L. variegata. The epiphytic community varied significantly between blade surface, depth and site. The greatest number of genera per blade was found growing on the underside of the blades regardless of site and depth. Filamentous red algae (e.g. Neosiphonia howei) were commonly found on the upperside of the blades over the whole depth gradient, whereas the underside was mainly colonized by calcifying (e.g. Hydrolithon spp., Jania spp., Amphiroa fragillissima), fleshy red algae (e.g. Champia spp., Gelidiopsis spp., Hypnea spinella) and foliose brown alga (e.g. Dictyota spp.). Anotrichum tenue, a red alga capable of overgrowing corals, was a common epiphyte of both blade surfaces. L. variegata plays an important role as a newly available substratum. Thus, its spread may influence other algal species and studies of benthic macroalgae such as L. variegata should also take into consideration their associated epiphytic algal communities.

  1. Evaluation of effects of Bauhinia variegata stem bark extracts against milk-induced eosinophilia in mice

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    Ravindra G Mali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bauhinia variegata Linn (family: Caesalpiniaceae, popularly known as Rakta Kanchnar, is a medium-sized tree found throughout India. The stem bark of B. variegata (BV is used traditionally in the treatment of asthma, jaundice, tuberculosis, leprosy, and skin diseases. In the present study, we have investigated the role of aqueous (BVA and ethanol (BVE extracts of the plant against milk-induced leukocytosis and eosinophilia in albino mice. The results of the study revealed that pretreatment with both the extracts caused significant reduction in the total leukocyte and eosinophil counts in animals in dose-dependent manner. From these results, it can be concluded that the plant BV is having antieosinophilic activity.

  2. A case report of porphyria variegata management in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Betty C; Griffey, Richard T

    2012-10-01

    Porphyria variegata (VP) is one of the hepatic porphyrias that results from the deficiency of protoporphyrinogen oxidase, an enzyme in the heme synthesis pathway. The name porphyria variegata refers to its many presentations, which include various neuropsychiatric and cutaneous manifestations. Emergency department (ED) presentations due to VP are most commonly neuropathic abdominal pain. We present the case of a 57-year-old woman presenting to an ED with abdominal pain consistent with prior VP attacks. In addition to analgesics and supportive care, infusion of intravenous dextrose resulted in improvement in her symptoms. Intravenous dextrose and heme administration remain the first-line treatment for abdominal pain attributable to known acute hepatic porphyria attacks. Recently, the mechanism of action of carbohydrates in treating porphyria has been elucidated. Current information on this illness and ED management are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bauhinia variegata leaf extracts exhibit considerable antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amita; Sharma, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Shashank; Saxena, Ajit K; Pandey, Abhay K

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports the phytochemical profiling, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities of Bauhinia variegata leaf extracts. The reducing sugar, anthraquinone, and saponins were observed in polar extracts, while terpenoids and alkaloids were present in nonpolar and ethanol extracts. Total flavonoid contents in various extracts were found in the range of 11-222.67 mg QE/g. In disc diffusion assays, petroleum ether and chloroform fractions exhibited considerable inhibition against Klebsiella pneumoniae. Several other extracts also showed antibacterial activity against pathogenic strains of E. coli, Proteus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of potential extracts were found between 3.5 and 28.40 mg/mL. The lowest MBC (3.5 mg/mL) was recorded for ethanol extract against Pseudomonas spp. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was compared with standard antioxidants. Dose dependent response was observed in reducing power of extracts. Polar extracts demonstrated appreciable metal ion chelating activity at lower concentrations (10-40 μg/mL). Many extracts showed significant antioxidant response in beta carotene bleaching assay. AQ fraction of B. variegata showed pronounced cytotoxic effect against DU-145, HOP-62, IGR-OV-1, MCF-7, and THP-1 human cancer cell lines with 90-99% cell growth inhibitory activity. Ethyl acetate fraction also produced considerable cytotoxicity against MCF-7 and THP-1 cell lines. The study demonstrates notable antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities in B. variegata leaf extracts.

  4. Bauhinia variegata Leaf Extracts Exhibit Considerable Antibacterial, Antioxidant, and Anticancer Activities

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    Amita Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the phytochemical profiling, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities of Bauhinia variegata leaf extracts. The reducing sugar, anthraquinone, and saponins were observed in polar extracts, while terpenoids and alkaloids were present in nonpolar and ethanol extracts. Total flavonoid contents in various extracts were found in the range of 11–222.67 mg QE/g. In disc diffusion assays, petroleum ether and chloroform fractions exhibited considerable inhibition against Klebsiella pneumoniae. Several other extracts also showed antibacterial activity against pathogenic strains of E. coli, Proteus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values of potential extracts were found between 3.5 and 28.40 mg/mL. The lowest MBC (3.5 mg/mL was recorded for ethanol extract against Pseudomonas spp. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was compared with standard antioxidants. Dose dependent response was observed in reducing power of extracts. Polar extracts demonstrated appreciable metal ion chelating activity at lower concentrations (10–40 μg/mL. Many extracts showed significant antioxidant response in beta carotene bleaching assay. AQ fraction of B. variegata showed pronounced cytotoxic effect against DU-145, HOP-62, IGR-OV-1, MCF-7, and THP-1 human cancer cell lines with 90–99% cell growth inhibitory activity. Ethyl acetate fraction also produced considerable cytotoxicity against MCF-7 and THP-1 cell lines. The study demonstrates notable antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities in B. variegata leaf extracts.

  5. Non-Polar Natural Products from Bromelia laciniosa, Neoglaziovia variegata and Encholirium spectabile (Bromeliaceae

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    Ole Johan Juvik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Extensive regional droughts are already a major problem on all inhabited continents and severe regional droughts are expected to become an increasing and extended problem in the future. Consequently, extended use of available drought resistant food plants should be encouraged. Bromelia laciniosa, Neoglaziovia variegata and Encholirium spectabile are excellent candidates in that respect because they are established drought resistant edible plants from the semi-arid Caatinga region. From a food safety perspective, increased utilization of these plants would necessitate detailed knowledge about their chemical constituents. However, their chemical compositions have previously not been determined. For the first time, the non-polar constituents of B. laciniosa, N. variegata and E. spectabile have been identified. This is the first thorough report on natural products from N. variegata, E. spectabile, and B. laciniosa. Altogether, 20 non-polar natural products were characterized. The identifications were based on hyphenated gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS and supported by 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR plant metabolomics.

  6. Effects of forest structure and composition on food availability for Varecia variegata at Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, E.A.; Underwood, H.B.

    2005-01-01

    We present a summary of a long-term field study that examined the effects of forest disturbance on the availability of palatable fruit and its utilization by V. variegata. Forest structure and tree species composition were measured in three adjacent study areas, with different histories of disturbance, in Ranomafana National Park (RNP), Madagascar. V. variegata abundance was monitored by frequent encounters with resident groups and periodic censuses conducted along trails. Finally, the abundance of mature fruit in species used by V. variegata was scored monthly at representative trees at several locations. V. variegata abundance was most consistent in the least anthropogenically disturbed site, while no established lemur groups were observed in the heavily logged site for over a decade post-harvest. Lemur abundance was variable in the selectively logged site. The presence of select food trees, particularly specimens with voluminous crowns capable of producing abundant fruit crops, appears to be key to the establishment and expansion of V variegata groups. Our analysis of year-long fruit utilization revealed a high degree of preference for several species of trees. Two species exhibited mature fruit in a low percentage of stems but were available for a protracted period of time, while two additional species showed high intraspecific fruiting synchrony and were available for a shorter period of time. These contrasting phenologies, rather than the individual tree species, may be most important to V. variegata due to their coincident timing of fruit maturation with key lemur life-history events. Any disturbance-natural or anthropogenic-that disrupts the phenology cycles of food trees has the potential to impact lemur abundance and dispersion. Intense disturbances, such as heavy logging or severe cyclones, have long-lasting impacts on fruit production, while selective logging or moderate cyclonic windthrow cause more transient impacts. V. variegata is adapted to deal

  7. In vitro behaviour of Aspasia variegata, an epiphytic orchid from the Brazilian Cerrado

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    Vespasiano Borges de Paiva Neto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspasia variegata occurs naturally in the savanna of the Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil and it has been widely collected for its beautiful flowers. Additionally, its habitat has been greatly reduced and little or no investigation of its spread has been performed. Aiming to establish a protocol to obtain seedlings of the orchid A. variegata, different compositions of culture medium were tested to identify which one provided better in vitro growth and development and to assess the influence of these media in seedling acclimatisation. Thus, seeds obtained from mature capsules were inoculated in Knudson culture medium for 120 days until the protocorm stage. They were transferred to different culture media formulations, including MS and Knudson with half or full formulation, and 3.0 and 6.0g L-1 activated charcoal were added to them or not. After 180 days of protocorm inoculation, seedlings were evaluated for length of roots and shoots, number of roots and leaves, and chlorophyll contents. After that, seedlings were transferred to trays containing a mixture of Plantmax® and coconut fibre (1:1 for acclimatisation. Best results for the in vitro growth of A. variegata were obtained with the use of MS medium supplemented with 6.0g L-1 activated charcoal. Higher levels of chlorophyll were obtained, however, in treatments containing MS salts without activated charcoal presence, and lower levels in media containing Knudson salts with the presence of activated charcoal. The seedlings originated by higher chlorophyll levels during in vitro cultivation presented the highest survival rates and better development in the acclimatisation phase.

  8. Aphid facultative symbionts reduce survival of the predatory lady beetle Hippodamia convergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costopoulos, Kelly; Kovacs, Jennifer L; Kamins, Alexandra; Gerardo, Nicole M

    2014-02-20

    Non-essential facultative endosymbionts can provide their hosts with protection from parasites, pathogens, and predators. For example, two facultative bacterial symbionts of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), Serratia symbiotica and Hamiltonella defensa, protect their hosts from parasitism by two species of parasitoid wasp. Previous studies have not explored whether facultative symbionts also play a defensive role against predation in this system. We tested whether feeding on aphids harboring different facultative symbionts affected the fitness of an aphid predator, the lady beetle Hippodamia convergens. While these aphid faculative symbionts did not deter lady beetle feeding, they did decrease survival of lady beetle larvae. Lady beetle larvae fed a diet of aphids with facultative symbionts had significantly reduced survival from egg hatching to pupation and therefore had reduced survival to adult emergence. Additionally, lady beetle adults fed aphids with facultative symbionts were significantly heavier than those fed facultative symbiont-free aphids, though development time was not significantly different. Aphids reproduce clonally and are often found in large groups. Thus, aphid symbionts, by reducing the fitness of the aphid predator H. convergens, may indirectly defend their hosts' clonal descendants against predation. These findings highlight the often far-reaching effects that symbionts can have in ecological systems.

  9. The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata: A Source of Antiprotozoal Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillo-Ciau, Zulema; Moo-Puc, Rosa; Quijano, Leovigildo; Freile-Pelegrín, Yolanda

    2010-01-01

    Lobophora variegata, a brown alga collected from the coast of the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico, was studied for antiprotozoal activity against Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The whole extract showed the highest activity against T. vaginalis, with an IC50 value of 3.2 μg/mL. For the fractions, the best antiprotozoal activity was found in non-polar fractions. The chloroform fraction of the extract contained a major sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), identified as 1-O-palmitoyl-2-O-myristoyl-3-O-(6‴-sulfo-α-d-quinovopyranosyl)-glycerol (1), together with small amounts of 1,2-di-O-palmitoyl-3-O-(6‴-sulfo-α-d-quinovopyranosyl)-glycerol (2) and a new compound identified as 1-O-palmitoyl-2-O-oleoyl-3-O-(6‴-sulfo-α-d-quinovopyranosyl)-glycerol (3). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis and careful analysis of FAB-MS and NMR spectroscopic data. This is the first report on the isolation of SQDGs from L. variegata. The mixture of 1–3 showed good activity against E. histolytica and moderate activity against T. vaginalis with IC50s of 3.9 and 8.0 μg/mL, respectively, however, the activity of 1–3 is not as effective as metronidazole. These results afford ground information for the potential use of the whole extract and fractions of this species in protozoal infections. PMID:20479979

  10. High Concentrations of Chlorantraniliprole Reduce Its Compatibility with a Key Predator, Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, P R R; Torres, J B; Michaud, J P; Rodrigues, A R S

    2017-10-01

    Diamides are a novel insecticide group that act by disrupting insect muscle contraction. Recommended field rates (FRs) vary greatly among target pests and cropping systems, leading to variable risks for non-target organisms. We evaluated the toxicity of chlorantraniliprole to the predator Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) by exposure to residues, topical application, and consumption of contaminated food. We also estimated lethal concentrations (LCs) of chlorantraniliprole in two target pests, cotton leafworm, Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), and tobacco budworm, Chloridea virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), by exposing larvae to treated cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., leaves and assessed residual activity at various intervals after application to cotton plants. Exposure to dried residues and ingestion of treated moth eggs resulted in similar toxicity to H. convergens, whereas topical application was a less toxic route of exposure. Regardless of exposure route, the LC50s and LC90s obtained for H. convergens were higher than those calculated for the pests. Residues at the upper limit of the LC90 for C. virescens remained effective against this pest for up to 16 d, while exhibiting minor impacts on H. convergens. In contrast, the FR concentration of C. virescens caused significant mortality in H. convergens. The results suggest that the current FR for C. virescens is too high to be safe for H. convergens, and given the LCs observed for this pest in the present study, trials to explore the potential efficacy of lower FRs are justified. Depending on the concentration and route of exposure, this insecticide has the potential to be compatible with H. convergens. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Intercrop movement of convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), between adjacent cotton and alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastola, Anup; Parajulee, Megha N; Porter, R Patrick; Shrestha, Ram B; Chen, Fa-Jun; Carroll, Stanley C

    2016-02-01

    A 2-year study was conducted to characterize the intercrop movement of convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) between adjacent cotton and alfalfa. A dual protein-marking method was used to assess the intercrop movement of the lady beetles in each crop. In turns field collected lady beetles in each crop were assayed by protein specific ELISA to quantify the movement of beetles between the crops. Results indicated that a high percentage of convergent lady beetles caught in cotton (46% in 2008; 56% in 2009) and alfalfa (46% in 2008; 71% in 2009) contained a protein mark, thus indicating that convergent lady beetle movement was largely bidirectional between the adjacent crops. Although at a much lower proportion, lady beetles also showed unidirectional movement from cotton to alfalfa (5% in 2008 and 6% in 2009) and from alfalfa to cotton (9% in 2008 and 14% in 2009). The season-long bidirectional movement exhibited by the beetles was significantly higher in alfalfa than cotton during both years of the study. The total influx of lady beetles (bidirectional and unidirectional combined) was significantly higher in alfalfa compared with that in cotton for both years. While convergent lady beetles moved between adjacent cotton and alfalfa, they were more attracted to alfalfa when cotton was not flowering and/or when alfalfa offered more opportunities for prey. This study offers much needed information on intercrop movement of the convergent lady beetle that should facilitate integrated pest management decisions in cotton utilizing conservation biological control. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. PENDUGAAN PARAMETER GENETIK SEMAI NYAWAI (Ficus variegata Blume ASAL PULAU LOMBOK

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    Liliek Haryjanto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic parameters were estimated for height and diameter characteristic of Ficus variegata Blume seedlings planted in the nursery of The Centre for Forest Biotechnology and Tree Improvement, Yogyakarta at 8 months of age. The trial involved seedlings from several mother trees (family originated from Lombok Island. The trial was arranged in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD which comprised of 17 families as treatment, 3 replications and each replication comprised 10 seedlings. Analysis of varians showed that height and diameter were significantly different between families. Family heritabilities for height and diameter characteristic were 0.98 and 0.91 respectively, while genetic correlation between the two characteristics were 0.7. This information is very important for future genetic improvement of the species. 

  13. Development and Evaluation of Photoprotective O/W Emulsions Containing Hydroalcoholic Extract of Neoglaziovia variegata (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira-Júnior, Raimundo Gonçalves; Souza, Grasielly Rocha; Ferraz, Christiane Adrielly Alves; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Araújo, Camila de Souza; de Lima-Saraiva, Sarah Raquel Gomes; Reis, Silvio Alan Gonçalves Bomfim; Gonçalves, Talita Mota; Rolim, Larissa Araújo; Rolim-Neto, Pedro José; César, Francine Celise Siqueira; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Neoglaziovia variegata is a Bromeliaceae plant species widely found in Brazil with several pharmacological properties, including photoprotective activity. Although herbal-based active ingredients have been applied in cosmetic products, especially for skin treatment, its application in sunscreen formulations remains unexplored. The aim of this work is to evaluate the photoprotective effect of cosmetic formulations containing hydroalcoholic extract of N. variegata (Nv-HA). Initially, the phenolic and flavonoid total content of Nv-HA were determined. The photoprotective activity of Nv-HA was subsequently assessed using a spectrophotometric method. Nv-HA was incorporated in O/W emulsions in the presence or absence of synthetic filters and their photoprotective efficacy was evaluated by spectrophotometric SPF determination. Finally, the stability study of the formulations was performed through the freezing/defrosting method. Nv-HA showed significant phenolic and flavonoids content (61.66 ± 5.14 mg GAE/g and 90.27 ± 5.03 mg CE/g, resp.). Nv-HA showed SPF values of 5.43 ± 0.07 and 11.73 ± 0.04 for the concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0% (v/v), respectively. It was verified that Nv-HA potentiated the photoprotective effect of formulations containing only synthetic filters. Furthermore, the formulations have remained stable at the end of the preliminary stability study. According to the results, it was concluded that Nv-HA can be used as a chemical filter in cosmetic formulations.

  14. Physico-chemical Characteristics of Oil and Seed Residues of Bauhinia variegata and Bauhinia linnaei

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    Sarfraz Arain

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Physico-chemical characteristics of two Bauhinia seed varieties (B. variegata and B. linnaei, were evaluated for commercial exploration. Physico-chemical characteristics of the oils for both varieties were demonstrated and mean values found to be refractive index (40 °C 1.4589 and 1.4588, peroxide value 1.9 and 2.4 (meq O2 / kg of oil, iodine value 84.5 and 92.2 (g of I2/100g of oil, saponification number 191.3 and 195.5 (mg of KOH /g of oil, free fatty acids 0.6% and 0.9%, unsaponifiable matter 0.9% and 1.2% and color (1 in. cell, 2.2-2.9R + 30.0-25.0Y, respectively. Linoleic 42.1 and 45.8 %, oleic 13.4 and 12.6%, stearic 17.5 and 18.8% and palmitic 22.1 and 16.8% were the main fatty acids in the crude seed oils. Minor amounts of palmitoleic, margaric, linolenic, arachidic, behenic, eicosapentaenoic and nervonic acid were also identified. The composition of defatted seed residue of B. variegata and B. linnaei were found as: protein 41.9% and 38.6%, oil 18.0%, and 17.4% ash 4.8% and 4.2%, moisture 6.7% and 6.3%, fiber 6.9% and 7.3% and total carbohydrate 28.4% and 33.8%, respectively. Proximate and fatty acid composition of both Bauhinia varieties were found to be almost similar. It was concluded that Bauhinia seed is a rich source of linoleic acid and could be explored for commercial uses.

  15. Development and Evaluation of Photoprotective O/W Emulsions Containing Hydroalcoholic Extract of Neoglaziovia variegata (Bromeliaceae

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    Raimundo Gonçalves de Oliveira-Júnior

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoglaziovia variegata is a Bromeliaceae plant species widely found in Brazil with several pharmacological properties, including photoprotective activity. Although herbal-based active ingredients have been applied in cosmetic products, especially for skin treatment, its application in sunscreen formulations remains unexplored. The aim of this work is to evaluate the photoprotective effect of cosmetic formulations containing hydroalcoholic extract of N. variegata (Nv-HA. Initially, the phenolic and flavonoid total content of Nv-HA were determined. The photoprotective activity of Nv-HA was subsequently assessed using a spectrophotometric method. Nv-HA was incorporated in O/W emulsions in the presence or absence of synthetic filters and their photoprotective efficacy was evaluated by spectrophotometric SPF determination. Finally, the stability study of the formulations was performed through the freezing/defrosting method. Nv-HA showed significant phenolic and flavonoids content (61.66±5.14 mg GAE/g and 90.27±5.03 mg CE/g, resp.. Nv-HA showed SPF values of 5.43±0.07 and 11.73±0.04 for the concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0% (v/v, respectively. It was verified that Nv-HA potentiated the photoprotective effect of formulations containing only synthetic filters. Furthermore, the formulations have remained stable at the end of the preliminary stability study. According to the results, it was concluded that Nv-HA can be used as a chemical filter in cosmetic formulations.

  16. Development and Evaluation of Photoprotective O/W Emulsions Containing Hydroalcoholic Extract of Neoglaziovia variegata (Bromeliaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Grasielly Rocha; Ferraz, Christiane Adrielly Alves; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Araújo, Camila de Souza; de Lima-Saraiva, Sarah Raquel Gomes; Gonçalves, Talita Mota; Rolim-Neto, Pedro José; César, Francine Celise Siqueira

    2017-01-01

    Neoglaziovia variegata is a Bromeliaceae plant species widely found in Brazil with several pharmacological properties, including photoprotective activity. Although herbal-based active ingredients have been applied in cosmetic products, especially for skin treatment, its application in sunscreen formulations remains unexplored. The aim of this work is to evaluate the photoprotective effect of cosmetic formulations containing hydroalcoholic extract of N. variegata (Nv-HA). Initially, the phenolic and flavonoid total content of Nv-HA were determined. The photoprotective activity of Nv-HA was subsequently assessed using a spectrophotometric method. Nv-HA was incorporated in O/W emulsions in the presence or absence of synthetic filters and their photoprotective efficacy was evaluated by spectrophotometric SPF determination. Finally, the stability study of the formulations was performed through the freezing/defrosting method. Nv-HA showed significant phenolic and flavonoids content (61.66 ± 5.14 mg GAE/g and 90.27 ± 5.03 mg CE/g, resp.). Nv-HA showed SPF values of 5.43 ± 0.07 and 11.73 ± 0.04 for the concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0% (v/v), respectively. It was verified that Nv-HA potentiated the photoprotective effect of formulations containing only synthetic filters. Furthermore, the formulations have remained stable at the end of the preliminary stability study. According to the results, it was concluded that Nv-HA can be used as a chemical filter in cosmetic formulations. PMID:28680948

  17. Isolation and intracellular localization of insulin-like proteins from leaves of Bauhinia variegata

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    C.R. Azevedo

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based on immunological cross-reactivity and anti-diabetic properties has suggested the presence of insulin-like peptides in plants. The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence of insulin-like proteins in the leaves of Bauhinia variegata ("pata-de-vaca", "mororó", a plant widely utilized in popular medicine as an anti-diabetic agent. We show that an insulin-like protein was present in the leaves of this plant. A chloroplast protein with a molecular mass similar to that of bovine insulin was extracted from 2-mm thick 15% SDS-PAGE gels and fractionated with a 2 x 24 cm Sephadex G-50 column. The activity of this insulin-like protein (0.48 mg/mL on serum glucose levels of four-week-old Swiss albino (CF1 diabetic mice was similar to that of commercial swine insulin used as control. Further characterization of this molecule by reverse-phase hydrophobic HPLC chromatographic analysis as well as its antidiabetic activity on alloxan-induced mice showed that it has insulin-like properties. Immunolocalization of the insulin-like protein in the leaves of B. variegata was performed by transmission electron microscopy using a polyclonal anti-insulin human antibody. Localization in the leaf blades revealed that the insulin-like protein is present mainly in chloroplasts where it is also found associated with crystals which may be calcium oxalate. The presence of an insulin-like protein in chloroplasts may indicate its involvement in carbohydrate metabolism. This finding has strengthened our previous results and suggests that insulin-signaling pathways have been conserved through evolution.

  18. The persistence toxicity of four insecticides against adult Hippodamia varigata (Coleptera: Cocinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasi, A; Sabahi, Q; Kavousi, A

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of four insecticides on Hippodomia variegata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), the predator of Aphis fabae, an experiment was carried out using IOBC/wprs method. Persistence toxicity of insecticides has been evaluated in the greenhouse condition. The insecticides abamectin 1.8 EC, deltamethrin 2.5 EC, imidacloprid 350 SC, and proteus OD 110 were used at recommended field rates. The insecticides were applied on broad bean foliage using a hand sprayer, until run-off. Contact toxicity of aged residues of insecticides on adult predator was evaluated using the cage-method. The trials were laid out in randomized complete design (CRD) with 3 replicates and an untreated check. The arcsine transformation was used for analysis. The mortality of adult predator, after 24 h contact with fresh residues of abamectin, deltamethrin, imidacloprid and proteus were 53.4, 52.1, 63.4 and 65.1%, respectively. After 5 days the effect of residues decreased so that the adult mortality diminished to 32.4, 36.5, 56.1 and 57.5% for mentioned above insecticides. 15-day old residues lead to 8.8, 23.1, 56.3 and 57.5%; and 31-day old residues lead to 8.8, 22.7, 29.5 and 41.7% mortality for these insecticides, respectively. Based on this study, abamectin and deltamethrin with persistence less than 5 d are classified as short lived (Class A) while imidacloprid and proteus with persistence between 16 to 31d, classified as moderately persistent (Class C) compounds.

  19. Study of Phytochemical, Anti-Microbial, Anti-Oxidant, Phytotoxic, and Immunomodulatory Activity Properties of Bauhinia Variegata

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandari, Jaya; Thapa, Pratiksha; Niraula, Prasodhan; Thapa, Nita; Shrestha, Nikita; Shrestha, Bhupal Govinda

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use plants for the treatment and prevention of cancer and are currently being evaluated as promising anticancer agents. In this paper, we investigated the anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, phytotoxic and immunomodulatory of plant Bauhinia variegata and also established the presence of important phytoconstituents which might signify its anticancer property. Phytochemical screening, anti-microbial assay, phytotoxicity assay, anti-oxidant assay and immunomodulatory a...

  20. Biosorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) onto brown seaweed, Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux): kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Bhavanath; Basha, Shaik; Jaiswar, Santlal; Mishra, Biswajit; Thakur, Mukund C

    2009-02-01

    The present work deals with the biosorption performance of raw and chemically modified biomass of the brown seaweed Lobophora variegata for removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solution. The biosorption capacity was significantly altered by pH of the solution delineating that the higher the pH, the higher the Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal. Kinetic and isotherm experiments were carried out at the optimal pH 5.0. The metal removal rates were conspicuously rapid wherein 90% of the total sorption occurred within 90 min. Biomass treated with CaCl(2) demonstrated the highest potential for the sorption of the metal ions with the maximum uptake capacities i.e. 1.71 and 1.79 mmol g(-1) for Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively. Kinetic data were satisfactorily manifested by a pseudo-second order chemical sorption process. The process mechanism consisting of both surface adsorption and pore diffusion was found to be complex. The sorption data have been analyzed and fitted to sorption isotherm of the Freundlich, Langmuir, and Redlich-Peterson models. The regression coefficient for both Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherms were higher than those secured for Freundlich isotherm implying that the biosorption system is possibly monolayer coverage of the L. variegata surface by the cadmium and lead ions. FT-IR studies revealed that Cd(II) and Pb(II) binding to L. variegata occurred primarily through biomass carboxyl groups accompanied by momentous interactions of the biomass amino and amide groups. In this study, we have observed that L. variegata had maximum biosorption capacity for Cd(II) and Pb(II) reported so far for any marine algae.

  1. Effects of an unidentified microsporidium on the convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), used for biological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joudrey, P; Bjørnson, S

    2007-02-01

    Convergent lady beetles, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, are collected from overwintering sites in California and redistributed for aphid control in home gardens and agroecosystems. The effects of an unidentified microsporidium on the life history characteristics of commercially available H. convergens were examined. Mean development for microsporidia-infected and uninfected H. convergens was 15.40+/-0.14 and 14.76+/-0.16 days, respectively (P=0.01). Larval mortality did not differ significantly. Cumulative mean egg production for microsporidia-infected and uninfected females was 545.8+/-92.6 and 928.3+/-86.4 eggs, respectively (P=0.004) and mean survival was 64.5+/-5.6 and 77.1+/-4.5 days, respectively (P=0.04). Microsporidian spores (3.6x2.4 microm) are similar in size to those of Nosema hippodamiae.

  2. Phortica variegata as an intermediate host of Thelazia callipaeda under natural conditions: evidence for pathogen transmission by a male arthropod vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otranto, D; Cantacessi, C; Testini, G; Lia, R P

    2006-09-01

    Knowledge about Phortica variegata (Drosophilidae, Steganinae), the intermediate host of the eyeworm Thelazia callipaeda (Spirurida, Thelaziidae), is confined to experimental studies. To investigate the role P. variegata plays in the transmission of T. callipaeda under natural conditions, the population dynamics of these flies in the natural environment and their feeding preferences (on vegetables and/or animal lachrymal secretions) were examined. From April to November 2005, a total number of 969 (557 males and 412 females) P. variegata flies were collected weekly in a region of southern Italy with a history of canine thelaziosis. The flies were identified and dissected or subjected to a PCR assay specific for a region within the ribosomal ITS-1 DNA of T. callipaeda. The zoophilic preferences of P. variegata were assessed by collecting flies around the eyes of a person or around a fruit bait. Seven hundred and twenty flies (398 males and 322 females) were dissected under a stereomicroscope; 249 flies (158 males and 91 females) that died prior to the dissection were subjected to molecular investigation. Only P. variegata males were infected with larval T. callipaeda both at dissection (six, 0.83%) and with the specific PCR (seven, 2.81%), representing a total percentage of 1.34% flies infected. Interestingly, only males were collected around the eyes, compared with a male/female ratio of 1:4 around the fruit. This survey indicated that P. variegata males act as intermediate hosts of T. callipaeda under natural conditions in Europe. Both the zoophilic behaviour of P. variegata males on lachrymal secretions and their role as vector of T. callipaeda have been discussed as they represent a peculiarity in medical and veterinary entomology. The synchrony between the fly population dynamics and the biology of the nematode in the definitive host provides an interesting model for exploring the co-evolution of Thelazia spp. with their hosts.

  3. PENGGUNAAN MIKORIZA DAN PUPUK NPK DALAM PEMBIBITAN NYAWAI (Ficus variegata Blume

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    NFN Danu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kebutuhan bahan baku  untuk industri pengolahan kayu dan serat dari tahun ke tahun semakin meningkat, sedangkan pasokan bahan baku dari hutan alam semakin menurun, akibatnya terjadi kelangkaan bahan baku industri pengolahan kayu dan pulp. Oleh karena itu perlu dilakukan pengembangan hutan tanaman yang memadai. Tanaman nyawai (Ficus variegata Blume  merupakan jenis alternatif prioritas dalam pembangunan hutan tanaman penghasil kayu. Salah satu faktor yang menentukan keberhasilan pengembangan hutan tanaman nyawai adalah penggunaan bibit bermutu, karena bibit yang berkualitas akan menghasilkan tegakan dengan tingkat produktivitas tinggi. Pengadaan bibit nyawai bermutu dapat melalui teknik perbanyakan generatif maupun vegetatif. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mendapatkan kombinasi pemupukan dan mikoriza yang tepat untuk menghasilkan bibit nyawai yang berkualitas. Buah nyawai dikumpulkan dari Kebun Raya Cibodas (Cianjur. Lokasi Penelitian di persemaian Nagrak. Perkecambahan dilakukan dengan menabur benih pada bak kecambah yang berisi media yang telah disterilkan. Media penyapihan menggunakan tanah sub soil ditambah mikoriza: tanpa mikoriza (C0, Glomus sp. (C1, Acaulospora sp. (C2 dan dosis NPK sebanyak : 0,0 g (P0, 0,5 g/polybag (P1, 1,0 g/poybag (P2. Pengadaan bibit nyawai dapat menggunakan campuran media tanah subsoil + 30 % serbuk sabut kelapa (coco peat +10 % arang sekam padi (v/v, CMA Glomus sp dan Acaulospora sp mampu berkolonisasi dengan akar bibit nyawai. Pemberian pupuk NPK 0,5 – 1,0 gram per polybag dapat meningkatkan serapan hara P.

  4. Genetic Variation in Growth Traits of Two Years Old Ficus variegata Blume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliek Haryjanto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A progeny trial of nyawai (Ficus variegata Blume with subline system was established in Mangunan, Bantul, Yogyakarta and designed as a Randomized Completely Block Design. Lombok subline comprised of 17 families and Cilacap-Pangandaran subline comprised of 19 families. This study was aimed to observe  growth variation and genetic parameter of these sublines  at two years after planting. Varians analysis was performed  to find out family  effect on survival,  height, and diameter traits.  Component varians analysis was used to estimate coefficient of genetic variation and heritability. This study showed that survival rate of the trial ranged from 89.01%  to 91.42%. Family effect on height and diameter variation was very significant at both sublines. Estimation coefficient of genetic variation for height and diameter traits ranged from 4.41% to 9.04% or categorized as intermediate. Individual heritabilities for height traits ranged from 0.15 to 0.22;  diameter ranged from 0.18 to 0.09, while family heritabilities for height and diameter traits  ranged from 0.49 to 0.60 and 0.29 to 0.66 respectively.

  5. Caracterização química e bioquímica de sementes de Bauhinia variegata L. Chemical and biochemical characterization of Bauhinia variegata L. seeds

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    Luciano S. Pinto

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Sementes quiescentes de Bauhinia variegata foram submetidas a caracterização bioquímica, por meio de análise elementar, fracionamento de proteínas e atividade hemaglutinante. A análise elementar mostrou grande quantidade de proteína total e de lipídeos, com 29,41 e 14,89%, respectivamente. O ácido linoléico foi o mais encontrado na constituição lipídica das sementes e a composição mineral ficou dentro de níveis aceitáveis para o consumo humano. As diferentes frações protéicas (albuminas, globulinas, prolaminas, glutelinas ácidas e básicas apresentaram atividade hemaglutinante contra hemácias tratadas e não-tratadas com enzimas proteolíticas, mas a maior atividade hemaglutinante específica foi evidenciada na fração globulínica; já nas frações glutelinas ácidas e albuminas, esta atividade é maior quando se utilizam hemácias de coelho previamente tratadas com tripsina e papaína, respectivamente. Assim, por apresentarem alto valor energético, as sementes de Bauhinia variegata são uma possível fonte opcional na alimentação.Seeds of Bauhinia variegata were submitted to biochemical characterization through elementary analysis, protein fractioning and hemaglutinanting activity. The elementary analysis of seed showed high protein and lipid contents, with 29.41 and 14.89%, respectively. The linolenic acid was found in the lipidic constitution of the seeds and the mineral composition remained with in acceptable levels for the human consumption. The specific hemaglutinanting activity from different fractions of proteins (albumin, globulin, prolamin, glutelin acid and alkaline demonstrated hemaglutinanting activity against native and enzyme treated rabbit erythrocytes. However, the fraction globulins showed the largest specific hemaglutinanting activity. Acid glutelin and albumin had a larger specific hemaglutinanting activity against tripisin-treated and papain-treated rabbit erythrocytes, respectively. Thus, for

  6. Acaricidal activity of extracts from the leaves and aerial parts of Neoglaziovia variegata (Bromeliaceae) on the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, A C S; Machado, D M R; Araujo, A C; Oliveira-Junior, R G; Lima-Saraiva, S R G; Ribeiro, L A A; Almeida, J R G S; Horta, M C

    2015-06-01

    This experiment was carried out to study the bioacaricidal activity of Neoglaziovia variegata against engorged females of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The mortality and fecundity of groups of engorged adult females exposed to different concentrations of ethanol, hexane, chloroform, and ethyl acetate extracts obtained from the leaves and aerial parts of N. variegata were evaluated, using three treatments with concentrations of 5, 10 e 25 mg/ml; two controls (distilled water and distilled water with drops of cremophor); with three replicates. The hexane extract of the leaves demonstrated significant results, presenting 94.1% inhibition of oviposition; 0.33% the average percentage of eclosion of eggs; and 99.8% of effectiveness. These results indicate N. variegata, particularly the hexane extract of leaves, as potential alternative control agents of R. (B.) microplus. Pharmacological and chemical studies are continuing in order to characterize the mechanism responsible for this effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Trajectories of reproductive effort in Coleomegilla maculata and Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) respond to variation in both income and capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, German; Michaud, J P; Nechols, James R

    2013-04-01

    Lady beetles such as Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer and Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville have been categorized as income breeders because egg maturation depends on resources available during reproduction. However, capital resources acquired during larval feeding influence reproductive success via effects on adult body size and other traits. We produced three sizes of beetles by varying larval access to food and subjected mated females to alternating periods of food surplus and deficit. Both species exhibited temporal variation in clutch size that reflected changes in income, the amplitude of fluctuations being greater in H. convergens. Egg mass in C. maculata appeared to increase as a fixed function of oviposition sequence but also was affected by maternal body size, whereas H. convergens egg mass fluctuated more in response to food supply. Fertility was largely unaffected by income fluctuation but appeared constrained by capital, especially in H. convergens. Dynamic changes in reproductive effort (daily mass of eggs/female mass at emergence) mirrored changes in clutch size, the amplitude of fluctuations being greater in H. convergens, the species with higher reproductive effort. Generally, large females compensated for income fluctuations better than small females, likely because of their greater capital and possibly an ability to consume larger meals when food was available. The greater sensitivity to income observed in H. convergens likely reflects a higher degree of aphid-specificity compared with the more generalist C. maculata because effective exploitation of ephemeral aphid outbreaks would favor rapid reproductive responses to changes in food supply.

  8. Heterophylly in the yellow waterlily, Nuphar variegata (Nymphaeaceae): effects of [CO2], natural sediment type, and water depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, J E; Gary Sullivan, P

    2001-08-01

    We transplanted Nuphar variegata with submersed leaves only into natural lake sediments in pH-, [CO(2)]-, depth-, and temperature-controlled greenhouse tanks to test the hypotheses that more fertile sediment, lower free [CO(2)], and shallower depth would all stimulate the development of floating leaves. Sediment higher in porewater [NH(4)(+)] favored floating leaf development. Low CO(2)-grown plants initiated floating leaf development significantly earlier than high CO(2)-grown plants, which produced significantly more submersed leaves and fewer floating leaves. Mean floating leaf biomass was significantly greater than mean submersed leaf biomass but was not influenced by CO(2) enrichment, whereas mean submersed leaf biomass increased 88% at high [CO(2)]. At the shallower depth (35 cm), floating leaves required 50% less biomass investment per leaf than at 70 cm, and a significantly greater proportion of plants had floating leaves (70 vs. 23-43% at 35 vs. 70 cm, respectively) for the last three of the eight leaf censuses. Sediment type, water depth, and especially free [CO(2)] all can influence leaf morphogenesis in Nuphar variegata, and the development of more and larger submersed leaves with CO(2) enrichment favors the exploitation of high [CO(2)] when it is present in the water column.

  9. Comparative evaluation of Bacillus licheniformis 5A5 and Aloe variegata milk-clotting enzymes

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    S. A. Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The properties of a milk clotting enzyme (MCE produced by bacteria (Bacillus licheniformis 5A5 were investigated and compared to those of rennet extracted from a plant (Aloe variegata. Production of MCE by B. licheniformis 5A5 was better in static than in shaken cultures. Maximum activity (98.3 and 160.3 U/ml of clotting was obtained at 75ºC and 80ºC with bacterial and plant rennet, respectively. In the absence of substrate, the clotting activity of Aloe MCE was found to be less sensitive to heat inactivation up to 80ºC for 75 min, retaining 63.8% of its activity, while bacterial MCE was completely inhibited. CaCl2 stimulated milk clotting activity (MCA up to 2% and 1.5% for bacterial and plant enzymes. NaCl inhibited MCA for both enzymes, even at low concentration (1%. Plant MCE was more sensitive to NaCl at 3% concentration it retained 30.2% of its activity, whereas bacterial MCE retained 64.1%. Increasing skim milk concentration caused a significant increase in MCA up to 6% for both enzymes. Mn2+ stimulated the activity of bacterial and plant enzymes to 158.6 and 177.9%, respectively. EDTA and PMSF increased the activity of plant MCE by 34.4 and 41.1%, respectively, which is higher than those for the bacterial MCE (19.1 and 20.9%. Some natural materials activated MCE, the highest activation of bacterial MCE (128.1% was obtained in the presence of Fenugreek (with acid extraction. However Lupine Giza 1 (with neutral extraction gave the highest activation of plant MCE (137.9%. All extracts from Neem plant increased MCA at range from 105.6% to 136.4%. Plant MCE exhibited much better stability when stored at room temperature (25-30ºC for 30 days, retaining 51.2% of its activity. Bacterial MCE was highly stabile when stored under freezing (-18ºC, retaining 100% of its activity after 30 days. Moreover, bacterial MCE was highly tolerant to repeated freezing and thawing without loss of activity for 8 months.

  10. Splenocyte proliferation, NK cell activation and cytokines production by extract of Scrophularia variegata; an in vitro study on mice spleen cells

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    A. Azadmehr

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives:Scrophularia variegata M. Beib. (Scrophulariaceae is a medicinal plant, used for various inflammatory diseases in Iranian Traditional Medicine. In the present study, we evaluated the immune modulation and antioxidant effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of S.  variegata. Methods: The splenocytes were harvested from the spleen of Balb/c mice and were cultured. The splenocyte proliferation, NK cell activity, cytokines production and antioxidant effects were evaluated by MTT assay, enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and DPPH assay, respectively. Results: The S. variegata extract significantly increased splenocyte proliferation. The results indicated that the extract increased NK cell cytotoxicity of Yac-1 tumor cells and at the concentration of 50-200 µg/mL significantly increased IFN-γ and IL-2 cytokines, although the level of IL-4 cytokine was significantly reduced. The antioxidant activity was observed in the extract with IC50 302.34±0.11 μg/mL.Conclusion: The increasing in the splenocyte proliferation, anti-tumor NK cell cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion were indicated as potent immunomodulatory effects. These results suggest that S. variegata could be considered in the treatment of immunopathological disorders such as allergy and cancer; however, future studies are necessary.

  11. Aqueous Extracts of the Marine Brown Alga Lobophora variegata Inhibit HIV-1 Infection at the Level of Virus Entry into Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kremb, Stephan

    2014-08-21

    In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs). Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

  12. Aqueous extracts of the marine brown alga Lobophora variegata inhibit HIV-1 infection at the level of virus entry into cells.

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    Stephan Kremb

    Full Text Available In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs. Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors.

  13. Egg Cannibalism and its Life History Consequences Vary with Life Stage, Sex, and Reproductive Status in Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoumy, Mohamed H; Michaud, J P

    2015-08-01

    Egg cannibalism is common in Coccinellidae, but its biological consequences have not been fully explored. We examined egg cannibalism by neonates, fourth instars, and adults of Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville for effects on development, reproduction, and progeny fitness. We also tested female adults for ability to avoid cannibalizing their own eggs and first-instar larvae, and both sexes for changes in cannibalism propensity following mating, all in the presence of ad libitum food [larvae: eggs of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), adults: Schizaphis graminum (Rondani)]. Cannibalism by neonates reduced developmental time and increased male body size. Cannibalism in the fourth instar accelerated pupation and led to the production of eggs that hatched faster, regardless of which parent cannibalized. However, egg fertility was improved only by maternal cannibalism in the fourth instar. Females recognized their own egg clusters, sometimes added eggs to them, and preferentially cannibalized nonfilial clusters. Most gravid females cannibalized a first-instar larva within 30 min, whether filial or not. Adult egg cannibalism was similar for virgin males and females, but declined after mating in males, and increased in females, although it had no effect on fecundity or fertility. Daughters of cannibal pairs were heavier than those of other mating combinations, but offspring of noncannibal parents had the fastest development. Reproductive females appeared to use egg cannibalism to reduce risk for their own eggs, increasing the number cannibalized with the number laid. Thus, egg cannibalism in coccinellids varies with life stage, sex, and reproductive condition, independent of food availability, and benefits are life stage specific. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Determinants of acute mortality of Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) to ultra-low volume permethrin used for mosquito management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robert K D; Preftakes, Collin J; Bodin, Jennifer L; Brown, Christopher R; Piccolomini, Alyssa M; Schleier, Jerome J

    2016-01-01

    There are relatively few experimental studies and risk assessments of the effects on non-target insects from ultra-low volume (ULV) insecticides used for management of adult mosquitoes. Therefore, we evaluated factors that may influence the ability of an insect to intercept the insecticide at the time of application by using Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in field bioassay experiments in 2011 and 2015. Treatment factors included different distances, two cage heights (ground-level and 1.5 m above ground) to the point of the application, and covered vs. uncovered cage faces (2015 only). Insecticides used included a water-based formulation (Aqua-Reslin®) and an oil-based formulation (Permanone® 30-30) of permethrin. Cage height was highly significant both years, with much less acute (i.e., short-term exposure) mortality at ground-level compared with 1.5 m. In 2011, acute mortality was less at ground-level (mean = 3.2%, median = 0%) compared to 1.5 m (mean = 85.2%, median = 100%). Cage type also was highly significant, with less mortality in covered cages compared to uncovered cages. Mortality by cage height and cage type was as follows: ground level, covered cage (mean = 2.8%, median = 0.1%); ground level, uncovered cage (mean = 41.9%, median = 9.6%); 1.5 m, covered cage (mean = 6.8%, median = 0%); 1.5 m, uncovered cage (mean = 83.7%, median = 100%). Results suggest that acute mortality to non-target insects may vary considerably based on their height and their ability to directly intercept the insecticide as the aerosol passes through the area being sprayed.

  15. Differences in Flight Activity of Coleomegilla maculata and Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Following Emergence, Mating, and Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed H; Michaud, J P; Bayoumy, Mohamed H; Awadalla, Samir S; El-Gendy, Mohamed

    2017-12-08

    The flight activity of Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer and Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was examined by observing tethered beetles in the laboratory. C. maculata were fed eggs of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller, as were larval H. convergens, whereas adult H. convergens were fed Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner) to induce egg maturation; adults of both species received water and diluted honey. A spot of magnetic paint was applied to one elytrum of each beetle, which then adhered to a small neodymium magnet attached to a thread. Beetles were permitted 1 h flight opportunities daily for 3-d periods, first as virgins on their fifth day of adult life, secondly after mating, thirdly after females began oviposition, and fourthly after prey were withheld and egg maturation and oviposition ceased. Both species exhibited low flight activity as virgins, and whereas C. maculata females increased their activity after mating, H. convergens females did not. Flight activity in C. maculata did not change with onset of oviposition, whereas it increased in H. convergens males, but not females. In contrast, H. convergens females increased their flight activity after cessation of oviposition, whereas C. maculata females did not. Female flight activity when either virgin or mated correlated weakly with fecundity in C. maculata, but not in H. convergens. Species differences are discussed in the context of nutritional ecology; H. convergens usually enters diapause immediately following emergence, and is more dependent on aphids for reproduction, whereas C. maculata develops and reproduces on a wider range of foods and is not so constrained. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. No detection of chytrid in first systematic screening of Bombina variegata pachypus (Anura: Bombinatoridae in Liguria, northern Italy

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    Stefano Canessa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Apennine Yellow-bellied toad Bombina variegata pachypus, a small anuran endemic to peninsular Italy, has been declining throughout its range over the last 30 years. Although mortality by chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, was first reported for the species in 2004, its role in the decline has not yet been assessed. Between 2011 and 2012 we sampled eight populations of B. v. pachypus in Liguria, northern Italy, swabbing 86 and 143 individuals respectively, corresponding to between 24 and 80% of the estimated individuals within each population. We did not detect chytrid in any the samples collected. For the three largest populations in the region, we can rule out infections of prevalence greater than 10% with at least 98% confidence. Research at a larger scale is urgently needed to clarify the role of B. dendrobatidis in the decline of this and other amphibians in Italy.

  17. The convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville and its endoparasitoid Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank): the effect of a microsporidium on parasitoid development and host preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, T; Bjørnson, S

    2013-05-01

    Convergent lady beetles, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville are host to the braconid endoparasitoid, Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank) and the microsporidian pathogen, Tubulinosema hippodamiae. The interrelationship between the endoparasitoid and the pathogen in H. convergens adults under laboratory conditions was examined by quantifying the effect of microsporidiosis on D. coccinellae development and host preference. Uninfected wasps were provided either uninfected or T. hippodamiae-infected beetles as hosts and the development of their progeny was observed over 30 days. The duration of endoparasitoid development from egg deposition in the host until adult eclosion for D. coccinellae did not differ significantly, regardless of the infection status of the host beetle. All wasp progeny that developed within, and emerged from, T. hippodamiae-infected beetles were infected with the microsporidian pathogen (n = 48; 100% transmission). Infected D. coccinellae adults were also provided either uninfected or T. hippodamiae infected host beetles so that the development of their progeny could be assessed over 30 days. Endoparasitoid development did not differ significantly; however, a significantly greater proportion of beetles stung by microsporidia-infected wasps did not contain an endoparasitoid larva when dissected at the end of the 30-day trial when compared to those stung by uninfected wasps. This suggests that the pathogen may reduce wasp fecundity or egg viability. Examination of paraffin-embedded D. coccinellae adult tissues revealed an extensive microsporidian infection throughout all major organs and tissues with exception of the ovary. During host choice trials, uninfected and microsporidia-infected D. coccinellae adults pursued, took an ovipositional stance, and attacked uninfected beetles more often than microsporidia-infected hosts but these observations did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Species-level view of population structure and gene flow for a critically endangered primate (Varecia variegata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Andrea L; Holmes, Sheila M; Johnson, Steig E; Engberg, Shannon E; Louis, Edward E; Bradley, Brenda J

    2014-01-01

    Lemurs are among the world's most threatened mammals. The critically endangered black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata), in particular, has recently experienced rapid population declines due to habitat loss, ecological sensitivities to habitat degradation, and extensive human hunting pressure. Despite this, a recent study indicates that ruffed lemurs retain among the highest levels of genetic diversity for primates. Identifying how this diversity is apportioned and whether gene flow is maintained among remnant populations will help to diagnose and target conservation priorities. We sampled 209 individuals from 19 sites throughout the remaining V. variegata range. We used 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci and ∼550 bp of mtDNA sequence data to evaluate genetic structure and population dynamics, including dispersal patterns and recent population declines. Bayesian cluster analyses identified two distinct genetic clusters, which optimally partitioned data into populations occurring on either side of the Mangoro River. Localities north of the Mangoro were characterized by greater genetic diversity, greater gene flow (lower genetic differentiation) and higher mtDNA haplotype and nucleotide diversity than those in the south. Despite this, genetic differentiation across all sites was high, as indicated by high average FST (0.247) and ΦST (0.544), and followed a pattern of isolation-by-distance. We use these results to suggest future conservation strategies that include an effort to maintain genetic diversity in the north and restore connectivity in the south. We also note the discordance between patterns of genetic differentiation and current subspecies taxonomy, and encourage a re-evaluation of conservation management units moving forward. PMID:25077019

  19. Taxonomic revision of the Australian arid zone lizards Gehyra variegata and G. montium (Squamata, Gekkonidae) with description of three new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Mark N; Sistrom, Mark J; Donnellan, Stephen C; Hutchinson, Rhonda G

    2014-06-09

    The taxonomy of central Australian populations of geckos of the genus Gehyra has been uncertain since chromosomal studies carried out in the 1970s and 1980s revealed considerable heterogeneity and apparently independent patterns of morphological and karyotypic diversity. Following detailed molecular genetic studies, species boundaries in this complex have become clearer and we here re-set the boundaries of the three named species involved, G. variegata (Duméril & Bibron, 1836), G. montium Storr, 1982, and G. nana King, 1982, and describe three new species. Two of the new species, G. moritzi and G. pulingka, include populations formerly assigned to either G. montium or G. nana Storr, 1982, while the third, G. versicolor, includes all of the eastern Australian populations formerly assigned to G. variegata.

  20. Micropropagation and in vitro conservation of Neoglaziovia variegata (Arr. Cam. mez, a fiber producing bromeliad from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Garcia Silveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Neoglaziovia variegata (Arr. Cam. Mez is a Bromeliaceae native to the Caatinga, used for fiber extraction in the Northeast Region of Brazil. The antropic activity has place this species among the threatened ones. The objective of the work was to establish an in vitro propagation and conservation of caroá. Seeds were cultivated in MS medium in the presence or absence of light. In vitro germinated seedlings were multiplied in MS medium supplemented with the combinations 0.05 and 0.50 µM NAA and 2.2 and 4.4 µM BAP and KIN. The best percentages of germination were obtained with the seeds incubated in the presence of light. The highest multiplication ratio was obtained for the NAA (0,5 µM + BAP (4,4 µM treatment and the number of roots, with NAA (0.5 µM + KIN (2.2 µM. Plant acclimatization presented differentiated results regarding the substrates tested. The conservation was established.Neoglaziovia variegata é uma Bromeliaceae nativa da Caatinga, usada para extração de fibras na Região Nordeste do Brasil. A atividade antrópica coloca esta espécie entre as ameaçadas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estabelecer uma propagação e conservação in vitro de caroá. Foram cultivadas sementes em meio MS na presença ou ausência de luz. Plântulas germinadas in vitro foram multiplicadas em meio MS suplementado com as combinações de 0,05 e 0.50 µM de NAA e 2.2 e 4.4 µM de BAP e KIN. Foram obtidas as melhores porcentagens de germinação com sementes incubadas na presença de luz. A taxa de multiplicação mais alta foi obtida no tratamento NAA (0,5 µM + BAP (4,4 µM e, o número de raízes, com NAA (0.5 µM + KIN (2.2 µM. Aclimatização das plantas apresentou resultados diferenciados em relação aos substratos testados. A conservação foi estabelecida.

  1. Estudios sobre semilla de Hypochaeris variegata L. (Baker: aceite seminal y harina residual de extracción

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolasco, S. M.

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Seeds from Hypochaeris variegata L. (Baker harvested at Olavarría (Buenos Aires, Argentine were defatted with hexane and the raw oil obtained with a yield of 24,7% dry basis. The crude oil was examined in their physicochemical characteristics had refractive index of 1,4637 (at 25ºC, iodine value of 125,2, saponification index of 188,4, unsaponifiable matter of 8,5 % and free fatty acid content of 9,7 (mg KOH/g. Gas chromatographic analysis of the oil revealed high levels of linoleic acid (66,2%, appreciable amount of linolenic and erucic acids. The residual seed meal contained 35,49% of crude protein and 35,1% of crude fiber. Total and phytic acid phosphorous, calcium, ash, sugar and polisaccharides (non presence of starch contents are reported.Semillas de Hypochaeris variegata L. (Baker cosechadas en Olavarría (prov. de Buenos Aires, Argentina se extrajeron con hexano (soxhlet obteniéndose el aceite crudo con un rendimiento del 24,7 % (b.s. y la harina residual de extracción. El aceite crudo se examinó en sus características fisicoquímicas (Indice de refracción: 1.4637 (a 25ºC, Indice de iodo: 125,2, Indice de saponificación: 188,4, insaponificable: 8,5%, Indice de acidez: 9,7 (mgKOH/g y composición acídica. El análisis por cromatografía gaseosa de los ésteres metílicos revela un alto porcentaje de ácido linoleico (66,2%, cantidades apreciables de ácido linolénico y erúcico. La harina residual de extracción presentó un 35,49% b.s. de proteína cruda y 35,1% b.s. de fibra cruda. Se informan valores de fósforo total y de ácido fítico, cenizas, calcio e hidratos de carbono.

  2. Phytochemical Profile of Erythrina variegata by Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriyavathana Muthukrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural products derived from plant sources have been utilized to treat patients with numerous diseases. The phytochemical constituents present in ethanolic leaf extract of Erythrina variegata (ELEV were identified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS analyses. Shade dried leaves were powdered and extracted with ethanol for analyses through HPLC to identify selected flavonoids and through GC-MS to identify other molecules. The HPLC analysis of ELEV showed the presence of gallic and caffeic acids as the major components at concentrations of 2.0 ppm and 0.1 ppm, respectively, as well as other components. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 3-eicosyne; 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol; butanoic acid, 3-methyl-3,7-dimethyl-6-octenyl ester; phytol; 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester; 1-octanol, 2-butyl-; squalene; and 2H-pyran, 2-(7-heptadecynyloxy tetrahydro-derivative. Because pharmacopuncture is a new evolving natural mode that uses herbal extracts for treating patients with various ailments with minimum pain and maximum effect, the results of this study are particularly important and show that ELEV possesses a wide range of phytochemical constituents, as indicated above, as effective active principle molecules that can be used individually or in combination to treat patients with various diseases.

  3. Phytochemical Profile of Erythrina variegata by Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukrishnan, Suriyavathana; Palanisamy, Subha; Subramanian, Senthilkumar; Selvaraj, Sumathi; Mari, Kavitha Rani; Kuppulingam, Ramalingam

    2016-08-01

    Natural products derived from plant sources have been utilized to treat patients with numerous diseases. The phytochemical constituents present in ethanolic leaf extract of Erythrina variegata (ELEV) were identified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analyses. Shade dried leaves were powdered and extracted with ethanol for analyses through HPLC to identify selected flavonoids and through GC-MS to identify other molecules. The HPLC analysis of ELEV showed the presence of gallic and caffeic acids as the major components at concentrations of 2.0 ppm and 0.1 ppm, respectively, as well as other components. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 3-eicosyne; 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol; butanoic acid, 3-methyl-3,7-dimethyl-6-octenyl ester; phytol; 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester; 1-octanol, 2-butyl-; squalene; and 2H-pyran, 2-(7-heptadecynyloxy) tetrahydro-derivative. Because pharmacopuncture is a new evolving natural mode that uses herbal extracts for treating patients with various ailments with minimum pain and maximum effect, the results of this study are particularly important and show that ELEV possesses a wide range of phytochemical constituents, as indicated above, as effective active principle molecules that can be used individually or in combination to treat patients with various diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Survey of Predatory Coccinellids (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in the Chitral District, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inamullah; Din, Sadrud; Khan Khalil, Said; Ather Rafi, Muhammad

    2007-01-01

    An extensive survey of predatory Coccinellid beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was conducted in the Chitral District, Pakistan, over a period of 7 months (April through October, 2001). A total of 2600 specimens of Coccinellids were collected from 12 different localities having altitudes from 1219.40–2651.63 m. Twelve different species belonging to 9 genera of 3 tribes and 2 sub-families were recorded. Two sub-families, viz, Coccinellinae Latreille, 1807 and Chilocorinae Mulsant, 1846 were identified. The following 8 species belonged to family Coccinellinae Latreille 1807 and tribe Coccinellini Latreille 1807: Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus, 1758, Hippodamia (Adonia) variegata Goeze, 1777, Calvia punctata (Mulsant, 1846), Adalia bipunctata (Linnaeus, 1758),Adalia tetraspilota (Hope, 1831), Aiolocaria hexaspilota Hope 1851, Macroilleis (Halyzia) hauseri Mader, 1930,Oenopia conglobata Linnaeus, 1758. Only one species namely Halyzia tschitscherini Semenov, 1965 represented tribe Psylloborini of the sub-family Coccinellinae Latreille, 1807. Three species occurred from sub-family Chilocorinae Mulsant 1846 and tribe Chilocorini Mulsant 1846: Chilocorus rubidus Hope, 1831, Chilocorus circumdatus (Gyllenhal, 1808), Priscibrumus uropygialis (Mulsant, 1853). From the aforementioned species 6 were recorded for the first time from Pakistan: Chilocorus circumdatus, Calvia punctata, Adalia bipunctata, Macroilleis (Halyzia) hauseri, Priscibrumus uropygialis, and Oenopia conglobata. PMID:20334592

  5. Allelopathy in the tropical alga Lobophora variegata (Phaeophyceae): mechanistic basis for a phase shift on mesophotic coral reefs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Marc; Lesser, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    Macroalgal phase shifts on Caribbean reefs have been reported with increasing frequency, and recent reports of these changes on mesophotic coral reefs have raised questions regarding the mechanistic processes behind algal population expansions to deeper depths. The brown alga Lobophora variegata is a dominant species on many shallow and deep coral reefs of the Caribbean and Pacific, and it increased in percent cover (>50%) up to 61 m on Bahamian reefs following the invasion of the lionfish Pterois volitans. We examined the physiological and ecological constraints contributing to the spread of Lobophora on Bahamian reefs across a mesophotic depth gradient from 30 to 61 m, pre- and post-lionfish invasion. Results indicate that there were no physiological limitations to the depth distribution of Lobophora within this range prior to the lionfish invasion. Herbivory by acanthurids and scarids in algal recruitment plots at mesophotic depths was higher prior to the lionfish invasion, and Lobophora chemical defenses were ineffective against an omnivorous fish species. In contrast, Lobophora exhibited significant allelopathic activity against the coral Montastraea cavernosa and the sponge Agelas clathrodes in laboratory assays. These data indicate that when lionfish predation on herbivorous fish released Lobophora from grazing pressure at depth, Lobophora expanded its benthic cover to a depth of 61 m, where it replaced the dominant coral and sponge species. Our results suggest that this chemically defended alga may out-compete these species in situ, and that mesophotic reefs may be further impacted in the near future as Lobophora continues to expand to its compensation point. © 2013 Phycological Society of America.

  6. Predators and Parasitoids of Cacopsylla pyri (L. (Hemiptera: Psyllidae in Serbia

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    Dušanka Jerinić Prodanović

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of C. pyri and its natural enemies was studied in both treated and untreated pear orchards in Serbia from 2005 to 2009. Five parasitoid and 21 predator species were identified as present on a considerable number of sites. The following parasitoid species were found: Prionomitus mitratus (Dalman,Psyllaephagus procerus Marcet,Syrphophagus ariantes (Walker,Syrphophagus taeniatus Förster and Tamarixia sp. In the study, the species Psyllaephagus procerus,Syrphophagus ariantes and Tamarixia sp. were forthe first time identified as parasitoids of C. pyri and as new species in the Serbian fauna.Among the parasitoids determined, Prionomitus mitratus predominated. Of the predators, the following species in four orders were registered: Dermaptera [Forficula auricularia Linnaeus (Forficulidae], Heteroptera [Anthocoris nemoralis(Fabricius, Anthocoris nemorum (Linnaeus, Orius (Heterorius minutus (Linnaeus, Orius (Heterorius nigerWolff (Anthocoridae, Campylomma verbasci (Mayer-Dür, Deraeocoris (Deraeocorisruber(Linnaeusand Deraeocoris(Knightocarsuslutescens (Schilling(Miridae],Neuroptera[Chrysopa pallens Rambur,Chrysoperla carnea(Stephens,Chrysopa sp.(Chrysopidae], and Coleoptera [Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus, Adalia bipunctata Linnaeus, Adalia decempunctata(Linnaeus, Hippodamia tredecimpunctata (Linnaeus,Hippodamia variegata(Goeze,Propylea quatuordecimpunctata (Linnaeus, Calvia (Anisocalvia quatuordecimguttata(Linnaeus(Coccinellidae, Cantharis rustica Fallén, Rhagonycha fulva (Scopoli and Rh. testacea(Linnaeus (Cantharidae]. Of the predators determined, 12 species were registered for the first time as predators of C. pyri in Serbia, while C. rustica, Rhagonycha fulva and Rh.testacea have so far been known neither in Serbia nor in the world as predators of pear suckers.

  7. Seasonal variation of leaf ecophysiological traits of Iris variegata observed in two consecutive years in natural habitats with contrasting light conditions

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    Živković Uroš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount and pattern of individual phenotypic responses to seasonal changes in environmental conditions were determined in clones of Iris variegata growing in differing light habitats. For the purpose of the study, 97 clonal plants of the rhizomatous herb I. variegata that experienced different light conditions in their two native habitats were selected: one along the top and slope of sand dunes and one in woodland understories. Two fully expanded leaves that had developed during spring, summer and fall in two consecutive years were sampled from each of these clones. Six leaf traits affecting the photosynthetic rate of a plant − morphological (specific leaf area, anatomical (stomatal density and physiological (total chlorophyll concentration, chlorophyll a/chlorophyll b ratio, carotenoid concentration, chlorophyll a/carotenoid ratio exhibited significant plastic responses in the two different light habitats. To test whether these traits differ between exposed and shaded habitats as well as during different vegetation periods, we used the repeated model analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results of the repeated ANOVA revealed statistically significant effects of year, habitat and period of vegetation season. Patterns of changes during growing seasons were year-specific for almost all analyzed traits. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 173025: Evolution in heterogeneous environments: mechanisms of adaptation, biomonitoring and conservation of biodiversity

  8. SENYAWA AKTIF ANTIKANKER PAYUDARA DAN ANTIMALARIA DARI TUMBUHAN DADAP AYAM (ERHYTHRINA VALERIEGATA SECARA IN VITRO (Anti Breast-cancer and anti-malarial Active Compounds of Erithrina Variegata by in Vitro Test

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    Tati Herlina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Tumbuhan Erythrina variegata (Leguminosae secara tradisional dikenal oleh masyarakat Indonesia sebagai obat antikanker dan antimalaria. Bagian tumbuhan ini yang biasa digunakan sebagai bahan pengobatan adalah daun dan kulit batang, tapi kandungan senyawa kimia aktif biologisnya belum banyak dilaporkan. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengungkapkan senyawa aktif antikanker dan antimalaria secara in vitro yang terdapat di dalam daun dan kulit batang E. variegata. Penelitian dilakukan dengan cara ekstraksi metanol dan fraksionasi dari daun dan kulit batang E. variegata yang dipandu dengan uji antikanker secara in vitro terhadap sel kanker payudara T47D menggunakan metode Sulforodamin B (SRB dan uji antimalaria secara in vitro terhadap Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 (sensitif klorokuin dan K1 (resisten klorokuin menggunakan metode laktatdehidrogenase (LDH. Selanjutnya dilakukan pemisahan fraksi etil asetat daun dan kulit batang E. variegata yang dipantau dengan uji antikanker dan antimalaria secara in vitro menggunakan kombinasi kolom kromatografi diperoleh tiga senyawa aktif (1, 2, dan 3. Struktur kimia senyawa aktif (1, 2, dan 3 ditetapkan berdasarkan data-data spektroskopi dan diidentifikasikan sebagai turunan triterpenoid pentasiklik glikosida(1; flavonoid, eristagallin A (2; dan steroid, (22E-5α,8α-epidioksiergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol (3. Senyawa (1 menunjukkan aktivitas antimalaria secara in vitro terhadap P. falciparum strain 3D7 (sensitif klorokuin dengan IC50 1,8 µg/mL dan terhadap strain K1 (resisten klorokuin dengan IC50 3,3 µg/mL. Senyawa (2 dan (3 menunjukkan aktivitas antikanker secara in vitro terhadap sel kanker payurada T47D dengan IC50 masing-masing 3,0 dan 3,2 µg/mL. Tumbuhan E. variegata mempunyai potensi sebagai bahan dasar obat herbal antikanker payudara dan antimalaria. ABSTRACT Erythrina variegata (Leguminosae plant used traditionaly as plant of  anti-cancer and anti-malarial in Indonesia. The leaves and stem bark of

  9. Comparative biology of Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763 and Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae focusing on the control of Cinara spp. (Hemiptera, Aphididae

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    Josiane Teresinha Cardoso

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The giant conifer aphids Cinara pinivora (Wilson, 1919 and Cinara atlantica (Wilson, 1919 (Hemiptera, Aphididae have been observed attacking Pinus spp. in Southern and Southeastern Brazil. The coccinellids, on the other hand, were found feeding on these aphids in the field, which can be regarded as potential biological control agents. The biological cycle and mortality rate of larvae of Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763 and Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae were evaluated using twenty larvae of each predator species fed with nymphs of Cinara. The vials with the insects were kept under 15 ºC, 20 ºC and 25 ºC, with 12h photophase and 70 ± 10% relative humidity. The consumption was evaluated every 24 hours and the nymphs replaced. For C. sanguinea, the egg incubation time was 10.5, 5.0 and 4.0 days; the average larval development period was 33.3, 15.8 and 8.6 days and the larval mortality rate 20%,0% and 15%, respectively at 15 ºC, 20 ºC and 25 ºC. For H. convergens, the larval development time was 41.9, 19.3 and 10.9 days at 15 ºC, 20 ºC and 25 ºC, respectively. The larval mortality rate was 35%, 15% and 0% under the three temperatures. Both species developed adequately when fed nymphs of Cinara, however, C. sanguinea performed better than H. convergens, even at 15 ºC, at which temperature the biological cycles of the coccinellids are prolonged, but the temperature is favorable for the development of Cinara populations in the field.

  10. Relative Toxicity of Two Aphicides to Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): Implications for Integrated Management of Sugarcane Aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colares, Felipe; Michaud, J P; Bain, Clint L; Torres, Jorge B

    2017-02-01

    Flupyradifurone and sulfoxaflor present novel insecticide chemistries with particular efficacy against aphids, and the recent emergence of sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), as a pest of sorghum in the United States has resulted in their widespread use. We examined their toxicity to Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, an important aphid biocontrol agent. We exposed beetles to topical applications of the field rate (FR) of these insecticides, fed them contaminated food (eggs of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller), and gave first-instar larvae 24-h exposures to leaf residues. More than half of fourth-instar larvae receiving topical applications of sulfoxaflor at FR survived, whereas flupyradifurone at 0.1× FR caused 90% mortality. Adults survived topical treatments better than larvae and without measurable mortality, except flupyradifurone at FR, which killed more than 80% of beetles. Survivors of all treatments had fertility similar to controls, whether treated as larvae or adults. Ingestion of contaminated food caused significant mortality in all treatments (15-40% for adults and 55-85% for larvae), with no significant differences between insecticides at FR. Leaf residues of sulfoxaflor at 1.0 and 2.0× FR caused approximately 60 and 80% mortality of first instars, respectively, whereas flupyradifurone at 0.1 and 1.0× FR caused > 90% mortality. Although sulfoxaflor was less toxic to H. convergens than flupyradifurone, the tested FR of flupyradifurone has now been reduced by half. We conclude that neither insecticide appears as toxic as other nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists, and that both materials are compatible with integrated pest management programs for M. sacchari. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Preference and Performance of Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) on Brevicoryne brassicae, Lipaphis erysimi, and Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) from Winter-Adapted Canola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessie, W P; Giles, K L; Rebek, E J; Payton, M E; Jessie, C N; McCornack, B P

    2015-06-01

    In the southern plains of the United States, winter-adapted canola (Brassica napus L.) is a recently introduced annual oilseed crop that has rapidly increased in hectares during the past 10 yr. Winter canola fields are infested annually with populations of Brevicoryne brassicae (L.) and Lipaphis erysimi (Kaltenbach), and these Brassica specialists are known to sequester plant volatiles from host plants, producing a chemical defense system against predators. Myzus persicae (Sulzer) is also common in winter canola fields, but as a generalist herbivore, does not sequester plant compounds. These three aphid species are expected to affect predator survival and development in very different ways. We conducted laboratory studies to 1) determine whether Hippodamia convergens (Guérin-Méneville) and Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) larvae demonstrate feeding preferences among winter canola aphids and 2) describe the suitability of these prey species. Predators demonstrated no significant preference among prey, and each aphid species was suitable for predator survival to the adult stage. However, prey species significantly affected development times and adult weights of each predator species. Overall, predator development was delayed and surviving adults weighed less when provided with L. erysimi or B. brassicae, which sequestered high levels of indole glucosinolates from their host plants. Our results indicate that although common winter canola aphids were suitable prey for H. convergens and C. carnea, qualitative differences in nutritional suitability exist between Brassica-specialist aphids and the generalist M. persicae. These differences appear to be influenced by levels of sequestered plant compounds that are toxic to aphid predators. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A Comprehensive Selection of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Analysis in a Predatory Lady Beetle, Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huipeng; Yang, Xiaowei; Siegfried, Blair D; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a reliable, rapid, and reproducible technique for measuring and evaluating changes in gene expression. To facilitate gene expression studies and obtain more accurate RT-qPCR data, normalization relative to stable reference genes is required. In this study, expression profiles of seven candidate reference genes, including β-actin (Actin), elongation factor 1 α (EF1A), glyceralde hyde-3-phosphate dehydro-genase (GAPDH), cyclophilins A (CypA), vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (ATPase), 28S ribosomal RNA (28S), and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S) from Hippodamia convergens were investigated. H. convergens is an abundant predatory species in the New World, and has been widely used as a biological control agent against sap-sucking insect pests, primarily aphids. A total of four analytical methods, geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and the ΔCt method, were employed to evaluate the performance of these seven genes as endogenous controls under diverse experimental conditions. Additionally, RefFinder, a comprehensive evaluation platform integrating the four above mentioned algorithms, ranked the overall stability of these candidate genes. A suite of reference genes were specifically recommended for each experimental condition. Among them, 28S, EF1A, and CypA were the best reference genes across different development stages; GAPDH, 28S, and CypA were most stable in different tissues. GAPDH and CypA were most stable in female and male adults and photoperiod conditions, 28S and EF1A were most stable under a range of temperatures, Actin and CypA were most stable under dietary RNAi condition. This work establishes a standardized RT-qPCR analysis in H. convergens. Additionally, this study lays a foundation for functional genomics research in H. convergens and sheds light on the ecological risk assessment of RNAi-based biopesticides on this non-target biological control agent.

  13. Effects of a microsporidium from the convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), on three non-target coccinellids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, T; Bjørnson, S

    2008-11-01

    A microsporidium from Hippodamia convergens was transmitted horizontally to three non-target coccinellid hosts (Adalia bipunctata L., Coccinella septempunctata L. and Harmonia axyridis Pallas) under laboratory conditions. For all species examined, microsporidia-infected larvae took significantly longer to develop than did uninfected larvae but the microsporidium had no effect on larval mortality. Adult sex ratios of uninfected and microsporidia-infected adults were about 1:1 (female symbol:male symbol) and did not differ significantly. At the end of a 90-day trial, microsporidia-infected H. convergens produced significantly fewer eggs and did not live as long as uninfected individuals. Differences in fecundity and longevity were not observed for the three non-target coccinellids that were examined. Mean spore counts from smear preparations of microsporidia-infected A. bipunctata did not differ significantly from H. convergens, suggesting that A. bipunctata (a native coccinellid) is a suitable host for the microsporidium but infection was lighter in C. septempunctata and H. axyridis (introduced species). Vertical transmission of the pathogen was observed during the 90-day trial by examining eggs and larvae that were produced by microsporidia-infected adults. For all species examined, 100% vertical transmission of the pathogen was eventually observed. Three eugregarines were found in two adult A. bipunctata: Gregarine A trophozoites are similar in size to those of Gregarina katherina Watson (described earlier from Coccinella spp.), Gregarine B trophozoites are similar in size to those of Gregarine A but are morphology distinct, and Gregarine C trophozoites are similar in size to G. barbarara Watson (described earlier from A. bipunctata).

  14. Antiphytoviral Activity of Satureja montana L. ssp. variegata (Host P. W. Ball Essential Oil and Phenol Compounds on CMV and TMV

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    Dubravka Cukrov

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Satureja montana L. ssp. variegata (Host P. W. Ball (Lamiaceae was characterized by a high concentration of oxygenated monoterpenes (71.3%, among which carvacrol (19.4% and thymol (16.6% were the major compounds. When the essential oil was applied on local hosts Chenopodium amaranticolor Coste & Reyn. and Chenopodium quinoa Willd. simultaneously with the infecting virus, the number of local lesions on both Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV infected plants was reduced for 29.2% and 24.1%, respectively. When applied individually for each virus, thymol was more effective in reducing CMV infection (33.2%, while carvacrol was more effective in reducing the TMV infection (34.3%. No synergistic effect of both monoterpenes was observed in the antiviral activity of the oil.

  15. Peptide IC-20, encoded by skin kininogen-1 of the European yellow-bellied toad, Bombina variegata, antagonizes bradykinin-induced arterial smooth muscle relaxation

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    Mu Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives were to determine if the skin secretion of the European yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata, in common with other related species, contains a bradykinin inhibitor peptide and to isolate and structurally characterize this peptide. Materials and Methods: Lyophilized skin secretion obtained from this toad was subjected to reverse phase HPLC fractionation with subsequent bioassay of fractions for antagonism of the bradykinin activity using an isolated rat tail artery smooth muscle preparation. Subsequently, the primary structure of the peptide was established by a combination of microsequencing, mass spectroscopy, and molecular cloning, following which a synthetic replicate was chemically synthesised for bioassay. Results: A single peptide of molecular mass 2300.92 Da was resolved in HPLC fractions of skin secretion and its primary structure determined as IYNAIWP-KH-NK-KPGLL-. Database interrogation with this sequence indicated that this peptide was encoded by skin kininogen-1 previously cloned from B. variegata. The blank cycles were occupied by cysteinyl (C residues and the peptide was located toward the C-terminus of the skin kininogen, and flanked N-terminally by a classical -KR- propeptide convertase processing site. The peptide was named IC-20 in accordance (I = N-terminal isoleucine, C = C-terminal cysteine, 20 = number of residues. Like the natural peptide, its synthetic replicate displayed an antagonism of bradykinin-induced arterial smooth muscle relaxation. Conclusion: IC-20 represents a novel bradykinin antagonizing peptide from amphibian skin secretions and is the third such peptide found to be co-encoded with bradykinins within skin kininogens.

  16. The Effect of Different Concentrations of IBA, Type of Plant Rootstock and Timeing of Cuttings on Propagation of Ficus benjamina CV. Variegata by Cutting - Graft

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    H. Babaei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of different concentrations of IBA, timing of cuttings and type of plant rootstock in cutting-graft propagation (Omega graft of Ficus benjamin cv. variegate, an experiment was performed as a factorial in a completely randomized design with three replications in Gorgan University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources in 2012. Each replication consisted of ten samples. Treatments were consisted of IBA concentration in four levels, 0 (control, 2000, 4000 and 6000 mg/l, two types of rootstock (Ficus benjamina cv. exotica and Ficus amstel and two timing of cuttings (late June and early September. Percentage of graft success, rooting percentage, average root length, root number, root dry weight and survival percentage were evaluated. The results of this experiment showed that the highest percentage of rooting and number of roots obtained in hormone concentrations of 4000 and 6000 mg/l. The maximum of mean root length and root dry weight were obtained at hormone concentration of 4000 mg/l. The greatest percentages of graft success and survival were obtained in all the treatments that the auxin was applied. Most suitable of rootstock in terms of all traits studied, was Ficus benjamina cv.exotica. Best time of rooting, root characteristics and survival percentage were achieved with the cuttings in September. The highest percentage of graft success was achieved in July. The results indicate the beneficial effects of suitable concentration of auxin, timing of cuttings and type of plant rootstock in propagation of Ficus benjamina cv. variegata by bench grafting.

  17. Identification of plant families associated with the predators Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Menéville (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae) using pollen grain as a natural marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, M A; Ribeiro, P A; Morais, H C; Castelo Branco, M; Sujii, E R; Salgado-Laboriau, M L

    2010-05-01

    The predators Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Menéville (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae) and Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), are frequently observed on vegetable crops, especially on tomato plants, as well as on flowers of several plants around crop fields. It is well known that when predators feed on pollen and nectar they can increase their longevity and reproductive capacity. The objective of this work was to identify plants that could be a pollen source for H. convergens and C. externa in order to develop strategies to attract and keep these predators in vegetable fields like the tomato crop. Adults of C. externa (53 individuals) and H. convergens (43 individuals) were collected in fields from 2004-2005 at Embrapa Hortaliças, Brasília, Federal District. The insects were processed by the acetolysis method and pollen from them was extracted and identified. A total of 11335 grains of pollen belonging to 21 families were extracted from C. externa. A total of 46 pollen grains belonging to ten families were extracted from H. convergens. The Poaceae family was the most abundant one for C. externa while Asteraceae was the commonest pollen for H. convergens. The importance of pollen from different plant species as a food resource for each predator species gives an indication of the importance of plant community structure inside and around crop fields for the establishment of these predator populations and to enhance conservation biological control.

  18. Identification of plant families associated with the predators Chrysoperla externa (Hagen (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae and Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Menéville (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae using pollen grain as a natural marker Identificação de famílias de plantas associadas aos predadores Chrysoperla externa (Hagen (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae e Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Menéville (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae usando o pólen como marcador natural

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    MA Medeiros

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The predators Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Menéville (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae and Chrysoperla externa (Hagen (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae, are frequently observed on vegetable crops, especially on tomato plants, as well as on flowers of several plants around crop fields. It is well known that when predators feed on pollen and nectar they can increase their longevity and reproductive capacity. The objective of this work was to identify plants that could be a pollen source for H. convergens and C. externa in order to develop strategies to attract and keep these predators in vegetable fields like the tomato crop. Adults of C. externa (53 individuals and H. convergens (43 individuals were collected in fields from 2004-2005 at Embrapa Hortaliças, Brasília, Federal District. The insects were processed by the acetolysis method and pollen from them was extracted and identified. A total of 11335 grains of pollen belonging to 21 families were extracted from C. externa. A total of 46 pollen grains belonging to ten families were extracted from H. convergens. The Poaceae family was the most abundant one for C. externa while Asteraceae was the commonest pollen for H. convergens. The importance of pollen from different plant species as a food resource for each predator species gives an indication of the importance of plant community structure inside and around crop fields for the establishment of these predator populations and to enhance conservation biological control.Os predadores Chrysoperla externa (Hagen (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae e Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Menéville (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae são frequentemente observados em cultivos de hortaliças, especialmente tomateiros, bem como sobre flores de diversas plantas próximas aos cultivos. Sabe-se que os predadores, quando se alimentam de pólen e néctar, aumentam a sua longevidade e a sua capacidade reprodutiva. O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar as plantas que poderiam servir de fonte de p

  19. Soil-applied imidacloprid translocates to ornamental flowers and reduces survival of adult Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens lady beetles, and larval Danaus plexippus and Vanessa cardui butterflies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Krischik

    Full Text Available Integrated Pest Management (IPM is a decision making process used to manage pests that relies on many tactics, including cultural and biological control, which are practices that conserve beneficial insects and mites, and when needed, the use of conventional insecticides. However, systemic, soil-applied neonicotinoid insecticides are translocated to pollen and nectar of flowers, often for months, and may reduce survival of flower-feeding beneficial insects. Imidacloprid seed-treated crops (0.05 mg AI (active ingredient /canola seed and 1.2 mg AI/corn seed translocate less than 10 ppb to pollen and nectar. However, higher rates of soil-applied imidacloprid are used in nurseries and urban landscapes, such as 300 mg AI/10 L (3 gallon pot and 69 g AI applied to the soil under a 61 (24 in cm diam. tree. Translocation of imidacloprid from soil (300 mg AI to flowers of Asclepias curassavica resulted in 6,030 ppb in 1X and 10,400 ppb in 2X treatments, which are similar to imidacloprid residues found in another plant species we studied. A second imidacloprid soil application 7 months later resulted in 21,000 ppb in 1X and 45,000 ppb in 2X treatments. Consequently, greenhouse/nursery use of imidacloprid applied to flowering plants can result in 793 to 1,368 times higher concentration compared to an imidacloprid seed treatment (7.6 ppb pollen in seed- treated canola, where most research has focused. These higher imidacloprid levels caused significant mortality in both 1X and 2X treatments in 3 lady beetle species, Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens, but not a fourth species, Coccinella septempunctata. Adult survival were not reduced for monarch, Danaus plexippus and painted lady, Vanessa cardui, butterflies, but larval survival was significantly reduced. The use of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid at greenhouse/nursery rates reduced survival of beneficial insects feeding on pollen and nectar and is incompatible with the

  20. Soil-Applied Imidacloprid Translocates to Ornamental Flowers and Reduces Survival of Adult Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens Lady Beetles, and Larval Danaus plexippus and Vanessa cardui Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischik, Vera; Rogers, Mary; Gupta, Garima; Varshney, Aruna

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a decision making process used to manage pests that relies on many tactics, including cultural and biological control, which are practices that conserve beneficial insects and mites, and when needed, the use of conventional insecticides. However, systemic, soil-applied neonicotinoid insecticides are translocated to pollen and nectar of flowers, often for months, and may reduce survival of flower-feeding beneficial insects. Imidacloprid seed-treated crops (0.05 mg AI (active ingredient) /canola seed and 1.2 mg AI/corn seed) translocate less than 10 ppb to pollen and nectar. However, higher rates of soil-applied imidacloprid are used in nurseries and urban landscapes, such as 300 mg AI/10 L (3 gallon) pot and 69 g AI applied to the soil under a 61 (24 in) cm diam. tree. Translocation of imidacloprid from soil (300 mg AI) to flowers of Asclepias curassavica resulted in 6,030 ppb in 1X and 10,400 ppb in 2X treatments, which are similar to imidacloprid residues found in another plant species we studied. A second imidacloprid soil application 7 months later resulted in 21,000 ppb in 1X and 45,000 ppb in 2X treatments. Consequently, greenhouse/nursery use of imidacloprid applied to flowering plants can result in 793 to 1,368 times higher concentration compared to an imidacloprid seed treatment (7.6 ppb pollen in seed- treated canola), where most research has focused. These higher imidacloprid levels caused significant mortality in both 1X and 2X treatments in 3 lady beetle species, Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens, but not a fourth species, Coccinella septempunctata. Adult survival were not reduced for monarch, Danaus plexippus and painted lady, Vanessa cardui, butterflies, but larval survival was significantly reduced. The use of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid at greenhouse/nursery rates reduced survival of beneficial insects feeding on pollen and nectar and is incompatible with the principles of IPM

  1. Soil-applied imidacloprid translocates to ornamental flowers and reduces survival of adult Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens lady beetles, and larval Danaus plexippus and Vanessa cardui butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischik, Vera; Rogers, Mary; Gupta, Garima; Varshney, Aruna

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a decision making process used to manage pests that relies on many tactics, including cultural and biological control, which are practices that conserve beneficial insects and mites, and when needed, the use of conventional insecticides. However, systemic, soil-applied neonicotinoid insecticides are translocated to pollen and nectar of flowers, often for months, and may reduce survival of flower-feeding beneficial insects. Imidacloprid seed-treated crops (0.05 mg AI (active ingredient) /canola seed and 1.2 mg AI/corn seed) translocate less than 10 ppb to pollen and nectar. However, higher rates of soil-applied imidacloprid are used in nurseries and urban landscapes, such as 300 mg AI/10 L (3 gallon) pot and 69 g AI applied to the soil under a 61 (24 in) cm diam. tree. Translocation of imidacloprid from soil (300 mg AI) to flowers of Asclepias curassavica resulted in 6,030 ppb in 1X and 10,400 ppb in 2X treatments, which are similar to imidacloprid residues found in another plant species we studied. A second imidacloprid soil application 7 months later resulted in 21,000 ppb in 1X and 45,000 ppb in 2X treatments. Consequently, greenhouse/nursery use of imidacloprid applied to flowering plants can result in 793 to 1,368 times higher concentration compared to an imidacloprid seed treatment (7.6 ppb pollen in seed- treated canola), where most research has focused. These higher imidacloprid levels caused significant mortality in both 1X and 2X treatments in 3 lady beetle species, Coleomegilla maculata, Harmonia axyridis, and Hippodamia convergens, but not a fourth species, Coccinella septempunctata. Adult survival were not reduced for monarch, Danaus plexippus and painted lady, Vanessa cardui, butterflies, but larval survival was significantly reduced. The use of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid at greenhouse/nursery rates reduced survival of beneficial insects feeding on pollen and nectar and is incompatible with the principles of IPM.

  2. Taenia saginata (goeze,1782) In Cattle Slaughtered In Idah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean size of the parasite in both sexes differed significantly (P<0.05) being higher in females (91.7cm) than in males (67.7cm). The relatively high prevalence of taeniasis among the cattle hosts and its zoonotic implication are discussed. Keywords: Teaniasis, T. saginata, bulls, cows, prevalence, intensity of infections.

  3. nduced hyperlipidemic rats. Methods: Column chromatographic fractionation of butanol fraction of total methanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. yields four sub-fractions (sub-fraction A-D. All sub-fractions tested for their anti-hyperlipidemic activity. Sub-fractions administered at a dose of 65 mg/kg (oral to the Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats and total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and VLDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect and evaluation of Anti-hyperlipidemic activity guided subfraction isolated from total methanolic extract of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. leaves on Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats. Methods: Column chromatographic fractionation of butanol fraction of total methanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. yields four subfractions (sub-fraction A-D. All sub-fractions tested for their anti-hyperlipidemic activity. Subfractions administered at a dose of 65 mg/kg (oral to the Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats and total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and VLDL level in the blood were checked. Results: Sub-fraction D showed significant reduction (P<0.05 among four sub-fraction in comparison with standard drug fenofibrate. Conclusions: From the above study it could be concluded that butanol sub-fraction D of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. not only have resulted in significant reduction in cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, VLDL level but also increases the HDL level at a reduced dose level.

  4. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective potentials of Bauhinia variegata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Iron accumulation in the liver is customary in pathological conditions associated with oxidative stress. Iron is also an essential element for organisms at its physiological levels. This study was aimed at investigating the antioxidant and hepatoprotective potential of acetone and methanol defatted seed extracts of ...

  5. Impact of agrochemicals on non-target species: Calathus fuscipes Goeze 1777 (Coleoptera: Carabidae) as model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Anita; Cavaliere, Francesco; Giulianini, Piero Giulio; Mazzei, Antonio; Talarico, Federica; Vommaro, Maria Luigia; Brandmayr, Pietro

    2017-08-01

    Carabid beetles are important in the biological control of arable crop pests. Agricultural practices can produce over time a delayed toxic effect at the organismal and population levels and can compromise the survival on these species. In this research, we quantified the cumulative sublethal effect on body size, Malpighian tubules and immune responses in Calathus fuscipes adults living in the potato field and exposed to lambda-cyhalothrin and cymoxanil-based commercial formulates. Reductions of morphological parameters such as body, pronotum and elytron in both males and females from the potato field indicated that the pre-imaginal stages (larvae and pupae) suffer the sublethal effects of exposure to the larvicide control action of lambda-cyhalothrin. Ultrastructural alterations recorded in Malpighian tubules at the level of plasma membrane, mitochondria and nucleus indicated the reduction of the detoxification capability. The basal phenoloxidase and lysozyme-like enzyme activities have measured as markers of immune competence. Spectrophometric analyses showed that the chronic exposure in field causes an increase of basal phenoloxidase enzyme activity, while the lytic activity of haemolymph was not affected. As a result, the use of larvicides and fungicides have a harmful effect on beneficial species such C. fuscipes living in the soil of potato fields. These morphological and physiological results recorded at the organismal level can provide useful information of effects at the population and community levels to preserve the biodiversity of agroecosystem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dioctophyma renale (Goeze, 1782 Infection in a Domestic Dog from Hamedan, Western Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Masoud ZOLHAVARIEH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dioctophyma renale infection is found in a wide range of mammalian species, typically in temperate areas of the world. Here, we report for the first time, the parasitism of a domestic dog by D. renale in Hamedan, Iran, a mountainous cold region, lacking significant amounts of rainfall, high humidity and temperature. A 2.5 yr old male mixed breed dog was presented with a two months history of progressive hematuria and muscle weakness. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry were performed with results indicating impaired renal function. Urinalysis, showed hematuria as well as parasitic eggs, suggestive of D. renale infection. Urinary system ultrasonography revealed a hypoecogenic tubular structure in the right kidney. The animal was treated with fenbendazole (45 mg/kg, PO, QD - five days and ivermectin (0.02 mg/kg, SC, single dose. One week later, repeated laboratory examination confirmed presence of at least one alive worm in the affected kidney. A unilateral nephrectomy was performed; one female (60 x 5 cm and one male (30 x 3.8 cm live worm were taken out of the extremely thin walled right kidney. One month later, due to failure of the remained kidney and poor condition, the patient deceased. We conclude that dioctophymosis can be found in cold and or relatively dry area. Moreover, the results showed that the worm was not affected with common anthelmintic drugs.

  7. Acute oral Toxicity and Antioxidant Activity of Neoglaziovia variegata

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fisiologia

    2012-09-18

    Sep 18, 2012 ... carcinogenic effects (Wannes et al., 2010). On the other hand, it is necessary to carry out toxicological studies to evaluate safety parameters which are not observed by .... parameters of body weight variation, consumption of food and ... touch, analgesia and defecation) were observed and graded.

  8. Reproductive biology of Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field observation of pollinator visitation and flowering phenology of 20 trees showed that foraging behaviour of pollinator guilds varies depending on flowering phenology and canopy structure. A positive effect of tree mean flowering effort was found on insect visitation, while bat visitation was predicted by tree height and by ...

  9. Estimating the effect of plant-provided food supplements on pest consumption by omnivorous predators: lessons from two coccinellid beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldiner-Harpaz, Tarryn; Coll, Moshe

    2017-05-01

    Plant-provided food supplements can influence biological pest control by omnivorous predators in two counteracting ways: they can (i) enhance predator populations, but (ii) reduce pest consumption by individual predators. Yet the majority of studies address only one of these aspects. Here, we first tested the influence of canola (Brassica napus L.) pollen supplements on the life history of two ladybeetle species: Hoppodamia variegata (Goeze) and Coccinella septempunctata (L.). We then developed a theoretical model to simulate total pest consumption in the presence and absence of pollen supplements. Supplementing a prey diet with canola pollen increased H. variegata larval survival from 50 to 82%, and C. septempunctata female oviposition by 1.6-fold. Model simulations revealed a greater benefit of pollen supplements when relying on C. septempunctata for pest suppression than on H. variegata. For these two predators, the tested pollen serves as an essential supplement to a diet of prey. However, the benefit of a mixed prey-pollen diet was not always sufficient to overcome individual decrease in pest consumption. Taken together, our study highlights the importance of addressing both positive and negative roles of plant-provided food supplements in considering the outcome for biological control efforts that rely on omnivorous predators. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Functional characterization and immunolocalization of odorant binding protein 1 in the lucerne plant bug, Adelphocoris lineolatus (GOEZE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shao-Hua; Wang, Wei-Xuan; Wang, Gui-Rong; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Guo, Yu-Yuan; Zhang, Ziding; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun

    2011-06-01

    In the insect phylum, the relationships between individuals and their environment are often modulated by chemical communication. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are widely and robustly expressed in insect olfactory organs and play a key role in chemosensing and transporting hydrophobic odorants across the sensillum lymph to the olfactory receptor neuron. In this study, a novel OBP gene (AlinOBP1) in the lucerne plant bug, Adelphocoris lineolatus was identified, cloned and expressed. Real-time PCR results indicated that the expression level of AlinOBP1 gene differed in each developmental stage (from first instar to adult) and was predominantly expressed in the antennae of adults. The expression level of AlinOBP1 was 1.91 times higher in male antennae than in female antennae. The binding properties of AlinOBP1 with 114 odorants were measured using a fluorescence probe, N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (1-NPN), with fluorescence competitive binding. The results revealed that AlinOBP1 exhibits high binding abilities with two major putative pheromone components, ethyl butyrate and trans-2-hexenyl butyrate. In addition, it was observed that six volatiles released from cotton, octanal, nonanal, decanal, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, β-caryophyllene and β-ionone also bind to AlinOBP1. Immunocytochemistry analysis showed that AlinOBP1 was expressed in the sensillum lymph of sensilla trichodica and sensilla basiconca. Our results demonstrate that AlinOBP1 may function as a carrier in the chemoperception of the lucerne plant bug. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Taenia saginata Goeze, 1872 (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda: Taeniidae en un indígena de Tierra del Fuego, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo I. Faúndez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Se entrega el primer registro del céstodo Taenia saginata en un indígena de Tierra del Fuego (Patagonia chilena, correspondiente al año 1902. Se discute la importancia del registro y se entregan ilustraciones del ejemplar.

  12. Competition for Aphid Prey between Different Lady Beetle Species in a Laboratory Arena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy Leppanen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct competition for aphid prey (Hemiptera: Aphididae was evaluated between and among several lady beetle species (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae. The behavior of three native (Coccinella trifasciata, Coleomegilla maculata, and Hippodamia convergens and four nonnative (Coccinella septempunctata, Harmonia axyridis, Hippodamia variegata, and Propylea quatuordecimpunctata lady beetles was observed in laboratory arenas. The beetles were kept alone, paired with conspecifics or paired with heterospecifics, and presented with potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae. Harmonia axyridis was the most successful aphid predator in our study, being able to find aphids more quickly and consume more of them compared to most other lady beetle species. It was also by far the most aggressive of the tested species. Coccinella septempunctata, C. trifasciata, and C. maculata generally followed H. axyridis in aphid consumption. Prey discovery, consumption, and aggressive behaviors were dependent on which species were present in the arena. Except for the generally superior H. axyridis, there was no obvious dominance hierarchy among the other tested species and no dichotomy between the native and non-native species. Asymmetric interactions between lady beetle species may affect their abilities to coexist in the same habitat.

  13. Ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of Taeniarhynchus saginatus (syn. Taenia saginata) (Goeze, 1782) Weinland, 1858 (Cestoda, Taeniidae) an intestinal parasite of human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bâ, Aïssatou; Bâ, Cheikh Tidiane; Quilichini, Yann; Dieng, Thérèse; Marchand, Bernard

    2011-04-01

    The mature Taeniarhynchus saginatus spermatozoon exhibits an apical cone of electron-dense material and one helicoidal crest-like body roughly 50 nm thick. The axoneme is of the 9 + "1" Trepaxonemata pattern. It is surrounded by a periaxonemal sheath of electron-dense material. The cytoplasm is electron lucent and divided into compartments by intracytoplasmic walls of electron-dense material in regions III and IV. The nucleus is an electron-dense cord 60-90 nm thick coiled in a spiral around the axoneme. It reaches the posterior extremity of the gamete where the axoneme is disorganized and is accompanied on all its posterior length by the nucleus. To our knowledge, such a posterior extremity has never been described before in a cyclophyllidean cestode.

  14. Feeding Deterrent Activity of Melia azedarach Linn. and Phytolacca dodecondra (L’Herit) Plant Extracts Against Cabbage Flea Beetle, Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze)

    OpenAIRE

    Geleta Mathewos; Alemayehu Bayable; Tedbabe Nigatu; Zewdinesh Aboset; Birtukan Mulat; Nagappan Raja

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate feeding deterrent activity of cold and hot water extracts of Melia azedarach and Phytolacca dodecandra plant parts against cabbage flea beetle, Phyllotreta cruciferae. Tap water was used for cold water extraction and 100°C boiled water was used for hot water extraction. Five concentrations (w/v) such as 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10 g, respectively of powder/100 mL of water was used to check feeding deterrent activity by leaf discs method. Feeding deterrent activ...

  15. Conservation genetics of the yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata) and the common lizard (Zootoca vivipara) in the Italian Alps

    OpenAIRE

    Cornetti, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Global change is heavily affecting Alpine ecosystems in term of both climate warming and anthropization and its effects have been already demonstrated for many different taxa. However, understanding the genetic consequences on wild species caused by environmental modifications is complicated. In this thesis, I analyzed the genetic variation pattern in two vertebrate species whose distribution and persistence across the Italian Alps could be, or already have been, affected by changing climatic...

  16. Variación en germinación simbiótica entre semillas de Tolumnia variegata y entre hongos micorrízicos

    OpenAIRE

    Otero, J. Tupac; Bayman, Paul; Ackerman, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Desde hace cien años se sabe que las semillas de las orquídeas necesitan hongos micorrízicos para germi- nar. Todavía no se sabe si las orquídeas pueden evolucionar para aprovechar mejor los hongos micor- rízicos, y si las micorrizas han contribuido en la diversidad de las orquídeas.  Desde hace cien años se sabe que las semillas de las orquídeas necesitan hongos micorrízicos para germi- nar. Todavía no se sabe si las orquídeas pueden evolucionar para aprovechar mejor los hongo...

  17. Naturally Occurring Ehrlichia chaffeensis Infection in Two Prosimian Primate Species: Ring-tailed Lemurs (Lemur catta) and Ruffed Lemurs (Varecia variegata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steenhouse, Jan L.; Bradley, Julie M.; Hancock, Susan I.; Hegarty, Barbara C.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.

    2002-01-01

    A naturally occurring infection of Ehrlichia chaffeensis in lemurs is described. DNA of Ehrlichia chaffeensis was identified by polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood from six of eight clinically ill lemurs. Organisms were cultured from the blood of one lemur exhibiting clinical and hematologic abnormalities similar to those of humans infected with E. chaffeensis. PMID:12498671

  18. Naturally occurring Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection in two prosimian primate species: ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) and ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Cathy V; Van Steenhouse, Jan L; Bradley, Julie M; Hancock, Susan I; Hegarty, Barbara C; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2002-01-01

    A naturally occurring infection of Ehrlichia chaffeensis in lemurs is described. DNA of Ehrlichia chaffeensis was identified by polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood from six of eight clinically ill lemurs...

  19. The types of Palaearctic species of the families Apionidae, Rhynchitidae, Attelabidae and Curculionidae in the collection of Étienne Louis Geoffroy (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso-Zarazaga, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of 131 more or less complete Curculionoid specimens of the collection Étienne Louis Geoffroy, conserved in the Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de Paris (Entomologie has permitted the identification of several nominal species that were nomina dubia and the establishment of several new synonymies and combinations, and, in some cases, the reversion of precedence following Art. 23.9 of the Code, declaring nomina protecta and nomina oblita. New synonymies are (the first term is the valid name: Lixus filiformis (Fabricius, 1781 = Curculio longus Gmelin, 1790; Lasiorhynchites cavifrons (Gyllenhal, 1833 nom. protectum = Rhinomacer viridis Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Byctiscus betulae (Linnaeus, 1758 = Rhinomacer auratus Geoffroy, 1785; Neocoenorrhinus pauxillus (Germar, 1824 nom. protectum = Rhinomacer caeruleus Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Deporaus betulae (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio nigrostriatus Goeze, 1777 = Rhinomacer niger Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio fuliginosus Gmelin, 1790; Coniocleonus hollbergii (F√•hraeus, 1842 = Curculio sulcatus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio sulcatus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio sulcatus Gmelin, 1790; Larinus iaceae (Fabricius, 1775 = Curculio carduelis Goeze, 1777; Hypera postica (Gyllenhal, 1813, nom. protectum = Curculio fasciolatus Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Charagmus griseus (Fabricius, 1775 = Curculio cupreosquamosus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio intersectus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio squamosus Gmelin, 1790; Sitona hispidulus (Fabricius, 1777 = Curculio griseus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio modestus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio geoffroaei Gmelin, 1790; Aulacobaris cuprirostris (Fabricius, 1787 = Curculio viridisericeus Goeze, 1777; Cleopomiarus plantarum (Germar, 1824, nom. protectum =

  20. Germinacion simbiotica y asimbiotica en semillas de orquideas epifitas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Otero Ospina, Joel Tupac; Bayman, Paul

    2009-01-01

    .... Los metodos de germinacion simbiotica produjeron embriones de T. variegata mas desarrollados que los metodos de germinacion asimbiotica y las diferencias fueron estadisticamente significativas...

  1. OIL POLLUTION OF THE CAPE INFANTA COASTLINE Cape Infanta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stele tigrina and O. variegata appear to be largely unaffected. O. variegata is present on rocks of low oil cover and in pools surrounded by dense oil cover, but is absent from exposed rocks where oil cover is dense. The sea urchin Parechinus angulosus and the alikreukel, Turbo sar- maticus also appear unaffected. R eprod.

  2. Taxonomic status of several sibling species – parasites in man and in other vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Tenora

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic status of several related species pairs of sibling species character is discussed. They are the following pairs: 1 Ascaris lumbricoides L., 1758; A. suum Goeze, 1782; 2 Rodentolepis nana (Siebold, 1852; R. fraterna (Stiles, 1906; 3 Hymenolepis flavopunctata (Weinland, 1858; H. diminuta (Rudolphi, 1819.

  3. Untitled

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies in Erythroxylaceae—I . . . . . . . . . L. L. Narayana 270. A New Species ofXanthoemcyrtus from India . . . . B. R. Subba Rao 276. Biology and Morphology of the Immature Stages of Microctonus indicus, New. Species (Braconidæ: Hymenoptera)—A Parasite of Phyllotreta cruciferæ. Goeze (Chrysomellidæ: Coleoptera) .

  4. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ejima, I A. Vol 5 (2007) - Articles Taenia saginata (goeze,1782) In Cattle Slaughtered In Idah Metropolis, Kogi State, Nigeria. Abstract. ISSN: 1596-972X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of ...

  5. Separation, identification and quantification of photosynthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty one photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls, carotenoids and degradation products) from the seaweeds, Codium dwarkense, (Chlorophyta), , Laurencia obtusa , (Rhodophyta) and , Lobophora variegata, (Phaeophyta), were separated in a single-step procedure by reversed phase high-performance liquid ...

  6. Morphologic descriptions of Taenia asiatica sp. n.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, K S; Rim, H J

    1993-03-01

    Among taeniid tapeworms infecting humans through pork or beef, Taenia solium Linnaeus 1758 and Taenia saginata Goeze 1782 have already been known. Based on the morphologic characteristics of adult and metacestodes of Asian Taenia saginata, the third kind of human taeniid tapeworm known to distribute in Asian countries, a new species name of Taenia asiatica is proposed. In addition to the known biology in their intermediate hosts, T. asiatica was different morphologically from Taenia saginata Goeze 1782 in having the unarmed rostellum on the scolex of adult, the large number of 'uterine twigs' and the existence of 'posterior protuberance'. These structures in the gravid proglottids were used as taxonomic keys in taeniid tapeworms for the first time. T. asiatica metacestode (Cysticercus viscerotropica) was different morphologically from T. saginata metacestode (Cysticercus bovis) in having wartlike formations on the external surface of the bladder wall.

  7. Eelworms in wild hoofed mammals of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Dovgyi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongylata, Rhabditata and Ascaridata eelworms were found in wild hoofs (roe deers and wild boars in Ukraine. Strongylata are presented by Globocephalus sp., Dictyocaulus viviparous (Bloch, D. еckerti Skrjabin, Muellerius sp., Cystocaulus sp., Protostrongylus sp., Haemonchus contortus Rundolphi, Marshallagia marshalli (Ransom, Nematodirus oiratianus Rajevskaja, Trichostrongylus axei (Cobbold, Bunostomum phlebotomum (Railliet, Oesophagostomum venulosus (Rudolphi, O. dentatm (Rudolphi and Chabertia ovina (Raill.. The helmints Strongyloides papillosus Wedl, S. ransomi Scwartz et Al. and Ascaris suum (Goeze were identified for Rhabditata and Ascaridata.

  8. A new species of the genus Nalassus Mulsant (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Helopini) from the Baltic amber

    OpenAIRE

    M. V. Nabozhenko; Perkovsky, E.E.; Chernei, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    The first Eocene species of the tribe Helopini, Nalassus klebsi sp. nov., from the Baltic amber is described. The new species is included in the nominative subgenus and similar to the extant species N. dermestoides (Illiger) and N. laevioctostriatus (Goeze), from which it differs in the shape of eyes (eyes are considerably less transverse than in living Palearctic species of the genus Nalassus Mulsant), the shape of the pronotum with acute posterior angles (other Palearctic Nalassus have o...

  9. Development of a standardized protein immunomarking protocol for insect mark-capture dispersal research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted to test the marking efficiency of broadcast spray applications of protein marks on stationary (represented by cadavers) and free-roaming lady beetles, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville that were strategically placed in blooming alfalfa plots. The marks tested include...

  10. The influence of microsporidian pathogens from commercially available lady beetles on larval development of the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea, in the absence of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, A; Bjørnson, S

    2018-02-02

    In North America, more than 70 species of natural enemies are available for pest control, including the aphid predators, Adalia bipunctata L. (two-spotted lady beetle) and Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville (convergent lady beetle), and the generalist predator Chrysoperla carnea Stephens (green lacewing). The two lady beetle species are known to host microsporidian pathogens: Nosema adaliae was originally described from Adalia bipunctata and Tubulinosema hippodamiae from H. convergens. Microsporidia are spore-forming pathogens that typically produce chronic, debilitating disease. Because the spores of both pathogens are transovarially transmitted through beetle eggs, the predation behavior of lacewing larvae provides an opportunity for the transmission of these pathogens when infected lady beetles and lacewings share the same local environment. In this study, uninfected and microsporidia-infected eggs from A. bipunctata and H. convergens were offered to C. carnea larvae. The development of larvae that consumed N. adaliae-infected eggs was not affected, but larval development was prolonged by almost 3 days for those that consumed two or more T. hippodamiae-infected eggs. Prolonged larval development is considered to be costly because larvae remain vulnerable to cannibalization by sibling larvae or other predators. Longevity did not differ significantly between sexes of C. carnea, and the sex ratio of newly eclosed adults did not differ from the previously reported sex ratio of 1♂: 1♀. Upon examination by light microscopy at the end of the trial, two C. carnea larvae were infected with N. adaliae and none were infected with T. hippodamiae, suggesting that T. hippodamiae influenced lacewing larval development without establishing an infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence for the hybrid origin of Nuphar xrubrodisca (Nymphaeaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, D J; Les, D; Crow, G

    1998-10-01

    Plants intermediate in appearance between Nuphar microphyllaand N. variegata (Nymphaeaceae) have long been assumed to bethe result of hybridization. The evidence for this is based primarilyon field observations of morphology, poor fruit production, closegeographical proximity of presumed parent species, and limited pollensterility data. Fertile populations of the same plants have also beendocumented. We employed multivariate analyses of morphology, pollenfertility studies, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markersto test the hypothesis that Nuphar × rubrodiscarepresents a natural interspecific hybrid between N.microphylla and N. variegata. Examination of 15morphological characters demonstrated the intermediacy of N.× rubrodisca between N. microphylla and N.variegata, and the pollen data revealed a markedly lower meanpollen viability in N. × rubrodisca (23%)compared to the other two species (91 and 86%, respectively). Eight 10-mer primers produced 13 species-specific RAPD markers forN. microphylla and nine for N. variegata, with all 22markers present in N. × rubrodisca. The datafrom RAPDs are concordant with morphology in implicating N.microphylla and N. variegata as parents of N.×rubrodisca.

  12. Preliminary data concerning the distribution of amphibian fauna in Suceava county (Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru STRUGARIU

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused upon an area in which the herpetofauna had previously been very poorly studied and aimed to identify the species of amphibians from the research area and to establish distribution areas. In the 54 investigated localities 16 species of amphibians (Salamandra salamandra, Triturus vulgaris, Triturus cristatus, Triturus alpestris, Triturus montandoni, Pelobates fuscus, Bombina bombina, Bombina variegata, Hyla arborea, Bufo bufo, Bufo viridis, Rana dalmatina, Rana temporaria, Rana arvalis, Rana ridibunda & Rana lessonae and 2 hybrids (Bombina bombina X Bombina variegata & Rana kl. esculanta have been identified. Of these, the Bombina hybrids have been identified for the first time in the studied region.

  13. The effects of two microsporidian pathogens on the two-spotted lady beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, T; Bjørnson, S

    2012-02-01

    Two-spotted lady beetles, Adalia bipunctata L. are available for biological pest control in North America. Lady beetles are known to host microsporidia and although these pathogens are able to infect more than one host under laboratory conditions, little is known regarding the effects of more than one microsporidian pathogen on host fitness. In this study, egg cannibalism was used to examine the effects of the microsporidium Tubulinosema hippodamiae from Hippodamia convergens and an undescribed microsporidium from A. bipunctata (alone and in combination) on A. bipunctata host fitness (larval development and mortality, sex ratio, adult fecundity and longevity). Development was prolonged significantly for larvae that were infected with the undescribed microsporidium but T. hippodamiae had no effect and as a result, conclusions could not be made regarding the effects of both pathogens on larval development. The two microsporidia had no effect on sex ratios (1♀:1♂) or on adult fecundity and longevity. Spores were detected in the majority of smear preparations of individuals that were fed microsporidia-infected eggs and molecular analysis confirmed the identity of both pathogens in sampled individuals. T. hippodamiae spores were smaller than spores of the undescribed microsporidium (3.76±0.03×2.32±0.02 μm and 5.43±0.06×2.75±0.03 μm, respectively) and although the former stained less intensely than did those of latter, spores of the two pathogens are difficult to differentiate when examined by light microscopy alone. The ability of some microsporidia to infect more than one lady beetle host makes it difficult to conclude with certainty as to the number of species that are present in infected Adalia when specimens are examined solely by light microscopy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Incorporating a Sorghum Habitat for Enhancing Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Cotton

    OpenAIRE

    Tillman, P. G.; Cottrell, T. E.

    2012-01-01

    Lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) prey on insect pests in cotton. The objective of this 2 yr on-farm study was to document the impact of a grain sorghum trap crop on the density of Coccinellidae on nearby cotton. Scymnus spp., Coccinella septempunctata (L.), Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer), Cycloneda munda (Say), and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant) were found in sorghum over both years. Lady beetle compositions in sorghum and ...

  15. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract · Vol 3, No 1-2 (2011) - Articles Laxative activity of aqueous root extract of Cnestis ferruginea (VAHL EX DC) in loperamide-induced constipated rats. Abstract · Vol 4, No 1 (2012) - Articles Evaluation of the Antidiarrhoeal Property and Safety of Ethanolic Extract of Ficus Benjamina 'Variegata' Fruits in Wistar Rats

  16. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oyegoke, RA. Vol 4, No 1 (2012) - Articles Evaluation of the Antidiarrhoeal Property and Safety of Ethanolic Extract of Ficus Benjamina 'Variegata' Fruits in Wistar Rats Abstract. ISSN: 2251-0079. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  17. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yakubu, MT. Vol 3, No 1-2 (2011) - Articles Laxative activity of aqueous root extract of Cnestis ferruginea (VAHL EX DC) in loperamide-induced constipated rats. Abstract · Vol 4, No 1 (2012) - Articles Evaluation of the Antidiarrhoeal Property and Safety of Ethanolic Extract of Ficus Benjamina 'Variegata' Fruits in Wistar Rats

  18. Nigerian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Vol 4, No 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the Antidiarrhoeal Property and Safety of Ethanolic Extract of Ficus Benjamina 'Variegata' Fruits in Wistar Rats · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AT Oladiji, MT Yakubu, RA Oyegoke, 25-31 ...

  19. Evaluation of the Antidiarrhoeal Property and Safety of Ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: There is an age long folkloric claim that Ficus benjamina fruits could be used as an antidiarrhoeal agent. Up till this time, there has not been any scientific report on the acclaimed use. Therefore, the efficacy of the ethanolic extract of Ficus benjamina 'variegata' fruit as an antidiarrhoeal agent as ...

  20. A NEW SPECIES OF AGAFETES FROM BHUTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. BALAKRISHNAN N. P. BALAKRISHNAN

    1966-12-01

    Full Text Available AGAPETES BHUTANICA Balak. & Chowdhury, spec. nov. — Fig.Affinis A. odontdcerae (Wight Rook. f. et A. variegatae (Roxb. D.Don ex G. Don; ab utraque differt pedicellis, ccdycibus et corollis glandu-loso-pilosis; ab A. odontocera differt foliis pseudoverticillatis; ab A.vanegata differt corolla breviore.

  1. Seaweed community response to a massive CO2 input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangil, Carlos; Clemente, Sabrina; Brito, Alberto; Rodríguez, Adriana; Balsalobre, Marc; Mendoza, José Carlos; Martínez, David; Hernández, José Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Changes in the structure of seaweed communities were examined following a massive CO2 input caused by a submarine eruption near the coast of El Hierro island (Canary Islands, Spain). The event lasted almost five months (October 2011-March 2012) and created a significant pH gradient. Specifically, we compared three different zones: highly affected with extreme low pH (6.7-7.3), affected with low pH (7.6-7.8), and unaffected ambient pH zone (∼8.1) according to the pH gradient generated by the predominate currents and waves in the south of the island. Studies were carried out before, during and after the CO2 input event in each zone. We found community-wide effects on seaweed communities during the eruption; these included changes in species abundance and changes in the diversity. However, changes in all these community traits were only evident in the highly affected zone, where there were major shifts in the seaweed community, with a replacement of Lobophora variegata by ephemeral seaweeds. Lobophora variegata dropped in cover from 87-94 to 27% while ephemeral seaweeds increased 6-10 to 29%. When the impact ended Lobophora variegata began to recover reaching a cover higher than 60%. In the moderate affected area the Lobophora variegata canopies maintained their integrity avoiding phase shifts to turfs. Here the only significant changes were the reduction of the cover of the crustose and geniculate coralline algae.

  2. Micropropagation and acclimatization of Bauhinia cheilantha (an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... Plantas Medicinais no Brasil: Nativas e exóticas. 2nd ed. Nova Odessa, São Paulo, Brasil. Mathur J, Mukunthakumar S (1992). Micropropagation of Bauhinia variegata and Parkinsonia aculeata from nodal explants of mature trees. Plant Cell, Tissue Organ Cult. 28: 119-121. Merkle SA, Nairn CJ (2005).

  3. make up.contents pg

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Of the 19 species of seabirds nesting off the coast of. Peru, the guanay cormorant Phalacrocorax bougainvillii, the Peruvian booby Sula variegata and the Peruvian pelican Pelecanus thagus, hereafter referred to as guano birds, have been the most abundant (Duffy et al. 1984). From historical times the guanay cormorant.

  4. 77 FR 298 - Endangered Species Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... variegata), western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla), Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), leopard (Panthera pardus), Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), and Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) to enhance their... their captive-bred wildlife registration under 50 CFR 17.21(g) for leopard (Panthera pardus) and Asian...

  5. 78 FR 54479 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... conservation responsibilities for affected species, and in consideration of section 10(a)(1)(A) of the... applicant requests a captive-bred wildlife registration under 50 CFR 17.21(g) for the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata), red ruffed lemur (Varecia rubra), black...

  6. 77 FR 51819 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... conservation responsibilities for affected species, and in consideration of section 10(a)(1)(A) of the...) Salmon-crested cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) Ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) Black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata) Cottontop tamarin (Saguinus oedipus) Asian wild ass (Equus hemionus) Dama...

  7. 78 FR 53473 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... conservation responsibilities for affected species, and ] in consideration of section 10(a)(1)(A) of the... captive-bred wildlife registration under 50 CFR 17.21(g) for ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata), red ruffed lemur (Varecia rubra), black lemur (Eulemur macaco...

  8. Fowleria abocellata, a new cardinal fish from the Gulf of Elat — Red Sea (Pisces, Apogonidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goren, M.; Karplus, I.

    1980-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The genus Fowleria Jordan & Evermann, 1903 is represented in the Red Sea by four species: F. aurita (Valenciennes, 1831) (the type species); F. variegata (Cuvier & Valenciennes, 1832); F. isostigma (Jordan & Seale, 1905) and F. marmorata (Alleyn & Mecleay, 1876). All of them are very

  9. 2017-12-08T08:33:36Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    article/43814 2017-12-08T08:33:36Z sfjfs:ART Quambalaria species: increasing threat to eucalypt plantations in Australia Pegg, GS Carnegie, AJ Wingfield, MJ Drenth, A Spotted gum Corymbia citriodora subsp . variegata and C. maculata) is a ...

  10. Quambalaria species: increasing threat to eucalypt plantations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spotted gum Corymbia citriodora subsp . variegata and C. maculata) is a valuable source of commercial timber and suitable for a wide range of different soil types in eastern Australia. The main biological constraint to further expansion of spottedgum plantations is Quambalaria shoot blight caused by the fungus ...

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 18, No 2 (1983), Population dynamics and growth of the gastropod Oxystele variegata (Anton) on an exposed rocky shore, Abstract PDF. C.D. McQuaid. Vol 32, No 4 (1997), Population dynamics of Lemniscomys rosalia (Muridae: Rodentia) in a Swaziland grassland: effects of food and fire, Abstract PDF. A Monadjem ...

  12. Estimation of taper rates and volume of smaller-sized logs in spotted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spotted gum (Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata) is a popular tree species for hardwood saw timber plantations in Southeast Queensland (SEQ), Australia. In many parts of the world, logs up to 10cm top diameter are considered to be merchantable logs and acceptable at sawmills. However, due to the higher handling ...

  13. A snake in paradise: Dusturbance of plant reproduction following extirpation of bird flower-visitors on Guam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Hanne Skovgaard; Dupont, Yoko; Olesen, Jens Mogens

    2008-01-01

    -pollinated native plant species in Guam. We investigated flower visitation, seed set and germination in two native plants, the mangrove tree Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and the forest tree Erythrina variegata var. orientalis. Both species are bird-pollinated. Studies were conducted on two Mariana islands, Guam (with high...

  14. PRELIMINARY DATA CONCERNING THE HERPETOFAUNA IN NEAM COUNTY (ROMANIA)

    OpenAIRE

    Sorin ROŞU; Iulian GHERGHEL

    2005-01-01

    In the researched area we identified 14 amphibian species: (Salamandra salamndra, Triturus vulgaris, Triturus cristatus, Triturus alpestris, Triturus montandoni, Bombina bombina, Bombina variegata, Bufo bufo, Bufo viridis, Pelobates fuscus, Hyla arborea, Rana ridibunda, Rana dalmatina, Rana temporaria) and 8 reptilian species (Lacerta agilis, Lacerta viridis, Zootoca vivipara, Anguis fragilis, Natrix natrix, Elaphe longissima, Coronella austriaca, Vipera berus). Within the region we identi...

  15. Purification and molecular cloning of a new galactose-specific lectin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new galactose-specific lectin was purified from seeds of a Caesalpinoideae plant, Bauhinia variegata, by affinity chromatography on lactose–agarose. Protein extracts haemagglutinated rabbit and human erythrocytes (native and treated with proteolytic enzymes), showing preference for rabbit blood treated with papain ...

  16. JOPAT [14th Edition - Jan to Dec 2009

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secretary

    Methanolic extract of leaves and soft stems of Erythrina variegata (EVLSS) was investigated for analgesic activity at the doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight orally. All the doses of. EVLSS significantly attenuated the writhing responses induced by intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid in mice.

  17. Genetic variation in growth and wood-quality traits of Corymbia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten growth or wood-quality traits were assessed in three nearby Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata (CCV) open-pollinated family-within-provenance trials (18 provenances represented by a total of 374 families) to provide information for the development of a breeding program targeting both pulp and solid-wood products.

  18. Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leles, Daniela; Gardner, Scott L; Reinhard, Karl; Iñiguez, Alena; Araujo, Adauto

    2012-02-20

    Since the original description and naming of Ascaris lumbricoides from humans by Linnaeus in 1758 and later of Ascaris suum from pigs by Goeze 1782, these species have been considered to be valid. Four hypotheses relative to the conspecificity or lack thereof (and thus origin of these species) are possible: 1) Ascaris lumbricoides (usually infecting humans) and Ascaris suum (recorded mostly from pigs) are both valid species, with the two species originating via a speciation event from a common ancestor sometime before the domestication of pigs by humans, or 2) Ascaris lumbricoides in humans is derived directly from the species A. suum found in pigs with A. suum then existing as a persistent ancestor after formation of A. lumbricoides, or 3) Ascaris suum is derived directly from A. lumbricoides with the persistent ancestor being A. lumbricoides and A. suum being the newly derived species, and finally, 4) Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are the same species, this hypothesis being supported by studies showing both low morphological and low genetic divergence at several genes. We present and discuss paleoparasitological and genetic evidence that complement new data to evaluate the origin and evolution of Ascaris spp. in humans and pigs, and the uniqueness of the species in both hosts. Finally, we conclude that Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are a single species and that the name A. lumbricoides Linnaeus 1758 has taxonomic priority; therefore A. suum Goeze 1782 should be considered a synonym of A. lumbricoides.

  19. Are Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum a single species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leles Daniela

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since the original description and naming of Ascaris lumbricoides from humans by Linnaeus in 1758 and later of Ascaris suum from pigs by Goeze 1782, these species have been considered to be valid. Four hypotheses relative to the conspecificity or lack thereof (and thus origin of these species are possible: 1 Ascaris lumbricoides (usually infecting humans and Ascaris suum (recorded mostly from pigs are both valid species, with the two species originating via a speciation event from a common ancestor sometime before the domestication of pigs by humans, or 2 Ascaris lumbricoides in humans is derived directly from the species A. suum found in pigs with A. suum then existing as a persistent ancestor after formation of A. lumbricoides, or 3 Ascaris suum is derived directly from A. lumbricoides with the persistent ancestor being A. lumbricoides and A. suum being the newly derived species, and finally, 4 Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are the same species, this hypothesis being supported by studies showing both low morphological and low genetic divergence at several genes. We present and discuss paleoparasitological and genetic evidence that complement new data to evaluate the origin and evolution of Ascaris spp. in humans and pigs, and the uniqueness of the species in both hosts. Finally, we conclude that Ascaris lumbricoides and A. suum are a single species and that the name A. lumbricoides Linnaeus 1758 has taxonomic priority; therefore A. suum Goeze 1782 should be considered a synonym of A. lumbricoides.

  20. Euphotic Zone Study moves forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Kenneth

    The Global Ocean Euphotic Zone Study (GOEZS), a potential core program of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) being planned jointly with the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), was recently given the go-ahead by IGBP's Scientific Committee to move on to the next level of developing its scientific program.The GOEZS program will focus on the coupled physical, biological, and chemical processes operating in the euphotic zone, which is the ocean surface layer where sufficient light penetrates for photosynthesis by phytoplankton to exceed their metabolic energy losses. The upper ocean is extremely important to understanding the atmosphereocean system because it mediates exchanges of heat, momentum, carbon dioxide, sulphur, and nitrogen between the atmosphere and the ocean interior. For the major greenhouse gas carbon dioxide for example, there is more carbon in the upper ocean than in the whole atmosphere. Essentially all carbon dioxide from the atmosphere that passes from the upper ocean to the ocean interior has been transformed chemically or biologically in the upper ocean. Moreover, the upper ocean is the site of all marine shipping and most recreation and industrial activity and contains the planktonic food chain and most fish stocks.

  1. The genus Callophyllis (Kallymeniaceae, Rhodophyta from the central-south Chilean coast (33° to 41° S, with the description of two new species El género Callophyllis (Kallymeniaceae, Rhodophyta de la costa central y sur de Chile (33° a 41° S, con la descripción de dos nuevas especies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NATALIA ARAKAKI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic status of the species in the genus Callophyllis Kützing (Kallymeniaceae, Rhodophyta from central-south Chile (33° to 41° S is examined on the basis of morphological and molecular evidence. Of the four species originally cited for central Chile, C. variegata, C. pinnata, C. atrosanguinea and C. laciniata, only the presence of C. variegata has been confirmed in this study. C. pinnata reported from Chile is found to be different from C. pinnata described from California, and it is here newly described as C. concepcionensis sp. nov. C. atrosanguinea from southern Chile (including C. linguata from the Antarctic Peninsula is distinct from the species called C. atrosanguinea from central-south Chile, the latter which is here described as C. macrostiolata sp. nov. C. variegata, C. concepcionensis and C. macrostiolata are distinguished from one another by their external habit, the nature and distribution of their cystocarps, and the female reproductive morphology. Comparative rbcL sequence analysis corroborates the distinction of these taxa from central-south Chile and their relationships to other species worldwide.Se examina el estatus taxonómico de las especies del género Callophyllis Kützing (Kallymeniaceae, Rhodophyta de la costa centro-sur de Chile (33° a 41° S en base a caracteres morfológicos y moleculares. De las cuatro especies citadas para Chile central, C. variegata, C. pinnata, C. atrosanguinea y C. laciniata, solo la presencia de C. variegata ha sido confirmada en este estudio. C. pinnata de Chile muestra diferencias con C. pinnata descrita para California y con el resto de las especies de Callophyllis hasta ahora conocidas, constituyendo así una nueva especie, C. concepcionensis sp. nov. C. atrosanguinea del sur de Chile (incluyendo C. linguata de la Península Antártica muestra diferencias con la especie llamada C. atrosanguinea de la costa centro-sur de Chile, esta última especie es descrita como C. macrostiolata

  2. Revisiting species delimitation within the genus Oxystele using DNA barcoding approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Bank, Herman; Herbert, Dai; Greenfield, Richard; Yessoufou, Kowiyou

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The genus Oxystele, a member of the highly diverse marine gastropod superfamily Trochoidea, is endemic to southern Africa. Members of the genus include some of the most abundant molluscs on southern African shores and are important components of littoral biodiversity in rocky intertidal habitats. Species delimitation within the genus is still controversial, especially regarding the complex O. impervia / O. variegata. Here, we assessed species boundaries within the genus using DNA barcoding and phylogenetic tree reconstruction. We analysed 56 specimens using the mitochondrial gene COI. Our analysis delimits five molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs), and distinguishes O. impervia from O. variegata. However, we reveal important discrepancies between MOTUs and morphology-based species identification and discuss alternative hypotheses that can account for this. Finally, we indicate the need for future study that includes additional genes, and the combination of both morphology and genetic techniques (e.g. AFLP or microsatellites) to get deeper insight into species delimitation within the genus. PMID:24453566

  3. Grasshoppers, crickets (Orthoptera and earwigs (Dermaptera of Tovačov gravel pit (central Moravia, Czech Republic: New locality for several thermophilous species in anthropogenic secondary habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trnka Filip

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of Orthoptera and earwigs was conducted in Tovačov gravel pit in 2014. We have recorded 18 species of Orthoptera and 3 species of earwigs. The most significant recorded species are Cepero’s ground-hopper (Tetrix ceperoi, pygmy mole cricket (Xya variegata, Italian tree cricket (Oecanthus pellucens and riparian earwig (Labidura riparia. Tovačov gravel pit poses the northernmost locality of T. ceperoi and X. variegata in the Czech Republic and the northernmost known locality in Moravia for O. pellucens. For the L. riparia, we present a founding from Tovačov together with another finding from Olomouc vicinity, which is currently the northernmost locality within Moravia. Our findings display recent spatial expansion of some thermophilous species. Moreover, we emphasize importance of (post-industrial areas as secondary habitats for specialised endangered species.

  4. Morfologia dos Coccinellini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae Depositados na Coleção Entomológica dos Campos Gerais do Paraná, Ponta Grossa, Paraná

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    Julianne Milléo

    2012-07-01

    Abstract. A comparative analysis was carried out based on the detailed morphology of exoskeleton and genitalia of the adult of eight species of the Coccinellini: Coleomegilla quadrifasciata (Schönherr, 1808; Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763; Cycloneda pulchella (Klug, 1829; Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824; Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773; Hippodamia convergens (Guérin, 1842; Neocalvia anastomozans (Crotch, 1874; Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866. A dichotomic key, diagnoses for the species with description of new characters and records of the plants in which it was collected, are added.

  5. Amphibian optokinetic after nystagmus: properties and comparative analysis in various species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteuffel, G; Kopp, J; Himstedt, W

    1986-01-01

    Optokinetic nystagmus and after nystagmus were studied in six amphibian species, three urodeles and three anurans. It was demonstrated that two of the urodeles, Hydromantes italicus and Salamandra salamandra, display a relatively well-developed optokinetic after nystagmus, which is less pronounced in Bombina variegata and nearly absent in Bufo bufo, Rana temporaria, and Tylototriton verrucosus. These results indicate a certain degree of velocity storage in the optokinetic reflex of some amphibians.

  6. Cryptocephaline Egg Case Provides Incomplete Protection from Generalist Predators (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae

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    Matthias Schöller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The egg case of Cryptocephalus rufipes (Goeze is described and illustrated. In laboratory trials, eggs of field-collected C. rufipes were observed for larval emergence (untreated control or exposed to two species of generalist predators, Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens or Xylocoris flavipes (Reuter in no-choice experiments. The behaviour of the predators upon contact with the C. rufipes eggs was observed. The number of hatching larvae was counted and compared. In the presence of each of the two species of predators, larval emergence was significantly reduced. Eggs that were not protected by an egg case were completely consumed by the predators. C. rufipes eggs were therefore incompletely protected from the studied generalist predators. This is the first study showing experimentally the protective function of cryptocephaline egg case.

  7. O aparelho muscular dos Proglotes de Taenia Saginata The muscular texture of the proglottides of Taenia Saginata

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    Antonio Augusto Xavier

    1945-02-01

    Full Text Available The writers describe the muscular texture of the proglottides of Taenia saginata, Goeze, 1782, based upon microscopical preparations of mature and gravid proglottides stained by several methods. The muscular system of the proglottides of Taenia saginata is disposed mainly in two layers, a longitudinal and external one, and a deeper transverse layer, lining the body parenchym and internal organs. A circular or annular layer ranging under the cuticle is also referred. The writers emphasize the peculiar texture of the smooth muscle fibres, which only excepcionally do exist as isolated fibres, anastomosis between the fibres being the common histological appearence. Special features of the body parenchym such as calcareous bodies and globous nuclea scattered in the parenchym are also described.

  8. Germinación simbiótica y asimbiótica en semillas de orquídeas epifitas Symbiotic vs. asymbiotic seed germination in epiphytic orchids

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    Joel Tupac Otero Ospina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Se compara el crecimiento de plántulas de la orquídeas epifita Tolumnia variegata en medios de agar con y sin hongos micorrízicos. Los métodos de germinación simbiótica produjeron embriones de T. variegata más desarrollados que los métodos de germinación asimbiótica y las diferencias fueron estadísticamente significativas. Las semillas en los controles en medio de celulosa sin hongos micorrízicos no germinaron. Las semillas de Epidendrum ramosum, Lepanthes rupestris y Psychilis monensis no mostraron diferencias significativas en germinación entre métodos simbiótica y asimbiótica utilizando hongos aislados de raíces de T. variegata, incluso algunos aislados del grupo Rhizoctonia parasitaron las semillas. Los resultados sugieren que las semillas de orquídeas epifitas y sus hongos micorrízicos son más específicos de lo que anteriormente se había creído y por tanto es necesario utilizar los hongos específicos para cada especie de orquídea. Además, se sugiere que los cultivadores de orquídeas podrían obtener mejores resultados en la propagación de orquídeas epifitas si utilizan metodologías de germinación simbiótica apropiados.We compared seedling growth of the epiphytic orchid, Tolumnia variegata in agar media with and without inoculated mycorrhizal fungi. Symbiotic germination produced more-developed embryos than asymbiotic germination. Differences were highly significant, although some isolates of Rhizoctonia-like fungi were parasitic on seeds. Control seeds in a cellulose medium without Rhizoctonia-like fungi did not germinate. Seeds of Epidendrum ramosum, Lepanthes rupestris and Psychilis monensis showed no significant differences between asymbiotic and symbiotic germination using mycorrhizal fungi isolated from T. variegata roots, suggesting high mycorrhizal specificity. Our data suggest that the relationship between epiphytic orchids and the mycorrhizal fungi is more specific than previously thought. The use of

  9. Evaluation of Relationships between Growth Rate, Tree Size, Lignocellulose Composition, and Enzymatic Saccharification in Interspecific Corymbia Hybrids and Parental Taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Adam L; Lee, David J; Lupoi, Jason S; Papa, Gabriella; Guenther, Joel M; Corno, Luca; Adani, Fabrizio; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A; Henry, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    In order for a lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstock to be considered sustainable, it must possess a high rate of growth to supply biomass for conversion. Despite the desirability of a fast growth rate for industrial application, it is unclear what effect growth rate has on biomass composition or saccharification. We characterized Klason lignin, glucan, and xylan content with response to growth in Corymbia interspecific F1 hybrid families (HF) and parental species Corymbia torelliana and C. citriodora subspecies variegata and measured the effects on enzymatic hydrolysis from hydrothermally pretreated biomass. Analysis of biomass composition within Corymbia populations found similar amounts of Klason lignin content (19.7-21.3%) among parental and hybrid populations, whereas glucan content was clearly distinguished within C. citriodora subspecies variegata (52%) and HF148 (60%) as compared to other populations (28-38%). Multiple linear regression indicates that biomass composition is significantly impacted by tree size measured at the same age, with Klason lignin content increasing with diameter breast height (DBH) (+0.12% per cm DBH increase), and glucan and xylan typically decreasing per DBH cm increase (-0.7 and -0.3%, respectively). Polysaccharide content within C. citriodora subspecies variegata and HF-148 were not significantly affected by tree size. High-throughput enzymatic saccharification of hydrothermally pretreated biomass found significant differences among Corymbia populations for total glucose production from biomass, with parental Corymbia torelliana and hybrids HF-148 and HF-51 generating the highest amounts of glucose (~180 mg/g biomass, respectively), with HF-51 undergoing the most efficient glucan-to-glucose conversion (74%). Based on growth rate, biomass composition, and further optimization of enzymatic saccharification yield, high production Corymbia hybrid trees are potentially suitable for fast-rotation bioenergy or biomaterial production.

  10. ROLE OF ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC FACTORS IN RESEARCH OF VARIETES OF WEIGELA (WEIGELA THUNB., CAPRIFOLIACEAE

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    A. V. Savenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The success of the introduction of plants depends on their vitality and adaptation to the new conditions of existence. The aim of our study is to identify environmental characteristics of varieties of Weigela to extend the range of ornamental plants under urban ecosystem of Krasnodar. We have analyzed the tolerance of varieties of Weigela to the temperature regime in the introduction region, we explored the complex biotic factors influencing the growth and development of these plants, and also studied the morphological characteristics of pollen and pollen productivity of Weigela flowers.Methods. Evaluation of resistance of varieties of Weigela to a complex of abiotic and biotic factors has been conducted in the field and in the laboratory, taking into account recommendations for ornamental shrubs.Results. Studied Weigela varieties have enough ecological valence to the force of impact of the maximum and minimum air temperatures in the area of the introduction. The most resistant to the complex of summer stress factors are the following varieties of Weigela: 'Candida', 'Nana Variegata', 'Olimpik Flame', 'Red Rrince'. The most heat-resistant varieties are 'Nana Variegata' and 'Olimpik Flame'. The most winter-hardy varieties are 'Candida' and 'Red Rrince', less winter-hardy variety is 'Nana Purpurea'. The most cold-resistant variety is 'Candida'. 'Nana Variegata' produces the highest number of fertile pollen grains. The smallest amount of fertile pollen is formed by 'Nana Purpurea'.Main conclusion. These studies allow us to conclude that all the studied varieties of Weigela are characterized by a high degree of adaptation and deserve widespread use in gardens and parks of the city of Krasnodar.

  11. Germinación simbiótica y asimbiótica en semillas de orquídeas epifitas

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    Joel Tupac Otero Ospina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Se compara el crecimiento de plántulas de la orquídeas epifita Tolumnia variegata en medios de agar con y sin hongos micorrízicos. Los métodos de germinación simbiótica produjeron embriones de T. variegata más desarrollados que los métodos de germinación asimbiótica y las diferencias fueron estadísticamente significativas. Las semillas en los controles en medio de celulosa sin hongos micorrízicos no germinaron. Las semillas de Epidendrum ramosum, Lepanthes rupestris y Psychilis monensis no mostraron diferencias significativas en germinación entre métodos simbiótica y asimbiótica utilizando hongos aislados de raíces de T. variegata, incluso algunos aislados del grupo Rhizoctonia parasitaron las semillas. Los resultados sugieren que las semillas de orquídeas epifitas y sus hongos micorrízicos son más específicos de lo que anteriormente se había creído y por tanto es necesario utilizar los hongos específicos para cada especie de orquídea. Además, se sugiere que los cultivadores de orquídeas podrían obtener mejores resultados en la propagación de orquídeas epifitas si utilizan metodologías de germinación simbiótica apropiados.

  12. Germinación simbiótica y asimbiótica en semillas de orquídeas epifitas

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    Bayman Paul

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Se compara el crecimiento de plántulas de la orquídeas epifita Tolumnia variegata en medios de agar con y sin hongos micorrízicos. Los métodos de germinación simbiótica produjeron embriones de T. variegata más desarrollados que los métodos de germinación asimbiótica y las diferencias fueron estadísticamente significativas. Las semillas en los controles en medio de celulosa sin hongos micorrízicos no germinaron. Las semillas de Epidendrum ramosum, Lepanthes rupestris y Psychilis monensis no mostraron diferencias significativas en germinación entre métodos simbiótica y asimbiótica utilizando hongos aislados de raíces de T. variegata, incluso algunos aislados del grupo Rhizoctonia parasitaron las semillas. Los resultados sugieren que las semillas de orquídeas epifitas y sus hongos micorrízicos son más específicos de lo que anteriormente se había creído y por tanto es necesario utilizar los hongos específicos para cada especie de orquídea. Además, se sugiere que los cultivadores de orquídeas podrían obtener mejores resultados en la propagación de orquídeas epifitas si utilizan metodologías de germinación simbiótica apropiados.

  13. Considerazioni sul Realismo socialista in Albania, fra rigide direttive ufficiali e aperture culturali

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    Amalda Cuka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Si propone una analisi del contesto culturale dell’Albania socialista e delle ricerche artistiche indirizzate verso uno stile nazionale: il realismo socialista. L’analisi non prescinde da una valutazione dei percorsi di alcuni artisti che hanno dato spazio ad una ricerca più ampia e variegata. A tal proposito si sottolineano le esperienze internazionali che alcuni hanno avuto modo di compiere negli altri paesi socialisti, oltre ai rapporti culturali con l’Italia, nel periodo tra le due guerre mondiali, in quanto hanno segnato profondamente il panorama artistico albanese degli decenni successivi.

  14. [Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of acute hepatic prophyrias (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, M

    1979-11-16

    Diagnosis of porphyria is a clinical and biochemical procedure. Acute hepatic porphyrias are molecular regulation diseases which are characterized by a relative enzyme deficiency of the ferro-chelatase chain and an induction of hepatic delta-aminoacid synthase. There are indistinct clinical and pathobiochemical transitions between the three acute hepatic types of porphyria: acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria and porphyria variegata. They develop a similar acute clinical syndrome. The differential diagnosis is made possible by a differentiation of porphyrins and porphyrin precursers in the urine and the porphyrines in the stool and by the determination of uroporphyrinogen synthase activity in the erythrocytes.

  15. Portar via per condurre altrove: suggestioni e annotazioni metodologiche sull'orizzonte di senso di una blogoclasse

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    Andreas Robert Formiconi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Un articolo scritto in stile ibrido, fra il paper scientifico e il saggio, per descrivere le necessità€ e le suggestioni che hanno dato vita ad un nuovo tipo di corso su temi attinenti alla “digital literacy” insieme ai risultati ottenuti su una vasta e variegata popolazione studentesca nel corso degli ultimi quattro semestri.Si descrivono le caratteristiche di una nuova “classe a pareti sottili”, che abbiamo definito blogoclasse e si discutono le affinità fra una blogoclasse ed una comunità di pratica.

  16. Análise Faunística de Insetos Associados à Cultura do Quiabeiro [Abelmoschus esculentus (L. Moench] em Plantio Comercial, no Município de Canindé de São Francisco, SE, Brasil

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    Daniele Cristina Silva

    2016-08-01

    Abstract. This research aims to study the entomofauna associated with the commercial cultivation of okra in municipality of Canindé do São Francisco, Sergipe State, Brazil, through faunal analysis. The species Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius biotype B, Aphis gossypii (Glover, Phenacoccus sp., Icerya purchasi (Maskell and Lagria villosa (Fabricius were the okra key pests. Diabrotica speciosa (Germar and Gryllus assimilis (Fabricius were plagues of secondary importance. And Leptoglossus zonatus (Dallas, Nezaraviridula L., Pachycoris torridus (Scopoli and Oxycarenus hyalinipennis (Costa were sporadic pests. Four species of predatory insects were found, a constant and dominant (Cycloneda sanguinea L. a dispersed, but constant (Eriopis connexa German and two rare (Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville and Psyllobora confluens F..

  17. Biological cycle and predation of three coccinellid species (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae) on giant conifer aphid Cinara atlantica (Wilson) (Hemiptera, Aphididae)

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Nádia Cristina de [UNESP; Wilcken, Carlos Frederico [UNESP; Matos, Carlos Alberto O. de [UNESP

    2004-01-01

    Afídeos do gênero Cinara Curtis são importantes pragas de coníferas em vários países. No Brasil Cinara atlantica (Wilson, 1919) tem causado danos em plantações comerciais de Pinus spp. e o controle biológico com predadores pode ser uma opção melhor que o controle químico. Este trabalho teve por objetivo estudar a biologia e a capacidade de predação dos coccinelídeos Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842, Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763) e Eriopis connexa (German, 1824) (Coleoptera,...

  18. Incorporating a Sorghum Habitat for Enhancing Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae in Cotton

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    P. G. Tillman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae prey on insect pests in cotton. The objective of this 2 yr on-farm study was to document the impact of a grain sorghum trap crop on the density of Coccinellidae on nearby cotton. Scymnus spp., Coccinella septempunctata (L., Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer, Cycloneda munda (Say, and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant were found in sorghum over both years. Lady beetle compositions in sorghum and cotton and in yellow pyramidal traps were similar. For both years, density of lady beetles generally was higher on cotton with sorghum than on control cotton. Our results indicate that sorghum was a source of lady beetles in cotton, and thus incorporation of a sorghum habitat in farmscapes with cotton has great potential to enhance biocontrol of insect pests in cotton.

  19. Barcode haplotype variation in north American agroecosystem lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstone, Matthew H; Vandenberg, Natalia J; Hu, Jing H

    2011-07-01

    DNA barcodes have proven invaluable in identifying and distinguishing insect pests, most notably for determining the provenance of exotic invasives, but relatively few insect natural enemies have been barcoded. We used Folmer et al.'s (1994) universal invertebrate primers and Hebert et al.'s (2004) for Lepidoptera, to amplify 658 bp at the 5' end of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI) gene in five species of lady beetles from crop fields in six states in the US Mid-Atlantic, Plains and Midwest: three native species, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, H. parenthesis (Say) and Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer); and two exotic species, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) and Coccinella septempunctata Linnaeus. Sequence divergences within species were low, never exceeding 0.9% (Kimura 2-parameter distances). Sequence divergences between the two Hippodamia species ranged from 14.7 to 16.4%, mirroring the relationships found for other arthropod taxa. Among the exotic species, C. septempunctata sequences were as variable as those of the three native species, while H. axyridis populations comprised a single haplotype. Limited data on two Coleomegilla subspecies, C. m. lengi Timberlake and C. m. fuscilabris (Mulsant), are consistent with their belonging to the same species, although morphological and reproductive data indicate that they represent separate species. Our results support the general utility of COI barcodes for distinguishing and diagnosing coccinellid species, but point to possible limitations in the use of barcodes to resolve species assignments in recently divergent sibling species. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae perjudiciales para "frutos rojos" en la Argentina Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae harmful for berry fruits in Argentina

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    M. Guadalupe Del Rio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Se registraron seis especies de gorgojos de rostro corto de la subfamilia Entiminae que causan daños en cultivos de frutos rojos, en la Argentina. Tres de ellas son exóticas y se distribuyen a lo largo de los bosques patagónicos: Otiorhynchus ovatus (Linnaeus, O. rugosostriatus (Goeze y O. sulcatus (Fabricius(Otiorhynchini; otras tres son nativas y habitan en la zona norte y central del país: Hyphantus sulcifrons Boheman (Anypotactini, Naupactusxanthographus (Germary N. cervinus Boheman (Naupactini. Las larvas viven en el suelo y se alimentan de la superficie externa de las raíces de sus plantas hospedadoras, causan daños más importantes que los adultos, los cuales se alimentan principalmente sobre el follaje. Los principales objetivos de esta contribución son: aportar una clave, diagnosis y fotografías de los hábitos de las seis especies para facilitar su correcta determinación; brindar datos sobre su distribución, plantas hospedadoras y biología, y citar la especie O. ovatus por primera vez para la Argentina, asociada con cultivos de arándano y frutilla.Six species of broad nosed weevils of the subfamily Entiminae are recorded as harmful for berries in Argentina. Three of them are exotic and distributed along the Patagonian forests: Otiorhynchus ovatus (Linnaeus, O. rugosostriatus (Goeze and O. sulcatus (Fabricius(Otiorhynchini and three are native and range in the northern and central areas of this country: Hyphantus sulcifrons Boheman (Anypotactini, Naupactusxanthographus (Germarand N. cervinus Boheman (Naupactini. Larvae live in soil and bore externally on the roots of their host plants, causing more damage than adults that usually feed on the leaves. The main objectives of this contribution are: to give a dichotomous key, diagnoses and habitus photographs for the identification of the six species; to provide information on their geographic distributions, host plants and biology; and to bring the first record of O. ovatus for

  1. Acalyptrate flies (Diptera on glacial sand deposits in the Hlučínsko region (NE Czech Republic: most interesting records

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    Roháček Jindřich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Records of six species of the families Ulidiidae, Anthomyzidae, Asteiidae, Milichiidae, Chloropidae and Curtonotidae from glacial sand deposits in the Hlučínsko region (NW Czech Republic are presented and their association with sandy habitats are discussed. Two thermophilous and/or xerophilous species, Anthomyza elbergi Andersson, 1976 (Anthomyzidae and Desmometopa discipalpis Papp, 1993 (Milichiidae represent new additions to the fauna of the Czech Republic. Two psammophilous or psammobiont species, Eutropha variegata Loew, 1866 (Chloropidae and Curtonotum anus (Meigen, 1830 (Curtonotidae are recorded for the first time from Moravia and the Czech Silesia respectively, the latter from a locality lying on northern border of its distributional range. Also Asteia elegantula Zetterstedt, 1847 (Asteiidae is first recorded from the Czech Silesia and Desmometopa discipalpis is recorded from its northernmost known locality. Information on microhabitats of these species and also the psammobiont Tetanops myopina Fallén, 1820 (Ulidiidae in sandpits are provided and most of them were photographed alive. The origins of populations of these species on glacial sands in the Hlučínsko region are discussed and it is concluded that while Asteia elegantula and Eutropha variegata are widespread in the W Palaearctic, Curtonotum anus and Desmometopa discipalpis are distinctly of southern origin and, most interestingly, Tetanops myopina and Anthomyza elbergi seem to originate from northern Europe and may have reached this area already during the Saalian glaciation (cca 160 000 ya.

  2. Análise química em órgãos de reserva de algumas herbáceas e arbóreas ocorrentes na flora do Espírito Santo, Brasil Chemical analysis of storage organs in herb and tree species from Espírito Santo State, Brazil

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    Joscineia Kelli Clippel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi investigada a composição de carboidratos não estruturais em órgãos subterrâneos de reserva das herbáceas Dioscorea sp. 1 e Dioscorea sp. 2 (Dioscoreaceae, Hedychium coronarium J. König (Zingiberaceae, Hippeastrum reticulatum (L'Hérit. Herb. (Amaryllidaceae, Scadoxus multiflorus (Martyn Raf. (Amaryllidaceae, Prescottia nivalis Barb. Rodr. (Orchidaceae e Sinningia aghensis Chautems (Gesneriaceae. O trabalho objetivou, também, avaliar os teores dos polissacarídeos de reserva de parede celular (PRPC e de nutrientes minerais em sementes de Cassia fistula L., Cassia grandis L.f., Canavalia rosea (Sw. DC., Erythrina variegata L., Hymenaea courbaril L. e Ormosia arborea (Vell. Harms pertencentes à família Leguminosae. A espécie que apresentou maior conteúdo de frutose foi a bulbosa H. reticulatum (25% MS sugerindo a presença de frutanos em seus órgãos subterrâneos. Os maiores teores de carboidratos solúveis totais, especialmente a sacarose (63% MS, foram observados em rizomas de P. nivalis, indicando que esse carboidrato desempenhe papel osmorregulador nessa rupestre revivescente. Quanto aos polissacarídeos de reserva de parede celular, maiores valores foram encontrados em sementes de H. courbaril (70% MS, C. grandis (53% MS e C. rosea (40% de MS. Valores intermediários foram obtidos em C. fistula (24% de MS e E. variegata (11% MS. Sementes de O. arborea mostraram os mais baixos teores de PRPC não ultrapassando ao valor de 3% da MS. Trabalhos anteriores denotam que o polissacarídeo de reserva de H. courbaril é do tipo xiloglucano, enquanto o de C. grandis, C. fistula e C. rosea seja do tipo galactomanano. A identificação do tipo de polissacarídeo de E. variegata e de O. arborea depende de análises futuras através da cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência. Dos nutrientes minerais, sementes de C. rosea e E. variegata destacaram pelos elevados teores de N (60 g.kg-1 entre os macronutrientes e de Fe (160-170 mg.g-1 e Zn

  3. Impact of the newly arrived seed-predating beetle Specularius impressithorax (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, A.C.; Von Allmen, E.; Fukada, M.; Samuelson, A.; Lau, T.

    2008-01-01

    Prior to 2001, seed predation was virtually absent in the endemic Wiliwili Erythrina sandwicensis (Fabaceae: Degener), dominant tree species of lower-elevation Hawaiian dryland forests. The African bruchine chrysomelid Specularius impressithorax (Pic) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) was first detected in Hawai'i in 2001 and became established on all main islands within the next two years. The mode of entry for this invasive Erythrina seed predator into Hawai'i is unknown, but likely occurred with the importation of trinket jewelry from Africa containing characteristically brightly-colored Erythrina seeds. The initial establishment of this insect likely occurred on a non-native host, the widely cultivated coral tree E. variegata. Within three years of its first record, S. impressithorax accounted for 77.4% mean seed crop loss in 12 populations of Wiliwili on six main Hawaiian islands. Specularius impressithorax, dispersed through international commerce and established via E. variegata, has become a threat to a unique Hawaiian forest type and may threaten other Erythrina, especially New World representatives.

  4. Evaluation of selected tropical seaweeds for in vitro anti-trichomonal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moo-Puc, R; Robledo, D; Freile-Pelegrin, Y

    2008-10-30

    Human parasitic infections are a serious problem in tropical and sub-tropical developing countries. Trichomoniasis, responsible for the annual infection of 180 million people, is a common sexually transmitted disease caused by the protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis. Traditionally seaweeds have been used in folk medicine by coastal people in Asia and the Caribbean to treat parasitic infections and are a valuable source of novel anti-trichomonals. In our search for therapeutical alternatives to anti-protozoal chemotherapy, we collected a selection of 25 tropical seaweeds (12 Rhodophyta, 5 Phaeophyta and 8 Chlorophyta) from the coast of Yucatan (Mexico) in order to undertake ethnopharmacological and chemotaxonomic investigations. Organic algal extracts were tested for their anti-trichomonal properties on the growth inhibition of Trichomonas vaginalis. The cytotoxicity of seaweed extracts on mammal cell lines was also assessed. The results indicated that 44% of the seaweeds studied had high to moderate anti-trichomonal activity. Lobophora variegata and Udotea conglutinata showed the maximal anti-trichomonal activity with IC(50) values of 1.39 and 1.66microg/ml, respectively, with good selectivity. Lobophora variegata and Udotea conglutinata demonstrated promising anti-trichomonal potential and have been selected for further bio-guided fractionation and isolation of active anti-trichomonal compounds.

  5. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance

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    Maria Luiza V. Oliva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.Obtidas de sementes leguminosas, várias proteínas inibem proteinases de origem animal, incluindo humanas, e podem ser consideradas para o desenvolvimento de compostos com atividade biológica. Inibidores da família Bowman-Birk e da família Kunitz vegetal tem sido caracterizados em relação a especificidade para proteinase, estrutura primária e sitio reativo. O nosso grupo majoritariamente vem estudando o gênero Bauhinia, principalmente as espécies bauhinioides, rufa, ungulatae variegata. Em algumas espécies, mais de um inibidor com propriedades diferentes foi caracterizado. Embora tais proteínas apresentem alta similaridade estrutural, diferem quanto à inibição de proteinases, e foram exploradas em estudos utilizando diversos modelos biológicos.

  6. A Comparison of the Human Buccal Cell Assay and the Pollen Abortion Assay in Assessing Genotoxicity in an Urban-Rural Gradient

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    Alan da Silveira Fleck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is exacerbated near heavy traffic roads in cities. Air pollution concentration and composition vary by region and depend on urban-rural gradients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of air pollution in areas of varying population densities and to compare plant biomonitoring with an established biomarker of human exposure to traffic-related air pollution in children. The areas of study were selected near a major street in 3 different regions. Areas A, B and C represent high, intermediate and low population densities, respectively. Micronucleus assay, an established biomarker of human exposure, was performed in children from these areas. For a plant biomonitoring assay, the pollen abortion assay was performed on Bauhinia variegata in these areas. NO2 and O3 concentrations were determined by passive sampling. We report here that the pollen abortion frequency in Bauhinia variegata is correlated with NO2 concentration (P = 0.004 and is strongly associated with vehicular flow and population density in the studied areas. Micronuclei frequency in buccal cells of children was higher in the regions with more degree of urbanization (P < 0.001 following the same pattern of O3 concentrations (P = 0.030. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that high concentrations of air pollutants in Porto Alegre are related to both human and plant genotoxicity. Areas with different concentration of pollutants demonstrated to have an urbanization gradient dependent pattern which also reflected on genotoxic damage among these areas.

  7. Screening of flavonoids rich fractions of three Indian medicinal plants used for the management of liver diseases

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    Arti Gupta

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe decoctions of the Butea monosperma (Lam. Taub., Fabaceae, Bauhinia variegata L., Fabaceae, and Ocimum gratissimum L., Lamiaceae, are traditionally used for the treatment of various types of hepatic disorder. Phytochemical studies have shown that total flavonoids from these plants were the major constituents of the picked out part of each plant. The present study was planned to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of flavonoid rich fractions of the B. monosperma, B. variegata and O. gratissimum against paracetamol induced liver damage. Flavonoid rich fractions were isolated by solvent fractionation from each plant. Each fraction was subjected to various qualitative chemical tests to findout the metabolites. Flavonoid fractions of each plant were subjected for pharmacological screening. The rats were monitored for change in liver morphology, biochemical parameters like serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin for the groups receiving the flavonoid-rich fractions. All flavonoid rich fractions showed significant hepatoprotective activity. The histological studies supported the biochemical parameters. From the results of biochemical analysis and histopathological studies, it can be accomplished that in the ethyl acetate fraction of O. gratissimum showed highest hepatoprotective activity as compared to other fractions. The present study was the first evidence of flavonoid-rich fractions of each plant have a remarkable hepatoprotective effect. All fractions contain a potent hepatoprotective agent suggested to be a flavone, which may find clinical application in amelioration of paracetamol-induced liver damage.

  8. El género Bauhinia (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae, Cercideae en la península de Yucatán (México, Belice y Guatemala The genus Bauhinia (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae, Cercideae in Yucatán Peninsula (Mexico, Belice and Guatemala

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    Rafael Torres-Colín

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta información del género Bauhinia, tribu Cercideae en la provincia biótica de la península de Yucatán. Se reconocen 5 especies nativas: Bauhinia divaricata L., B. erythrocalyx Wunderlin, B. jenningsii P. Wilson, B. herrerae (Britton et Rose Standl. et Steyerm. y B. ungulata L., así como 2 introducidas: B. monandra Kurz y B. variegata L. Se presenta una clave para identificación, descripciones morfológicas, mapas de distribución, fotografías de las especies e información de los nombres comunes y uso en la región.General information about the genus Bauhinia in the Yucatán Peninsula Biotic Province is presented. Five native species, B. divaricata L, B. erythrocalyx Wunderlin, B. jenningsii P. Wilson, B. herrerae (Britton et Rose Standl. et Steyerm., B. ungulata L. and 2 exotic species, B. monandra Kurz and B. variegata L., are recognized. Species identification key, morphological descriptions, distribution maps, and photographs are presented. Additional information of common names and uses in the region is included.

  9. Heavy metal contamination by Al-fabrication plants in Hong Kong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, N.F.Y.; Wong, Y.S.; Wong, M.H. (Hong Kong Polytechnic, Kowloon)

    1988-01-01

    Leaf samples of six plant species collected from locations near the Al-fabrication plants in Sai Kung, Hong Kong were found to be heavily contaminated by Al, Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu and Zn, as determined by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrophotometer (ICP). Studies using scanning electron microscope incorporated with X-ray microanalyzer showed that significant amounts of dust, with elevated concentrations of heavy metals, were deposited on the leaf surface. The stomatal pores were partially plugged and the guard cells were distorted. The amount of dust deposition and metal contamination varied significantly among different species. Lantana camara had the highest concentration of all metals. Washing with deionized waster could remove the surficial dust particles and reduce the metal contamination, with a degree of effectiveness depending on plant species and metal species. About 50% of Al and other metals were removed from leaves of L. camara and Fiscus variegata by washing, whereas only 20% removal was recorded in Bauhina variegata, the species had the least dust deposition. The soil samples and Al wastes collected from the same sites also exhibited higher values of total metal concentrations than the control. However, the contents of extractable metals were extremely low and were almost below the limits of detection. Experimental data further suggested that the source of leaf metals was mainly accumulated from metal-enriched aerosols, either from Al-fabrication plants or from automobile exhausts, and contribution from soil was relatively unimportant.

  10. Changes in the viability of the eggs of Ascaris suum under the influence of flavourings and source materials approved for use in and on foods

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    A. A. Boyko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common parasitic diseases of pigs globally is ascariasis. It is caused by the nematode Ascaris suum Goeze, 1782 (Nematoda, Ascaridata, which parasitises the small intestine of pigs in its mature form and the respiratory system at the larval stage. This helminthiasis causes immense damage to swine-rearing. Control of the ascariasis pathogen in the host’s organism and in the environment is essential for the health of the animals and successful swine-rearing. The results of studying the effect of flavourings and source materials approved for use in and on foods – cinnamaldehyde (0656 Codex Alimentarius, benzoic acid (Е210 Codex Alimentarius and methylparaben (Е218 Codex Alimentarius , on the viability of invasive eggs of A. suum are useful for determining the minimum concentration of solution of these substances for use against eggs of A. suum (10 g/l. The lowest efficiency against invasive eggs of A. suum was obtained for methylparaben (LD50 = 3850 ± 2130 mg/l, the highest was obtained with cinnamaldehyde (LD50 = 2437 ± 864 mg/l, and benzoic acid (LD50 = 1240 ± 680 mg/l.

  11. A new genus and species of proteocephalidean tapeworm (Cestoda) from Pangasius larnaudii (Siluriformes: Pangasiidae) in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Tomáš; de Chambrier, Alain

    2012-06-01

    A new proteocephalidean cestode is described from spot pangasius, Pangasius larnaudii (Siluriformes: Pangasiidae), from Tonle Sap Lake in Cambodia and a new genus, Pangasiocestus , is proposed to accommodate it. The genus is placed in the Gangesiinae because its scolex possesses a large rostellum-like apical organ and its genital organs (testes, ovary, vitellarium, and uterus) are situated in the medulla, with some vitelline follicles paramuscular. Pangasiocestus romani n. gen. and n. sp., the type and only species of the new genus, is characterized mainly by its rosette-like scolex composed of 4 lobes bearing a small sucker in their center, and the apical part with a large, discoidal, rostellum-like apical organ devoid of hooks, by weakly developed inner longitudinal musculature formed by very few isolated muscle fibers, uneven size of testes in immature and mature proglottids, with lateral testes smaller and more dense than median ones, by very narrow lateral bands of vitelline follicles, formed usually by single follicles, and by the vagina anterior to the cirrus sac. This is the first proteocephalidean cestode from a pangasiid catfish identified to the species level (proteocephalidean cestodes from 3 Pangasius spp. reported in an unpublished account from Vietnam, misidentified as Proteocephalus osculatus (Goeze, 1782) [ =  Glanitaenia osculata ], are not considered).

  12. New Curculionoidea records from New Brunswick, Canada with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Reginald P; Anderson, Robert S; Webster, Vincent L; Alderson, Chantelle A; Hughes, Cory C; Sweeney, Jon D

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents 27 new records of Curculionoidea for the province of New Brunswick, Canada, including three species new to Canada, and 12 adventive species, as follows: Eusphryrus walshii LeConte, Choragus harrisii LeConte (newly recorded for Canada), Choragus zimmermanni LeConte (newly recorded for Canada) (Anthribidae); Cimberis pallipennis (Blatchley) (Nemonychidae); Nanophyes marmoratus marmoratus (Goeze) (Brentidae); Procas lecontei Bedel (Brachyceridae); Anthonomus pusillus LeConte (newly recorded for Canada), Anthonomus (Cnemocyllus) pictus Blatchley, Archarius salicivorus (Paykull), Dorytomus hirtus LeConte, Ellescus bipunctatus (Linnaeus), Mecinus janthinus (Germar), Myrmex chevrolatii (Horn), Madarellus undulatus (Say), Microplontus campestris (Gyllenhal), Pelenomus waltoni (Boheman), Rhinoncus bruchoides (Herbst), Rhinoncus perpendicularis (Reich), Cossonus impressifrons Boheman, Cossonus pacificus Van Dyke, Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher), Eubulus bisignatus (Say), Polydrusus cervinus (Linnaeus), Magdalis piceae Buchanan, Procryphalus mucronatus (LeConte), Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff), and Xyleborinus attenuatus (Blandford). Recent name changes in the genus Rhinoncus are applied to species known from New Brunswick. In addition, Orchestes alni (Linnaeus) is newly recorded from Nova Scotia.

  13. FLEA BEETLES (CHRYSOMELIDAE: ALTICINAE SPECIES OCCURRING ON AMARANTHUS spp. IN SLOVAKIA

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    L Cagán

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Occurrence and abundance of flea beetle species associated with Amaranthus spp. was studied in Slovakia with the aim to assess their potential as biological control agents. Insects were collected by sweeping/catching at 10 localities three times during the growing season. Together 13 species from the subfamily Alticinae were collected on A. retroflexus L. and A. caudatus L. plants by sweeping net. They were Altica oleracea (L., Chaetocnema concinna (Marsh., C. leavicolis Thoms., C. tibialis (Ill., Longitarsus longipennis Kutsch., L. melanocephalus Deg., L. nasturtii (F., L. pellucidus Foudras, Phyllotreta atra (F., P. cruciferae (Goeze, P. nigripes (F., P. vittula (Redt. and Psylliodes chrysocephala (L.. C. tibialis contained 41.17- 97.45 percent of all flea beetles population and it was found at all observed localities. It comprised 94.85-99.74 percent of flea beetles on cultivated A. caudatus. Another two Chaetocnema species, C. concinna and C. leavicollis did not overcome more than one percent of C. tibialis population. P. vittula was present at each locality. All the other species occurred on Amaranthus plants were probably concomitant. Species composition of subfamily Alticinae on cultivated species A. caudatus did not differ significantly from those on A. retroflexus.

  14. Taxonomic corrections to species of Rhyparochromidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) described by Carl Peter Thunberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondorosy, Előd; Rédei, Dávid; Mejlon, Hans

    2014-07-22

    Types of Rhyparochromidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Lygaeoidea) species described by Carl Peter Thunberg, deposited in the Museum of Evolution (formerly Zoologiska Institut), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, were reexamined and the taxonomic and nomenclatural problems that existed among those species discussed and resolved as required. Lectotypes are designated for Cimex caffer Thunberg, 1784, Lygaeus ater Thunberg, 1822, Lygaeus biguttatus Thunberg, 1822, and Pendulinus guttatus Thunberg, 1825. The lectotype of Pendulinus (now Metochus) guttatus is designated as neotype of Pendulinus (now Metochus) uniguttatus Thunberg, 1822; as a result the former name becomes junior objective synonym of the latter. The following taxonomic changes are proposed: Lethaeus ater (Thunberg, 1822), new combination (from Lygaeus); Migdilybs biguttatus (Thunberg, 1822), new combination (from Lygaeus) = Migdilybs furcifer Hesse, 1925, new subjective synonym; Metochus uniguttatus (Thunberg, 1822) = Metochus bengalensis (Dallas, 1852), confirmed subjective synonym = Metochus yeh (Dohrn, 1860), confirmed subjective synonym; Raglius alboacuminatus (Goeze, 1778) = Cimex caffer Thunberg, 1874, confirmed subjective synonym. Lethaeus barberi Slater, 1964 does not belong to Lethaeus Dallas, 1852 but currently it cannot be placed with confidence in any existing genus. 

  15. Seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii in zoo animals in selected zoos in the midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camps, Silvia; Dubey, J P; Saville, W J A

    2008-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infections in zoo animals are of interest because many captive animals die of clinical toxoplasmosis and because of the potential risk of exposure of children and elderly to T. gondii oocysts excreted by cats in the zoos. Seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies in wild zoo felids, highly susceptible zoo species, and feral cats from 8 zoos of the midwestern United States was determined by using the modified agglutination test (MAT). A titer of 1:25 was considered indicative of T. gondii exposure. Among wild felids, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 6 (27.3%) of 22 cheetahs (Acynonyx jubatus jubatus), 2 of 4 African lynx (Caracal caracal), 1 of 7 clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa), 1 of 5 Pallas cats (Otocolobus manul), 12 (54.5%) of 22 African lions (Panthera leo), 1 of 1 jaguar (Panthera onca), 1 of 1 Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis), 1 of 1 Persian leopard (Panthera pardus saxicolor), 5 (27.8%) of 18 Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), 1 of 4 fishing cats (Prionailurus viverrinus), 3 of 6 pumas (Puma concolor), 2 of 2 Texas pumas (Puma concolor stanleyana), and 5 (35.7%) of 14 snow leopards (Uncia uncia). Antibodies were found in 10 of 34 feral domestic cats (Felis domesticus) trapped in 3 zoos. Toxoplasma gondii oocysts were not found in any of the 78 fecal samples from wild and domestic cats. Among the macropods, antibodies were detected in 1 of 3 Dama wallabies (Macropus eugenii), 1 of 1 western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus), 1 of 2 wallaroos (Macropus robustus), 6 of 8 Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus), 21 (61.8%) of 34 red kangaroos (Macropus rufus), and 1 of 1 dusky pademelon (Thylogale brunii). Among prosimians, antibodies were detected in 1 of 3 blue-eyed black lemurs (Eulemur macaco flavifrons), 1 of 21 ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), 2 of 9 red-ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata rubra), and 2 of 4 black- and white-ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata variegata). Among the avian species tested, 2 of 3 bald

  16. Nematode biology and larval development of Thelazia callipaeda (Spirurida, Thelaziidae) in the drosophilid intermediate host in Europe and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otranto, D; Lia, R P; Cantacessi, C; Testini, G; Troccoli, A; Shen, J L; Wang, Z X

    2005-12-01

    Thelazia callipaeda, commonly known as the 'oriental eyeworm', has been recently reported in Italy and other European countries. The insect/s that act as intermediate hosts and details of larval development inside the vector remain unclear. In order to (1) demonstrate the species of fly that may act as vector/s for T. callipaeda in southern Italy (Site A) and China (Site B) and (2) describe the larval development of the nematode in the body of flies, 847 Phortica (Drosophilidae) flies were collected from the above two sites, each with a history of human and/or canine thelaziosis. Flies were identified as Phortica variegata (245 - site A) and Phortica okadai (602 - site B), experimentally infected by 1st-stage larvae (L1), kept at different temperatures and dissected daily until day 180 post-infection (p.i.). Dead flies from site A were subjected to specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to detect T. callipaeda. To demonstrate the role of Phortica as vectors of T. callipaeda, 3rd-stage larvae (L3) recovered from the proboscis of flies were deposited onto the cornea of the eyes of dogs and rabbits. Following dissection, 3 (2.9%) of P. variegata in site A were found to be infected by L3 in the proboscis on days +14, +21 and +53 p.i., compared with 26 (18.4%) of Phortica flies recorded as being positive by PCR. Sequences from positive PCR products were 99% identical to sequences of the corresponding species available in GenBank (AY207464). At site B, 106 (17.6%) of 602 dissected P. okadai were found to be infected by T. callipaeda larvae (different stages) and in total 62 L3 were recovered from the proboscis of 34 (5.6%) flies. The shortest time in which L3 were found was at day +14, +17, +19, and +50 p.i. respectively, depending on the environmental temperatures. Of 30 flies overwintered for 6 months, 6 L3 were detected at day +180 p.i. in 3 flies (10%). The biology of larval development was reconstructed on the basis of the dissection of 602 P. okadai

  17. Current knowledge on biotechnological interesting seaweeds from the Magellan Region, Chile

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    Andrés Mansilla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a compilation of data from investigations made with marine benthic algae from the Magellan Region that have biotechnological utilization in human consumption or medicine or as a source of phycolloids or food supplements or animal feed. The most important Rhodophyta species are: Ahnfeltia plicata (Hudson E.M. Fries for agarose production, Gigartina skottsbergii Setchell & N.L.Gardner for carrageenan production, and Callophyllis variegata (Bory de Saint-Vincent Kützing for human consumption. The most important Heterokontophyta species are: Macrocystis pyrifera (L. C. Agardh, and Durvillaea antarctica (Chamisso Hariot for human consumption, alginate production, and as biofertilizer for agricultural crops. M. pyrifera is also used as a food supplement for salmon, chickens, quails, sheep and bovines and for biofuel production.

  18. Current knowledge on biotechnological interesting seaweeds from the Magellan Region, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Mansilla

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a compilation of data from investigations made with marine benthic algae from the Magellan Region that have biotechnological utilization in human consumption or medicine or as a source of phycolloids or food supplements or animal feed. The most important Rhodophyta species are: Ahnfeltia plicata (Hudson E.M. Fries for agarose production, Gigartina skottsbergii Setchell & N.L.Gardner for carrageenan production, and Callophyllis variegata (Bory de Saint-Vincent Kützing for human consumption. The most important Heterokontophyta species are: Macrocystis pyrifera (L. C. Agardh, and Durvillaea antarctica (Chamisso Hariot for human consumption, alginate production, and as biofertilizer for agricultural crops. M. pyrifera is also used as a food supplement for salmon, chickens, quails, sheep and bovines and for biofuel production.

  19. First reports of autochthonous eyeworm infection by Thelazia callipaeda (Spirurida, Thelaziidae) in dogs and cat from France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchies, Ph; Chaudieu, G; Siméon, L A; Cazalot, G; Cantacessi, C; Otranto, D

    2007-11-10

    Thelazia callipaeda (Spirurida, Thelaziidae) is a small nematode living in the conjunctival sac of domestic and wild carnivores, rabbits and humans causing lacrimation, epiphora, conjunctivitis, keratitis and even corneal ulcers. The first autochthonous cases of thelaziosis affecting four dogs and one cat living in South Western France (Dordogne area) are reported and described. Nematodes recovered from the animals were morphologically identified as T. callipaeda and a partial region of the cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 gene (cox1) was amplified by PCR from nematode specimens (from two dogs and the cat). In each case, this was shown to have an identical sequence to the haplotype 1 (h1) of T. callipaeda. So far, the arthropod acting as intermediate host of T. callipaeda eyeworms has not been identified in France although it might be Phortica variegata (Steganinae, Drosophilidae) as recently described in Italy.

  20. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is present in Poland and associated with reduced fitness in wild populations of Pelophylax lessonae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenda, Krzysztof; Najbar, Anna; Ogielska, Maria; Balá, Vojtech

    2017-05-11

    The fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is a pathogen associated with global declines of amphibians. We used qPCR to detect Bd in 255 samples from 10 Polish populations of 8 species. We found Bd infection in 3 species (Bombina variegata, Pelophylax lessonae, P. esculentus). The infection intensity in P. lessonae reached a maximum of 58400 genomic equivalents of zoospores (GE), and the 2 most heavily infected individuals died. Previous observations of the populations that included infected individuals showed reduced body size, failure to reproduce, and mortalities of adults. These data highlight the importance of emerging diseases, and the need to recognize them as an important factor in conservation of the genus Pelophylax in Poland and Central and Eastern Europe.

  1. Using Ecological Niche Modeling For Biodiversity Conservation Guidance In The Western Podillya (Ukraine: Amphibians

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    Tytar V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Maximum entropy niche modeling was employed as a tool to assess potential habitat suitability for 13 amphibian species and to map their potential distribution in the Western Podillya (Ukraine. The predictor variables used were of climate, topography and human impact (assessed by the Human Footprint. The “mean temperature of coldest quarter” and “isothermality” were two of the most important factors in predicting habitat suitability and distribution. Another profound contribution has been displayed by the Human Footprint, meaning that human infrastructure may benefit amphibians, a phenomenon that perhaps is much more widespread than thought. Areas have been distinguished that in the first place should be of interest to nature conservationists targeting amphibians (exemplified by Bombina variegata and a map summarizing species richness was produced.

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12451-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1.4 2 ( AX281269 ) Sequence 11 from Patent WO0177164. 38 1.4 2 ( DQ842609 ) Viola dissecta voucher Zhou s.n.... maturase K (matK... 34 1.4 3 ( DQ842606 ) Viola violacea voucher Yoo983 maturase K (matK) g... 34 1.4 3 ( DQ842604 ) Viola... tenuicornis voucher Yoo030429 maturase K (m... 34 1.4 3 ( DQ842603 ) Viola... variegata voucher Yoo 967 maturase K (matK)... 34 1.4 3 ( DQ842600 ) Viola philippica voucher Yoo... 0305201 maturase K (... 34 1.4 3 ( DQ842599 ) Viola seoulensis voucher Lee & Heo 3029 maturase ... 34 1.4 3 ( DQ842598 ) Viola

  3. First report of Thelazia callipaeda infection in wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Adelina; Pires, Isabel; Canado, Márcia; Coutinho, Teresa; Lopes, Ana Patrícia; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Cardoso, Luís; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2016-05-10

    Thelazia callipaeda is a zoonotic nematode that affects the eyes of domestic and wild animals, including dogs, cats and red foxes. This parasitic eye worm is transmitted by Phortica variegata, which is a zoophilic fruit fly spread in Europe. Two wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) found dead in north-eastern Portugal were submitted to necropsy. Both animals presented gross lesions compatible with haemorrhagic viral disease. Eye examination revealed the presence of six worms (three in each animal, on both eyes). Out of the six nematodes, five females and one male were morphologically and molecularly identified as T. callipaeda. This is the first report of T. callipaeda in wild rabbits from Portugal, which reveals a new host for this parasite in southern Europe and emphasizes the importance of including thelaziosis in the differential diagnosis of ocular alterations in both animals and humans from areas where the eye worm is endemic.

  4. Species distribution modeling techniques as a tool in preliminary assessment of special nature reserve ,,Goč-Gvozdac’’

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    Čubrić, T.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective conservation actions such as defining new nature reserve require accurate estimates of the spatial distributions of the target species. Species distribution models provide habitat suitability maps for studied species. In this paper we used Maxent software to estimate the distribution and extent of potential suitable habitat of five amphibian and reptilian species (Mesotriton alpestris, Bombina variegata, Testudo hermanni, Lacerta viridis and Vipera ammodytes in the special nature reserve “Goč-Gvozdac” (Central Serbia in order to assess how much of the potential habitats is included in this reserve. Comparing produced suitable habitat maps of the species with a map of the special nature reserve “Goč – Gvozdac” we concluded that the reserve boundaries do not coincide with the proposed distribution of suitable habitats for M. alpestris, T. hermanni, L. viridis and V. ammodytes, and therefore this reserve does not contribute much to the protection of local populations of these species.

  5. PRELIMINARY DATA CONCERNING THE HERPETOFAUNA IN NEAM COUNTY (ROMANIA

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    Sorin ROŞU

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available In the researched area we identified 14 amphibian species: (Salamandra salamndra, Triturus vulgaris, Triturus cristatus, Triturus alpestris, Triturus montandoni, Bombina bombina, Bombina variegata, Bufo bufo, Bufo viridis, Pelobates fuscus, Hyla arborea, Rana ridibunda, Rana dalmatina, Rana temporaria and 8 reptilian species (Lacerta agilis, Lacerta viridis, Zootoca vivipara, Anguis fragilis, Natrix natrix, Elaphe longissima, Coronella austriaca, Vipera berus. Within the region we identified species quoted (Coglniceanu et al. 2000 to have the lowest altitudinal limit of their spreading area at much higher altitudes. The species Triturus montandoni was identified at 320 m altitude at Agârcia and Doamna. Most of the amphibian and reptilian species are not endangered in the researched area.

  6. Water wave communication in the genus Bombina (amphibia)

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    Seidel, B.; Yamashita, M.; Choi, I.-H.; Dittami, J.

    2001-01-01

    Amphibians were phylogenetically the first vertebrates to leave the aquatic environment and cope with terrestrial conditions including effects of gravity and substrate on movement and communication. Studies of extant primitive amphibians, which have conserved ancestral morphology and behavior, may help us to understand how gravitational adaptation from aquatic to terrestrial environments occurred. The anuran genus Bombina is a candidate for this type of investigation. In particular, a member of this genus, B. orientalis, is known for its low reaction threshold to minor changes of angular acceleration. We hypothesize that a heightened sensitivity to angular and mechanical accelerations evolved with wave communication. Comparisons of such behavior among B. variegata, B. bombina and B. orientalis may shed light on the evolution of reproductive systems based on water wave communication and relevant vestibular sensitivity. This may represent a transition to derived vocalization modes, which is seen in B. bombina to a certain degree.

  7. How do we share food? Feeding of four amphibian species from an aquatic habitat in south–western Romania

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    Bogdan, H. V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The feeding of four amphibian species (Triturus cristatus, Lissotriton vulgaris, Bombina variegata, Pelophylax ridibundus was studied in 2011, in south–western Romania. The diet of the newts was uniform and mostly composed of aquatic preys The diet of the anurans was more diversified, comprising more prey taxa, mostly terrestrial. The trophic niches of the two newt species overlapped highly but differed from those of the anurans. The trophic niches of the anurans differed from one another. The differences among the four species’ diets were determined by the use of different trophic resources, originating from different environments, and by their different sizes. The newts’ diet was less diversified because the aquatic habitat was small and poor in trophic availability. The anurans used the aquatic habitat as a base from where they captured terrestrial preys in the surrounding terrestrial environment.

  8. Seven new species of the genus Xestoleberis (Ostracoda: Podocopida: Cytheroidea) from the Fiji Archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Prerna; Kamiya, Takahiro

    2016-12-18

    The genus Xestoleberis has a global distribution, and although they are predominant in shallow marine environments adapted to both sediment and algal habitats, only two species of this genus, Xestoleberis curta (Brady, 1866) and Xestoleberis variegata Brady, 1880, have previously been reported from the Fiji archipelago. Herein we report seven new species of the genus Xestoleberis from intertidal environments of fringing reef flats of the Fiji Islands: Xestoleberis becca n. sp., Xestoleberis concava n. sp., Xestoleberis gracilariaii n. sp., Xestoleberis marcula n. sp., Xestoleberis natuvuensis n. sp., Xestoleberis penna n. sp. and Xestoleberis petrosa n. sp. With the exception of X. becca n. sp., Xestoleberis species show restricted distribution within Fijian waters. The possible causes for their distribution patterns are suggested to be physical barriers imposed by the fast flowing Bligh Water currents, and islands separated by deep ocean waters.

  9. Natural enemies associated to aphids in peach orchards in Araucária, Paraná, Brazil Inimigos naturais associados a afídeos em pomares de pessegueiros em Araucária, Estado do Paraná, Brasil

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    JM. Schuber

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural enemies of the Class Insecta are important agents in the balance of aphid populations and an alternative to using insecticides to control these insects. The aim of this study was to identify the species of natural enemies associated with aphids present in peach orchards and observe the efficiency of capturing different sampling methods. The experiment was conducted from July, 2005 to September, 2006 in six peach orchards 'Chimarrita', in Araucária, PR, Brazil. The samples were taken by visual analysis in peach plants and weeds, yellow pan traps, sticky traps and funnels. Predator species were identified: Cryptolaemus montrouzieri, Cycloneda pulchella, Cycloneda sanguinea, Eriopis connexa, Harmonia axyridis, Hippodamia convergens and Scymnus sp. (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Allograpta sp., Palpada sp. and Toxomerus sp. (Diptera, Syrphidae and Chrysoperla sp. (Neuroptera, Chrysopidae and the parasitoids: Diaretiella rapae, Opius sp. and Praon sp (Braconidae. Examples of Encyrtidae and Eulophidae await identification. Chrysoperla sp. was a less abundant species. There were no statistically significant differences between the different sampling methods tested.Os inimigos naturais da Classe Insecta são importantes agentes no equilíbrio das populações de afídeos e uma forma alternativa ao uso de inseticidas no controle desses insetos. O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar as espécies de inimigos naturais associados aos afídeos presentes em pomares de pessegueiros, além de verificar a eficiência de captura de diferentes métodos de amostragem. O experimento foi realizado de julho de 2005 a setembro de 2006, em seis pomares de pessegueiros 'Chimarrita' em Araucária-PR, Brasil. As amostragens foram realizadas por meio de: análise visual em plantas de pessegueiros e plantas invasoras; armadilhas amarelas; armadilhas adesivas, e funil. Foram identificados os predadores: Cryptolaemus montrouzieri, Cycloneda pulchella, Cycloneda

  10. Ciclo biológico e predação de três espécies de coccinelídeos (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae sobre o pulgão-gigante-do-pinus Cinara atlantica (Wilson (Hemiptera, Aphididae Biological cycle and predation of three coccinellid species (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae on giant conifer aphid Cinara atlantica (Wilson (Hemiptera, Aphididae

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    Nádia Cristina de Oliveira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Afídeos do gênero Cinara Curtis são importantes pragas de coníferas em vários países. No Brasil Cinara atlantica (Wilson, 1919 tem causado danos em plantações comerciais de Pinus spp. e o controle biológico com predadores pode ser uma opção melhor que o controle químico. Este trabalho teve por objetivo estudar a biologia e a capacidade de predação dos coccinelídeos Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842, Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763 e Eriopis connexa (German, 1824 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae sobre ninfas de C. atlantica. O estudo foi conduzido sob condições controladas (temperatura: 23 ± 1ºC, UR: 70 ± 10% e fotofase: 14 h.. Foi verificado que ninfas de C. atlantica são adequadas como alimento para as três espécies de coccinelídeos, assegurando seu desenvolvimento e reprodução. H. convergens e C. sanguinea apresentaram maior longevidade e capacidade de reprodução e também maior capacidade de predação (3832 e 3633 ninfas de C. atlantica em comparação a 2735 ninfas consumidas por E. connexa durante o ciclo completo, respectivamente para as espécies. Estas espécies de predadores podem contribuir para a redução da população de Cinara no campo.The aphids of the genus Cinara Curtis are important pests of conifers in several countries. In Brazil, Cinara atlantica (Wilson, 1919 has damaged commercial plantations of Pinus spp. and biological control with predators can be a better option than chemical control. The objective of this work was to study biology and predation potential of coccinellids Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, 1842, Cycloneda sanguinea (Linnaeus, 1763 and Eriopis connexa (German, 1824 (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae on nymphs of C. atlantica. The study was carried out under controlled conditions (temperature: 23 ± 1ºC, RH: 70 ± 10% and fotophase: 14 h. It was verified that C. atlantica nymphs are adequate as food for the three coccinellid species, assuring their development and

  11. Perspectives on screening winter-flood-tolerant woody species in the riparian protection forests of the three gorges reservoir.

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    Fan Yang

    Full Text Available The establishment of riparian protection forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR is an ideal measure to cope with the eco-environmental problems of the water-level fluctuation zone (WLFZ. Thus, the information for screening winter-flood-tolerant woody plant species is useful for the recovery and re-establishment of the riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ. Therefore, we discussed the possibilities of constructing and popularizing riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ from several aspects, including the woody plant species distribution in the WLFZ, the survival rate analyses of suitable candidate woody species under controlled flooding conditions, the survival rate investigation of some woody plant species planted in the TGR WLFZ, and the physiological responses of some woody plant species during the recovery stage after winter floods. The results of woody species investigation showed that most woody plant species that existed as annual seedlings in the TGR WLFZ are not suitable candidates for the riparian protection forests. However, arbor species (e.g., Salix matsudana, Populus×canadensis, Morus alba, Pterocarya stenoptera, Taxodium ascendens, and Metasequoia glyptostroboides and shrub species (e.g., Salix variegata, Distylium chinensis, Lycium chinense, Myricaria laxiflora, and Rosa multiflora might be considered suitable candidates for the riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ by survival rate analyses under controlled winter flooding conditions, and survival rate investigations of woody plant species planted in the TGR WLFZ, respectively. Physiological analyses showed that P.×canadensis, M. alba, L. chinense, and S. variegata could develop specific self-repairing mechanisms to stimulate biomass accumulation and carbohydrate synthesis via the increases in chlorophyll pigments and photosynthesis during recovery after winter floods. Our results suggested these woody plant species could endure the winter flooding stress

  12. Variación ontogenética en la palatibilidad de los renacuajos de Bufo spinulosus papillosus Philippi, 1902 (Anura: Bufonidae

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    Jara, Fabián Gastón

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la variación ontogenética de la palatabilidad en Bufo spinulosus papillosus expuestos a larvas del odonato Rhionaeshna variegata (Odonata, Aeshnidae. Los renacuajos fueron agrupados en cuatro categorías de desarrollo y fueron expuestos a la depredación directa determinándose el número de renacuajos consumidos al finalizar los experimentos. Bufo spinulosus papillosus no fue palatable en los primeros estadios del desarrollo (categorías I, estadios 24-26 y categoría II, estadios 32-34, mientras que los estadios de las categoría III (estadios 38-40 y categoría IV (estadios 42-45 fueron progresivamente palatables. Se observó un comportamiento de rechazo por parte de los depredadores luego de la captura de renacuajos de las categorías I y II. El patrón de palatabilidad encontrado en Bufo spinulosus papillosus difiere del observado en otras especies relacionadas del género Bufo (Brodie y Formanowicz, 1987; Kehr y Schnack, 1991; Lawler y Hero, 1997. We evaluated the ontogenetic variation in the palatability of Bufo spinulosus papillosus tadpoles exposed to odonate larvae of Rhionaeshna variegata (Odonata, Aeshnidae. We exposed tadpoles to direct predation and determined the number of consumed tadpoles in four developmental categories. Bufo spinulosus papillosus tadpoles of categories I (stages 24-26 and II (stages 32-34 were unpalatable, while categories III (stages 38-40 and IV (stages 42-45 were progressively palatable. We observed a post-capture rejection behavior when they caught unpalatable tadpoles in categories I and II. The palatability pattern observed in Bufo spinulosus papillosus was different from related Bufo species (Brodie and Formanowicz, 1987; Kehr and Schnack, 1991; Lawler and Hero, 1997.

  13. Farmed areas predict the distribution of amphibian ponds in a traditional rural landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, Tibor; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Traditional rural landscapes of Eastern Europe are undergoing major changes due to agricultural intensification, land abandonment, change in agricultural practices and infrastructural development. Small man-made ponds are important yet vulnerable components of rural landscapes. Despite their important role for biodiversity, these ponds tend to be excluded from conservation strategies. Our study was conducted in a traditional rural landscape in Eastern Europe. The aim of this study is twofold: (i) to model the distribution of four major man-made pond types and (ii) to present the importance of man-made ponds for the endangered Yellow Bellied Toad (Bombina variegata) and the Common Toad (Bufo bufo). Six environmental variables were used to model pond distribution: Corine landcover, the heterogeneity of the landcover, slope, road distance, distance to closest village and the human population density. Land cover heterogeneity was the most important driver for the distribution of fishponds. Areas used for agriculture with significant areas of natural vegetation were the most important predictors for the distribution of temporary ponds. In addition, areas covered by transitional woodland and scrub were important for the open cattle ponds. Bombina variegata was found predominantly in the temporary ponds (e.g. ponds created by cattle and buffalo, dirt road ponds and concrete ponds created for livestock drinking) and Bufo bufo in fishponds. Our Maxent models revealed that the highest probability of occurrence for amphibian ponds was in areas used as farmland. The traditional farming practices combined with a low level of infrastructure development produces a large number of amphibian ponds. The challenge is to harmonize economic development and the maintenance of high densities of ponds in these traditional rural landscapes.

  14. Farmed areas predict the distribution of amphibian ponds in a traditional rural landscape.

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    Tibor Hartel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditional rural landscapes of Eastern Europe are undergoing major changes due to agricultural intensification, land abandonment, change in agricultural practices and infrastructural development. Small man-made ponds are important yet vulnerable components of rural landscapes. Despite their important role for biodiversity, these ponds tend to be excluded from conservation strategies. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Our study was conducted in a traditional rural landscape in Eastern Europe. The aim of this study is twofold: (i to model the distribution of four major man-made pond types and (ii to present the importance of man-made ponds for the endangered Yellow Bellied Toad (Bombina variegata and the Common Toad (Bufo bufo. Six environmental variables were used to model pond distribution: Corine landcover, the heterogeneity of the landcover, slope, road distance, distance to closest village and the human population density. Land cover heterogeneity was the most important driver for the distribution of fishponds. Areas used for agriculture with significant areas of natural vegetation were the most important predictors for the distribution of temporary ponds. In addition, areas covered by transitional woodland and scrub were important for the open cattle ponds. Bombina variegata was found predominantly in the temporary ponds (e.g. ponds created by cattle and buffalo, dirt road ponds and concrete ponds created for livestock drinking and Bufo bufo in fishponds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our Maxent models revealed that the highest probability of occurrence for amphibian ponds was in areas used as farmland. The traditional farming practices combined with a low level of infrastructure development produces a large number of amphibian ponds. The challenge is to harmonize economic development and the maintenance of high densities of ponds in these traditional rural landscapes.

  15. Life history tactics shape amphibians' demographic responses to the North Atlantic Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayuela, Hugo; Joly, Pierre; Schmidt, Benedikt R; Pichenot, Julian; Bonnaire, Eric; Priol, Pauline; Peyronel, Olivier; Laville, Mathias; Besnard, Aurélien

    2017-11-01

    Over the last three decades, climate abnormalities have been reported to be involved in biodiversity decline by affecting population dynamics. A growing number of studies have shown that the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) influences the demographic parameters of a wide range of plant and animal taxa in different ways. Life history theory could help to understand these different demographic responses to the NAO. Indeed, theory states that the impact of weather variation on a species' demographic traits should depend on its position along the fast-slow continuum. In particular, it is expected that NAO would have a higher impact on recruitment than on adult survival in slow species, while the opposite pattern is expected occur in fast species. To test these predictions, we used long-term capture-recapture datasets (more than 15,000 individuals marked from 1965 to 2015) on different surveyed populations of three amphibian species in Western Europe: Triturus cristatus, Bombina variegata, and Salamandra salamandra. Despite substantial intraspecific variation, our study revealed that these three species differ in their position on a slow-fast gradient of pace of life. Our results also suggest that the differences in life history tactics influence amphibian responses to NAO fluctuations: Adult survival was most affected by the NAO in the species with the fastest pace of life (T. cristatus), whereas recruitment was most impacted in species with a slower pace of life (B. variegata and S. salamandra). In the context of climate change, our findings suggest that the capacity of organisms to deal with future changes in NAO values could be closely linked to their position on the fast-slow continuum. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Fast detection of nutrient limitation in macroalgae and seagrass with nutrient-induced fluorescence.

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    Joost den Haan

    Full Text Available Rapid determination of which nutrients limit the primary production of macroalgae and seagrasses is vital for understanding the impacts of eutrophication on marine and freshwater ecosystems. However, current methods to assess nutrient limitation are often cumbersome and time consuming. For phytoplankton, a rapid method has been described based on short-term changes in chlorophyll fluorescence upon nutrient addition, also known as Nutrient-Induced Fluorescence Transients (NIFTs. Thus far, though, the NIFT technique was not well suited for macroalgae and seagrasses.We developed a new experimental setup so that the NIFT technique can be used to assess nutrient limitation of benthic macroalgae and seagrasses. We first tested the applicability of the technique on sea lettuce (Ulva lactuca cultured in the laboratory on nutrient-enriched medium without either nitrogen or phosphorus. Addition of the limiting nutrient resulted in a characteristic change in the fluorescence signal, whereas addition of non-limiting nutrients did not yield a response. Next, we applied the NIFT technique to field samples of the encrusting fan-leaf alga Lobophora variegata, one of the key algal species often involved in the degradation of coral reef ecosystems. The results pointed at co-limitation of L. variegata by phosphorus and nitrogen, although it responded more strongly to phosphate than to nitrate and ammonium addition. For turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum we found the opposite result, with a stronger NIFT response to nitrate and ammonium than to phosphate.Our extension of the NIFT technique offers an easy and fast method (30-60 min per sample to determine nutrient limitation of macroalgae and seagrasses. We successfully applied this technique to macroalgae on coral reef ecosystems and to seagrass in a tropical inner bay, and foresee wider application to other aquatic plants, and to other marine and freshwater ecosystems.

  17. Reproductive cycles in tropical intertidal gastropods are timed around tidal amplitude cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Rachel; Kerr, Kecia; Contolini, Gina; Ochoa, Isis

    2017-08-01

    Reproduction in iteroparous marine organisms is often timed with abiotic cycles and may follow lunar, tidal amplitude, or daily cycles. Among intertidal marine invertebrates, decapods are well known to time larval release to coincide with large amplitude nighttime tides, which minimizes the risk of predation. Such bimonthly cycles have been reported for few other intertidal invertebrates. We documented the reproduction of 6 gastropod species from Panama to determine whether they demonstrate reproductive cycles, whether these cycles follow a 2-week cycle, and whether cycles are timed so that larval release occurs during large amplitude tides. Two of the species ( Crepidula cf. marginalis and Nerita scabricosta ) showed nonuniform reproduction, but without clear peaks in timing relative to tidal or lunar cycles. The other 4 species show clear peaks in reproduction occurring every 2 weeks. In 3 of these species ( Cerithideopsis carlifornica var. valida, Littoraria variegata , and Natica chemnitzi ), hatching occurred within 4 days of the maximum amplitude tides. Siphonaria palmata exhibit strong cycles, but reproduction occurred during the neap tides. Strong differences in the intensity of reproduction of Cerithideopsis carlifornica , and in particular, Littoraria variegata , between the larger and smaller spring tides of a lunar month indicate that these species time reproduction with the tidal amplitude cycle rather than the lunar cycle. For those species that reproduce during both the wet and dry seasons, we found that reproductive timing did not differ between seasons despite strong differences in temperature and precipitation. Overall, we found that most (4/6) species have strong reproductive cycles synchronized with the tidal amplitude cycle and that seasonal differences in abiotic factors do not alter these cycles.

  18. SURVEY, IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF INSECT INJURIES IN ORNAMENTAL TREES IN THE URBAN AREA OF GOIÂNIA, GOIÁS STATE, BRASIL LEVANTAMENTO, IDENTIFICAÇÃO E AVALIAÇÃO DOS DANOS DE INSETOS EM ÁRVORES ORNAMENTAIS NA ÁREA URBANA DE GOIÂNIA (GO

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    Antônio Henrique Garcia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    From 1800 ornamental trees sampled in Goiânia urban area, Paquira aquatica represented 62,7 %, Cesalpinia sp. 15,3 %, Bauhinia variegata 10 %, Sapthodea campanulata 6 %, Terminalia catappa 3,2 %, Acacia sp. 1,2%, Ponciana sp. 1,0 %, and other species 1 %. The most frequent insect species observed in P. aquatica were Psylla floccosa ( 92,3%, Steirastoma breve (76,7%, Palindia detracta (63,4%, Phelypera shuppeli (43,4% and Euchroma gigantea (23,7%. The most severe injuries to plants are caused by S. breve, which desiccates trunk and stems, and E. gigantea. Its larvae destroy the whole root system and cause the fall of the tree. Orthezia praelonga was observed in 84,6 % of the sampled B. variegata; in 30 trees 20% died after three years and 40% at the of the fourth year; from 50 seedlings 36% were desiccated after one year and 58% 36 months later. O. praelonga was observed in 94,6% of S. campanulata; in 32 trees 8% were desiccated in one year, 18% in the second and the remaining at the end of the third year. Icerya purchasi was observed in 84,7% of Cesalpinia sp.; from 48 trees 5% were desiccated after six, 16 % two years later and 30% at the end of the fourth year; from 50 seedlings of this species, under intense attack, 78% were desiccated in 15 days. Quesadas gigas e Dorisiana sp. were observed in Acacia sp. In Ponciana sp. it was observed the presence of some species of Scolytidae, Platipodidae and Rhinotermitidae, and no injuries were observed in Terminalia catappa.

    KEY-WORDS:

  19. New Curculionoidea (Coleoptera) records for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Hume; Bouchard, Patrice; Anderson, Robert S; de Tonnancour, Pierre; Vigneault, Robert; Webster, Reginald P

    2013-01-01

    Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902; Tyloderma foveolatum (Say, 1832); (all Curculionidae); Ontario - Trichapion nigrum (Herbst, 1797); Nanophyes marmoratus marmoratus (Goeze, 1777) (both Brentidae); Asperosoma echinatum (Fall, 1917); Micracis suturalis LeConte, 1868; Orchestes alni (Linnaeus, 1758); Phloeosinus pini Swaine, 1915; Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902; Xyleborinus attenuatus (Blandford, 1894) (all Curculionidae); Quebec - Trigonorhinus alternatus (Say, 1826); Trigonorhinus tomentosus tomentosus (Say, 1826) (both Anthribidae); Trichapion nigrum (Herbst, 1797); Trichapion porcatum (Boheman, 1839); Nanophyes marmoratus marmoratus (Goeze, 1777) (all Brentidae); Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, 1952 (Brachyceridae); Acalles carinatus LeConte, 1876; Ampeloglypter ampelopsis (Riley, 1869); Anthonomus rufipes LeConte, 1876; Anthonomus suturalis LeConte, 1824; Ceutorhynchus hamiltoni Dietz, 1896; Curculio pardalis (Chittenden, 1908); Cyrtepistomus castaneus (Roelofs, 1873); Larinus planus (Fabricius, 1792); Mecinus janthinus (Germar, 1821); Microhyus setiger LeConte, 1876; Microplontus campestris (Gyllenhal, 1837); Orchestes alni (Linnaeus, 1758); Otiorhynchus ligustici (Linnaeus, 1758); Rhinusa neta (Germar, 1821); Trichobaris trinotata (Say, 1832); Tychius liljebladi Blatchley, 1916; Xyleborinus attenuatus (Blandford, 1894); Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, 1868 (all Curculionidae); Sphenophorus incongruus Chittenden, 1905 (Dryophthoridae); New Brunswick - Euparius paganus Gyllenhal, 1833; Allandrus populi Pierce, 1930; Gonotropis dorsalis (Thunberg, 1796); Euxenus punctatus LeConte, 1876 (all Anthribidae); Loborhynchapion cyanitinctum (Fall, 1927) (Brentidae); Pseudanthonomus seriesetosus Dietz, 1891; Curculio sulcatulus (Casey, 1897); Lignyodes bischoffi (Blatchley, 1916); Lignyodes horridulus (Casey, 1892); Dietzella zimmermanni (Gyllenhal, 1837); Parenthis vestitus Dietz, 1896; Pelenomus squamosus LeConte, 1876; Psomus armatus Dietz, 1891; Rhyncolus macrops

  20. New Curculionoidea (Coleoptera records for Canadа

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    Hume Douglas

    2013-06-01

    schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902; Tyloderma foveolatum (Say, 1832; (all Curculionidae; Ontario – Trichapion nigrum (Herbst, 1797; Nanophyes marmoratus marmoratus (Goeze, 1777 (both Brentidae; Asperosoma echinatum (Fall, 1917; Micracis suturalis LeConte, 1868; Orchestes alni (Linnaeus, 1758; Phloeosinus pini Swaine, 1915; Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902; Xyleborinus attenuatus (Blandford, 1894 (all Curculionidae; Quebec – Trigonorhinus alternatus (Say, 1826; Trigonorhinus tomentosus tomentosus (Say, 1826 (both Anthribidae; Trichapion nigrum (Herbst, 1797; Trichapion porcatum (Boheman, 1839; Nanophyes marmoratus marmoratus (Goeze, 1777 (all Brentidae; Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, 1952 (Brachyceridae; Acalles carinatus LeConte, 1876; Ampeloglypter ampelopsis (Riley, 1869; Anthonomus rufipes LeConte, 1876; Anthonomus suturalis LeConte, 1824; Ceutorhynchus hamiltoni Dietz, 1896; Curculio pardalis (Chittenden, 1908; Cyrtepistomus castaneus (Roelofs, 1873; Larinus planus (Fabricius, 1792; Mecinus janthinus (Germar, 1821; Microhyus setiger LeConte, 1876; Microplontus campestris (Gyllenhal, 1837; Orchestes alni (Linnaeus, 1758; Otiorhynchus ligustici (Linnaeus, 1758; Rhinusa neta (Germar, 1821; Trichobaris trinotata (Say, 1832; Tychius liljebladi Blatchley, 1916; Xyleborinus attenuatus (Blandford, 1894; Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, 1868 (all Curculionidae; Sphenophorus incongruus Chittenden, 1905 (Dryophthoridae; New Brunswick – Euparius paganus Gyllenhal, 1833; Allandrus populi Pierce, 1930; Gonotropis dorsalis (Thunberg, 1796; Euxenus punctatus LeConte, 1876 (all Anthribidae; Loborhynchapion cyanitinctum (Fall, 1927 (Brentidae; Pseudanthonomus seriesetosus Dietz, 1891; Curculio sulcatulus (Casey, 1897; Lignyodes bischoffi (Blatchley, 1916; Lignyodes horridulus (Casey, 1892; Dietzella zimmermanni (Gyllenhal, 1837; Parenthis vestitus Dietz, 1896; Pelenomus squamosus LeConte, 1876; Psomus armatus Dietz, 1891; Rhyncolus macrops Buchanan, 1946; Magdalis

  1. Dioctophyma renale in maned wolf in the geoeconomic region of Jatai, GO, Brazil - Case report

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    Valcinir Aloisio Scalla Vulcani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Vulcani V.A.S., Franzo V.S., de Araújo D.P., Vicentin F.R., da Costa O.M., Rangel A.S. & Gomes L.A. [Dioctophyma renale in maned wolf in the geoeconomic region of Jatai, GO, Brazil - Case report.] Dioctophyma renale em Lobo-Guará na região geoeconômica de Jataí, GO, Brasil - Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(2:149-152, 2015. Laboratório de Anatomia, Curso de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Campus de Jataí, BR 364 Km 192, 3800, Setor Industrial, Jataí, GO 75801-615, Brasil. E-mail: aloisiosv@hotmail.com The maned Wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus (Illiger, 1815 is the largest animal that represents the canidae species at the South America. The Dioctophyme renale (Goeze, 1782 known as the giant kidney-worm, because it is used to lodges mostly this organs, and it has been also responsible for the majority of captive animals deaths. A maned wolf necropsy was done at the animal anatomy laboratory of the Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG - Campus Jataí and showed a nematode in the right kidney of the wild dog. This is the second confirmed case report of maned wolf that have free life in the city of Jataí and in State of Goiás, that suggests that is a common parasitism in this region of the country.

  2. Early-season host switching in Adelphocoris spp. (Hemiptera: Miridae of differing host breadth.

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    Hongsheng Pan

    Full Text Available The mirid bugs Adelphocoris suturalis (Jakovlev, Adelphocoris lineolatus (Goeze and Adelphocoris fasciaticollis (Reuter (Hemiptera: Miridae are common pests of several agricultural crops. These three species have vastly different geographical distributions, phenologies and abundances, all of which are linked to their reliance on local plants. Previous work has shown notable differences in Adelphocoris spp. host use for overwintering. In this study, we assessed the extent to which each of the Adelphocoris spp. relies on some of its major overwinter hosts for spring development. Over the course of four consecutive years (2009-2012, we conducted population surveys on 77 different plant species from 39 families. During the spring, A. fasciaticollis used the broadest range of hosts, as it was found on 35 plant species, followed by A. suturalis (15 species and A. lineolatus (7 species. Abundances of the species greatly differed between host plants, with A. fasciaticollis reaching the highest abundance on Chinese date (Ziziphus jujuba Mill., whereas both A. suturalis and A. lineolatus preferred alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.. The host breadths of the three Adelphocoris spp. differed greatly between subsequent spring and winter seasons. The generalist species exhibited the least host fidelity, with A. suturalis and A. lineolatus using 8 of 22 and 4 of 12 overwinter host species for spring development, respectively. By contrast, the comparative specialist A. fasciaticollis relied on 9 of its 11 overwinter plants as early-season hosts. We highlight important seasonal changes in host breadth and interspecific differences in the extent of host switching behavior between the winter and spring seasons. These findings benefit our understanding of the evolutionary interactions between mirid bugs and their host plants and can be used to guide early-season population management.

  3. Feeding by flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae; Phyllotreta spp.) is decreased on canola (Brassica napus) seedlings with increased trichome density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Juliana J; Holowachuk, Jennifer M; Gruber, Margaret Y; Grenkow, Larry F

    2011-02-01

    Laboratory and field studies were undertaken to determine the effects of increased numbers of trichomes on seedling stems, petioles, and first true leaves of Brassica napus L., canola, on the feeding and behavior of the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Seedlings of 'Westar' canola with genes inserted from Arabidopsis thaliana L. for increased trichome production, called Hairyl, were tested against Westar seedlings in no-choice and choice laboratory tests, and against parental plants and other cultivars grown from seed with and without insecticide in field trials at Saskatoon and Lethbridge, Canada. Analyses ofprefeeding and feeding behavior in no-choice tests of first true leaves found that flea beetles interacted with their host while off Hairyl leaves more so than beetles presented with leaves of Westar. Beetles required twice as much time to reach satiation when feeding on leaves with increased pubescence than on Westar leaves. In laboratory choice tests, flea beetles fed more on cotyledons and second true leaves of Westar than on comparable tissues of the transgenic line. In field trials, variations in feeding patterns were seen over time on cotyledons of the line with elevated trichomes. However, all four young true leaves of Hairyl seedlings were fed upon less than were the parental lines. Feeding on Hairyl plants frequently occurred at levels equal to or less than on cultivars grown from insecticide-treated seed. This study highlights the first host plant resistance trait developed in canola, dense pubescence, with a strong potential to deter feeding by crucifer flea beetles.

  4. Survival of three commercially available natural enemies exposed to Michigan wildflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Nathaniel J; Isaacs, Rufus

    2011-10-01

    Flowering plants are often used in habitat management programs to conserve the arthropod natural enemies of insect pests. In this study, nine species of flowering plants representing six families commonly found in North America east of the Rocky Mountains were evaluated based on how much they extended the lifespans of three commercially available natural enemy species in cages with cut flower stems compared with cages containing water only. The natural enemies used in the experiments were a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville), a predatory bug (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae: Orius insidiosus (Say)), and an aphid parasitoid (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidius colemani Viereck). The plant species that most extended the lifespans of all three natural enemies were Monarda fistulosa L. (Lamiaceae), Solidago juncea Aiton (Asteraceae), and Daucus carota L. (Apiaceae). Agastache nepetoides (L.) Kuntze (Lamiaceae), Lobelia siphilitica L. (Campanulaceae), and Trifolium pratense L. (Fabaceae) were intermediate in their support of natural enemies. One plant species, Penstemon hirsutus (L.) Willdenow (Scrophulariaceae), did not contribute to the longevity of natural enemies any more than water alone. These results emphasize the need for multi-species evaluations of flowering plants for conservation biocontrol programs, and the variability in plant value for natural enemies.

  5. Permanent genetic resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 August 2011-30 September 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A'Hara, S W; Amouroux, P; Argo, Emily E; Avand-Faghih, A; Barat, Ashoktaru; Barbieri, Luiz; Bert, Theresa M; Blatrix, R; Blin, Aurélie; Bouktila, D; Broome, A; Burban, C; Capdevielle-Dulac, C; Casse, N; Chandra, Suresh; Cho, Kyung Jin; Cottrell, J E; Crawford, Charles R; Davis, Michelle C; Delatte, H; Desneux, Nicolas; Djieto-Lordon, C; Dubois, M P; El-Mergawy, R A A M; Gallardo-Escárate, C; Garcia, M; Gardiner, Mary M; Guillemaud, Thomas; Haye, P A; Hellemans, B; Hinrichsen, P; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Kerdelhué, C; Kharrat, I; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Yong Yul; Kwan, Ye-Seul; Labbe, Ellen M; LaHood, Eric; Lee, Kyung Mi; Lee, Wan-Ok; Lee, Yat-Hung; Legoff, Isabelle; Li, H; Lin, Chung-Ping; Liu, S S; Liu, Y G; Long, D; Maes, G E; Magnoux, E; Mahanta, Prabin Chandra; Makni, H; Makni, M; Malausa, Thibaut; Matura, Rakesh; McKey, D; McMillen-Jackson, Anne L; Méndez, M A; Mezghani-Khemakhem, M; Michel, Andy P; Paul, Moran; Muriel-Cunha, Janice; Nibouche, S; Normand, F; Palkovacs, Eric P; Pande, Veena; Parmentier, K; Peccoud, J; Piatscheck, F; Puchulutegui, Cecilia; Ramos, R; Ravest, G; Richner, Heinz; Robbens, J; Rochat, D; Rousselet, J; Saladin, Verena; Sauve, M; Schlei, Ora; Schultz, Thomas F; Scobie, A R; Segovia, N I; Seyoum, Seifu; Silvain, J-F; Tabone, Elisabeth; Van Houdt, J K J; Vandamme, S G; Volckaert, F A M; Wenburg, John; Willis, Theodore V; Won, Yong-Jin; Ye, N H; Zhang, W; Zhang, Y X

    2012-01-01

    This article documents the addition of 299 microsatellite marker loci and nine pairs of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) EPIC primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources (MER) Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Alosa pseudoharengus, Alosa aestivalis, Aphis spiraecola, Argopecten purpuratus, Coreoleuciscus splendidus, Garra gotyla, Hippodamia convergens, Linnaea borealis, Menippe mercenaria, Menippe adina, Parus major, Pinus densiflora, Portunus trituberculatus, Procontarinia mangiferae, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, Schizothorax richardsonii, Scophthalmus rhombus, Tetraponera aethiops, Thaumetopoea pityocampa, Tuta absoluta and Ugni molinae. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Barilius bendelisis, Chiromantes haematocheir, Eriocheir sinensis, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus cladocalix, Eucalyptus globulus, Garra litaninsis vishwanath, Garra para lissorhynchus, Guindilla trinervis, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, Luma chequen. Guayaba, Myrceugenia colchagüensis, Myrceugenia correifolia, Myrceugenia exsucca, Parasesarma plicatum, Parus major, Portunus pelagicus, Psidium guayaba, Schizothorax richardsonii, Scophthalmus maximus, Tetraponera latifrons, Thaumetopoea bonjeani, Thaumetopoea ispartensis, Thaumetopoea libanotica, Thaumetopoea pinivora, Thaumetopoea pityocampa ena clade, Thaumetopoea solitaria, Thaumetopoea wilkinsoni and Tor putitora. This article also documents the addition of nine EPIC primer pairs for Euphaea decorata, Euphaea formosa, Euphaea ornata and Euphaea yayeyamana. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Seasonal Abundance of Aphids and Aphidophagous Insects in Pecan

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    Ghulam Abbas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal occurrence of aphids and aphidophagous insects was monitored for six years (2006–2011 from full leaf expansion in May to leaf fall in October in “Desirable” variety pecan trees that were not treated with insecticides. Aphid outbreaks occurred two times per season, once in the spring and again in the late summer. Yellow pecan and blackmargined aphids exceeded the recommended treatment thresholds one time and black pecan aphids exceeded the recommended treatment levels three times over the six seasons. Increases in aphidophagous insect abundance coincided with aphid outbreaks in five of the six seasons. Among aphidophagous insects Harmonia axyridis and Olla v-nigrum were frequently collected in both the tree canopy and at the ground level, whereas, Coccinella septempunctata, Hippodamia convergens were rarely found in the tree canopy and commonly found at the ground level. Green lacewing abundance was higher in the ground level than in the tree canopy. Brown lacewings were more abundant in the tree canopy than at the ground level. Dolichopodid and syrphid fly abundance, at the ground level increased during peak aphid abundance in the tree canopy. Application of an aqueous solution of fermenting molasses to the pecan foliage during an aphid outbreak significantly increased the abundance of ladybeetles and lacewings and significantly reduced the abundance of yellow pecan, blackmargined and black pecan aphids.

  7. Biological aspects and control of a Gracillariidae (Gracillariidae: Lepidoptera in Caesalpinia spinosa (Mol. Kuntze (1898, in Cajamarca, Peru

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    Hipólito Murga

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Determine biological target, identify natural enemies, and establish appropriate periods of controlling a pest gracillariid tare. The biological aspects and natural enemies in field and laboratory were evaluated, appropriate control periods was determined by host-pest interaction. The results, egg lasts 7.8 days and measured 0.34x0.21 mm; presents four instars larvae and lasts 35.7 days, ranging from measures between 1st and the 4th instar from 0.09 to 0.65 mm diameter brain; the pupa lasts 14.3 days and measured 6.7mmx1.1mm; adult takes 7.5 days and measured 13.43 mm wingspan. Presents natural enemies, family Encyrtidae, Ichneumonidae, and genres Chelonus sp., Chrysoperla sp., Hemerobius sp., Cicloneda sp., Hippodamia sp., and Zelus spp. The best times control occur when the phenology of the tara is between R3.1 to R3.3 and R4 to R6.

  8. Natural enemies associated to aphids in peach orchards in Araucária, Paraná, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuber, J M; Monteiro, L B; Almeida, L M; Zawadneak, M A C

    2012-11-01

    Natural enemies of the Class Insecta are important agents in the balance of aphid populations and an alternative to using insecticides to control these insects. The aim of this study was to identify the species of natural enemies associated with aphids present in peach orchards and observe the efficiency of capturing different sampling methods. The experiment was conducted from July, 2005 to September, 2006 in six peach orchards 'Chimarrita', in Araucária, PR, Brazil. The samples were taken by visual analysis in peach plants and weeds, yellow pan traps, sticky traps and funnels. Predator species were identified: Cryptolaemus montrouzieri, Cycloneda pulchella, Cycloneda sanguinea, Eriopis connexa, Harmonia axyridis, Hippodamia convergens and Scymnus sp. (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae), Allograpta sp., Palpada sp. and Toxomerus sp. (Diptera, Syrphidae) and Chrysoperla sp. (Neuroptera, Chrysopidae) and the parasitoids: Diaretiella rapae, Opius sp. and Praon sp (Braconidae). Examples of Encyrtidae and Eulophidae await identification. Chrysoperla sp. was a less abundant species. There were no statistically significant differences between the different sampling methods tested.

  9. Trap Height Affects Capture of Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Pecan Orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, T E

    2017-04-01

    There is scarce information regarding the vertical stratification of predaceous Coccinellidae in tall trees. Although numerous studies have been done in orchards and forests, very few studies have assessed the occurrence of predaceous Coccinellidae high in tree canopies. The objective of this study was to examine the abundance of Coccinellidae at different heights in mature pecan, Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch, orchards with tall trees. From spring through late fall during 2013 and 2014, yellow pyramidal Tedders traps were suspended in the pecan canopy at 6.1 and 12.2 m, in addition to being placed on the ground (0 m). The exotic species Harmonia axyridis and Coccinella septempunctata accounted for a high percentage of trap capture during this study. Except for Olla v-nigrum, low numbers of native species (Hippodamia convergens, Coleomegilla maculata, Cycloneda munda, Scymnus spp., and Hyperaspis spp.) were captured. However, significantly more were captured in ground traps rather than in canopy traps with the exception of O. v-nigrum. Similar to most native species, significantly more C. septempunctata were captured in ground traps than canopy traps. This contrasts sharply with H. axyridis captured similarly at all trap heights. The ability to exploit resources across vertical strata, unlike many intraguild predators, may be an underestimated factor helping to explain the invasiveness of H. axyridis. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by a US Government employee and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Mitogenome sequence accuracy using different elucidation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velozo Timbó, Renata; Coiti Togawa, Roberto; M C Costa, Marcos; A Andow, David; Paula, Débora P

    2017-01-01

    Mitogenome sequences are highly desired because they are used in several biological disciplines. Their elucidation has been facilitated through the development of massive parallel sequencing, accelerating their deposition in public databases. However, sequencing, assembly and annotation methods might induce variability in their quality, raising concerns about the accuracy of the sequences that have been deposited in public databases. In this work we show that different sequencing methods (number of species pooled in a library, insert size and platform) and assembly and annotation methods generated variable completeness and similarity of the resulting mitogenome sequences, using three species of predaceous ladybird beetles as models. The identity of the sequences varied considerably depending on the method used and ranged from 38.19 to 90.1% for Cycloneda sanguinea, 72.85 to 91.06% for Harmonia axyridis and 41.15 to 93.60% for Hippodamia convergens. Dissimilarities were frequently found in the non-coding A+T rich region, but were also common in coding regions, and were not associated with low coverage. Mitogenome completeness and sequence identity were affected by the sequencing and assembly/annotation methods, and high within-species variation was also found for other mitogenome depositions in GenBank. This indicates a need for methods to confirm sequence accuracy, and guidelines for verifying mitogenomes should be discussed and developed by the scientific community.

  11. Mitogenome sequence accuracy using different elucidation methods.

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    Renata Velozo Timbó

    Full Text Available Mitogenome sequences are highly desired because they are used in several biological disciplines. Their elucidation has been facilitated through the development of massive parallel sequencing, accelerating their deposition in public databases. However, sequencing, assembly and annotation methods might induce variability in their quality, raising concerns about the accuracy of the sequences that have been deposited in public databases. In this work we show that different sequencing methods (number of species pooled in a library, insert size and platform and assembly and annotation methods generated variable completeness and similarity of the resulting mitogenome sequences, using three species of predaceous ladybird beetles as models. The identity of the sequences varied considerably depending on the method used and ranged from 38.19 to 90.1% for Cycloneda sanguinea, 72.85 to 91.06% for Harmonia axyridis and 41.15 to 93.60% for Hippodamia convergens. Dissimilarities were frequently found in the non-coding A+T rich region, but were also common in coding regions, and were not associated with low coverage. Mitogenome completeness and sequence identity were affected by the sequencing and assembly/annotation methods, and high within-species variation was also found for other mitogenome depositions in GenBank. This indicates a need for methods to confirm sequence accuracy, and guidelines for verifying mitogenomes should be discussed and developed by the scientific community.

  12. Aphid secondary symbionts do not affect prey attractiveness to two species of predatory lady beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Jennifer L; Wolf, Candice; Voisin, Dené; Wolf, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Heritable symbionts have been found to mediate interactions between host species and their natural enemies in a variety of organisms. Aphids, their facultative symbionts, and their potential fitness effects have been particularly well-studied. For example, the aphid facultative symbiont Regiella can protect its host from infection from a fungal pathogen, and aphids with Hamiltonella are less likely to be parasitized by parasitic wasps. Recent work has also found there to be negative fitness effects for the larvae of two species of aphidophagous lady beetles that consumed aphids with facultative symbionts. In both species, larvae that consumed aphids with secondary symbionts were significantly less likely to survive to adulthood. In this study we tested whether adult Harmonia axyridis and Hippodamia convergens lady beetles avoided aphids with symbionts in a series of choice experiments. Adults of both lady beetle species were as likely to choose aphids with symbionts as those without, despite the potential negative fitness effects associated with consuming aphids with facultative symbionts. This may suggest that under natural conditions aphid secondary symbionts are not a significant source of selection for predatory lady beetles.

  13. Aphid secondary symbionts do not affect prey attractiveness to two species of predatory lady beetles.

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    Jennifer L Kovacs

    Full Text Available Heritable symbionts have been found to mediate interactions between host species and their natural enemies in a variety of organisms. Aphids, their facultative symbionts, and their potential fitness effects have been particularly well-studied. For example, the aphid facultative symbiont Regiella can protect its host from infection from a fungal pathogen, and aphids with Hamiltonella are less likely to be parasitized by parasitic wasps. Recent work has also found there to be negative fitness effects for the larvae of two species of aphidophagous lady beetles that consumed aphids with facultative symbionts. In both species, larvae that consumed aphids with secondary symbionts were significantly less likely to survive to adulthood. In this study we tested whether adult Harmonia axyridis and Hippodamia convergens lady beetles avoided aphids with symbionts in a series of choice experiments. Adults of both lady beetle species were as likely to choose aphids with symbionts as those without, despite the potential negative fitness effects associated with consuming aphids with facultative symbionts. This may suggest that under natural conditions aphid secondary symbionts are not a significant source of selection for predatory lady beetles.

  14. Seasonal Abundance of Aphids and Aphidophagous Insects in Pecan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutcher, James D.; Karar, Haider; Abbas, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal occurrence of aphids and aphidophagous insects was monitored for six years (2006–2011) from full leaf expansion in May to leaf fall in October in “Desirable” variety pecan trees that were not treated with insecticides. Aphid outbreaks occurred two times per season, once in the spring and again in the late summer. Yellow pecan and blackmargined aphids exceeded the recommended treatment thresholds one time and black pecan aphids exceeded the recommended treatment levels three times over the six seasons. Increases in aphidophagous insect abundance coincided with aphid outbreaks in five of the six seasons. Among aphidophagous insects Harmonia axyridis and Olla v-nigrum were frequently collected in both the tree canopy and at the ground level, whereas, Coccinella septempunctata, Hippodamia convergens were rarely found in the tree canopy and commonly found at the ground level. Green lacewing abundance was higher in the ground level than in the tree canopy. Brown lacewings were more abundant in the tree canopy than at the ground level. Dolichopodid and syrphid fly abundance, at the ground level increased during peak aphid abundance in the tree canopy. Application of an aqueous solution of fermenting molasses to the pecan foliage during an aphid outbreak significantly increased the abundance of ladybeetles and lacewings and significantly reduced the abundance of yellow pecan, blackmargined and black pecan aphids. PMID:26466738

  15. Limited Transmission of the Ectoparasitic Fungus Hesperomyces virescens between Lady Beetles

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    Ted E. Cottrell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ectoparasitic fungus Hesperomyces virescens Thaxter (Ascomycota: Laboulbeniales commonly infects the invasive lady beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pallas and several other aphidophagous lady beetles in North America and Europe. We tested the hypothesis that bodily contact between adults of different lady beetle species supports horizontal transmission of H. virescens. We used laboratory assays to determine whether H. axyridis or Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant harboring H. virescens (i.e., source beetles transmit the fungus to noninfected target beetles H. axyridis, O. v-nigrum, Coccinella septempunctata L., Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer, or Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville. Results indicate that intraspecific transmission (i.e., for the source beetles H. axyridis and O. v-nigrum was common but interspecific transmission (i.e., from source H. axyridis or O. v-nigrum to target species was low. Interspecific transmission occurred at low rates from H. axyridis to both C. septempunctata and O. v-nigrum and from O. v-nigrum to both C. septempunctata and H. convergens. Based upon our laboratory assays of forced pairings/groupings of source and target beetles, we predict that horizontal transmission of H. virescens between species of aphidophagous coccinellids is possible but likely rare.

  16. Frass analysis of diets of aphidophagous lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Utah alfalfa fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, L Nicole; Evans, Edward W

    2010-04-01

    Aphidophagous lady beetles enhance their foraging success in natural settings by consuming other types of food in addition to aphids. Frass analysis was used to examine natural diets of female lady beetles in fields of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in northern Utah. The first (spring) alfalfa crop was censused in 2004 and 2005 to determine the diet of female adults of the introduced Coccinella septempunctata L., and two native species, C. transversoguttata richardsoni Brown, and Hippodamia convergens Guerin. The proportion of females of the three lady beetle species that fed on pea aphids [Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris)] and alfalfa weevil larvae [Hypera postica (Gyllenhal), an abundant alternative prey] increased from early to late season during the first crop. A corresponding seasonal decrease occurred in the proportion of females consuming other types of arthropods (e.g., thrips and collembolans) and nonarthropod food (pollen and fungal spores). Overall, frass analysis indicated that the diets of C. septempunctata and the two native species in alfalfa were similar in their inclusion of a broad variety of foods. The study shows that frass analysis can provide a good overview of the diets of lady beetles in natural settings.

  17. Larval life history responses to food deprivation in three species of predatory lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoofolo, Mpho W; Giles, Kristopher L; Elliott, Norman C

    2008-04-01

    We studied life history responses of larvae of three coccinellid species, Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer), Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, and Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), when deprived of food for different periods of time during the fourth stadium. The coccinellid species did not differ in starvation resistance when larvae were starved throughout the stadium; however, for larvae fed only on day 1 of the stadium, H. convergens had the highest starvation resistance, followed by H. axyridis and then C. maculata. Percentage weight loss of larvae was affected by food deprivation period and coccinellid species. Both C. maculata and H. axyridis lost significantly more weight than H. convergens when starved throughout the fourth stadium. When deprived of food for 4 d of the stadium, C. maculata lost a higher percentage of initial body weight than H. axyridis. Percentage weight loss of H. convergens did not differ from that of C. maculata or H. axyridis. The weight of fourth instars and adults declined in an accelerating pattern as food deprivation period increased. However, food deprivation period had no significant effect on pupal development time for any of the three species or on larval development time for C. maculata and H. convergens. The increase in H. axyridis larval development time as a result of an increase in food deprivation period was curvilinear. Based on this laboratory study, it would seem that H. convergens is better able to cope with acute nutritional stress than either C. maculata or H. axyridis.

  18. Oviposition Site Selection Structures Niche Partitioning Among Coccinellid Species in a Tropical Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicsú, P R; Macedo, R H; Sujii, E R

    2015-10-01

    The competitive exclusion hypothesis suggests that coexisting related species using similar resources in nature should partition their realized niches. This hypothesis has direct implications for conservation strategies using biological control, taking into consideration the shifts caused by the introduction of natural enemies in a local community. Such introductions typically lead to disruptions in species interactions and interfere with community structure. In this study, we asked whether community structure of aphidophagous lady beetles is determined by the distribution of specific plants and aphids. To answer this question, we describe the distribution patterns of lady beetles (adults, larvae, and egg clusters) relative to plants and aphids in eight crop ecosystems in a central region of Brazil. We used canonical correspondence analysis to evaluate lady beetle distribution relative to selected habitat variables. Cycloneda sanguinea L., Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, Harmonia axyridis Pallas, and Eriopis connexa Germar (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) differed in their use of plants and aphids. The association of egg clusters with specific plants/aphids was stronger than that of larvae or adults. In conclusion, lady beetle species occupied different niches, indicating different patterns of habitat use that may facilitate their coexistence in crop ecosystems. Furthermore, immature individuals had more specific environmental associations than adults, likely because female choice of oviposition sites influences their distribution and thus lady beetle community structure.

  19. Potential nontarget effects of Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycetes) used for biological control of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; LeBrun, Roger A.; Heyer, Klaus; Zhioua, Elyes

    2002-01-01

    The potential for nontarget effects of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin, when used for biological control of ticks, was assessed in laboratory trials. Fungal pathogenicity was studied against convergent ladybird beetles, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, house crickets, Acheta domesticus (L.), and the milkweed bugs Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas). Fungal spores applied with a spray tower produced significant mortality in H. convergens and A. domesticus, but effects on O. fasciatus were marginal. Placing treated insects with untreated individuals resulted in mortality from horizontal transmission to untreated beetles and crickets, but not milkweed bugs. Spread of fungal infection in the beetles resulted in mortality on days 4–10 after treatment, while in crickets mortality was on day 2 after treatment, suggesting different levels of pathogenicity and possibly different modes of transmission. Therefore, M. anisopliae varies in pathogenicity to different insects. Inundative applications can potentially affect nontarget species, but M. anisopliae is already widely distributed in North America, so applications for tick control generally would not introduce a novel pathogen into the environment. Pathogenicity in lab trials does not, by itself, demonstrate activity under natural conditions, so field trials are needed to confirm these results and to assess methods to minimize nontarget exposure.

  20. Taxonomic revision and cladistic analysis of Avicularia Lamarck, 1818 (Araneae, Theraphosidae, Aviculariinae with description of three new aviculariine genera01

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    Caroline Sayuri Fukushima

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Avicularia Lamarck, 1818 is revised and all species are rediagnosed. The type species, described as Aranea avicularia Linnaeus, 1758, is the oldest mygalomorph species described and its taxonomic history is extensive and confusing. Cladistic analyses using both equal and implied weights were carried out with a matrix of 46 taxa from seven theraphosid subfamilies, and 71 morphological and ecological characters. The optimal cladogram found with Piwe and concavity = 6 suggests Avicularia and Aviculariinae are monophyletic. Subfamily Aviculariinae includes Avicularia Lamarck, 1818, Typhochlaena C. L. Koch, 1850, Tapinauchenius Ausserer, 1871, Stromatopelma Karsch, 1881, Ephebopus Simon, 1892, Psalmopoeus Pocock, 1895, Heteroscodra Pocock, 1899, Iridopelma Pocock, 1901, Pachistopelma Pocock, 1901, Ybyrapora gen. n., Caribena gen. n., and Antillena gen. n. The clade is supported by well-developed scopulae on tarsi and metatarsi, greatly extended laterally. Avicularia synapomorphies are juveniles bearing black tarsi contrasting with other lighter articles; spermathecae with an accentuated outwards curvature medially, and male palpal bulb with embolus medial portion and tegulum’s margin form an acute angle in retrolateral view. Avicularia is composed of twelve species, including three new species: Avicularia avicularia (Linnaeus, 1818, Avicularia glauca Simon, 1891, Avicularia variegata (F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896 stat. n., A. minatrix Pocock, 1903, Avicularia taunayi (Mello-Leitão, 1920, Avicularia juruensis Mello-Leitão, 1923, Avicularia rufa Schiapelli & Gerschman, 1945, Avicularia purpurea Kirk, 1990, A. hirschii Bullmer et al. 2006, Avicularia merianae sp. n., A. lynnae sp. n., and A. caei sp. n.. Avicularia species are distributed throughout Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil. Three new genera are erected to accommodate former

  1. Taxonomic revision and cladistic analysis of Avicularia Lamarck, 1818 (Araneae, Theraphosidae, Aviculariinae) with description of three new aviculariine genera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Caroline Sayuri; Bertani, Rogério

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The genus Avicularia Lamarck, 1818 is revised and all species are rediagnosed. The type species, described as Aranea avicularia Linnaeus, 1758, is the oldest mygalomorph species described and its taxonomic history is extensive and confusing. Cladistic analyses using both equal and implied weights were carried out with a matrix of 46 taxa from seven theraphosid subfamilies, and 71 morphological and ecological characters. The optimal cladogram found with Piwe and concavity = 6 suggests Avicularia and Aviculariinae are monophyletic. Subfamily Aviculariinae includes Avicularia Lamarck, 1818, Typhochlaena C. L. Koch, 1850, Tapinauchenius Ausserer, 1871, Stromatopelma Karsch, 1881, Ephebopus Simon, 1892, Psalmopoeus Pocock, 1895, Heteroscodra Pocock, 1899, Iridopelma Pocock, 1901, Pachistopelma Pocock, 1901, Ybyrapora gen. n., Caribena gen. n., and Antillena gen. n. The clade is supported by well-developed scopulae on tarsi and metatarsi, greatly extended laterally. Avicularia synapomorphies are juveniles bearing black tarsi contrasting with other lighter articles; spermathecae with an accentuated outwards curvature medially, and male palpal bulb with embolus medial portion and tegulum’s margin form an acute angle in retrolateral view. Avicularia is composed of twelve species, including three new species: Avicularia avicularia (Linnaeus, 1818), Avicularia glauca Simon, 1891, Avicularia variegata (F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896) stat. n., Avicularia minatrix Pocock, 1903, Avicularia taunayi (Mello-Leitão, 1920), Avicularia juruensis Mello-Leitão, 1923, Avicularia rufa Schiapelli & Gerschman, 1945, Avicularia purpurea Kirk, 1990, Avicularia hirschii Bullmer et al. 2006, Avicularia merianae sp. n., Avicularia lynnae sp. n., and Avicularia caei sp. n.. Avicularia species are distributed throughout Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil. Three new genera are erected

  2. Species composition and abundance of solpugids (Arachnida: Solifugae in ecotopes of the transitional coastal desert of Chile Composición de especies y abundancia de solífugos (Arachnida: Solifugae en ecotopos del desierto costero transicional de Chile

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    Daniel Eugenio Valdivia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using pitfall traps, the species composition and abundance of solpugids were studied in several ecotopes of Chile's transitional coastal desert. The study was conducted in the area around Punta de Choros (29°15'S, 71°26'W and in Los Choros Archipelago (29°32'S, 67°61'W, in 2005 and 2006. Five species were recorded: Procleobis sp.; Sedna pirata Muma, 1971 (Ammotrechidae; Mummucia sp.; Mummucia variegata (Gervais, 1849 (Mummuciidae; and Ammotrechelis goetschi Roewer, 1934 (Daesiidae. Solpugid abundance was higher on the continent (65% than on the islands (35%. The ANOSIM used to evaluate any difference in species richness between ecotopes revealed no significant differences (R= 0.097, p= 0.13. The similarity dendrogram obtained from the Bray-Curtis matrix indicates that there are 3 groups of ecotopes: steppe, dune, and a miscellaneous group. From the data it is inferred that the diversity and abundance of solpugids in the ecotopes studied may be related to plant structure and to the pedological conditions of the habitat.Mediante trampas de intercepción se estudió la composición específica y la abundancia de solífugos en diversos ecotopos del desierto costero transicional de Chile. El trabajo se llevó a cabo tanto en el sector de Punta de Choros (29°15'S, 71°26'O como en el archipiélago de Los Choros (29°32'S, 67°61'O, durante los años 2005 y 2006. Se registró la presencia de 5 especies: Procleobis sp.; Sedna pirata Muma, 1971 (Ammotrechidae, Mummucia sp.; Mummucia variegata (Gervais, 1849 (Mummuciidae y Ammotrechelis goetschi Roewer, 1934 (Daesiidae. En el sector continental se observó mayor abundancia que en el sector insular (65% y 35%, respectivamente. El ANOSIM aplicado para evaluar la diferencia en la riqueza especifica entre ecotopos, no mostró diferencias significativas (R= 0.097; p= 0.13. El dendrograma de similitud generado a partir de la matriz Bray-Curtis mostró 3 agrupaciones de ecotopos: estepario, dunario y

  3. Aspectos morfofisiológicos na pré-aclimatização in vitro e aclimatização de plantas de caroá Morpho-physiological aspects of in vitro pre-acclimatization and acclimatization of the caroá plant

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    Daniela Garcia Silveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a influência da sacarose (0; 15 e 30 g L-1, tipo de vedação (filme de PVC e tampão de algodão dos tubos de ensaio, e a concentração dos sais do meio MS (50; 75 e 100% sobre os aspectos morfofisiológicos das plantas de caroá durante a fase de pré-aclimatização in vitro visando otimizar a taxa de sobrevivência e reduzir o tempo de aclimatização das mudas. A análise das características de comprimento, produção de matéria seca, taxa de sobrevivência e enraizamento mostraram que as plantas de Neoglaziovia variegata nas fases de pré-aclimatização in vitro e aclimatização foram dependentes das concentrações de sacarose e nutrientes inorgânicos, além da aeração. Melhores resultados foram obtidos quando as mudas de caroá foram inoculadas em meio MS com a concentração original dos sais do MS, suplementado com 15 ou 30 g L-1 de sacarose e vedadas com tampão de algodão.This work aimed to evaluate the influence of sucrose (0; 15 and 30g L-1, the type of seal used in the test tubes (PVC film or cotton plug, and salt concentration in the MS medium (50%; 75% and 100% on the morphological and physiological traits of caroá plants during in vitro pre-acclimatization phase aiming to optimize the survival rate and shorten the acclimatization period of the seedlings. The analysis of characteristics such as length, dry matter production, survival rate and rooting, showed that Neoglaziovia variegata plants at pre-acclimatization and acclimatization stages were dependent on sucrose concentrations, inorganic nutrients from MS medium and aeration. The best results in the acclimatization stage were obtained when the caroá seedlings were inoculated in MS medium with the full salt concentration, supplemented with 15 or 30g L-1 sucrose, and sealed with cotton plugs during the pre-acclimatization stage.

  4. A window of opportunity: Subdominant predators can use suboptimal prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kelly A; McCord, Joshua S; White, Jennifer A

    2017-07-01

    Introduced species have been linked to declines of native species through mechanisms including intraguild predation and exploitative competition. However, coexistence among species may be promoted by niche partitioning if native species can use resources that the invasive species cannot. Previous research has shown that some strains of the aphid Aphis craccivora are toxic to a competitively dominant invasive lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis. Our objective was to investigate whether these aphids might be an exploitable resource for other, subdominant, lady beetle species. We compared larval development rate, survival, and adult weight of five lady beetle species in no-choice experiments with two different strains of A. craccivora, one of which is toxic to H. axyridis and one that is nontoxic. Two lady beetle species, Cycloneda munda and Coleomegilla maculata, were able to complete larval development when feeding on the aphid strain that is toxic to H. axyridis, experiencing only slight developmental delays relative to beetles feeding on the other aphid strain. One species, Coccinella septempunctata, also was able to complete larval development, but experienced a slight reduction in adult weight. The other two lady beetle species, Hippodamia convergens and Anatis labiculata, demonstrated generally low survivorship when consuming A. craccivora, regardless of aphid strain. All five species showed increased survival and/or development relative to H. axyridis on the "toxic" aphid strain. Our results suggest that this toxic trait may act as a narrow-spectrum defense for the aphids, providing protection against only some lady beetle enemies. For other less-susceptible lady beetles, these aphids have the potential to provide competitive release from the otherwise dominant H. axyridis.

  5. Indigenous Aphid Predators Show High Levels of Preadaptation to a Novel Prey, Melanaphis sacchari (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colares, Felipe; Michaud, J P; Bain, Clint L; Torres, Jorge B

    2015-12-01

    The performance of four aphid predators, Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens and Orius insidiosus Say was compared on three prey species: Schizaphis graminum Rondani, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), and Ephestia kuehniella Zeller eggs. Species predatory in both life stages (all except Ch. carnea) were reared on E. kuehniella eggs and switched to aphid prey for assessment of reproduction. Differences were greater between the E. kuehniella and aphid diets than between the two aphid species. Juvenile survival was high for all predators on all prey, except for O. insidiosus, which had survival on E. kuehniella > S. graminum > M. sacchari. The fastest development of Ch. carnea and O. insidiosus was obtained on E. kuehniella, whereas H. convergens developed fastest on S. graminum, and C. maculata did not differ among diets. S. graminum also yielded the largest H. convergens adults, whereas the largest adults of other predators were obtained on E. kuehniella. Female fecundity and egg viability were similarly high on both aphid diets for H. convergens and C. maculata, whereas, on E. kuehniella, 50% of the former entered reproductive diapause and the latter species had reduced fecundity. Reproductive success of Ch. carnea was S. graminum = M. sacchari > E. kuehniella, but it was similar among treatments for O. insidiosus, although female infertility ranged from 25 to 37.5%. We concluded that all the predators studied are preadapted to utilize sugarcane aphid as prey and have excellent potential to provide sustainable biological control of this newly invasive pest. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Biodiversity loss following the introduction of exotic competitors: does intraguild predation explain the decline of native lady beetles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Smith

    Full Text Available Exotic species are widely accepted as a leading cause of biodiversity decline. Lady beetles (Coccinellidae provide an important model to study how competitor introductions impact native communities since several native coccinellids have experienced declines that coincide with the establishment and spread of exotic coccinellids. This study tested the central hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic species has caused these declines. Using sentinel egg experiments, we quantified the extent of predation on previously-common (Hippodamia convergens and common (Coleomegilla maculata native coccinellid eggs versus exotic coccinellid (Harmonia axyridis eggs in three habitats: semi-natural grassland, alfalfa, and soybean. Following the experiments quantifying egg predation, we used video surveillance to determine the composition of the predator community attacking the eggs. The extent of predation varied across habitats, and egg species. Native coccinellids often sustained greater egg predation than H. axyridis. We found no evidence that exotic coccinellids consumed coccinellid eggs in the field. Harvestmen and slugs were responsible for the greatest proportion of attacks. This research challenges the widely-accepted hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic competitors explains the loss of native coccinellids. Although exotic coccinellids may not be a direct competitor, reduced egg predation could indirectly confer a competitive advantage to these species. A lower proportion of H. axyridis eggs removed by predators may have aided its expansion and population increase and could indirectly affect native species via exploitative or apparent competition. These results do not support the intraguild predation hypothesis for native coccinellid decline, but do bring to light the existence of complex interactions between coccinellids and the guild of generalist predators in coccinellid foraging habitats.

  7. Alarm pheromone habituation in Myzus persicae has fitness consequences and causes extensive gene expression changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Martin; Cheng, Wing Yin; Summers, Holly E; Raguso, Robert A; Jander, Georg

    2010-08-17

    In most aphid species, facultative parthenogenetic reproduction allows rapid growth and formation of large single-genotype colonies. Upon predator attack, individual aphids emit an alarm pheromone to warn the colony of this danger. (E)-beta-farnesene (EBF) is the predominant constituent of the alarm pheromone in Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) and many other aphid species. Continuous exposure to alarm pheromone in aphid colonies raised on transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that produce EBF leads to habituation within three generations. Whereas naive aphids are repelled by EBF, habituated aphids show no avoidance response. Similarly, individual aphids from the habituated colony can revert back to being EBF-sensitive in three generations, indicating that this behavioral change is not caused by a genetic mutation. Instead, DNA microarray experiments comparing gene expression in naive and habituated aphids treated with EBF demonstrate an almost complete desensitization in the transcriptional response to EBF. Furthermore, EBF-habituated aphids show increased progeny production relative to EBF-responsive aphids, with or without EBF treatment. Although both naive and habituated aphids emit EBF upon damage, EBF-responsive aphids have a higher survival rate in the presence of a coccinellid predator (Hippodamia convergens), and thus outperform habituated aphids that do not show an avoidance response. These results provide evidence that aphid perception of conspecific alarm pheromone aids in predator avoidance and thereby bestows fitness benefits in survivorship and fecundity. Therefore, although habituated M. persicae produce more progeny, EBF-emitting transgenic plants may have practical applications in agriculture as a result of increased predation of habituated aphids.

  8. Three homopteran pests of citrus as prey for the convergent lady beetle: suitability and preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Jawwad A; Stansly, Philip A

    2011-12-01

    The convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is an important predator of soft-bodied insect pests in many regions of the United States, but generally uncommon in Florida citrus. Certain citrus producers in Florida recently initiated releases of commercially available H. convergens from California against the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, vector of Huanglongbing or citrus greening disease. However, there is little information on potential efficacy of this predator against the psyllid or other pests of citrus. Preference, development, and reproduction by H. convergens was evaluated on freshly collected nymphs of D. citri, brown citrus aphid Toxoptera citricida Kirkaldy, green citrus aphid Aphis spiraecola Patch, and frozen eggs of the flour moth Ephestia kuehniella Zeller. Larvae preferred D. citri over T. citricida in two-way choice tests and consumed more D. citri or A. spiraecola than T. citricida in no-choice tests. Adults consumed equal numbers of all three species in both tests. Development times of larvae at 25.5±0.05°C on A. spiraecola were longer than on the other three diets. Larval survival and pupation times did not differ among diets. Females lived longer than males irrespective of diet, and longevity of both genders was greatly increased on E. kuehniella compared with D. citri and A. spiraecola. Life table analysis indicated that H. convergens should increase on all three species, with a greater potential on psyllids than aphids. Further studies are warranted to assess establishment and persistence of this potential biological control agent in the Florida citrus environment.

  9. Potential cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii, population suppression by arthropod predators in upland cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Ram B; Parajulee, Megha N

    2013-12-01

    The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, predation rate of convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, was determined by assigning a single predator randomly to each of four prey density treatments in the laboratory. Prey densities included 25, 50, 100, and 200 aphids per Petri dish arena. Predation response was recorded at 1, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 h after assigning predators to their prey treatments. Rate of consumption increased through time, with all 25 aphids consumed during the first 4 h of the experiment. At the highest density, adult lady beetle consumed on average 49, 99, 131, 163, 183, and 200 aphids within 1, 4, 8, 16, 24 and 48 h, respectively. Predators showed a curvilinear feeding response in relation to total available time, indicating that convergent lady beetles have the potential to suppress larger populations of aphids through continuous feeding by regulating their predation efficiency during feeding. The analysis of age-specific mortality in absence of prey revealed that lady beetles could survive for an extended period of time (more than 2 weeks) without prey. The ability of a predator to survive without prey delays or prevents the rebound of pest populations that is a significant factor in natural biological control. A two-year field sampling of 10 cotton arthropod predator species showed that spiders (27%) were the most dominant foliage dwelling predators in the Texas High Plains cotton followed by convergent lady beetles (23.5%), hooded beetles (13.5%), minute pirate bugs (11%), green lacewings (9.5%), bigeyed bugs (7.5%), scymnus beetles (3%), soft-winged flower beetles (2%), damsel bugs (1.5%), and assassin bugs (1.5%). A field cage study showed that one H. convergens adult per plant released at prey density of one aphid per leaf kept the aphid population below economic threshold for the entire growing season. © 2012 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. Predation by adult and larval lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on initial contact with lady beetle eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Ted E

    2007-04-01

    Naïve adults and larvae of the native lady beetles Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer), Cycloneda munda (Say), Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant), and the exotic lady beetle Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) were tested for their initial response to eggs of these five lady beetle species and for egg consumption on first contact and after 3 h. Additionally, field-collected O. v-nigrum and H. axyridis adults were tested. C. maculata, H. axyridis, and O. v-nigrum adults responded similarly to all egg species on first contact. Higher numbers of C. munda adults did not eat C. maculata, H. convergens, and O. v-nigrum eggs on first contact compared with numbers that did eat C. munda and H. axyridis eggs. H. convergens adults always ate C. munda eggs but hardly ate H. axyridis eggs on first contact. Results showed that over the 3-h interval, egg predation by those predators feeding on first contact was always higher, except for adults and larvae of C. maculata, than for those that did not feed on first contact. Thus, acceptance of eggs on initial contact does impact egg survival. It is likely that eggs of all native species tested (i.e., C. maculata, C. munda, H. convergens, and O. v-nigrum), but not exotic H. axyridis eggs, are suitable food for C. maculata, H. convergens, and O. v-nigrum, whereas only C. munda eggs serve as suitable food for C. munda. In direct contrast, all egg species tested would likely serve as suitable food for the exotic H. axyridis.

  11. Potential of yellow sticky traps for lady beetle survey in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajulee, M N; Slosser, J E

    2003-02-01

    A 2-yr study was conducted to investigate the potential of using yellow sticky traps to survey lady beetles in cotton and to quantify seasonal activity patterns. The performance of sticky traps was compared with that of a 2-cycle vacuum sampler. The most common lady beetle species captured by sticky traps and vacuum sampler in cotton were Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville and Scymnus loewii Mulsant. Sticky traps captured significantly more of both species of lady beetles, had greater capture efficiency, and more effectively detected lady beetles compared with the vacuum sampler. These data indicate that the sticky trap can be a valuable tool in monitoring lady beetle populations in cotton. In the second part of this study, a year-round survey of lady beetle populations in the periphery of a cotton farm using sticky traps showed that lady beetles remained active throughout the year in the Texas Rolling Plains, but the activity was influenced by winter severity. Over a 2-yr period, H. convergens, S. loewii, Coccinella septempunctata (L.), and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant) comprised 89.6, 8.2, 1.9, and 0.3% of the specimens, respectively. Sticky trap captures were affected by year, trap height, and cropping season. Traps placed at 0.75 m above ground captured significantly more (80%) lady beetles than traps placed at 1.50 m (20%) above ground; traps at 0.75 m above ground also detected the rarer species while the traps at 1.50 m above ground detected only the abundant species. Trap captures were higher during the noncotton season (November to April) compared with the cotton season (May to October). A significant positive correlation between cotton aphid abundance during the growing season and H. convergens abundance during the following noncotton season was also detected, indicating a significant movement of H. convergens from cotton to the periphery of the farm to seek refuge after cotton termination.

  12. Intraguild predation and native lady beetle decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Mary M; O'Neal, Matthew E; Landis, Douglas A

    2011-01-01

    Coccinellid communities across North America have experienced significant changes in recent decades, with declines in several native species reported. One potential mechanism for these declines is interference competition via intraguild predation; specifically, increased predation of native coccinellid eggs and larvae following the introduction of exotic coccinellids. Our previous studies have shown that agricultural fields in Michigan support a higher diversity and abundance of exotic coccinellids than similar fields in Iowa, and that the landscape surrounding agricultural fields across the north central U.S. influences the abundance and activity of coccinellid species. The goal of this study was to quantify the amount of egg predation experienced by a native coccinellid within Michigan and Iowa soybean fields and explore the influence of local and large-scale landscape structure. Using the native lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata as a model, we found that sentinel egg masses were subject to intense predation within both Michigan and Iowa soybean fields, with 60.7% of egg masses attacked and 43.0% of available eggs consumed within 48 h. In Michigan, the exotic coccinellids Coccinella septempunctata and Harmonia axyridis were the most abundant predators found in soybean fields whereas in Iowa, native species including C. maculata, Hippodamia parenthesis and the soft-winged flower beetle Collops nigriceps dominated the predator community. Predator abundance was greater in soybean fields within diverse landscapes, yet variation in predator numbers did not influence the intensity of egg predation observed. In contrast, the strongest predictor of native coccinellid egg predation was the composition of edge habitats bordering specific fields. Field sites surrounded by semi-natural habitats including forests, restored prairies, old fields, and pasturelands experienced greater egg predation than fields surrounded by other croplands. This study shows that intraguild

  13. Cannibalism and intraguild predation of eggs within a diverse predator assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Tadashi; Snyder, William E

    2011-02-01

    Greater biodiversity among aphid predators sometimes leads to greater predator reproductive success. This could occur if cannibalism of predator eggs is consistently stronger than intraguild predation, such that diversity dilutes cannibalism risk when total predator densities remain constant across diversity levels. We compared the frequency of cannibalism versus intraguild predation by adult predators of four species [the lady beetles Coccinella septempunctata L. and Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, and the predatory bugs Geocoris bullatus (Say) and Nabis alternatus Parshley] on the eggs of three predator species (all of these predators but Nabis). For both coccinellid species, egg predation averaged across all intraguild predators was less frequent than cannibalism. In contrast, Geocoris eggs were generally more likely to be consumed by intraguild predators than by conspecifics. Closer inspection of the data revealed that Geocoris consistently consumed fewer eggs than the other species, regardless of egg species. Indeed, for lady beetle eggs it was relatively infrequent egg predation by Geocoris that brought down the average across all heterospecific predators, masking the fact that adults of the two lady beetles were no more likely to act as egg cannibals than as intraguild predators. Nabis ate eggs of the two beetles at approximately equal rates, but rarely ate Geocoris eggs. Female predators generally consumed more eggs than did males, but this did not alter any of the patterns described above. Altogether, our results suggest that species-specific differences in egg predation rates determined the relative intensity of egg intraguild-predation versus cannibalism, rather than any more general trend for egg cannibalism to always exceed intraguild predation. © 2011 Entomological Society of America

  14. Sublethal effects of insecticide seed treatments on two nearctic lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardini, Valéria Fonseca; Gontijo, Pablo Costa; Michaud, J P; Carvalho, Geraldo Andrade

    2015-07-01

    Predatory insects often feed on plants or use plant products to supplement their diet, creating a potential route of exposure to systemic insecticides used as seed treatments. This study examined whether chlorantraniliprole or thiamethoxam might negatively impact Coleomegilla maculata and Hippodamia convergens when the beetles consumed the extrafloral nectar of sunflowers grown from treated seed. We reared both species on eggs of Ephestia kuehniella and then switched adult H. convergens to a diet of greenbugs, Schizaphis graminum, in order to induce oviposition in this species. Excised sunflower stems, either treated or control and refreshed every 48 h, were provided throughout larval development, or for the first week of adult life. Exposure of C. maculata larvae to chlorantraniliprole and thiamethoxam applied as seed treatments delayed adult emergence by prolonging the pupal period. When adults were exposed, thiamethoxam reduced the preoviposition period compared to chlorantraniliprole, whereas the latter treatment cause females to produce fewer clutches during the observation period. Larvae of C. maculata did not appear to obtain sufficient hydration from the sunflower stems and their subsequent fecundity and fertility were compromised in comparison to the adult exposure experiment where larvae received supplemental water during development. Exposure of H. convergens larvae to thiamethoxam skewed the sex ratio in favor of females; both materials reduced the egg viability of resulting adults and increased the period required for eclosion. Exposure of H. convergens adults to chlorantraniliprole reduced egg eclosion times compared to thiamethoxam and exposure to both insecticides reduced pupation times in progeny. The results indicate that both insecticides have negative, sublethal impacts on the biology of these predators when they feed on extrafloral nectar of sunflower plants grown from treated seed.

  15. Biodiversity loss following the introduction of exotic competitors: does intraguild predation explain the decline of native lady beetles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chelsea A; Gardiner, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    Exotic species are widely accepted as a leading cause of biodiversity decline. Lady beetles (Coccinellidae) provide an important model to study how competitor introductions impact native communities since several native coccinellids have experienced declines that coincide with the establishment and spread of exotic coccinellids. This study tested the central hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic species has caused these declines. Using sentinel egg experiments, we quantified the extent of predation on previously-common (Hippodamia convergens) and common (Coleomegilla maculata) native coccinellid eggs versus exotic coccinellid (Harmonia axyridis) eggs in three habitats: semi-natural grassland, alfalfa, and soybean. Following the experiments quantifying egg predation, we used video surveillance to determine the composition of the predator community attacking the eggs. The extent of predation varied across habitats, and egg species. Native coccinellids often sustained greater egg predation than H. axyridis. We found no evidence that exotic coccinellids consumed coccinellid eggs in the field. Harvestmen and slugs were responsible for the greatest proportion of attacks. This research challenges the widely-accepted hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic competitors explains the loss of native coccinellids. Although exotic coccinellids may not be a direct competitor, reduced egg predation could indirectly confer a competitive advantage to these species. A lower proportion of H. axyridis eggs removed by predators may have aided its expansion and population increase and could indirectly affect native species via exploitative or apparent competition. These results do not support the intraguild predation hypothesis for native coccinellid decline, but do bring to light the existence of complex interactions between coccinellids and the guild of generalist predators in coccinellid foraging habitats.

  16. Demographic histories of three predatory lady beetles reveal complex patterns of diversity and population size change in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuraman, Arun; Janzen, Fredric J; Rubio, Michael A; Vasquez, Yumary; Obrycki, John J

    2017-05-15

    Predatory lady beetles (Coccinellidae) contribute to biological control of agricultural pests, however, multiple species frequently compete for similar resources in the same environment. Numerous studies have examined ecological interactions among the native North American convergent lady beetle (Hippodamia convergens) and two introduced species, the seven-spotted lady beetle (Coccinella septempunctata) and the Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis), in agricultural fields and described multiyear population dynamics. However, the evolutionary dynamics of these interacting species of predatory beetles are uncharacterized. We utilize publicly available multilocus genotype data from geographically disjunct populations of these three species to estimate demography across North American populations. Coalescent analyses reveal (1) a recent (∼4-5 years) decline (>12 fold) in microsatellite effective population size of H. convergens, while expanding (mutation scaled growth rate in 1/u generations = 2910, SD = 362) over evolutionary time scales, (2) a massive (>150 fold), and very recent, effective population size decline in Ha. axyridis, and (3) population size growth (mutation scaled growth rate = 997, SD = 60) over recent and evolutionary time scales in C. septempunctata. Although these estimates are based on genetic data with different mutation rates and patterns of inheritance (mitochondrial versus nuclear), these dynamic and differing population size histories are striking. Further studies of the interactions of these predatory lady beetles in the field are thus warranted to explore the consequences of population size change and biological control activities for evolutionary trajectories in North America. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Seasonal fluctuation in the population of Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae and co-occurrence with other Coccinellids in the Federal District of Brazil

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    Érica Sevilha Harterreiten-Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas, 1773, was first recorded in Brazil in 2002 in Paraná state and subsequently observed in Santa Catarina, Rio Grande do Sul and Minas Gerais. This species can spread to new areas and become dominant in the local community, reducing the density and diversity of native species, mainly Coccinellidae. The objective of this work was to record for the first time the occurrence of H. axyridis in the Federal District and its co-occurrence with other Coccinellidae species. The individuals were collected directly from plants at an organic farm in Taguatinga and in experimental fields of Embrapa Hortaliças, located in the Federal District, from August 2008 to January 2010. We collected 881 Coccinelids, and of these, 110 belong to the species H. axyridis. These were found exclusively on the following plants of the succinea group: maize, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, kale, cucumber, cotton, tomato and coriander. We also observed its co-occurrence with the following lady beetle species: Cycloneda sanguine (Linnaeus, 1763, Hippodamia convergens (Guerin-Meneville 1842, Eriopis connexa (German, 1824, Scymnus sp., Nephaspis sp., Azya luteipes (Mulsant, 1850, Hyperaspis festiva (Mulsant, 1850, Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866, Psyllobora sp. and Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer, 1775. So far, we have not found any negative interactions between H. axyridis and these species. This is the northernmost H. axyridis record in Brazil. Moreover, the region was previously considered to have a low probability of occurrence for this species. Therefore, this record confirms that H. axyridis presents great adaptive plasticity to new habitats.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ON THE BIODIVERSITY AND POPULATION STRUCTURE OF THE HELMINTHES OF DOMESTIC RUMINANTS IN THE SOUTHEAST OF THE NORTH CAUCASUS

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    A. M. Ataev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the research is to analyze the biodiversity of helminths of domestic ruminants in the south-east of the North Caucasus; indicators of infestation of cattle grazing on different types of pastures; environmental factors affecting their population structure and the formation of combined foci of bio and geo helminthiasis.Methods. We used classical research methods adopted in contemporary parasitology: helminth - larvoscopia, complete helminthological autopsy of animals and humans by KI Scriabin, cultivation of the larvae, opening of invertebrates, flotation, and feces washed successively.Results. 30 years of research revealed that the domestic ruminants in the south-east of the North Caucasus are infected by 64 species of helminthes: sheep 54, cattle 55, buffaloes 49. Common to domestic ruminants are 39 species of helminths. The causative agents zoonozis are Fasciola hepatica L., 1758, F. gigantica (Сobbold, 1856, Dicrocoelium lanceatum (Stiles et Hassal, 1896, Taeniarhynchus saginatus (Goeze, 1782 larvae, Echinococcus granulosus (Batsch, 1786 larvae, Trichostongylus axei (Cobbold, 1879, T. vitrinus Looss, 1905, Haemonchus contortus (Rud., 1803, and Gongylonema pulchrum (Molin, 1857.Conclusion. Infestation by helminthes of ruminants varies the extensity of invasion (EI 0,8-67,5%, intensity of invasion (II 1-1260 species. Animals are infected with helminthes in plain and foothill zones from April to the end of November, and in the mountains 2500 meters above sea level from July to the end of September. In the plain belt, ecological grassland can be divided into four types: steppe, semi-arid, saline, low-lying wet lands where we can find combined foci of helminthes with different quantitative and qualitative characteristics. The species composition of helminthes, their population is dependent on the environmental factors. In combined foci, ruminants are always infected with mixed invasions of helminthes, from 4 to 17

  19. Functional characterizations of chemosensory proteins of the alfalfa plant bug Adelphocoris lineolatus indicate their involvement in host recognition.

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    Shao-Hua Gu

    Full Text Available Insect chemosensory proteins (CSPs have been proposed to capture and transport hydrophobic chemicals from air to olfactory receptors in the lymph of antennal chemosensilla. They may represent a new class of soluble carrier protein involved in insect chemoreception. However, their specific functional roles in insect chemoreception have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we report for the first time three novel CSP genes (AlinCSP1-3 of the alfalfa plant bug Adelphocoris lineolatus (Goeze by screening the antennal cDNA library. The qRT-PCR examinations of the transcript levels revealed that all three genes (AlinCSP1-3 are mainly expressed in the antennae. Interestingly, these CSP genes AlinCSP1-3 are also highly expressed in the 5(th instar nymphs, suggesting a proposed function of these CSP proteins (AlinCSP1-3 in the olfactory reception and in maintaining particular life activities into the adult stage. Using bacterial expression system, the three CSP proteins were expressed and purified. For the first time we characterized the types of sensilla in the antennae of the plant bug using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Immunocytochemistry analysis indicated that the CSP proteins were expressed in the pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea and general odorant-sensitive sensilla basiconica, providing further evidence of their involvement in chemoreception. The antennal activity of 55 host-related semiochemicals and sex pheromone compounds in the host location and mate selection behavior of A. lineolatus was investigated using electroantennogram (EAG, and the binding affinities of these chemicals to the three CSPs (AlinCSP1-3 were measured using fluorescent binding assays. The results showed several host-related semiochemicals, (Z-3-hexen-1-ol, (E-2-hexen-1-al and valeraldehyde, have a high binding affinity with AlinCSP1-3 and can elicit significant high EAG responses of A. lineolatus antennae. Our studies indicate the three antennae

  20. Материалы к гельминтофауне серой жабы - bufo bufo (Amphibia: Anura) в Мордовии

    OpenAIRE

    ЧИХЛЯЕВ И.В.; РУЧИН А.Б.; ЛУКИЯНОВ С.В.

    2009-01-01

    Изучена гельминтофауна серой жабы в трех популяциях из Мордовии. Ее основу составляют нематоды Oswaldocruzia filiformis (Goeze, 1782) и Rhabdias bufonis (Schrank, 1788), часто встречающиеся во всех популяциях с высокой численностью. Трематоды являются редкими паразитами данного хозяина. Состав и структура гельминтофауны этого вида амфибий, характер инвазии тесно связаны с образом жизни хозяина и в каждой популяции имеют свои биотопические особенности. Гельминтофауна серой жабы из популяций Мо...

  1. Leafhoppers and Cixiids in Phytoplasma-infected Carrot Fields: Species Composition and Potential Phytoplasma Vectors

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    Tanja Drobnjaković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The first molecular analysis of samples collected in southern Bačka (Serbia confirmed the presence of aster yellows (16SrI and stolbur phytoplasmas (16SrXII in insects belonging to the family Cicadellidae, as well as in carrot plants where the insects were collected. A correct identification of the phytoplasmas and their vectors is essential to arrange effective control strategies to prevent diseases associated with phytoplasmas from spreading to carrots and other vegetable crops. In order to enhance knowledgeabout insect vectors of aster yellows and stolbur phytoplasmas in Serbia, Cicadellidae and Cixiidae (Homoptera Auchenorrhyncha, the most common vectors of these phytoplasmas,were monitored in southern Bačka during 2008. Adults leaf- and planthoppers were collected and identified at species level using standard entomological methods,and tested for phytoplasma presence by means of PCR/RFLP. A total of 13 insect species of Cicadellidae were identified, as follows: a three species of the subfamily Agallinae: Anaceratagallia ribauti (Ossiannilsson, Anaceratagallia venosa (Fourcroy,and Anaceratagallia laevis (Ribaut; b seven species of the subfamily Deltocephalinae: Psammotettix confinis (Dahlbom, Psammotettix striatus (Linnaues Psammottettix alienus (Dahlbom, Macrosteles sexnotatus (Fallén, Ophiola decumana (Kontkanen,Errastunus ocellaris Fallén, and Scaphoideus titanus Ball; c three species of the subfamily Typhlocibinae: Eupteryx atropunctata (Goeze, Eupteryx mellissae Curtis, Zyginidia pullula (Boheman. Female specimens of the genus Euscelis (Deltocephalinae were also collected, as well as one species of Reptalus quinquecostatus (Dufour of the family Cixiidae. Stolbur phytoplasmas were detected in A. laevis, A. ribauti, A. venosa, P. striatus, P. confinis and P. alienus. The species: A. laevis, O. decumana, and P. confinis were AY-infected (subgroup 16SrI-A, while subgroup 16SrI-C was found only in one specimen of P. confinis. Since some

  2. INSPEÇÃO SANITÁRIA E CRITÉRIO DE JULGAMENTO DA CISTICERCOSE BOVINA CALCIFICADA. INFECÇÃO LEVE

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    Lauro Vicente Campello Rodrigues

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available O experimento objetivou avaliar os riscos para a saúde pública da cisticercose e da teníase através da infecção da carne de bovinos pelo Cysticercus bovis e a Taeniarhyncus saginatus (Taenia saginata, GOEZE, 1782. A pesquisa, ao nível de matadouro no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, concentrou-se no grau de "infecção leve", ou seja, na constatação de um único cisticerco calcificado, no conjunto de órgãos, vísceras e carcaças, buscando-se a existência de outros cisticercos, especialmente os vivos, através do fatiamento de massas musculares dos segmentos mais valorizados da carcaça (filé mignon, filé de lombo, alcatra, coxão mole, coxão duro, patinho e lagarto. Das 16 carcaças utilizadas no experimento, 5 delas (31,25% acusaram presença de cisticerco em um de seus cortes nobres fatiados, sendo que em 2 delas (12,5% os cisticercos eram vivos e, em 3 (18,75%, eram degenerados (calcificados. O experimento, inclusive calcado em literatura disponível e na regulamentação a propósito de diversos países, permitiu recomendar à Divisão de Inspeção de Produtos de Origem Animal, do Ministério da Agricultura e Reforma Agrária, a revisão do Art. n0 176, Parágrafo 2º, Inciso 3, do Regulamento de Inspeção Industrial e Sanitária de Produtos de Origem Animal, que permite o aproveitamento para o consumo de carcaças que apresentam um único cisto já calcificado, sem qualquer tratamento prévio.

  3. Patterns of gut bacterial colonization in three primate species.

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    Erin A McKenney

    Full Text Available Host fitness is impacted by trillions of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract that facilitate development and are inextricably tied to life history. During development, microbial colonization primes the gut metabolism and physiology, thereby setting the stage for adult nutrition and health. However, the ecological rules governing microbial succession are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the relationship between host lineage, captive diet, and life stage and gut microbiota characteristics in three primate species (infraorder, Lemuriformes. Fecal samples were collected from captive lemur mothers and their infants, from birth to weaning. Microbial DNA was extracted and the v4 region of 16S rDNA was sequenced on the Illumina platform using protocols from the Earth Microbiome Project. Here, we show that colonization proceeds along different successional trajectories in developing infants from species with differing dietary regimes and ecological profiles: frugivorous (fruit-eating Varecia variegata, generalist Lemur catta, and folivorous (leaf-eating Propithecus coquereli. Our analyses reveal community membership and succession patterns consistent with previous studies of human infants, suggesting that lemurs may serve as a useful model of microbial ecology in the primate gut. Each lemur species exhibits distinct species-specific bacterial diversity signatures correlating to life stages and life history traits, implying that gut microbial community assembly primes developing infants at species-specific rates for their respective adult feeding strategies.

  4. Macroalgal extracts induce bacterial assemblage shifts and sublethal tissue stress in Caribbean corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Kathleen M; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Ross, Cliff; Liles, Mark R; Paul, Valerie J

    2012-01-01

    Benthic macroalgae can be abundant on present-day coral reefs, especially where rates of herbivory are low and/or dissolved nutrients are high. This study investigated the impact of macroalgal extracts on both coral-associated bacterial assemblages and sublethal stress response of corals. Crude extracts and live algal thalli from common Caribbean macroalgae were applied onto the surface of Montastraea faveolata and Porites astreoides corals on reefs in both Florida and Belize. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to examine changes in the surface mucus layer (SML) bacteria in both coral species. Some of the extracts and live algae induced detectable shifts in coral-associated bacterial assemblages. However, one aqueous extract caused the bacterial assemblages to shift to an entirely new state (Lobophora variegata), whereas other organic extracts had little to no impact (e.g. Dictyota sp.). Macroalgal extracts more frequently induced sublethal stress responses in M. faveolata than in P. astreoides corals, suggesting that cellular integrity can be negatively impacted in selected corals when comparing co-occurring species. As modern reefs experience phase-shifts to a higher abundance of macroalgae with potent chemical defenses, these macroalgae are likely impacting the composition of microbial assemblages associated with corals and affecting overall reef health in unpredicted and unprecedented ways.

  5. 'Emerging' mycobacteria in South Africa : review article

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    P.D. Van Helden

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Disease can be caused by various species of the genus Mycobacterium. A number of reports, both published and unpublished, of rarely reported mycobacteria have surfaced in South Africa in the last few years. Some unusual hosts have also been involved, causing concern in some quarters.These include reports on Mycobacterium goodii in a spotted hyaena (Crocuta crocuta, M. xenopi in a ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata, M. intracellulare in wild-caught chacma baboons (Papio ursinus, the 'dassie bacillus' in free ranging rock hyrax (dassies; Procavia capensis the 'oryx bacillus' from free-ranging buffalo (Syncerus caffer and M. tuberculosis in suricates (Suricata suricatta, a domestic dog and in baboons. In this article it has been attempted to put these in context and show how improved surveillance and technologies have allowed mycobacteria to be identified to species level more easily. Most of the unusual mycobacterial species have most likely been present in the region for many years and have probably caused disease episodes before, but have been misdiagnosed. Each case must be evaluated carefully with respect to the animal species involved, the environment in which the host is found and the mycobacterial species, and operational decisions made accordingly.

  6. PTM-driven differential peptide display: survey of peptides containing inter/intra-molecular disulfide bridges in frog venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaristo, Geisa P C; Verhaert, Peter D E M; Pinkse, Martijn W H

    2012-12-21

    Amphibian defensive skin secretions are complex species-specific mixtures of biologically active molecules, including many uncharacterized peptides. Many of these peptides are post-translationally modified and amongst the modifications discovered so far on amphibian defense peptides, disulfide bonds are quite frequently encountered. The presence of this PTM often complicates the MS-based sequencing. Here we demonstrate a method to target peptides containing inter/intra-molecular S-S bonds applying a PTM-driven differential display. Upon reduction of the disulfide bond both molecular mass and retention time of a peptide are altered. Assembling the LC-MS data by plotting the m/z data against retention time generates a peptide display and overlaying peptide displays of untreated and DTT-reduced material yields a differential display. From such an overlay, peptides originally carrying a disulfide bond are recognized due to the shift in both retention time and m/z values, whereas non cystine containing peptides remain unaltered in the differential display. The success of this approach is demonstrated by the visualization of the cystines-containing peptides in the skin secretion of Odorrana schmackeri, Phyllomedusa burmeisteri, Phyllomedusa rohdei, Kassina senegalensis, and Bombina variegata. The venoms from these different species yield complicated differential displays, showing interesting peptides, allowing one to target them for more detailed structural characterization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Occurrence of Encephalitozoon intestinalis in the Red ruffed lemur (Varecia rubra) and the Ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) housed in the Poznan Zoological Garden, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słodkowicz-Kowalska, Anna; Majewska, Anna C; Trzesowska, Ewa; Skrzypczak, Łukasz

    2012-01-01

    Encephalitozoon intestinalis is one of the most common microsporidial species found in humans worldwide but it has rarely been identified in animals. The presence of this pathogen has been detected in a few species of domestic, captive and wild mammals as well as in three species of birds. The aim of the present study was to examine fecal samples obtained from mammals housed in the Poznan Zoological Garden, Poland, for the presence of potentially human-infectious microsporidia. A total of 339 fresh fecal samples collected from 75 species of mammals belonging to 27 families and 8 orders were examined for the presence of microsporidian spores. Microsporidian spores were identified in 3 out of 339 (0.9%) examined fecal samples. All samples identified as positive by chromotrope 2R and calcofluor white M2R were also positive by the FISH assay. Using multiplex FISH in all 3 fecal samples, only spores of E. intestinalis were identified in 2 out of 14 Ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) and in one out of 17 Red ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata rubra). To our knowledge this is the first diagnosis of E. intestinalis in Ring-tailed and Red ruffed lemurs. It should be mentioned that both lemur species are listed by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Although the lemurs were asymptomatically infected, the possibility of widespread infection or death of these animals remains in the event of an elevated stress or a decrease in their immunological functions.

  8. Structural and Chemical Characterization of Hardwood from Tree Species with Applications as Bioenergy Feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çetinkol, Özgül Persil; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M.; Cheng, Gang; Lao, Jeemeng; George, Anthe; Hong, Kunlun; Henry, Robert; Simmons, Blake A.; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Holmes, Bradley M.; Zabotina, Olga A.

    2012-12-28

    Eucalypt species are a group of flowering trees widely used in pulp production for paper manufacture. For several decades, the wood pulp industry has focused research and development efforts on improving yields, growth rates and pulp quality through breeding and the genetic improvement of key tree species. Recently, this focus has shifted from the production of high quality pulps to the investigation of the use of eucalypts as feedstocks for biofuel production. Here the structure and chemical composition of the heartwood and sapwood of Eucalyptus dunnii, E. globulus, E. pillularis, E. urophylla, an E. urophylla-E. grandis cross, Corymbia citriodora ssp. variegata, and Acacia mangium were compared using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and biochemical composition analysis. Some trends relating to these compositions were also identified by Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. These results will serve as a foundation for a more comprehensive database of wood properties that will help develop criteria for the selection of tree species for use as biorefinery feedstocks.

  9. Structural and chemical characterization of hardwood from tree species with applications as bioenergy feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinkol, Özgül Persil; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M; Cheng, Gang; Lao, Jeemeng; George, Anthe; Hong, Kunlun; Henry, Robert; Simmons, Blake A; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Holmes, Bradley M

    2012-01-01

    Eucalypt species are a group of flowering trees widely used in pulp production for paper manufacture. For several decades, the wood pulp industry has focused research and development efforts on improving yields, growth rates and pulp quality through breeding and the genetic improvement of key tree species. Recently, this focus has shifted from the production of high quality pulps to the investigation of the use of eucalypts as feedstocks for biofuel production. Here the structure and chemical composition of the heartwood and sapwood of Eucalyptus dunnii, E. globulus, E. pillularis, E. urophylla, an E. urophylla-E. grandis cross, Corymbia citriodora ssp. variegata, and Acacia mangium were compared using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and biochemical composition analysis. Some trends relating to these compositions were also identified by Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. These results will serve as a foundation for a more comprehensive database of wood properties that will help develop criteria for the selection of tree species for use as biorefinery feedstocks.

  10. Purification and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from seeds of Murraya koenigii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shee, Chandan; Sharma, Ashwani K

    2007-02-01

    A protein with trypsin inhibitory activity was purified to homogeneity from the seeds of Murraya koenigii (curry leaf tree) by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography on HPLC. The molecular mass of the protein was determined to be 27 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis under reducing conditions. The solubility studies at different pH conditions showed that it is completely soluble at and above pH 7.5 and slowly precipitates below this pH at a protein concentration of 1 mg/ml. The purified protein inhibited bovine pancreatic trypsin completely in a molar ratio of 1:1.1. Maximum inhibition was observed at pH 8.0. Kinetic studies showed that Murraya koenigii trypsin inhibitor is a competitive inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 7 x 10(-9) M. The N-terminal sequence of the first 15 amino acids showed no similarity with any of the known trypsin inhibitors, however, a short sequence search showed significant homology to a Kunitz-type chymotrypsin inhibitor from Erythrina variegata.

  11. Kinetochore of the Lepidoptera, (2). Chromosomal features and behavior in meiotic-II and in /sup 60/Co-treated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeki, K. (Kwansei Gakuin Univ., Nishinomiya, Hyogo (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1980-10-01

    The chromosomes of Graphium Sarpedon (n, 20) and Eumeta variegata were examined by the acetoorcein squash method. In the equatorial plate of M-2 metaphase, two sister chromatids (rod-type) appeared in linear arrangement. The spindle fibers then gathered to the chromosomal part toward the cell pole, which condensed longwise on the other side. In the second anaphase, the two sister chromatids moved to the opposite poles, they appeared to move toward the pole ends-first. The M-2 metaphase and anaphase were identified only for the chromosomes equipped with the diffuse kinetochore structure. The male larvae of Graphium Sarpedon at the last-instar were irradiated with 800, 1000, 1500 or 2000 R of /sup 60/Co to induce chromosome fragmentation, and killed 18, 21, 24, 27 and 30 hrs after the irradiation. The chromosomal aberration at the meitotic stage after the irradiation of 1500 R and 2000 R was pronounced. Although the normal haploid chromosome number of G. sarpedon is 20, it was found that the irradiated larvae had 21 or 19 chromosomes at the M-1 metaphase. The aberration resulted from chromosomal fusion as well as from fragmentation during meiosis. It was suggested that the induced fragment chromosomes each carry kinetochore. In general, it is considered that the chromosomes of lepidopteran insects were characterized by holokinetic organization.

  12. Caracterización bromatológica de seis especies forrajeras en el Valle del Cauto, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danis M. Verdecia Acosta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Se realizaron seis experimentos simultáneos para determinar la composición bromatológica de leguminosas forrajeras en las condiciones edafoclimáticas del Valle del Cauto, Cuba. Se empleó un diseño en bloques al azar con seis réplicas y los tratamientos fueron las edades de rebrote de 60, 120 y 180 días para los árboles y arbustos ( Leucaena leucocephala, Tithonia diversifolia, Gliricidia sepium y Eritrina varie - gata y de 30, 45, 60, 75 y 90 días para las leguminosas rastreras ( Neonotonia wightii y Te - ramnus labialis , en los periodos lluvioso y poco lluvioso. Se determinaron MS, PB, Ca, P, Mg, Si, FND, FAD, LAD, celulosa, hemicelulosa, contenido celular, ceniza, MO, DIVMS, DV, DISMS, DMO, DFND, DFAD y DPB. Se realizaron análisis de conglomerados para agrupar las especies con características simila - res. Durante el periodo lluvioso se encontraron seis grupos y en el poco lluvioso siete grupos; con los mejores resultados, de forma integral, para la Neonotonia wightii, Teramnus labialis, Gliricidia sepium y Tithonia diversifolia , en el periodo lluvioso; y en el poco lluvioso, para Tithonia diversifolia, Gliricidia sepium y Erythri - na variegata a edades tempranas. Se concluye que la edad presentó un marcado efecto en la composición bromatológica al disminuir la calidad en la medida que la madurez avanza.

  13. Salicylic acid-induced changes in physiological parameters and genes of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway in Artemisia vulgaris and Dendranthema nankingense during aphid feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Xia, X L; Jiang, J F; Chen, S M; Chen, F D; Lv, G S

    2016-02-19

    Phloem-feeding aphids cause serious damage to plants. The mechanisms of plant-aphid interactions are only partially understood and involve multiple pathways, including phytohormones. In order to investigate whether salicylic acid (SA) is involved and how it plays a part in the defense response to the aphid Macrosiphoniella sanbourni, physiological changes and gene expression profiles in response to aphid inoculation with or without SA pretreatment were compared between the aphid-resistant Artemisia vulgaris 'Variegata' and the susceptible chrysanthemum, Dendranthema nankingense. Changes in levels of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde (MDA), and flavonoids, and in the expression of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, including PAL (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase), CHS (chalcone synthase), CHI (chalcone isomerase), F3H (flavanone 3-hydroxylase), F3'H (flavanone 3'-hydroxylase), and DFR (dihydroflavonol reductase), were investigated. Levels of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anions, MDA, and flavonoids, and their related gene expression, increased after aphid infestation and SA pretreatment followed by aphid infestation; the aphid-resistant A. vulgaris exhibited a more rapid response than the aphid-susceptible D. nankingense to SA treatment and aphid infestation. Taken together, our results suggest that SA could be used to increase aphid resistance in the chrysanthemum.

  14. Species composition of forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and flesh flies (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) through space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremdt, Heike; Amendt, Jens

    2014-03-01

    Weekly monitoring of forensically important flight-active blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and flesh flies (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) was performed using small baited traps. Sampling took place in two rural, one suburban and two urban habitats in and around Frankfurt (Main), Germany, lasting two years and eight months. Highest values for species richness and Chao-Shen entropy estimator for Shannon's index in both families were found at the urban sites, peaking during summer. Space-time interaction was tested and found to be significant, demonstrating the value of a statistical approach recently developed for community surveys in ecology. K-means partitioning and analysis of indicator species gave significant temporal and habitat associations of particular taxa. Calliphora vicina was an indicator species for lower temperatures without being associated with a particular habitat. Lucilia sericata was an indicator for urban sites, whereas Lucilia ampullacea and Lucilia caesar were indicators for rural sites, supplemented by the less frequent species Calliphora vomitoria. Sarcophagidae were observed during a clearly shorter period of year. Sarcophaga subvicina+Sarcophaga variegata was found to be an indicator for urban habitats during summer as well as Sarcophaga albiceps for rural habitats. A significant association of Sarcophaga caerulescens to rural habitats as well as one of Sarcophaga similis to urban habitats was observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Botanicals to Control Soft Rot Bacteria of Potato

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    M. M. Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from eleven different plant species such as jute (Corchorus capsularis L., cheerota (Swertia chiraita Ham., chatim (Alstonia scholaris L., mander (Erythrina variegata, bael (Aegle marmelos L., marigold (Tagetes erecta, onion (Allium cepa, garlic (Allium sativum L., neem (Azadiracta indica, lime (Citrus aurantifolia, and turmeric (Curcuma longa L. were tested for antibacterial activity against potato soft rot bacteria, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc P-138, under in vitro and storage conditions. Previously, Ecc P-138 was identified as the most aggressive soft rot bacterium in Bangladeshi potatoes. Of the 11 different plant extracts, only extracts from dried jute leaves and cheerota significantly inhibited growth of Ecc P-138 in vitro. Finally, both plant extracts were tested to control the soft rot disease of potato tuber under storage conditions. In a 22-week storage condition, the treated potatoes were significantly more protected against the soft rot infection than those of untreated samples in terms of infection rate and weight loss. The jute leaf extracts showed more pronounced inhibitory effects on Ecc-138 growth both in in vitro and storage experiments.

  16. Further contributions to the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Reginald P.; Webster, Vincent L.; Alderson, Chantelle A.; Hughes, Cory C.; Sweeney, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper treats 134 new records of Coleoptera for the province of New Brunswick, Canada from the following 41 families: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Histeridae, Leiodidae, Scarabaeidae, Scirtidae, Buprestidae, Elmidae, Limnichidae, Heteroceridae, Ptilodactylidae, Eucnemidae, Throscidae, Elateridae, Lampyridae, Cantharidae, Dermestidae, Bostrichidae, Ptinidae, Cleridae, Melyridae, Monotomidae, Cryptophagidae, Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae, Nitidulidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, Corylophidae, Latridiidae, Tetratomidae, Melandryidae, Mordellidae, Tenebrionidae, Mycteridae, Pyrochroidae, Aderidae, Scraptiidae, Megalopodidae, and Chrysomelidae. Among these, the following four species are newly recorded from Canada: Dirrhagofarsus ernae Otto, Muona & McClarin (Eucnemidae), Athous equestris (LeConte) (Elateridae), Ernobius opicus Fall (Ptinidae), and Stelidota coenosa Erichson (Nitidulidae). The Family Limnichidae is newly reported for New Brunswick, and one species is added to the fauna of Nova Scotia. Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer (Latridiidae), Tetratoma (Abstrulia) variegata Casey (Tetratomidae), and Chauliognathus marginatus (Fabricius) (Cantharidae) are removed from the faunal list of New Brunswick, and additional records of Lacconotus punctatus LeConte (Mycteridae) are presented and discussed. Lindgren funnel traps provided specimens for 104 (78%) of the species and were the sole source of specimens for 89 (66%) of the species reported here, suggesting they are a very useful tool for sampling Coleoptera fauna in the forests of New Brunswick. PMID:27110171

  17. Il gioco le leggi naturali governano il caso

    CERN Document Server

    Eigen, Manfred

    1986-01-01

    Manfred Eigen, Premio Nobel per la chimica nel 1967, e la sua collaboratrice Ruthild Winkler hanno voluto con questo libro uscire allo scoperto, esponendo in una trattazione complessa ma comprensibile per ogni lettore veramente interessato una teoria molto audace, basata su ricerche e scoperte di Eigen stesso e di altri (come per esempio Thom e Prigogine) che in questi ultimi anni sono al centro dell’attenzione degli scienziati, anche se non sempre sono filtrate al di fuori della loro cerchia. Questa teoria ha come perno la nozione di gioco: e non già in una o più delle innumerevoli accezioni della parola, ma in tutte, con l’aggiunta di una ulteriore accezione che sottende tutte le altre: il gioco come struttura intelligibile emergente dal divenire caotico, quindi come fenomeno «che ha guidato fin dall’inizio il corso dell’Universo». Gioco, in questo libro, è dunque un «fenomeno naturale», non specificamente umano. I giochi che noi tutti giochiamo sono soltanto la schiuma variegata di un flutto...

  18. Further contributions to the Coleoptera fauna of New Brunswick with an addition to the fauna of Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Reginald P; Webster, Vincent L; Alderson, Chantelle A; Hughes, Cory C; Sweeney, Jon D

    2016-01-01

    This paper treats 134 new records of Coleoptera for the province of New Brunswick, Canada from the following 41 families: Gyrinidae, Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Histeridae, Leiodidae, Scarabaeidae, Scirtidae, Buprestidae, Elmidae, Limnichidae, Heteroceridae, Ptilodactylidae, Eucnemidae, Throscidae, Elateridae, Lampyridae, Cantharidae, Dermestidae, Bostrichidae, Ptinidae, Cleridae, Melyridae, Monotomidae, Cryptophagidae, Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae, Nitidulidae, Endomychidae, Coccinellidae, Corylophidae, Latridiidae, Tetratomidae, Melandryidae, Mordellidae, Tenebrionidae, Mycteridae, Pyrochroidae, Aderidae, Scraptiidae, Megalopodidae, and Chrysomelidae. Among these, the following four species are newly recorded from Canada: Dirrhagofarsus ernae Otto, Muona & McClarin (Eucnemidae), Athous equestris (LeConte) (Elateridae), Ernobius opicus Fall (Ptinidae), and Stelidota coenosa Erichson (Nitidulidae). The Family Limnichidae is newly reported for New Brunswick, and one species is added to the fauna of Nova Scotia. Stephostethus productus Rosenhauer (Latridiidae), Tetratoma (Abstrulia) variegata Casey (Tetratomidae), and Chauliognathus marginatus (Fabricius) (Cantharidae) are removed from the faunal list of New Brunswick, and additional records of Lacconotus punctatus LeConte (Mycteridae) are presented and discussed. Lindgren funnel traps provided specimens for 104 (78%) of the species and were the sole source of specimens for 89 (66%) of the species reported here, suggesting they are a very useful tool for sampling Coleoptera fauna in the forests of New Brunswick.

  19. Spatial Distribution and a Retrospective Analysis of the Herpetofauna in the City of Plovdiv, Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelin A. Mollov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study presents the contemporary status and distribution of theamphibians and reptiles in the city of Plovdiv. To track changes in the status ofamphibians and reptiles in the research area through time, a retrospective analysis wasmade based on available literary data. During the past 100 years four species ofamphibians (Triturus karelinii, Lissotriton vulgaris, Bombina bombina, B. variegata and fourspecies of reptiles (Coronella austriaca, Zamenis longissimus, Elaphe sauromates, Viperaammodytes probably have disappeared from the study area; one amphibian species (Bufobufo and one reptile (Natrix natrix have not changed their status, one amphibian(Pelobates syriacus and two reptile species (Ablepharus kitaibelii, Podarcis muralis havereduced their localities and four amphibian species (Epidalea viridis, Rana dalmatina,Pelophylax ridibundus, Hyla arborea and seven species of reptiles (Mediodactylus kotschyi,Lacerta trilineata, Lacerta viridis, Podarcis tauricus, Emys orbicularis, Dolichophis caspius,Natrix tessellata have increased their localities and frequency of occurrence. The recordsof the two tortoise species (Testudo hermanni and T. graeca in the city, and the presence ofthe Red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans should be considered as accidental.Important Herpetological Areas (IHA in the study region are also identified.

  20. Ecology of Syllidae (Annelida: Polychaeta from shallow rocky environments in the Cantabrian Sea (South Bay of Biscay

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    Alberto Serrano

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The syllids inhabiting 12 hard bottom macrobenthic habitats were studied. A total of 38 species belonging to 19 genera were identified. Differences in density, species richness, and diversity among habitats were analysed, as well as the relationships between these ecological parameters and depth range, slope and in-bay/out-bay gradient. The effect of environmental variables on syllid distribution was studied using canonical ordination. A high faunistic homogeneity has been found, since all biotopes were dominated by a low number of eurytopic species (Syllis armillaris, S. gracilis and S. variegata. Habitat complexity, determined by physical disturbance, is the main structuring factor in syllid populations. Biotopes with the highest structural complexity displayed a high number of companion species increasing ecological indices and denoting a well-structured habitat. On the other hand, communities such as in upper intertidal habitats, mainly controlled by physical environmental variables, showed a poorer syllid fauna, dominated by ubiquitious species and a few stenotopic species well-adapted to those environments. However, this is not the case in some other intertidal biotopes, such as in Corallina, whose tangled structure prevents drying and provides shelter from predation, allowing a richer and more diverse syllid fauna.

  1. Unraveling some Kinki worms (Annelida: Oligochaeta: Megadrili: Moniligastridae - Part I

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    Blakemore, R.J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A new species, Drawida eda Blakemore, is proposed for an earthworm from rice paddy near Lake Biwa in centralJapan. It is compared with both Drawida barwelli (Beddard, 1886 – the cosmopolitan type of the genus – and with sympatric D.japonica (Michaelsen, 1892 for which a new synonym, D. propatula Gates, 1935, is added. Parasitic origin theory of diagnostic‘genital markings’ in D. japonica is extended to other taxa and their conspecificity is mooted. Definitive resolution of thetaxonomic complexities within Drawida via DNA analysis is pending, although the COI barcode for the type of D. eda is initiallyprovided, the first time for a new earthworm species. Polygiceriate similarity of Oriental ‘exquisiticlitellate’ Drawida tomegascolecid genera like Nexogaster Blakemore, 1997 (type Nexogaster sexies Blakemore, 1997 is briefly noted. Using thisopportunity, replacement names are given for two preoccupied Tasmanian Lake Pedder taxa as a normal part of taxonomic‘housekeeping’, viz. Anisogogaster for Anisogaster Blakemore, 2000 (non Deyrolle, 1862, nec Looss, 1901 and Perionchellavariegogata for Perionchella variegata Blakemore, 2000 (non Michaelsen, 1907

  2. Structure and sensory physiology of the leg scolopidial organs in Mantophasmatodea and their role in vibrational communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, M J B; Lang, D; Metscher, B; Pass, G; Picker, M D; Wolf, H

    2010-07-01

    Individuals of the insect order Mantophasmatodea use species-specific substrate vibration signals for mate recognition and location. In insects, substrate vibration is detected by mechanoreceptors in the legs, the scolopidial organs. In this study we give a first detailed overview of the structure, sensory sensitivity, and function of the leg scolopidial organs in two species of Mantophasmatodea and discuss their significance for vibrational communication. The structure and number of the organs are documented using light microscopy, SEM, and x-ray microtomography. Five scolopidial organs were found in each leg of male and female Mantophasmatodea: a femoral chordotonal organ, subgenual organ, tibial distal organ, tibio-tarsal scolopidial organ, and tarso-pretarsal scolopidial organ. The femoral chordotonal organ, consisting of two separate scoloparia, corresponds anatomically to the organ of a stonefly (Nemoura variegata) while the subgenual organ complex resembles the very sensitive organs of the cockroach Periplatena americana (Blattodea). Extracellular recordings from the leg nerve revealed that the leg scolopidial organs of Mantophasmatodea are very sensitive vibration receptors, especially for low-frequency vibrations. The dominant frequencies of the vibratory communication signals of Mantophasmatodea, acquired from an individual drumming on eight different substrates, fall in the frequency range where the scolopidial organs are most sensitive. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative genomics of Eucalyptus and Corymbia reveals low rates of genome structural rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J B; Vaillancourt, R E; Potts, B M; Lee, D J; King, G J; Baten, A; Shepherd, M; Freeman, J S

    2017-05-22

    Previous studies suggest genome structure is largely conserved between Eucalyptus species. However, it is unknown if this conservation extends to more divergent eucalypt taxa. We performed comparative genomics between the eucalypt genera Eucalyptus and Corymbia. Our results will facilitate transfer of genomic information between these important taxa and provide further insights into the rate of structural change in tree genomes. We constructed three high density linkage maps for two Corymbia species (Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata and Corymbia torelliana) which were used to compare genome structure between both species and Eucalyptus grandis. Genome structure was highly conserved between the Corymbia species. However, the comparison of Corymbia and E. grandis suggests large (from 1-13 MB) intra-chromosomal rearrangements have occurred on seven of the 11 chromosomes. Most rearrangements were supported through comparisons of the three independent Corymbia maps to the E. grandis genome sequence, and to other independently constructed Eucalyptus linkage maps. These are the first large scale chromosomal rearrangements discovered between eucalypts. Nonetheless, in the general context of plants, the genomic structure of the two genera was remarkably conserved; adding to a growing body of evidence that conservation of genome structure is common amongst woody angiosperms.

  4. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma lycopersici', a phytoplasma associated with 'hoja de perejil' disease in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arocha, Yaima; Antesana, Olivia; Montellano, Ernesto; Franco, Pablo; Plata, G; Jones, Phil

    2007-08-01

    New diseases known locally as 'hoja de perejil' of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) and 'brotes grandes' of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) were first recognized in surveys of production fields in Bolivia during 2000-2003. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) witches' broom and little leaf diseases of native weeds Morrenia variegata and mora-mora (Serjania perulacea) were also identified near to production fields. Phytoplasma aetiology was attributed to each of these diseases following detection and initial identification of aster yellows group (16SrI) phytoplasmas in all five diseased plant species. While potato, alfalfa and mora-mora plants contained indistinguishable 16SrI-B strains, 'hoja de perejil' (THP) and morrenia little leaf (MVLL)-associated phytoplasma strains shared 97.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with 'Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris' and related strains and <95 % similarity with all other 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the THP and MVLL phytoplasmas represent a novel lineage within the aster yellows (16SrI) group and, on the basis of unique 16S rRNA gene sequences, we propose that THP and MVLL phytoplasmas represent 'Candidatus Phytoplasma lycopersici', with THP as the reference strain.

  5. First report of canine ocular thelaziosis by Thelazia callipaeda in Portugal

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    Vieira Lisete

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Thelazia callipaeda eyeworms are transmitted by the non-biting insect vector Phortica variegata in Europe and infest the conjunctiva(s of several mammalians, including dogs and humans. Infested hosts might remain asymptomatic or display clinical manifestations characterized by variable degrees of severity. Methods From July to November 2011, nine dogs were detected with eyeworms at two veterinary clinics in Chaves and Bragança (North of Portugal. Nematodes collected from dogs were morphologically and molecularly characterized at species level. Results Nematodes were identified as T. callipaeda. The number of worms collected from each dog ranged from three to 76 (average = 17.9 ± 26.8 and was not associated with the severity of clinical signs. Ocular discharge and conjunctivitis were observed in all dogs and ocular pruritus occurred in six of them. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of a portion of target cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene further identified all nematodes as haplotype 1. Conclusions This is the first report of T. callipaeda and associated ocular disease in dogs from Portugal, suggesting that thelaziosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of canine ocular affections. The risk of the infestation spreading from Spain and France to Portugal, through domestic dogs or wild mammals, is realistic.

  6. Natural dyes as photosensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Sancun; Wu, Jihuai; Huang, Yunfang; Lin, Jianming [Institute of Materials Physical Chemistry, Huaqiao University, Quanzhou, Fujian 362021 (China)

    2006-02-15

    The dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) were assembled by using natural dyes extracted from black rice, capsicum, erythrina variegata flower, rosa xanthina, and kelp as sensitizers. The I{sub SC} from 1.142mA to 0.225mA, the V{sub OC} from 0.551V to 0.412V, the fill factor from 0.52 to 0.63, and P{sub max} from 58{mu}W to 327{mu}W were obtained from the DSC sensitized with natural dye extracts. In the extracts of natural fruit, leaves and flower chosen, the black rice extract performed the best photosensitized effect, which was due to the better interaction between the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of anthocyanin molecule on black rice extract and the surface of TiO{sub 2} porous film. The blue-shift of absorption wavelength of the black rice extract in ethanol solution on TiO{sub 2} film and the blue-shift phenomenon from absorption spectrum to photoaction spectrum of DSC sensitized with black rice extract are discussed in the paper. Because of the simple preparation technique, widely available and low cheap cost natural dye as an alternative sensitizer for dye-sensitized solar cell is promising. (author)

  7. Flower garden trees' ability to absorb solar radiation heat for local heat reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Syuhada, Ahmad; Hamdani

    2017-06-01

    Banda Aceh as an urban area tends to have a high air temperature than its rural surroundings. A simple way to cool Banda Aceh city is by planting urban vegetation such as home gardens or parks. In addition to aesthetics, urban vegetation plays an important role as a reducer of air pollution, oxygen producer, and reducer of the heat of the environment. To create an ideal combination of plants, knowledge about the ability of plants to absorb solar radiation heat is necessary. In this study, some types of flowers commonly grown by communities around the house, such as Michelia Champaka, Saraca Asoka, Oliander, Adenium, Codiaeum Variegatum, Jas Minum Sambac, Pisonia Alba, Variegata, Apium Graveolens, Elephantopus Scaber, Randia, Cordylin.Sp, Hibiscus Rosasinensis, Agave, Lili, Amarilis, and Sesamum Indicum, were examined. The expected benefit of this research is to provide information for people, especially in Banda Aceh, on the ability of each plant relationship in absorbing heat for thermal comfort in residential environments. The flower plant which absorbs most of the sun's heat energy is Hibiscus Rosasinensis (kembang sepatu) 6.2 Joule, Elephantopus Scaber.L (tapak leman) 4.l Joule. On the other hand, the lowest heat absorption is Oliander (sakura) 0.9 Joule.

  8. Further characterization of some heterophile agglutinins reacting with alkali-labile carbohydrate chains of human erythrocyte glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahr, W; Uhlenbruck, G; Bird, G W

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the receptor sites for several agglutinins is characterized by hemagglutination inhibition assays. The inhibitory activity of human erythrocytes glycoproteins, from which sialic acid, sialic acid and galactose or alkali-labile oligosaccharides have been removed, is compared to the inhibitory effect of compounds with known structure. It is shown that the lectin from Arachis hypogea and anti-T bind to alkali-labile galactosyl-residues. Agglutinins from Bauhinia purpurea and variegata (non- or N-specific), Maclura aurantiaca, Iberis amara, sempervirens, umbellata hybrida and umbellata nana (M- or nonspecific), Moluccella laevis (A- plus N-specific), Helix pomatia, Helix aspersa, Helix lucorum and Caucasotachea atrolabiata interact with alkali-labile N-acetylgalactosamine. The results obtained with the anti-A agglutinins from various snails suggest that human erythrocyte glycoproteins contain, besides the alkali-labile tetrasaccharide, a peptide-linked sialyl-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-residue. The investigations do not allow a precise definition of the receptor sites for the lectins having M- or N-specificity.

  9. Taxonomic notes on some Polyglyptini: descriptions of new genus and new species (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino M. Sakakibara

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic notes on some Polyglyptini; descriptions of new genus and new species (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae. The genera Hemiptycha Germar, Metheisa Fowler, Maturnaria Metcalf, Aphetea Fowler, Dioclophara Kirkaldy, and Phormophora Stål, are redescribed; Creonus, gen.n. (type species: Maturna lloydi Funkhouser, 1914, and Aphetea robustula, sp.n. (from Bolivia, are described. Some nomenclatural changes are introduced, as follow: - Hemiptycha Germar, 1833 = Polyrhyssa Stål, 1869, syn.n.: - Hemiptycha cultrata (Coquebert, 1801, comb.n., = Polyglyptodes flavocostatus Haviland, 1925, syn.n., = Polyrhyssa cultrata maculata Fonseca, 1942, syn.n. - Hemiptycha obtecta (Fabricius, 1803 = Hille herbicola Haviland, 1925, syn.n. - Maturnaria ephippigera (Fairmaire, 1846 = Publilia tumulata Buckton, 1903, syn.n., = Metheisa fowleri Funkhouser, 1927, syn.n. - Creonus lloydi (Funkhouser, 1914, comb.n. - Aphetea parvula (Fabricius, 1803, comb.n., = Aphetea affinis Haviland, 1925, syn.n. - Dioclophara Kirkaldy, 1904 = lncolea Goding, 1926, syn.n. - Dioclophara viridula (Fairmaire, 1846 = Maturna multilineata Fonseca, 1942, syn.n. - Dioclophara variegata (Goding, 1926, comb.n. = lncolea viridis Goding, 1926, syn.n. - Phormophora maura (Fabricius, 1803 = Darnis dorsata Fabricius, 1803, syn.n.

  10. Doom and boom on a resilient reef: climate change, algal overgrowth and coral recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; McCook, Laurence J; Dove, Sophie; Berkelmans, Ray; Roff, George; Kline, David I; Weeks, Scarla; Evans, Richard D; Williamson, David H; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2009-01-01

    Coral reefs around the world are experiencing large-scale degradation, largely due to global climate change, overfishing, diseases and eutrophication. Climate change models suggest increasing frequency and severity of warming-induced coral bleaching events, with consequent increases in coral mortality and algal overgrowth. Critically, the recovery of damaged reefs will depend on the reversibility of seaweed blooms, generally considered to depend on grazing of the seaweed, and replenishment of corals by larvae that successfully recruit to damaged reefs. These processes usually take years to decades to bring a reef back to coral dominance. In 2006, mass bleaching of corals on inshore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef caused high coral mortality. Here we show that this coral mortality was followed by an unprecedented bloom of a single species of unpalatable seaweed (Lobophora variegata), colonizing dead coral skeletons, but that corals on these reefs recovered dramatically, in less than a year. Unexpectedly, this rapid reversal did not involve reestablishment of corals by recruitment of coral larvae, as often assumed, but depended on several ecological mechanisms previously underestimated. These mechanisms of ecological recovery included rapid regeneration rates of remnant coral tissue, very high competitive ability of the corals allowing them to out-compete the seaweed, a natural seasonal decline in the particular species of dominant seaweed, and an effective marine protected area system. Our study provides a key example of the doom and boom of a highly resilient reef, and new insights into the variability and mechanisms of reef resilience under rapid climate change.

  11. Iron ore particles on four seaweed species from Camburi Beach (Espírito Santo state, Brazil

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    Cristina Aparecida Gomes Nassar

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study estimated the iron-ore concentration found on four species of seaweed. The species tested grow on a site heavily contaminated by this ore, in the city of Vitória, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Under natural conditions, the iron ore reached a temperature 5.0ºC higher than the sand on a sunny day. All the species had iron ore adhered to their fronds. Udotea cyathiformis was the species with the highest iron-ore concentration varing from 0.07 to 0.90 g wet weight, followed by Lobophora variegata (from 0.07 to 0.62 g wet weight, Padina gymnospora (from 0.08 to 0.55 g wet weight and Ulva fasciata (from 0.05 to 0.25 g wet weight. Even after four changes of water over a 12-hour period, the fronds still had particles adhered to their outside cell wall. All the species showed similar tendencies to release the iron, with the highest percentage of particles (40 to 60% released in the first change of water.Minério de ferro particulado sobre quatro macroalgas da Praia de Camburi (Estado do Espírito Santo-Brasil. O presente trabalho determinou a concentração de minério de ferro presente em quatro macroalgas. As espécies testadas ocorrem em um local extremamente contaminado por este particulado, na cidade de Vitória, Estado do Espírito Santo, Brasil. Sob condições naturais, o minério de ferro alcançou um temperatura de até 5,0ºC acima da temperatura da areia em um dia ensolarado.Todas as espécies estudadas apresentavam minério em suas paredes externas. A espécie Udotea cyathiformis apresentou a maior concentração de minério em sua fronde variando de 0,07 a 0,90 g massa úmida, seguida por Lobophora variegata (de 0,07 a 0,62 g massa úmida, Padina gymnospora (de 0,08 a 0,55 g massa úmida e Ulva fasciata (de 0,05 a 0,25 g massa úmida. Mesmo após sucessivas trocas de água, as frondes ainda apresentavam partículas aderidas às suas paredes celulares externas. As espécies apresentaram a mesma tendência de libera

  12. Diversidad y abundancia de moluscos de la epifauna en la comunidad sublitoral de Punta Patilla,Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antulio Prieto A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la diversidad de una comunidad malacológica sublitoral en Punta Patilla, Estado Sucre, Venezuela, desde septiembre 1990 hasta septiembre 1991. Se identificaron 25 especies, 14 bivalvos y 11 gasterópodos. Los parámetros de diversidad total en número de la comunidad fueron H´=3.41 bits/ind., J´=0.74 y 1-D =0.85. Las máximas diversidades mensuales se observaron en marzo 1991 (3.12 bits/ind., junio 1991 (2.88 bits/ind y septiembre 1991 (2.95 bits/ind. y la mínima ocurrió en agosto 1991 (1.20 bits/ind.. Los datos del número de individuos conforman una línea recta ajustada por la serie logarítmica con un índice alfa =4.56 y alfa =3.11 para los de biomasa. Las especies más abundantes fueron Chione cancellata, Antigona listeri, Chione granulata y Arca zebra entre los bivalvos, y Chicoreus brevifrons, Turritella variegata y Phyllonotus pomum entre los gasterópodos, estos presentaron las máximas biomasas individuales. La biomasa total promedio de la comunidad (56.80 g/m² es baja cuando se compara con otros reportes de áreas tropicales. Los moluscos habitaron fondos de grava y arenofangoso cubiertos por praderas de Thalasia testudinumDiversity and abundance of mollusks in the sublittoral epifaunal community of Punta Patilla, Venezuela. The diversity of a sublittoral epifaunal mollusk community of Punta Patilla, Sucre State, Venezuela, was studied from September 1990 to September 1991. We identified 25 species (14 bivalves and 11 gastropods of mollusks that inhabit gravel, soft sand and bottoms covered by Thalassia testudinum.Total diversity indices were H´= 3.42, J´= 0.74 and 1-D = 0.85. Monthly diversity reached its maximum in March 1991 (3.12 bits/ ind., June 1991 (2.88 bits/ind. and September 1991 (2.95 bits/ind.; minimum diversity was recorded in August 1991 (1.20 bits/ind..A log series model showed a diversity index alpha = 4.56 for species abundance data and alpha = 3.11 for biomass data. The more abundant species were

  13. Response of different populations of seven lady beetle species to lambda-cyhalothrin with record of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Agna R S; Spindola, Aline F; Torres, Jorge B; Siqueira, Herbert A A; Colares, Felipe

    2013-10-01

    Simultaneous use of biological and chemical controls is a valued and historic goal of integrated pest management, but has rarely been achieved. One explanation for this failure may be the inadequate documentation of field populations of natural enemies for insecticide tolerance or resistance because natural enemies surviving insecticide application do not create problems like resistant pest species. Therefore, this study investigated 31 populations of lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) regarding their susceptibility to lambda-cyhalothrin, a pyrethroid insecticide that is widely used in cotton and other crops to control lepidopteran and coleopteran pests that are not targeted as prey by lady beetles. The study focused on seven coccinellid species common in cotton fields Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, Cycloneda sanguinea (L.), Eriopis connexa Germar, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant), and Brumoides foudrasi (Mulsant) and one lady beetle species [Curinus coeruleus Mulsant] from a non-cotton ecosystem for comparisons. Dose-mortality curves were estimated after topical treatment of adult lady beetles with lambda-cyhalothrin. Statistically significant variations in lady beetle susceptibility were observed between species and between populations of a given species. Seven and eighteen populations of lady beetles exhibited greater values of LD50 and LD90, respectively, than the highest recommended field rate of lambda-cyhalothrin (20g a.i./hectare≈0.2g a.i./L) for cotton fields in Brazil. Furthermore, based on LD50 values, 29 out of 30 tested populations of lady beetles exhibited ratios of relative tolerance varying from 2- to 215-fold compared to the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Four populations of E. connexa were 10.5-37.7 times more tolerant than the most susceptible population and thus were considered to be resistant to lambda

  14. The influence of pre- and post-zygotic barriers on interspecific Corymbia hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Geoffrey R; Lee, David J; Wallace, Helen M

    2012-06-01

    Corymbia species from different sections hybridize readily, with some of increasing economic importance to plantation forestry. This study explores the locations of reproductive barriers between interspecific Corymbia hybrids and investigates the reproductive success of a wide taxonomic range of C. torelliana hybrid crosses. Pollen, pistil and embryo development were investigated for four C. torelliana crosses (×C. torelliana, ×C. citriodora subsp. citriodora, ×C. tessellaris and ×C. intermedia) using fluorescent and standard microscopy to identify the locations of interspecific reproductive isolating barriers. Corymbia torelliana was also crossed with 16 taxa, representing six of the seven Corymbia sections, both Corymbia subgenera and one species each from the related genera, Angophora and Eucalyptus. All crosses were assessed for capsule and seed yields. Interspecific C. torelliana hybridization was controlled by pre-zygotic reproductive isolating barriers inhibiting pollen adhesion to the stigma, pollen germination, pollen tube growth in the style and pollen tube penetration of the micropyle. Corymbia torelliana (subgenus Blakella, sect. Torellianae) was successfully hybridized with Corymbia species from subgenus Blakella, particularly C. citriodora subsp. citriodora, C. citriodora subsp. variegata, C. henryi (sect. Maculatae) and C. tessellaris (sect. Abbreviatae), and subgenus Corymbia, particularly C. clarksoniana and C. erythrophloia (sect. Septentrionales). Attempted intergeneric hybrids between C. torelliana and either Angophora floribunda or Eucalyptus pellita were unsuccessful. Corymbia hybrids were formed between species from different sections and subgenera, but not with species from the related genera Angophora or Eucalyptus. Reproductive isolation between the interspecific Corymbia hybrid crosses was controlled by early- and late-acting pre-zygotic isolating barriers, with reproductive success generally decreasing with increasing taxonomic

  15. Thelazia callipaeda (Spirurida, Thelaziidae) in wild animals: report of new host species and ecological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otranto, Domenico; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Mallia, Egidio; DiGeronimo, Peter M; Brianti, Emanuele; Testini, Gabriella; Traversa, Donato; Lia, Riccardo P

    2009-12-23

    Thelazia callipaeda infects the eyes of carnivores and humans in Far Eastern Asiatic and European countries. Studies have demonstrated the occurrence of T. callipaeda in foxes from areas where canine thelaziosis is endemic. However, there is little information on the role of wild carnivores as hosts of this nematode. From May 2003 to May 2009, a total of 130 carcasses of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes; n=75), wolves (Canis lupus; n=2), beech martens (Martes foina; n=22), brown hares (Lepus europaeus; n=13), Eurasian badgers (Meles meles; n=10), and wild cats (Felis silvestris; n=8) were examined in an area of southern Italy where canine thelaziosis is highly prevalent. At necropsy, animals were examined and nematodes were collected from the conjunctival sacs of both eyes. All nematodes were morphologically identified and at least five specimens from each of the five host species were molecularly processed by PCR amplification and sequencing of a partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1). Five out of the six wild animal species examined were found to be infected with eyeworms. The overall infection rate, excluding the Eurasian badgers that were all negative, was 39.1%. All the 189 adult nematodes collected (intensity of infection=4+/-2.2) were morphologically identified as T. callipaeda. The molecular analysis confirmed that the only haplotype of T. callipaeda circulating in Europe (i.e., haplotype 1) is present in that area. The competence of red foxes, wolves, beech martens, brown hares, and wild cats as definitive hosts for T. callipaeda is discussed in relationship to their ecology and their likely exposure to the vector Phortica variegata in the study area. The role the wild fauna plays in maintaining and spreading eyeworm infection in humans and domestic animals is also discussed.

  16. Use of Social Information in Seabirds: Compass Rafts Indicate the Heading of Food Patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimerskirch, Henri; Bertrand, Sophie; Silva, Jaime; Marques, Jose Carlos; Goya, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    Ward and Zahavi suggested in 1973 that colonies could serve as information centres, through a transfer of information on the location of food resources between unrelated individuals (Information Centre Hypothesis). Using GPS tracking and observations on group movements, we studied the search strategy and information transfer in two of the most colonial seabirds, Guanay cormorants (Phalacrocorax bougainvillii) and Peruvian boobies (Sula variegata). Both species breed together and feed on the same prey. They do return to the same feeding zone from one trip to the next indicating high unpredictability in the location of food resources. We found that the Guanay cormorants use social information to select their bearing when departing the colony. They form a raft at the sea surface whose position is continuously adjusted to the bearing of the largest returning columns of cormorants. As such, the raft serves as a compass signal that gives an indication on the location of the food patches. Conversely, Peruvian boobies rely mainly on personal information based on memory to take heading at departure. They search for food patches solitarily or in small groups through network foraging by detecting the white plumage of congeners visible at long distance. Our results show that information transfer does occur and we propose a new mechanism of information transfer based on the use of rafts off colonies. The use of rafts for information transfer may be common in central place foraging colonial seabirds that exploit short lasting and/or unpredictably distributed food patches. Over the past decades Guanay cormorants have declined ten times whereas Peruvian boobies have remained relatively stable. We suggest that the decline of the cormorants could be related to reduced social information opportunities and that social behaviour and search strategies have the potential to play an important role in the population dynamics of colonial animals. PMID:20360959

  17. Masoala Peninsula, Madagascar

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    Adina Merenlender

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the influence of human actions on flagship species is an important part of conserving biodiversity, because the information gained is crucial for the development and adaptation of conservation management plans. On the Masoala Peninsula in Madagascar, we are monitoring the two largest prosimian species, Eulemur fulvus albifrons and Varecia variegata rubra, at disturbed and undisturbed forest sites to determine if extraction of forest resources has a significant impact on the population viability of these species. To test the sensitivity of lemur species to routine extraction of natural resources by local villagers, we compared population demography and density for both species across six study sites, using a new census technique. Three of the study sites were closer to villages and, therefore, were more impacted by resource extraction than the others. Our data on more than 600 individual primates suggest that the level of resource extraction did not significantly influence group size, fecundity, or density for either species over the two-year period of this study; however sex ratios in Eulemur were biased toward juvenile and adult females in more disturbed areas, suggesting that males may be emigrating from areas of less suitable habitat. Population densities at each site and estimates of population size across the entire peninsula were calculated and used to evaluate the design of a new park in the area, and to ensure that it will be large enough to support viable populations of these threatened primates. These estimates were calculated by obtaining the surface area of each study region from a geographic information system. Monitoring of these species continues in buffer zone areas of the park, where resource extraction is still permitted.

  18. Sight or Scent: Lemur Sensory Reliance in Detecting Food Quality Varies with Feeding Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushmore, Julie; Leonhardt, Sara D.; Drea, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    Visual and olfactory cues provide important information to foragers, yet we know little about species differences in sensory reliance during food selection. In a series of experimental foraging studies, we examined the relative reliance on vision versus olfaction in three diurnal, primate species with diverse feeding ecologies, including folivorous Coquerel's sifakas (Propithecus coquereli), frugivorous ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata spp), and generalist ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). We used animals with known color-vision status and foods for which different maturation stages (and hence quality) produce distinct visual and olfactory cues (the latter determined chemically). We first showed that lemurs preferentially selected high-quality foods over low-quality foods when visual and olfactory cues were simultaneously available for both food types. Next, using a novel apparatus in a series of discrimination trials, we either manipulated food quality (while holding sensory cues constant) or manipulated sensory cues (while holding food quality constant). Among our study subjects that showed relatively strong preferences for high-quality foods, folivores required both sensory cues combined to reliably identify their preferred foods, whereas generalists could identify their preferred foods using either cue alone, and frugivores could identify their preferred foods using olfactory, but not visual, cues alone. Moreover, when only high-quality foods were available, folivores and generalists used visual rather than olfactory cues to select food, whereas frugivores used both cue types equally. Lastly, individuals in all three of the study species predominantly relied on sight when choosing between low-quality foods, but species differed in the strength of their sensory biases. Our results generally emphasize visual over olfactory reliance in foraging lemurs, but we suggest that the relative sensory reliance of animals may vary with their feeding ecology. PMID:22870229

  19. Evaluation of relationships between growth rate, tree size, lignocellulose composition and enzymatic saccharification in interspecific Corymbia hybrids and parental taxa.

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    Adam L Healey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In order for a lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstock to be considered sustainable, it must possess a high rate of growth to supply biomass for conversion. Despite the desirability of a fast growth rate for industrial application, it is unclear what effect growth rate has on biomass composition or saccharification. We characterized Klason lignin, glucan, and xylan content with response to growth in Corymbia interspecific F1 hybrid families (HF and parental species C. torelliana (CT and C. citriodora subspecies variegata (CCV and measured the effects on enzymatic hydrolysis from hydrothermally pretreated biomass. Analysis of biomass composition within Corymbia populations found similar amounts of Klason lignin content (19.7-21.3% among parental and hybrid populations, whereas glucan content was clearly distinguished within CCV (52% and HF148 (60% as compared to other populations (28-38%. Multiple linear regression indicates that biomass composition is significantly impacted by tree size measured at the same age, with Klason lignin content increasing with diameter breast height (DBH (+0.12% per cm DBH increase, and glucan and xylan typically decreasing per DBH cm increase (-0.7% and -0.3%, respectively. Polysaccharide content within CCV and HF-148 were not significantly affected by tree size. High-throughput enzymatic saccharification of hydrothermally pretreated biomass found significant differences among Corymbia populations for total glucose production from biomass, with parental CT and hybrids HF-148 and HF-51 generating the highest amounts of glucose (~180 mg/g biomass, respectively, with HF-51 undergoing the most efficient glucan-to-glucose conversion (74%. Based on growth rate, biomass composition, and further optimization of enzymatic saccharification yield, high production Corymbia hybrid trees are potentially suitable for fast-rotation bioenergy or biomaterial production.

  20. Sight or scent: lemur sensory reliance in detecting food quality varies with feeding ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Rushmore

    Full Text Available Visual and olfactory cues provide important information to foragers, yet we know little about species differences in sensory reliance during food selection. In a series of experimental foraging studies, we examined the relative reliance on vision versus olfaction in three diurnal, primate species with diverse feeding ecologies, including folivorous Coquerel's sifakas (Propithecus coquereli, frugivorous ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata spp, and generalist ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta. We used animals with known color-vision status and foods for which different maturation stages (and hence quality produce distinct visual and olfactory cues (the latter determined chemically. We first showed that lemurs preferentially selected high-quality foods over low-quality foods when visual and olfactory cues were simultaneously available for both food types. Next, using a novel apparatus in a series of discrimination trials, we either manipulated food quality (while holding sensory cues constant or manipulated sensory cues (while holding food quality constant. Among our study subjects that showed relatively strong preferences for high-quality foods, folivores required both sensory cues combined to reliably identify their preferred foods, whereas generalists could identify their preferred foods using either cue alone, and frugivores could identify their preferred foods using olfactory, but not visual, cues alone. Moreover, when only high-quality foods were available, folivores and generalists used visual rather than olfactory cues to select food, whereas frugivores used both cue types equally. Lastly, individuals in all three of the study species predominantly relied on sight when choosing between low-quality foods, but species differed in the strength of their sensory biases. Our results generally emphasize visual over olfactory reliance in foraging lemurs, but we suggest that the relative sensory reliance of animals may vary with their feeding ecology.

  1. Foraging dispersion of Ryukyu flying-foxes and relationships with fig abundance in East-Asian subtropical island forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Fu; Kuo, Yen-Min; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Tsai, Chi-Feng; Baba, Shigeyuki

    2017-11-14

    Figs are widely distributed key resources to many tropical-subtropical animals, and flying-foxes are major consumers and seed dispersers of figs. Bat-fig interrelationships, however, may vary among species differing in fruiting traits, i.e., bat- versus bird-dispersed figs. We examined Ryukyu flying-fox foraging dispersion and the relationships with tree species composition and fig abundance in forests of Iriomote Island. Bat foraging dispersion showed no spatial patterns with respect to different areas of the island, and was not explained by heterogeneity, density, or basal area (BA) of total trees, nor by relative density or BA of fruiting trees or total fruiting figs among sites. Instead, bat densities were positively dependent on the relative density of total figs, and particularly the relative BA of bat-dispersed figs Ficus septica and F. variegata. Both species were dominant figs in forests, fruiting asynchronously with long crop seasons, and were used as predominant foods. Bats foraged mostly solitarily and the mean density was in a hump-shaped relationship with crop sizes of the dominant bat-figs. These two species and Ficus benguetensis are larger-sized bat-figs, all contained more seeds, higher dry-pulp mass and water mass, but not necessarily water content. By approximate estimation, higher proportions of seeds of these bat-figs would have been removed from fruits through the bat consumption, than that of small-sized bird-figs like F. virgata, F. superba, and F. microcarpa. The foraging dispersion of Ryukyu flying-foxes in forests depends on the availability of the most abundant bat-figs that serve as predominant foods. Intermediate levels of crop sizes of theses figs appear most fit with their solitary foraging. Our results suggest that as density and BA coverage of these dominant bat-figs are below a certain level, their effectiveness to attract bats may dwindle and so would their chance of dispersal by bats.

  2. Reliability of different mark-recapture methods for population size estimation tested against reference population sizes constructed from field data.

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    Annegret Grimm

    Full Text Available Reliable estimates of population size are fundamental in many ecological studies and biodiversity conservation. Selecting appropriate methods to estimate abundance is often very difficult, especially if data are scarce. Most studies concerning the reliability of different estimators used simulation data based on assumptions about capture variability that do not necessarily reflect conditions in natural populations. Here, we used data from an intensively studied closed population of the arboreal gecko Gehyra variegata to construct reference population sizes for assessing twelve different population size estimators in terms of bias, precision, accuracy, and their 95%-confidence intervals. Two of the reference populations reflect natural biological entities, whereas the other reference populations reflect artificial subsets of the population. Since individual heterogeneity was assumed, we tested modifications of the Lincoln-Petersen estimator, a set of models in programs MARK and CARE-2, and a truncated geometric distribution. Ranking of methods was similar across criteria. Models accounting for individual heterogeneity performed best in all assessment criteria. For populations from heterogeneous habitats without obvious covariates explaining individual heterogeneity, we recommend using the moment estimator or the interpolated jackknife estimator (both implemented in CAPTURE/MARK. If data for capture frequencies are substantial, we recommend the sample coverage or the estimating equation (both models implemented in CARE-2. Depending on the distribution of catchabilities, our proposed multiple Lincoln-Petersen and a truncated geometric distribution obtained comparably good results. The former usually resulted in a minimum population size and the latter can be recommended when there is a long tail of low capture probabilities. Models with covariates and mixture models performed poorly. Our approach identified suitable methods and extended options to

  3. Use of social information in seabirds: compass rafts indicate the heading of food patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimerskirch, Henri; Bertrand, Sophie; Silva, Jaime; Marques, Jose Carlos; Goya, Elisa

    2010-03-29

    Ward and Zahavi suggested in 1973 that colonies could serve as information centres, through a transfer of information on the location of food resources between unrelated individuals (Information Centre Hypothesis). Using GPS tracking and observations on group movements, we studied the search strategy and information transfer in two of the most colonial seabirds, Guanay cormorants (Phalacrocorax bougainvillii) and Peruvian boobies (Sula variegata). Both species breed together and feed on the same prey. They do return to the same feeding zone from one trip to the next indicating high unpredictability in the location of food resources. We found that the Guanay cormorants use social information to select their bearing when departing the colony. They form a raft at the sea surface whose position is continuously adjusted to the bearing of the largest returning columns of cormorants. As such, the raft serves as a compass signal that gives an indication on the location of the food patches. Conversely, Peruvian boobies rely mainly on personal information based on memory to take heading at departure. They search for food patches solitarily or in small groups through network foraging by detecting the white plumage of congeners visible at long distance. Our results show that information transfer does occur and we propose a new mechanism of information transfer based on the use of rafts off colonies. The use of rafts for information transfer may be common in central place foraging colonial seabirds that exploit short lasting and/or unpredictably distributed food patches. Over the past decades Guanay cormorants have declined ten times whereas Peruvian boobies have remained relatively stable. We suggest that the decline of the cormorants could be related to reduced social information opportunities and that social behaviour and search strategies have the potential to play an important role in the population dynamics of colonial animals.

  4. An Updated Distribution of the Herpetofauna from the Natura 2000 Site Rarău-Giumalău (Rosci0212, Romania

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    Ştefan Remus Zamfirescu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Amphibians and reptiles are among the most threatened animal species in Europe. Because of their legal conservation status, amphibians and reptiles may act as umbrella and flagship species in certain areas. The Rarău-Giumalău Natura 2000 site (ROSCI 0212 is such an area that, despite its conservation status, is still exposed to human activities alterations. In addition, the standard data form of the site mentions only three amphibian species, which is notably below the herpetofauna diversity of the region. Therefore, the aim of this study is to update the existing knowledge on the local herpetofauna. To this end, herpetological field surveys were conducted in the area between May– September, 2015, ten species being identified, as follows: six amphibians (Salamandra salamandra, Lissotriton montandoni, Ichthyosaura alpestris, Bombina variegata, Bufo bufo and Rana temporaria and four reptiles (Anguis colchica, Lacerta agilis, Zootoca vivipara and Vipera berus. Species distribution is influenced by human activities, among which grazing seems to be the most important. The diversity of herpetofauna is not evenly distributed between the perimeters of the site. The Giumalău perimeter has only six species probably because of a lower habitat diversity compared to the Rarău perimeter. Nine of the identified species are protected by European and national regulations, whereas the standard data form of the site lists only two of them, and one not confirmed by our study. Therefore, the standard data form, a tool for protective management, does not reflect the real situation of the herpetofauna of the site and for this reason, it should be updated.

  5. Antimicrobial potential of ethanol extracts of plants against gramnegative bacilli isolated from cervicovaginal mucosa of sheep bred in the region of Petrolina-PE

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    Valdenice Félix da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive tract infections are the main causes of losses from the low reproductive efficiency of sheep. Gram negative bacilli belonging to the normal flora of the genital region can trigger diseases. The pathogenicity of these agents is expressed when females are with weakened immune system, either by food or stress management. Flaws in and concern about antibiotic residues in animal production have prompted research regarding alternatives for the treatment of diseases. The herbal medicine hás been considered in this context is the subject of numerous studies. This study aimed to evaluate the antibacterial potential of ethanol extracts of plants belonging to the flora of the Northeast against gram negative bacilli isolated from cervical-vaginal mucosa of sheep. Six plants were selected from Caatinga biome: Encholirium spectabile, Bromelia laciniosa, Neoglaziovia variegata, Amburana cearensis Hymenaea martiana and Selaginella convoluta. The plant material was processed to obtain the crude extract. This was tested by microdilution plate and determining the minimum bactericidal concentration, the second document of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI and the extracts diluted in water and alcohol. We used 43 gram negative isolates, as follows: 14 E. coli, 10 Enterobacter spp., 10 Acinetobacter spp. 9 and Klebsiella spp. In the aqueous dilution Klebsiella spp. showed response only to species B. laciniosa, S. convoluta and H. martiana. All tested extracts showed antibacterial activity against Acinetobacter spp and no activity against E. coli and Enterobacter spp. Among the extracts diluted in water H. martiana showed the highest antibacterial activity. In all dilution alcoholic extracts showed inhibitory activity against all bacterial genera, but no statistical difference between them.

  6. Doom and boom on a resilient reef: climate change, algal overgrowth and coral recovery.

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    Guillermo Diaz-Pulido

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral reefs around the world are experiencing large-scale degradation, largely due to global climate change, overfishing, diseases and eutrophication. Climate change models suggest increasing frequency and severity of warming-induced coral bleaching events, with consequent increases in coral mortality and algal overgrowth. Critically, the recovery of damaged reefs will depend on the reversibility of seaweed blooms, generally considered to depend on grazing of the seaweed, and replenishment of corals by larvae that successfully recruit to damaged reefs. These processes usually take years to decades to bring a reef back to coral dominance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 2006, mass bleaching of corals on inshore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef caused high coral mortality. Here we show that this coral mortality was followed by an unprecedented bloom of a single species of unpalatable seaweed (Lobophora variegata, colonizing dead coral skeletons, but that corals on these reefs recovered dramatically, in less than a year. Unexpectedly, this rapid reversal did not involve reestablishment of corals by recruitment of coral larvae, as often assumed, but depended on several ecological mechanisms previously underestimated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These mechanisms of ecological recovery included rapid regeneration rates of remnant coral tissue, very high competitive ability of the corals allowing them to out-compete the seaweed, a natural seasonal decline in the particular species of dominant seaweed, and an effective marine protected area system. Our study provides a key example of the doom and boom of a highly resilient reef, and new insights into the variability and mechanisms of reef resilience under rapid climate change.

  7. Patterns of quadrupedal locomotion in a vertical clinging and leaping primate (Propithecus coquereli) with implications for understanding the functional demands of primate quadrupedal locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granatosky, Michael C; Tripp, Cameron H; Fabre, Anne-Claire; Schmitt, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Many primates exhibit a suite of characteristics that distinguish their quadrupedal gaits from non-primate mammals including the use of a diagonal sequence gait, a relatively protracted humerus at touchdown, and relatively high peak vertical forces on the hindlimbs compared to the forelimbs. These characteristics are thought to have evolved together in early, small-bodied primates possibly in response to the mechanical demands of navigating and foraging in a complex arboreal environment. It remains unclear, however, whether primates that employ quadrupedalism only rarely demonstrate the common primate pattern of quadrupedalism or instead use the common non-primate pattern or an entirely different mechanical pattern from either group. This study compared the kinematics and kinetics of two habitually quadrupedal primates (Lemur catta and Varecia variegata) to those of a dedicated vertical clinger and leaper (Propithecus coquereli) during bouts of quadrupedal walking. All three species employed diagonal sequence gaits almost exclusively, displayed similar degrees of humeral protraction, and exhibited lower vertical peak forces in the forelimbs compared to the hindlimb. From the data in this study, it is possible to reject the idea that P. coquereli uses a non-primate pattern of quadrupedal walking mechanics. Nor do they use an entirely different mechanical pattern from either most primates or most non-primates during quadrupedal locomotion. These findings provide support for the idea that this suite of characteristics is adaptive for the challenges of arboreal locomotion in primates and that these features of primate locomotion may be basal to the order or evolved independently in multiple lineages including indriids. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:644-652, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nereididae (Annelida: Phyllodocida) of the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman, including description of two new species and 11 new records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonyadi-Naeini, Alieh; Rastegar-Pouyani, Nasrullah; Rastegar-Pouyani, Eskandar; Glasby, Christopher J; Rahimian, Hassan

    2017-03-17

    Currently, only 31 nereidid species are known from the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the poorly known diversity of nereidid polychaetes from seas of the southern coasts of Iran. Specimens were collected from 23 locations along the intertidal zones of the two water bodies. Among the 26 species found: two are new, and are described here, including Simplisetia qeshmensis sp. nov. and Neanthes biparagnatha sp. nov.; 11 are new geographical records. Neanthes biparagnatha sp. nov. is most similar to N. deplanata (Mohammed, 1971), which is also found in the Persian Gulf, but can be most easily distinguished from it by the presence of bars in addition to cones in Area IV of the pharynx. Simplisetia qeshmensis sp. nov. may be distinguished from its closest congener, S. erythraeensis (Fauvel, 1918), also reported from the Persian Gulf, by having a greater number of paragnaths in Area I of the pharynx, an additional type of chaeta (homogomph spinigers) in the ventral neuropodial fascicle and having a reduced notopodial lobe in posterior chaetigers. The list of new records includes: one species from both areas, Neanthes glandicincta (Southern, 1921); eight species from the Persian Gulf, Leonnates decipiens Fauvel, 1929, Neanthes acuminata (Ehlers, 1868), Neanthes sp., Neanthes sp. cf. N. acuminata, Nereis sp. cf. N. pelagica Linnaeus, 1758, Perinereis cultrifera (Grube, 1840) species complex., Pseudonereis trimaculata (Horst, 1924), Pseudonereis sp. cf. P. variegata (Grube, 1857) and two from the Gulf of Oman, Leonnates persicus Wesenberg-Lund, 1949 and Perinereis kuwaitensis Mohammed, 1970. The present study brings to 40 the number of nereidid species currently known from the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman. A taxonomic key to nereidid species from the intertidal zones of the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman is presented to facilitate future investigations.

  9. Atividade antimicrobiana in vitro de extratos de plantas do bioma caatinga em isolados de Escherichia coli de suínos

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    A.W.C FERNANDES

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO A suinocultura é uma atividade pecuária bem consolidada no Brasil. Por outro lado a colibacilose neonatal, cujo patógeno é Escherichia coli, pode diminuir a produtividade nas granjas e causar prejuízos aos produtores. O tratamento baseia-se na utilização de drogas antimicrobianas. Todavia, o uso indiscriminado dessas substâncias tem levado a seleção de cepas resistentes. Diante disso, a busca por alternativas terapêuticas, como as plantas medicinais, tem se tornado cada vez mais comum. Dessa maneira, objetivou-se determinar a atividade antimicrobiana de cinco extratos etanólicos de plantas do bioma caatinga: Amburana cearensis (Fr. Allem A.C. Smith, Encholirium spectabile Mart., Hymenaea courbaril L, Neoglaziovia variegata Mez e Selaginella convoluta Spring frente a 43 isolados de Eschericha coli coletados de suínos. Para o teste de sensibilidade in vitro foi realizada a técnica da Concentração Bactericida Mínima (CBM pelo método da microdiluição em microplaca. Os extratos apresentaram atividade antimicrobiana nas seguintes médias 138,75 175,28, 128,36, 127,71 e 129,33 μg/mL, respectivamente. Essa atividade antibacteriana pode estar relacionada a ação de metabólitos secundários presentes nos extratos dessas plantas. Dessa forma, nosso estudo pode contribuir para o desenvolvimento de alternativas terapêuticas no tratamento de infecções, como a colibacilose neonatal em suíno, bem como para o conhecimento acerca das plantas medicinais da Caatinga.

  10. Emergence of Thelazia callipaeda Infection in Dogs and Cats from East-Central Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, C; Catarino, A L; Almeida, B; Ramos, C; Campino, L; Cardoso, L

    2016-08-01

    The eyeworm Thelazia callipaeda (Spirurida, Thelaziidae) infects domestic animals, wildlife and human beings, and is considered an emerging pathogen in Europe. This study aimed at investigating the prevalence and risk factors of T. callipaeda infection in dogs and cats from east-central Portugal, a region where the parasite was previously detected in two red foxes (Vulpes vulpes). Thelazia callipaeda was found in 22 (3.8%) of 586 dogs and in four (23.5%) of 17 cats. A total of 178 adult worms (71.9% of females and 28.1% of males) were collected from the conjunctiva of the infected dogs. The number of worms collected per dog ranged from 1 to 35 (average ± standard deviation: 8.08 ± 9.49), with four dogs (18.2%) harbouring only a single parasite. Worms were gathered from dogs throughout all months of the year. A total of 17 adult worms (64.7% of females and 35.3% of males) were obtained from cats. The number of worms per cat ranged from 1 to 14 (4.3 ± 6.5), with three cats (75.0%) having a single parasite. Eyeworm infection was statistically more prevalent in pastoral and farm dogs, in those dogs with contact with other animals and in dogs with ocular manifestations. T. callipaeda is endemic in the east-central part of Portugal, reportedly infecting domestic (dogs and cats) and wild carnivores (red foxes) and evidencing a southerly dissemination. Future investigations should be focused on determining the local distribution and density of the insect vector (Phortica variegata) in this geographical area. This emergent zoonosis should be included by veterinarians, physicians and ophthalmologists in the differential diagnosis of ocular manifestations in their patients, particularly in areas where T. callipaeda is endemic. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Illegal captive lemurs in Madagascar: Comparing the use of online and in-person data collection methods.

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    Reuter, Kim E; Schaefer, Melissa S

    2017-11-01

    Although it is illegal to capture, sell, and trade lemurs, the live capture of lemurs in Madagascar is ongoing and may have impacted over 28,000 lemurs between 2010 and 2013. Only one study has examined this trade and did so using in-person interviews in northern Madagascar. The current study sought to expand this existing dataset and examine the comparability of online surveys to more traditional on-location data collection methods. In this study, we collected data through a web-based survey resulting in 302 sightings of 685 captive lemurs. We also collected data from 171 hotel and 43 restaurant websites and social media profiles. Survey submissions included sightings of 30 species from 10 genera, nearly twice as many species as identified via the in-person interviews. Lemur catta, Varecia variegata, and Eulemur fulvus were the most common species sighted in captivity. Captive lemurs were reported in 19 of Madagascar's 22 administrative regions and most were seen in urban areas near their habitat ranges. This represents a wider geographic distribution of captive lemurs than previously found through in-person interviews. The online survey results were broadly similar to those of the in-person surveys though greater in species and geographic diversity demonstrating advantages to the use of online surveys. The online research methods were low in cost (USD $100) compared to on-location data collection (USD $12,000). Identified disadvantages included sample bias; most of the respondents to the online survey were researchers and many captive sightings were near study sites. The results illustrate the benefits of incorporating a social science approach using online surveys as a complement to traditional fieldwork. Am. J. Primatol. 79:e22541, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Assessing the herbivore role of the sea-urchin Echinometra viridis: Keys to determine the structure of communities in disturbed coral reefs.

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    Sangil, Carlos; Guzman, Hector M

    2016-09-01

    Echinometra viridis previously was considered a cryptic species unable to control the development and growth of macroalgae on coral reefs. Its role as a herbivore was seen as minor compared to other grazers present on the reef. However, the present disturbed state of some reefs has highlighted the role played by this sea-urchin. Combining field data with experiments on the Caribbean coast of Panama, we demonstrate that the current community organization on disturbed coral reefs in the Mesoamerican Caribbean is largely due to the action of E. viridis. It is the most abundant sea-urchin species, together with two others (Diadema antillarum and Echinometra lucunter). Field data also indicate that the relationship between its density and the abundance of macroalgae is stronger and it is more negative in impact than those of the other two. However, the niche this urchin exploits most efficiently is confined to leeward reefs with low levels of sedimentation. Outside these habitats, their populations are not decisive in controlling macroalgal growth. Grazing experiments showed that E. viridis consumes more fresh macroalgae per day and per weight of sea-urchin, and is a more effective grazer than D. antillarum or E. lucunter. E. viridis showed food preferences for early-successional turf macroalgae (Acanthophora spicifera), avoiding the less palatable late-successional and fleshy macroalgae (Lobophora variegata, Halimeda opuntia). However, it becomes a generalist herbivore feeding on all varieties of macroalgae when resources are scarce. H. opuntia is the macroalga that most resists E. viridis activity, which may explain its wide distribution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. PAROLE, LINGUE E ALFABETI NELLA CLASSE MULTICULTURALE

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    Graziella Favaro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Il bilinguismo è soprattutto un’opportunità e una ricchezza perché la padronanza di due lingue amplia le frontiere delle possibilità e il mondo si allarga di conseguenza. Ma che cosa succede quando in epoche diverse della vita – nella prima infanzia, nell’infanzia o nell’adolescenza – a causa del viaggio di migrazione, una nuova lingua entra a far parte del patrimonio linguistico dei bambini? Quali rapporti profondi  di concorrenza, conflitto, complementarietà, integrazione  si stabiliscono tra i due codici, tra i diversi significati e i significanti? E se la lingua madre diventa improvvisamente muta e una nuova lingua sostituisce quella originaria, quali cambiamenti e perdite si verificano nella vita emotiva dei bambini venuti da lontano? Sono queste alcune delle domande a cui il contributo si propone di rispondere, analizzando la condizione bilingue  variegata e molteplice  degli alunni stranieri in Italia e presentando alcuni progetti significativi e materiali innovativi per valorizzare la pluralità linguistica della classe.WORDS, LANGUAGES AND ALPHABETS IN THE MULTICULTURAL CLASSROOMBilingualism is above all an opportunity and a richness, since mastering two languages creates greater possibilities and the world expands as a consequence. But what happens in different stages of life- in childhood or adolescence- due to migration, when a new language becomes part of a child’s heritage? What profound relationships –competition, conflict, complementarity, integration- are established between the two codes, between different meanings and signifiers? And if the new language renders the mother tongue mute, what changes and losses take place in the emotional sphere of migrant children? These are a few of the questions which the paper attempts to answer, by analyzing the varied and multifaceted bilingual condition of foreign students in Italy. The paper presents a few important projects and innovative materials to give

  14. Taxonomic revision and cladistic analysis of Avicularia Lamarck, 1818 (Araneae, Theraphosidae, Aviculariinae) with description of three new aviculariine genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Caroline Sayuri; Bertani, Rogério

    2017-01-01

    The genus Avicularia Lamarck, 1818 is revised and all species are rediagnosed. The type species, described as Aranea avicularia Linnaeus, 1758, is the oldest mygalomorph species described and its taxonomic history is extensive and confusing. Cladistic analyses using both equal and implied weights were carried out with a matrix of 46 taxa from seven theraphosid subfamilies, and 71 morphological and ecological characters. The optimal cladogram found with Piwe and concavity = 6 suggests Avicularia and Aviculariinae are monophyletic. Subfamily Aviculariinae includes Avicularia Lamarck, 1818, Typhochlaena C. L. Koch, 1850, Tapinauchenius Ausserer, 1871, Stromatopelma Karsch, 1881, Ephebopus Simon, 1892, Psalmopoeus Pocock, 1895, Heteroscodra Pocock, 1899, Iridopelma Pocock, 1901, Pachistopelma Pocock, 1901, Ybyraporagen. n., Caribenagen. n., and Antillenagen. n. The clade is supported by well-developed scopulae on tarsi and metatarsi, greatly extended laterally. Avicularia synapomorphies are juveniles bearing black tarsi contrasting with other lighter articles; spermathecae with an accentuated outwards curvature medially, and male palpal bulb with embolus medial portion and tegulum's margin form an acute angle in retrolateral view. Avicularia is composed of twelve species, including three new species: Avicularia avicularia (Linnaeus, 1818), Avicularia glauca Simon, 1891, Avicularia variegata (F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896) stat. n., Avicularia minatrix Pocock, 1903, Avicularia taunayi (Mello-Leitão, 1920), Avicularia juruensis Mello-Leitão, 1923, Avicularia rufa Schiapelli & Gerschman, 1945, Avicularia purpurea Kirk, 1990, Avicularia hirschii Bullmer et al. 2006, Avicularia merianaesp. n., Avicularia lynnaesp. n., and Avicularia caeisp. n.. Avicularia species are distributed throughout Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Brazil. Three new genera are erected to accommodate

  15. Survey of Phortica drosophilid flies within and outside of a recently identified transmission area of the eye worm Thelazia callipaeda in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggero, C; Schaffner, F; Bächli, G; Mathis, A; Schnyder, M

    2010-07-15

    Phortica drosophilid flies are the intermediate hosts and vectors of the eye worm Thelazia callipaeda. This nematode originates from Asia and was first detected in southern Europe in 1989. The aim of the study was to assess the presence and the population dynamics of Phortica flies in a recently discovered new endemic area (Ticino, Southern Switzerland, south of the Alps) of T. callipaeda (site 1), at its border (site 2), at higher altitudes (beyond 1100 meters above sea level) within (site 3) or outside (site 4) the endemic area, and in a site north of the Alps (site 5). Flies were captured using two types of fruit-baited traps, the bait being changed once per week, and by netting around the eyes of a dog and human. A total of 1695 Phortica flies were collected. One of the fruit-baited traps, which can easily be assembled with cheap components, was found to be efficient for catching Phortica spp. At site 1, 644 such flies were collected with this trap during 34 weekly catches from April to October. The number of flies caught was highest at site 2 (n=903) and it was significantly lower (n=36) at site 5 north of the Alps. Virtually no Phortica at all were caught at higher altitudes (sites 3 and 4). Females were all in all predominant in the traps, accounting for 72.6% of Phortica flies (1150/1584), although males became dominant late in the season (male/female ratio 1.26 in October). In contrast, 80.2% of Phortica flies collected around the eyes of dog and human baits by netting (n=111) were males. No female at all was captured by netting until September. PCR for T. callipaeda was negative with all Phortica flies. Morphological examination of the 523 male flies based on features of the eye margin and the number of particular genital sensilla identified 89.1% P. semivirgo, 5.7% P. variegata but also 5.2% intermediate forms. Genetic analyses of partial mitochondrial cox1 and rDNA internal transcribed spacer 1 sequences revealed that these three morphotypes were

  16. Espaços públicos arborizados enquanto elemento potencializador de saúde

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    Mariel Stenia Vanina Vianna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A crescente expansão urbana vem interferindo significativamente na distribuição de áreas verdes nas cidades; essas têm a função de aprimorar a saúde, melhorando a qualidade de vida das pessoas. Objetivo: caracterizar as áreas verdes existentes na zona urbana do município e identificar potencialidades, enquanto ambiente para promoção da saúde. Método: estudo quali-quantitativo e descritivo, realizado na cidade de Santo Ângelo/RS. Foram caracterizadas cada uma das áreas verdes públicas urbanas (praças existentes no município, através de levantamento da vegetação arbórea, além de investigar a existência de plantas medicinais. Para a classificação dos vegetais, foram utilizadas bibliografias já existentes. Quanto à constatação das plantas autorizadas pelo SUS, realizou-se uma busca no site da Secretaria Nacional da Saúde, para a posterior verificação. Resultados e Considerações Finais: constatou-se que, na cidade de Santo Ângelo/RS, existem 8 (oito áreas verdes públicas, onde observou-se a existência de um número menor de espécies nativas em relação às exóticas. O número total de espécies existentes em cada praça varia de 14 a 26; para as espécies nativas, este número encontra-se entre 4 a 15, enquanto que para as espécies exóticas oscila de 8 a 14. Ainda foram encontradas diversas espécies arbóreas que apresentam potencial medicinal, sendo estes os mais variados. Dentre as 58 espécies encontradas algumas estão citadas na lista de plantas medicinais de interesse do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, como é o caso da Bahuinia Variegata, Eugenia uniflora, Persea americana e Psidium guajava, que auxiliam na promoção da saúde.

  17. Species-Specific Transmission of Novel Picornaviruses in Lemurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Efrem S.; Deem, Sharon L.; Porton, Ingrid J.; Cao, Song

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The roles of host genetics versus exposure and contact frequency in driving cross-species transmission remain the subject of debate. Here, we used a multitaxon lemur collection at the Saint Louis Zoo in the United States as a model to gain insight into viral transmission in a setting of high interspecies contact. Lemurs are a diverse and understudied group of primates that are highly endangered. The speciation of lemurs, which are endemic to the island of Madagascar, occurred in geographic isolation apart from that of continental African primates. Although evidence of endogenized viruses in lemur genomes exists, no exogenous viruses of lemurs have been described to date. Here we identified two novel picornaviruses in fecal specimens of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) and black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata). We found that the viruses were transmitted in a species-specific manner (lesavirus 1 was detected only in ring-tailed lemurs, while lesavirus 2 was detected only in black-and-white ruffed lemurs). Longitudinal sampling over a 1-year interval demonstrated ongoing infection in the collection. This was supported by evidence of viral clearance in some animals and new infections in previously uninfected animals, including a set of newly born triplets that acquired the infection. While the two virus strains were found to be cocirculating in a mixed-species exhibit of ring-tailed lemurs, black-and-white ruffed lemurs, and black lemurs, there was no evidence of cross-species transmission. This suggests that despite high-intensity contact, host species barriers can prevent cross-species transmissions of these viruses. IMPORTANCE Up to 75% of emerging infectious diseases in humans today are the result of zoonotic transmission. However, a challenge in understanding transmission dynamics has been the limited models of cross-species transmission. Zoos provide a unique opportunity to explore parameters defining viral transmission. We demonstrated that

  18. Il territorio delle Lipari tra ambiente, cinema e turismo / The territory of Lipari between environment, cinema and tourism

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    Elena Di Blasi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fino agli anni ’50 le Lipari (dette anche Eolie, sfavorite dall’insularità e con un’economia di sussistenza, basata su attività tradizionali, erano dominate da povertà ed emigrazione. Tutto mutò nel 1949, quando una troupe cinematografica, guidata da Rossellini, girò Stromboli, interpretato da Ingrid Bergman: tra i due era nata una storia d’amore. Poco dopo, un’altra troupe utilizzò Vulcano come location dell’omonimo film, con Anna Magnani, ex fiamma di Rossellini. Questi cult passarono alla storia del cinema come la guerra dei vulcani. I due film, con gli scoop legati alle vicende sentimentali dei protagonisti, hanno innescato un nuovo percorso per le Eolie, fuori dall’atavico letargo, che ha determinato un vero e proprio “boom turistico”. Indagando la variegata realtà delle Lipari, lo scopo del presente articolo è quello di dimostrare come, attraverso un’analisi storica del mercato turistico, l’arrivo del cinema nel territorio eoliano abbia innescato importanti processi di sviluppo economico e cambiamento sociale. Questa ricerca vuole, inoltre, evidenziare il rapporto privilegiato tra insularità e cineturismo. Till the late 50s the Aeolian Islands, plagued by insularity and characterized by a subsistence economy based on traditional activities, had been dominated by poverty and emigration. All changed in 1949 when Rossellini shot Stromboli featuring Ingrid Bergman, his new love. Soon after a crew shot in Volcano the homonymous film starring Anna Magnani, Rossellini’s old flame. The two films, gone down in history as the war of volcanoes, and the scoops about the love scandal have drawn a new path for the Aeolian Islands that has taken them to a tourist boom. The present paper aims to show by means of a historical analysis of the local tourist market how the coming of the film industry have triggered processes of economic growth and social change in the Aeolian Islands. This paper also aims to point out the

  19. Antimicrobial (including antimollicutes, antioxidant and anticholinesterase activities of Brazilian and Spanish marine organisms – evaluation of extracts and pure compounds

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    Éverson Miguel Bianco

    Full Text Available Abstract This work describes the antimicrobial, antioxidant and anticholinesterase activities in vitro of organic extracts from fourteen seaweeds, eleven sponges, two ascidians, one bryozoan, and one sea anemone species collected along the Brazilian and Spanish coast, as well as the isolation of the diterpene (4R, 9S, 14S-4α-acetoxy-9β,14α-dihydroxydolast-1(15,7-diene (1 and halogenated sesquiterpene elatol (2. The most promising antimicrobial results for cell wall bacteria were obtained by extracts from seaweeds Laurencia dendroidea and Sargassum vulgare var. nanun (MIC 250 μg/ml, and by the bryozoan Bugula neritina (MIC 62.5 μg/ml, both against Staphylococcus aureus. As for antimollicutes, extracts from seaweeds showed results better than the extracts from invertebrates. Almost all seaweeds assayed (92% exhibited some antimicrobial activity against mollicutes strains (Mycoplasma hominis,Mycoplasma genitalium,Mycoplasma capricolum and Mycoplasma pneumoniae strain FH. From these seaweeds, A1 (Canistrocarpus cervicornis, A11 (Gracilaria sp. and A4 (Lobophora variegata showed the best results for M. pneumoniae strain FH (MIC 250 μg/ml. Furthermore, compounds 1 and 2 were also assayed against mollicutes strains M. hominis,M. genitalium,M. capricolum,M. pneumoniae strain 129 and M. pneumoniae strain FH, which showed MIC > 100 μg/ml. Antioxidant activities of extracts from these marine organisms were inactive, except for E7 (from sponge Ircinia sp., which exhibited moderated antioxidant activities for two methods assayed (IC50 83.0 ± 0.1 μg/ml, and 52.0 ± 0.8 mg AA/g, respectively. Finally, for the anticholinesterase activity, all the 29 samples evaluated (100% exhibited some level of activity, with IC50 < 1000 μg/ml. From these, seaweeds extracts were considered more promising than marine invertebrate extracts [A10 (IC50 14.4 ± 0.1 μg/ml, A16 (IC50 16.4 ± 0.4 μg/ml and A8 (IC50 14.9 ± 0.5 μg/ml]. The findings of this work are useful

  20. In vitro antibacterial activity of crude extracts of 9 selected medicinal plants against UTI causing MDR bacteria

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    Monali P. Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI has become a more grievous problem today, due to multidrug resistance of infecting Gram-positive (GP and Gram-negative (GN bacteria, sometimes even with multiple infections. This study examines effectivity of 9 tropical flowering plants (Anogeissus acuminata, Azadirachta indica, Bauhinia variegata, Boerhaavia diffusa, Punica granatum, Soymida febrifuga, Terminalia chebula, Tinospora cordifolia and Tribulus terrestris for possible use as source of antimicrobials for multidrug resistant (MDR bacteria, along with main-stream antibiotics. Pathogenic bacteria were isolated from urine samples of patients attending and admitted in the hospital. Antibiograms of 11 isolated bacteria (GPs, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus; and GNs, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were ascertained by the disc-diffusion method, and antibacterial effectivity of plant extracts was monitored by the agar-well diffusion method. Isolated bacteria were floridly MDR to most antibiotics of the day. Methanol extracts of 9 plants were used, and extracts of 3 plants, A. acuminata, P. granatum and S. febrifuga at least caused 25–29 mm as the maximum size of zone of inhibition on bacterial lawns. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values of methanol extracts of 9 plants were recorded. The methanol extract of A. acuminata had 0.29 mg/ml as the lowest MIC value and 0.67 mg/ml as the lowest MBC value, against MDR S. aureus, signifying effectivity; but, it had the highest MIC value of 3.41 mg/ml. and the highest MBC value of 4.27 mg/ml for most other MDR bacteria including E. coli. Qualitative phytochemical analysis was done for these 9 plants and information on leading phytochemicals was presented retrieved from PubChem database. Thus

  1. Evaluación de la degradabilidad in situ en bovinos suplementados con cuatro especies arbóreas

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    María Roa V.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar degradabilidad in situ en rumen de cuatro especies forrajeras: Acacia Roja (Delonix regia, pízamo (Eritryna glauca, Cratilia (Cratylia argentea y casco de vaca (Bahuinia variegata, para determinar su calidad nutricional. Materiales y métodos. Cuatro hembras rumino-fistuladas en un diseño de sobrecambio simple, pastoreando en Brachiaria decumbens, suplementadas en la mañana con tres kg de hojas deshidratadas de las cuatro especies mencionadas, de un año de establecidas y podadas cada 3 meses. En las pruebas in situ se utilizaron bolsas de nylon, adicionando 5 g de MS de cada arbórea/bolsa, incluyendo braquiaria, en diferentes horas (6, 12, 24, 48 y 72. Se evaluó la degradabilidad de la materia seca (DMS, fibra detergente neutro (DFDN fibra detergente ácido (DFDA, nitrógeno total (DNT y nitrógeno adherido a FDN (DNFDN. En el líquido ruminal se midió nitrógeno amoniacal a las 0, 4, 8 y 12 y pH a las 0, 3, 6, 9 y 12 horas. Resultados. La DMS fue mayor (p>0.05 para casco de vaca (53.3% y acacia roja (56.1% con relación a pízamo y cratilia. La DMS de braquiaria fue mayor (p>0.05 en 18.6% suplementando con casco de vaca con relación a las otras arbóreas. La DFDN potencial fue menor (p>0.05 para pízamo (7.6% en comparación con cratilia. La DFDN de braquiaria fue similar en todas las forrajeras. Conclusiones. Algunos componentes de las arbóreas tienen efecto asociativo en la cinética de la tasa de degradación de MS y FDA del pasto, siendo superiores (p>0.05 cuando se suplementó con casco de vaca.

  2. Assessment of Attractiveness of Plants as Roosting Sites for the Melon Fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae, and Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Grant T.; Vargas, Roger I.

    2007-01-01

    The use of toxic protein bait sprays to suppress melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), populations typically involves application to vegetation bordering agricultural host areas where the adults seek shelter (“roost”). Although bait spray applications for suppression of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), populations have traditionally been applied to the host crop, rather than to crop borders, roosting by oriental fruit flies in borders of some crop species, such as papaya, Carica papaya L. (Brassicales: Caricaceae), suggests that bait spray applications to crop borders could also help in suppression of B. dorsalis populations. In order to develop improved recommendations for application of bait sprays to border plants for suppression of melon fly and oriental fruit fly populations, the relative attractiveness of a range of plant species, in a vegetative (non-flowering) stage, was tested to wild melon fly and oriental fruit fly populations established in a papaya orchard in Hawaii. A total of 20 plant species were evaluated, divided into four categories: 1) border plants, including corn, Zea mays L. (Poales: Poaceae), windbreaks and broad-leaved ornamentals, 7 species; 2) weed plants commonly found in agricultural fields in Hawaii, 6 species; 3) host crop plants, 1 species- zucchini, Cucurbita pepo L. (Violales: Curcurbitaceae), and 4) locally grown fruit trees, 6 species. Plants were established in pots and placed in an open field, in clusters encircling protein bait traps, 20 m away from the papaya orchard. Castor bean, Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiales: Euphorbiaceae), panax, Polyscias guilfoylei (Bull) Bailey (Apiales: Araliaceae), tiger's claw, Erythnna variegata L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), and guava, Psidium guajava L. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae) were identified as preferred roosting hosts for the melon fly, and tiger's claw, panax, castor bean, Canada cocklebur, Xanthium strumarium L. (Asterales: Asteraceae

  3. Ethnomedicinal values, phenolic contents and antioxidant properties of wild culinary vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Arshad Mehmood; Shah, Munir H; Li, Tong; Fu, Xiong; Guo, Xinbo; Liu, Rui Hai

    2015-03-13

    Traditional medicines comprise a variety of health practices, approaches, knowledge, and beliefs. Documentation of traditional knowledge, estimation of total phenolics and antioxidant properties of plant species used as wild vegetables and in traditional medicines by the local communities of Lesser Himalayas-Pakistan are targeted. Interviews, questionnaires, and focus group conversation with local informants were carried out to record ethno-medicinal values. Used value, percentage of people who have traditional knowledge, preference ranking and informant consensus factors were also measured. Standard analytical methods were applied to estimate phenolic contents and antioxidant properties in water and acetone extracts. A total of 39 plant species used as culinary vegetables and to treat 44 different health disorders are investigated. Significant levels of use value (0.571) and preference ranking (58% PPK, PR-5) are calculated for Ficus palmata, Ficus carica and Solanum nigrum. Elevated levels of total phenolics (144.5 mg GAE/100 g, FW), and flavonoid contents (142.5 mgRtE/100 g, FW) were measured in the water extracts of Origanum vulgare, while Ficus palmata exhibits the highest flavonol contents (142.7 mg RtE/100 g, FW). Maximum DPPH activity is noted in the flowering buds of Bauhinia variegata (85.34%). However, highest values for OH(-) radical scavenging activity (75.12%), Fe(3+) reducing antioxidant power (54.50 µM GAE/100 g, FW), and total antioxidant capacity (180.8 µM AAE/100 g, FW) were measured in the water extracts of Origanum vulgare. Lesser Himalayas is a rich source of traditional cultural heritage, and plant biodiversity, which are under threat and necessitate urgent documentation. Present study is focused on the plant species used in traditional medicines and culinary vegetables as well. Preliminary determinations of phenoloic contents and antioxidant properties of various plant species were carried out. Present work will introduce new resource of

  4. Ichthyosis with confetti: clinics, molecular genetics and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Liliana; Diociaiuti, Andrea; El Hachem, May; Castiglia, Daniele; Zambruno, Giovanna

    2015-09-17

    Ichthyosis with confetti (IWC) is an autosomal dominant congenital ichthyosis also known as ichthyosis variegata or congenital reticular ichthyosiform erythroderma. It manifests at birth with generalized ichthyosiform erythroderma or with a collodion baby picture. The erythrodermic and ichthyotic phenotype persists during life and its severity may modify. However, the hallmark of the disease is the appearance, in childhood or later in life, of healthy skin confetti-like spots, which increase in number and size with time. IWC is a very rare genodermatosis, with a prevalence KRT10 and KRT1 genes, encoding for keratins 10 and keratin 1, respectively. In this context, healthy skin confetti-like spots represent "repaired" skin due to independent events of reversion of keratin gene mutations via mitotic recombination. In most cases, IWC clinical suspicion is delayed until the detection of white skin spots. Clinical features, which may represent hint to the diagnosis of IWC even before appearance of confetti-like spots, include ear and mammillae hypoplasia, the progressive development of hypertrichosis and, in some patients, of adherent verrucous plaques of hyperkeratosis. Altogether the histopathological finding of keratinocyte vacuolization and the nuclear staining for keratin 10 and keratin 1 by immunofluorescence are pathognomonic. Nevertheless, mutational analysis of KRT10 or KRT1 genes is at present the gold standard to confirm the diagnosis. IWC has to be differentiated mainly from congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma. Differential diagnosis also includes syndromic ichthyoses, in particular Netherton syndrome, and the keratinopathic ichthyoses. Most of reported IWC cases are sporadic, but familial cases with autosomal dominant mode of inheritance have been also described. Therefore, knowledge of the mutation is the only way to properly counsel the couples. No specific and satisfactory therapy is currently available for IWC. Like for other congenital ichthyoses

  5. L’impatto del cinema sul turismo: il fenomeno del cineturismo / The impact of cinema on tourism: the phenomenon of cine-tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Pellicano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available “Un film è sempre l’inizio di un viaggio”, così il fenomeno del cineturismo ci porta per mano a scoprire le location dei film e le emozioni che si celano dietro la più grande macchina dei sogni: il cinema. Spesso decidere la giusta destinazione per le proprie ferie è difficile, dal momento che esistono vari fattori, dal tempo, all’età, alle esigenze economiche e ai gusti, e luoghi che sono più speciali e più interessanti per trascorrervi le vacanze. Spesso ad influenzare ci pensano oggi film, documentari o fiction, diventati il mezzo potenzialmente migliore per trasmettere i valori, le tradizioni e la cultura di un territorio, in quanto l’attenzione con cui le persone seguono i film e il coinvolgimento emotivo sono irripetibili con altri strumenti di comunicazione. Il cineturismo è dunque un’emergente motivazione al viaggio, che si aggiunge alla già variegata domanda turistica. L’Italia ha cominciato ad elaborare un proprio concetto di cineturismo nel 2003. Delle migliaia di location utilizzate da film e serie tv, solo poche decine tuttavia entrano a far parte del circuito legato al cineturismo. “A film is always the beginning of a journey”, so the phenomenon of movie-induced tourism takes us by the hand to discover the location of the film and the emotions that lie behind the biggest dream machine: the cinema. Choosing the right destination for holidays is difficult, since there are various factors, such as time, age, economic needs and tastes, and places that are more special and more interesting to spend the holidays. Often, we think movies, documentaries or fiction, as means that potentially convey the values, traditions and culture of an area, as the attention that people follow the film and the emotional involvement are unique with other communication tools. Movie-induced tourism is therefore an emerging motivation for travel, which adds to the already varied tourist demand. Italy has begun to develop

  6. Ethnobotanical survey of medicinally important shrubs and trees of Himalayan region of Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Sofia; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Zafar, Muhammad; Sultana, Shazia; Ayub, Muhammad; Khan, Mir Ajab; Yaseen, Ghulam

    2015-05-26

    =100%) was expressed by Abies pindrow, Adhatoda vasica, Bauhinia variegata and Cedrela serrata. Based on use value Juglans regia (0.88) was found most significant species followed by Acacia nilotica (0.83), Phyllanthus emblica (0.81), Pinus roxburghii (0.75) and Punica granatum (0.71). The area has a rich diversity of medicinally important shrub and tree species. The tradition of using plants for medicinal purposes is still alive in the local community but recently this tradition is gradually declining in new generation. Therefore awareness is needed to be raised among the local people on sustainable use and conservation of local flora. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of cover crops on insect pests and predators in conservation tillage cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Glynn; Schomberg, Harry; Phatak, Sharad; Mullinix, Benjamin; Lachnicht, Sharon; Timper, Patricia; Olson, Dawn

    2004-08-01

    In fall 2000, an on-farm sustainable agricultural research project was established for cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., in Tift County, Georgia. The objective of our 2-yr research project was to determine the impact of several cover crops on pest and predator insects in cotton. The five cover crop treatments included 1) cereal rye, Secale cereale L., a standard grass cover crop; 2) crimson clover, Trifolium incarnatum L., a standard legume cover crop; 3) a legume mixture of balansa clover, Trifolium michelianum Savi; crimson clover; and hairy vetch, Vicia villosa Roth; 4) a legume mixture + rye combination; and 5) no cover crop in conventionally tilled fields. Three main groups or species of pests were collected in cover crops and cotton: 1) the heliothines Heliothis virescens (F.) and Helicoverpa zea (Boddie); 2) the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois); and 3) stink bugs. The main stink bugs collected were the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.); the brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say); and the green stink bug, Acrosternum hilare (Say). Cotton aphids, Aphis gossypii Glover, were collected only on cotton. For both years of the study, the heliothines were the only pests that exceeded their economic threshold in cotton, and the number of times this threshold was exceeded in cotton was higher in control cotton than in crimson clover and rye cotton. Heliothine predators and aphidophagous lady beetles occurred in cover crops and cotton during both years of the experiment. Geocoris punctipes (Say), Orius insidiosus (Say), and red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren were relatively the most abundant heliothine predators observed. Lady beetles included the convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville; the sevenspotted lady beetle, Coccinella septempunctata L.; spotted lady beetle, Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer); and the multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas). Density of G. punctipes was

  8. An ethnomedicinal survey and documentation of important medicinal folklore food phytonims of flora of Samahni valley, (Azad Kashmir) Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtiaq, Muhammad; Hanif, Wajahat; Khan, M A; Ashraf, M; Butt, Ansar M

    2007-07-01

    Ethnobotanical knowledge is one of the precious cultural heritage parts of an area that involves the interaction between plants and people and foremost among these are the management of plant diversity by indigenous communities and the traditional use of medicinal plants. An ethnobotanical analysis was conducted in order to document the traditional medicinal uses of plants, particularly medicinally important folklore food phytonims of flora of Samahni valley, Azad Kashmir (Pakistan). In the valley, inhabitants use different taxa of flora in two different ways; herbal medicines and food (vegetable and fruits) medicines. The distinctive geographic position and historic demological background of the area keep folk phytotherapy potential of medicinal herbs hitherto alive, which are used in various forms; as regular herbal medicines prescribed by Hakeems (herbal practitioners) and as food (medicines) recepies suggested by elder people. Among these, some herbs are used as single remedy while others depict better curative effects in synergistic mode against various ailments. Some interesting and uncommon findings are as; Sisymbrium irio is used for treatment of measles, asthma; Solanum miniatum to cure urinary calculi, heart pain, rheumatism, Momordica balsamina leaves as wound healer; Allium sativum bulb juice as anti cancer, contraceptive, blood pressure; Boerhavia diffusa roots as anti jaundice, anemia, edema; Capsicum annuum fruit as omen against evil eye and giant, yellow fever; Corriandrum sativum seeds as diuretic, anti spermatogenesis; Raphanus sativus seeds against syphilis; Solanum miniatum fruit for treatment of enlarged spleen and liver; seed's oil of Pisum sativum as anti spermatogenesis; Bauhinia variegata for skin diseases, ulcers; Malva sylvestris for cough, bladder ulcer; Phoenix sylvestris kernel as anti-aging tonic; Phyllanthus emblica for diuretic, anemia, biliousness; Terminalia chebula to cure chronic ulcers, carious teeth pain, heart problems

  9. La lirica cosmica di Pascoli. Il ciocco e il corpus astrale: fonti, immagini e intertestualità della mitologia siderale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Scartozzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available L’indagine intende proporre una panoramica completa sul gruppo di testi pascoliani di ispirazione astronomica; un corpus universalmente acclamato, ma non sempre tenuto in debita considerazione per l’apparente dissonanza col macrotesto disegnato dalle sillogi pascoliane. A partire dalle fonti e dalle posizioni filosofico-concettuali espresse dall’autore nelle prose si è voluto penetrare a fondo nel racconto per sintetizzare i risultati stilistici e le riflessioni ideologiche più rilevanti. L’analisi del testo ha costituito il focus principale del lavoro: particolare attenzione è stata rivolta alla ricerca di indizi su una possibile mitologia affidata dall’autore alla sede lirica scelta; delineata la simbologia di base si è proceduto con l’approfondimento comparatistico. Una buona parte dell’indagine è stata infatti dedicata al confronto delle modalità testuali e dei simboli propri del filone lirico astrale con quelli appartenenti alle tradizionali destinazioni della poesia pascoliana. Si è voluto quindi ricostruire il disegno complessivo, distribuito in diverse tipologie poetiche e sostenuto da una trama di modelli organica e variegata. L’ipotesi di base ha considerato la presenza di un filo logico-diegetico in grado di attraversare le distinzioni di genere (prosa / poesia, linguistiche (italiano / latino e editoriali; un progetto capace di arricchire di sfumature nuove il dibattito critico relativo all’opera di Pascoli.The aim of this paper is to offer a specific overview on the group of lyrics by Giovanni Pascoli inspired by astronomy; a combination universally acclaimed, but not always considered in its topical relevance, because of its original subject and language.Basing on an in-depth text analysis and on the poet’s ideological-philosophical thought, I examined the cosmic tale to identify the most important stylistic solutions and ideas. Secondly, I investigated the patterns of a hypothetical mythology

  10. α-, β-caroteno e α-tocoferol em algas marinhas in natura α- and β-carotene, and α-tocopherol in fresh seaweeds

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    Márcia Barbosa de Sousa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o potencial de 32 espécies de algas marinhas das divisões Chlorophyta, Rhodophyta e Phaeophyta como fontes de α- e β-caroteno e α-tocoferol. Todas as clorofíceas analisadas apresentaram α- e β-caroteno. Os teores máximo e mínimo de α-caroteno foram detectados nas espécies do gênero Caulerpa e em Codium decorticatum, respectivamente; e β-caroteno foi mais baixo em Caulerpa mexicana e mais elevado em Ulva fasciata. Dentre as rodofíceas, 11 espécies apresentaram α-caroteno, com máximo em Botryocladia occidentalis. β-caroteno foi encontrado em todas as algas vermelhas analisadas com teores mínimo e máximo em Gracilaria caudata e Bryothamnion triquetrum, respectivamente. As feofíceas apresentaram apenas β-caroteno, com mínimo e máximo em Dictyopteris delicatula e Padina gymnospora, respectivamente. Na divisão Chlorophyta, α-tocoferol, foi máximo em Codium decorticatum e mínimo em Caulerpa prolifera. Na Rhodophyta, 12 espécies apresentaram α-tocoferol com teor máximo em Enantiocladia duperreyi. Na Phaeophyta, α-tocoferol foi encontrado com valores mínimo e máximo em Lobophora variegata e Dictyota dichotoma, respectivamente.The aim of this work was to evaluate the potential of 32 marine macro algae species, members of Chlorophyta, Rhodophyta and Phaeophyta, as sources of a-carotene, b-carotene and a-tocopherol. Both b-carotene and a-carotene were found in all species of green macroalgae analyzed. The maximum content of a-carotene was detected in algae belonging to Caulerpa genus and the minimum in Codium decorticatum. The amount of b-carotene found was minimum in Caulerpa mexicana and maximum in Ulva fasciata. Among the Rhodophyta species, eleven contain a-carotene, the maximum content was found in Botryocladia occidentalis. b-Carotene was found in all red macroalgae analyzed presenting the lowest and highest values in Gracilaria caudata and Bryothamnion triquetrum, respectively