WorldWideScience

Sample records for hinode observations combined

  1. On the Solar Chromosphere Observed at the LIMB with Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Philip G.; Carlsson, Mats

    2010-08-01

    Broadband images in the Ca II H line, from the Broadband Filter Imager (BFI) instrument on the Hinode spacecraft, show emission from spicules emerging from and visible right down to the observed limb. Surprisingly, little absorption of spicule light is seen along their lengths. We present formal solutions to the transfer equation for given (ad hoc) source functions, including a stratified chromosphere from which spicules emanate. The model parameters are broadly compatible with earlier studies of spicules. The visibility of Ca II spicules down to the limb in Hinode data seems to require that spicule emission be Doppler shifted relative to the stratified atmosphere, either by supersonic turbulent or organized spicular motion. The non-spicule component of the chromosphere is almost invisible in the broadband BFI data, but we predict that it will be clearly visible in high spectral resolution data. Broadband Ca II H limb images give the false impression that the chromosphere is dominated by spicules. Our analysis serves as a reminder that the absence of a signature can be as significant as its presence.

  2. Morphology Of A Hot Prominence Cavity Observed with Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Mark A.; Reeves, K. K.; Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    Prominence cavities appear as circularly shaped voids in coronal emission over polarity inversion lines where a prominence channel is straddling the solar limb. The presence of chromospheric material suspended at coronal altitudes is a common but not necessary feature within these cavities. These voids are observed to change shape as a prominence feature rotates around the limb. We use a morphological model projected in cross-sections to fit the cavity emission in Hinode/XRT passbands, and then apply temperature diagnostics to XRT and SDO/AIA data to investigate the thermal structure. We find significant evidence that the prominence cavity is hotter than the corona immediately outside the cavity boundary. This investigation follows upon "Thermal Properties of A Solar Coronal Cavity Observed with the X-ray Telescope on Hinode" by Reeves et al., 2012, ApJ, in press.

  3. Hinode/XRT and Stereo Observations of the May 2007 Coronal Wave-cme-dimming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Gemma; Engell, A. J.; Wills-Davey, M. J.; Grigis, P.; Testa, P.

    2009-05-01

    We report observations of the first diffuse coronal wave detected by Hinode/XRT. The event occurred near the West solar limb on 23 May 2007, originating from active region (AR) 10956. The bright emission expanded both to the East and South of the AR. We combine the XRT results with data from STEREO (B) and a potential magnetic field extrapolation to understand the global magnetic field connectivity. We consider that the brightenings seen to the East and South of the source AR are generated by different physical processes, due to the distinct magnetic environments in these regions. We attribute the brightening to the East of the AR to compression and channelling of the plasma along large-scale loops. The brightening to the South of the AR expands across the quiet Sun, making the southern component a likely candidate for a classical diffuse coronal wave. We analyse the bright front in STEREO/EUVI 171, 195 and 284 A images, as well as in XRT data, finding it to be largely co-spatial in all bandpasses. The expansion velocity of the diffuse bright front is 250 (± 85) km/s. We also exploit the near-limb properties of this event by combining STEREO/COR1 and EUVI data to derive a full picture of the low-coronal development of the eruption. The COR1 data show that the southern-most outer edge of the CME is progressively displaced southward. The core coronal dimmings map to the bright core of the CME; the secondary coronal dimmings map to the CME cavity; and the diffuse coronal "wave” maps to the outermost edge of the expanding CME shell. The analysis of this near-limb event has implications for understanding earlier eruptions originating from the same AR. In particular, we present a new analysis of the 19 May 2007 event. NASA grants NNX09AB11G and NNH07AB97C supported this work.

  4. High-cadence Hinode/XRT observations for studying coronal events with very short timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, David Eugene; Kobelski, Adam; Savage, Sabrina

    2017-08-01

    The Hinode X-Ray Telescope’s capability for high time cadence observations makes it an excellent tool for probing highly variable conditions in the corona, including wave-like activity, dynamic plasma motions, and short-duration transient events. XRT is capable of producing images at cadences faster than one image per 10 seconds, which is comparable to the energy release timescales, and/or ionization evolution timescales, predicted by a range of models of coronal activity. In the present work, we demonstrate XRT’s high-cadence capability through observations of active region AR 10923 (2006 November), with cadences of 6-20 seconds. The image sequences, made sequentially with multiple analysis filters, reveal many transient brightenings (i.e., microflares), for which we derive heating and cooling timescales. We also forward model the observed light curves to estimate the temperature, density, filling factors, and lengths of the observed loops. These estimates allow us to prioritize different heating mechanisms, and to better understand the unresolved structures within the observations. This study provides a test of capabilities, which have still not yet been fully utilized by the ten-year-old Hinode X-Ray Telescope, and thus provides a starting point for future investigations of short-timescale/high-frequency variations in coronal X-ray intensity.

  5. Coordinated Observations of AR 11726 by Hinode/EIS and EUNIS-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancheta, A. J.; Daw, A. N.; Brosius, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) sounding rocket payload was flown on 2013 April 23 with two independent channels covering the 300-370 A and 525-635 A wavebands. EUNIS-2013 observed two targets on the solar disk that included quiet sun, active regions, a flare, and a micro-flare. The active region AR 11726 was co-observed with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. The radiometric response of EUNIS is measured in the laboratory using a NIST-calibrated photodiode and hollow cathode discharge lamp. A density- and temperature- insensitive line intensity ratio technique can be used to derive an in-flight calibration update of Hinode/EIS. Measurements of EIS emission lines with respect to EUNIS lines, including Fe X to Fe XII and Si X, provide a comparison between the calibrations of the two instruments. The radiometric calibration of EUNIS-2013 is also validated using the same insensitive ratio technique with emission lines such as Mg VIII, Fe XI, Fe XVI, and Si IX.

  6. Morphology of a Hot Coronal Cavity Core as Observed by Hinode/XRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K. K.; Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Hudson, H. S.

    2010-01-01

    We follow a coronal cavity that was observed by Hinode/XRT during the summer of 2008. This cavity has a persistent area of relatively bright X-ray emission in its center. We use multifilter data from XRT to study the thermal emission from this cavity, and find that the bright center is hotter than the surrounding cavity plasma with temperatures of about 1.6 MK. We follow the morphology of this hot feature as the cavity structure rotates over the limb during the several days between July 19 - 23 2008. We find that the hot structure at first looks fairly circular, then appears to expand and elongate, and then shrinks again to a compact circular shape. We interpret this apparent change in shape as being due to the morphology of the filament channel associated with the cavity, and the change in viewing angle as the structure rotates over the limb of the Sun.

  7. Characteristics that Produce White-light Enhancements in Solar Flares Observed by Hinode/SOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Kitagawa, Jun; Masuda, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    To understand the conditions that produce white-light (WL) enhancements in solar flares, a statistical analysis of visible continuum data as observed by Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) was performed. In this study, approximately 100 flare events from M- and X-class flares were selected. The time period during which the data were recorded spans from 2011 January to 2016 February. Of these events, approximately half are classified as white-light flares (WLFs), whereas the remaining events do not show any enhancements of the visible continuum (non-WLF; NWL). To determine the existence of WL emission, running difference images of not only the Hinode/SOT WL (G-band, blue, green, and red filter) data, but also the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager continuum data are used. A comparison between these two groups of WL data in terms of duration, temperature, emission measure of GOES soft X-rays, distance between EUV flare ribbons, strength of hard X-rays, and photospheric magnetic field strength was undertaken. In this statistical study, WLF events are characterized by a shorter timescale and shorter ribbon distance compared with NWL events. From the scatter plots of the duration of soft X-rays and the energy of non-thermal electrons, a clear distinction between WLF and NWL events can be made. It is found that the precipitation of large amounts of accelerated electrons within a short time period plays a key role in generating WL enhancements. Finally, it was demonstrated that the coronal magnetic field strength in the flare region is one of the most important factors that allow the individual identification of WLF events from NWL events.

  8. Analysis and modelling of recurrent solar flares observed with Hinode/EIS on March 9, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, V.; Del Zanna, G.; Valori, G.; Pariat, E.; Mason, H. E.; Dudík, J.; Janvier, M.

    2017-05-01

    Three homologous C-class flares and one last M-class flare were observed by both the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) in the AR 11429 on March 9, 2012. All the recurrent flares occurred within a short interval of time (less than 4 h), showed very similar plasma morphology and were all confined, until the last one when a large-scale eruption occurred. The C-class flares are characterized by the appearance, at approximatively the same locations, of two bright and compact footpoint sources of ≈3-10 MK evaporating plasma, and a semi-circular ribbon. During all the flares, the continuous brightening of a spine-like hot plasma (≈10 MK) structure is also observed. Spectroscopic observations with Hinode/EIS are used to measure and compare the blueshift velocities in the Fe xxiii emission line and the electron number density at the flare footpoints for each flare. Similar velocities, of the order of 150-200 km s-1, are observed during the C2.0 and C4.7 confined flares, in agreement with the values reported by other authors in the study of the last M1.8 class flare. On the other hand, lower electron number densities and temperatures tend to be observed in flares with lower peak soft X-ray flux. In order to investigate the homologous nature of the flares, we performed a non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of the 3D magnetic field configuration in the corona. The NLFFF extrapolation and the Quasi-Separatrix Layers (QSLs) provide the magnetic field context which explains the location of the kernels, spine-like hot plasma and semi-circular brightenings observed in the (non-eruptive) flares. Given the absence of a coronal null point, we argue that the homologous flares were all generated by the continuous recurrence of bald patch reconnection. The movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  9. PHOTOSPHERIC ABUNDANCES OF POLAR JETS ON THE SUN OBSERVED BY HINODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun [Hinode Team, ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Imada, Shinsuke, E-mail: lksun@solar.isas.jaxa.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2015-08-20

    Many jets are detected at X-ray wavelengths in the Sun's polar regions, and the ejected plasma along the jets has been suggested to contribute mass to the fast solar wind. From in situ measurements in the magnetosphere, it has been found that the fast solar wind has photospheric abundances while the slow solar wind has coronal abundances. Therefore, we investigated the abundances of polar jets to determine whether they are the same as that of the fast solar wind. For this study, we selected 22 jets in the polar region observed by Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) simultaneously on 2007 November 1–3. We calculated the First Ionization Potential (FIP) bias factor from the ratio of the intensity between high (S) and low (Si, Fe) FIP elements using the EIS spectra. The values of the FIP bias factors for the polar jets are around 0.7–1.9, and 75% of the values are in the range of 0.7–1.5, which indicates that they have photospheric abundances similar to the fast solar wind. The results are consistent with the reconnection jet model where photospheric plasma emerges and is rapidly ejected into the fast wind.

  10. FLARE FOOTPOINT REGIONS AND A SURGE OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS, RHESSI, AND SDO/AIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Dennis, B. R. [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Caspi, A. [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft observed flare footpoint regions coincident with a surge for an M3.7 flare observed on 2011 September 25 at N12 E33 in active region 11302. The flare was observed in spectral lines of O vi, Fe x, Fe xii, Fe xiv, Fe xv, Fe xvi, Fe xvii, Fe xxiii, and Fe xxiv. The EIS observations were made coincident with hard X-ray bursts observed by RHESSI. Overlays of the RHESSI images on the EIS raster images at different wavelengths show a spatial coincidence of features in the RHESSI images with the EIS upflow and downflow regions, as well as loop-top or near-loop-top regions. A complex array of phenomena were observed, including multiple evaporation regions and the surge, which was also observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly telescopes. The slit of the EIS spectrometer covered several flare footpoint regions from which evaporative upflows in Fe xxiii and Fe xxiv lines were observed with Doppler speeds greater than 500 km s{sup −1}. For ions such as Fe xv both evaporative outflows (∼200 km s{sup −1}) and downflows (∼30–50 km s{sup −1}) were observed. Nonthermal motions from 120 to 300 km s{sup −1} were measured in flare lines. In the surge, Doppler speeds are found from about 0 to over 250 km s{sup −1} in lines from ions such as Fe xiv. The nonthermal motions could be due to multiple sources slightly Doppler-shifted from each other or turbulence in the evaporating plasma. We estimate the energetics of the hard X-ray burst and obtain a total flare energy in accelerated electrons of ≥7 × 10{sup 28} erg. This is a lower limit because only an upper limit can be determined for the low-energy cutoff to the electron spectrum. We find that detailed modeling of this event would require a multithreaded model owing to its complexity.

  11. Open questions on prominences from coordinated observations by IRIS, Hinode, SDO/AIA, THEMIS, and the Meudon/MSDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, B.; Tian, H.; Kucera, T.; López Ariste, A.; Mein, N.; Mein, P.; Dalmasse, K.; Golub, L.

    2014-09-01

    Context. A large prominence was observed by multiple instruments on the ground and in space during an international campaign on September 24, 2013, for three hours (12:12 UT -15:12 UT). Instruments used in the campaign included the newly launched (June 2013) Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), THEMIS (Tenerife), the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), the Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), and the Multichannel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph (MSDP) in the Meudon Solar Tower. The movies obtained in 304 Å with the EUV imager SDO/AIA, and in Ca II line by SOT show the dynamic nature of the prominence. Aims: The aim of this work is to study the dynamics of the prominence fine structures in multiple wavelengths to understand their formation. Methods: The spectrographs IRIS and MSDP provided line profiles with a high cadence in Mg II h (2803.5 Å) and k (2796.4 Å) lines along four slit positions (IRIS), and in Hα in a 2D field of view (MSDP). The spectropolarimetry of THEMIS (Tenerife) allowed us to derive the magnetic field of the prominence using the He D3 line depolarization (Hanle effect combined with the Zeeman effect). Results: The magnetic field is found to be globally horizontal with a relatively weak field strength (8-15 Gauss). On the other hand, the Ca II movie reveals turbulent-like motion that is not organized in specific parts of the prominence. We tested the addition of a turbulent magnetic component. This model is compatible with the polarimetric observations at those places where the plasma turbulence peaks. On the other hand, the Mg II line profiles show multiple peaks well separated in wavelength. This is interpreted by the existence of small threads along the line of sight with a large dispersion of discrete values of Doppler shifts, from 5 km s-1 (a quasi-steady component) to 60-80 km s-1. Each peak corresponds to a Gaussian profile, and not to a reversed profile as was expected by the present non

  12. Horizontal flow fields observed in Hinode G-band images. II. Flow fields in the final stages of sunspot decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Deng, N.; Liu, C.; Shimizu, T.; Wang, H.; Denker, C.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Generation and dissipation of magnetic fields is a fundamental physical process on the Sun. In comparison to flux emergence and the initial stages of sunspot formation, the demise of sunspots still lacks a comprehensive description. Aims: The evolution of sunspots is most commonly discussed in terms of their intensity and magnetic field. Here, we present additional information about the three-dimensional flow field in the vicinity of sunspots towards the end of their existence. Methods: We present a subset of multi-wavelengths observations obtained with the Japanese Hinode mission, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain during the time period 2010 November 18-23. Horizontal proper motions were derived from G-band and Ca ii H images, whereas line-of-sight velocities were extracted from VTT echelle Hα λ656.28 nm spectra and Fe i λ630.25 nm spectral data of the Hinode/Spectro-Polarimeter, which also provided three-dimensional magnetic field information. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO provided continuum images and line-of-sight magnetograms, in addition to the high-resolution observations for the entire disk passage of the active region. Results: We perform a quantitative study of photospheric and chromospheric flow fields in and around decaying sunspots. In one of the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 11126, we observe moat flow and moving magnetic features (MMFs), even after its penumbra had decayed. We also detect a superpenumbral structure around this pore. We find that MMFs follow well-defined, radial paths from the spot all the way to the border of a supergranular cell surrounding the spot. In contrast, flux emergence near the other sunspot prevents the establishment of similar well ordered flow patterns, which could be discerned around a tiny pore of merely 2 Mm diameter. After the disappearance of the sunspots/pores, a coherent patch of abnormal

  13. Dynamics of Trees of Fragmenting Granules in the Quiet Sun: Hinode/SOT Observations Compared to Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malherbe, J.-M.; Roudier, T.; Stein, R.; Frank, Z.

    2018-01-01

    We compare horizontal velocities, vertical magnetic fields, and the evolution of trees of fragmenting granules (TFG, also named families of granules) derived in the quiet Sun at disk center from observations at solar minimum and maximum of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT on board Hinode) and results of a recent 3D numerical simulation of the magneto-convection. We used 24-hour sequences of a 2D field of view (FOV) with high spatial and temporal resolution recorded by the SOT Broad band Filter Imager (BFI) and Narrow band Filter Imager (NFI). TFG were evidenced by segmentation and labeling of continuum intensities. Horizontal velocities were obtained from local correlation tracking (LCT) of proper motions of granules. Stokes V provided a proxy of the line-of-sight magnetic field (BLOS). The MHD simulation (performed independently) produced granulation intensities, velocity, and magnetic field vectors. We discovered that TFG also form in the simulation and show that it is able to reproduce the main properties of solar TFG: lifetime and size, associated horizontal motions, corks, and diffusive index are close to observations. The largest (but not numerous) families are related in both cases to the strongest flows and could play a major role in supergranule and magnetic network formation. We found that observations do not reveal any significant variation in TFG between solar minimum and maximum.

  14. Hinode, the Sun, and public outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaji, K.; Tonooka, H.; Shimojo, M.; Tokimasa, N.; Suzuki, D.; Nakamichi, A.; Shimoikura, I.

    2015-03-01

    Extended Abstract Hinode is a solar observation satellite in Japan and its launch was in September 2006. Its name means ``SUNRISE`` in Japanese. It has three instruments onboard in visible light, X-ray, EUV to solve mystery of coronal heating and origins of magnetic fields. Hinode has been providing us with impressive solar data, which are very important for not only investigating solar phenomena but also giving new knowledge about the sun to the public. In order to efficiently communicate Hinode data to the public, we organized working group for public use of Hinode data. which are composed of both researchers and educators in collaboration. As follow, we introduce our activities in brief. For the public use of Hinode data, at first, we produced two DVDs introducing Hinode observation results. In particular, second DVD contains a movie for kids, which are devloped to picturebook. Now, it is under producing an illustrated book and a planetarium program. It turn out that the DVDs help the public understand the sun from questionnaire surveys. Second, we developed teaching materials from Hinode data and had a science classroom about the sun, solar observations, practice with PC such as imaging software at junior high school. As the results, they had much interests in Hinode data. Third, we have joint observations with high school students and so on in a few years. The students compare their own data with Hinode data and have a presentation at science contests. The joint observations make their motivation higher in their activities. It is important to record and report our activities in some ways. So, we positively publish papers and have presentions in domestic/international meetings. Though we are supported in budget, resources and so on by NAOJ Hinode Team, we apply research funds for promoting our EPO activities and acquire some funds such as NAOJ Joint Research Expenses and Grands-Aid for Scientific Research Funds since the launch. This way, since its launch, we

  15. Improved SOT (Hinode mission) high resolution solar imaging observations: 2—Photometric properties of sunspot umbral dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, H.; Koutchmy, S.; Adjabshirizadeh, A.

    2016-11-01

    The origin and evolution of solar sunspots in deep photospheric layers are not yet well understood. The case of a quasi-symmetric single mature sunspot near the solar centre is selected for analysis. We use the best available observations of the partial Sun free of turbulent Earth atmospheric effects from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode spacecraft, after greatly improving the resolution with an optimum Max-likelihood deconvolution with the Point Spread Function (PSF) deduced in a preceding paper. For several different images both the smearing due to the instrumental diffraction effects (PSF core) and the large angle stray light are removed. The selected iterative processing depends on both the signal/noise ratio and on the desired contrast of the ultimate details under examination. The photometric properties of bright umbral dots (BUDs) are deduced from corrected frames. Calibrated isophote maps are provided to show the intensity variations around each UD across the background umbra and the surrounding photospheric field, including the penumbra. We deduce the typical photometrical properties of bright UDs that populate the whole umbral surface down to sub-pixel scales of 0.05448''. The analysis demonstrates the basic heterogeneous nature of the umbra, similar to a network of minute bright and dark round or elongated cells with a spacing of order of 0.35''. For the first time a complete and detailed map of the color index and temperature deduced from the analysis of deeply corrected continuum images is provided, showing that tiny bright UDs can reach photospheric temperatures and even higher for the peripheral BUDs. In the umbra, there are some very dark small regions with temperatures as low as 3100 K. Close links seemingly exist with bright UDs. Central BUDs and peripheral BUDs are found to have similar properties but significantly different contrast values. Photometric analysis shows a large dispersion that reflects the broad range of

  16. The Hinode Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Sakurai, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    The Solar-B satellite was launched in 2006 by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (ISAS/JAXA), and was renamed Hinode ('sunrise' in Japanese). Hinode carries three instruments: the X-ray telescope (XRT), the EUV imaging spectrometer (EIS), and the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). These instruments were developed by ISAS/JAXA in cooperation with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan as domestic partner, and NASA and the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK) as international partners. ESA and the Norwegian Space Center have been providing a downlink station. The Hinode (Solar-B) Mission gives a comprehensive description of the Hinode mission and its instruments onboard. This book is most useful for researchers, professionals, and graduate students working in the field of solar physics, astronomy, and space instrumentation. This is the only book that carefully describes the details of the Hinode mission; it is richly illustrated with full-color ima...

  17. Study of extreme-ultraviolet emission and properties of a coronal streamer from PROBA2/SWAP, HINODE/EIS and Mauna Loa Mk4 observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goryaev, F.; Slemzin, V.; Vainshtein, L. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the RAS (LPI), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Williams, David R., E-mail: goryaev_farid@mail.ru [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    Wide-field extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) telescopes imaging in spectral bands sensitive to 1 MK plasma on the Sun often observe extended, ray-like coronal structures stretching radially from active regions to distances of 1.5-2 R {sub ☉}, which represent the EUV counterparts of white-light streamers. To explain this phenomenon, we investigated the properties of a streamer observed on 2010 October 20 and 21, by the PROBA2/SWAP EUV telescope together with the Hinode/EIS (HOP 165) and the Mauna Loa Mk4 white-light coronagraph. In the SWAP 174 Å band comprising the Fe IX-Fe XI lines, the streamer was detected to a distance of 2 R {sub ☉}. We assume that the EUV emission is dominated by collisional excitation and resonant scattering of monochromatic radiation coming from the underlying corona. Below 1.2 R {sub ☉}, the plasma density and temperature were derived from the Hinode/EIS data by a line-ratio method. Plasma conditions in the streamer and in the background corona above 1.2 R {sub ☉} from the disk center were determined by forward-modeling the emission that best fit the observational data in both EUV and white light. It was found that the plasma in the streamer above 1.2 R {sub ☉} is nearly isothermal, with a temperature of T = 1.43 ± 0.08 MK. The hydrostatic scale-height temperature determined from the evaluated density distribution was significantly higher (1.72 ± 0.08 MK), which suggests the existence of outward plasma flow along the streamer. We conclude that, inside the streamer, collisional excitation provided more than 90% of the observed EUV emission, whereas, in the background corona, the contribution of resonance scattering became comparable with that of collisions at R ≳ 2 R {sub ☉}.

  18. Normal and counter Evershed flows in the photospheric penumbra of a sunspot. SPINOR 2D inversions of Hinode-SOT/SP observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu-Tapia, A.; Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; van Noort, M.; Jurčák, J.

    2017-11-01

    Context. The Evershed effect, a nearly horizontal outflow of material seen in the penumbrae of sunspots in the photospheric layers, is a common characteristic of well-developed penumbrae, but is still not well understood. Even less is known about photospheric horizontal inflows in the penumbra, also known as counter Evershed flows. Aims: Here we present a rare feature observed in the penumbra of the main sunspot of AR NOAA 10930. This spot displays the normal Evershed outflow in most of the penumbra, but harbors a fast photospheric inflow of material over a large sector of the disk-center penumbra. We investigate the driving forces of both, the normal and the counter Evershed flows. Methods: We invert the spectropolarimetric data from Hinode SOT/SP using the spatially coupled version of the SPINOR inversion code, which allows us to derive height-dependent maps of the relevant physical parameters in the sunspot. These maps show considerable fine structure. Similarities and differences between the normal Evershed outflow and the counter Evershed flow are investigated. Results: In both the normal and the counter Evershed flows, the material flows from regions with field strengths of the order of 1.5-2 kG to regions with stronger fields. The sources and sinks of both penumbral flows display opposite field polarities, with the sinks (tails of filaments) harboring local enhancements in temperature, which are nonetheless colder than their sources (heads of filaments). Conclusions: The anti-correlation of the gradients in the temperature and magnetic pressure between the endpoints of the filaments from the two distinct penumbral regions is compatible with both the convective driver and the siphon flow scenarios. A geometrical scale of the parameters is necessary to determine which is the dominant force driving the flows.

  19. Simultaneous Observation of High Temperature Plasma of Solar Corona By TESIS CORONAS-PHOTON and XRT Hinode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A.; Kuzin, S.; Bogachev, S.; Shestov, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Mg XII spectroheliograph is a part of instrumentation complex TESIS (satellite CORONAS-PHOTON). This instrument builds monochromatic images of hot plasma of the solar corona (λ = 8.42 Å, T>5 MK). The Mg XII spectroheliograph observed hot plasma in the non-flaring active-region NOAA 11019 during nine days. We reconstructed DEM of this active region with the help of genetic algorithm (we used data of the Mg XII spectroheliograph, XRT and EIT). Emission measure of the hot component amounts 1 % of the emission measure of the cool component.

  20. Transition-region/Coronal Signatures and Magnetic Setting of Sunspot Penumbral Jets: Hinode (SOT/FG), Hi-C, and SDO/AIA Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Alpert, Shane E.

    2016-01-01

    Penumbral microjets (PJs) are transient narrow bright features in the chromosphere of sunspot penumbrae, first characterized by Katsukawa et al. using the Ca ii H-line filter on Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). It was proposed that the PJs form as a result of reconnection between two magnetic components of penumbrae (spines and interspines), and that they could contribute to the transition region (TR) and coronal heating above sunspot penumbrae. We propose a modified picture of formation of PJs based on recent results on the internal structure of sunspot penumbral filaments. Using data of a sunspot from Hinode/SOT, High Resolution Coronal Imager, and different passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we examine whether PJs have signatures in the TR and corona. We find hardly any discernible signature of normal PJs in any AIA passbands, except for a few of them showing up in the 1600 Å images. However, we discovered exceptionally stronger jets with similar lifetimes but bigger sizes (up to 600 km wide) occurring repeatedly in a few locations in the penumbra, where evidence of patches of opposite-polarity fields in the tails of some penumbral filaments is seen in Stokes-V images. These tail PJs do display signatures in the TR. Whether they have any coronal-temperature plasma is unclear. We infer that none of the PJs, including the tail PJs, directly heat the corona in active regions significantly, but any penumbral jet might drive some coronal heating indirectly via the generation of Alfvén waves and/or braiding of the coronal field.

  1. Hinode: A Decade of Success in Capturing Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, S.; Elrod, S.; Deluca, E.; Doschek, G.; Tarbell, T.

    2017-01-01

    As the present solar cycle passes into its minimum phase, the Hinode mission marks its tenth year of investigating solar activity. Hinode's decade of successful observations have provided us with immeasurable insight into the solar processes that invoke space weather and thereby affect the interplanetary environment in which we reside. The mission's complementary suite of instruments allows us to probe transient, high energy events alongside long-term, cycle-dependent phenomena from magnetic fields at the Sun's surface out to highly thermalized coronal plasma enveloping active regions (ARs). These rich data sets have already changed the face of solar physics and will continue to provoke exciting research as new observational paradigms are pursued. Hinode was launched as part of the Science Mission Directorate's (SMD) Solar Terrestrial Probes Program in 2006. It is a sophisticated spacecraft equipped with a Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), an Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), and an X-Ray Telescope (XRT) (see x 4). With high resolution and sensitivity, Hinode serves as a microscope for the Sun, providing us with unique capabilities for observing magnetic fields near the smallest scales achievable, while also rendering full-Sun coronal context in the highest thermal regimes. The 2014 NASA SMD strategic goals objective to "Understand the Sun and its interactions with the Earth and the solar system, including space weather" forms the basis of three underlying Heliophysics Science Goals. While Hinode relates to all three, the observatory primarily addresses: Explore the physical processes in the space environment from the Sun to the Earth and through the solar system. Within the NASA National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey Priorities, Hinode targets: (a) Determine the origins of the Sun's activity and predict the variations of the space environment and (d) Discover and characterize fundamental processes that occur both within the heliosphere and

  2. Persistent Doppler Shift Oscillations Observed with HINODE-EIS in the Solar Corona: Spectroscopic Signatures of Alfvenic Waves and Recurring Upflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Tongjiang; Offman, Leon; De Pontieu, Bart; Innes, Davina E.; Peter, Hardi

    2012-01-01

    Using data obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, we have performed a survey of obvious and persistent (without significant damping) Doppler shift oscillations in the corona. We have found mainly two types of oscillations from February to April in 2007. One type is found at loop footpoint regions, with a dominant period around 10 minutes. They are characterized by coherent behavior of all line parameters (line intensity, Doppler shift, line width, and profile asymmetry), and apparent blueshift and blueward asymmetry throughout almost the entire duration. Such oscillations are likely to be signatures of quasi-periodic upflows (small-scale jets, or coronal counterpart of type-II spicules), which may play an important role in the supply of mass and energy to the hot corona. The other type of oscillation is usually associated with the upper part of loops. They are most clearly seen in the Doppler shift of coronal lines with formation temperatures between one and two million degrees. The global wavelets of these oscillations usually peak sharply around a period in the range of three to six minutes. No obvious profile asymmetry is found and the variation of the line width is typically very small. The intensity variation is often less than 2%. These oscillations are more likely to be signatures of kink/Alfv´en waves rather than flows. In a few cases, there seems to be a p/2 phase shift between the intensity and Doppler shift oscillations, which may suggest the presence of slow-mode standing waves according to wave theories. However, we demonstrate that such a phase shift could also be produced by loops moving into and out of a spatial pixel as a result of Alfv´enic oscillations. In this scenario, the intensity oscillations associated with Alfv´enic waves are caused by loop displacement rather than density change. These coronal waves may be used to investigate properties of the coronal plasma and magnetic field.

  3. Quiescent Prominence Dynamics Observed with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope. II. Prominence Bubble Boundary Layer Characteristics and the Onset of a Coupled Kelvin-Helmholtz Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Hillier, Andrew; Liu, Wei

    2017-11-01

    We analyze solar quiescent prominence bubble characteristics and instability dynamics using Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope data. We measure the bubble expansion rate, prominence downflows, and the profile of the boundary layer brightness and thickness as a function of time. The largest bubble analyzed rises into the prominence with a speed of about 1.3 {km} {{{s}}}-1 until it is destabilized by a localized shear flow on the boundary. Boundary layer thickness grows gradually as prominence downflows deposit plasma onto the bubble with characteristic speeds of 20{--}35 {km} {{{s}}}-1. Lateral downflows initiate from the thickened boundary layer with characteristic speeds of 25{--}50 {km} {{{s}}}-1, “draining” the layer of plasma. Strong shear flow across one bubble boundary leads to an apparent coupled Kelvin-Helmholtz Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) instability. We measure shear flow speeds above the bubble of 10 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and infer interior bubble flow speeds on the order of 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1. Comparing the measured growth rate of the instability to analytic expressions, we infer a magnetic flux density across the bubble boundary of ˜10-3 T (10 Gauss) at an angle of ˜ 70^\\circ to the prominence plane. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that prominence bubbles are caused by magnetic flux that emerges below a prominence, setting up the conditions for RT, or combined KH-RT, instability flows that transport flux, helicity, and hot plasma upward into the overlying coronal magnetic flux rope.

  4. PROMINENCE VISIBILITY IN HINODE/XRT IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, P. [Astronomical Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, 05960 Tatranská Lomnica (Slovakia); Jejčič, S. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Heinzel, P. [Astronomical Institute, Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Anzer, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Jibben, P. R., E-mail: pschwartz@astro.sk [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we study the soft X-ray (SXR) signatures of one particular prominence. The X-ray observations used here were made by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope instrument using two different filters. Both of them have a pronounced peak of the response function around 10 Å. One of them has a secondary smaller peak around 170 Å, which leads to a contamination of SXR images. The observed darkening in both of these filters has a very large vertical extension. The position and shape of the darkening correspond nicely with the prominence structure seen in SDO/AIA images. First, we have investigated the possibility that the darkening is caused by X-ray absorption. However, detailed calculations of the optical thickness in this spectral range show clearly that this effect is completely negligible. Therefore, the alternative is the presence of an extended region with a large emissivity deficit, which can be caused by the presence of cool prominence plasmas within an otherwise hot corona. To reproduce the observed darkening, one needs a very large extension along the line of sight of the region amounting to around 10{sup 5} km. We interpret this region as the prominence spine, which is also consistent with SDO/AIA observations in EUV.

  5. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation and Warm Rain in a C3.1 Flare Observed by IRIS, Hinode/EIS, and RHESSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Inglis, Andrew R.

    2017-10-01

    IRIS and EIS observed a GOES C3.1 flare in stare mode on 2014 March 15. The GOES flare started at 00:21:35 and peaked at 00:26:30 UT. The IRIS slit pointed near the center of the flare, while the EIS slit pointed 35\\prime\\prime to its west. About 4 minutes before the GOES flare start, the IRIS C II and Si IV intensities became (and remained) greater than their pre-flare averages, indicating that the flare had begun and that the chromosphere and transition region were involved. IRIS first detected blueshifted Fe xxi emission at 00:22:42 UT, by which time the C II and Si IV intensities had increased by factors around 100 and their profiles were redshifted. Simultaneous, cospatial blueshifted Fe xxi emission with redshifted C II and Si IV emission indicates explosive chromospheric evaporation. EIS spectra reveal Fe xxiii emission that is too weak to measure velocities, and intensity enhancements by factors about 1.7 in the Fe xiv and Fe xvi emission. Lines from both of these coronal ions show redshifts ≈9 km s-1 around 00:24:00 UT, and the Fe xiv 264.7/274.2 intensity ratio reveals an increase of n e from (1.03+/- 0.20)× {10}9 before to (3.58+/- 0.68)× {10}9 cm-3 during the flare. The redshifted coronal line emission and increased n e are consistent with warm rain falling and accumulating in the remote area observed by EIS. A fit to the RHESSI hard X-ray spectrum yields a nonthermal energy injection rate of 4.9× {10}26 erg s-1, from which we estimate a HXR beam energy flux range consistent with explosive evaporation.

  6. New Views of the Sun: STEREO and Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Janet G.; Tsuneta, Saku; Bougeret, J.-L.; Galvin, Antoinette; Howard, R. A.; Kaiser, Michael; Thompson, W. T.

    The twin-spacecraft STEREO mission has now been in orbit for 1.5 years. Although the main scientific objective of STEREO is the origin and evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their heliospheric consequences, the slow decline of the previous solar cycle has provided an extraordinary opportunity for close scrutiny of the quiet corona and solar wind, including suprathermal and energetic particles. However, STEREO has also captured a few late cycle CMEs that have given us a taste of the observations and analyses to come. Images from the SECCHI investigation afforded by STEREO's separated perspectives and the heliospheric imager have already allowed us to visibly witness the origins of the slow solar wind and the Sun-to-1 AU transit of ICMEs. The SWAVES investigation has monitored the transit of interplanetary shocks in 3D while the PLASTIC and IMPACT in-situ measurements provide the 'ground truth' of what is remotely sensed. New prospects for space weather forecasting have been demonstrated with the STEREO behind spacecraft, a successful proof-of-concept test for future space weather mission designs. The data sets for the STEREO investigations are openly available through a STEREO Science Center web interface that also provides supporting information for potential users from all communities. Comet observers and astronomers, interplanetary dust researchers and planetary scientists have already made use of this resource. The potential for detailed Sun-to-Earth CME/ICME interpretations with sophisticated modeling efforts are an upcoming STEREO-Hinode partnering activity whose success we can only anticipate at this time. Since its launch in September 2006, Hinode has sent back solar images of unprecedented clarity every day. The primary purpose of this mission is a systems approach to understanding the generation, transport and ultimate dissipation of solar magnetic fields with a well-coordinated set of advanced telescopes. Hinode is equipped with three

  7. Investigating prominence turbulence with Hinode SOT Dopplergrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Ichimoto, K.

    2017-01-01

    Quiescent prominences host a diverse range of flows, including Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven upflows and impulsive downflows, and so it is no surprise that turbulent motions also exist. As prominences are believed to have a mean horizontal guide field, investigating any turbulence they host could shed light on the nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a wide range of astrophysical systems. In this paper we have investigated the nature of the turbulent prominence motions using structure function analysis on the velocity increments estimated from Hα Dopplergrams constructed with observational data from Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). The probability density function of the velocity increments shows that as we look at increasingly small spatial separations the distribution displays greater departure from a reference Gaussian distribution, hinting at intermittency in the velocity field. Analysis of the even order structure functions for both the horizontal and vertical separations showed the existence of two distinct regions displaying different exponents of the power law with the break in the power law at approximately 2000 km. We hypothesise this to be a result of internal turbulence excited in the prominence by the dynamic flows of the system found at this spatial scale. We found that the scaling exponents of the pth order structure functions for these two regions generally followed the p/ 2 (smaller scales) and p/ 4 (larger scales) laws that are the same as those predicted for weak MHD turbulence and Kraichnan-Iroshnikov turbulence respectively. However, the existence of the p/ 4 scaling at larger scales than the p/ 2 scaling is inconsistent with the increasing nonlinearity expected in MHD turbulence. We also found that as we went to higher order structure functions, the dependence of the scaling exponent on the order p is nonlinear implying that intermittency may be playing an important role in the turbulent cascade. Estimating the heating

  8. Hinode SOT Images Coaligned with IRIS Level 2 Data Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2016-05-01

    We have produced new data products consisting of HInode SOT images coaligned with simultaneous observations by IRIS. Cross-correlation between SOT Filtergraph images and similar SDO wavelength bands provides accurate pointing coordinates for nearly all SOT images, correcting for the solar flows followed by the SOT correlation tracker. Data from all of 2014 and 2015 and part of 2013 have been processed by now and verification of the data products is ongoing. The cubes of SOT images are created in IRIS level 2 data format and can be read using IRIS software tools. In addition, the SOT cubes can be studied using CRISPEX along with the corresponding IRIS Level 3 data. Work has begun to process time series of SOT Spectro-Polarimeter data into cubes of images that can be studied the same way. Examples of some datasets from IHOPs, both FG and SP, will be shown and instructions given for accessing and viewing the available datasets.

  9. Combination and interpretation of observables in Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virey Jean-Marc

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The standard cosmological model has deep theoretical foundations but need the introduction of two major unknown components, dark matter and dark energy, to be in agreement with various observations. Dark matter describes a non-relativistic collisionless fluid of (non baryonic matter which amount to 25% of the total density of the universe. Dark energy is a new kind of fluid not of matter type, representing 70% of the total density which should explain the recent acceleration of the expansion of the universe. Alternatively, one can reject this idea of adding one or two new components but argue that the equations used to make the interpretation should be modified consmological scales. Instead of dark matter one can invoke a failure of Newton's laws. Instead of dark energy, two approaches are proposed : general relativity (in term of the Einstein equation should be modified, or the cosmological principle which fixes the metric used for cosmology should be abandonned. One of the main objective of the community is to find the path of the relevant interpretations thanks to the next generation of experiments which should provide large statistics of observationnal data. Unfortunately, cosmological in formations are difficult to pin down directly fromt he measurements, and it is mandatory to combine the various observables to get the cosmological parameters. This is not problematic from the statistical point of view, but assumptions and approximations made for the analysis may bias our interprettion of the data. Consequently, a strong attention should be paied to the statistical methods used to make parameters estimation and for model testing. After a review of the basics of cosmology where the cosmological parameters are introduced, we discuss the various cosmological probes and their associated observables used to extract cosmological informations. We present the results obtained from several statistical analyses combining data of diferent nature but

  10. Combining the Observations from Different GNSS (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dach, R.; Lutz, S.; Schaer, S.; Bock, H.; Jäggi, A.; Meindl, M.; Ostini, L.; Thaller, D.; Steinbach, A.; Beutler, G.; Steigenberger, P.

    2009-12-01

    For a very long time GPS has clearly dominated the use of GNSS measurements for scientific purposes. This picture is changing: we are moving from a GPS-only to a multi-GNSS world. This is, e.g., reflected by changing the meaning of the abbreviation IGS in March 2005 from International GPS to GNSS Service. The current situation can be described as follows: GPS has the leading role in the GNSS because it has provided a very stable satellite constellation over many years. Some of the currently active GPS satellites are nearly 15 years old. These old satellites are expected to be decommissioned within the next years. On the other hand, due to the increasing number of active GLONASS satellites and the improved density of multi-GNSS tracking stations in the IGS network, the quality of the GLONASS orbits has drastically improved during the last years. The European Galileo system is under development: currently two test satellites (GIOVE-A and GIOVE-B) are in orbit. The IOV (in-orbit-validation phase) will start soon. Also the first test satellites for the Chinese Compass system are in space. For the maximum benefit the observations of these GNSS will be processed in a combined multi-GNSS analysis in future. CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe) is a joint venture between the Astronomical Institute of the University Bern (AIUB, Bern, Switzerland), the Federal Office of Topography (swisstopo, Wabern, Switzerland), the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG, Frankfurt am Main, Germany), and the Institut für Astronomische und Physikalische Geodäsie of the Technische Universität München (IAPG/TUM, Munich, Germany). It acts as one of the global analysis centers of the IGS and has started in May 2003 with a rigorous combined processing of GPS and GLONASS measurements for the final, rapid, and even ultra-rapid product lines. All contributions from CODE to the IGS are in fact multi-GNSS products -- the only exception is the satellite and receiver clock

  11. Hinode/SOT Measurements of Flows and Waves in Solar Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Okamoto, Takenori; Schmieder, Brigitte

    We review Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) measurements of flows and waves in quies-cent and active solar prominences. In quiescent prominences, Hinode/SOT observations have revealed a new mode of buoyant transport in the form of dark upflows that originate at the chromospheric base of the prominence. The upflows can take the form of large-scale (10 Mm) "bubbles" that rise through the entire prominence into the overlying coronal cavity, or they can take the form of numerous small-scale (1 Mm) plumes that generate from an apparent Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the boundary between the prominence and the impinging buoy-ant flow system. The episodic flows directly inject mass, magnetic flux, and helicity into the overlying coronal cavity, moving the system towards destabilization and eruption in the form of CMEs. Hinode/SOT quiescent prominence observations have also verified the existence of ubiquitous downflow streams and vortex flows confirming that prominences are far from magne-tostatic conditions. Tracking and doppler measurements of prominence downflows find speeds of 5-15 km s-1 and imply that the trajectories are not strictly vertical. Active region promi-nence studies find counter-streaming flows along horizontal magnetic field lines with velocities of 20-30 km s-1 ; upflows, downflow streams, and rotational flows have not been observed in these systems. Active Region prominence field lines exhibit transverse oscillations indicative of Alfv`n waves with periods of several minutes, amplitudes of 1 Mm, and wavelengths of 250 Mm or more. These properties are consistent with magnetic field strengths of 50 gauss or more at typical prominence density conditions and carry enough energy to heat the surrounding prominence/corona transition region (PCTR).

  12. High-Resolution Vector Magnetograms of the Sun's Poles from Hinode: Flux Distributions and Global Coronal Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    The Sun's polar fields play a leading role in structuring the large-scale solar atmosphere and in determining the interplanetary magnetic field. They are also believed to supply the seed field for the subsequent solar activity cycle. However, present-day synoptic observations do not have sufficient spatial resolution or sensitivity to diagnose accurately the high-latitude magnetic vector field. The high spatial resolution and sensitivity of the full-Stokes observations from the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope Spectro-Polarimeter, observing the poles long-term, allows us to build up a detailed picture of the Cycle 24 polar field reversal, including the changing latitude distribution of the high-latitude flux, and to study the effect on global coronal field models. The Hinode observations provide detailed information on the dominant facular-scale magnetic structure of the polar fields, and their field inclination and flux distribution. Hybrid synoptic magnetograms are constructed from Hinode polar measurements and full-disk magnetograms from the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) Vector Spectro-Magnetograph (VSM), and coronal potential field models are calculated. Loss of effective spatial resolution at the highest latitudes presents complications. Possible improvements to synoptic polar data are discussed.

  13. Combining VLBI and ring laser observations at normal equation level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartner, Matthias; Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Schreiber, Karl Ulrich; Gebauer, André

    2017-04-01

    Observations from ring laser gyroscopes can be used to continuously monitor earth rotation with high resolution and without an external reference frame, which makes them unique in contrast to other techniques like VLBI or GNSS. A combination, however, of ring laser and VLBI data could potentially result in an improved accuracy of estimated earth rotation parameters. In this study, we use observations from the ring laser "G" (Grossring) located at Wettzell (Germany) and combine them with VLBI observations at the normal equation level. The Vienna VLBI and Satellite Software (VieVS) is used to set up the normal equations for each VLBI session as SINEX files. We present combined estimates for polar motion and length of day and assess the impact by the ring laser observations.

  14. Intensity contrast from MHD simulations and HINODE observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afram, N.; Unruh, Y.C.; Solanki, S.K.; SchÜssler, M.; Lagg, A.; Vögler, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323397212

    2011-01-01

    Context. Changes in the solar surface area, which is covered by small-scale magnetic elements, are thought to cause long-term changes in the solar spectral irradiance, which are important for determining the impact on Earth’s climate. Aims. To study the effect of small-scale magnetic elements on the

  15. Spicules Intensity Oscillations in SOT/HINODE Observations E ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-01

    Apr 1, 2015 ... Phys., 283, 187T. Tavabi, E. 2014, Astrophys. Space Sci., 352, 43T. Tavabi, E., Koutchmy, S., Ajabshirizadeh, A., Ahangarzadeh Maralani, A. R., Zeighami, S. 2014, Astron. Astrophys., arXiv:1409.7654v2[astro-ph.SR] 30 Sep 2014. Trauth, M. H., MATLAB Recipes for Earth Sciences, Second Edition, Chapter ...

  16. Automatic Identification of Solar X-Ray Bright Points in Hinode X-Ray Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    We have automated a method that is used to find point sources in Chandra X-ray telescope data, to identify solar bright points in Hinode X-ray data. This tool, called lextrct, first identifies candidate sources that are brighter than the surrounding background. The algorithm also allows selected pixels to be excluded from the source-finding, thus allowing saturated pixels (from flares and/or active regions) to be ignored. We then use lextrct to fit the sources to two-dimensional, elliptical Gaussians. The size and orientation give an approximation of the shape of the bright points. We are in the process of analyzing observations through the Al_poly filter with a four-second exposure time, to obtain a catalogue of bright points, which will include their sizes, lifetimes, intensities, and position on the solar disk

  17. Nonlinear force-free field extrapolation of the coronal magnetic field using the data obtained by the Hinode satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Han; Wang, Huaning; Yan, Yihua

    2011-01-01

    The Hinode satellite can obtain high-quality photospheric vector magnetograms of solar active regions and the simultaneous coronal loop images in soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) bands. In this paper, we continue the work of He and Wang (2008) and apply the newly developed upward boundary integration computational scheme for the nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of the coronal magnetic field to the photospheric vector magnetograms acquired by the Spectro-Polarimeter of the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode. Three time series vector magnetograms of the same solar active region, NOAA 10930, are selected for the NLFFF extrapolations, which were observed within the time interval of 26 h during 10-11 December 2006 when the active region crossed the central area of the Sun's disk. Parallel computation of the NLFFF extrapolation code was realized through OpenMP multithreaded, shared memory parallelism and Fortran 95 programming language for the extrapolation calculations. The comparison between the extrapolated field lines and the coronal loop images obtained by the X-Ray Telescope and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer of Hinode shows that, in the central area of the active region, the field line configurations generally agree with the coronal images, and the orientations of the field lines basically coincide with the coronal loop observations for all three successive magnetograms. This result supports the NLFFF model being used for tracing the time series evolution of the 3-D coronal magnetic structures as the responses of the quasi-equilibrium solar atmosphere to the vector magnetic field changes in the photosphere.

  18. Multi-technique combination at observation level with NAPEOS: combining GPS, GLONASS and LEO satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, M.; Flohrer, C.; Springer, T.; Enderle, W.

    2012-04-01

    For the ITRF2008 call for participation ESOC reprocessed the historic data from the IDS, IGS, and ILRS. Our three solutions were computed with one and the same software package NAPEOS, running on the same machine and using, as far as possible, identical settings. Any systematic differences between the technique dependent reference frame solutions must therefore be caused by the technique itself, and not because of model differences or errors. Our three technique dependent solutions gave us a good understanding of the technique dependent effects, helping us to improve our models. At ESOC we have now made a significant step forward by including all satellite geodetic techniques (SLR, DORIS and GPS/GLONASS) in one solution. This allows us to combine the ILRS, IDS and IGS reference frames by using "space-ties". Of course these space-ties are not perfectly known but nevertheless they allow for a rigorous combination of the different reference frames. And, very important for the GNSS technique, they allow for the direct estimation of the GNSS satellite transmitter phase centre offset. We solve not only for integer ambiguities of the GPS satellites but also for those of the Jason-2 satellite, which is also providing GPS phase observations on two frequencies. In our presentation we will give an overview of this multi-technique combination approach at observation level. As part of our activities within the IERS COL working group we processed the data of the CONT11 and CONT08 periods. We included all observations provided by the following satellites in one and the same parameter estimation process: GPS,GLONASS, SPOT, Envisat, Jason-2, LAGEOS and Etalon satellites. We will show the benefits of such a rigorous approach compared to processing the various space geodetic techniques separately. We will also address the impact of resolving integer ambiguities for the LEO satellite Jason-2 on the global solution.

  19. Europlanet/IDIS: Combining Diverse Planetary Observations and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Walter; Capria, Maria Teresa; Chanteur, Gerard

    2013-04-01

    Planetary research involves a diversity of research fields from astrophysics and plasma physics to atmospheric physics, climatology, spectroscopy and surface imaging. Data from all these disciplines are collected from various space-borne platforms or telescopes, supported by modelling teams and laboratory work. In order to interpret one set of data often supporting data from different disciplines and other missions are needed while the scientist does not always have the detailed expertise to access and utilize these observations. The Integrated and Distributed Information System (IDIS) [1], developed in the framework of the Europlanet-RI project, implements a Virtual Observatory approach ([2] and [3]), where different data sets, stored in archives around the world and in different formats, are accessed, re-formatted and combined to meet the user's requirements without the need of familiarizing oneself with the different technical details. While observational astrophysical data from different observatories could already earlier be accessed via Virtual Observatories, this concept is now extended to diverse planetary data and related model data sets, spectral data bases etc. A dedicated XML-based Europlanet Data Model (EPN-DM) [4] was developed based on data models from the planetary science community and the Virtual Observatory approach. A dedicated editor simplifies the registration of new resources. As the EPN-DM is a super-set of existing data models existing archives as well as new spectroscopic or chemical data bases for the interpretation of atmospheric or surface observations, or even modeling facilities at research institutes in Europe or Russia can be easily integrated and accessed via a Table Access Protocol (EPN-TAP) [5] adapted from the corresponding protocol of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance [6] (IVOA-TAP). EPN-TAP allows to search catalogues, retrieve data and make them available through standard IVOA tools if the access to the archive

  20. Warfarin and fibrinolysis - a challenging combination: an observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luurila Harri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI frequently use warfarin. Fibrinolytic agents and warfarin both increase bleeding risk, but only a few studies have been published concerning the bleeding risk of warfarin-prescribed patients receiving fibrinolysis. The objective of this study was to define the prevalence for intracranial haemorrhage (ICH or major bleeding in patients on warfarin treatment receiving pre-hospital fibrinolysis. Methods This was an observational cohort study. Data for this retrospective case series were collected in Helsinki Emergency Medical Service catchment area from 1.1.1997 to 30.6.2010. All warfarin patients with suspected ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, who received pre-hospital fibrinolysis, were included. Bleeding complications were detected from Medical Records and classified as ICH, major or minor bleeding. Results Thirty-six warfarin patients received fibrinolysis during the study period. Fourteen patients had bleeding complications. One (3%, 95% CI 0-15% patient had ICH, six (17%, 95% CI 7-32% had major and seven (19%, 95% CI 9-35% had minor bleeding. The only fatal bleeding occurred in a patient with ICH. Patients' age, fibrinolytic agent used or aspirin use did not predispose to bleeding complications. High International Normalized Ratio (INR seemed to predispose to bleedings with values over 3, but no statistically significant difference was found. Conclusions Bleedings occur frequently in warfarin patients treated with fibrinolysis in the real world setting, but they are rarely fatal.

  1. Enhancement of motor skill learning by a combination of ideal model-observation and self-observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Hitomi; Kimura, Teiji

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] In sports physical therapy, video of a patient's movement or of a skilled model's movement has been used as observational learning methods for injury prevention and movement modification. Positive effects of model video observation have been reported. This study aimed to clarify the effect on motor skill learning using a combination of model-observation and self-observation, which is thought to act as an enhanced method for active error detection by comparing model-observation and self-observation alone for acquisition of correct sports movement. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five healthy females were randomly allocated into three groups comprising model- and self-observation, model-observation, and self-observation. The motor task performed was a half golf swing using an elastic club. Shoulder grip angle between both shoulder lines and the acromia grip strength were measured as an index of body rotation using a three-dimensional motion analyzer. Change in the shoulder grip angle in the three groups was analyzed at pre-, immediate delayed retention, and delayed retention tests. [Results] A significant difference in shoulder grip angle was observed among the three groups for the immediate delayed retention test. The combined model and self-observation group had a value closer to 90 degrees compared to the other two groups. [Conclusion] Observation combining model and self-observation exerted a positive effect on short-term motor skill learning.

  2. Simultaneous Observations of Atmospheric Tides from Combined in Situ and Remote Observations at Mars from the MAVEN Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Scott L.; Liu, Guiping; Withers, Paul; Yigit, Erdal; Lo, Daniel; Jain, Sonal; Schneider, Nicholas M. (Inventor); Deighan, Justin; McClintock, William E.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report the observations of longitudinal variations in the Martian thermosphere associated with nonmigrating tides. Using the Neutral Gas Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) and the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN Mission (MAVEN) spacecraft, this study presents the first combined analysis of in situ and remote observations of atmospheric tides at Mars for overlapping volumes, local times, and overlapping date ranges. From the IUVS observations, we determine the altitude and latitudinal variation of the amplitude of the nonmigrating tidal signatures, which is combined with the NGIMS, providing information on the compositional impact of these waves. Both the observations of airglow from IUVS and the CO2 density observations from NGIMS reveal a strong wave number 2 signature in a fixed local time frame. The IUVS observations reveal a strong latitudinal dependence in the amplitude of the wave number 2 signature. Combining this with the accurate CO2 density observations from NGIMS, this would suggest that the CO2 density variation is as high as 27% at 0-10 deg latitude. The IUVS observations reveal little altitudinal dependence in the amplitude of the wave number 2 signature, varying by only 20% from 160 to 200 km. Observations of five different species with NGIMS show that the amplitude of the wave number 2 signature varies in proportion to the inverse of the species scale height, giving rise to variation in composition as a function of longitude. The analysis and discussion here provide a roadmap for further analysis as additional coincident data from these two instruments become available.

  3. The Small-scale Structure of Photospheric Convection Retrieved by a Deconvolution Technique Applied to Hinode/SP Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, T.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Iida, Y.; Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.

    2017-11-01

    Solar granules are bright patterns surrounded by dark channels, called intergranular lanes, in the solar photosphere and are a manifestation of overshooting convection. Observational studies generally find stronger upflows in granules and weaker downflows in intergranular lanes. This trend is, however, inconsistent with the results of numerical simulations in which downflows are stronger than upflows through the joint action of gravitational acceleration/deceleration and pressure gradients. One cause of this discrepancy is the image degradation caused by optical distortion and light diffraction and scattering that takes place in an imaging instrument. We apply a deconvolution technique to Hinode/SP data in an attempt to recover the original solar scene. Our results show a significant enhancement in both the convective upflows and downflows but particularly for the latter. After deconvolution, the up- and downflows reach maximum amplitudes of ‑3.0 km s‑1 and +3.0 km s‑1 at an average geometrical height of roughly 50 km, respectively. We found that the velocity distributions after deconvolution match those derived from numerical simulations. After deconvolution, the net LOS velocity averaged over the whole field of view lies close to zero as expected in a rough sense from mass balance.

  4. Improved hydrological modeling for remote regions using a combination of observed and simulated precipitation data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Linden, Sandra; Christensen, Jens Hesselbjerg

    2003-01-01

    -resolution regional climate model (HIRHAM4) with a mean-field bias correction using observed precipitation. A hydrological model (USAFLOW) was applied to simulate runoff using observed precipitation and a combination of observed and simulated precipitation as input. The method was illustrated for the remote Usa basin......Precipitation, as simulated by climate models, can be used as input in hydrological models, despite possible biases both in the total annual amount simulated as well as the seasonal variation. Here we elaborated on a new technique, which adjusted precipitation data generated by a high......, situated in the European part of Arctic Russia, close to the Ural Mountains. It was shown that runoff simulations agree better with observations when the combined precipitation data set was used than when only observed precipitation was used. This appeared to be because the HIRHAM4 model data compensated...

  5. Effect of tactile stimulation on primary motor cortex excitability during action observation combined with motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Megumi; Kubota, Shinji; Onmyoji, Yusuke; Hirano, Masato; Uehara, Kazumasa; Morishita, Takuya; Funase, Kozo

    2015-07-23

    We aimed to investigate the effects of the tactile stimulation to an observer's fingertips at the moment that they saw an object being pinched by another person on the excitability of observer's primary motor cortex (M1) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In addition, the above effects were also examined during action observation combined with the motor imagery. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were evoked from the subjects' right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles. Electrical stimulation (ES) inducing tactile sensation was delivered to the subjects' first and second fingertips at the moment of pinching action performed by another person. Although neither the ES nor action observation alone had significant effects on the MEP amplitude of the FDI or ADM, the FDI MEP amplitude which acts as the prime mover during pinching was reduced when ES and action observation were combined; however, no such changes were seen in the ADM. Conversely, that reduced FDI MEP amplitude was increased during the motor imagery. These results indicated that the M1 excitability during the action observation of pinching action combined with motor imagery could be enhanced by the tactile stimulation delivered to the observer's fingertips at the moment corresponding to the pinching being observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radar Shape Modeling Of 1996 HW1 Combined With Thermal Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howell, Ellen S.; Magri, C.; Nolan, M. C.; Taylor, P. A.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Mueller, M.; Benner, L. A. M.; Giorgini, J. D.; Scheeres, D. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Rhoades, H.; Somers, J. M.; Gaftonyuk, N. M.; Krugly, Y. N.; Kouprianov, V. V.; Molotov, I. E.; Benishek, V.; Protitch-Benishek, V.; Galad, A.; Higgins, D.; Kusnirak, P.; Pray, D.

    2010-01-01

    We observed near-Earth asteroid (8567) 1996 HW1 at the Arecibo Observatory on six dates in September 2008, obtaining radar images and spectra. By combining these data with an extensive set of new lightcurves taken during 2008-2009 and with previously published lightcurves from 2005, we were able to

  7. A Phytosociological Study on the Moss and Lichen Communities in Cape Hinode, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Kobayashi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Under the project of the 15th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition, the field investigation was carried out between December 30, 1973 and January 6, 1974 in Cape Hinode. This paper was undertaken to classify and describe the moss and lichen communities in Cape Hinode according to the vegetation concept and method of the Zrich-Montpellier (Z-M school of phytosociology. The following vegetation units of moss and lichen communities were classified: A. Ceratodontetum purpurei ass. nov.: 1. Subass. of typicum, 2. Subass. of Protoblastenia citrina, 3. Subass. of Protoblastenia citrina-Rinodina olivaceobrunnea, 4. Subass. of Rinodina olivaceobrunnea, 5. Subass. of Alectoria minuscula, 6. Subass. of Alectoria minuscula-Buellia frigida, 7. Subass. of Buellia frigida; B. Buellietum frigidae ass. nov.: 8. Subass. of typicum, 9. Subass. of Caloplaca elegans var. pulvinata; C. Alectorietum minusculae ass. nov.: 10. Subass. of Buellia frigida, 11. Subass. of typicum. Each vegetation unit classified was described with an association table showing floristic composition and data on growing habitat. The distribution of each subassociation was shown on the map. The relationships among 11 classified subassociations were examined using the similarity index.

  8. Effects of hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole on gastric ulcer healing quality: A clinical observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui-Qi; Mao, Hua; Huang, Li-Yun; Su, Pei-Zhu; Lu, Min

    2017-02-21

    To evaluate the effects of hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole on gastric ulcer healing quality. Forty-eight patients diagnosed with gastric ulcer between June 2014 and February 2016 were randomly allocated to the combination therapy group or monotherapy group. The former received hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole, and the latter received esomeprazole alone, for 8 wk. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were recruited and acted as the healthy control group. Endoscopic ulcer healing was observed using white light endoscopy and narrow band imaging magnifying endoscopy. The composition of collagen fibers, amount of collagen deposition, expression of factor VIII and TGF-β1, and hydroxyproline content were analyzed by Masson staining, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescent imaging and ELISA. Following treatment, changes in the gastric microvascular network were statistically different between the combination therapy group and the monotherapy group (P esomeprazole is superior to esomeprazole alone in improving gastric ulcer healing quality in terms of improving microvascular morphology, degree of structure maturity and function of regenerated mucosa.

  9. IERS Working group on Combination of Space Geodetic Techniques at the Observation Level (COL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, J.-Y.; Biancale, R.; Bizouard, C.; Deleflie, F.; Gambis, G.; Koenig, R.; Loyer, S.; Sciaretta, C.; Seitz, M.; Spicakova, H.; Springer, T.; Thaller, D.

    2012-04-01

    The different space geodetic techniques have different strengths and weaknesses for recovering geodetic parameters. This makes their combination useful. However they may have some systematic behaviour which can be detected and removed at the observation level. In order to review the interest in combining techniques at this level, a Working Group at the Combination Level (WG COL) was set up in the course of 2009 in the frame of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS). A major task of the WG COL is to study methods and advantages of combining space geodetic techniques (DORIS, GNSS, SLR, VLBI), searching for an optimal strategy to solve for geodetic parameters. The first action of the Working Group was to organize an inter-comparison benchmark campaign to serve as a test. The period chosen is from August 10 to August 30, 2008. It includes the intensive CONT08 VLBI period. The combination analyses are based on weekly or daily combined SINEX files which contain normal equations of station coordinates, Earth Orientation Parameters from all space geodetic techniques, tropospheric parameters for GNSS, DORIS and VLBI techniques and quasar coordinates for the VLBI technique. We will present the objectives and strategy of multi-technique combination, establishing conventions and some results already achieved.

  10. Study on Precursor Activity of the X1.6 Flare in the Great AR 12192 with SDO, IRIS, and Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Yumi; Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, Shinsuke; Kusano, Kanya

    2017-05-01

    The physical properties and their contribution to the onset of a solar flare are still uncleare even though chromospheric brightening is considered a precursor phenomenon of a flare. Many studies suggested that photospheric magnetic field changes cause destabilization of large-scale coronal structure. We aim to understand how a small photospheric change contributes to a flare and to reveal how the intermediary chromosphere behaves in the precursor phase. We analyzed the precursor brightening of the X1.6 flare on 2014 October 22 in the AR 12192 using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data. We investigated a localized jet with the strong precursor brightening, and compared the intensity, Doppler velocity, and line width in C II, Mg II k, and Si IV lines by IRIS and He II, Fe xii, and Fe xv lines by Hinode/EIS. We also analyzed the photospheric magnetic field and chromospheric/coronal structures using the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. We found a significant blueshift (˜100 km s-1), which is related to the strong precursor brightening over a characteristic magnetic field structure, and the blueshift was observed at all of the temperatures. This might indicate that the flow is accelerated by Lorentz force. Moreover, the large-scale coronal loop that connects the foot points of the flare ribbons was destabilized just after the precursor brightening with the blueshift. It suggests that magnetic reconnection locally occurred in the lower chromosphere and it triggered magnetic reconnection of the X1.6 flare in the corona.

  11. Evidence for coherent spicule oscillations from correcting Hinode/SOT Ca II H in the south-east limb of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarzadeh Maralani, A. R.; Tavabi, E.; Ajabshirizadeh, A.

    2017-05-01

    Wave theories of heating of the chromosphere, corona and solar wind due to photospheric fluctuations are strengthened by the existence of the wave coherency observed up to the transition region. The coherency of intensity oscillations of solar spicules was explored using the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on the Hinode spacecraft with increasing height above the solar limb in the active region. We used time sequences near the south-east region from the Hinode/SOT for the Ca II H line obtained on 2015 April 3 and applied the de-convolution procedure to the spicule to illustrate how effectively our restoration method works on fine structures such as spicules. Moreover, the intensity oscillations at different heights above the solar limb were analysed through wavelet transforms. Afterwards, the phase difference was measured between oscillations at two heights in search of evidence for coherent oscillations. The results of the wavelet transformations revealed dominant period peaks for 2, 4, 5.5 and 6.5 min at four separate heights. The dominant frequencies for a coherency level higher than 75 per cent were found to be around 5.5 and 8.5 mHz. Mean phase speeds of 155-360 km s-1 were measured. We found that the mean phase speeds increased with height. The results suggest that the energy flux carried by coherent waves into the corona and heliosphere may be several times larger than previous estimates that were based solely on constant velocities. We provide compelling evidence for the existence of upwardly propagating coherent waves.

  12. Patients’ Views on a Combined Action Observation and Motor Imagery Intervention for Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Bek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Action observation and motor imagery activate neural structures involved in action execution, thereby facilitating movement and learning. Although some benefits of action observation and motor imagery have been reported in Parkinson’s disease (PD, methods have been based on stroke rehabilitation and may be less suitable for PD. Moreover, previous studies have focused on either observation or imagery, yet combining these enhances effects in healthy participants. The present study explores the feasibility of a PD-specific home-based intervention combining observation, imagery, and imitation of meaningful everyday actions. Methods. A focus group was conducted with six people with mild to moderate PD and two companions, exploring topics relating to the utility and feasibility of a home-based observation and imagery intervention. Results. Five themes were identified. Participants reported their experiences of exercise and use of action observation and motor imagery in everyday activities, and the need for strategies to improve movement was expressed. Motivational factors including feedback, challenge, and social support were identified as key issues. The importance of offering a broad range of actions and flexible training was also highlighted. Conclusions. A home-based intervention utilising action observation and motor imagery would be useful and feasible in mild to moderate PD.

  13. Patients' Views on a Combined Action Observation and Motor Imagery Intervention for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Judith; Webb, Jordan; Gowen, Emma; Vogt, Stefan; Crawford, Trevor J; Sullivan, Matthew S; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Action observation and motor imagery activate neural structures involved in action execution, thereby facilitating movement and learning. Although some benefits of action observation and motor imagery have been reported in Parkinson's disease (PD), methods have been based on stroke rehabilitation and may be less suitable for PD. Moreover, previous studies have focused on either observation or imagery, yet combining these enhances effects in healthy participants. The present study explores the feasibility of a PD-specific home-based intervention combining observation, imagery, and imitation of meaningful everyday actions. Methods. A focus group was conducted with six people with mild to moderate PD and two companions, exploring topics relating to the utility and feasibility of a home-based observation and imagery intervention. Results. Five themes were identified. Participants reported their experiences of exercise and use of action observation and motor imagery in everyday activities, and the need for strategies to improve movement was expressed. Motivational factors including feedback, challenge, and social support were identified as key issues. The importance of offering a broad range of actions and flexible training was also highlighted. Conclusions. A home-based intervention utilising action observation and motor imagery would be useful and feasible in mild to moderate PD.

  14. The combined effects of action observation and passive proprioceptive training on adaptive motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yuming; Bao, Shancheng; Wang, Jinsung

    2016-09-07

    Sensorimotor adaptation can be induced by action observation, and also by passive training. Here, we investigated the effect of a protocol that combined action observation and passive training on visuomotor adaptation, by comparing it with the effect of action observation or passive training alone. Subjects were divided into five conditions during the training session: (1) action observation, in which the subjects watched a video of a model who adapted to a novel visuomotor rotation; (2) proprioceptive training, in which the subject's arm was moved passively to target locations that were associated with desired trajectories; (3) combined training, in which the subjects watched the video of a model during a half of the session and experienced passive movements during the other half; (4) active training, in which the subjects adapted actively to the rotation; and (5) a control condition, in which the subjects did not perform any task. Following that session, all subjects adapted to the same visuomotor rotation. Results showed that the subjects in the combined training condition adapted to the rotation significantly better than those in the observation or proprioceptive training condition, although their performance was not as good as that of those who adapted actively. These findings suggest that although a protocol that combines action observation and passive training consists of all the processes involved in active training (error detection and correction, effector-specific and proprioceptively based reaching movements), these processes in that protocol may work differently as compared to a protocol in which the same processes are engaged actively. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical Observation on Treatment of Anxiety with Combined Acupuncture and Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-hua; YU Wei-ying; WU Zhou-hong; WU Bo-xiang; DAI Xiao-ying; HAN Chou-ping

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To observe the curative effect of combined acupuncture and medicine on anxiety. Method An acupuncture plus medicine group and a medicine group were established for a comparison of their curative effects on anxiety. Results The total effective rate was 96% in the acupuncture plus medicine group and 64% in the medicine group, and there was a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.001). Conclusion The curative effect of combined acupuncture and medicine on anxiety is better than that of simple medicine.

  16. Multiple Component Outflows in an Active Region Observed with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    comprised of further components. 1. Introduction One of the most significant discoveries of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrom- eter (EIS) on...fundamental physical processes involved in production of the solar wind and mass flow into the corona . Emission line widths in excess of their thermal...it is seen to move along either open or highly extended field lines. This indicates significant mass flow into the corona and, in the case of open

  17. Intrathecal ziconotide and opioid combination therapy for noncancer pain: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deer, Timothy R; Kim, Christopher; Bowman, Richard; Tolentino, Diana; Stewart, C; Tolentino, Wilfrido

    2009-01-01

    Intrathecal ziconotide is used to manage severe chronic pain. Although ziconotide is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for monotherapy, it is sometimes used in combination with other intrathecal drugs for the management of intractable pain conditions in clinical practice. Evaluate the safety and tolerability of ziconotide combination therapy. A retrospective, observational study. A single center. Patients with severe chronic pain of noncancer origin who were receiving inadequate analgesia with intrathecal opioid therapy (with or without intrathecal adjuvants) and who had ziconotide added to their intrathecal regimens were included. Patient characteristics, intrathecal ziconotide doses, concomitant intrathecal and systemic drug use, visual analog scale pain scores, Oswestry Disability Index scores, mini-mental status examination scores, neurological examination results, clinical observations (including adverse event reports), and equipment complications were reviewed for 12 weeks after ziconotide initiation. Sixteen patients were identified. Ziconotide was initiated at a dose of 0.5 mcg/d and titrated to a mean dose of 2.64 mcg/d at week 12. Intrathecal opioids were hydromorphone (n=7), morphine (n=5), fentanyl (n=3), and sufentanil (n=1). Adverse events were noted in one patient, who reported increased depression and pain during combination therapy; ziconotide treatment was discontinued, and all adverse events resolved over a 4-week period. Substantial pain relief (> or =4-point decrease in visual analog scale score) was reported in 3 of 15 patients (20.0%) and increased functional capacity was evident in 3 of 15 patients (20.0%). A retrospective study with a limited number of patients from a single center. Results from this observational study suggest that combination intrathecal ziconotide and opioid therapy may be a safe and potentially effective treatment option for patients with refractory chronic pain. Controlled, prospective clinical trials to

  18. Observations of Hot-Jupiter occultations combining Spitzer and Kepler photometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knutson H.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the status of an ongoing program which aim at measuring occultations by their parent stars of transiting hot giant exoplanets discovered recently by Kepler. The observations are obtained in the near infrared with WarmSpitzer Space Telescope and at optical wavelengths by combining more than a year of Kepler photometry. The investigation consists of measuring the mid-occultation times and the relative occultation depths in each band-passes. Our measurements of occultations depths in the Kepler bandpass is turned into the determination of the optical geometric albedo Ag in this wavelength domain. The brightness temperatures of these planets are deduced from the infrared observations. We combine the optical and near infrared planetary emergent fluxes to obtain broad band emergent spectra of individual planet. We finally compare these spectra to hot Jupiter atmospheric models in order broadly distinguishing these atmospheres between different classes of models.

  19. Astrometric star catalogues as combination of Hipparcos/Tycho catalogues with ground-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vondrák J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful ESA mission Hipparcos provided very precise parallaxes positions and proper motions of many stars in optical wavelength. Therefore it is a primary representation of International Celestial Reference System in this wavelength. However, the shortness of the mission (less than four years causes some problems with proper motions of the stars that are double or multiple. Therefore, a combination of the positions measured by Hipparcos satellite with ground-based observations with much longer history provides a better reference frame that is more stable in time. Several examples of such combinations are presented (ACT, TYCHO-2, FK6, GC+HIP, TYC2+HIP, ARIHIP and briefly described. The stress is put on the most recent Earth Orientation Catalogue (EOC that uses about 4.4 million optical observations of latitude/universal time variations (made during the twentieth century at 33 observatories in Earth orientation programmes, in combination with some of the above mentioned combined catalogues. The second version of the new catalogue EOC-2 contains 4418 objects, and the precision of their proper motions is far better than that of Hipparcos Catalogue.

  20. Clinical observation of bio-amnion implantation used in combined trabeculectomy for refractory glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Huai Xue

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical effect of bio-amnion implantation used in combined trabeculectomy for refractory glaucoma METHODS: Totally 86 eyes of 80 glaucoma patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. In experimental group, 43 eyes underwent trabeculectomy combined with bio-amnion implantation. In control group, 43 eyes only underwent trabeculectomy combined. The intraocular pressure(IOP, filtrative bleb and complications were observed. RESULTS: Following-up for 12 months, IOP: there was significant difference between the average IOP(15.5±1.1mmHgin experimental group and the average IOP(19.7±2.5mmHgin control group(P<0.05. Filtrative bleb: the incidence of the functional filtering bleb(86%in experimental group was more than the one in control group(67%, there was significant different between the two groups(P<0.05. The incidence of complications of post-operation(shallow anterior chamber, choroidal detachment and bleb leakingwas lower than the one of the control group obviously. CONCLUSION: Combined trabeculectomy with bio-amnion implantation can increase the rate of success and reduce the incidence of complications.

  1. Clinical observation of phacoemulsification combined goniosynechialysis in treating absolute glaucoma after trabeculectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Yong Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the effect of phacoemulsification combined goniosynechialysis in treating absolute glaucoma after trabeculectomy.METHODS: Phacoemulsification combined goniosynechialysis was performed on 16 patients(16 eyeswith absolute glaucoma after trabeculectomy, and they were followed up for 6~12mo, The postoperative intraocular pressure(IOPand anterior chamber depth, preoperative and postoperative medication types(quantity, preoperative and postoperative 1 month's status of anxiety and depression, symptoms of ocular surface were observed.RESULTS: The IOP decreased significantly after phacoemulsification combined goniosynechialysis. The mean IOP was 35.00±15.43mmHg preoperatively, and it was 12.00±6.69mmHg, 15.00±4.26mmHg and 15.3±5.2mmHg on 1d, 6 and 12mo after the surgery. The statistic difference was found between preoperative and postoperative(t=6.22, Pt=6.65, PCONCLUSION: Phacoemulsification combined goniosynechialysis in treating absolute glaucoma after trabeculectomy is a safe and effective surgical option.

  2. Precipitating Snow Retrievals from Combined Airborne Cloud Radar and Millimeter-Wave Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.

    2008-01-01

    An algorithm for retrieving snow over oceans from combined cloud radar and millimeter-wave radiometer observations is developed. The algorithm involves the use of physical models to simulate cloud radar and millimeter-wave radiometer observations from basic atmospheric variables such as hydrometeor content, temperature, and relative humidity profiles and is based on an optimal estimation technique to retrieve these variables from actual observations. A high-resolution simulation of a lake-effect snowstorm by a cloud-resolving model is used to test the algorithm. That is, synthetic observations are generated from the output of the cloud numerical model, and the retrieval algorithm is applied to the synthetic data. The algorithm performance is assessed by comparing the retrievals with the reference variables used in synthesizing the observations. The synthetic observation experiment indicates good performance of the retrieval algorithm. The algorithm is also applied to real observations from the Wakasa Bay field experiment that took place over the Sea of Japan in January and February 2003. The application of the retrieval algorithm to data from the field experiment yields snow estimates that are consistent with both the cloud radar and radiometer observations.

  3. Measuring Velocities in the Early Stage of an Eruption: Using “Overlappogram” Data from Hinode EIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harra, Louise K.; Hara, Hirohisa; Doschek, George A.; Matthews, Sarah; Warren, Harry; Culhane, J. Leonard; Woods, Magnus M.

    2017-06-01

    In order to understand the onset phase of a solar eruption, plasma parameter measurements in the early phases are key to constraining models. There are two current instrument types that allow us to make such measurements: narrow-band imagers and spectrometers. In the former case, even narrow-band filters contain multiple emission lines, creating some temperature confusion. With imagers, however, rapid cadences are achievable and the field of view can be large. Velocities of the erupting structures can be measured by feature tracking. In the spectrometer case, slit spectrometers can provide spectrally pure images by “rastering” the slit to build up an image. This method provides limited temporal resolution, but the plasma parameters can be accurately measured, including velocities along the line of sight. Both methods have benefits and are often used in tandem. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that data from the wide slot on the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer, along with imaging data from AIA, can be used to deconvolve velocity information at the start of an eruption, providing line-of-sight velocities across an extended field of view. Using He II 256 Å slot data at flare onset, we observe broadening or shift(s) of the emission line of up to ±280 km s-1. These are seen at different locations—the redshifted plasma is seen where the hard X-ray source is later seen (energy deposition site). In addition, blueshifted plasma shows the very early onset of the fast rise of the filament.

  4. Combined EISCAT radar and optical multispectral and tomographic observations of black aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, B.; Kosch, M. J.; Senior, A.; Kavanagh, A. J.; BräNdströM, B. U. E.; Blixt, E. M.

    2008-06-01

    Black auroras are recognized as spatially well-defined regions within a uniform diffuse auroral background where the optical emission is significantly reduced. Black auroras typically appear post-magnetic midnight and during the substorm recovery phase, but not exclusively so. We report on the first combined multimonochromatic optical imaging, bistatic white-light TV recordings and incoherent scatter radar observations of black aurora by EISCAT of the phenomenon. From the relatively larger reduction in luminosity at 4278 Å than at 8446 Å we show that nonsheared black auroras are most probably not caused by downward directed electrical fields at low altitude. From the observations, we determine this by relating the height and intensity of the black aurora to precipitating particle energy within the surrounding background diffuse aurora. The observations are more consistent with an energy selective loss cone. Hence the mechanism causing black aurora is most probably active in the magnetosphere rather than close to Earth.

  5. Geocenter Coordinates from a Combined Processing of LEO and Ground-based GPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männel, Benjamin; Rothacher, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The GPS observations provided by the global IGS (International GNSS Service) tracking network play an important role for the realization of a unique terrestrial reference frame that is accurate enough to allow the monitoring of the Earth's system. Combining these ground-based data with GPS observations tracked by high-quality dual-frequency receivers on-board Low Earth Orbiters (LEO) might help to further improve the realization of the terrestrial reference frame and the estimation of the geocenter coordinates, GPS satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters (ERP). To assess the scope of improvement, we processed a network of 50 globally distributed and stable IGS-stations together with four LEOs (GRACE-A, GRACE-B, OSTM/Jason-2 and GOCE) over a time interval of three years (2010-2012). To ensure fully consistent solutions the zero-difference phase observations of the ground stations and LEOs were processed in a common least-square adjustment, estimating GPS orbits, LEO orbits, station coordinates, ERPs, site-specific tropospheric delays, satellite and receiver clocks and ambiguities. We present the significant impact of the individual LEOs and a combination of all four LEOs on geocenter coordinates derived by using a translational approach (also called network shift approach). In addition, we present geocenter coordinates derived from the same set of GPS observations by using a unified approach. This approach combines the translational and the degree-one approach by estimating translations and surface deformations simultaneously. Based on comparisons against each other and against geocenter time series derived by other techniques the effect of the selected approach is assessed.

  6. Spontaneous movement tempo can be influenced by combining action observation and somatosensory stimulation

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    Ambra eBisio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous movement tempo (SMT was a popular field of study of the Gestalt psychologists . It can be determined from subjects freely tapping out a rhythm with their finger, and it has been found to average about 2Hz. A previous study showed that SMT changed after the observation of rhythmical movements performed at frequency different from the SMT. This effect was long-lasting only when movement execution immediately followed action observation (AO. We recently demonstrated that only when AO was combined with peripheral nerve stimulation (AO-PNS was it possible to induce plastic changes in the excitability of the motor cortex, whereas AO and PNS alone did not evoke any changes.Here we investigated whether the observation of rhythmical actions at a frequency higher than the SMT combined with PNS induced lasting changes in SMT even in absence of immediate movement execution. Forty-eight participants were assigned to 4 groups. In AO-PNS group they observed a video showing a right hand performing a finger opposition movement sequence at 3Hz and contemporarily received an electrical stimulation at the median nerve; in AO group and PNS group participants either observed the same video or received the same electrical stimulation of the AO-PNS group, respectively; in LANDSCAPE group subjects observed a neutral video. Participants performed a finger opposition movement sequence at spontaneous movement rate before and 30 min after the conditioning protocols. Results showed that SMT significantly changed only after AO-PNS. This result suggested that the AO-PNS protocol was able to induce lasting changes in SMT due to neuroplasticity mechanisms, indicating possible application of AO-PNS in rehabilitative treatments.

  7. GNSS-based SSH observations from ships combined with satellite altimetry and tide gauge readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggenbuck, Ole; Reinking, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Geoscientists and many parts of society rely on precise information of the sea surface height (SSH) and its temporal behavior. Satellite altimetry and tide gauges are the standard source for SSH measurement data. Different studies demonstrated how ships can be used to gather additional SSH observations. These three techniques have their individual pros and cons in case of e.g. spatial and temporal resolution. It is most likely that combined solution, using all available sensors can improve the quality of models. Four ships will be used for measuring the SSH within a project at the Jade University in Oldenburg. The ships, two ferries and two research vessels, are operated in the German Bight of the North Sea. The resulting measurements will be integrated into a multi-technique model that will combine all three data types. The tidal parameters will be estimated for a grid while coastlines and islands are taken into account during grid generation. Since the number of unknowns is related to the number of grid knots, the normal equation system is usually underestimated. Hence auxiliary constraints have to be introduced to ensure the resolvability of the normal equation system. In this contribution the necessary processing steps - from GNSS observations aboard a ship to an instantaneous SSH - will be shown. A first approach for the combination method will be explain and first results of this multi-technique model will be presented.

  8. Combination of simulated VLBI and SLR observations to determine a global TRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Susanne; Ampatzidis, Dimitrios; Schuh, Harald; Koenig, Rolf; Nilsson, Tobias; Heinkelmann, Robert; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System requires a global terrestrial reference frame (TRF) that should have an accuracy better than 1 mm and a stability better than 0.1 mm/yr as several phenomena in geophysics and climatology such as the prediction of the global sea level rise require a most accurate and stable reference. These goals have not been met so far. Simulation studies allow to better understand the error-limiting factors in the TRF determination and hence, they can contribute to the improvement of the next ITRF. Within project GGOS-SIM we combine normal equation systems (NEQs) of simulated VLBI and SLR observations to determine a global TRF. The time span of 2008-2014 is considered and the software EPOS is employed for the combination. The NEQs include station coordinates, velocities as well as pole coordinates and dUT1. We test different combination strategies including local ties as well as global ties in terms of pole coordinates and proper datum constraints. Our results are compared to ITRF2008 and IERS C04 focusing on origin and scale, i.e. the main contributions of the considered space geodetic techniques to the ITRF.

  9. Improving Ambiguity Resolution for Medium Baselines Using Combined GPS and BDS Dual/Triple-Frequency Observations

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    Wang Gao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The regional constellation of the BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS has been providing continuous positioning, navigation and timing services since 27 December 2012, covering China and the surrounding area. Real-time kinematic (RTK positioning with combined BDS and GPS observations is feasible. Besides, all satellites of BDS can transmit triple-frequency signals. Using the advantages of multi-pseudorange and carrier observations from multi-systems and multi-frequencies is expected to be of much benefit for ambiguity resolution (AR. We propose an integrated AR strategy for medium baselines by using the combined GPS and BDS dual/triple-frequency observations. In the method, firstly the extra-wide-lane (EWL ambiguities of triple-frequency system, i.e., BDS, are determined first. Then the dual-frequency WL ambiguities of BDS and GPS were resolved with the geometry-based model by using the BDS ambiguity-fixed EWL observations. After that, basic (i.e., L1/L2 or B1/B2 ambiguities of BDS and GPS are estimated together with the so-called ionosphere-constrained model, where the ambiguity-fixed WL observations are added to enhance the model strength. During both of the WL and basic AR, a partial ambiguity fixing (PAF strategy is adopted to weaken the negative influence of new-rising or low-elevation satellites. Experiments were conducted and presented, in which the GPS/BDS dual/triple-frequency data were collected in Nanjing and Zhengzhou of China, with the baseline distance varying from about 28.6 to 51.9 km. The results indicate that, compared to the single triple-frequency BDS system, the combined system can significantly enhance the AR model strength, and thus improve AR performance for medium baselines with a 75.7% reduction of initialization time on average. Besides, more accurate and stable positioning results can also be derived by using the combined GPS/BDS system.

  10. Disturbance observer-based fuzzy control for flexible spacecraft combined attitude & sun tracking system

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    Chak, Yew-Chung; Varatharajoo, Renuganth; Razoumny, Yury

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates the combined attitude and sun-tracking control problem in the presence of external disturbances and internal disturbances, caused by flexible appendages. A new method based on Pythagorean trigonometric identity is proposed to drive the solar arrays. Using the control input and attitude output, a disturbance observer is developed to estimate the lumped disturbances consisting of the external and internal disturbances, and then compensated by the disturbance observer-based controller via a feed-forward control. The stability analysis demonstrates that the desired attitude trajectories are followed even in the presence of external disturbance and internal flexible modes. The main features of the proposed control scheme are that it can be designed separately and incorporated into the baseline controller to form the observer-based control system, and the combined attitude and sun-tracking control is achieved without the conventional attitude actuators. The attitude and sun-tracking performance using the proposed strategy is evaluated and validated through numerical simulations. The proposed control solution can serve as a fail-safe measure in case of failure of the conventional attitude actuator, which triggered by automatic reconfiguration of the attitude control components.

  11. Clinical observation of alprostadil combined with glucocorticoids on acute optic neuritis

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    Ke-Shun Fan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the clinical effect of alprostadil combined with glucocorticoids in the treatment of acute optic neuritis(AON.METHODS: Seventy patients(70 eyeswith AON from January, 2012 to June, 2014 were randomly divided into two groups. 35 patients in observation group were used 10ug alprostadil with 10mL normal saline(NSby intravenous injection, once/d for 7d/one treatment course, and 10mL NS was used by intravenous injection in 35 patients of control group. Besides, the two groups were treated with the combined therapy as follows: 20mg methylprednisolone was injected periglomerularly beside the eyeballs, once /3d for 3 times; 800~1 000mg of methylprednisolone through intravenous drip for 3d, once/d; after 3d, oral administration of prednisone acetate for 1wk, 1mg/(kg·d; after 1wk, the dose decreased to 5mg/wk until withdraw. Simultaneously, oral administration of ranitidine capsules, calcium carbonate and vitamin D3 tablets were combined in the supportive treament. The differences of curative effect between two groups were comparatively analyzed.RESULTS: In the observation group, 25 eyes(71.4%were markedly effective, 7 eyes(20.0%were valid and 3 eyes(8.6%were invalid, and the total effective rate was 91.4%. In the control group, 15 eyes(42.9%were markedly effective, 14 eyes(40.0%were valid and 6 eyes(17.1%were invalid, and the total effective rate was 82.9%. The difference of total effective rate between the two groups was not statistically significant(P=0.477, but there was a significant difference in markedly effective rate between the two groups(χ2=5.833, P=0.016.CONCLUSION: Alprostadil combined with glucocorticoids is effective for AON, and it is worth of advocation.

  12. Electronic monitoring in combination with direct observation as a means to significantly improve hand hygiene compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, John M

    2017-05-01

    Monitoring hand hygiene compliance among health care personnel (HCP) is an essential element of hand hygiene promotion programs. Observation by trained auditors is considered the gold standard method for establishing hand hygiene compliance rates. Advantages of observational surveys include the unique ability to establish compliance with all of the World Health Organization "My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene" initiative Moments and to provide just-in-time coaching. Disadvantages include the resources required for observational surveys, insufficient sample sizes, and nonstandardized methods of conducting observations. Electronic and camera-based systems can monitor hand hygiene performance on all work shifts without a Hawthorne effect and provide significantly more data regarding hand hygiene performance. Disadvantages include the cost of installation, variable accuracy in estimating compliance rates, issues related to acceptance by HCP, insufficient data regarding their cost-effectiveness and influence on health care-related infection rates, and the ability of most systems to monitor only surrogates for Moments 1, 4, and 5. Increasing evidence suggests that monitoring only Moments 1, 4, and 5 provides reasonable estimates of compliance with all 5 Moments. With continued improvement of electronic monitoring systems, combining electronic monitoring with observational methods may provide the best information as part of a multimodal strategy to improve and sustain hand hygiene compliance rates among HCP. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  14. Observation on the therapeutic effect of aspirin in combined with acupuncture in the treatment of TIA

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    Jing Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of aspirin in combined with acupuncture in the treatment of transient ischemic attack (TIA. Methods: A total of 90 patients with TIA who were admitted in our hospital were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group with 45 cases in each group. The patients in the two groups were given aspirin and routine symptomatic treatments. On this basis, the patients in the observation group were given acupuncture. Two-week treatment was regarded as one course. The fasting venous blood before treatment and one course after treatment was collected to detect the serum lipid level. TCD was used to detect the average peak flow velocity of MCA, VA, and BA. A follow-up visit was paid to TIA attack times within 3 months. Results: TC, TG, and LDL levels after treatment in the two groups were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment, while HDL was significantly elevated when compared with before treatment. The comparison of TC, TG, LDL, and HDL after treatment between the two groups was not statistically significant. The comparison of the average peak flow velocity of MCA, VA, and BA before treatment between the two groups was not statistically significant. The average peak flow velocity of MCA and BA after treatment were significantly slowing down when compared with before treatment, while the average peak flow velocity of VA was not significantly different from that before treatment. The average peak flow velocity of MCA and BA after treatment in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the control group. The average attack time of TIA every week after treatment in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group. Conclusions: Aspirin in combined with acupuncture in the treatment of TIA can effectively improve the cerebral hemodynamic indicators, and reduce TIA attack time; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended in the

  15. Clinical observation on bandage contact lens applied in pterygium excision combined with conjunctival transplantation

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    Yuan Yuan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical effect of bandage contact lens in pterygium excision combined with conjunctival transplantation.METHODS: The retrospective study included 114 eyes of 101 patients who underwent the pterygium excision combined with conjunctival transplantation from June 2012 to June 2013 in our hospital. The patients were divided into three groups according to the postoperative treatment. In group A, 30 cases(38 eyeswore bandage contact lens; In group B, compression bandage was used in all the 33 cases(38 eyes; In group C, 38 eyes(38 caseswere covered with normal eye pad. All patients were examined 1, 3, 5d after surgery.RESULTS:No complications such as corneal ulcer, granuloma, etc. or recurrence occurred in 114 eyes. Eye irritations in group A were less severe than in the other two groups. Postoperative repair time of corneal epithelium was shorter in group A and B than in group C.CONCLUSION: Bandage contact lens can significantly reduce the irritations after pterygium excision combined with conjunctival transplantation and promote corneal epithelium repair in the defected area. Compared with traditional treatment, it can obviously increase the postoperative comfort level in patients, it is easy to promote its application, and it has lesser risks. So it has extensive clinical value.

  16. CO2 Dimer: Four Intermolecular Modes Observed via Infrared Combination Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norooz Oliaee, Jalal; Dehghany, Mehdi; Rezaei, Mojtaba; McKellar, Bob; Moazzen-Ahmadi, Nasser

    2016-06-01

    Study of the carbon dioxide dimer has a long history, but there is only one previous observation of an intermolecular vibration [1]. Here we analyze four new combination bands of (CO2)2 in the CO2 νb{3} region (˜2350 wn), observed using tunable infrared lasers and a pulsed slit-jet supersonic expansion. The previous combination band at 2382.2 wn was simple to assign [1]. A much more complicated band (˜2370 wn) turns out to involve two upper states, one at 2369.0 wn (Bu symmetry), and the other at 2370.0 wn (Au). The spectrum can be nicely fit by including the Coriolis interactions between these states. Another complicated band around 2443 wn also involves two nearby upper states which are highly perturbed in so-far unexplained ways (possibly related to tunneling shifts). With the help of new ab initio calculations [2], we assign the results as follows. The 2369.0 wn band is the combination of the forbidden Ag intramolecular fundamental (probably [1] at about 2346.76 wn) and the intermolecular geared bend (Bu). The 2370.0 wn band is the combination of the same Ag fundamental and the intermolecular torsion (Au). This gives about 22.3 and 23.2 wn for the geared bend and torsion. The previous 2382.2 wn band [1] is the allowed Bu fundamental (2350.771 wn) plus two quanta of the geared bend (Bu), giving 31.509 wn for this overtone. The highly perturbed 2442.7 wn band is the Bu fundamental plus the antigeared bend (Ag), giving about 91.9 wn for the antigeared bend. Finally, the perturbed 2442.1 wn band is due to an unknown combination of modes which gains intensity from the antigeared bend by a Fermi-type interaction. Calculated values [2] are: 20.64 (geared bend), 24.44 (torsion), 32.34 (geared bend overtone), and 92.30 wn (antigeared bend), in good agreement with experiment. \\vskip 0.2 truecm [1] M. Dehghany, A.R.W. McKellar, Mahin Afshari, and N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, Mol. Phys. 108, 2195 (2010). [2] X.-G. Wang, T. Carrington, Jr., and R. Dawes, private communication.

  17. Observer-Based Robust Control of Uncertain Switched Fuzzy Systems with Combined Switching Controller

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    Hong Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The observer-based robust control for a class of switched fuzzy (SF time-delay systems involving uncertainties and external disturbances is investigated in this paper. A switched fuzzy system, which differs from existing ones, is firstly employed to describe a nonlinear system. Next, a combined switching controller is proposed. The designed controller based on the observer instead of the state information integrates the advantages of both the switching controllers and the supplementary controllers but eliminates their disadvantages. The proposed controller provides good performance during the transient period, and the chattering effect is removed when the system state approaches the origin. Sufficient condition for the solvability of the robust control problem is given for the case that the state of system is not available. Since convex combination techniques are used to derive the delay-independent criteria, some subsystems are allowed to be unstable. Finally, various comparisons of the elaborated examples are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design approach.

  18. Five intermolecular vibrations of the CO2 dimer observed via infrared combination bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norooz Oliaee, J.; Dehghany, M.; Rezaei, Mojtaba; McKellar, A. R. W.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.

    2016-11-01

    The weakly bound van der Waals dimer (CO2)2 has long been of considerable theoretical and experimental interest. Here, we study its low frequency intermolecular vibrations by means of combination bands in the region of the CO2 monomer ν3 fundamental (≈2350 cm-1), which are observed using a tunable infrared laser to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion. With the help of a recent high level ab initio calculation by Wang, Carrington, and Dawes, four intermolecular frequencies are assigned: the in-plane disrotatory bend (22.26 cm-1); the out-of-plane torsion (23.24 cm-1); twice the disrotatory bend (31.51 cm-1); and the in-plane conrotatory bend (92.25 cm-1). The disrotatory bend and torsion, separated by only 0.98 cm-1, are strongly mixed by Coriolis interactions. The disrotatory bend overtone is well behaved, but the conrotatory bend is highly perturbed and could not be well fitted. The latter perturbations could be due to tunneling effects, which have not previously been observed experimentally for CO2 dimer. A fifth combination band, located 1.3 cm-1 below the conrotatory bend, remains unassigned.

  19. Geocenter variations derived from a combined processing of LEO- and ground-based GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männel, Benjamin; Rothacher, Markus

    2017-08-01

    GNSS observations provided by the global tracking network of the International GNSS Service (IGS, Dow et al. in J Geod 83(3):191-198, 2009) play an important role in the realization of a unique terrestrial reference frame that is accurate enough to allow a detailed monitoring of the Earth's system. Combining these ground-based data with GPS observations tracked by high-quality dual-frequency receivers on-board low earth orbiters (LEOs) is a promising way to further improve the realization of the terrestrial reference frame and the estimation of geocenter coordinates, GPS satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters. To assess the scope of the improvement on the geocenter coordinates, we processed a network of 53 globally distributed and stable IGS stations together with four LEOs (GRACE-A, GRACE-B, OSTM/Jason-2 and GOCE) over a time interval of 3 years (2010-2012). To ensure fully consistent solutions, the zero-difference phase observations of the ground stations and LEOs were processed in a common least-squares adjustment, estimating all the relevant parameters such as GPS and LEO orbits, station coordinates, Earth rotation parameters and geocenter motion. We present the significant impact of the individual LEO and a combination of all four LEOs on the geocenter coordinates. The formal errors are reduced by around 20% due to the inclusion of one LEO into the ground-only solution, while in a solution with four LEOs LEO-specific characteristics are significantly reduced. We compare the derived geocenter coordinates w.r.t. LAGEOS results and external solutions based on GPS and SLR data. We found good agreement in the amplitudes of all components; however, the phases in x- and z-direction do not agree well.

  20. C2 emission features in the Red Rectangle. A combined observational laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehres, N.; Romanzin, C.; Linnartz, H.; van Winckel, H.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2010-07-01

    Context. The Red Rectangle proto-planetary nebula (HD 44179) is known for a number of rather narrow emission features superimposed on a broad extended red emission (ERE) covering the 5000-7500 Å regime. The origin of these emission features is unknown. Aims: The aim of the present work is to search for potential carriers by combining new observational and laboratory data. This also allows to interpret spectral emission features in terms of actual physical conditions like temperature and density constraints and to trace chemical processes in the outflows of the Red Rectangle. Methods: Observational spectra have been obtained with the EMMI-NTT at offsets of 3'', 6'', 7'', 11'', 16'' and 20'' distance to the central star HD 44179. The spectra are compared to the outcome of a time-gated laser induced fluorescence laboratory study of an expanding acetylene plasma using a special supersonic pin-hole discharge source. With this set-up the hydrocarbon chemistry in the Red Rectangle nebula is simulated under laboratory controlled conditions. The plasma source has the unique feature to generate electronically and vibrationally excited species at low rotational temperatures. The comparison is facilitated by a simple model for fluorescent emission in the nebula. Results: Two of the astronomically observed narrow emission bands can be assigned as originating from unresolved rovibronic progressions within the d3Π_g → a3Π_u Swan system of the C2 radical. The band appearance corresponds to a rotational temperature between 200 and 1000 K. The emission is driven by absorption in the C2 Phillips bands followed by intersystem crossing from the singlet to the triplet state and pumping in the Swan bands. Conclusions: These observations imply an active (photo)chemistry in the ejecta of the Red Rectangle. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile. Program ID: 080.C-0814(A).

  1. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  2. [Clinical observation on moving cupping therapy combined with moxibustion for treatment of senile habitual constipation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhen-ya; Li, Chang-du; Li, Jin-cun; Gao, Li; Wang, Qiong-fen

    2005-12-01

    To explore an effective method for treatment of senile habitual constipation. Sixty-four cases were randomly divided into a treatment group treated with moving cupping at Hechelu plus Shenque (CV 8) Bazhenxue moxibustion, and a control group with oral administration of Tab phenolphthaleinum, 32 cases in each group. Improvement of constipation in the patients were observed and compared. The short-term (14 days) clinical cured-markedly effective rate was 84.4% in the treatment group, which was significantly better than 59.4% of the control group (P < 0.05), and there was a significant difference between the two groups in the long-term (2 months) therapeutic effect (P < 0. 01). Moving cupping at the Hechelu combined with Shenque (CV 8) Bazhenxue moxibustion is an effective method for senile habitual constipation.

  3. Combination of the Flow Disturbance Observer and Base Plate Jerk Feedback in a Pneumatic Positioning Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Mohebullah; Wakui, Shinji

    Pneumatic actuation systems are commonly used to drive the positioning stage due to several merits. However, one of the critical demerits of the pneumatic systems is the problem of the compressibility, which results in the flow disturbance. Another problem of the positioning stage can be addressed to the vibration which occurs due to the active condition of the base plate. This paper concerns the mentioned two issues in a pneumatic positioning stage. In order to suppress the flow disturbance and to reduce the horizontal vibration of the stage due to the reaction force, a combined control scheme is proposed. This scheme is composed of the fusion of flow disturbance observer (FDOB) and base plate jerk feedback (BPJFB) scheme. An enhanced experimental methodology is provided to successfully implement the fusion of the mentioned feedback controllers. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. [Clinical observation on fire needles at bones combined with cupping and Tuina for knee osteoarthritistis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang-Lai; Yao, Jun-Han; Guo, Jun-Xiong

    2013-08-01

    To explore a better therapy for knee osteoarthritis. One hundred cases were randomly divided into a comprehensive group and an acupuncture group, 50 cases in each one. The comprehensive treatment of fire needles at bones combined with cupping and Tuina on local area of affected knee was applied in the comprehensive group. The Ashi points were mainly selected in the fire needles at bones therapy, once every other day. The cupping and Tuina therapy was adopted once a day. The conventional acupuncture was applied in the acupuncture group, in which Dubi (ST 35), Neixiyan (EX-LE 4), Xuehai (SP 10), Liangqiu (ST 34) and so on were selected, once a day. Ten days of treatment were taken as a treatment course in both two groups, and totally 1 to 2 courses was required. The pain score of joint before and after the treatment was observed and efficacy was assessed in two groups. Compared before the treatment, the pain score of joint after the treatment was obviously improved in two groups (both Ptreatment of fire needles at bones combined with cupping and Tuina, considered as a better therapy for knee osteoarthritis, could improve joint pain, swelling and action function, which is superior to the conventional acupuncture.

  5. A combined smoking cessation intervention within a lung cancer screening trial: a pilot observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Paolo; Munarini, Elena; Bravi, Francesca; Rossi, Marta; La Vecchia, Carlo; Boffi, Roberto; Pastorino, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    The time of lung cancer screening may provide the ideal setting to discuss and initiate a smoking cessation plan that includes pharmacologic aids. No studies to date have fully investigated the potential effectiveness of such combined approach. We prospectively evaluated the biochemically verified 1-year continuous abstinence rate from smoking of 187 persistent smokers enrolled within the Multicentric Italian Lung Detection Trial (MILD), who received a pharmacologic aid to quit smoking with varenicline along with behavioral counseling. The propensity of study subjects to succeed in smoking cessation was also monitored. At 12 months, the continuous abstinence rate from smoking was achieved in 37 out of 187 patients (19.8%), with a propensity to succeed in smoking cessation for the assisted attempt equal to 1.43, as compared to an unassisted MILD patient. At the end of the third month of therapy, 48.7% of subjects showed a continuous abstinence rate, while only 33.7% of patients were abstinent from smoking at 6 months. At baseline, the subgroup of MILD participants who were originally allocated to lung tomography showed higher smoking intensity than those allocated to no screening. A combined smoking cessation intervention can be implemented with satisfactory results within a lung cancer screening program; this preliminary observation needs to be replicated in a prospective investigation. Clinicians should consider that lung cancer screening may be falsely reassuring for persistent smokers; therefore it should always be coupled with a smoking cessation program.

  6. Monitoring Poisson observations using combined applications of Shewhart and EWMA charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abujiya, Mu'azu Ramat

    2017-11-01

    The Shewhart and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) charts for nonconformities are the most widely used procedures of choice for monitoring Poisson observations in modern industries. Individually, the Shewhart EWMA charts are only sensitive to large and small shifts, respectively. To enhance the detection abilities of the two schemes in monitoring all kinds of shifts in Poisson count data, this study examines the performance of combined applications of the Shewhart, and EWMA Poisson control charts. Furthermore, the study proposes modifications based on well-structured statistical data collection technique, ranked set sampling (RSS), to detect shifts in the mean of a Poisson process more quickly. The relative performance of the proposed Shewhart-EWMA Poisson location charts is evaluated in terms of the average run length (ARL), standard deviation of the run length (SDRL), median run length (MRL), average ratio ARL (ARARL), average extra quadratic loss (AEQL) and performance comparison index (PCI). Consequently, all the new Poisson control charts based on RSS method are generally more superior than most of the existing schemes for monitoring Poisson processes. The use of these combined Shewhart-EWMA Poisson charts is illustrated with an example to demonstrate the practical implementation of the design procedure.

  7. Electron distribution functions in solar flares from combined X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, M. [Institute of 4D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Kontar, E. P., E-mail: marina.battaglia@fhnw.ch [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-20

    Simultaneous solar flare observations with SDO and RHESSI provide spatially resolved information about hot plasma and energetic particles in flares. RHESSI allows the properties of both hot (≳8 MK) thermal plasma and non-thermal electron distributions to be inferred, while SDO/AIA is more sensitive to lower temperatures. We present and implement a new method to reconstruct electron distribution functions from SDO/AIA data. The combined analysis of RHESSI and AIA data allows the electron distribution function to be inferred over the broad energy range from 0.1 keV up to a few tens of keV. The analysis of two well-observed flares suggests that the distributions in general agree to within a factor of three when the RHESSI values are extrapolated into the intermediate range 1-3 keV, with AIA systematically predicting lower electron fluxes. Possible instrumental and numerical effects, as well as potential physical origins for this discrepancy, are discussed. The inferred electron distribution functions in general show one or two nearly Maxwellian components at energies below ∼15 keV and a non-thermal tail above.

  8. Flare-CME characteristics from Sun to Earth combining observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmer, Manuela; Thalmann, Julia K.; Dissauer, Karin; Veronig, Astrid M.; Tschernitz, Johannes; Hinterreiter, Jürgen; Rodriguez, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    We analyze the well observed flare-CME event from October 1, 2011 (SOL2011-10-01T09:18) covering the complete chain of action - from Sun to Earth - for a better understanding of the dynamic evolution of the CME and its embedded magnetic field. We study in detail the solar surface and atmosphere from SDO and ground-based instruments associated to the flare-CME and also track the CME signature offlimb from combined EUV and white-light data with STEREO. By applying 3D reconstruction techniques (GCS, total mass) to stereoscopic STEREO-SoHO coronagraph data, we track the temporal and spatial evolution of the CME in interplanetary space and derive its geometry and 3D-mass. We combine the GCS and Lundquist model results to derive the axial flux and helicity of the MC from in situ measurements (Wind). This is compared to nonlinear force-free (NLFF) model results as well as to the reconnected magnetic flux derived from the flare ribbons (flare reconnection flux) and the magnetic flux encompassed by the associated dimming (dimming flux). We find that magnetic reconnection processes were already ongoing before the start of the impulsive flare phase, adding magnetic flux to the flux rope before its final eruption. The dimming flux increases by more than 25% after the end of the flare, indicating that magnetic flux is still added to the flux rope after eruption. Hence, the derived flare reconnection flux is most probably a lower limit for estimating the magnetic flux within the flux rope. We obtain that the magnetic helicity and axial magnetic flux are reduced in interplanetary space by ˜50% and 75%, respectively, possibly indicating to an erosion process. A mass increase of 10% for the CME is observed over the distance range from about 4-20 Rs. The temporal evolution of the CME associated core dimming regions supports the scenario that fast outflows might supply additional mass to the rear part of the CME.

  9. Combined TOPEX/Poseidon TEC and ionosonde observations of negative low-latitude ionospheric storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. W. Lynn

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric storms showing a strong depression in daytime foF2 values were sought which penetrated to low-latitudes, as identified by vertical ionosondes operating at Darwin and Townsville over the period 1992-1998. The 32 storms thus identified showed a seasonal occurrence peaking near the equinoxes with a bias to the summer side. Of these storms, three (27 March 1995, 25 October 1997, 8 November 1997 combined Australian and South East Asian ionosonde observations with local afternoon TOPEX/Poseidon measurements of TEC. The equatorial anomaly is usually well developed at this time of day and consequently these storms were chosen for detailed study. The TOPEX/Poseidon satellite provided vertical profiles of the ionosphere across both hemispheres, thus allowing the totality of storm behaviour to be observed for the first time at low-latitudes and related directly to the ionosonde observations. The three storms were remarkably consistent in their behaviour, the negative ionospheric storm day followed some 24-36h after the beginning of a magnetic storm and the development of the equatorial anomaly was suppressed. However, the suppression of the equatorial anomaly was not the main cause of the strong depression in foF2 observed by the Southern Hemisphere ionosondes. The latter was associated with an additional bite-out in both TEC and foF2 that occurred on the southern side of the magnetic equator. None of the three storms produced any major negative disturbance outside the range of normal variability of TEC and foF2 at the northern latitude sites for which data was available, despite the absence of the anomaly. The satellite measurements show the strength of the anomaly to be highly variable from day-to-day and anomaly peaks are frequently not present even on magnetically quiet days. Thus, an absence of anomaly peaks is contained within the normal variability of non-storm days. The north-south asymmetry and seasonal occurrence are consistent with

  10. Combining soundscape analysis with in situ observations and oceanographic data for future ecosystem evaluation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S. E.; Freeman, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reef ecosystems face many anthropogenic threats. There are urgent requirements for improved monitoring and management. Conventional assessment methods using SCUBA are costly and prone to bias and under-sampling. Here, three approaches to understanding coral reef ecology are combined to aid the goal of enhanced passive monitoring in the future: statistical analysis of oceanographic habitats, remote cameras for nocturnal surveys of benthic fauna, and soundscape analysis in the context of oceanographic setting and ecological metrics collected in-situ. Hawaiian reefs from Kure Atoll to the island of Hawaii, an area spanning two oceanographic habitats, are assessed. Multivariate analysis of acoustic, remote camera, and in-situ observational data showed significant differences in more than 20 percent of ecological and acoustic variables when grouped by oceanic regime, suggesting that large-scale oceanography substantially influences local ecological states and associated soundscapes. Acoustic variables further delineated sites by island, suggesting local conditions influence the soundscape to a greater degree. While the number of invertebrates (with an emphasis on crustaceans and echinoderms) imaged using remote cameras correlated with a number of acoustic metrics, an increasingly higher correlation between invertebrate density and spectral level was observed as acoustic bands increased in frequency from 2 to 20 kHz. In turn, correlation was also observed between the number of predatory fish and sound levels above 2 kHz, suggesting a connection between the number of invertebrates, sound levels at higher frequencies, and the presence of their predators. Comparisons between sound recordings and diversity indices calculated from observational and remote camera data indicate that greater diversity in fishes and benthic invertebrates is associated with a larger change in sound levels between day and night. Interdisciplinary analyses provide a novel view to underwater

  11. Bifurcation Observation of Combining Spiral Gear Transmission Based on Parameter Domain Structure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study considers the bifurcation evolutions for a combining spiral gear transmission through parameter domain structure analysis. The system nonlinear vibration equations are created with piecewise backlash and general errors. Gill’s numerical integration algorithm is implemented in calculating the vibration equation sets. Based on cell-mapping method (CMM, two-dimensional dynamic domain planes have been developed and primarily focused on the parameters of backlash, transmission error, mesh frequency and damping ratio, and so forth. Solution demonstrates that Period-doubling bifurcation happens as the mesh frequency increases; moreover nonlinear discontinuous jump breaks the periodic orbit and also turns the periodic state into chaos suddenly. In transmission error planes, three cell groups which are Period-1, Period-4, and Chaos have been observed, and the boundary cells are the sensitive areas to dynamic response. Considering the parameter planes which consist of damping ratio associated with backlash, transmission error, mesh stiffness, and external load, the solution domain structure reveals that the system step into chaos undergoes Period-doubling cascade with Period-2m (m: integer periodic regions. Direct simulations to obtain the bifurcation diagram and largest Lyapunov exponent (LE match satisfactorily with the parameter domain solutions.

  12. Patients' views on a combined action observation and motor imagery intervention for Parkinson's disease.(Research Article)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crawford, Trevor J; Gowen, Emma; Bek, Judith; Poliakoff, Ellen; Vogt, Stefan; Sullivan, Matthew S; Webb, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    ...), methods have been based on stroke rehabilitation and may be less suitable for PD. Moreover, previous studies have focused on either observation or imagery, yet combining these enhances effects in healthy participants...

  13. [Clinical observation on the therapeutic effect of electroacupuncture combined with cupping on post-stroke fatigue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Guo-Ying; Li, Shao-Kun; Jin, Jian-Hong

    2010-10-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with cupping at the lumbo-back on post-stroke fatigue. A total of 128 cases of post-stroke fatigue patients were randomly divided into EA + cupping group and medication group, with 64 cases in each group. EA (20 Hz, 2 mA) was applied to Baihui (GV 20), Yintang (EX-HN 3), Shuigou (GV 26), Hegu (LI 4), Zusanli (ST 36), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), and Taichong (LR 3) for 30 min, once daily for 30 times, and cupping was applied at the patient's lumbo-back region once every two days, and continuously for 5 weeks. Patients of medication group were ordered to take compound aminobutyric acid vitamin E capsule (20 mg, t. i.d, po), magnesium gluconate solution (10 mL, t. i. d, po), sertraline hydrochloridetablet (50 mg, qd, po) for 5 weeks. The Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QOL) was used to evaluate the patients' energy state. After the treatment, the energy scores of SS-QOL of both EA + cupping and medication groups were increased significantly in comparison with the pre-treatment in each group (P cupping group was significantly higher than the score of the medication group (P cupping group and medication group, 42 and 23 were recovered basically, 13 and 13 experienced marked improvement, 7 and 18 were effective, 2 and 10 failed in the treatment, with the effective rates being 96.87% and 84.37% respectively. The effective rate of EA + cupping group was obviously higher than that of medication group (P cupping at the lumbo-back can effectively relieve fatigue of post-stroke patients, and its therapeutic effect is superior to medication.

  14. Multi-Technique Combinations of Geodetic Observations at the level of Normal Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Jean-Yves; Gambis, Daniel; Biancale, Richard; Bizouard, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The space geodetic techniques GPS, VLBI, SLR, and DORIS can been combined at the level of Normal Equations for recovering geodetic parameters such as terrestrial frame, Earth orientation parameters and celestial frame consistently in a same run. The potential advantage of the method is to improve the accuracy, the time resolution and the overall consistency of the products obtained in the combination. In the frame of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) a Working Group at the Combination Level (WG COL) was set up in the course of 2009. As participant to this Working Group, the GRGS (Groupe de Recherche en Géodésie Spatiale) has developed a combination process at the weekly bases using the CNES GINS/DYNAMO software. In this presentation the GRGS will present some results derived from the combination of normal equations obtained for the different techniques over two VLBI intensive campaigns referred to as CONT08 and CONT11.

  15. Blowout Jets: Hinode X-Ray Jets that Don't Fit the Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly half of all H-alpha macrospicules in polar coronal holes appear to be miniature filament eruptions. This suggests that there is a large class of X-ray jets in which the jet-base magnetic arcade undergoes a blowout eruption as in a CME, instead of remaining static as in most solar X-ray jets, the standard jets that fit the model advocated by Shibata. Along with a cartoon depicting the standard model, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures expected of blowout jets in coronal X-ray images. From Hinode/XRT movies and STEREO/EUVI snapshots in polar coronal holes, we present examples of (1) X-ray jets that fit the standard model, and (2) X-ray jets that do not fit the standard model but do have features appropriate for blowout jets. These features are (1) a flare arcade inside the jet-base arcade in addition to the small flare arcade (bright point) outside that standard jets have, (2) a filament of cool (T is approximately 80,000K) plasma that erupts from the core of the jetbase arcade, and (3) an extra jet strand that should not be made by the reconnection for standard jets but could be made by reconnection between the ambient unipolar open field and the opposite-polarity leg of the filament-carrying flux-rope core field of the erupting jet-base arcade. We therefore infer that these non-standard jets are blowout jets, jets made by miniature versions of the sheared-core-arcade eruptions that make CMEs

  16. Multi-instrument observations of a failed flare eruption associated with MHD waves in a loop bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, G.; Polito, V.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Del Zanna, G.

    2017-04-01

    Context. We present observations of a B7.9-class flare that occurred on the 24th January, 2015, using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the X-Ray Telescope of Hinode. The flare triggers the eruption of a dense cool plasma blob as seen in AIA 171 Å, which is unable to completely break out and remains confined within a local bundle of active region loops. During this process, transverse oscillations of the threads are observed. The cool plasma is then observed to descend back to the chromosphere along each loop strand. At the same time, a larger diffuse co-spatial loop observed in the hot wavebands of SDO/AIA and Hinode/XRT is formed, exhibiting periodic intensity variations along its length. Aims: The formation and evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves depend upon the values of the local plasma parameters (e.g. density, temperature and magnetic field), which can hence be inferred by coronal seismology. In this study we aim to assess how the observed MHD modes are affected by the variation of density and temperature. Methods: We combined analysis of EUV/X-ray imaging and spectroscopy using SDO/AIA, Hinode/EIS and XRT. Results: The transverse oscillations of the cool loop threads are interpreted in terms of vertically polarised kink oscillations. The fitting procedure applied to the loop displacement time series gives a period of 3.5 to 4 min, and an amplitude of 5 Mm. The oscillations are strongly damped showing very low quality factor (1.5-2), which is defined as the ratio of the damping time and the oscillation period. The weak variation of the period of the kink wave, which is estimated from the fitting analysis, is in agreement with the density variations due to the presence of the plasma blob inferred from the intensity light curve at 171 Å. The coexisting intensity oscillations along the hot loop are interpreted as a slow MHD wave with a period of 10 min and phase

  17. Estimation receiver operating characteristic curve and ideal observers for combined detection/estimation tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Eric

    2007-12-01

    The localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) curve is a standard method to quantify performance for the task of detecting and locating a signal. This curve is generalized to arbitrary detection/estimation tasks to give the estimation ROC (EROC) curve. For a two-alternative forced-choice study, where the observer must decide which of a pair of images has the signal and then estimate parameters pertaining to the signal, it is shown that the average value of the utility on those image pairs where the observer chooses the correct image is an estimate of the area under the EROC curve (AEROC). The ideal LROC observer is generalized to the ideal EROC observer, whose EROC curve lies above those of all other observers for the given detection/estimation task. When the utility function is nonnegative, the ideal EROC observer is shown to share many mathematical properties with the ideal observer for the pure detection task. When the utility function is concave, the ideal EROC observer makes use of the posterior mean estimator. Other estimators that arise as special cases include maximum a posteriori estimators and maximum-likelihood estimators.

  18. Identification of possible intense historical geomagnetic storms using combined sunspot and auroral observations from East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Willis

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive catalogues of ancient sunspot and auroral observations from East Asia are used to identify possible intense historical geomagnetic storms in the interval 210 BC-AD 1918. There are about 270 entries in the sunspot catalogue and about 1150 entries in the auroral catalogue. Special databases have been constructed in which the scientific information in these two catalogues is placed in specified fields. For the purposes of this study, an historical geomagnetic storm is defined in terms of an auroral observation that is apparently associated with a particular sunspot observation, in the sense that the auroral observation occurred within several days of the sunspot observation. More precisely, a selection criterion is formulated for the automatic identification of such geomagnetic storms, using the oriental records stored in the sunspot and auroral databases. The selection criterion is based on specific assumptions about the duration of sunspot visibility with the unaided eye, the likely range of heliographic longitudes of an energetic solar feature, and the likely range of transit times for ejected solar plasma to travel from the Sun to the Earth. This selection criterion results in the identification of nineteen putative historical geomagnetic storms, although two of these storms are spurious in the sense that there are two examples of a single sunspot observation being associated with two different auroral observations separated by more than half a (synodic solar rotation period. The literary and scientific reliabilities of the East Asian sunspot and auroral records that define the nineteen historical geomagnetic storms are discussed in detail in a set of appendices. A possible time sequence of events is presented for each geomagnetic storm, including possible dates for both the central meridian passage of the sunspot and the occurrence of the energetic solar feature, as well as likely transit times for the ejected solar plasma

  19. [Clinical observation on acupuncture combined with cupping therapy for treatment of ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xue-wen

    2005-08-01

    To search for an effective method for treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The treatment group (n = 32) were treated by acupuncture combined with cupping therapy and the control group (n = 30) by simple acupuncture for 40 days. The clinical remission rate was 62.5% in the treatment group and 33.3% in the control group with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01); the total effective rate in the treatment group was 93.8% which was better than 83.3% in the control group (P<0.01); the recurrence rate after one year was 3.3% in the treatment group and 24.0% in the control group with significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). Acupuncture combined with cupping therapy in the therapeutic effect on ankylosing spondylitis is better than simple acupuncture, with shorter therapeutic course and lower recurrence rate.

  20. Combined observations of rock mass movements using satellite SAR interferometry, differential GPS, airborne digital photogrammetry, and airborne photography interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Strozzi, Tazio; Delaloye, Reynald; Kääb, Andreas; Ambrosi, Christian; Perruchoud, Eric; Wegmüller, Urs

    2010-01-01

    Recent global warming, through the related retreat of mountain glaciers, causes a growing number of different slope instabilities requiring accurate and cost-effective monitoring. We investigate the potential of combined remote sensing observations from satellite and airborne microwave and optical sensors for an efficient survey of mountainous ground displacements. The evolution of a paraglacial deep-seated rock mass movement due to glacier retreat in the Swiss Alps has been observed between ...

  1. Clinical observation of ulinastatin combined with CRRT in the treatment of early cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinghong; Peng, Jinliang; Zhou, Yuming; Zeng, Weilan; Xiao, Shihui; Cheng, Hui; Zhong, Zhenzhou; Liao, Xiangming; Xiao, Xiaoliu; Luo, Liang; Liu, Xianghong

    2017-12-01

    The clinical efficacy of ulinastatin (UTI) combined with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in the treatment after early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was evaluated. A total of 70 patients who were successfully treated with CPR in Ganzhou People's Hospital from October 2016 to March 2017 were selected as the subjects. The patients were randomly divided into control group (35 cases, conventional treatment) and UTI combined with CRRT group (35 cases, UTI + CRRT). The whole blood of patients was collected at 0, 3, 6 and 12 h after CPR. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect the changes of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene in mRNA levels between the two groups, i-STAT system 300 was used to analyze pH level, SO2, HCO3- and lactic acid (LAC) concentration; Abbott AXSYM system was used to detect the expression of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in serum; the concentration of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) was examined by a special kit; interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in patients was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effect of UTI combined with CRRT in the early stage of CPR was analyzed. The levels of TLR4, cTnI, TNF-α, IL-6 and MDA in the plasma of patients in both groups were significantly increased (PCRRT group was lower than that in control group (PCRRT group at 3 h, while the pH and SO2 did not change significantly. UTI + CRRT could significantly shorten the average recovery time of consciousness and the average recovery time of consciousness and spontaneous respiration in patients treated with CPR (PCRRT treatment can significantly improve the patient's condition after early CPR.

  2. A method to combine spaceborne radar and radiometric observations of precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchak, Stephen Joseph

    This dissertation describes the development and application of a combined radar-radiometer rainfall retrieval algorithm for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. A retrieval framework based upon optimal estimation theory is proposed wherein three parameters describing the raindrop size distribution (DSD), ice particle size distribution (PSD), and cloud water path (cLWP) are retrieved for each radar profile. The retrieved rainfall rate is found to be strongly sensitive to the a priori constraints in DSD and cLWP; thus, these parameters are tuned to match polarimetric radar estimates of rainfall near Kwajalein, Republic of Marshall Islands. An independent validation against gauge-tuned radar rainfall estimates at Melbourne, FL shows agreement within 2% which exceeds previous algorithms' ability to match rainfall at these two sites. The algorithm is then applied to two years of TRMM data over oceans to determine the sources of DSD variability. Three correlated sets of variables representing storm dynamics, background environment, and cloud microphysics are found to account for approximately 50% of the variability in the absolute and reflectivity-normalized median drop size. Structures of radar reflectivity are also identified and related to drop size, with these relationships being confirmed by ground-based polarimetric radar data from the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME). Regional patterns of DSD and the sources of variability identified herein are also shown to be consistent with previous work documenting regional DSD properties. In particular, mid-latitude regions and tropical regions near land tend to have larger drops for a given reflectivity, whereas the smallest drops are found in the eastern Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone. Due to properties of the DSD and rain water/cloud water partitioning that change with column water vapor, it is shown that increases in water vapor in a global warming scenario could lead to slight (1

  3. Testing the inversion of the Gaia asteroid photometry combined with groundbased observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Ros, T.; Bartczak, P.; Michalowski, T.; Tanga, P.; Cellino, A.

    2014-07-01

    The potential of the sparse photometric data to provide physical information about asteroids has been extensively proven by several authors. Generally, the inversion methods used to derive such parameters are making use of the fact that a simplified version of the asteroids' real shape (triaxial ellipsoid, convex representation) is, in the majority of cases, good enough to describe the asteroid brightness variation due to its rotation for a given period. If the observations are spread over a variety of aspect angles, it is then possible to derive the direction of the asteroid spin axis. The main challenge to be solved when inverting sparse data is the correct determination of the rotation period. One possible approach to solve this issue is to fit an asteroid model on a given period interval (Kaasalainen 2004). Using a convex representation of the asteroid's body shape, some authors have successfully used this technique to solve the inversion problem for a couple of hundreds of asteroids (e.g. Durech et al. 2008 or Hanus et al. 2013). If any ''dense'' lightcurve is available for the object, the interval is reduced to some boundaries around the observed period, saving a lot of computational time and increasing the solution reliability. But unfortunately obtaining full lightcurves of asteroids is a highly time consuming task, thus such observations are actually available only for ˜4,000 asteroids (stored in the Minor Planet Lightcurve Database). It is estimated that the ESA Gaia mission will produce photometric measurements for more than 300,000 asteroids, which means that for the majority of inversion trials the period scanning shall be extended to all the possible period values, namely from 2 to 100 hours. However, the inversion technique specifically developed to invert the Gaia sparse data of asteroids (Cellino et al. 2006), is based on a ''genetic'' algorithm, where the solution of the inversion problem is characterized by the best fit of a set of parameters

  4. Combined observational and modeling based study of the aerosol indirect effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Storelvmo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The indirect effect of aerosols via liquid clouds is investigated by comparing aerosol and cloud characteristics from the Global Climate Model CAM-Oslo to those observed by the MODIS instrument onboard the TERRA and AQUA satellites http://modis.gsfc.nasa.gov. The comparison is carried out for 15 selected regions ranging from remote and clean to densely populated and polluted. For each region, the regression coefficient and correlation coefficient for the following parameters are calculated: Aerosol Optical Depth vs. Liquid Cloud Optical Thickness, Aerosol Optical Depth vs. Liquid Cloud Droplet Effective Radius and Aerosol Optical Depth vs. Cloud Liquid Water Path. Modeled and observed correlation coefficients and regression coefficients are then compared for a 3-year period starting in January 2001. Additionally, global maps for a number of aerosol and cloud parameters crucial for the understanding of the aerosol indirect effect are compared for the same period of time. Significant differences are found between MODIS and CAM-Oslo both in the regional and global comparison. However, both the model and the observations show a positive correlation between Aerosol Optical Depth and Cloud Optical Depth in practically all regions and for all seasons, in agreement with the current understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions. The correlation between Aerosol Optical Depth and Liquid Cloud Droplet Effective Radius is variable both in the model and the observations. However, the model reports the expected negative correlation more often than the MODIS data. Aerosol Optical Depth is overall positively correlated to Cloud Liquid Water Path both in the model and the observations, with a few regional exceptions.

  5. A study of episodic events in the Baltic Sea - combined in situ and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Sagan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A project was developed concerning the operational system of surveillanceand the recording of episodic events in the Baltic Sea.In situ information was to be combined with multi-sensory satelliteimagery to determine the extent of algal blooms, to track their evolutionand that of rapid environmental events like hydrological fronts. The mainelement of the system was an autonomous Ferry Box module on a ferry operatingbetween Gdynia and Karlskrona, automatically measuring temperature,salinity and chlorophyll a fluorescence. At pre-selected locations,discrete water samples were collected, which were subsequently analysedfor their phytoplankton content, and algal hepato- and neurotoxins;they were also used in toxicity tests with Artemia franciscana}.

  6. Combined flatland ST radar and digital-barometer network observations of mesoscale processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, W. L.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Gage, K. S.; Einaudi, F. E.; Rottman, J. W.; Hollinger, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a six-station digital-barometer network centered on the Flatland ST radar to support observational studies of gravity waves and other mesoscale features at the Flatland Atmospheric Observatory in central Illinois. The network's current mode of operation is examined, and a preliminary example of an apparent group of waves evident throughout the network as well as throughout the troposphere is presented. Preliminary results demonstrate the capabilities of the current operational system to study wave convection, wave-front, and other coherent mesoscale interactions and processes throughout the troposphere. Unfiltered traces for the pressure and horizontal zonal wind, for days 351 to 353 UT, 1990, are illustrated.

  7. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  8. Robust Neutrino Constraints by Combining Low Redshift Observations with the CMB

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Beth A; Jimenez, Raul; Mena, Olga

    2010-01-01

    We illustrate how recently improved low-redshift cosmological measurements can tighten constraints on neutrino properties. In particular we examine the impact of the assumed cosmological model on the constraints. We first consider the new HST H0 = 74.2 +/- 3.6 measurement by Riess et al. (2009) and the sigma8*(Omegam/0.25)^0.41 = 0.832 +/- 0.033 constraint from Rozo et al. (2009) derived from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog. In a Lambda CDM model and when combined with WMAP5 constraints, these low-redshift measurements constrain sum mnu<0.4 eV at the 95% confidence level. This bound does not relax when allowing for the running of the spectral index or for primordial tensor perturbations. When adding also Supernovae and BAO constraints, we obtain a 95% upper limit of sum mnu<0.3 eV. We test the sensitivity of the neutrino mass constraint to the assumed expansion history by both allowing a dark energy equation of state parameter w to vary, and by studying a model with coupling between dark energy and dark...

  9. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  10. Intelligent Photovoltaic Systems by Combining the Improved Perturbation Method of Observation and Sun Location Tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Wang

    Full Text Available Currently, tracking in photovoltaic (PV systems suffers from some problems such as high energy consumption, poor anti-interference performance, and large tracking errors. This paper presents a solar PV tracking system on the basis of an improved perturbation and observation method, which maximizes photoelectric conversion efficiency. According to the projection principle, we design a sensor module with a light-intensity-detection module for environmental light-intensity measurement. The effect of environmental factors on the system operation is reduced, and intelligent identification of the weather is realized. This system adopts the discrete-type tracking method to reduce power consumption. A mechanical structure with a level-pitch double-degree-of-freedom is designed, and attitude correction is performed by closed-loop control. A worm-and-gear mechanism is added, and the reliability, stability, and precision of the system are improved. Finally, the perturbation and observation method designed and improved by this study was tested by simulated experiments. The experiments verified that the photoelectric sensor resolution can reach 0.344°, the tracking error is less than 2.5°, the largest improvement in the charge efficiency can reach 44.5%, and the system steadily and reliably works.

  11. Intelligent Photovoltaic Systems by Combining the Improved Perturbation Method of Observation and Sun Location Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajie; Shi, Yunbo; Yu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Currently, tracking in photovoltaic (PV) systems suffers from some problems such as high energy consumption, poor anti-interference performance, and large tracking errors. This paper presents a solar PV tracking system on the basis of an improved perturbation and observation method, which maximizes photoelectric conversion efficiency. According to the projection principle, we design a sensor module with a light-intensity-detection module for environmental light-intensity measurement. The effect of environmental factors on the system operation is reduced, and intelligent identification of the weather is realized. This system adopts the discrete-type tracking method to reduce power consumption. A mechanical structure with a level-pitch double-degree-of-freedom is designed, and attitude correction is performed by closed-loop control. A worm-and-gear mechanism is added, and the reliability, stability, and precision of the system are improved. Finally, the perturbation and observation method designed and improved by this study was tested by simulated experiments. The experiments verified that the photoelectric sensor resolution can reach 0.344°, the tracking error is less than 2.5°, the largest improvement in the charge efficiency can reach 44.5%, and the system steadily and reliably works.

  12. Multiscale River Hydraulic and Water Quality Observations Combining Stationary and Mobile Sensor Network Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, T. C.; Fisher, J. C.; Kaiser, W. J.

    2006-05-01

    Increasing demands on water supplies, non-point source pollution, and water quality-based ecological concerns all point to the need for observing stream flow perturbations and pollutant discharges at higher resolution than was practical in the past. This work presents the results from a test of a rapidly deployable river observational approach consisting of four components: (1) existing geospatial data and federal, state, and private river gauging infrastructure for identifying key river reaches and critical sampling times, (2) human- actuated sensor deployments for broad spatial characterization of the targeted river reach, (3) stationary sensors embedded in the river and its sediments for longer term spatiotemporal observations within the targeted reach, and (4) the robotic Networked Infomechanical System (NIMS RD) for high resolution scanning of spatiotemporal hydraulic and chemical properties at specific points along the reach. The approach is demonstrated for a test bed deployment at the confluence of the Merced and San Joaquin Rivers in Central California. After identifying a suitable reach for the test deployment, a network of on-line gauging stations, accessed through the California Data Exchange Center (CDEC), is used to coordinate the timing of the subsequent three deployment aspects based on flow and river stage forecasts. Kayak-mounted sonar and water quality sensors are used to rapidly survey the test zone bathymetry and basic water quality parameters (temperature, salinity). Results from the rapid survey are then used to guide locations of the sediment- anchored sensor arrays (javelins) which include temperature, water pressure (depth) and water quality sensors distributed vertically at screened intervals. The NIMS RD is comprised of two supporting towers and a suspension cable delivering power and Internet connectivity for controlling and actuating the tram-like NIMS unit. The NIMS unit is capable of raising and lowering a payload of sensors

  13. Improving coastal wave hindcasts by combining offshore buoy observations with global wave models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, S. C.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Guza, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    Waves conditions in southern California are sensitive to offshore wave directions. Due to blocking by coastal islands and refraction across complex bathymetry, a transform incident offshore swell-spectra to shallow water buoy locations. A nearly continuous 10 yr data set of approximately 14 buoys is used. Comparisons include standard bulk parameters (e.g. significant wave height, peak period), the frequency-dependent energy spectrum (needed for run-up estimation) and radiation stress component Sxy (needed for alongshore current and sediment transport estimation). Global wave model uncertainties are unknown, complicating the formulation of optimum assimilation constraints. Several plausible models for estimating offshore waves are tested. Future work includes assimilating nearshore buoy observations, with the long-term objective of accurate regional wave hindcasts using an efficient mix of global wave models and buoys. This work is supported by the California Department of Parks and Recreation, Division of Boating and Waterways Oceanography Program.

  14. Combining Satellite Data and Community-Based Observations for Forest Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Pratihast

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Within the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+ framework, the involvement of local communities in national forest monitoring activities has the potential to enhance monitoring efficiency at lower costs while simultaneously promoting transparency and better forest management. We assessed the consistency of forest monitoring data (mostly activity data related to forest change collected by local experts in the UNESCO Kafa Biosphere Reserve, Ethiopia. Professional ground measurements and high resolution satellite images were used as validation data to assess over 700 forest change observations collected by the local experts. Furthermore, we examined the complementary use of local datasets and remote sensing by assessing spatial, temporal and thematic data quality factors. Based on this complementarity, we propose a framework to integrate local expert monitoring data with satellite-based monitoring data into a National Forest Monitoring System (NFMS in support of REDD+ Measuring, Reporting and Verifying (MRV and near real-time forest change monitoring.

  15. Population prevalence of high dose paracetamol in dispensed paracetamol/opioid prescription combinations: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is generally considered a safe medication, but is associated with hepatotoxicity at doses above doses of 4.0 g/day, and even below this daily dose in certain populations. Methods The Nova Scotia Prescription Monitoring Program (NSPMP) in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia is a legislated organization that collects dispensing information on all out-of-hospital prescription controlled drugs dispensed for all Nova Scotia residents. The NSPMP provided data to track all paracetamol/opioids redeemed by adults in Nova Scotia, from July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2010. Trends in the number of adults dispensed these prescriptions and the numbers of prescriptions and tablets dispensed over this period were determined. The numbers and proportions of adults who filled prescriptions exceeding 4.0 g/day and 3.25 g/day were determined for the one-year period July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010. Data were stratified by sex and age (paracetamol/opioid prescription was lower in each successive one-year period. From July 2009 to June 2010, one in 12 adults (n = 59,197) filled prescriptions for over 13 million paracetamol/opioid tablets. Six percent (n = 3,786) filled prescriptions that exceeded 4.0 g/day and 18.6% (n = 11,008) exceeded 3.25 g/day of paracetamol at least once. These findings exclude non-prescription paracetamol and paracetamol–only prescribed medications. Conclusions A substantial number of individuals who redeem prescriptions for paracetamol/opioid combinations may be at risk of paracetamol-related hepatotoxicity. Healthcare professionals must be vigilant when prescribing and dispensing these medications in order to reduce the associated risks. PMID:22709372

  16. Combining satellite precipitation and long-term ground observations for hydrological monitoring in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuejun; Tang, Qiuhong

    2015-07-01

    Satellite real-time precipitation enables hydrological monitoring in China where the near-real-time ground observations are not readily available. However, the inconsistency between the real-time satellite precipitation and gauge-based retrospective data may introduce large systematic bias in near-real-time hydrological monitoring. Here we attempted to integrate the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) real-time precipitation (3B42RTV7) into a 62 year gauge-based retrospective product, the IGSNRR (Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research) dataset through matching their cumulative probability functions toward a near-real-time hydrological monitoring consistent with the long-term retrospective simulations. A nearly 11 year period from March 2000 to December 2010 was taken as the training period to establish the satellite-gauge precipitation relationship, which was employed in the period of 2011-2013 to evaluate the performance of the adjustment. The results show that the adjusted 3B42RTV7 matches well with IGSNRR precipitation, while the unadjusted data tend to overestimate precipitation. Forced by the adjusted 3B42RTV7, the Variable Infiltration Capacity model can reproduce the IGSNRR-derived hydrographs and high/low flows better than the model forced by the unadjusted data. The percentiles of the adjusted hydrological estimates in the 62 year estimates from IGSNRR are used for near-real-time assessment of hydrological extremes. The hydrological monitoring assisted by the adjusted satellite precipitation, which enables the employment of the long-term ground observations, is able to capture more detailed drought information than that before adjustment. Our experiment suggests that the satellite real-time precipitation, after adjustment, can generate the current hydrological conditions which can be directly compared with the long-term climatology, and thus facilitates near-real-time diagnosis and detection of hydrological extremes.

  17. Manual small incision combined with negative power intraocular lens implantation for cataract with high myopia clinical observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ming Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the clinical effect of manual small incision combined with negative power intraocular lens implantation for cataract with high myopia. METHODS: Totally 75 cases(98 eyeswith super high myopia and cataract which had underwent small incision combined with negative power intraocular lens implantation were studied retrospectively. Preoperative axial length and postoperative visual acuity, refractive diopter and expected deviation value(refractive deviationwere recorded. Eye conditions operation complications and postoperative were observed. The patients were followed-up for 6 to 12 months. RESULTS: The mean preoperative axial length was 32.05±1.78mm. Best corrected visual acuity≥0.2 was in 66 eyes, accounting for 67.3%; ≥0.5 in 43 eyes, accounting for 43.9%; the postoperative refractive error CONCLUSION: The manual small incision cataract extraction combined with negative power intraocular lens implantation for cataract with high myopia is safe, effective method.

  18. Unveiling the structure of galaxy clusters with combined ESO-VLT, WFI, and XMM-Newton observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, H.; Braglia, F.; Pierini, D.; Schuecker, P.; Zhang Yu-Ying; Finoguenov, A.; Pratt, G.W. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Biviano, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Quintana, H. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Lynam, P.D. [ESO (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Understanding the dynamical structure and matter content of galaxy clusters is crucial for many cosmological and astrophysical applications. While optical studies provide information on the distribution and dynamics of the galaxies, allowing for a tentative reconstruction of the cluster mass distribution, X-ray observations provide complementary details through the study of the hot, X-ray luminous intracluster plasma which is confined by the cluster's gravitational potential well. To exploit the advantage of such a combined approach we have been conducting observations with VIMOS at the ESO-VLT, the wide field imager at the 2.2-m MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla, and ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory. In this article we illustrate the power of the combination of these instruments for galaxy cluster studies. (orig.)

  19. [Clinical observation on pricking blood along meridians combined with electroacupuncture for treatment of prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao-Hu; Xie, Xiao-Kun; Liu, Xue-Ni

    2010-12-01

    To observe the therapeutic effects on pricking blood along meridians combined with electroacupuncture for treatment of prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc. One hundred cases were randomly divided into an observation group (50 cases) and a control group (50 cases). The observation group was treated with pricking blood along meridians combined with electroacupuncture. The main points for pricking blood were collaterals with blood stasis around Weizhong (BL 40) on the affected side, and collaterals with blood stasis on corresponding meridians such as Foot Shaoyang Meridian, Foot Taiyang Meridian and Foot Yangming Meridian according to body parts syndrome differentiation could also be used. The points for electroacupuncture included Ashi point (1 cun away from the spinal space of segmental lesions), Dachangshu (BL 25), Guanyuanshu (BL 26), Zhibian (BL 54), Huantiao (GB 30) and so on. The control group was only treated with electroacupuncture and treatment was same as the observation group. The therapeutic effects and scores of Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of two groups were compared. The cured rate of observation group (68.0%, 34/50) was higher than that of control group (46.0%, 23/50, P prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc.

  20. Estimation of the temporal and spatial distribution of dust concentration over China by combining PM10 and conventional meteorological observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fengsheng; Li, Xiaoqing; Gai, Changsong; Gao, Wenhua

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we will present a simple algorithm to estimate the temporal and spatial distribution of dust mass concentration by combining PM10 and conventional meteorological observations. The efficiency of the algorithm has been demonstrated by applying it to analyze the dust source, transport, and dissipation of the dust storm which occurred in the west region of Pa-tan-chi-lin Desert at 0200 BST 27 March, 2004.

  1. Restoration of mandibular continuity defects using combinations of hydroxylapatite and autogenous bone: microscopic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, C M; Eick, J D; Barker, B F; Mosby, E L; Hiatt, W R

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess by light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy the healing of mandibular continuity defects reconstructed with varying ratios of an alloplastic hydroxylapatite implant material (HA) mixed with autogenous bone (AB). This study reports the microscopic observations of implant and control sites at 6 and 18 months postsurgery. The results confirm the biocompatibility of dense HA granules. Specimens exhibited differing degrees of osseous regeneration that appeared related to the percent composition of HA. At 18 months, 86% and 91% of the HA granules were completely surrounded by bone in those specimens reconstructed with implants consisting of 25% and 50% HA, respectively. In contrast, specimens receiving implants consisting of 75% and 100% HA features osseous encapsulation of 75% and 66% of the granules, respectively. The results of this limited study indicate that dense HA granules mixed with AB in ratios ranging from 3:1 to 1:1 (AB:HA) may be successfully used as a bone extender during reconstructive surgery.

  2. On Modeling Regional Total Electron Content and Receiver Differential Code Bias Using Combined GPS/BeiDou Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelazeem, M.; Çelik, R. N.; El-Rabbany, A.

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to develop an effective regional model for vertical total electron content (VTEC) and receiver differential code bias (DCB) estimation based on the GPS-only and the combined GPS/BeiDou observations over Europe. GPS/BeiDou observations from a regional network consisting of 16 reference stations are processed in the zero-differenced mode in order to extract the geometry-free linear combination of the code observations. The bi-linear expansion function is used to model the VTEC and the receiver DCBs. A least-squares (LS) estimation algorithm is developed in order to estimate those parameters for a 15-minute time interval. To validate the proposed model, GPS and BeiDou receiver DCB for three stations are determined and compared with the international global navigation satellite system (GNSS) service multi-GNSS experiment (IGS-MGEX) counterparts in three successive days. The examined stations are selected to represent different latitudes and receiver types. In addition, the estimated VTEC values at those stations are compared with the final IGS global ionospheric map (IGS-GIM) counterparts. The results indicate that the estimated DCB and VTEC values have good agreement with the IGS-MGEX and the IGS-GIM counterparts, respectively, particularly for the combined GPS/BeiDou system.

  3. Estimating the causal effects of chronic disease combinations on 30-day hospital readmissions based on observational Medicaid data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casucci, Sabrina; Lin, Li; Hewner, Sharon; Nikolaev, Alexander

    2017-11-30

    Demonstrate how observational causal inference methods can generate insights into the impact of chronic disease combinations on patients' 30-day hospital readmissions. Causal effect estimation was used to quantify the impact of each risk factor scenario (ie, chronic disease combination) associated with chronic kidney disease and heart failure (HF) for adult Medicaid beneficiaries with initial hospitalizations in 2 New York State counties. The experimental protocol: (1) created matched risk factor and comparator groups, (2) assessed covariate balance in the matched groups, and (3) estimated causal effects and their statistical significance. Causality lattices summarized the impact of chronic disease comorbidities on readmissions. Chronic disease combinations were ordered with respect to their causal impact on readmissions. Of disease combinations associated with HF, the combination of HF, coronary artery disease, and tobacco abuse (in that order) had the highest causal effect on readmission rate (+22.3%); of disease combinations associated with chronic kidney disease, the combination of chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, and diabetes had the highest effect (+9.5%). Multi-hypothesis causal analysis reveals the effects of chronic disease comorbidities on health outcomes. Understanding these effects will guide the development of health care programs that address unique care needs of different patient subpopulations. Additionally, these insights bring new attention to individuals at high risk for readmission based on chronic disease comorbidities, allowing for more personalized attention and prioritization of care. Multi-hypothesis causal analysis, a new methodological tool, generates meaningful insights from health care claims data, guiding the design of care and intervention programs.

  4. Combining laboratory data sets from multiple institutions using the logical observation identifier names and codes (LOINC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baorto, D M; Cimino, J J; Parvin, C A; Kahn, M G

    1998-07-01

    A standard set of names and codes for laboratory test results is critical for any endeavor requiring automated data pooling, including multi-institutional research and cross-facility patient care. This need has led to the development of the logical observation identifier names and codes (LOINC) database and its test-naming convention. This study is an expansion of a pilot study using LOINC to exchange laboratory data between Columbia University Medical Center in New York and Barnes Hospital at Washington University in St. Louis, where we described complexities and ambiguities that arose in the LOINC coding process (D.M. Baorto, J.J. Cimino, C.A. Parvin, M.G. Kahn, Proc. Am. Med. Inf. Assoc. 1997). For the present study, we required the same two medical centers to again extract raw laboratory data from their local information system for a defined patient population, translate tests into LOINC and provide aggregate data which could then be used to compare laboratory utilization. Here we examine a larger number of tests from each site which have been recoded using an updated version of the LOINC database. We conclude that the coding of local tests into LOINC can often be complex, especially the 'Kind of Property' field and apparently trivial differences in choices made by individual institutions can result in nonmatches in electronically pooled data. In the present study, 75% of failures to match the same tests between different institutions using LOINC codes were due to differences in local coding choices. LOINC has the potential to eliminate the need for detailed human inspection during the pooling of laboratory data from diverse sites and perhaps even a built-in capability to adjust matching stringency by selecting subsets of LOINC fields required to match. However, a quality standard coding procedure is required and examples highlighted in this paper may require special attention while mapping to LOINC.

  5. Histomorphological observation of surgical debridement combined with negative pressure therapy in treatment of diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiao-Yun; Song, Fei; Qing, Chun; Lu, Shu-Liang

    2017-08-01

    To further study the mechanism of epithelization on the fascia side of the flap after surgical incision and the treatment of the negative pressure therapy. With the patients' informed consent, parts of tissue samples were obtained from a 51-year-old diabetic patient who was suffering lower extremity ulcers. The samples were processed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and Masson trichrome staining. The keratin 19, keratin 15 and carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) were immunohistochemically detected. The results of HE staining showed that the specimen was divided into two regions, newborn area and original epithelial area. There were more inflammatory cells infiltrating in the dermis in the newborn epithelial area, compared with the original epithelial area. Cells in newborn epithelial area were more active and many dinuclear and polynuclear cells were observed in newborn epithelial area. But there were more cuticular layers and obvious rete pegs in original epithelial area. In addition, the cells with keratin 19 and CEA positive were found around hair follicle, while keratin 15 was negative. Masson trichrome staining showed that there was a lot of de novo collagen in newborn epithelial area. Epidermal cells on the fascia side of the flap could be derived from the stem cells. Negative pressure wound therapy would attract not only cells but also other elements such as growth factors, cytokines, some nutrients and extracellular matrix. With the formation of the appropriate microenvironment after debridement, the migrated cells can grow, differentiate and spread, eventually leading to the epithelization on the fascia side of the flap in diabetic foot. Copyright © 2017. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Investigating Marine Boundary Layer Parameterizations by Combining Observations with Models via State Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delle Monahce, Luca [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Clifton, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hacker, Joshua [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Kosovic, Branko [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Lee, Jared [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Vanderberghe, Francois [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Wu, Yonghui [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Hawkins, Sam [Vattenfall, Solna Municipality (Sweden); Nissen, Jesper [Vattenfall, Solna Municipality (Sweden)

    2015-06-30

    In this project we have improved numerical weather prediction analyses and forecasts of low level winds in the marine boundary layer. This has been accomplished with the following tools; The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Weather and Research Forecasting model, WRF, both in his single column (SCM) and three-dimensional (3D) versions; The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wave Watch III (WWIII); SE algorithms from the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART, Anderson et al. 2009); and Observations of key quantities of the lower MBL, including temperature and winds at multiple levels above the sea surface. The experiments with the WRF SCM / DART system have lead to large improvements with respect to a standard WRF configuration, which is currently commonly used by the wind energy industry. The single column model appears to be a tool particularly suitable for off-shore wind energy applications given its accuracy, the ability to quantify uncertainty, and the minimal computational resource requirements. In situations where the impact of an upwind wind park may be of interest in a downwind location, a 3D approach may be more suitable. We have demonstrated that with the WRF 3D / DART system the accuracy of wind predictions (and other meteorological parameters) can be improved over a 3D computational domain, and not only at specific locations. All the scripting systems developed in this project (i.e., to run WRF SCM / DART, WRF 3D / DART, and the coupling between WRF and WWIII) and the several modifications and upgrades made to the WRF SCM model will be shared with the broader community.

  7. Combining unsaturated and saturated hydraulic observations to understand and estimate groundwater recharge through glacial till

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Mackay, R.; Tellam, J. H.; Thatcher, K. E.

    2010-09-01

    SummaryAlthough there has been much previous research into various aspects of the flow mechanisms through glacial till, an integrated analysis of the flow system from the ground surface to the aquifer is lacking. This paper describes such an approach with reference to a detailed field study of the hydraulic processes controlling groundwater recharge through lodgement till in Shropshire, UK. A fieldsite was instrumented with tensiometers and piezometers at a range of depths through the profile, and the geology investigated in detail through field and laboratory testing. The median matrix hydraulic conductivity of the 6 m thick till is found to be around 2 × 10 -10 m/s on the basis of laboratory measurements. Using the barometric efficiency of the till derived from on-site pressure responses, the specific storage for the till is found to be in the range 2 × 10 -6-6 × 10 -6 m -1 and approximately 3 × 10 -6 m -1 for the underlying Permo-Triassic sandstone, the regional aquifer. The hydraulic data indicate that till water table responses to rainfall occur during the summer period even when large tensions are present higher in the profile. This is thought to be due to preferential flow through hydraulically active fractures in the till, which were observed in a test pit dug on-site. The field evidence indicates that the fractures are usually infilled with a variety of materials derived and transported from clasts within the till. The bulk hydraulic conductivity of the till seems to be greatly enhanced by these features and it is shown on the basis of hydraulic testing and numerical modelling that the bulk hydraulic conductivity of the till is orders of magnitude greater than that of the till matrix and reduces with depth below ground surface. The paper furthers understanding of the hydraulic processes contributing to recharge through till and makes the link between the detail of these processes and simplified models of recharge estimation, which may be needed for

  8. Top-down approach to West Siberian regional carbon budget: combination of the CO2 observations and inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksyutov, S.; Machida, T.; Shimoyama, K.; Carouge, C.; Peregon, A.; Patra, P.; Arshinov, M.; Krasnov, O.; Belan, B.; Fedoseev, N.; Shvidenko, A.; Inoue, G.

    2006-12-01

    Joint Japanese-Russian project is aiming at top-down approach to West Siberian regional carbon budget estimation. Study is combining three main components: regional atmospheric CO2 observing network, regional carbon inventory (bottom-up approach), and inverse model of atmospheric CO2 surface emissions, sinks and transport, that links together CO2 observations and carbon inventories. Airborne air sampling programs and observations are conducted over Siberia since 1993, now at 4 sites. A tower network has been established in West Siberia since 2002 with total of planned 10 tower sites, 6 of them operating in 2005. Bottom-up inventory of the regional carbon pools is based on analysis of the forest/wetland biomass inventories and interannual changes in forest survey totals on eco-region levels. To support the forward and inverse model simulations, detailed soil and vegetation type maps, soil profile and vegetation structure databases were developed. The inverse model of the surface CO2 sources and sinks was used for observation network design and is applied now to the first complete set observational data for year 2005. Preliminary analysis of the multiyear Siberian CO2 observations with inverse model suggest that more carbon sink is needed in Siberia to match the atmospheric data than implied without the regional observations.

  9. Observation of oral acyclovir combined with sodium hyaluronate and fluorometholone eye drops on the treatment of herpes zoster keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Hua Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the effects of oral acyclovir combined with sodium hyaluronate and fluorometholone eye drops on the treatment of herpes zoster keratitis. METHODS:Forty patients with ocular herpes zoster were divided into two groups, 20 cases in the observation group, 20 cases in the control group. Observation group was treated with 200mg oral acyclovir for 5 times a day and sodium hyaluronate eye drops for 4 times a day. When stromal keratitis, disciform keratitis or corneal endotheliitis occurred, fluorometholone was used for 4 times a day. The control group was treated with ganciclovir ophthalmic gel for 4 times a day. The efficacy of two groups was observed, patients were followed up for 3-4wk. RESULTS:The observation group of local pain and photophobia in remission time and corneal damage healing time were better than control group, and there were significant differences(PCONCLUSION: Effects of oral acyclovir combined with sodium hyaluronate and fluorometholone eye drops on the treatment of herpes zoster keratitis are satisfactory.

  10. Management of cardiovascular risk factors with pioglitazone combination therapies in type 2 diabetes: an observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlachogiannis Nikolaos

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D is strongly associated with cardiovascular risk and requires medications that improve glycemic control and other cardiovascular risk factors. The authors aimed to assess the relative effectiveness of pioglitazone (Pio, metformin (Met and any sulfonylurea (SU combinations in non-insulin-treated T2D patients who were failing previous hypoglycemic therapy. Methods Over a 1-year period, two multicenter, open-labeled, controlled, 1-year, prospective, observational studies evaluated patients with T2D (n = 4585 from routine clinical practice in Spain and Greece with the same protocol. Patients were eligible if they had been prescribed Pio + SU, Pio + Met or SU + Met serving as a control cohort, once they had failed with previous therapy. Anthropometric measurements, lipid and glycemic profiles, blood pressure, and the proportions of patients at microvascular and macrovascular risk were assessed. Results All study treatment combinations rendered progressive 6-month and 12-month lipid, glycemic, and blood pressure improvements. Pio combinations, especially Pio + Met, were associated with increases in HDL-cholesterol and decreases in triglycerides and in the atherogenic index of plasma. The proportion of patients at high risk decreased after 12 months in all study cohorts. Minor weight changes (gain or loss and no treatment-related fractures occurred during the study. The safety profile was good and proved similar among treatments, except for more hypoglycemic episodes in patients receiving SU and for the occurrence of edema in patients using Pio combinations. Serious cardiovascular events were rarely reported. Conclusions In patients with T2D failing prior hypoglycemic therapies, Pio combinations with SU or Met (especially Pio + Met improved blood lipid and glycemic profiles, decreasing the proportion of patients with a high microvascular or macrovascular risk. The combination of Pio with SU or Met may therefore

  11. A Method to Combine Signals from Spontaneous Reporting Systems and Observational Healthcare Data to Detect Adverse Drug Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Ryan, Patrick B; Wei, Ying; Friedman, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Observational healthcare data contain information useful for hastening detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) that may be missed by using data in spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) alone. There are only several papers describing methods that integrate evidence from healthcare databases and SRSs. We propose a methodology that combines ADR signals from these two sources. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the proposed method would result in more accurate ADR detection than methods using SRSs or healthcare data alone. We applied the method to four clinically serious ADRs, and evaluated it using three experiments that involve combining an SRS with a single facility small-scale electronic health record (EHR), a larger scale network-based EHR, and a much larger scale healthcare claims database. The evaluation used a reference standard comprising 165 positive and 234 negative drug-ADR pairs. Area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC) was computed to measure performance. There was no improvement in the AUC when the SRS and small-scale HER were combined. The AUC of the combined SRS and large-scale EHR was 0.82 whereas it was 0.76 for each of the individual systems. Similarly, the AUC of the combined SRS and claims system was 0.82 whereas it was 0.76 and 0.78, respectively, for the individual systems. The proposed method resulted in a significant improvement in the accuracy of ADR detection when the resources used for combining had sufficient amounts of data, demonstrating that the method could integrate evidence from multiple sources and serve as a tool in actual pharmacovigilance practice.

  12. Gravity anomalies and lithospheric flexure around the Longmen Shan deduced from combinations of in situ observations and EGM2008 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Yawen; Fu, Guangyu; Wang, Zhuohua; Liu, Tai; Xu, Changyi; Jin, Honglin

    2016-10-01

    The current work describes the combined data of three field campaigns, spanning 2009-2013. Their joint gravity and GPS observations thoroughly cover the sites of lithospheric flexure between the Sichuan Basin and the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The study area's free-air gravity anomalies (FGAs) are updated by using a remove-and-restore algorithm which merges EGM2008 data with in situ observations. These new FGAs show pairs of positive and negative anomalies along the eastern edges of the Tibetan Plateau. The FGAs are used to calculate effective elastic thickness ( T e) and load ratios ( F) of the lithosphere. Admittance analysis indicates the T e of Longmen Shan (LMS) to be 6 km, and profile analysis indicates that the T e of the Sichuan Basin excesses 30 km. The load ratio ( F 1 = 1) confirms that the lithospheric flexure of the LMS area can be attributed solely to the surface load of the crust. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: The current work describes the combined data of three field campaigns, spanning 2009-2013. Their joint gravity and GPS observations thoroughly cover the sites of lithospheric flexure between the Sichuan Basin and the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The study area's free-air gravity anomalies (FGAs) are updated by using a remove-and-restore algorithm which merges EGM2008 data with in situ observations. With the new FGAs data, the lithospheric strength of the study area is studied by the authors, and they also give a combined model to illustrate the uplift mechanism of this area.

  13. The combined geodetic network adjusted on the reference ellipsoid – a comparison of three functional models for GNSS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadaj Roman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The adjustment problem of the so-called combined (hybrid, integrated network created with GNSS vectors and terrestrial observations has been the subject of many theoretical and applied works. The network adjustment in various mathematical spaces was considered: in the Cartesian geocentric system on a reference ellipsoid and on a mapping plane. For practical reasons, it often takes a geodetic coordinate system associated with the reference ellipsoid. In this case, the Cartesian GNSS vectors are converted, for example, into geodesic parameters (azimuth and length on the ellipsoid, but the simple form of converted pseudo-observations are the direct differences of the geodetic coordinates. Unfortunately, such an approach may be essentially distorted by a systematic error resulting from the position error of the GNSS vector, before its projection on the ellipsoid surface. In this paper, an analysis of the impact of this error on the determined measures of geometric ellipsoid elements, including the differences of geodetic coordinates or geodesic parameters is presented. Assuming that the adjustment of a combined network on the ellipsoid shows that the optimal functional approach in relation to the satellite observation, is to create the observational equations directly for the original GNSS Cartesian vector components, writing them directly as a function of the geodetic coordinates (in numerical applications, we use the linearized forms of observational equations with explicitly specified coefficients. While retaining the original character of the Cartesian vector, one avoids any systematic errors that may occur in the conversion of the original GNSS vectors to ellipsoid elements, for example the vector of the geodesic parameters. The problem is theoretically developed and numerically tested. An example of the adjustment of a subnet loaded from the database of reference stations of the ASG-EUPOS system was considered for the preferred functional

  14. [Clinical observation on abdominal cluster-needling combined with sacro-iliac-needling for treatment of chronic pelvic inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jian-Yun; Ou, Lan-Fang; Li, Fu; Chen, Hong; Huang, Chao-Hua

    2005-07-01

    To observe therapeutic effect of abdominal cluster-needling combined with sacro-iliac-needling on chronic pelvic inflammation. One hundred and ten cases of pelvic inflammation were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. The treatment group of 70 cases were treated by abdominal cluster-needling combined with sacro-iliac-needling; the control group of 40 cases were treated by oral administration of Fuyankang tablet. Their therapeutic effects were compared. The cured rate and the total effective rate were 75.7% and 97.1% in the treatment group, and 37.5% and 85.0% in the control group, respectively, with significant difference between the two groups (P sacro-iliac-needling is significantly better than that in the control group for chronic pelvic inflammation.

  15. Observation on the efficacy of Etiasa in combined with mesalazine suppository in the treatment of ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the clinical effect of Etiasa (mesalazine slow-release granules in combined with mesalazine suppository in the treatment of ulcerative colitis and the medication safety. Methods: A total of 82 patients with ulcerative colitis who were admitted in our hospital from June, 2013 to January, 2015 were included in the study and randomized into the observation group (n=42 and the control group (n=40. The patients in the two groups were orally given Etiasa. The patients in the observation group were given additional mesalazine suppository. Medication for 4-6 weeks was regarded as one course. The symptom relieving, the total remission rate of mucosal lesions after one course, the change of DAI 3 and 6 months after treatment, and the serum IL-8 and IL-10 levels before and after treatment in the two groups were compared. Results: The comparison of quantitative scoring of clinical efficacy and DAI before treatment between the two groups was not statistically significant. The above indicators after treatment in the observation group were significantly reduced and the reduced degree was significantly greater than that in the control group. The total effective rate in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group. IL-8 level after treatment in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group, while IL-10 level was significantly higher than that in the control group. The comparison of the occurrence rate of adverse reactions during the treatment process between the two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Etiasa in combined with mesalazine suppository in the treatment of ulcerative colitis can increase the local drug concentration, and correct the imbalance of anti-inflammatory cytokines and proinflammatory cytokines, with a significant efficacy.

  16. Combined technology for observing, understanding and predicting suspended particle transport and fate from anthropogenic discharges in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, E. J.

    2016-02-01

    The combined observation, understanding and prediction of suspended particle transport and fate in coastal waters is essential for assessing environmental stresses that originate from anthropogenic sources. We present a toolbox consisting of an optics-based instrument suite, post-processing and analysis tools, and numerical models for understanding particle transport and fate, and its effect on the marine environment. We show results from a combined measurement and modelling campaign, focussed on understanding the transport of flocculating particulate material discharged into a Norwegian fjord, and demonstrate the application of this approach to real-time monitoring of drilling discharges in the vicinity of coral reefs. Unique measurements and images of suspended particulates, obtained from multiple water column profiles within a fjord, are presented. Initial model predictions of particle transport were used to highlight target areas for the field campaign, where model uncertainty was highest. Regular discharges of flocculating material were released into the fjord, requiring particle observations to span several orders of magnitude in size and concentration. This was achieved by combining data from a LISST-100, LISST-HOLO, and a bespoke Silhouette particle imaging system. Together, these instruments produced size distributions ranging from 2.5-10000microns. In-situ imaging proved essential in providing a realistic picture of the nature of the flocculated material, with many long, string-like flocs of several cm in length being advected hundreds of metres from their discharge location. Observations surrounding the discharge within this fjord system are used to help validate an improved particle transport model aimed at accurately accounting for flocculation, subsequent sedimentation and modifications to seabed bathymetry. The numerical formulation enhanced by this combined measurement and modelling approach is applicable for a wide variety of scenarios where human

  17. Comparative efficacy of irbesartan/ hydrochlorothiazide and valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide combination in lowering blood pressure: a retrospective observational study in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, K A; Habib, J Q; Al-Zakwani, I

    2013-01-01

    To compare blood pressure (BP) control in patients receiving irbesartan/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and valsartan/HCTZ at a tertiary care university hospital in Oman. This was a retrospective observational study, where 232 patients' medical records were reviewed during a 3-month period, July to September 2010, at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Oman. BP readings of the previous 6 months were also retrieved from the electronic medical records. Analyses were conducted using univariate statistical techniques. The mean age of the cohort was 58 ± 11 years (range: 21-88). Sixty-nine (30%) patients were on the irbesartan/HCTZ combination (150/12.5 mg) and 163 (70%) were on the valsartan/HCTZ combination. The patients on the valsartan/HCTZ combination were divided into two subgroups: 117 (72%) received 160/12.5 mg and 46 (28%) 80/12.5 mg. Diabetic patients (43/69, 62%, vs. 61/163, 37%, p < 0.001) and those with diabetic nephropathy (8/69, 12%, vs. 7/163, 4%, p = 0.039) were prescribed more often irbesartan/HCTZ than valsartan/HCTZ. In comparison to the valsartan/HCTZ cohort, the irbesartan/HCTZ group was associated with significant reductions in both systolic BP (SBP; -9 vs. -2 mm Hg; p = 0.021) and diastolic BP (DBP; -5 vs. 0 mm Hg; p = 0.022). BP reductions were noted more in diabetics than nondiabetics with the irbesartan/HCTZ patients associated with significant reductions in both SBP (-12 vs. 5.1 mm Hg; p < 0.001) and DBP (-6.4 vs. 1.9 mm Hg; p = 0.001). The irbesartan/HCTZ combination was associated with significant reductions in both SBP and DBP when compared with the valsartan/HCTZ combination. Specifically, the reductions were noted more in diabetics than nondiabetics. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The efficacy of combining satellite water storage and soil moisture observations as constraints on water balance estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Siyuan; van Dijk, Albert; Renzullo, Luigi; Tregoning, Paul; Walker, Jeffrey; Pauwels, Valentijn

    2016-04-01

    The ability to accurately estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS) and its components (e.g. soil moisture, groundwater, surface water and snow) is of considerable value to water resources assessment. Due to the imperfection of both model predictions and observations, data assimilation methods have been widely applied to hydrological problems for optimal combination of model and observations. Recent studies on the assimilation of TWS data have shown its capability to improve simulated groundwater storages, but the assimilation of TWS only does not guarantee accurate estimation of surface soil moisture (SSM). We investigated the efficiency of data assimilation combining TWS change estimates, derived from temporal changes in Earth's gravity field measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), with SSM, retrieved from emitted microwave radiation at L-band observed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The global World Wide Water (W3) water balance model was used. The specific satellite data products used were the SMOS CATDS level 3 daily SSM product and the JPL mascon monthly GRACE product. Both the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother (EnKS) were implemented to determine the best option for the assimilation of SSM observations only and the joint assimilation of SSM and TWS. The observation models, which map model states into observation space, are the top-layer soil relative wetness and monthly average TWS (i.e. aggregated daily top-, shallow-, deep-layer soil water storage, ground- and surface water storages). Three assimilation experiments were conducted with each method: a) assimilation of SSM data only; b) assimilation of TWS data only; c) joint assimilation of SSM and TWS data. Results were compared against in-situ soil moisture and groundwater observations, and the performance assessed with respect to open-loop results. Results for the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia demonstrate that the assimilation of SSM data only

  19. Combined Flux Observer With Signal Injection Enhancement for Wide Speed Range Sensorless Direct Torque Control of IPMSM Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Andreescu, G.-D.; Pitic, C.I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a motion-sensorless control system using direct torque control with space vector modulation for interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) drives, for wide speed range operation, including standstill. A novel stator flux observer with variable structure uses a combined...... correction depending on estimated torque, is proposed and tested. Extensive simulation results and significant experimental results provided good performance for the proposed IPMSM sensorless system in more than 1:1000 speed range, under full-load operation, from very low speeds (1 r/min experimental) up...... voltage-current model with PI compensator for low-speed operations. As speed increases, the observer switches gradually to a PI compensated closed-loop voltage model, which is solely used at high speeds. High-frequency rotating-voltage injection with a single D-module bandpass vector filter and a phase...

  20. Flare Observations

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    Arnold O. Benz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays beyond 1 GeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, SOHO, and more recently Hinode and SDO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting magnetic reconnection as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s ionosphere. Flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, but every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  1. Flare Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2017-12-01

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays beyond 1 GeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, SOHO, and more recently Hinode and SDO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting magnetic reconnection as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's ionosphere. Flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, but every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  2. Asteroids' physical models from combined dense and sparse photometry and scaling of the YORP effect by the observed obliquity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanuš, J.; Ďurech, J.; Brož, M.; Marciniak, A.; Warner, B. D.; Pilcher, F.; Stephens, R.; Behrend, R.; Carry, B.; Čapek, D.; Antonini, P.; Audejean, M.; Augustesen, K.; Barbotin, E.; Baudouin, P.; Bayol, A.; Bernasconi, L.; Borczyk, W.; Bosch, J.-G.; Brochard, E.; Brunetto, L.; Casulli, S.; Cazenave, A.; Charbonnel, S.; Christophe, B.; Colas, F.; Coloma, J.; Conjat, M.; Cooney, W.; Correira, H.; Cotrez, V.; Coupier, A.; Crippa, R.; Cristofanelli, M.; Dalmas, Ch.; Danavaro, C.; Demeautis, C.; Droege, T.; Durkee, R.; Esseiva, N.; Esteban, M.; Fagas, M.; Farroni, G.; Fauvaud, M.; Fauvaud, S.; Del Freo, F.; Garcia, L.; Geier, S.; Godon, C.; Grangeon, K.; Hamanowa, H.; Hamanowa, H.; Heck, N.; Hellmich, S.; Higgins, D.; Hirsch, R.; Husarik, M.; Itkonen, T.; Jade, O.; Kamiński, K.; Kankiewicz, P.; Klotz, A.; Koff, R. A.; Kryszczyńska, A.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Laffont, A.; Leroy, A.; Lecacheux, J.; Leonie, Y.; Leyrat, C.; Manzini, F.; Martin, A.; Masi, G.; Matter, D.; Michałowski, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Michałowski, T.; Michelet, J.; Michelsen, R.; Morelle, E.; Mottola, S.; Naves, R.; Nomen, J.; Oey, J.; Ogłoza, W.; Oksanen, A.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Pääkkönen, P.; Paiella, M.; Pallares, H.; Paulo, J.; Pavic, M.; Payet, B.; Polińska, M.; Polishook, D.; Poncy, R.; Revaz, Y.; Rinner, C.; Rocca, M.; Roche, A.; Romeuf, D.; Roy, R.; Saguin, H.; Salom, P. A.; Sanchez, S.; Santacana, G.; Santana-Ros, T.; Sareyan, J.-P.; Sobkowiak, K.; Sposetti, S.; Starkey, D.; Stoss, R.; Strajnic, J.; Teng, J.-P.; Trégon, B.; Vagnozzi, A.; Velichko, F. P.; Waelchli, N.; Wagrez, K.; Wücher, H.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The larger number of models of asteroid shapes and their rotational states derived by the lightcurve inversion give us better insight into both the nature of individual objects and the whole asteroid population. With a larger statistical sample we can study the physical properties of asteroid populations, such as main-belt asteroids or individual asteroid families, in more detail. Shape models can also be used in combination with other types of observational data (IR, adaptive optics images, stellar occultations), e.g., to determine sizes and thermal properties. Aims: We use all available photometric data of asteroids to derive their physical models by the lightcurve inversion method and compare the observed pole latitude distributions of all asteroids with known convex shape models with the simulated pole latitude distributions. Methods: We used classical dense photometric lightcurves from several sources (Uppsala Asteroid Photometric Catalogue, Palomar Transient Factory survey, and from individual observers) and sparse-in-time photometry from the U.S. Naval Observatory in Flagstaff, Catalina Sky Survey, and La Palma surveys (IAU codes 689, 703, 950) in the lightcurve inversion method to determine asteroid convex models and their rotational states. We also extended a simple dynamical model for the spin evolution of asteroids used in our previous paper. Results: We present 119 new asteroid models derived from combined dense and sparse-in-time photometry. We discuss the reliability of asteroid shape models derived only from Catalina Sky Survey data (IAU code 703) and present 20 such models. By using different values for a scaling parameter cYORP (corresponds to the magnitude of the YORP momentum) in the dynamical model for the spin evolution and by comparing synthetic and observed pole-latitude distributions, we were able to constrain the typical values of the cYORP parameter as between 0.05 and 0.6. Table 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Evaluation of fixed dose combination of glimepiride and metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results of Russian observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Vladislavovna Zaytseva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim.To investigate the efficacy and safety of combined glimepiride and metformin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM.Materials and methods.A multi-centre, open-label, prospective, observational study was conducted. A total of 1200 patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with metformin, glimepiride or combination of metformin + glimepiride were enrolled. Change in serum glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, and postprandial blood glucose (PPG levels; weight; waist circumference and hypoglycemic episodes were evaluated.Results.Baseline HbA1c levels (8.24% ± 0.42% were significantly reduced after 12 weeks of treatment (7.48% ± 0.48% and at the end of the study(6.88% ± 0.56%. Target HbA1c levels (≤7% were achieved in 65.1% of patients at the final visit at 24 weeks. FPG and PPG levels decreased by 1.45 ± 1.14 mmol/l and 2.17 ± 1.27 mmol/l respectively (p < 0.001. No severe hypoglycemic events were reported. Body mass index reduced by 0.85 ± 1.28 kg/m2 (p < 0.001.Conclusion. Combined glimepiride and metformin therapy significantly improved long-term glycemic control in patients with T2DM during the period of 24 weeks without additional risk of hypoglycemic events or weight gain.

  4. Dexamethasone decreases migraine recurrence observed after treatment with a triptan combined with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krymchantowski Abouch V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Triptans are effective drugs for the acute treatment of migraine. However, 30-40% of the patients commonly present recurrence before 24 hours therefore requiring another dose. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID such as tolfenamic acid and naproxen sodium combined with sumatriptan have demonstrated efficacy in reducing recurrence observed with the single use of this drug. Steroids also have been suggested to treat refractory migraine and status migranosus. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether patients presenting frequent recurrence with the combination triptan plus NSAID, would decrease it with the association of dexamethasone. METHOD: Twenty three patients, 17 women and 6 men with migraine according to IHS criteria were prospectively studied. All patients presented frequent recurrence ( > or = 60%, mean recurrence rate 74,8% with the single use of sumatritpan 100mg or zolmitriptan 2,5mg or rizatriptan 10mg in at least 5 consecutive attacks, and didn't present a reduction of the recurrence rate superior than 20% with the combination of tolfenamic acid 200mg or rofecoxib 25mg in at least 5 other consecutive attacks (mean recurrence rate 60%. The patients had to treat 6 consecutive moderate or severe migraine attacks with their usual combination plus 4mg of dexamathasone with a maximum of twice a week, and fill out a diary reporting headache parameters. RESULTS: Twenty patients, 16 women and 4 men completed the study. Of those who completed the study, 11 took rizatriptan plus rofecoxib, 4 rizatriptan plus tolfenamic acid, 3 zolmitriptan plus rofecoxib, 1 zolmitriptan plus tolfenamic acid and 1 patient took sumatriptan plus tolfenamic acid, having the 20 patients taken as a third medication, a single tablet of 4mg of dexamethasone. All patients took oral formulations and none presented vomiting after that. Among all 20 patients, one female and one male patient presented recurrence in 3 out of the 6

  5. [Observation of curative effect of herpes zoster treated with acupuncture based on syndrome differentiation combined with pricking and cupping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hua

    2011-10-01

    To compare the differences of curative effects of herpes zoster treated with acupuncture based on syndrome differentiation combined with pricking and cupping and simple pricking and cupping. Eighty-six cases were randomly divided into an observation group (43 cases) and a control group (43 cases). In observation group, acupoints selection based on syndrome differentiation i.e. Quchi (LI 11), Zusanli (ST 36), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), etc. were selected and pricking and cupping at affected parts were applied, and the cases were classified into damp heat in liver and gallbladder, damp retention and spleen deficiency, and qi deficiency and blood stasis. In control group, all the cases were simplely treated with pricking and cupping at affected parts. The treatment was given once a day, and seven days were made one session. The curative effect was evaluated after 2 courses, and the follow-up was carried on after 1 month. The cured and markedly effective rate was 93.0% (40/43) in observation group, superior to that of 67.4% (29/43) in control group (P 0.05). The cured and markedly effective rate of damp retention and spleen deficiency: 93.8% (15/16) in observation group, superior to that of 60.0% (9/15) in control group (P cupping therapy is high pertinent and effective, the postherpetic neuralgia can be reduced significantly and the curative effect is superior to that of simple pricking and cupping.

  6. Protocol for a prospective observational study of conventional treatment and traditional Korean medicine combination treatment for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jeong-Eun; Yun, Young-Ju; Shin, Yong-Beom; Kim, Nam-Kwen; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Shin, Myung-Jun; Yu, Sun-Ae

    2016-06-08

    Cerebral palsy leads to many complications as well as delayed motor development, and early intensive rehabilitation in infancy, which is based on the theory of brain plasticity, is emphasized. In addition to conventional treatment, including physical, occupational, or speech-language therapies, children also have a demand for traditional Korean medicine interventions such as acupuncture or herbal medicine; however, a lack of evidence has made traditional Korean medicine difficult to implement in practice. We planned a multicentre, prospective, observational study to assess the effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of conventional treatment and traditional Korean medicine combination treatment for children with cerebral palsy. Three hundred children with cerebral palsy aged 6 to 78 months will be recruited from six institutions. Data from each child are collected every month for a one-year period, during which time treatment might be changed or discontinued. A qualified investigator visits the sites to measure effectiveness variables, including Gross Motor Function Measure and Paediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory. Adverse events and cost-effectiveness variables are collected using surveys conducted at baseline, mid-study, and end of study, as well as monthly tracking surveys. In the analyses, participants will be classified into two groups: group A children will be the conventional treatment group with physical, occupational, speech-language or other conventional rehabilitation therapies, whereas group B children will be the combination treatment group with traditional Korean medicine interventions, that is, herbal medicine, chuna, moxibustion and acupuncture, in addition to conventional treatment. Only a few clinical case reports have evaluated the effectiveness and safety of traditional Korean medicine; therefore, more data are required to provide optimal information to children with cerebral palsy and their guardians. We hypothesized that

  7. A Combined Observational and Modeling Approach to Study Modern Dust Transport from the Patagonia Desert to East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasso, S.; Stein, A.; Marino, F.; Castellano, E.; Udisti, R.; Ceratto, J.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of present atmospheric transport processes from Southern Hemisphere (SH) landmasses to Antarctica can improve the interpretation of stratigraphic data in Antarctic ice cores. In addition, long range transport can deliver key nutrients normally not available to marine ecosystems in the Southern Ocean and may trigger or enhance primary productivity. However, there is a dearth of observational based studies of dust transport in the SH. This work aims to improve current understanding of dust transport in the SH by showing a characterization of two dust events originating in the Patagonia desert (south end of South America). The approach is based on a combined and complementary use of satellite retrievals (detectors MISR, MODIS, GLAS ,POLDER, OMI,), transport model simulation (HYSPLIT) and surface observations near the sources and aerosol measurements in Antarctica (Neumayer and Concordia sites). Satellite imagery and visibility observations confirm dust emission in a stretch of dry lakes along the coast of the Tierra del Fuego (TdF) island (approx.54deg S) and from the shores of the Colihue Huapi lake in Central Patagonia (approx.46deg S) in February 2005. Model simulations initialized by these observations reproduce the timing of an observed increase in dust concentration at the Concordia Station and some of the observed increases in atmospheric aerosol absorption (here used as a dust proxy) in the Neumayer station. The TdF sources were the largest contributors of dust at both sites. The transit times from TdF to the Neumayer and Concordia sites are 6-7 and 9-10 days respectively. Lidar observations and model outputs coincide in placing most of the dust cloud in the boundary layer and suggest significant de- position over the ocean immediately downwind. Boundary layer dust was detected as far as 1800 km from the source and approx.800 km north of the South Georgia Island over the central sub-Antarctic Atlantic Ocean. Although the analysis suggests the

  8. A combined observational and modeling approach to study modern dust transport from the Patagonia desert to East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gassó

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of present atmospheric transport processes from Southern Hemisphere (SH landmasses to Antarctica can improve the interpretation of stratigraphic data in Antarctic ice cores. In addition, long range transport can deliver key nutrients normally not available to marine ecosystems in the Southern Ocean and may trigger or enhance primary productivity. However, there is a dearth of observational based studies of dust transport in the SH.

    This work aims to improve current understanding of dust transport in the SH by showing a characterization of two dust events originating in the Patagonia desert (south end of South America. The approach is based on a combined and complementary use of satellite retrievals (detectors MISR, MODIS, GLAS, POLDER, OMI, transport model simulation (HYSPLIT and surface observations near the sources and aerosol measurements in Antarctica (Neumayer and Concordia sites.

    Satellite imagery and visibility observations confirm dust emission in a stretch of dry lakes along the coast of the Tierra del Fuego (TdF island (~54° S and from the shores of the Colihue Huapi lake in Central Patagonia (~46° S in February 2005. Model simulations initialized by these observations reproduce the timing of an observed increase in dust concentration at the Concordia Station and some of the observed increases in atmospheric aerosol absorption (here used as a dust proxy in the Neumayer station. The TdF sources were the largest contributors of dust at both sites. The transit times from TdF to the Neumayer and Concordia sites are 6–7 and 9–10 days respectively. Lidar observations and model outputs coincide in placing most of the dust cloud in the boundary layer and suggest significant deposition over the ocean immediately downwind. Boundary layer dust was detected as far as 1800 km from the source and ~800 km north of the South Georgia Island over the central sub-Antarctic Atlantic Ocean. Although the analysis

  9. A combined observational and modeling approach to study modern dust transport from the Patagonia desert to East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassó, S.; Stein, A.; Marino, F.; Castellano, E.; Udisti, R.; Ceratto, J.

    2010-09-01

    The understanding of present atmospheric transport processes from Southern Hemisphere (SH) landmasses to Antarctica can improve the interpretation of stratigraphic data in Antarctic ice cores. In addition, long range transport can deliver key nutrients normally not available to marine ecosystems in the Southern Ocean and may trigger or enhance primary productivity. However, there is a dearth of observational based studies of dust transport in the SH. This work aims to improve current understanding of dust transport in the SH by showing a characterization of two dust events originating in the Patagonia desert (south end of South America). The approach is based on a combined and complementary use of satellite retrievals (detectors MISR, MODIS, GLAS, POLDER, OMI), transport model simulation (HYSPLIT) and surface observations near the sources and aerosol measurements in Antarctica (Neumayer and Concordia sites). Satellite imagery and visibility observations confirm dust emission in a stretch of dry lakes along the coast of the Tierra del Fuego (TdF) island (~54° S) and from the shores of the Colihue Huapi lake in Central Patagonia (~46° S) in February 2005. Model simulations initialized by these observations reproduce the timing of an observed increase in dust concentration at the Concordia Station and some of the observed increases in atmospheric aerosol absorption (here used as a dust proxy) in the Neumayer station. The TdF sources were the largest contributors of dust at both sites. The transit times from TdF to the Neumayer and Concordia sites are 6-7 and 9-10 days respectively. Lidar observations and model outputs coincide in placing most of the dust cloud in the boundary layer and suggest significant deposition over the ocean immediately downwind. Boundary layer dust was detected as far as 1800 km from the source and ~800 km north of the South Georgia Island over the central sub-Antarctic Atlantic Ocean. Although the analysis suggests the presence of dust at

  10. LOW FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER CANDIDATES ESTIMATED FROM A COMBINATION OF SPITZER AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Brown, Timothy M. [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Latham, David W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bryson, Stephen T.; Borucki, William J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Seager, Sara, E-mail: desert@colorado.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02159 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  11. A robust observer based on H∞ filtering with parameter uncertainties combined with Neural Networks for estimation of vehicle roll angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, Beatriz L.; Boada, Maria Jesus L.; Vargas-Melendez, Leandro; Diaz, Vicente

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, one of the main objectives in road transport is to decrease the number of accident victims. Rollover accidents caused nearly 33% of all deaths from passenger vehicle crashes. Roll Stability Control (RSC) systems prevent vehicles from untripped rollover accidents. The lateral load transfer is the main parameter which is taken into account in the RSC systems. This parameter is related to the roll angle, which can be directly measured from a dual-antenna GPS. Nevertheless, this is a costly technique. For this reason, roll angle has to be estimated. In this paper, a novel observer based on H∞ filtering in combination with a neural network (NN) for the vehicle roll angle estimation is proposed. The design of this observer is based on four main criteria: to use a simplified vehicle model, to use signals of sensors which are installed onboard in current vehicles, to consider the inaccuracy in the system model and to attenuate the effect of the external disturbances. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer.

  12. Clinical observation of corneal lamellar debridement combined with sutureless amniotic membrane transplantation for the treatment of superficial fungal keratitis

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    Huang Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the clinical efficacy of corneal lamellar debridement combined with sutureless amniotic membrane transplantation for the treatment of superficial fungal keratitis.METHODS:Totally 22 cases(22 eyeswith superficial fungal keratitis were referred to our hospital from April 2012 to October 2013. The patients with persistent cornea ulcer after treatment of local and systemic antifungal drugs underwent corneal lamellar debridement combined with sutureless amniotic membrane transplantation, and the recipient bed was covered with an amniotic membrane using fibrin sealant during the operation. All patients were still given topical antifungal therapy for 1-2mo after operation. The followed-up time was 3mo or above. We observed the corneal healing and amniotic membrane adhesion by split lamp microscope, and investigated the transformation of amniotic membrane and fungal infection recurrence with confocal microscope. RESULTS: Corneal edema and anterior chamber reaction of 21 patients disappeared gradually, and no amniotic membrane graft dissolved and shed off within 1-2wk postoperatively. Two weeks after operation, the graft integrated into the corneal and the corneal wounds' thickness increased gradually, the corneal epithelium reconstructed and corneas became clear. Four weeks after operation, the corneal scarring developed gradually and fluorescence staining was negative. Nineteen cases' amniotic membranes that adhered with the cornea dissolved 4wk after operation. There were different degrees of corneal nebula or macula remained 3mo postoperatively. All patients' vision improved in varying degrees, except in 1 case with fungal keratitis who had been cured by lamellar keratoplasty.CONCLUSION:Corneal lamellar debridement combined with sutureless amniotic membrane transplantation can effectively remove the foci of inflammation, improve the local efficacy, shorten the operation time, relieve the postoperative reaction, and promote cornea

  13. [Observation on therapeutic effect of acupoint catgut-embedding combined western medicine for epilepsy of generalized seizures type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhong-nan; Gao, Zhi-guo; Zhang, Guang-wu; Wang, Shi-biao

    2011-06-01

    To compare the efficacy differences between acupoint catgut-embedding combined western medicine (ACCWM) and simple western medicine (WM) for treatment of epilepsy of generalized seizures type. Fifty-two patients with epilepsy of generalized seizures type were randomly divided into an ACCWM group (n=30) and a WM group (n=22). Dazhui (GV 14), Yaoshu (GV 2), Jiuwei (CV 15), Qihai (CV 6) were selected in the ACCWM group as the main acupoints combined with routine antiepileptic drugs, Valpromide was taken orally, 2.0 g/d for adult, 50 mg/kg x d for child. The WM group was treated with routine antiepileptic drugs. The epilepsy score and the attack frequency one year before the treatment and one year during treatment were observed and the therapeutic effects in the two groups were compared. The epilepsy score and the attack frequency were both decreased in the two groups (Pepilepsy score in the ACCWM group decreased significantly (6.57 +/- 3.29 vs 10.73 +/- 2.54, Pepilepsy of generalized seizures type. It can improve significantly the attack symptoms so as to enhance life quality of the patients with epilepsy.

  14. Extension of the SIM Hydrometeorological Reanalysis Over the Entire 20th Century by Combination of Observations and Statistical Downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minvielle, M.; Céron, J.; Page, C.

    2013-12-01

    The SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM) system is a combination of three different components: an atmospheric analysis system (SAFRAN) providing the atmospheric forcing for a land surface model (ISBA) that computes surface water and energy budgets and a hydrological model (MODCOU) that provides river flows and level of several aquifers. The variables generated by the SIM chain constitute the SIM reanalysis and the current version only covers the 1958-2012 period. However, long climate datasets are required for evaluation and verification of climate hindcasts/forecasts and to isolate the contribution of natural decadal variability from that of anthropogenic forcing to climate variations. The aim of this work is to extend of the fine-mesh SIM reanalysis to the entire 20th century, especially focusing on temperature and rainfall over France, but also soil wetness and river flows. This extension will first allow a detailed investigation of the influence of decadal variability on France at very fine spatial scales and will provide crucial information for climate model evaluation. Before 1958, the density of available observations from Météo-France necessary to force SAFRAN (rainfall, snow, wind, temperature, humidity, cloudiness) is much lower than today, and not sufficient to produce a correct SIM reanalysis. That's why is has been decided to use the available atmospheric observations over the past decades combined to a statistical downscaling algorithm to overcome the lack of observations. The DSCLIM software package implemented by the CERFACS and using a weather typing based statistical methodology will be used as statistical downscaling method to reconstruct the atmospheric variables necessary to force the ISBA-MODCOU hydrological component. The first stage of this work was to estimate and compare the bias and strengths of the two approaches in their ability to reconstruct the past decades. In this sense, SIM hydro-meteorological experiments were performed for some recent

  15. Combining Observations of a Digital Camera Network, Satellite Remote Sensing, and Micrometeorology for Improved Understanding of Forest Phenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, B. H.; Richardson, A. D.; Ollinger, S. V.; Friedl, M. A.; Hollinger, D. Y.

    2009-04-01

    The observed phenological behavior of terrestrial ecosystems is a result of the seasonality of climatic forcing superposed with physical and biological responses of the plant-soil system. Biogeochemical models that represent rapid time scale phenomena well tend to simulate interannual variability and trends in productivity more accurately when phenology is prescribed, suggesting a gap in our understanding of the underlying processes or a generic means to represent their emergent behavior. Specifically, questions surround environmental triggers of leaf turnover, the relative importance of internal nutrient cycling, and the potential for generalization across broadly defined biome types. Satellite observations provide a spatially comprehensive record of the seasonality of land vegetation characteristics, but are most valuable when combined with direct measurements of ecosystem state. Time series of meteorology and fluxes (e.g. from eddy covariance tower sites) are one such data source, providing a valuable means to estimate productivity, but not a view of the state of the vegetation canopy. We have begun to assemble a network of digital cameras ('webcams') by deploying camera systems at existing research sites, and by harvesting imagery from collaborating sites and institutions. There are currently 80 cameras in the network, 17 of which are 'core' locations that are located at flux towers or field stations. We process and analyze the camera imagery as remote sensing data, utilizing the red, green, and blue, channels as a means to stratify the scenes and quantify relative vegetation 'greenness'. Our initial analyses have shown that these images do yield hourly-to-daily information about the seasonal cycle of vegetation state as compared both to fluxes and satellite indices. This presentation will summarize the current findings of the project, specifically focusing on (a) insights into controls on interannual variability at sites with long records (2000-present), and

  16. [Kuntai capsule combined with gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist in treatment of moderate-severe endometriosis: a clinical observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Qing; Qin, Zi-Xin; Jiang, Fang-Fang; Hong, Ting; Wang, Feng

    2014-11-01

    To observe the effect of Kuntai Capsule (KC), a Chinese patent medicine, in add-back therapy for gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) treatment for moderate-severe endometriosis (EM). Totally 100 patients suffering from stage III/IV EM, who were confirmed by laparoscopic surgery were randomly assigned to the GnRH-a group (A) and the KC combined GnRH-a group (B), 50 in each group. Patients in Group A were hypodermically injected with goserelin (3.6 mg), once per 4 weeks. Those in Group B additionally took KC, 4 pills each time, three times per day. The therapeutic course for all was 12 weeks. Serum levels of estradiol (E2), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), bone gamma-carboxyglutamic-acid-containing proteins (BGP) were measured respectively. Kupperman Menopausal Index (KMI) and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar vertebra were also compared between the two groups. Serum levels of E2 and FSH both significantly decreased in the two groups at week 12 of the treatment (P KMI increased in the two groups (P 0.05). Serum BGP increased after 12-week treatment (P KMI between the two groups (P > 0.05). As for the incidence of menopausal symptoms, better effects in improving symptoms such as hot flashes, sleep disorders, and vaginal dryness were obtained in Group B than in Group A (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the post-pre-treatment difference of BMI between the two groups, but with statistical post-pre-treatment difference in the BGP level (P < 0.05). HKC combined GnRH-a could effectively reduce GnRH-a treatment induced partial low estrogen symptoms, improve increased serum BGP levels after GnRH-a therapy.

  17. Evidence for a Magnetic Flux Rope in Observations of a Solar Prominence-Cavity System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R. Jibben

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Coronal cavities are regions of low coronal emission that usually sit above solar prominences. These systems can exist for days or months before erupting. The magnetic structure of the prominence-cavity system during the quiescent period is important to understanding the pre-eruption phase. We describe observations of a coronal cavity situated above a solar prominence observed on the western limb as part of an Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS and Hinode coordinated Observation Program (IHOP 264. During the observation run, an inflow of hot plasma observed by the Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT envelopes the coronal cavity and triggers an eruption of chromospheric plasma near the base of the prominence. During and after the eruption, bright X-ray emission forms within the cavity and above the prominence. IRIS and the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS show strong blue shifts in both chromospheric and coronal lines during the eruption. The Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT Ca II H-line data show bright emission during the ejection with complex, turbulent, flows near the prominence and along the cavity wall. These observations suggest a cylindrical flux rope best represents the cavity structure with the ejected material flowing along magnetic field lines supporting the cavity. We also find evidence for heating of the plasma inside the cavity after the flows. A model of the magnetic structure of the cavity comprised of a weakly twisted flux rope can explain the observed loops in the X-ray and EUV data. Observations from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP are compared to predicted models and are inconclusive. We find that more sensitive measurements of the magnetic field strength along the line-of-sight are needed to verify this configuration.

  18. Cloud Structure of Galactic OB Cluster-forming Regions from Combining Ground- and Space-based Bolometric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuxin; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Li, Di; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Pineda, Jaime E.; Qian, Lei; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; McLeod, Anna Faye; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dale, James E.; Immer, Katharina; Koch, Eric; Longmore, Steve; Walker, Daniel; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground-based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, and IRAM-30 m) and space telescopes (Herschel and Planck). For the seven luminous (L\\gt {10}6 L ⊙) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, and G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified blackbody fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The ˜10″ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3 kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed ˜10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (I.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations). In particular, the massive molecular gas clumps located at the center of G10.6-0.4 and

  19. Evaluation of regional climate model simulations versus gridded observed and regional reanalysis products using a combined weighting scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Hyung-Il; Laprise, Rene [University of Quebec at Montreal, ESCER (Etude et Simulation du Climat a l' Echelle Regionale), Montreal, QC (Canada); Gachon, Philippe [University of Quebec at Montreal, ESCER (Etude et Simulation du Climat a l' Echelle Regionale), Montreal, QC (Canada); Environment Canada, Adaptation and Impacts Research Section, Climate Research Division, Montreal, QC (Canada); Ouarda, Taha [University of Quebec, INRS-ETE (Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre Eau-Terre-Environnement), Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2012-04-15

    This study presents a combined weighting scheme which contains five attributes that reflect accuracy of climate data, i.e. short-term (daily), mid-term (annual), and long-term (decadal) timescales, as well as spatial pattern, and extreme values, as simulated from Regional Climate Models (RCMs) with respect to observed and regional reanalysis products. Southern areas of Quebec and Ontario provinces in Canada are used for the study area. Three series of simulation from two different versions of the Canadian RCM (CRCM4.1.1, and CRCM4.2.3) are employed over 23 years from 1979 to 2001, driven by both NCEP and ERA40 global reanalysis products. One series of regional reanalysis dataset (i.e. NARR) over North America is also used as reference for comparison and validation purpose, as well as gridded historical observed daily data of precipitation and temperatures, both series have been beforehand interpolated on the CRCM 45-km grid resolution. Monthly weighting factors are calculated and then combined into four seasons to reflect seasonal variability of climate data accuracy. In addition, this study generates weight averaged references (WARs) with different weighting factors and ensemble size as new reference climate data set. The simulation results indicate that the NARR is in general superior to the CRCM simulated precipitation values, but the CRCM4.1.1 provides the highest weighting factors during the winter season. For minimum and maximum temperature, both the CRCM4.1.1 and the NARR products provide the highest weighting factors, respectively. The NARR provides more accurate short- and mid-term climate data, but the two versions of the CRCM provide more precise long-term data, spatial pattern and extreme events. Or study confirms also that the global reanalysis data (i.e. NCEP vs. ERA40) used as boundary conditions in the CRCM runs has non-negligible effects on the accuracy of CRCM simulated precipitation and temperature values. In addition, this study demonstrates

  20. Mean and Seasonal Circulation of the South Indian Ocean Estimated by Combining Satellite Altimetry and Surface Drifter Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Peter Benny

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mean velocity field of south Indian Ocean has been derived by combining high resolution maps of sea level anomalies and the surface drifter data from the Global Drifter program from 1993 to 2012 with a resolution of 1/3 ¡_ 1/3 degrees in latitude and longitude. The estimated mean velocity field exhibits strong western boundary currents, zonal currents and eastern boundary currents. The Agulhas Current shows a velocity of above 1.5 m s-1 at around 35¢XS. The distribution of energy associated with the fluctuating motion and the mean flow illustrates that mesoscale variability are particularly relevant in the Mozambique Channel, south of Java and around 40¢XS. Advection of mesoscale features along the western boundary is evident in the distribution of eddy fluxes. The long-term average monthly surface velocity field exhibits large variations in surface currents. The most change is observed in the South Equatorial Current which shows spatial and temporal variations.

  1. Combining hydraulic model, hydrogeomorphological observations and chemical analyses of surface waters to improve knowledge on karst flash floods genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Raynaud

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During a flood event over a karst watershed, the connections between surface and ground waters appear to be complex ones. The karst may attenuate surface floods by absorbing water or contribute to the surface flood by direct contribution of karst waters in the rivers (perennial and overflowing springs and by diffuse resurgence along the hillslopes. If it is possible to monitor each known outlet of a karst system, the diffuse contribution is yet difficult to assess. Furthermore, all these connections vary over time according to several factors such as the water content of the soil and underground, the rainfall characteristics, the runoff pathways. Therefore, the contribution of each compartment is generally difficult to assess, and flood dynamics are not fully understood. To face these misunderstandings and difficulties, we analysed surface waters during six recent flood events in the Lirou watershed (a karst tributary of the Lez, in South of France. Because of the specific chemical signature of karst waters, chemical analyses can supply information about water pathways and flood dynamics. Then, we used the dilution law to combine chemical results, flow data and field observations to assess the dynamics of the karst component of the flood. To end, we discussed the surface or karst origin of the waters responsible for the apparent runoff coefficient rise during flash karst flood.

  2. [Clinical Observation of Heat-sensitive Moxibustion Combined with Kegel Exercise Therapy for Female Stress Urinary Incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dan; Deng, Peng; Jiao, Lin; Xiong, Jun; Xie, Ding-Yi; Chen, Ri-Xin

    2017-08-25

    To compare the clinical effects of heat-sensitive moxibustion combined with kegel exercise therapy and simple kegel exercise therapy on female stress urinary incontinence. Forty-five female patients with stress urinary incontinence were randomly divided into a treatment group ( n =23) and a control group ( n =22). Kegel exercise therapy was applied in the two groups. Heat-sensitive moxibustion was used at Zhongji (CV 3), Qihai (CV 6), Ciliao (BL 32) and Shen-shu (BL 23) in the treatment group, once a day for the first 10 times, and once every other day until 5 sessions were given, 10 times as one session. 1-hour pad test, International Incontinence Advisory Board questionnaire (ICIQ-SF) and the number of urine leakage were observed before and after treatment. And the clinical effect was evaluated. The curative rate of 43.48%(10/23) and the total effective rate of 95.65%(22/23) in the treatment group were respectively better than those of 18.18% (4/22) and 63.64%(14/22) in the control group (both P kegel exercise therapy achieves better effect than simple kegel exercise therapy on female stress urinary incontinence.

  3. Combining earth observations, gis data and eco-hydrological modelling for predicting carbon budgets and water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boegh, E.; Butts, M.; Hansen, S.; Soegaard, H.; Hasager, C. B.; Pilegaard, K.; Haastrup, M.; Henriksen, H. J.; Jensen, N. O.; Kristensen, M.

    2003-04-01

    Remote sensing data, GIS data and an eco-hydrological model (Daisy) are coupled within the project EO-FLUX-BUDGET for the prediction of CO2 budgets and water balance at Zealand which is the major island of Denmark (covering approximately 7.000 km2). In order to catch the surface heterogeneity shaped by the large variety of small fields, a high-resolution (30 m) land surface map is produced from satellite observations and validated using GIS data and national statistics on agricultural land use. GIS information on the housing density of built-up areas was superimposed on the land use map to facilitate the implementation of engineering methods for assessment of surface runoff in these regions. A geological soil map is combined with soil texture data registered in 5439 locations to construct a 3-layer GIS based soil map. The ground water depth is represented by the 10 year average water head elevation which is simulated by a distributed hydrological model (MIKE SHE). The Daisy model is run using grid based meteorological data and the results are evaluated by comparing with eddy covariance atmospheric fluxes recorded in agricultural, forest and urban regions. Temporal maps of vegetation properties are produced using multi-scale remote sensing data (Landsat TM, Terra-MODIS and SPOT-VEGETATION) and used to adjust the simulated leaf area indices. The initial result shows that the model efficiency is improved by the implementation of satellite data.

  4. [Clinical observation on therapeutic effect of cupping combined with acupuncture stimulation at trigger points for lumbar myofascial pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong

    2014-08-01

    To observe the clinical effect of cupping combined with acupuncture stimulation of trigger points on lumbar myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Sixty MPS patients were randomly divided into acupuncture + TDP group (n = 30), and cupping + acupuncture group (n = 30). Patients in the acupuncture + TDP group were treated by acupuncture stimulation of trigger points and local TDP irradiation, and patients of the cupping + acupuncture group treated by intensive cupping applied to the myofascial band and acupuncture stimulation of the locus according to the position of muscular tension band. The therapeutic effects were assessed according to the score of the McGill pain questionnaire composing of pain rating index (PRI), visual analogue scale (VAS) and present pain intensity (PPI) before, immediately and 1 month after the treatment. After the treatment, the total effective rates of the acupuncture+ TDP and cupping + acupuncture groups were 83.3% (25/30) and 96.6% (29/30), respectively, without significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). One month's follow-up showed that the total effective rates of the acupuncture + TDP and cupping + acupuncture groups were 40.0% and 90.0% respectively, and the latter group was significantly better than the acupuncture + TDP group in the therapeutic effect (P cupping + acupuncture group were obviously lower than those of the acupuncture group (P cupping plus acupuncture can effectively relieve pain in MPS patients, while the therapeutic effect of cupping plus acupuncture treatment lasts longer analgesic effect.

  5. How to fragment peralkaline rhyolites: Observations on pumice using combined multi-scale 2D and 3D imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ery C.; Neave, David A.; Dobson, Katherine J.; Withers, Philip J.; Edmonds, Marie

    2017-04-01

    Peralkaline rhyolites are volatile-rich magmas that typically erupt in continental rift settings. The high alkali and halogen content of these magmas results in viscosities two to three orders of magnitude lower than in calc-alkaline rhyolites. Unless extensive microlite crystallisation occurs, the calculated strain rates required for fragmentation are unrealistically high, yet peralkaline pumices from explosive eruptions of varying scales are commonly microlite-free. Here we present a combined 2D scanning electron microscopy and 3D X-ray microtomography study of peralkaline rhyolite vesicle textures designed to investigate fragmentation processes. Microlite-free peralkaline pumice textures from Pantelleria, Italy, strongly resemble those from calc-alkaline rhyolites on both macro and micro scales. These textures imply that the pumices fragmented in a brittle fashion and that their peralkaline chemistry had little direct effect on textural evolution during bubble nucleation and growth. We suggest that the observed pumice textures evolved in response to high decompression rates and that peralkaline rhyolite magmas can fragment when strain localisation and high bubble overpressures develop during rapid ascent.

  6. Routine delivery of artemisinin-based combination treatment at fixed health facilities reduces malaria prevalence in Tanzania: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatib Rashid A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT has been promoted as a means to reduce malaria transmission due to their ability to kill both asexual blood stages of malaria parasites, which sustain infections over long periods and the immature derived sexual stages responsible for infecting mosquitoes and onward transmission. Early studies reported a temporal association between ACT introduction and reduced malaria transmission in a number of ecological settings. However, these reports have come from areas with low to moderate malaria transmission, been confounded by the presence of other interventions or environmental changes that may have reduced malaria transmission, and have not included a comparison group without ACT. This report presents results from the first large-scale observational study to assess the impact of case management with ACT on population-level measures of malaria endemicity in an area with intense transmission where the benefits of effective infection clearance might be compromised by frequent and repeated re-infection. Methods A pre-post observational study with a non-randomized comparison group was conducted at two sites in Tanzania. Both sites used sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP monotherapy as a first-line anti-malarial from mid-2001 through 2002. In 2003, the ACT, artesunate (AS co-administered with SP (AS + SP, was introduced in all fixed health facilities in the intervention site, including both public and registered non-governmental facilities. Population-level prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum asexual parasitaemia and gametocytaemia were assessed using light microscopy from samples collected during representative household surveys in 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005 and 2006. Findings Among 37,309 observations included in the analysis, annual asexual parasitaemia prevalence in persons of all ages ranged from 11% to 28% and gametocytaemia prevalence ranged from Interpretation The introduction of ACT at

  7. Estimating radar reflectivity - snowfall rate relationships and their uncertainties over Antarctica by combining disdrometer and radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souverijns, Niels; Gossart, Alexandra; Lhermitte, Stef; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Kneifel, Stefan; Maahn, Maximilian; Bliven, Francis; van Lipzig, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    The Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) is the largest ice body on earth, having a volume equivalent to 58.3 m global mean sea level rise. Precipitation is the dominant source term in the surface mass balance of the AIS. However, this quantity is not well constrained in both models and observations. Direct observations over the AIS are also not coherent, as they are sparse in space and time and acquisition techniques differ. As a result, precipitation observations stay mostly limited to continent-wide averages based on satellite radar observations. Snowfall rate (SR) at high temporal resolution can be derived from the ground-based radar effective reflectivity factor (Z) using information about snow particle size and shape. Here we present reflectivity snowfall rate relations (Z = aSRb) for the East Antarctic escarpment region using the measurements at the Princess Elisabeth (PE) station and an overview of their uncertainties. A novel technique is developed by combining an optical disdrometer (NASA's Precipitation Imaging Package; PIP) and a vertically pointing 24 GHz FMCW micro rain radar (Metek's MRR) in order to reduce the uncertainty in SR estimates. PIP is used to obtain information about snow particle characteristics and to get an estimate of Z, SR and the Z-SR relation. For PE, located 173 km inland, the relation equals Z = 18SR1.1. The prefactor (a) of the relation is sensitive to the median diameter of the particles. Larger particles, found closer to the coast, lead to an increase of the value of the prefactor. More inland locations, where smaller snow particles are found, obtain lower values for the prefactor. The exponent of the Z-SR relation (b) is insensitive to the median diameter of the snow particles. This dependence of the prefactor of the Z-SR relation to the particle size needs to be taken into account when converting radar reflectivities to snowfall rates over Antarctica. The uncertainty on the Z-SR relations is quantified using a bootstrapping approach

  8. The tolerability of a combined hepatitis A and typhoid vaccine in children aged 2-16 years: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Colleen L; Streeton, Catherine L; David, Michael C; Sly, Peter D; Mills, Deborah J

    2016-02-01

    Combined hepatitis A and typhoid vaccines have been widely used globally and proven to be safe, well tolerated and efficacious in adults. The combined hepatitis A and typhoid vaccine (Vivaxim) available in Australia is licenced for use from age 16 years but the monovalent components are approved for use from age 2 years. Advantages of a single injection have led to widespread 'off-label' use of Vivaxim in children. This study aimed to investigate the tolerability of Vivaxim in children aged 2-16 years. A prospective observational study was conducted at Travel Medicine Alliance clinics across Australia. Children who required vaccination for both hepatitis A and typhoid were offered the option of receiving Vivaxim. Parents were contacted 3 days post-vaccination and asked to respond to a questionnaire on adverse events following immunization (AEFIs). Reactions to Vivaxim were compared with reported reactions to the monovalent vaccines. Our study included 425 children who received Vivaxim, including 189 (44.5%) who received other vaccines on the same day. No serious AEFIs were reported, and 26.8% did not experience any side effects. In children who did not receive other vaccines in the same arm as Vivaxim (n = 325), most common local reactions were sore arm (70.5%), redness (16.0%) and swelling (11.1%). Reports of local AEFIs in our subjects was significantly more common than those reported for the individual monovalent vaccines. In children who did not receive other vaccines on the same day (n = 236), the most common systemic reactions were tiredness/lethargy/malaise (5.9%), headache (4.2%), fever (3.4%) and sore muscles and joints (3.4%). Fever was more common in children aged <6 years. Less than 5% of children reported missing school, sport or other regular activities. Vivaxim was well tolerated in children aged 2-16 years. Parents should be advised about AEFIs to Vivaxim so that they can make informed decisions about vaccination options. © International

  9. Cloud Structure of Three Galactic Infrared Dark Star-forming Regions from Combining Ground- and Space-based Bolometric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuxin; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Dale, James E.; Li, Di; Busquet, Gemma; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Kovács, Attila; Koch, Eric; Qian, Lei; Wang, Ke; Longmore, Steve; Chen, Huei-Ru; Walker, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    We have modified the iterative procedure introduced by Lin et al., to systematically combine the submillimeter images taken from ground-based (e.g., CSO, JCMT, APEX) and space (e.g., Herschel, Planck) telescopes. We applied the updated procedure to observations of three well-studied Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs): G11.11-0.12, G14.225-0.506, and G28.34+0.06, and then performed single-component, modified blackbody fits to each pixel to derive ˜10″ resolution dust temperature and column density maps. The derived column density maps show that these three IRDCs exhibit complex filamentary structures embedded with rich clumps/cores. We compared the column density probability distribution functions (N-PDFs) and two-point correlation (2PT) functions of the column density field between these IRDCs with several OB-cluster-forming regions. Based on the observed correlation between the luminosity-to-mass ratio and the power-law index of the N-PDF, and complementary hydrodynamical simulations for a 104 {M}⊙ molecular cloud, we hypothesize that cloud evolution can be better characterized by the evolution of the (column) density distribution function and the relative power of dense structures as a function of spatial scales, rather than merely based on the presence of star-forming activity. An important component of our approach is to provide a model-independent quantification of cloud evolution. Based on the small analyzed sample, we propose four evolutionary stages, namely, cloud integration, stellar assembly, cloud pre-dispersal, and dispersed cloud. The initial cloud integration stage and the final dispersed cloud stage may be distinguished from the two intermediate stages by a steeper than -4 power-law index of the N-PDF. The cloud integration stage and the subsequent stellar assembly stage are further distinguished from each other by the larger luminosity-to-mass ratio (>40 {L}⊙ /{M}⊙ ) of the latter. A future large survey of molecular clouds with high angular

  10. How to fragment peralkaline rhyolites: Observations on pumice using combined multi-scale 2D and 3D imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, EC; Neave, DA; Dobson, KJ; Withers, PJ; Edmonds, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Peralkaline rhyolites are volatile-rich magmas that typically erupt in continental rift settings. The high alkali and halogen content of these magmas results in viscosities two to three orders of magnitude lower than in calc-alkaline rhyolites. Unless extensive microlite crystallisation occurs, the calculated strain rates required for fragmentation are unrealistically high, yet peralkaline pumices from explosive eruptions of varying scales are commonly microlite-free. Here we present a combin...

  11. Observation of Serum Bactericidal Activity of Brucella abortus RB51 OMPs Combined with Brucella abortus RB51 Live Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahime Gholizadeh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: vaccination is vital against brucellosis. Although current vaccines have low efficiency, some cell wall compartments such as Outer Membrane Proteins could be used as an immunogenic candidate in vaccine development. By this mean, our aim in this study was to evaluate the humoral immunity of the combination of Brucella abortus RB51 OMPs with the Brucella abortus RB51 live attenuated vaccine, by Serum Bactericidal Acitivity test. Materials and Methods: In this project, first Brucella abortus RB51 was cultivated in brucella agar. The OMPs were extracted by Sodium N-Lauryl Sarcosinate method, then added to the RB51 live attenuated vaccine. Immunization was done by injection of the vaccine to mice and rabbits. The blood was drawn on days 0, 15,30, and 45 from the rabbits and the sera were seperated. Brucella abortus 544 was also injected as challenge. Spleen colony count was also performed. Results: The data from Serum Bactericidal Assay has showed, there was a very high Humoral immunity and response as a bactericidal titre of the serum against Rb51 Live vaccine. There was a significant decrease of colonies in the group vaccinated with the combined vaccine in the Spleen colony count test. Statistical analysis of groups variances showed a significant difference between groups (P<0.05.Conclusions: The Serum Bactericidal Assay results showed despite previous studies, both the combine and live vaccine are capable to stimulate the Humoral immunity. greater activity of combined vaccine to boost the humoral activity might be due to the synergistic effect of this vaccine.

  12. Characterizing Surface Energy Budget Components in Urban Regions Using Combination of Flux Tower Observations and Satellite Remote Sensing Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Vant-hull, B.; Ramamurthy, P.; Blake, R.; Prakash, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Urban and built regions because of their lack of surface moisture and their surface impermeability significantly perform differently in surface energy budget than natural and non-urban regions. Characterizing the effect and the response of each surface type in the cities can help to increase our understanding of climate, anthropogenic heat, and urban heat islands. Both ground observations and remote sensing observations are important when the extent of the heat energy balance components in big cities is targeted. This is study aims to provide a novel approach to use ground observations and map the maxima and minima air temperature in New York City using satellite measurements. Complete energy balance stations are installed over distinct materials such as concrete, asphalt, and rooftops. The footprint of these stations is restricted to the individual materials. The energy balance stations monitor the sensible and latent heat fluxes through eddy covariance method. To account for the incoming and outgoing radiation, a 4-component radiometer is used that can observe both incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Moreover, satellite observations from Landsat 8 are utilized to classify the city surfaces to distinct defined surfaces where ground observations were performed. The mapped temperatures will be linked to MODIS surface temperatures to develop a model that can downscale MODIS skin temperatures to fine resolution air temperature over urban regions. The results are compared with ground observations, which they reveal a great potential of using synergetic use of flux tower observations and satellite measurement to study urban surface energy budget. The results of this study can enhance our understanding about urban heat islands as well as climate studies and their effects on the environment.

  13. Discriminating between silent cerebral infarction and deep white matter hyperintensity using combinations of three types of magnetic resonance images: a multicenter observer performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Hirai, Toshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Taoka, Toshiaki [Nara Prefectural Medical University, Department of Radiology, Kashihara (Japan); Higano, Shuichi [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Sendai (Japan); Wakabayashi, Chieko [Suiseikai Kajikawa Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsusue, Eiji [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan); Ida, Masahiro [Ebara Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    We attempted to determine the most appropriate combination of magnetic resonance (MR) images that can accurately detect and discriminate between asymptomatic infarction and deep white matter hyperintensity (DWMH); these lesions have different clinical implications and are occasionally confused. We performed an observer performance analysis using cerebral MR images of 45 individuals with or without asymptomatic small white matter infarction and/or mild DWMH who participated in a physical checkup program at four institutions. Six observers interpreted whether infarction and/or DWMH existed in combinations of two or three image types of the T1-weighted images (T1WI), T2-weighted images (T2WI), and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. The observers' performance was evaluated with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The averaged area under the ROC curve (Az) for detecting a infarction was significantly larger in the combination of all the three image types (0.95) than that in any combinations of the two image types (T1WI and FLAIR images, 0.87; T2WI and FLAIR images, 0.85; T1WI and T2WI, 0.86). The Az for detecting DWMH was significantly smaller in the combination of T1WI and T2WI (0.79) than that in other image combinations (T1WI and FLAIR, 0.89; T2WI and FLAIR, 0.91; T1WI, T2WI, and FLAIR, 0.90). The combination of T1WI, T2WI, and FLAIR images is required to accurately detect both small white matter infarction and mild DWMH. (orig.)

  14. [Observation on therapeutic effect of acupuncture and moxibustion combined with sacral injection on prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-jun; Zhou, You-long

    2005-02-01

    To search for an effective method for treatment of prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc. Ninety-four cases were randomly divided into a treatment group of 48 cases and a control group of 46 cases. The treatment group were treated by acupuncture and moxibustion combined with sacral injection and the control group with simple sacral injection. Their therapeutic effects were compared. The cured and total effective rates were 64.6% and 97.9% in the treatment group, and 37.0% and 89.1% in the control group, with statistically significant differences between the two groups (both P prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc.

  15. Variations in the drift of larval cod ( Gadus morhua L.) in the Baltic Sea : combining field observations and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, R.; Hinrichsen, H.H.; St. John, Michael

    1999-01-01

    in the vertical distribution on a smaller scale, i.e. vertical deviations of +/- 6 m from the observed mean centre of mass, on the drift was examined, revealing no significant differences in the drift of larvae depending on their vertical distribution. The different wind forcing during the investigated time...... periods was linked to a retention situation in May 1988 and to a dispersal situation in August 1991. Finally, observed spatial distribution patterns of 1-group cod based on Baltic Young Fish Surveys (BYFS) were compared with their predicted transport in the larval phase and examined with respect...

  16. Sequential Inhalational Tobramycin-Colistin-Combination in CF-Patients with Chronic P. Aeruginosa Colonization - an Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Riethmüller

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In cystic fibrosis (CF, chronic microbial lung infections are difficult to treat and cause morbidity and increased mortality. Methods: In a multicentre, open-label, exploratory, non-interventional study, inhaled tobramycin (300 mg twice daily and colistin (1 million I.U. twice daily were sequentially combined with the aim to investigate the effect on 41 CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infections for six months (mean age 24 ± 10.8y. Results: Six patients had adverse events that were assessed as being related to treatment. Mucus production and coughing both decreased in 39%, whereas FEV1 absolute and relative to baseline increased by 4.9% and 9.1%, respectively (p = 0.004 in 29 patients, who were definitely treated sequentially. Efficacy of the therapy was rated ‘excellent' or ‘good' by the physicians in 80.5% of the patients. Conclusions: The results indicate that treatment with inhaled antibiotics, sequentially combined, was very well tolerated by most patients and may have a beneficial effect, even if transitory on lung function and respiratory symptoms.

  17. Observations of NEAs at Arecibo Observatory and NASA's IRTF: Combining Radar and Thermal Measurements to Better Understand NEA Physical Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolan, Michael C.; Vervack, R. J.; Howell, E. S.; Magri, C.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Taylor, P. A.; Mueller, M.; Rivkin, A. S.; Benner, L. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    As we sample ever-smaller sizes of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), we see an increasing variation in the range of physical properties. Radar experiments show a diverse range of shapes, surface features, and rotation states among NEAs. Infrared observations of these objects are equally varied,

  18. Magnetopause Erosion During the 17 March 2015 Magnetic Storm: Combined Field-Aligned Currents, Auroral Oval, and Magnetopause Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Luehr, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Singer, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, T.; Bromund, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present multimission observations of field-aligned currents, auroral oval, and magnetopause crossings during the 17 March 2015 magnetic storm. Dayside reconnection is expected to transport magnetic flux, strengthen field-aligned currents, lead to polar cap expansion and magnetopause erosion. Our multimission observations assemble evidence for all these manifestations. After a prolonged period of strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field, Swarm and AMPERE observe significant intensification of field-aligned currents .The dayside auroral oval, as seen by DMSP, appears as a thin arc associated with ongoing dayside reconnection. Both the field-aligned currents and the auroral arc move equatorward reaching as low as approx. 60 deg. magnetic latitude. Strong magnetopause erosion is evident in the in situ measurements of the magnetopause crossings by GOES 13/15 and MMS. The coordinated Swarm, AMPERE, DMSP, MMS and GOES observations, with both global and in situ coverage of the key regions, provide a clear demonstration of the effects of dayside reconnection on the entire magnetosphere.

  19. Observations of IO hot-spots at coastal sites with the combination of a mobile CE- and LP- DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhler, D.; Horbanski, M.; Schmitt, S.; Anthofer, M.; Tschritter, J.; Platt, U.

    2012-04-01

    Reactive iodine species are emitted by seaweed in the intertidal zone of coastal sites during low tide. Beside their oxidation to iodine oxide (IO) and reduction of ozone, they act as precursors for particle formation and therefore have a potential impact on climate. A correlation between iodine oxide and particle formation could be observed in several field studies. However, modelling studies suggest that the so far observed mixing ratios of iodine oxide are too low to explain the observed particle formation. This may be caused by the so far applied measurement techniques which either average over a long measurement path of several km (LP-DOAS) or by immobile in-situ techniques (LIF or BB-CEAS) located typically few 10-100m of the intertidal area. Thus both techniques could not observe local "hot-spots", locations with locally elevated IO levels above the background with small spatial extend (e.g. above a source). We present a new developed Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE- DOAS) instrument for the direct identification of IO down to 1ppt. This technique gives the possibility to achieve long absorption light paths in a compact setup (research station Mace Head during MaCloud field campaign) to investigate the IO levels emitted by macro algae. During low tide the CE-DOAS instrument was regularly set-up directly in the intertidal area above the macro algae. Results of different coastal sites will be presented in detail. Elevated IO concentrations up to several 10ppt could be observed with the CE-DOAS instrument regularly, but LP-DOAS concentrations are typically more than an order of magnitude lower. The data will be discussed according to the IO "hot-spot" theory. Even at unfavorable meteorological conditions (clouds, strong wind) the CE-DOAS instrument could regularly observe enhanced IO levels. Different coastal sites show different IO emission strength and spatial distribution. The spatial distribution of IO at different coastal

  20. Effect of the combination of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine on dentinal permeability and scanning electron microscopy precipitate observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akisue, Eduardo; Tomita, Viviane S; Gavini, Giulio; Poli de Figueiredo, Jose Antonio

    2010-05-01

    This study compared the combined use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CXH) with citric acid and CXH on dentinal permeability and precipitate formation. Thirty-four upper anterior teeth were prepared by rotary instrumentation and NaOCl. The root canal surfaces were conditioned for smear layer removal using 15% citric acid solution under ultrasonic activation and a final wash with distilled water. All teeth were dried, and 30 specimens were randomly divided into three equal groups as follows: positive control group (PC), no irrigation; 15% citric acid + 2% CHX group (CA + CHX); and 1% NaOCl + 2% CHX group (NaOCl + CHX). All roots were immersed in a 0.2% Rhodamine B solution for 24 hours. One-millimeter-thick slices from the cementum-enamel junction were scanned at 400 dpi and analyzed using the software ImageLab (LIDO-USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil) for the assessment of leakage in percentage. For scanning electron microscopy analysis, four teeth, irrigated for NaOCl + CHX samples, were split in half, and each third was evaluated at 1,000x and 5,000x (at the precipitate). Using the analysis of variance test followed by the Bonferroni comparison method, no statistical differences between groups were found when analyzed at the cervical and medium thirds. At the apical third, differences between the PC and NaOCl + CHX (p < 0.05) and CA + CHX and NaOCl + CHX could be seen (p < 0.05). The combination of 1% NaOCl and 2% CHX solutions results in the formation of a flocculate precipitate that acts as a chemical smear layer reducing the dentinal permeability in the apical third. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Toward a Combined SAGE II-HALOE Aerosol Climatology: An Evaluation of HALOE Version 19 Stratospheric Aerosol Extinction Coefficient Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, L. W.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) aerosol extinction coefficient data is evaluated in the low aerosol loading period after 1996 as the first necessary step in a process that will eventually allow the production of a combined HALOE/SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) aerosol climatology of derived aerosol products including surface area density. Based on these analyses, it is demonstrated that HALOE's 3.46 microns is of good quality above 19 km and suitable for scientific applications above that altitude. However, it is increasingly suspect at lower altitudes and should not be used below 17 km under any circumstances after 1996. The 3.40 microns is biased by about 10% throughout the lower stratosphere due to the failure to clear NO2 but otherwise appears to be a high quality product down to 15 km. The 2.45 and 5.26 micron aerosol extinction coefficient measurements are clearly biased and should not be used for scientific applications after the most intense parts of the Pinatubo period. Many of the issues in the aerosol data appear to be related to either the failure to clear some interfering gas species or doing so poorly. For instance, it is clear that the 3.40micronaerosol extinction coefficient measurements can be improved through the inclusion of an NO2 correction and could, in fact, end up as the highest quality overall HALOE aerosol extinction coefficient measurement. It also appears that the 2.45 and 5.26 micron channels may be improved by updating the Upper Atmosphere Pilot Database which is used as a resource for the removal of gas species otherwise not available from direct HALOE measurements. Finally, a simple model to demonstrate the promise of mixed visible/infrared aerosol extinction coefficient ensembles for the retrieval of bulk aerosol properties demonstrates that a combined HALOE/SAGE II aerosol climatology is feasible and may represent a substantial improvement over independently derived data sets.

  2. Study of Aerosols’ Characteristics and Dynamics over the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Using a Multisensor Approach Combined with Ground Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Farahat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study covers various aspects of the aerosol distribution and characteristics, namely, optical depth climatology, absorption characteristics, and their microphysical properties over four regions in Saudi Arabia using satellite and ground observations including MODIS/Terra and Aqua, OMI, MISR/Terra, AERONET, and CALIPSO for the period April 2003–January 2013. The study includes cities in the North Western, Western, Eastern provinces of Saudi Arabia and in the Rub al Khali desert or Empty Quarter. Satellite and ground observations showed that the dust season extends from April to August with prominent peaks yet with high anthropogenic contribution late summer and early fall. Analysis shows an increase in the aerosol concentration during March 2009 which could be attributed to a major dust storm during that time. Comparing the AOD time series over regions 1–3 and region 4 (desert we observe monthly and annual variability with no recurrence pattern over the years. The Aqua Deep Blue AOD550 data shows a single peak pattern that occurs over region 4 during the spring season known for its frequent dust events. OMI data shed the light on the presence of higher air pollution levels over region 3, representing the oil rich eastern province of Saudi Arabia.

  3. Optimizing Observation Networks Combining Ships of Opportunity, Gliders, Moored Buoys and FerryBox in the Bay of Biscay and English Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charria, G.; Lamouroux, J.; De Mey, P. J.; Raynaud, S.; Heyraud, C.; Craneguy, P.; Dumas, F.; Le Henaff, M.

    2016-02-01

    Designing optimal observation networks in coastal oceans remains one of the major challenges towards the implementation of future Integrated Ocean Observing Systems to monitor the coastal environment. In the Bay of Biscay and the English Channel, the diversity of involved processes requires to adapt observing systems to the specific targeted environments. Also important is the requirement for those systems to sustain coastal applications. An efficient way to measure the hydrological content of the water column over the continental shelf is to consider ships of opportunity. In the French observation strategy, the RECOPESCA program, as a component of the High frequency Observation network for the environment in coastal SEAs (HOSEA), aims to collect environmental observations from sensors attached to fishing nets. In the present study, we assess that network performances using the ArM method (Le Hénaff et al., 2009). A reference network, based on fishing vessels observations in 2008, is assessed using that method. Moreover, three scenarios, based on the reference network, a denser network in 2010 and a fictive network aggregated from a pluri-annual collection of profiles, are also analyzed. Two other observational network design experiments have been implemented for the spring season in two regions: 1) the Loire River plume (northern part of the Bay of Biscay) to explore different possible glider endurance lines combined with a fixed mooring to monitor temperature and salinity and 2) the Western English Channel using a glider below FerryBox measurements. These experiments combining existing and future observing systems, as well as numerical ensemble simulations, highlight the key issue of monitoring the whole water column in and close to river plumes (e.g. using gliders), the efficiency of the surface high frequency sampling from FerryBoxes in macrotidal regions and the importance of sampling key regions instead of increasing the number of Voluntary Observing Ships.

  4. The VAULT2.0 Observing Campaign: A Comprehensive Investigation of the Chromosphere-Corona Interface at Sub-arcsecond scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlidas, A.; Korendyke, C.; Tun-Beltran, S. D.; Ugarte-Urra, I.; Morrill, J. S.; Warren, H. P.; Young, P.; De Pontieu, B.; Gauzzi, G.; Reardon, K.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first results from an observing campaign in support of the VAULT2.0 sounding rocket launch on September 30, 2014. VAULT2.0 is a Lya (1216Å) spectroheliograph capable of 0.3" (~250 km) spatial resolution. The objective of the VAULT2.0 project is the study of the chromosphere-corona interface. This interface has acquired renewed emphasis over the last few years, thanks to high-resolution observations from Hinode/SOT and EIS instruments and the Lya imaging from the two VAULT flights. The observations have shown that the upper chromosphere may play a more important role in heating the corona and in affecting EUV observations that previously thought: (1) by supplying the mass via Type-II spicules and, (2) by absorbing coronal emission. Many of the required clues for further progress are located in sub-arcsecond structures with temperatures between 10000 and 50000 K, a regime not accessible by Hinode or SDO. Lyman-alpha observations are, therefore, ideal, for filling in this gap. The observing campaign in support of the VAULT2.0 is closely coordinated with the Hinode and IRIS missions to study the mass/energy flow from the chromosphere to the corona with joint observations of type-II spicules, and the magnetic connectivity of coronal loops using the full imaging and spectral capabilities of IRIS, Hinode and SDO. Several ground-based observatories also provide important observations (IBIS, BBSO, SOLIS). The VAULT2.0 project is funded by the NASA LCAS program.

  5. Toward a combined SAGE II-HALOE aerosol climatology: an evaluation of HALOE version 19 stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. W. Thomason

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Herein, the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE aerosol extinction coefficient data is evaluated in the low aerosol loading period after 1996 as the first necessary step in a process that will eventually allow the production of a combined HALOE/SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment aerosol climatology of derived aerosol products including surface area density. Based on these analyses, it is demonstrated that HALOE's 3.46 μm is of good quality above 19 km and suitable for scientific applications above that altitude. However, it is increasingly suspect at lower altitudes and should not be used below 17 km under any circumstances after 1996. The 3.40 μm is biased by about 10% throughout the lower stratosphere due to the failure to clear NO2 but otherwise appears to be a high quality product down to 15 km. The 2.45 and 5.26 μm aerosol extinction coefficient measurements are clearly biased and should not be used for scientific applications after the most intense parts of the Pinatubo period. Many of the issues in the aerosol data appear to be related to either the failure to clear some interfering gas species or doing so poorly. For instance, it is clear that the 3.40 μm aerosol extinction coefficient measurements can be improved through the inclusion of an NO2 correction and could, in fact, end up as the highest quality overall HALOE aerosol extinction coefficient measurement. It also appears that the 2.45 and 5.26 μm channels may be improved by updating the Upper Atmosphere Pilot Database which is used as a resource for the removal of gas species otherwise not available from direct HALOE measurements. Finally, a simple model to demonstrate the promise of mixed visible/infrared aerosol extinction coefficient ensembles for the retrieval of bulk aerosol properties demonstrates that a combined HALOE/SAGE II aerosol climatology is feasible and may represent a substantial improvement over independently derived

  6. A Strategy for Short-Term Earthquake Forecasting Based on Combined Ground and Space-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafatos, M.; Papadopoulos, G. A.; Karastathis, V. K.; Minadakis, G.; Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S. A.; Tramutoli, V.; Tsinganos, K.

    2014-12-01

    No standard methodologies regarding the short-term (hours, days, few weeks) forecasting of earthquakes have been widely adopted so far. However, promising approaches from ground-based (e.g. foreshocks) and space-based (e.g. thermal anomalies) observations have been described. We propose to apply a multidisciplinary strategy by performing real-time experiments towards the identification of space-time windows having increased probability beyond chance for the occurrence of strong earthquakes (M>5.5). This is a new collaborative study which will continue the best practices achieved from other projects such as the EU-FP7 PRE-EARTHQUAKE and the ongoing ISSI project LAICa. The test region covers the entire Greece which is of the highest seismicity all over western Eurasia, while closer attention will be given to the Corinth Rift (Central Greece) which is an asymmetric half-graben of high seismicity opening rapidly with geodetic extension rates up to about 15mmyr-1. Ground-based observations will mainly include seismicity, magnetometers and radon measurements while space observations will include the ones that may provide thermal anomalies, GPS and TEC. The strategy will include the development of a system operating in real-time basis with strong tools and protocols for the collection, archiving and evaluation of the different types of data. The software part of the system may incorporate three basic interfaces implemented via open source technology: (1) The up-streaming software interface for the collection and archiving of data; (2) The backend real-time software interface incorporating all the available models; (3) The frontend WEBGIS software interface that will allow for data representation and mapping. The establishment of some certain rules for issuing non-public seismic alerts is needed. Therefore, in this paper we will also discuss the significance of the proposed work for the issues of earthquake forecasting/prediction statements and what critical new

  7. Effect of observation combined with motor imagery of a skilled hand-motor task on motor cortical excitability: difference between novice and expert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukazaki, Izumi; Uehara, Kazumasa; Morishita, Takuya; Ninomiya, Masato; Funase, Kozo

    2012-06-19

    We examined the effects of observation combined with motor imagery (MI) of a skilled hand-motor task on motor cortex excitability, which was assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Novices and experts at 3-ball cascade juggling (3BCJ) participated in this study. In one trial, the subjects observed a video clip of 3BCJ while imagining performing it. In addition, the subjects also imagined performing 3BCJ without video clip observation. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the hand muscles that were activated by the task during each trial. In the novices, the MEP amplitude was significantly increased by video clip observation combined with MI. In contrast, MI without video clip observation significantly increased the MEP amplitude of the experts. These results suggest that action observation of 3BCJ increases the ability of novices to make their MI performing the task. Meanwhile, experts use their own motor program to recall their MI of the task. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimizing viewing procedures of breast tomosynthesis image volumes using eye tracking combined with a free response human observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lång, Kristina; Zackrisson, Sophia; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nystrom, Marcus; Andersson, Ingvar; Förnvik, Daniel; Tingberg, Anders; Timberg, Pontus

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate four different viewing procedures as part of improving viewing conditions of breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes. The procedures consisted of free scroll volume browsing, and a combination of initial cine loops at three different frame rates (9, 14 and 25 fps) terminated upon request followed by free scroll volume browsing. Fifty-five normal BT image volumes in MLO view were collected. In these, simulated lesions (20 masses and 20 clusters of microcalcifications) were randomly inserted, creating four unique image sets for each procedure. Four readers interpreted the cases in a random order. Their task was to locate a lesion, mark and assign a five level confidence scale. The diagnostic accuracy was analyzed using Jackknife Free Receiver Operating Characteristics (JAFROC). Time efficiency and visual search behavior were also investigated using eye tracking. The results indicate that there was no statistically significant difference in JAFROC FOM between the different viewing procedures, however the medium cine loop speed seemed to be the preferred viewing procedure in terms of total analyze time and dwell time.

  9. Combining satellite-based fire observations and ground-based lightning detections to identify lightning fires across the conterminous USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Massada, A.; Hawbaker, T.J.; Stewart, S.I.; Radeloff, V.C.

    2012-01-01

    Lightning fires are a common natural disturbance in North America, and account for the largest proportion of the area burned by wildfires each year. Yet, the spatiotemporal patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US are not well understood due to limitations of existing fire databases. Our goal here was to develop and test an algorithm that combined MODIS fire detections with lightning detections from the National Lightning Detection Network to identify lightning fires across the conterminous US from 2000 to 2008. The algorithm searches for spatiotemporal conjunctions of MODIS fire clusters and NLDN detected lightning strikes, given a spatiotemporal lag between lightning strike and fire ignition. The algorithm revealed distinctive spatial patterns of lightning fires in the conterminous US While a sensitivity analysis revealed that the algorithm is highly sensitive to the two thresholds that are used to determine conjunction, the density of fires it detected was moderately correlated with ground based fire records. When only fires larger than 0.4 km2 were considered, correlations were higher and the root-mean-square error between datasets was less than five fires per 625 km2 for the entire study period. Our algorithm is thus suitable for detecting broad scale spatial patterns of lightning fire occurrence, and especially lightning fire hotspots, but has limited detection capability of smaller fires because these cannot be consistently detected by MODIS. These results may enhance our understanding of large scale patterns of lightning fire activity, and can be used to identify the broad scale factors controlling fire occurrence.

  10. Combining GPS + GLONASS observations to improve the fixing percentage and precision of long baselines with limited data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanyan; Ye, Shirong; Jiang, Peng; Song, Weiwei; Lou, Yidong

    2016-03-01

    Although commercial GPS + GLONASS real-time kinematic systems are available for more than 15 years, GLONASS ambiguity resolution is limited to short baselines within a few tens of kilometers. Furthermore, until now, none of the IGS analysis center has reported ambiguity resolution for GLONASS long baselines in their routine GNSS data processing. The currently published double- or single-differencing techniques are all concentrated on short baselines and are not applicable for long baselines. In this study, we propose a new Single Differencing Between-Receiver (SDBR) method, which is especially suitable for GPS + GLONASS long baseline ambiguity resolution. The SDBR wide-lane ambiguity is directly fixed by rounding with SDBR Hatch-Melbourne-Wübbena combination; the SDBR narrow-lane ambiguity is directly fixed with LAMBDA method. To eliminate the receiver Inter Frequency Bias (IFB), we selected 63 stations with identical IFBs, so that IFBs can be eliminated by SDBR. The results shows, adding GLONASS can improve the fixing rate from 87.8% to 98.8% for half-hourly static solutions, and from 99.3% to 99.9% for hourly static solutions. The position accuracy is also improved significantly for each strategy respectively. Kinematic solutions with different session length are also performed and the fixing rate is improved even more significantly than static solutions.

  11. Ecosystem function in complex mountain terrain: Combining models and long-term observations to advance process-based understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, William R.; Knowles, John F.; Blanken, Peter D.; Swenson, Sean C.; Suding, Katharine N.

    2017-04-01

    Abiotic factors structure plant community composition and ecosystem function across many different spatial scales. Often, such variation is considered at regional or global scales, but here we ask whether ecosystem-scale simulations can be used to better understand landscape-level variation that might be particularly important in complex terrain, such as high-elevation mountains. We performed ecosystem-scale simulations by using the Community Land Model (CLM) version 4.5 to better understand how the increased length of growing seasons may impact carbon, water, and energy fluxes in an alpine tundra landscape. The model was forced with meteorological data and validated with observations from the Niwot Ridge Long Term Ecological Research Program site. Our results demonstrate that CLM is capable of reproducing the observed carbon, water, and energy fluxes for discrete vegetation patches across this heterogeneous ecosystem. We subsequently accelerated snowmelt and increased spring and summer air temperatures in order to simulate potential effects of climate change in this region. We found that vegetation communities that were characterized by different snow accumulation dynamics showed divergent biogeochemical responses to a longer growing season. Contrary to expectations, wet meadow ecosystems showed the strongest decreases in plant productivity under extended summer scenarios because of disruptions in hydrologic connectivity. These findings illustrate how Earth system models such as CLM can be used to generate testable hypotheses about the shifting nature of energy, water, and nutrient limitations across space and through time in heterogeneous landscapes; these hypotheses may ultimately guide further experimental work and model development.

  12. Combining optical remote sensing, agricultural statistics and field observations for culture recognition over a peri-urban region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbart, Nicolas; Emmanuelle, Vaudour; Fabienne, Maignan; Catherine, Ottlé; Jean-Marc, Gilliot

    2017-04-01

    This study explores the potential of multi-temporal optical remote sensing, with high revisit frequency, to derive missing information on agricultural calendar and crop types over the agricultural lands in the Versailles plain in the western Paris suburbs. This study comes besides past and ongoing studies on the use of radar and high spatial resolution optical remote sensing to monitor agricultural practices in this study area (e.g. Vaudour et al. 2014). Agricultural statistics, such as the Land Parcel Identification System (LPIS) for France, permit to know the nature of annual crops for each digitized declared field of this land parcel registry. However, within each declared field several cropped plots and a diversity of practices may exist, being marked by agricultural rotations which vary both spatially and temporally within it and differ from one year to the other. Even though the new LPIS to be released in 2016 is expected to describe individual plots within declared fields, its attributes may not enable to discriminate between winter and spring crops. Here we evaluate the potential of high observation frequency remote sensing to differentiate seasonal crops based essentially on the seasonality of the spectral properties. In particular, we use the Landsat data to spatially disaggregate the LPIS statistical data, on the basis of the analysis of the remote sensing spectral seasonality measured on a number of selected ground-observed fields. This work is carried out in the framework of the CNES TOSCA-PLEIADES-CO of the French Space Agency.

  13. Estimating radar reflectivity - Snowfall rate relationships and their uncertainties over Antarctica by combining disdrometer and radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souverijns, N.; Gossart, A.; Lhermitte, S.; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; Kneifel, S.; Maahn, M.; Bliven, F. L.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2017-11-01

    Snowfall rate (SR) estimates over Antarctica are sparse and characterised by large uncertainties. Yet, observations by precipitation radar offer the potential to get better insight in Antarctic SR. Relations between radar reflectivity (Ze) and snowfall rate (Ze-SR relations) are however not available over Antarctica. Here, we analyse observations from the first Micro Rain Radar (MRR) in Antarctica together with an optical disdrometer (Precipitation Imaging Package; PIP), deployed at the Princess Elisabeth station. The relation Ze = A*SRB was derived using PIP observations and its uncertainty was quantified using a bootstrapping approach, randomly sampling within the range of uncertainty. This uncertainty was used to assess the uncertainty in snowfall rates derived by the MRR. We find a value of A = 18 [11-43] and B = 1.10 [0.97-1.17]. The uncertainty on snowfall rates of the MRR based on the Ze-SR relation are limited to 40%, due to the propagation of uncertainty in both Ze as well as SR, resulting in some compensation. The prefactor (A) of the Ze-SR relation is sensitive to the median diameter of the snow particles. Larger particles, typically found closer to the coast, lead to an increase of the value of the prefactor (A = 44). Smaller particles, typical of more inland locations, obtain lower values for the prefactor (A = 7). The exponent (B) of the Ze-SR relation is insensitive to the median diameter of the snow particles. In contrast with previous studies for various locations, shape uncertainty is not the main source of uncertainty of the Ze-SR relation. Parameter uncertainty is found to be the most dominant term, mainly driven by the uncertainty in mass-size relation of different snow particles. Uncertainties on the snow particle size distribution are negligible in this study as they are directly measured. Future research aiming at reducing the uncertainty of Ze-SR relations should therefore focus on obtaining reliable estimates of the mass-size relations of

  14. Firsthand in situ observation of active fine laser tuning by combining a temperature gradient and a CLC wedge cell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Mi-Yun; Cha, Jihun

    2015-08-10

    In situ direct observation of the lasing process in a cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) laser array using a CMOS camera was used to investigate discontinuous laser tuning in a parallel CLC cell. In accordance with the discontinuous pitch change by thermal energy transfer, at the same time the laser wavelength undergoes an immediate and discontinuous shift. And we found out the reason why the CLC phase has domain textures. And this work develops a simple active tunable laser array by forming a spatial temperature gradient along a wedge CLC cell. With this new strategy, only just about 7 nm laser tuning range at room temperature is extremely widened over the 105 nm wavelength range with about 0.2 nm tuning resolution. Furthermore, there is no aging effect because the employed CLC array has only one chiral molecular concentration. This strategy could be used in a practical CLC laser device application.

  15. Combining the 'bottom up' and 'top down' approaches in pharmacokinetic modelling: fitting PBPK models to observed clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamandouras, Nikolaos; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Aarons, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic models range from being entirely exploratory and empirical, to semi-mechanistic and ultimately complex physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. This choice is conditional on the modelling purpose as well as the amount and quality of the available data. The main advantage of PBPK models is that they can be used to extrapolate outside the studied population and experimental conditions. The trade-off for this advantage is a complex system of differential equations with a considerable number of model parameters. When these parameters cannot be informed from in vitro or in silico experiments they are usually optimized with respect to observed clinical data. Parameter estimation in complex models is a challenging task associated with many methodological issues which are discussed here with specific recommendations. Concepts such as structural and practical identifiability are described with regards to PBPK modelling and the value of experimental design and sensitivity analyses is sketched out. Parameter estimation approaches are discussed, while we also highlight the importance of not neglecting the covariance structure between model parameters and the uncertainty and population variability that is associated with them. Finally the possibility of using model order reduction techniques and minimal semi-mechanistic models that retain the physiological-mechanistic nature only in the parts of the model which are relevant to the desired modelling purpose is emphasized. Careful attention to all the above issues allows us to integrate successfully information from in vitro or in silico experiments together with information deriving from observed clinical data and develop mechanistically sound models with clinical relevance. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Observation of the rare Bs0 →µ+µ- decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cms Collaboration; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.

    2015-06-01

    The standard model of particle physics describes the fundamental particles and their interactions via the strong, electromagnetic and weak forces. It provides precise predictions for measurable quantities that can be tested experimentally. The probabilities, or branching fractions, of the strange B meson () and the B0 meson decaying into two oppositely charged muons (μ+ and μ-) are especially interesting because of their sensitivity to theories that extend the standard model. The standard model predicts that the and decays are very rare, with about four of the former occurring for every billion mesons produced, and one of the latter occurring for every ten billion B0 mesons. A difference in the observed branching fractions with respect to the predictions of the standard model would provide a direction in which the standard model should be extended. Before the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN started operating, no evidence for either decay mode had been found. Upper limits on the branching fractions were an order of magnitude above the standard model predictions. The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) collaborations have performed a joint analysis of the data from proton-proton collisions that they collected in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of seven teraelectronvolts and in 2012 at eight teraelectronvolts. Here we report the first observation of the µ+µ- decay, with a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations, and the best measurement so far of its branching fraction. Furthermore, we obtained evidence for the µ+µ- decay with a statistical significance of three standard deviations. Both measurements are statistically compatible with standard model predictions and allow stringent constraints to be placed on theories beyond the standard model. The LHC experiments will resume taking data in 2015, recording proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 teraelectronvolts, which will approximately

  17. [Observation on therapeutic effects of acupuncture combined with TDP irradiation and chinese herbal steaming and washing therapy for treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome in early stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui-yan; Wang, Yan-xiang

    2009-09-01

    To search for an effective therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome in early stage. Sixty cases were randomly divided into an observation group 1 (21 cases), an observation group 2 (22 cases) and a basic treatment group (17 cases). The patients in three groups were treated with oral administration of Vitamin B1, Vitamin B12, compound Vitamin B and small splint for wrist protection as basic treatment, and the observation group 1 was also treated with acupuncture on local points as Laogong (PC 8), Yuji (LU 10), Hegu (LI 4) and Waiguan (TE 5) etc. combined with TDP irradiation, and the observation group 2 was treated with herbal steaming and washing on the affected part using Safflower and Lopseed etc. Electromyography, visual analogue scale (VAS) and clinical effect of three groups were observed before and after treatment. The changes of electromyogra phy had no significant difference before and after treatment in all groups (all P > 0.05), the VAS scores in two ob servation groups were superior to that in basic treatment group (both P Acupunture combined with TDP irradiation and Chinese herbal steaming and washing therapy both have significant therapeutic effects for treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome in early stage.

  18. Combining Observations in the Reflective Solar and Thermal Domains for Improved Mapping of Carbon, Water and Energy FLuxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houborg, Rasmus; Anderson, Martha; Kustas, Bill; Rodell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the utility of integrating remotely sensed estimates of leaf chlorophyll (C(sub ab)) into a thermal-based Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model that estimates land-surface CO2 and energy fluxes using an analytical, light-use-efficiency (LUE) based model of canopy resistance. Day to day variations in nominal LUE (LUE(sub n)) were assessed for a corn crop field in Maryland U.S.A. through model calibration with CO2 flux tower observations. The optimized daily LUE(sub n) values were then compared to estimates of C(sub ab) integrated from gridded maps of chlorophyll content weighted over the tower flux source area. Changes in Cab exhibited a curvilinear relationship with corresponding changes in daily calibrated LUE(sub n) values derived from the tower flux data, and hourly water, energy and carbon flux estimation accuracies from TSEB were significantly improved when using C(sub ab) for delineating spatio-temporal variations in LUE(sub n). The results demonstrate the synergy between thermal infrared and shortwave reflective wavebands in producing valuable remote sensing data for monitoring of carbon and water fluxes.

  19. The seed factor: how a combination of four observables can unveil the location of blazar GeV emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Adam; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen

    2018-01-01

    We present here a method for constraining the emission location of γ-rays in powerful, lined blazars (i.e., flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs)). We develop a diagnostic criteria, which we term the seed factor, to differentiate between γ-ray emission due to external Compton (EC) scattering in the broad line region (BLR) and the molecular torus (MT). The seed factor is determined entirely by four observable quantities; the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peak frequencies, and the respective peak luminosities. It may thus be possible to use the seed factor to constrain the emission location in a model-independent way.We also present preliminary results of our analysis regarding the seed factor in quasi-simultaneous multi-wavelength SEDs from the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS), historical data from the ASDC SED Builder of FSRQs in the the Monitoring Of Jets in Active galactic nuclei with VLBA Experiments (MOJAVE) sample, and quasi-simultaneous multi-wavelength SEDs from the Dynamic SEDs of southern blazars (DSSB) sample.

  20. Clinical Observation of Recombinant Human Vascular Endostatin Durative Transfusion Combined with Window Period Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy in the Treatment of 
Advanced Lung Squamous Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan LV

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. The aim of this study is to observe the efficacy and safety of recombinant human vascular endostatin (endostar durative transfusion combined with window period arterial infusion chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced lung squamous carcinoma. Methods From February 2014 to January 2015, 10 cases of the cytological or histological pathology diagnosed stage IIIb - stage IV lung squamous carcinoma were treated with recombinant human vascular endostatin (30 mg/d durative transfusion combined with window period arterial infusion chemotherapy. Over the same period of 10 cases stage IIIb - stage IV lung squamous carcinoma patients for pure arterial perfusion chemotherapy were compared. Recombinant human vascular endostatin was durative transfused every 24 hours for 7 days in combination group, and in the 4th day of window period, the 10 patients were received artery infusion chemotherapy, using docetaxel combined with cisplatin. Pure treatment group received the same arterial perfusion chemotherapy regimen. 4 weeks was a cycle. 4 weeks after 2 cycles, to evaluate the short-term effects and the adverse drug reactions. Results 2 groups of patients were received 2 cycles treatments. The response rate (RR was 70.0%, and the disease control rate (DCR was 90.0% in the combination group; In the pure treatment group were 50.0%, 70.0% respectively, there were no statistically significant difference (P=0.650, 0.582. The adverse reactions of the treatment were mild, including level 1-2 of gastrointestinal reaction and blood toxicity, there were no statistically significant difference (P=0.999, P=0.628. In the combination group, 1 patient occurred level 1 of cardiac toxicity. Conclusion Recombinant human vascular endostatin durative transfusion combined with window period arterial infusion chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced lung squamous carcinoma could take a

  1. Unprecedented therapeutic potential with a combination of A2A/NR2B receptor antagonists as observed in the 6-OHDA lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Michel

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease, the long-term use of dopamine replacing agents is associated with the development of motor complications; therefore, there is a need for non-dopaminergic drugs. This study evaluated the potential therapeutic impact of six different NR2B and A2A receptor antagonists given either alone or in combination in unilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rats without (monotherapy or with (add-on therapy the co-administration of L-Dopa: Sch-58261+ Merck 22; Sch-58261+Co-101244; Preladenant + Merck 22; Preladenant + Radiprodil; Tozadenant + Radiprodil; Istradefylline + Co-101244. Animals given monotherapy were assessed on distance traveled and rearing, whereas those given add-on therapy were assessed on contralateral rotations. Three-way mixed ANOVA were conducted to assess the main effect of each drug separately and to determine whether any interaction between two drugs was additive or synergistic. Additional post hoc analyses were conducted to compare the effect of the combination with the effect of the drugs alone. Motor activity improved significantly and was sustained for longer when the drugs were given in combination than when administered separately at the same dose. Similarly, when tested as add-on treatment to L-Dopa, the combinations resulted in higher levels of contralateral rotation in comparison to the single drugs. Of special interest, the activity observed with some combinations could not be described by a simplistic additive effect and involved more subtle synergistic pharmacological interactions. The combined administration of A2A/NR2B-receptor antagonists improved motor behaviour in 6-OHDA rats. Given the proven translatability of this model such a combination may be expected to be effective in improving motor symptoms in patients.

  2. COMBINED MULTIPOINT REMOTE AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS OF THE ASYMMETRIC EVOLUTION OF A FAST SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollett, T.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Amerstorfer, U. V. [IGAM-Kanzelhöhe Observatory, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Frahm, R. A. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Davies, J. A. [RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Vršnak, B.; Žic, T. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, 1000 Zagreb (Croatia); Farrugia, C. J. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Zhang, T. L., E-mail: tanja.rollett@gmx.at [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-8042 Graz (Austria)

    2014-07-20

    We present an analysis of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) of 2012  March 7, which was imaged by both STEREO spacecraft and observed in situ by MESSENGER, Venus Express, Wind, and Mars Express. Based on detected arrivals at four different positions in interplanetary space, it was possible to strongly constrain the kinematics and the shape of the ejection. Using the white-light heliospheric imagery from STEREO-A and B, we derived two different kinematical profiles for the CME by applying the novel constrained self-similar expansion method. In addition, we used a drag-based model to investigate the influence of the ambient solar wind on the CME's propagation. We found that two preceding CMEs heading in different directions disturbed the overall shape of the CME and influenced its propagation behavior. While the Venus-directed segment underwent a gradual deceleration (from ∼2700 km s{sup –1} at 15 R {sub ☉} to ∼1500 km s{sup –1} at 154 R {sub ☉}), the Earth-directed part showed an abrupt retardation below 35 R {sub ☉} (from ∼1700 to ∼900 km s{sup –1}). After that, it was propagating with a quasi-constant speed in the wake of a preceding event. Our results highlight the importance of studies concerning the unequal evolution of CMEs. Forecasting can only be improved if conditions in the solar wind are properly taken into account and if attention is also paid to large events preceding the one being studied.

  3. Amlodipine/valsartan single-pill combination: a prospective, observational evaluation of the real-life safety and effectiveness in the routine treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Yuri; Dongre, Neelesh; Vigdorchik, Alexey; Sastravaha, Krisada

    2012-02-01

    As several international guidelines on hypertension have now recommended, single-pill/fixed-dose combination antihypertensive therapies may be particularly beneficial as first-line therapy in high-risk patients, in whom more rapid and pronounced blood pressure (BP) control is desired. Upon the single-pill combination of amlodipine and valsartan becoming available, the authors conducted this international, observational study to evaluate its efficacy and safety in a real-life practice setting. This prospective, open-label, postmarketing surveillance study enrolled adults with arterial hypertension (systolic BP >140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP >90 mmHg) who were prescribed antihypertensive therapy with single-pill combination amlodipine/valsartan 5/80, 5/160, or 10/160 mg once daily. Patients were observed over a 3-month period (12 weeks) with approximately monthly intervals between clinic visits. A total of 8336 patients completed all study visits and were included in the efficacy analysis. Mean age was 54.7 years and 83.4% of patients had received prior antihypertensive therapy. BP reductions were dose related. Overall, mean BP was reduced from 165.0/99.3 mmHg at baseline to 128.7/80.4 mmHg at 12 weeks (36.3/18.9 mmHg; Ppatients. Efficacy was consistent in subgroups of patients with comorbidities and regardless of whether patients were previously treated with monotherapy or combination therapy. Adverse events were reported in 5.3% of patients. The incidence of edema declined from 10.4% at baseline to 8.5% at study end. Single-pill combination amlodipine/valsartan safely and effectively reduced BP across all hypertension grades and allowed the vast majority of patients to achieve BP goals.

  4. [Observation on therapeutic effect of electroacupuncture combined with Chinese herbs for treatment of prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc of yang deficiency and cold coagulation type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lan; Liu, Lei-geng; Lü, Ming; Ran, Wei-jun

    2009-08-01

    To search for an effective therapy for prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc of yang deficiency and cold coagulation type. One hundred and twenty-six cases were randomly divided into a combined electroacupuncture and Chinese herb group (n=49), an electroacupuncture group (n=42) and a Chinese herb group (n=35). The combined electroacupuncture and Chinese herb group was treated with electroacupuncture at Dachangshu (BL 25), Guanyuanshu (BL 26), Xiaochangshu (BL 27) and Yaoyangguan (GV 3) and oral administration of Chinese herbs for cold-removing and yang-invigorating. The electroacupuncture group was treated with the same electroacupuncture treatment alone and the Chinese herb group with the same self Chinese herbs alone. The therapeutic effects were observed after treatment for 20 days, and the recurrence rates were followed up at 180 days after the last treatment among the three groups. The cured-markedly effective rate was 79.6% in the combined electroacupuncture and Chinese herb group, 54.8% in the electroacupuncture group and 51.4% in the Chinese herb group, the combined electroacupuncture and Chinese herb group being significantly better than both the electroacupuncture group and the Chinese herb group (both P0.05). The recurrence rate after 180 days was 15.4% in the combined electroacupuncture and Chinese herb group, 83.3% in the electroacupuncture group and 80.0% in the Chinese herb group, with more obvious decrease in the combined electroacupuncture and Chinese herb group (both Pprolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc of yang deficiency and cold coagulation type.

  5. A case study of liquefaction risk analysis based on the thickness and depth of the liquefaction layer using CPT and electric resistivity data in the Hinode area, Itako City, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinguuji, Motoharu; Toprak, Selcuk

    2017-12-01

    The Hinode area of Itako City in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan, suffered some of the most severe liquefaction damage of any areas in the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake in 2011. This liquefaction damage has been investigated by Itako City, as well as by universities and research institutes in Japan. The National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) has carried out numerous investigations along the Tone River, and in particular, intensive surveys were done in the Hinode area. We have conducted a risk analysis based on the thickness and depth of the liquefaction layer measured using cone penetration testing (CPT) data and electric resistivity data obtained in the Hinode area. The distribution of the risk estimated from CPT at 143 points, and that obtained from analysis of the resistivity survey data, agreed with the distribution of actual damage. We also carried out conventional risk analyses method using the liquefaction resistance factor (FL) and liquefaction potential index (PL) methods with CPT data. The results show high PL values over the entire area, but their distribution did not agree well with actual damage in some parts of the study area. Because the analysis of the thickness and depth of the liquefaction layer, using geophysical prospecting methods, can cover a widespread area, this method will be very useful in investigating liquefaction risk, especially for gas and water pipelines.

  6. Simultaneous observation of collagen and elastin based on the combined nonlinear optical imaging technique coupled with two-channel synchronized detection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianxin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Luo, Tianshu; Liu, Dingzhong; Zhao, Jingjun

    2008-08-01

    Collagen and elastin are the most important proteins of the connective tissues in higher vertebrates. In this paper, we present a combined nonlinear optical imaging technique of second-harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence to simultaneously observe the collagen and elastic fiber of dermis in a freshly excised human skin and rabbit aorta using a two-channel synchronized detection method. The obtained two-channel overlay image in the backward direction can clearly distinguish the morphological structure and distribution of collagen and elastic fibers. Tissue spectrum further confirms the obtained structural information. These results suggest that the combined nonlinear optical imaging technique coupled with two-channel synchronized detection method can be an effective tool for detecting collage and elastic fibers without any invasive tissue procedure of slicing, embedding, fixation and staining when two structural proteins are simultaneously present in the biological tissue.

  7. [Thread-moxa in Zhuang folk medicine combined with acupuncture and external application drugs on AIDS patients with herpes zoster: a clinical observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-wei; Mo, Jin-hua; Pang, Jun; Deng, Xin

    2013-08-01

    To observe the efficacy of thread-moxa in Zhuang folk medicine (TM) combined with acupuncture and external application drugs for AIDS patients with herpes zoster (AHZ). A randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted in 60 patients with AHZ. They were randomly assigned to the treatment group (treated with TM combined with acupuncture and Jingwanhong Scald Ointment) and the control group (treated with Famciclovir Tablet, nimesulide dispersible tablet, vitamin B1, ribavirin ointment). The treatment course was 14 days for both groups.The clinical efficacy, significant efficiency visual analog scale score (VAS), sleep quality score (QS), the postherpetic neuralgia rate in 1 year after treatment were observed. The markedly effective rate was significantly higher in the treatment group than in the control group (86.7% vs. 53.3%, P vs. 80.0%, P > 0.05). The post-treatment VAS, QS, the time for pain disappearance, skin repair, crusting, and 1-year postherpetic neuralgia incidence rate were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the control group (P acupuncture and Jingwanhong Scald Ointment was effective for treating AHZ patients. It relieved pain quickly, shortened their course of disease, and improved their quality of sleep.

  8. Treatment Compliance with Fixed-Dose Combination of Vildagliptin/Metformin in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Controlled with Metformin Monotherapy: A 24-Week Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Rombopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the differences in treatment compliance with vildagliptin/metformin fixed-dose versus free-dose combination therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in Greece. Design. Adult patients with T2DM, inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy, (850 mg bid, participated in this 24-week, multicenter, observational study. Patients were enrolled in two cohorts: vildagliptin/metformin fixed-dose combination (group A and vildagliptin metformin free-dose combination (group B. Results. 659 patients were enrolled, 360 were male, with mean BMI 30.1, mean T2DM duration 59.6 months, and mean HbA1c at baseline 8%; 366 patients were assigned to group A and 293 to group B; data for 3 patients was missing. In group A, 98.9% of patients were compliant with their treatment compared to 84.6% of group B. The odds ratio for compliance in group A versus B was (OR 18.9 (95% CI: 6.2, 57.7; P<0.001. In group A mean HbA1c decreased from 8.1% at baseline to 6.9% (P<0.001 at the study end and from 7.9% to 6.8% (P<0.001 in group B. Conclusions. Patients in group A were more compliant than patients in group B. These results are in accordance with international literature suggesting that fixed-dose combination therapies lead to increased compliance to treatment.

  9. Interpretation of the à ← X[combining tilde] transition of hydrated protons in aqueous solutions observed in the far-UV region with quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeyoshi; Beć, Krzysztof B; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2017-08-16

    Far-ultraviolet spectra (wavelength: 140-200 nm) of group I, II, and XIII cation nitrate electrolyte aqueous solutions show that the first electronic transition (à ← X[combining tilde]) energies of water hydrating the cations are linearly dependent on the hydration energies of the cations. However, deviations from these linear relations have been observed only for electrolyte solutions of small cations, i.e., H + , Li + , and Be 2+ (T. Goto, A. Ikehata, Y. Morisawa, N. Higashi and Y. Ozaki, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 8097-8104). In this study, the à ← X[combining tilde] transitions of group I cation-water clusters holding the first and second shell water molecules around the cations (M + (H 2 O) 6 , M + : H + , Li + , Na + , and K + ) were studied with quantum chemical calculations to elucidate the cation size effects on the electronic states of each shell water molecule. The calculation results show that the à ← X[combining tilde] transitions of the small cation clusters, especially H + , are more intensely split than those of the larger cation clusters, because of the difference in the à ← X[combining tilde] transition of each shell and the asymmetric structure of H + (H 2 O) 6 . Specifically, the à ← X[combining tilde] transitions of the first shell water molecules are mostly ascribed to the charge transfer transition of the nonbonding electrons to the central cations, while those of the second shell water molecules are ascribed to the transition to the σ* orbitals of the second shell water molecules. Moreover, the condensed and distorted structure of H + (H 2 O) 6 causes an asymmetrically delocalized electronic distribution in the excited state, as well as the ground state, because the electronic interference from the second shell water molecules weakens the exciton-hole interaction of the first shell. These interpretations based on calculations provide a detailed explanation concerning the substantial blue-shift of the à ← X[combining

  10. Multispacecraft observations of a prominence eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bemporad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available On 9 May 2007 a prominence eruption occurred at the West limb. Remarkably, the event was observed by the STEREO/EUVI telescopes and by the HINODE/EIS and SOHO/UVCS spectrometers. We present results from all these instruments. High-cadence (~37 s data from STEREO/EUVI A and B in the He II λ304 line were used to study the 3-D shape and expansion of the prominence. The high spatial resolution EUVI images (~1.5"/pixel have been used to infer via triangulation the 3-D shape and orientation of the prominence 12 min after the eruption onset. At this time the prominence has mainly the shape of a "hook" highly inclined southward, has an average thickness of 0.068 R⊙, a length of 0.43 R⊙ and lies, in first approximation, on a plane. Hence, the prominence is mainly a 2-D structure and there is no evidence for a twisted flux rope configuration. HINODE/EIS was scanning with the 2" slit the region where the filament erupted. The EIS spectra show during the eruption remarkable non-thermal broadening (up to ~100 km s−1 in the region crossed by the filament in spectral lines emitted at different temperatures, possibly with differences among lines from higher Fe ionization stages. The CME was also observed by the SOHO/UVCS instrument: the spectrograph slit was centered at 1.7 R⊙, at a latitude of 5° SW and recorded a sudden increase in the O VI λλ1032–1037 and Si XII λ520 spectral line intensities, representative of the CME front transit.

  11. Super-cooled liquid water topped sub-arctic clouds and precipitation - investigation based on combination of ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsikko, Anne; Brus, David; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Filioglou, Maria; Komppula, Mika; Romakkaniemi, Sami

    2017-04-01

    In the high and mid latitudes super-cooled liquid water layers are frequently observed on top of clouds. These layers are difficult to forecast with numerical weather prediction models, even though, they have strong influence on atmospheric radiative properties, cloud microphysical properties, and subsequently, precipitation. This work investigates properties of super-cooled liquid water layer topped sub-arctic clouds and precipitation observed with ground-based in-situ (cloud probes) and remote-sensing (a cloud radar, Doppler and multi-wavelength lidars) instrumentation during two-month long Pallas Cloud Experiment (PaCE 2015) in autumn 2015. Analysis is based on standard Cloudnet scheme supplemented with new retrieval products of the specific clouds and their properties. Combination of two scales of observation provides new information on properties of clouds and precipitation in the sub-arctic Pallas region. Current status of results will be presented during the conference. The authors acknowledge financial support by the Academy of Finland (Centre of Excellence Programme, grant no 272041; and ICINA project, grant no 285068), the ACTRIS2 - European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 654109, the KONE foundation, and the EU FP7 project BACCHUS (grant no 603445).

  12. Histological observation of a gelatin sponge transplant loaded with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells combined with platelet-rich plasma in repairing an annulus defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Hu, Jianzhong; Lu, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    To research the histological characteristics of a gelatin sponge transplant loaded with goat BMSCs (bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) combined with PRP (platelet-rich plasma) in repairing an annulus defect. BMSCs were separated from the iliac crest of goats, sub-cultured and identified after the third generation. Then, PRP was obtained using blood from the jugular vein of goats via two degrees of centrifugation. In the animal experiments, the goats were divided into the following three groups: a sham group, an injury group and a therapeutic group. In the sham group, we decompressed the lamina and exposed the annulus fibrosus. In the injury group, we exposed the annulus fibrosus after decompression of the lamina and created a 1 × 1 cm defect in the annulus using surgical instruments. In the therapeutic group, after decompression of the lamina, we exposed the annulus, created a 1 × 1 cm defect using surgical instruments, and placed a gelatin sponge combined with BMSCs and PRP into the defect for a combined method of repair. Three, six and twelve weeks after the surgery, the previously damaged or undamaged annulus tissue was removed from the three groups. Then, the above tissue was assayed using HE (hematoxylin-eosin) staining, Masson trichrome staining, AB-PAS (Alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff) staining, and type II collagen staining and observed by microscopy. From the HE staining, we observed that the number of repair cells gradually increased. Compared to the injury group, the cell density and gross morphology of cells in the therapeutic group were closer to those of the sham group. As observed by Masson trichrome gelatin staining, many of the fibroblast cells or tissues were under repair, and as time progressed, the number of fibroblast cells and amount of tissue gradually increased. The results of the AB-PAS staining suggest that chondrocytes participated in the repair of the annulus. The level of type II collagen gradually increased, as determined

  13. Combine intravitreal bevacizumab with Nd:YAG laser hyaloidotomy for valsalva pre-macular haemorrhage and observe the internal limiting membrane changes:a spectralis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Hua

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Valsalva retinopathy was described as a particular form of retinopathy, pre-retinal and subinternal limiting membrane haemorrhages in nature that rarely may break through and become subhyloid or intravitreal, secondary to a sudden increase in intrathoracic pressure. We reported a new way that Nd:YAG laser for ILM hyaloidotomy in order to drain the sub-ILM blood into vitreous cavity combined with intravitreal bevacizumab to improve the absorption of blood. Therapeutic alliance make significant outcome, protecting vision in time. We used spectralis OCT to observe sub-ILM mix cells and special ILM structure in this lesion for the first time, as the spectralis OCT can reach histology level imagination.

  14. Observation of the rare $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Musella, Pasquale; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Krohn, Michael; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Ratnikov, Fedor; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Malik, Sudhir; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Korjenevski, Sergey; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Idzik, Marek; Morawski, Piotr; Moron, Jakub; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Swientek, Krzysztof; Szumlak, Tomasz; Beaucourt, Leo; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Decamp, Daniel; Déléage, Nicolas; Ghez, Philippe; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Marchand, Jean François; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Qian, Wenbin; Tisserand, Vincent; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tournefier, Edwige; Bifani, Simone; Farley, Nathanael; Griffith, Peter; Kenyon, Ian; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Mazurov, Alexander; McCarthy, James; Pescatore, Luca; Watson, Nigel; Williams, Matthew; Adinolfi, Marco; Benton, Jack; Brook, Nicholas; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Dalseno, Jeremy; Hampson, Thomas; Harnew, Samuel; Naik, Paras; Price, Eugenia; Prouve, Claire; Rademacker, Jonas; Richards, Sophie; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Skidmore, Nicola; Souza, Daniel; Velthuis, Jaap; Voong, David; Cojocariu, Lucian; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Grecu, Alexandru; Maciuc, Florin; Orlandea, Marius; Popovici, Bogdan; Stoica, Sabin; Straticiuc, Mihai; Barter, William; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; Cliff, Harry; Evans, Hannah Mary; Garra Tico, Jordi; Gibson, Valerie; Gregson, Sam; Haines, Susan; Jones, Christopher; Sirendi, Marek; Smith, Jackson; Ward, David; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Xie, Yuehong; Pesen, Erhan; Alessio, Federico; Archilli, Flavio; Barschel, Colin; Benson, Sean; Buytaert, Jan; Campora Perez, Daniel; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Charpentier, Philippe; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Clemencic, Marco; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Collins, Paula; Corti, Gloria; Couturier, Benjamin; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Durante, Paolo; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Gaspar, Clara; Gligorov, V.V.; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Gys, Thierry; Haen, Christophe; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Jacobsson, Richard; Johnson, Daniel; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Langhans, Benedikt; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lohn, Stefan; Mapelli, Alessandro; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Otto, Adam; Panman, Jacob; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Rihl, Mariana; Roiser, Stefan; Ruf, Thomas; Schindler, Heinrich; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schopper, Andreas; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; Tonelli, Diego; Trisovic, Ana; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; van Herwijnen, Eric; Wicht, Jean; Wyllie, Kenneth; Andreassen, Rolf; Davis, Adam; De Silva, Weeraddana; Meadows, Brian; Sokoloff, Michael; Sun, Liang; Todd, Jacob; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Baalouch, Marouen; Cogneras, Eric; Deschamps, Olivier; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Henrard, Pierre; Hoballah, Mostafa; Lefèvre, Regis; Maratas, Jan; Monteil, Stephane; Niess, Valentin; Perret, Pascal; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Witek, Mariusz; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Blanc, Frédéric; Dorigo, Mirco; Dupertuis, Frederic; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Gianì, Sebastiana; Haefeli, Guido; Jaton, Pierre; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Komarov, Ilya; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lopez-March, Neus; Märki, Raphael; Martinelli, Maurizio; Muster, Bastien; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Puig Navarro, Albert; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rouvinet, Julien; Schneider, Olivier; Soomro, Fatima; Szczypka, Paul; Tobin, Mark; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Veneziano, Giovanni; Xu, Zhirui; Carson, Laurence; Clarke, Peter; Cowan, Greig; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Ferguson, Dianne; Lambert, Dean; Luo, Haofei; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Muheim, Franz; Needham, Matthew; Playfer, Stephen; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Campana, Pierluigi; De Simone, Patrizia; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Palutan, Matteo; Rama, Matteo; Sarti, Alessio; Sciascia, Barbara; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Alexander, Michael; Beddow, John; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Eklund, Lars; Hynds, Daniel; Karodia, Sarah; Longstaff, Iain; Ogilvy, Stephen; Pappagallo, Marco; Sail, Paul; Skillicorn, Ian; Soler, Paul; Spradlin, Patrick; Bachmann, Sebastian; Bien, Alexander; Comerma-Montells, Albert; De Cian, Michel; Dordei, Francesca; Esen, Sevda; Färber, Christian; Gersabeck, Evelina; Grillo, Lucia; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Jaeger, Andreas; Kolpin, Michael; Kreplin, Katharina; Krocker, Georg; Leverington, Blake; Marks, Jörg; Meissner, Marco; Neuner, Max; Nikodem, Thomas; Seyfert, Paul; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Uwer, Ulrich; Vesterinen, Mika; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wiedner, Dirk; Zhelezov, Alexey; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Blouw, Johan; Britsch, Markward; Fontana, Marianna; Popov, Dmitry; Schmelling, Michael; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Ciezarek, Gregory; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; Egede, Ulrik; Fol, Philip; Golutvin, Andrey; Hall, Samuel; McCann, Michael; Owen, Patrick; Patel, Mitesh; Petridis, Konstantin; Redi, Federico; Sepp, Indrek; Smith, Eluned; Sutcliffe, William; Websdale, David; Palano, Antimo; Carbone, Angelo; Falabella, Antonio; Galli, Domenico; Marconi, Umberto; Moggi, Niccolò; Mussini, Manuel; Perazzini, Stefano; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Zangoli, Maria; Bonivento, Walter; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cardini, Alessandro; Cogoni, Violetta; Contu, Andrea; Lai, Adriano; Liu, Bo; Manca, Giulia; Oldeman, Rudolf; Saitta, Biagio; Vacca, Claudia; Andreotti, Mirco; Baldini, Wander; Bozzi, Concezio; Calabrese, Roberto; Corvo, Marco; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Luppi, Eleonora; Pappalardo, Luciano; Shapoval, Illya; Tellarini, Giulia; Tomassetti, Luca; Vecchi, Stefania; Anderlini, Lucio; Bizzeti, Andrea; Frosini, Maddalena; Graziani, Giacomo; Passaleva, Giovanni; Veltri, Michele; Cardinale, Roberta; Fontanelli, Flavio; Gambetta, Silvia; Patrignani, Claudia; Petrolini, Alessandro; Pistone, Alessandro; Fu, Jinlin; Geraci, Angelo; Neri, Nicola; Palombo, Fernando; Calvi, Marta; Cassina, Lorenzo; Gotti, Claudio; Khanji, Basem; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Matteuzzi, Clara; Amerio, Silvia; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Gallorini, Stefano; Gianelle, Alessio; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lupato, Anna; Morandin, Mauro; Rotondo, Marcello; Sestini, Lorenzo; Simi, Gabriele; Stroili, Roberto; Bedeschi, Franco; Cenci, Riccardo; Leo, Sabato; Marino, Pietro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Punzi, Giovanni; Stracka, Simone; Walsh, John; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Auriemma, Giulio; Bocci, Valerio; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Penso, Gianni; Pinci, Davide; Santacesaria, Roberta; Satriano, Celestina; Sciubba, Adalberto; Carboni, Giovanni; Furfaro, Emiliano; Santovetti, Emanuele; Satta, Alessia; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Kandybei, Sergii; Raniuk, Iurii; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Pugatch, Valery; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Malinin, Alexander; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Affolder, Anthony; Bowcock, Themistocles; Brown, Henry; Casse, Gianluigi; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dreimanis, Karlis; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Hennessy, Karol; Hutchcroft, David; Liles, Myfanwy; McSkelly, Ben; Patel, Girish; Price, Joseph David; Pritchard, Adrian; Rinnert, Kurt; Shears, Tara; Smith, Anthony; Appleby, Robert; Barlow, Roger; Bird, Thomas; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Borghi, Silvia; Brett, David; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Chen, Shanzhen; De Capua, Stefano; Dujany, Giulio; Gersabeck, Marco; Harrison, Jonathan; Hombach, Christoph; Klaver, Suzanne; Lafferty, George; McNab, Andrew; Parkes, Christopher; Pearce, Alex; Reichert, Stefanie; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Smith, Mark; Adrover, Cosme; Akar, Simon; Aslanides, Elie; Cogan, Julien; Kanso, Walaa; Le Gac, Renaud; Leroy, Olivier; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mordà, Alessandro; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Serrano, Justine; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Andrews, Jason; Hamilton, Brian; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Wimberley, Jack; Counts, Ian; Ilten, Philip; Williams, Mike; Filippov, Sergey; Gushchin, Evgeny; Kravchuk, Leonid; Belogurov, Sergey; Belyaev, Ivan; Egorychev, Victor; Golubkov, Dmitry; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Polyakov, Ivan; Savrina, Darya; Semennikov, Alexander; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Batozskaya, Varvara; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kurek, Krzysztof; Szczekowski, Marek; Ukleja, Artur; Wislicki, Wojciech; Aaij, Roel; Ali, Suvayu; David, Pieter; De Bruyn, Kristof; de Vries, Jacco; Farinelli, Chiara; Heijne, Veerle; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Jans, Eddy; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Merk, Marcel; Oggero, Serena; Pellegrino, Antonio; Snoek, Hella; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; van Beuzekom, Martinus; van Leerdam, Jeroen; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Ketel, Tjeerd; Koopman, Rose; Lambert, Robert W; Martinez Santos, Diego; Raven, Gerhard; Schiller, Manuel; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Tolk, Siim; Bondar, Alexander; Eidelman, Semen; Krokovny, Pavel; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Shekhtman, Lev; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Amhis, Yasmine; Barsuk, Sergey; Borsato, Martino; Kochebina, Olga; Lefrançois, Jacques; Machefert, Frederic; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Nicol, Michelle; Robbe, Patrick; Schune, Marie Helene; Teklishyn, Maksym; Vallier, Alexis; Viaud, Benoit; Wormser, Guy; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Derkach, Denis; Evans, Timothy; Gauld, Rhorry; Greening, Edward; Harnew, Neville; Hill, Donal; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Jalocha, Pawel; John, Malcolm; Lupton, Oliver; Malde, Sneha; Smith, Edmund; Stevenson, Scott; Thomas, Christopher; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Wilkinson, Guy; Ben-Haim, Eli; Charles, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; David, Pascal; Del Buono, Luigi; Henry, Louis; Polci, Francesco; An, Liupan; Gao, Yuanning; Jing, Fanfan; Li, Yiming; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhong, Liang; Amato, Sandra; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; De Paula, Leandro; Francisco, Oscar; Gandelman, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Lopes, Jose; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Nasteva, Irina; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Polycarpo, Erica; Potterat, Cédric; Rangel, Murilo; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Vieira, Daniel; Bediaga, Ignacio; De Miranda, Jussara; dos Reis, Alberto; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Gomes, Alvaro; Massafferri, André; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Baesso, Clarissa; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Göbel, Carla; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Grünberg, Oliver; Heß, Miriam; Voß, Christian; Waldi, Roland; Easo, Sajan; Nandakumar, Raja; Papanestis, Antonios; Ricciardi, Stefania; Wilson, Fergus; Artamonov, Alexander; Belous, Konstantin; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Guz, Yury; Novoselov, Alexey; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Popov, Alexander; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Shapkin, Mikhail; Stenyakin, Oleg; Yushchenko, Oleg; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Korolev, Mikhail; Leflat, Alexander; Nikitin, Nikolay; Alkhazov, Georgy; Bondar, Nikolay; Dzyuba, Alexey; Maev, Oleg; Sagidova, Naylya; Shcheglov, Yury; Vorobyev, Alexey; Artuso, Marina; Blusk, Steven; Borgia, Alessandra; Britton, Thomas; Ely, Scott; Gandini, Paolo; Garofoli, Justin; Gui, Bin; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Jurik, Nathan; Kelsey, Matthew; Mountain, Raymond; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Stone, Sheldon; Wang, Jianchun; Xing, Zhou; Zhang, Liming; Albrecht, Johannes; Brambach, Tobias; Cauet, Christophe; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Gavardi, Laura; Kruse, Florian; Meier, Frank; Niet, Ramon; Parkinson, Christopher John; Schlupp, Maximilian; Shires, Alexander; Spaan, Bernhard; Swientek, Stefan; Wishahi, Julian; Badalov, Alexey; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Graugés, Eugeni; Marin Benito, Carla; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Rives Molina, Vincente; Ruiz, Hugo; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Adeva, Bernardo; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; García Pardiñas, Julián; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vieites Diaz, Maria; McNulty, Ronan; Wallace, Ronan; Zhang, Wen Chao; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Onderwater, Gerco; Wilschut, Hans; Back, John; Blake, Thomas; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Dossett, David; Gershon, Timothy; Kreps, Michal; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Pilař, Tomas; Poluektov, Anton; Reid, Matthew; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Wallace, Charlotte; Whitehead, Mark; Anderson, Jonathan; Bernet, Roland; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bursche, Albert; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Elsasser, Christian; Graverini, Elena; Lionetto, Federica; Lowdon, Peter; Müller, Katharina; Serra, Nicola; Steinkamp, Olaf; Storaci, Barbara; Straumann, Ulrich; Tresch, Marco; Vollhardt, Achim

    2015-05-13

    A joint measurement is presented of the branching fractions $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in proton-proton collisions at the LHC by the CMS and LHCb experiments. The data samples were collected in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and in 2012 at 8 TeV. The combined analysis produces the first observation of the $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay, with a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations, and the best measurement of its branching fraction so far, and three standard deviation evidence for the $B^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay. The measurements are statistically compatible with SM predictions and impose stringent constraints on several theories beyond the SM.

  15. Combination of differential interference contrast with prism-type total internal fluorescence microscope for direct observation of polyamidoamine dendrimer nanoparticle as a gene delivery in living human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungah; Choi, Joon Sig; Kang, Seong Ho

    2007-11-01

    A combined system of differential interference contrast (DIC) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM) with a transmitted all-side polished dove prism was used for the direct monitoring of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nanoparticles as a gene delivery in living human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells. The PAMAM dendrimer conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was used to form a fluorescent nanoparticle with the plasmid DNA (complexes) in order to directly monitor the entry of the complexes inside living cells. The DIC image provided precise information of the living HEK 293 cellular structures. Without moving the cell, the TIRFM images of the PAMAM nanoparticle-DNA complexes on the all-side polished dove prism provided precise information on the distance between the cell membrane and the complexes (< 200 nm) as well as the real-time localization of the individual complexes in the cells. The complexes were observed in cytosol within 4 h after incubating the cells with the complexes in Dulbecco's modified eagle's medium. The localization data of the complexes inside the cell obtained by TIRFM were reconfirmed using 3D confocal microscopy images of the complexes at the subcellular localization. These results suggest that the combined system of DIC and all-side polished dove prism-type TIRFM is a powerful tool for the direct real-time monitoring of the internalization and subcellular localization of nanoparticles carrying genes through a nonviral approach for gene therapy.

  16. Investigating patterns and controls of groundwater up-welling in a lowland river by combining Fibre-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing with observations of vertical hydraulic gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krause

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the patterns and controls of aquifer–river exchange in a fast-flowing lowland river by the conjunctive use of streambed temperature anomalies identified with Fibre-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS and observations of vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG.

    FO-DTS temperature traces along this lowland river reach reveal discrete patterns with "cold spots" indicating groundwater up-welling. In contrast to previous studies using FO-DTS for investigation of groundwater–surface water exchange, the fibre-optic cable in this study was buried in the streambed sediments, ensuring clear signals despite fast flow and high discharges. During the observed summer baseflow period, streambed temperatures in groundwater up-welling locations were found to be up to 1.5 °C lower than ambient streambed temperatures. Due to the high river flows, the cold spots were sharp and distinctly localized without measurable impact on down-stream surface water temperature.

    VHG patterns along the stream reach were highly variable in space, revealing strong differences even at small scales. VHG patterns alone are indicators of both, structural heterogeneity of the stream bed as well as of the spatial heterogeneity of the groundwater–surface water exchange fluxes and are thus not conclusive in their interpretation. However, in combination with the high spatial resolution FO-DTS data we were able to separate these two influences and clearly identify locations of enhanced exchange, while also obtaining information on the complex small-scale streambed transmissivity patterns responsible for the very discrete exchange patterns. The validation of the combined VHG and FO-DTS approach provides an effective strategy for analysing drivers and controls of groundwater–surface water exchange, with implications for the quantification of biogeochemical cycling and contaminant transport at aquifer–river interfaces.

  17. Combining external and internal mixing representation of atmospheric aerosol for optical properties calculations: focus on absorption properties over Europe and North America using AERONET observations and AQMEII simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curci, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    the coating formation). We compare sunphotometer observations from the AERosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET, http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/) across Europe and North America for the year 2010 with simulations from the Air Quality Modeling Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII, http://aqmeii.jrc.ec.europa.eu/). The calculation of optical properties from simulated aerosol profiles is carried out using a single post-processing tool (FlexAOD, http://pumpkin.aquila.infn.it/flexaod/) that allows explicit and flexible assignment of the underlying assumptions mentioned above. We found that the combination of externally and internally mixed particles weighted through the F_in fraction gives the best agreement between models and observations, in particular regarding the single-scattering albedo.

  18. Huge seafloor movements associated with the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake observed by GPS/acoustic combination technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T.; Sato, M.; Ujihara, N.; Watanabe, S.; Fujita, M.; Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department, Japan Coast Guard, have been developing precise seafloor positioning systems using the GPS/acoustic combination technique under technical cooperation with the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo and carrying out campaign observations along the major trenches in the Pacific Ocean, such as the Japan Trench and the Nankai Trough. The primary purpose of these observations is to detect and monitor the crustal deformation caused by the subduction of the oceanic plate near the plate boundary where huge earthquakes repeatedly occur. On 11 March 2011, a large interplate earthquake [Mw = 9.0] occurred at the plate boundary off Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan. Various studies have been under way to understand the mechanism of occurrence of this earthquake. For example, the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) has reported coseismic displacements on land, on the basis of the dense GPS network. The largest displacement has been detected at the Oshika peninsula, amounting to about 5 m toward ESE and about 1 m downward. Because the Oshika peninsula is located about 130 km away from the epicenter of the earthquake, it is preferable to measure crustal movements closer to the focal regions, that is, on the seafloor, to better constrain the focal mechanism of the event. In order to monitor crustal movements offshore, we have been carrying out seafloor geodetic observations. Five sea-floor reference points were installed off the Tohoku region between 2000 and 2004 with campaign observations carried out three times a year on average. After the event, we conducted observations at these sites. Comparison between before and after the event yielded coseismic displacements of 5 to 24 m toward ESE and -0.8 to 3 m upward. In particular, at reference point near the epicenter, we detected a huge coseismic displacement of about 24 m toward ESE and about 3 m upward. This is more than four times larger than that

  19. Combined CpG and poly I:C stimulation of monocytes results in unique signaling activation not observed with the individual ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Ryan J; Kogut, Michael H; He, Haiqi

    2013-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) bind to components of microbes, activate cellular signal transduction pathways and stimulate innate immune responses. Previously, we have shown in chicken monocytes that the combination of CpG, the ligand for TLR21 (the chicken equivalent of TLR9), and poly I:C, the ligand for TLR3, results in a synergistic immune response. In order to further characterize this synergy, kinome analysis was performed on chicken monocytes stimulated with either unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) individually or in combination for either 1h or 4h. The analysis was carried out using chicken species-specific peptide arrays to study the kinase activity induced by the two ligands. The arrays are comprised of kinase target sequences immobilized on an array surface. Active kinases phosphorylate their respective target sequences, and these phosphorylated peptides are then visualized and quantified. A significant number of peptides exhibited altered phosphorylation when CpG and poly I:C were given together, that was not observed when either CpG or poly I:C was given separately. The unique, synergistic TLR agonist affected peptides represent protein members of signaling pathways including calcium signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and Endocytosis at the 1h time point. At the 4h time point, TLR agonist synergy influenced pathways included Adipocytokine signaling pathway, cell cycle, calcium signaling pathway, NOD-like receptor signaling pathway and RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway. Using nitric oxide (NO) production as the readout, TLR ligand synergy was also investigated using signaling protein inhibitors. A number of inhibitors were able to inhibit NO response in cells given CpG alone but not in cells given both CpG and poly I:C, as poly I:C alone does not elicit a significant NO response. The unique peptide phosphorylation induced by the combination of CpG and poly I:C and the

  20. Changes in serum lipids in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with a combination of tocilizumab and methotrexate compared with methotrexate alone for 24 weeks of observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Udachkina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. According to the some studies tocilizumab therapy (TCZ in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA is accompanied by deterioration of blood lipid profile. Aim. To study changes in serum lipid parameters in patients with RA treated with a combination of tocilizumab and methotrexate compared with methotrexate alone for 24 weeks of observation. Material and methods. Patients (n=72 with RA were included into the pilot non-randomized 24-week study and divided in two groups: 1 TCZ+MTX group (n=39; women 30; median age 51 [43-55] years; 6 i.v. infusions of TCZ 8 mg/kg + МТX 10-20 mg/week; 2 MTX group (n=33; women 23; mеdian age 56 [48-63] years; MTX 7.5-20 mg/week. Results. At the baseline, similar proatherogenic blood profile was observed in both groups. The patients of MTX group more frequently took statins (n=19; 57.6% compared with the group TCZ+MTX (n=7; 18%, (p<0.05. The lipid levels correlated positively with traditional risk factors (p<0.05. RA activity and duration correlated negatively with high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, (p<0.05. Good/satisfactory anti-inflammatory effect was achieved in both groups after 24 weeks of treatment. Patients of TCZ+MTX group showed an increase in total cholesterol and HDL-C levels by 11% and 110%, respectively and decrease in plasma atherogenic index (PAI by 47%, (p<0.05. HDL-C level increased by 22% and PAI decreased by 16% in patients of MTX group (p<0.05. Among patients of MTX group without statin therapy HDL-C as well as non-HDL-C levels were increased by 24% and 27%, respectively (p<0.05; PAI did not change significantly in this subgroup. Among patients of MTX group treated with statins isolated increase in HDL-C level by 22% and decrease in PAI by 37.3% (p<0.05 were observed. A number of patients with achieved target levels of all studied lipid parameters did not change significantly in both groups. Conclusions. TCZ+MTX combined therapy as well as MTX monotherapy are associated

  1. Zooming into local active galactic nuclei: the power of combining SDSS-IV MaNGA with higher resolution integral field unit observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Schnorr Müller, Allan; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Greene, Jenny E.; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Kelly, Michael; Liu, Guilin; Law, David R.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Thomas, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Ionized gas outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are ubiquitous in high-luminosity AGN with outflow speeds apparently correlated with the total bolometric luminosity of the AGN. This empirical relation and theoretical work suggest that in the range Lbol ˜ 1043-45 erg s-1 there must exist a threshold luminosity above which the AGN becomes powerful enough to launch winds that will be able to escape the galaxy potential. In this paper, we present pilot observations of two AGN in this transitional range that were taken with the Gemini North Multi-Object Spectrograph integral field unit (IFU). Both sources have also previously been observed within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV (SDSS) Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey. While the MaNGA IFU maps probe the gas fields on galaxy-wide scales and show that some regions are dominated by AGN ionization, the new Gemini IFU data zoom into the centre with four times better spatial resolution. In the object with the lower Lbol we find evidence of a young or stalled biconical AGN-driven outflow where none was obvious at the MaNGA resolution. In the object with the higher Lbol we trace the large-scale biconical outflow into the nuclear region and connect the outflow from small to large scales. These observations suggest that AGN luminosity and galaxy potential are crucial in shaping wind launching and propagation in low-luminosity AGN. The transition from small and young outflows to galaxy-wide feedback can only be understood by combining large-scale IFU data that trace the galaxy velocity field with higher resolution, small-scale IFU maps.

  2. Understanding the effect of disturbance from selective felling on the carbon dynamics of a managed woodland by combining observations with model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnington, Ewan M.; Casella, Eric; Dance, Sarah L.; Lawless, Amos S.; Morison, James I. L.; Nichols, Nancy K.; Wilkinson, Matthew; Quaife, Tristan L.

    2017-04-01

    The response of forests and terrestrial ecosystems to disturbance is an important process in the global carbon cycle in the context of a changing climate. This study focuses on the effect of selective felling (thinning) at a managed forest site. Previous statistical analyses of eddy covariance data at the study site had found that disturbance from thinning resulted in no significant change to net ecosystem carbon uptake. In order to better understand the effect of thinning on carbon fluxes, we use the mathematical technique of four-dimensional variational data assimilation. Data assimilation provides a compelling alternative to more common statistical analyses of flux data as it allows for the combination of many different sources of data, with the physical constraints of a dynamical model, to find an improved estimate of the state of a system. We develop new observation operators to assimilate daytime and nighttime net ecosystem exchange observations with a daily time step model, increasing observations available by a factor of 4.25. Our results support previous analyses, with a predicted net ecosystem carbon uptake for the year 2015 of 426 ± 116 g C m-2 for the unthinned forest and 420 ± 78 g C m-2 for the thinned forest despite a model-predicted reduction in gross primary productivity of 337 g C m-2. We show that this is likely due to reduced ecosystem respiration postdisturbance compensating for a reduction in gross primary productivity. This supports the theory of an upper limit of forest net carbon uptake due to the magnitude of ecosystem respiration scaling with gross primary productivity.

  3. Motor training and the combination of action observation and peripheral nerve stimulation reciprocally interfere with the plastic changes induced in primary motor cortex excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisio, Ambra; Avanzino, Laura; Biggio, Monica; Ruggeri, Piero; Bove, Marco

    2017-04-21

    AO-PNS is a stimulation protocol combining action observation (AO) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) to induce plasticity in the primary motor cortex (M1) (increased excitability). Another method to increase M1 excitability is motor training. The combination of two protocols, which individually induce long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in overlapping neural circuits, results in a transitory occlusion or reverse of this phenomenon. This study aimed to understand the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying AO-PNS by testing whether AO-PNS and motor training induced LTP-like plasticity in, at least partially, overlapping neural networks. One group of participants practiced a motor training (finger opposition movements) followed by AO-PNS, whereas another group performed the two protocols in reverse order. Motor performance was evaluated by means of a sensor-engineered glove and transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess M1 excitability before and after each conditioning protocol. Motor training increased movement frequency, suggesting the occurrence of motor learning in both groups. When applied on first, both motor training and AO-PNS significantly increased the motor-evoked potential (MEP), but occluded the increase of cortical excitability expected after the following protocol, leading to a significant decrease of MEP amplitude. These results suggest that motor training and AO-PNS act on partially overlapping neuronal networks, which include M1, and that AO-PNS might be able to induce LTP-like plasticity in a similar way to overt movement execution. This candidates AO-PNS as methodology potentially useful when planning rehabilitative interventions on patients who cannot voluntarily move. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-acting nifedipine for hypertensive patients in the Middle East and Morocco: observations on efficacy and tolerability of monotherapy or combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoneim RA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Raafat AL Ghoneim,1 Abdalla Kamal Omar,2 VJ Sebastian,3 Roland Kassab,4 George Akijian,5 Meryem Hafiz,6 Birgit Schmidt7 1Department of Nephrology, Dr Bakhsh Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Open Specialist Clinics, Dallah Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Cardiology, International Modern Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates; 4Department of Cardiology, St Joseph University School of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon; 5Internal Medicine (private clinic, Marka, Amman, Jordan; 6Medical Department, Bayer SA, Casablanca, Morocco; 7Global NIS, Bayer Vital GmbH, Leverkusen, Germany Background: The Middle Eastern and North African region of developing countries is associated with poor rates of blood pressure (BP control and antihypertensive prescribing patterns. This post hoc analysis of data from an international observational study aimed to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of long-acting nifedipine (30 mg or 60 mg; monotherapy or in combination in the Middle Eastern and Moroccan populations defined as having high cardiovascular risk. Methods: This was a prospective, noninterventional, multicenter observational study. Observations from patients (aged ≥ 18 years with treated or untreated hypertension from the Middle East (Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Lebanon, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen and Morocco are presented. Hypertension grade and cardiovascular risk were defined at baseline, and systolic/diastolic BP change was defined at post-baseline visits (≤3. Adverse events and ratings of therapy efficacy and patient/physician satisfaction were recorded. Results: The study included 1466 patients from the Middle East and 524 from Morocco. Characteristics of the populations differed, with a more severe hypertension profile in Moroccan patients. Despite these differences, nifedipine reduced BP to a similar extent in each group, with efficacy dependent on cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension grade and age. Few adverse

  5. Observational evidence of mesoscale variability of the Northern Current (North-Western Mediterranean Sea): a combined study via gliders, HF RADAR, surface drifters, and vessel data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Lucio; Berta, Maristella; Pietro Gasparini, Gian; Griffa, Annalisa; Gatimu Magaldi, Marcello; Marmain, Julien; Molcard, Anne; Vetrano, Anna; Béguery, Laurent; Borghini, Mireno

    2013-04-01

    Results from a combined observational effort put forth in December 2011 are here presented. The focus is on the mesoscale variability of the Northern Current (NC), the branch of the general North-Western Mediterranean cyclonic circulation extending from the Ligurian to the Catalan Sea (Albérola et al., Oceanologica Acta, vol. 18, n. 2, 1995). The study area, located between the Ligurian Sea and the Gulf of Lions, includes the part of French coast between Nice and Toulon, where only a few hydrographic data have been collected in the past. Dynamic instabilities of the NC, observed and reported in literature (Picco et al., Ocean Science, vol. 6, 2010), make this region particularly important, with consequences in the recirculation of the Ligurian Gyre and in the NC intrusions in the Gulf of Lions (Millot and Wald, Oceanologica Acta, vol. 3, n. 4, 1980). This works aims at providing experimental evidence of the effects that mesoscale exerts on the NC dynamics via an innovative and complementary data set. Two Slocum Gliders (a Shallow and a Deep one), both equipped with CTD and dissolved oxygen sensors, sampled the area within 70 km from the coast for about 20 days. The shallow one (200 m) realized six transects describing a "W"-shaped pattern from Nice to Toulon, whereas the deep one (1000 m) performed repeated cross-current sections off Toulon. Concurrent observations were obtained via: a) CTD and both Lowered and Vessel-Mounted ADCP transects obtained during a 5-day oceanographic cruise on board of the Research Vessel Urania; b) repeated deployments of surface drifters; c) a continuously-recording High Frequency (HF) RADAR which measures surface currents off Toulon in a 40 × 25 km2 region with high resolution both in space (2 km) and in time (1 hour). The combined use of data from the shallow glider and the ship-based ADCP measurements reveals the presence of an instability of the offshore front of the NC. Its location is confirmed by high-resolution satellite

  6. Estimating spatial distribution of daily snow depth with kriging methods: combination of MODIS snow cover area data and ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. L.; Wang, H. W.; Hou, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    Accurately measuring the spatial distribution of the snow depth is difficult because stations are sparse, particularly in western China. In this study, we develop a novel scheme that produces a reasonable spatial distribution of the daily snow depth using kriging interpolation methods. These methods combine the effects of elevation with information from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover area (SCA) products. The scheme uses snow-free pixels in MODIS SCA images with clouds removed to identify virtual stations, or areas with zero snow depth, to compensate for the scarcity and uneven distribution of stations. Four types of kriging methods are tested: ordinary kriging (OK), universal kriging (UK), ordinary co-kriging (OCK), and universal co-kriging (UCK). These methods are applied to daily snow depth observations at 50 meteorological stations in northern Xinjiang Province, China. The results show that the spatial distribution of snow depth can be accurately reconstructed using these kriging methods. The added virtual stations improve the distribution of the snow depth and reduce the smoothing effects of the kriging process. The best performance is achieved by the OK method in cases with shallow snow cover and by the UCK method when snow cover is widespread.

  7. First Observation of CP Violation in B0->D(*)CP h0 Decays by a Combined Time-Dependent Analysis of BaBar and Belle Data

    CERN Document Server

    BaBar, The; Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Adametz, A; Adye, T; Ahmed, H; Aihara, H; Akar, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Said, S Al; Andreassen, R; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arinstein, K; Arnaud, N; Asner, D M; Aston, D; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barberio, E; Bard, D J; Barlow, R J; Batignani, G; Beaulieu, A; Bellis, M; Ben-Haim, E; Bernard, D; Bernlochner, F U; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biswal, J; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Bobrov, A; Bomben, M; Bondar, A; Bonneaud, G R; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bozzi, C; Bracko, M; Briand, H; Browder, T E; Brown, D N; Bünger, C; Burchat, P R; Buzykaev, A R; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Casarosa, G; Cenci, R; Cervenkov, D; Chang, P; Chao, D S; Chauveau, J; Cheaib, R; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, C; Cheng, C H; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, H H F; Choi, S -K; Chrzaszcz, M; Cibinetto, G; Cinabro, D; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Cremaldi, L; Dalseno, J; Dasu, S; Davier, M; Davis, C L; De Mori, F; De Nardo, G; Denig, A G; Derkach, D; de Sangro, R; Dey, B; Di Lodovico, F; Dingfelder, J; Dittrich, S; Dolezal, Z; Dorfan, J; Drasal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Dutta, D; Ebert, M; Echenard, B; Eidelman, S; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Faccini, R; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Ferber, T; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Filippi, A; Finocchiaro, G; Fioravanti, E; Flood, K T; Ford, W T; Forti, F; Sevilla, M Franco; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gabyshev, N; Gamba, D; Garmash, A; Gary, J W; Garzia, I; Gaspero, M; Gaur, V; Gaz, A; Gershon, T J; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Gioi, L Li; Giorgi, M A; Glattauer, R; Godang, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Golubev, V B; Gorodeisky, R; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Grauges, E; Griessinger, K; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Grünberg, O; Guttman, N; Haba, J; Hafner, A; Hamilton, B; Hara, T; Harrison, P F; Hast, C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hearty, C; He, X H; Hess, M; Hitlin, D G; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Huard, Z; Hutchcroft, D E; Iijima, T; Inguglia, G; Innes, W R; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Izen, J M; Jaegle, I; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kass, R; Kawasaki, T; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, P; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; King, G J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Koch, H; Kodys, P; Kolomensky, Yu G; Korpar, S; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R; Kravchenko, E A; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lacker, H M; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Leddig, T; Diberder, F Le; Lee, D H; Lee, I S; Lee, M J; Lees, J P; Leith, D W G S; Leruste, Ph; Lewczuk, M J; Lewis, P; Libby, J; Lockman, W S; Long, O; Pegna, D Lopes; LoSecco, J M; Lou, X C; Lueck, T; Luitz, S; Lukin, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Luth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; MacFarlane, D B; Malaescu, B; Mallik, U; Manoni, E; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Martellotti, S; Martinez-Vidal, F; Masuda, M; Mattison, T S; Matvienko, D; McKenna, J A; Meadows, B T; Miyabayashi, K; Miyashita, T S; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Monge, M R; Moon, H K; Morandin, M; Muller, D R; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakazawa, H; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nayak, M; Neal, H; Neri, N; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nugent, I M; Oberhof, B; Ocariz, J; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olaiya, E O; Olsen, J; Ongmongkolkul, P; Onorato, G; Onuchin, A P; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Oyanguren, A; Pakhlova, G; Pakhlov, P; Palano, A; Pal, B; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Vazquez, W Panduro; Paoloni, E; Park, C W; Park, H; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pedlar, T K; Peimer, D R; Peruzzi, I M; Pesantez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petric, M; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Piilonen, L E; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Prasad, V; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Puccio, E M T; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Pushpawela, B G; Rama, M; Randle-Conde, A; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Ribezl, E; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Röhrken, M; Roney, J M; Roodman, A; Rossi, A; Rostomyan, A; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Sacco, R; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Santoro, V; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schindler, R H; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schroeder, T; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Serednyakov, S I; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Simard, M; Simi, G; Simon, F; Simonetto, F; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snyder, A; So, R Y; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sohn, Y -S; Sokoloff, M D; Sokolov, A; Solodov, E P; Solovieva, E; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Staric, M; Stocchi, A; Stroili, R; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Summers, D J; Sun, L; Tamponi, U; Taras, P; Tasneem, N; Teramoto, Y; Tisserand, V; Todyshev, K Yu; Toki, W H; Touramanis, C; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Uwer, U; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vasseur, G; Va'vra, J; Verderi, M; Vinokurova, A; Vitale, L; Vorobyev, V; Voss, C; Wagner, M N; Wagner, S R; Waldi, R; Walsh, J J; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; West, C A; Williams, K M; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wisniewski, W J; Won, E; Wormser, G; Wright, D M; Wu, S L; Wulsin, H W; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zallo, A; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-01-01

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B0->D(*)CP h0 decays, where the light neutral hadron h0 is a pi0, eta or omega meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the CP eigenstates K+ K-, K0S pi0 or K0S omega. The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the Y(4S) resonance by the BaBar and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain ( 471 +/- 3 ) x 10^6 BB pairs recorded by the BaBar detector and ( 772 +/- 11 ) x 10^6, BB pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters -eta_f S = +0.66 +/- 0.10 (stat.) +/- 0.06 (syst.) and C = -0.02 +/- 0.07 (stat.) +/- 0.03 (syst.). These results correspond to the first observation of CP violation in B0->D(*)CP h0 decays. The hypothesis of no mixing-induced CP violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  8. Interaction vs. observation: distinctive modes of social cognition in human brain and behavior? A combined fMRI and eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylén, Kristian; Allen, Micah; Hunter, Bjørk K; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Human cognition has usually been approached on the level of individual minds and brains, but social interaction is a challenging case. Is it best thought of as a self-contained individual cognitive process aiming at an "understanding of the other," or should it rather be approached as an collective, inter-personal process where individual cognitive components interact on a moment-to-moment basis to form coupled dynamics? In a combined fMRI and eye-tracking study we directly contrasted these models of social cognition. We found that the perception of situations affording social contingent responsiveness (e.g., someone offering or showing you an object) elicited activations in regions of the right posterior temporal sulcus and yielded greater pupil dilation corresponding to a model of coupled dynamics (joint action). In contrast, the social-cognitive perception of someone "privately" manipulating an object elicited activation in medial prefrontal cortex, the right inferior frontal gyrus and right inferior parietal lobus, regions normally associated with Theory of Mind and with the mirror neuron system. Our findings support a distinction in social cognition between social observation and social interaction, and demonstrate that simple ostensive cues may shift participants' experience, behavior, and brain activity between these modes. The identification of a distinct, interactive mode has implications for research on social cognition, both in everyday life and in clinical conditions.

  9. Interaction versus Observation: distinctive modes of social cognition in human brain and behavior? A combined fMRI and eye-tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian eTylen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cognition has usually been approached on the level of individual minds and brains, but social interaction is a challenging case. Is it best thought of as a self-contained individual cognitive process aiming at an ‘understanding of the other’, or should it rather be approached as an collective, inter-personal process where individual cognitive components interact on a moment-to-moment basis to form coupled dynamics? In a combined fMRI and eye tracking study we directly contrasted these models of social cognition. We found that the perception of situations affording social contingent responsiveness (e.g. someone offering or showing you an object elicited activations in regions of the right posterior temporal sulcus and yielded greater pupil dilation corresponding to a model of coupled dynamics (joint action. In contrast, the social-cognitive perception of someone ‘privately’ manipulating an object elicited activation in medial prefrontal cortex, the right inferior frontal gyrus and right inferior parietal lobus, regions normally associated with Theory of Mind and with the mirror neuron system. Our findings support a distinction in social cognition between social observation and social interaction, and demonstrate that simple ostensive cues may shift participants’ experience, behavior and brain activity between these modes. The identification of a distinct, interactive mode has implications for research on social cognition, both in everyday life and in clinical conditions.

  10. On the Performance of Multi-Instrument Solar Flare Observations During Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Ryan O.; Ireland, Jack

    2018-02-01

    The current fleet of space-based solar observatories offers us a wealth of opportunities to study solar flares over a range of wavelengths. Significant advances in our understanding of flare physics often come from coordinated observations between multiple instruments. Consequently, considerable efforts have been, and continue to be, made to coordinate observations among instruments ( e.g. through the Max Millennium Program of Solar Flare Research). However, there has been no study to date that quantifies how many flares have been observed by combinations of various instruments. Here we describe a technique that retrospectively searches archival databases for flares jointly observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/ EUV Variability Experiment (EVE - Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph (MEGS)-A and -B, Hinode/( EUV Imaging Spectrometer, Solar Optical Telescope, and X-Ray Telescope), and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Out of the 6953 flares of GOES magnitude C1 or greater that we consider over the 6.5 years after the launch of SDO, 40 have been observed by 6 or more instruments simultaneously. Using each instrument's individual rate of success in observing flares, we show that the numbers of flares co-observed by 3 or more instruments are higher than the number expected under the assumption that the instruments operated independently of one another. In particular, the number of flares observed by larger numbers of instruments is much higher than expected. Our study illustrates that these missions often acted in cooperation, or at least had aligned goals. We also provide details on an interactive widget ( Solar Flare Finder), now available in SSWIDL, which allows a user to search for flaring events that have been observed by a chosen set of instruments. This provides access to a broader range of events in order to answer specific science questions. The difficulty in scheduling coordinated

  11. Observations of Magnetic Evolution and Network Flares Driven by Photospheric Flows in the Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attie, Raphael; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2017-08-01

    The quiet Sun may be the biggest laboratory to study physical elementary processes of fundamental importance to space plasma. The advantage is the continuous availability of small-scale events, carrying the hidden microphysics that is responsible for larger-scale phenomena. By small-scale events, we mean spatial dimensions of a few Mm at most, and durations of less than an hour. I present here an attempt to describe and understand the coupling between the photospheric flows, the photospheric magnetic flux, and small-scale energetic transient events. By adapting and improving the highly efficient Balltracking technique for Hinode/SOT data, we relate the fine structures of the supergranular flow fields with the magnetic flux evolution. For studying the dynamics of the latter, and more precisely, the magnetic flux cancellation at sites of energy releases, we applied a new feature tracking algorithm called "Magnetic Balltracking" -- which tracks photospheric magnetic elements -- to high-resolution magnetograms from Hinode/SOT.Using observations of the low corona in soft X-rays with Hinode/XRT, we analyse the triggering mechanism of small-scale network flares. By tracking both the flow fields on the one hand, and the magnetic motions on the other hand, we relate the flows with cancelling magnetic flux. We identify two patterns of horizontal flows that act as catalysts for efficient magnetic reconnection: (i) Funnel-shaped streamlines in which the magnetic flux is carried, and (ii) large-scale vortices (~10 Mm and above) at the network intersections, in which distant magnetic features of opposite polarities seem to be sucked in and ultimately vanish. The excess energy stored in the stressed magnetic field of the vortices is sufficient to power network flares.Prospects for determining the magnetic energy budget in the quiet sun are discussed.

  12. [Effectiveness and safety of conversion therapy with the combination of sirolimus with low dose cyclosporine in renal transplantation recipients: a five-year clinical observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L; Ding, T; Wang, X X; Lin, Z B; Chen, G

    2016-05-31

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of the conversion therapy from traditional cyclosporine (CsA) triple immunosuppression therapy to sirolimus (SRL) combined with low dose CsA and prednisone (Pred) in renal transplantation recipients in a five-year follow-up period. A prospective, open-label non-randomized study was performed with 46 renal allograft recipients who visited Tongji Hospital regularly for follow-up visits between January 2007 and May 2011 and were taking CsA+ mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)+ Pred. Conversion therapy to SRL+ low dose CsA+ Pred was initiated after renal transplantation. The recipients were allocated to 2 groups according to their renal function and proteinuria before the conversion: active conversion group [n=27, serum creatinine (SCr) ≤ 140 μmol/L with no or minimal proteinuria] and passive conversion group [n=19, SCr>140 μmol/L with less than moderate proteinuria]. After conversion, dosages of SRL and CsA were adjusted for trough levels of 5-7 μg/L and 20-60 μg/L, respectively. SCr and urine protein were compared before and after the conversion in five-year follow-up. Incidence of acute rejection, renal graft survival and SRL-related adverse effects of the immunosuppressive regimen were also observed. After conversion, an average 63% dose reduction of CsA was achieved in all the patients. In the active conversion group, the mean SCr level was (110±19) μmol/L at the time of conversion. Eight patients in this group withdrew from the study during the follow-up period for the following reasons: arthralgia (1 case), deteriorated proteinuria (2 cases), chronic diarrhea (2 cases), mild or suspicious acute rejection (2 cases), and recurrent fever (1 case). The rest patients (19/27) with a mean follow-up time of 5 years had a stable SCr level [(103±12) μmol/L] and a 100% 5-year graft survival. In the passive conversion group, the mean SCr level was (205±45) μmol/L at the time of conversion. There were 4 patients quitting the study

  13. Effect on quality of life of switching to combined oral contraception based on natural estrogen: an observational, multicentre, prospective phase IV study (ZOCAL Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lete, Iñaki; de la Viuda, Esther; Pérez-Campos, Ezequiel; Martínez, María Ángeles Gómez; Sanchez-de la Rosa, Rainel; Novalbos, Jesús; Sánchez-Borrego, Rafael

    2016-08-01

    This observational, multicentre, prospective phase IV study examined change in health-related quality of life (QOL) from baseline to 6 months in women initiating combined oral contraception (COC) based on natural estrogen. Eligible women attending a baseline and 6-month gynaecology appointment belonged to one of three groups: group 1 used barrier contraception (condoms) and elected to continue this method; group 2 used condoms and elected to switch to COC based on natural estrogen; group 3 used COC based on ethinylestradiol and elected to switch to COC based on natural estrogen. The Spanish Society of Contraception (SEC)-QOL scale assessed health-related QOL. Secondary outcomes included symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, intermenstrual bleeding, duration and intensity of menstrual bleeding, contraception continuation rate, and tolerability. A total of 857 women were enrolled and 785 completed the study. Group 2 (n = 224 completed) had significantly lower SEC-QOL global and dimension scores at baseline and significantly greater increases in SEC-QOL from baseline to 6 months compared with groups 1 (n = 72) and 3 (n = 489). Group 3 reported a similar SEC-QOL score to that of group 1 at baseline but showed significantly greater improvement in SEC-QOL global and psychological scores from baseline to 6 months. Among women receiving COC based on natural estrogen, the contraception continuation rate was 713/780 (91.4%); treatment-related adverse events were reported by 13/780 (1.7%). Improved SEC-QOL after 6 months was found in women who were dissatisfied with their current contraception at baseline and chose to switch to COC based on natural estrogen.

  14. Combining radar and direct observation to estimate pelican collision risk at a proposed wind farm on the Cape west coast, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Andrew R; Reid, Tim; du Plessis, Johan; Colyn, Robin; Benn, Grant; Millikin, Rhonda

    2018-01-01

    Pre-construction assessments of bird collision risk at proposed wind farms are often confounded by insufficient or poor quality data describing avian flight paths through the development area. These limitations can compromise the practical value of wind farm impact studies. We used radar- and observer-based methods to quantify great white pelican flights in the vicinity of a planned wind farm on the Cape west coast, South Africa, and modelled turbine collision risk under various scenarios. Model outputs were combined with pre-existing demographic data to evaluate the possible influence of the wind farm on the pelican population, and to examine impact mitigation options. We recorded high volumes of great white pelican movement through the wind farm area, coincident with the breeding cycle of the nearby colony and associated with flights to feeding areas located about 50 km away. Pelicans were exposed to collision risk at a mean rate of 2.02 High Risk flights.h-1. Risk was confined to daylight hours, highest during the middle of the day and in conditions of strong north-westerly winds, and 82% of High Risk flights were focused on only five of the proposed 35 turbine placements. Predicted mean mortality rates (22 fatalities.yr-1, 95% Cl, 16-29, with average bird and blade speeds and 95% avoidance rates) were not sustainable, resulting in a negative population growth rate (λ = 0.991). Models suggested that removal of the five highest risk turbines from the project, or institution of a curtailment regimen that shuts down at least these turbines at peak traffic times, could theoretically reduce impacts to manageable levels. However, in spite of the large quantities of high quality data used in our analyses, our collision risk model remains compromised by untested assumptions about pelican avoidance rates and uncertainties about the existing dynamics of the pelican population, and our findings are probably not reliable enough to ensure sustainable development.

  15. [Clnical observation, of the effects of lattice ultra pulse carbon dioxide laser combined with traditional Chinese medicine on the treatment of hyperplastic scar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lei; Zhenming, Hao; Lifeng, Yu; Peng, Duan; Yanbin, Meng

    2015-06-01

    To explore the clinical effects of lattice ultra pulse carbon dioxide laser combined with traditional Chinese medicine ( Fuchunsan ) on the treatment of postburn hyperplastic scar. Sixty-three patients with hyperplastic scar after burn injury hospitalized from February 2012 to June 2014 in our department were treated with lattice ultra pulse carbon dioxide laser combined with traditional Chinese medicine (Fuchunsan). Patients were divided into early stage group (E, n = 35), middle stage group (M, n = 25), and late stage group ( L, n = 3) according to the formation time of scar, which was respectively 3 weeks to 3 months, longer than 3 months and less than or equal to 6 months, and 3 to 15 years in groups E, M, and L. The number of times of laser treatment of patients in each group was recorded. The degree of scar pain in patients of the three groups was assessed by the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) before treatment and after treatment for 1, 2, and 3 times. The scar condition of patients in groups E and M was assessed by the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) before treatment and after treatment for 1, 3, and 5 times. Patients in group L did not receive VSS assessment but were evaluated by clinical observation only. Photos of scar in treating area were taken before treatment and after treatment for 3 and 5 times to evaluate the clinical effect. Data were processed with t test. Patients in groups E and M were treated with laser for (4.8 ± 1.1) and (7.7 ± 2.1) times respectively. In group L, the treatment was stopped in 2 patients after laser treatment for 5 times, and 1 patient received laser treatment for 12 times. The degree of pain in patients of groups E and M was alleviated significantly after treatment for one time, and the number of patients scoring 1-4 point(s) in NRS increased from 5 cases to 38 cases. After treatment for 2 and 3 times, the increase in the number of patients scoring 1-4 point (s) in NRS was on a small scale. Before treatment and after treatment

  16. Combining Remote Sensing Data, Airborne Snow Observations and High Resolution Hydrologic Modeling to Improve SWE Simulation and Validation over Mountainous Terrain in Western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaida, C. M.; Andreadis, K.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Painter, T. H.; Bormann, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    The mountain snowpack is an important component of the hydrologic cycle and an essential resource for communities across the globe. From scientists to water resource managers and politicians, accurate information on snow amount, extent, and melt rate is key in understanding physical processes within the earth system and for planning a sustainable existence. Being able to correctly simulate snow, both historically and projecting into the future, is not only a great necessity, but also a challenge. Combining the power of satellite and airborne observations with numerical model simulations can bring us closer to having a more complete picture of the current and future state of the snowpack. In this study, the VIC (Variable Infiltration Capacity) macroscale hydrologic model is employed over Western United States (WUS) at a horizontal resolution of 0.0175°, or 3 km2, to simulated the snowpack during the recent drought this area has been experiencing (WY 2013-2015). Remote sensing data (PRISM, MERRA) are used as meteorological forcing, as well as in the assimilation process (MODSCAG) for a more optimal estimation of snow water equivalent (SWE). The model is run under two scenarios, with and without assimilation of MODSCAG snow cover, and the two cases are compared against in situ and airborne SWE products (Airborne Snow Observatory, ASO). Several questions are addressed: how does a spatially distributed snow product like ASO improve validation of high-resolution SWE model simulations, compared to validation against sparsely available in-situ measurements, which are often only available at low-mid elevations? ASO provides a unique and comprehensive view of the snowpack in both space and time, and over complex terrain of mountain watersheds, which has not been previously available. Such comparison can also help identify the level of improvement when assimilation of snow cover is used in estimating modeled SWE. These results can help improve the models we use, from which

  17. Simulated Time Lags of Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA Lightcurves as an Indication of Loop Heating Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Caroline; Winebarger, Amy; Lionello, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The precise nature of the heating mechanism (location, duration) in coronal loops is still a matter of enormous research. We present results from a 1D hydrodynamic loop simulation of a coronal loop which was run using different parameters such as loops length (50, 200, and 500 Mm), maximum temperature reached (3MK and 10MK), and abundances. For each scenario the model outputs were used to calculate the corresponding lightcurves as seen by XRT/Be-thin and various EUV AIA channels. The lag time between the peak of these lightcurves was computed using cross-correlation and plotted as a function of loop length. Additional results were computed using the 0D EBTEL code in order to test the compatibility of the two codes and to investigate additional loop lengths. Initial results indicate that the long (greater than 5000s) lags observed in the approx. 100Mm loops of active regions can only be reproduced using photospheric abundances and much longer loop lengths.

  18. Incidence of virological failure and major regimen change of initial combination antiretroviral therapy in the Latin America and the Caribbean: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar, Carina; Jenkins, Cathy A; Shepherd, Bryan E; Padgett, Denis; Mejía, Fernando; Ribeiro, Sayonara Rocha; Cortes, Claudia P; Pape, Jean W; Madero, Juan Sierra; Fink, Valeria; Sued, Omar; McGowan, Catherine; Cahn, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    Access to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is expanding in Latin America (Mexico, Central America, and South America) and the Caribbean. We assessed the incidence of and factors associated with regimen failure and regimen change of initial ART in this region. This observational cohort study included antiretroviral-naive adults starting ART from 2000 to 2014 at sites in seven countries throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. Primary outcomes were time from ART initiation until virological failure, major regimen modification, and a composite endpoint of the first of virological failure or major regimen modification. Cumulative incidence of the primary outcomes was estimated with death considered a competing event. 14,027 patients starting ART were followed up for a median of 3.9 years (2.0-6.5): 8374 (60%) men, median age 37 years (IQR 30-44), median CD4 count 156 cells per μL (61-253), median plasma HIV RNA 5.0 log10 copies per mL (4.4-5.4), and 3567 (28%) had clinical AIDS. 1719 (12%) patients had virological failure and 1955 (14%) had a major regimen change. Excluding the site in Haiti, which did not regularly measure HIV RNA, cumulative incidence of virological failure was 7.8% (95% CI 7.2-8.5) 1 year after ART initiation, 19.2% (18.2-20.2) at 3 years, and 25.8% (24.6-27.0) at 5 years; cumulative incidence of major regimen change was 5.9% (5.3-6.4) at 1 year, 12.7% (11.9-13.5) at 3 years, and 18.2% (17.2-19.2) at 5 years. Incidence of major regimen change at the site in Haiti was 10.7% (95% CI 9.7-11.6) at 5 years. Virological failure was associated with younger age (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.03, 95% CI 1.68-2.44, for 20 years vs 40 years), infection through injection drug use (vs infection through heterosexual sex; 1.60, 1.02-2.52), and initiation in earlier calendar years (1.28, 1.13-1.46, for 2002 vs 2006), but was not significantly associated with boosted protease inhibitor-based regimens (vs non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor; 1

  19. Comparing soil functions for a wide range of agriculture soils focusing on production for bioenergy using a combined isotope-based observation and modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistert, Hannes; Herbstritt, Barbara; Weiler, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Increase crop production for bioenergy will result in changes in land use and the resulting soil functions and may generate new chances and risks. However, detailed data and information are still missing how soil function may be altered under changing crop productions for bioenergy, in particular for a wide range of agricultural soils since most data are currently derived from individual experimental sites studying different bioenergy crops at one location. We developed a new, rapid measurement approach to investigate the influence of bioenergy plants on the water cycle and different soil functions (filter and buffer of water and N-cycling). For this approach, we drilled 89 soil cores (1-3 m deep) in spring and fall at 11 sites with different soil properties and climatic conditions comparing different crops (grass, corn, willow, poplar, and other less common bioenergy crops) and analyzing 1150 soil samples for water content, nitrate concentration and stable water isotopes. We benchmarked a soil hydrological model (1-D numerical Richards equation, ADE, water isotope fractionation including liquid and vapor composition of isotopes) using longer-term climate variables and water isotopes in precipitation to derive crop specific parameterization and to specifically validate the differences in water transport and water partitioning into evaporation, transpiration and groundwater recharge among the sites and crops using the water isotopes in particular. The model simulation were in good agreement with the observed isotope profiles and allowed us to differentiate among the different crops. We defined different indicators for the soil functions considered in this study. These indicators included the proportion of groundwater recharge, transit time of water (different percentiles) though the upper 2m and nutrient leaching potential (e.g. nitrate) during the dormant season from the rooting zone. The parameterized model was first used to calculate the indicators for the

  20. When to initiate combined antiretroviral therapy to reduce mortality and AIDS-defining illness in HIV-infected persons in developed countries: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cain, Lauren E.; Logan, Roger; Robins, James M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Sabin, Caroline; Bansi, Loveleen; Justice, Amy; Goulet, Joseph; van Sighem, Ard; de Wolf, Frank; Bucher, Heiner C.; von Wyl, Viktor; Esteve, Anna; Casabona, Jordi; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Seng, Remonie; Meyer, Laurence; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Muga, Roberto; Lodi, Sara; Lanoy, Emilie; Costagliola, Dominique; Hernan, Miguel A.; Ainsworth, J.; Anderson, J.; Babiker, A.; Delpech, V.; Dunn, D.; Easterbrook, P.; Fisher, M.; Gazzard, B.; Gilson, R.; Gompels, M.; Hill, T.; Johnson, M.; Leen, C.; Orkin, C.; Phillips, A.; Pillay, D.; Porter, K.; Sabin, C.; Schwenk, A.; Walsh, J.; Bansi, L.; Glabay, A.; Thomas, R.; Jones, K.; Perry, N.; Pullin, A.; Churchill, D.; Nelson, M.; Asboe, D.; Bulbeck, S.; Mandalia, S.; Clarke, J.; Munshi, S.; Post, F.; Khan, Y.; Patel, P.; Karim, F.; Duffell, S.; Man, S. L.; Williams, I.; Dooley, D.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Grabowska, H.; Chaloner, C.; Ismajani Puradiredja, D.; Weber, J.; Kemble, C.; Mackie, N.; Winston, A.; Wilson, A.; Bezemer, D. O.; Gras, L. A. J.; Kesselring, A. M.; van Sighem, A. I.; Smit, C.; Zhang, S.; Zaheri, S.; Prins, J. M.; Boer, K.; Bos, J. C.; Geerlings, S. E.; Godfried, M. H.; Haverkort, M. E.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Lange, J. M. A.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Pajkrt, D.; van der Poll, T.; Reiss, P.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van der Valk, M.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; van Vugt, M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Schreij, G.; Lowe, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Bravenboer, B.; Pronk, M. J. H.; van der Ende, M. E.; van der Feltz, M.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Nouwen, J. L.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; de Ruiter, E. D.; Slobbe, L.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Verbon, A.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; Driessen, G.; Hartwig, N. G.; Branger, J.; Kauffmann, R. H.; Schippers, E. F.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alleman, M. A.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; Kroon, F. P.; Arend, S. M.; de Boer, M. G. J.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; Jolink, H.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; Bronsveld, W.; Kortmann, W.; van Twillert, G.; Vriesendorp, R.; Leyten, E. M. S.; van Houte, D.; Polee, M. B.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Brinkman, K.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Smit, P. M.; Weijer, S.; Juttmann, J. R.; Brouwer, A. E.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K. D.; Koopmans, P. P.; Brouwer, A. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; van der Flier, M.; de Groot, R.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; van Assen, S.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; Stek, C. J.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.; Arends, J. E.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; van der Hilst, J. C. H.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L. J.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Peters, E. J. G.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Danner, S. A.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Claessen, F. A. P.; de Jong, E. V.; Perenboom, R. M.; bij de Vaate, E. A.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J.; Gisolf, E. H.; van den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; Duits, A. J.; Winkel, K.; Abgrall, S.; Barin, F.; Bentata, M.; Billaud, E.; Boue, F.; Burty, C.; Cabie, A.; Costagliola, D.; Cotte, L.; de Truchis, P.; Duval, X.; Duvivier, C.; Enel, P.; Fredouille-Heripret, L.; Gasnault, J.; Gaud, C.; Gilquin, J.; Grabar, S.; Katlama, C.; Khuong, M. A.; Lang, J. M.; Lascaux, A. S.; Launay, O.; Mahamat, A.; Mary-Krause, M.; Matheron, S.; Meynard, J. L.; Pavie, J.; Pialoux, G.; Pilorge, F.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Pradier, C.; Reynes, J.; Rouveix, E.; Simon, A.; Tattevin, P.; Tissot-Dupont, H.; Viard, J. P.; Viget, N.; Salomon, V.; Jacquemet, N.; Guiguet, M.; Lanoy, E.; Lievre, L.; Selinger-Leneman, H.; Lacombe, J. M.; Potard, V.; Bricaire, F.; Herson, S.; Desplanque, N.; Girard, P. M.; Meyohas, M. C.; Picard, O.; Cadranel, J.; Mayaud, C.; Clauvel, J. P.; Decazes, J. M.; Gerard, L.; Molina, J. M.; Diemer, M.; Sellier, P.; Honore, P.; Jeantils, V.; Tassi, S.; Mechali, D.; Taverne, B.; Bouvet, E.; Crickx, B.; Ecobichon, J. L.; Picard-Dahan, C.; Yeni, P.; Berthe, H.; Dupont, C.; Chandemerle, C.; Mortier, E.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Weiss, L.; Salmon, D.; Auperin, I.; Roudiere, L.; Fior, R.; Delfraissy, J. F.; Goujard, C.; Jung, C.; Lesprit, P.; Vittecoq, D.; Fraisse, P.; Rey, D.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Stahl, J. P.; Lecercq, P.; Gourdon, F.; Laurichesse, H.; Fresard, A.; Lucht, F.; Bazin, C.; Verdon, R.; Chavanet, P.; Arvieux, C.; Michelet, C.; Choutet, P.; Goudeau, A.; Maiotre, M. F.; Hoen, B.; Eglinger, P.; Faller, J. P.; Borsa-Lebas, F.; Caron, F.; Daures, J. P.; May, T.; Rabaud, C.; Berger, J. L.; Remy, G.; Arlet-Suau, E.; Cuzin, L.; Massip, P.; Thiercelin Legrand, M. F.; Pontonnier, G.; Yasdanpanah, Y.; Dellamonica, P.; Pugliese, P.; Aleksandrowicz, K.; Quinsat, D.; Ravaux, I.; Delmont, J. P.; Moreau, J.; Gastaut, J. A.; Retornaz, F.; Soubeyrand, J.; Galinier, A.; Ruiz, J. M.; Allegre, T.; Blanc, P. A.; Bonnet-Montchardon, D.; Lepeu, G.; Granet-Brunello, P.; Esterni, J. P.; Pelissier, L.; Cohen-Valensi, R.; Nezri, M.; Chadapaud, S.; Laffeuillade, A.; Raffi, F.; Boibieux, A.; Peyramond, D.; Livrozet, J. M.; Touraine, J. L.; Trepo, C.; Strobel, M.; Bissuel, F.; Pradinaud, R.; Sobesky, M.; Contant, M.; Aebi, C.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Boni, J.; Brazzola, P.; Bucher, H. C.; Burgisser, P.; Calmy, A.; Cattacin, S.; Cavassini, M.; Cheseaux, J. J.; Drack, G.; Dubs, R.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fischer, M.; Flepp, M.; Fontana, A.; Francioli, P.; Furrer, H. J.; Fux, C.; Gayet-Ageron, A.; Gerber, S.; Gorgievski, M.; Gunthard, H.; Gyr, T.; Hirsch, H.; Hirschel, B.; Hosli, I.; Husler, M.; Kaiser, L.; Kahlert, C.; Karrer, U.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, T.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez, B.; Muller, N.; Nadal, D.; Paccaud, F.; Pantaleo, G.; Raio, L.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schupbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffe, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Wyler, C. A.; Yerly, S.; Casabona, J.; Miro, J. M.; Alquezar, A.; Isern, V.; Esteve, A.; Podzamczer, D.; Murillas, J.; Gatell, J. M.; Aguero, F.; Tural, C.; Clotet, B.; Ferrer, E.; Riera, M.; Segura, F.; Navarro, G.; Force, L.; Vilaro, J.; Masabeu, A.; Garcia, I.; Guadarrama, M.; Romero, A.; Agusti, C.; Montoliu, A.; Ortega, N.; Lazzari, E.; Puchol, E.; Sanchez, M.; Blanco, J. L.; Garcia-Alcaide, F.; Martinez, E.; Mallolas, J.; Lopez-Dieguez, M.; Garcia-Goez, J. F.; Sirera, G.; Romeu, J.; Jou, A.; Negredo, E.; Miranda, C.; Capitan, M. C.; Olmo, M.; Barragan, P.; Saumoy, M.; Bolao, F.; Cabellos, C.; Pena, C.; Sala, M.; Cervantes, M.; Jose Amengual, M.; Navarro, M.; Penelo, E.; Barrufet, P.; Berenguer, J.; del Amo, J.; Garcia, F.; Gutierrez, F.; Labarga, P.; Moreno, S.; Munoz, M. A.; Caro-Murillo, A. M.; Sobrino, P.; Jarrin, I.; Gomez Sirvent, J. L.; Rodriguez, P.; Aleman, M. R.; Alonso, M. M.; Lopez, A. M.; Hernandez, M. I.; Soriano, V.; Barreiro, P.; Medrano, J.; Rivas, P.; Herrero, D.; Blanco, F.; Vispo, M. E.; Martin, L.; Ramirez, G.; de Diego, M.; Rubio, R.; Pulido, F.; Moreno, V.; Cepeda, C.; Hervas, R. L.; Iribarren, J. A.; Arrizabalaga, J.; Aramburu, M. J.; Camino, X.; Rodriguez-Arrondo, F.; von Wichmann, M. A.; Pascual, L.; Goenaga, M. A.; Masia, M.; Ramos, J. M.; Padilla, S.; Sanchez-Hellin, V.; Bernal, E.; Escolano, C.; Montolio, F.; Peral, Y.; Lopez, J. C.; Miralles, P.; Cosin, J.; Gutierrez, I.; Ramirez, M.; Padilla, B.; Vidal, F.; Sanjuan, M.; Peraire, J.; Veloso, S.; Vilades, C.; Lopez-Dupla, M.; Olona, M.; Vargas, M.; Aldeguer, J. L.; Blanes, M.; Lacruz, J.; Salavert, M.; Montero, M.; Cuellar, S.; de los Santos, I.; Sanz, J.; Oteo, J. A.; Blanco, J. R.; Ibarra, V.; Metola, L.; Sanz, M.; Perez-Martinez, L.; Sola, J.; Uriz, J.; Castiello, J.; Reparaz, J.; Arriaza, M. J.; Irigoyen, C.; Antela, A.; Casado, J. L.; Dronda, F.; Moreno, A.; Perez, M. J.; Lopez, D.; Gutierrez, C.; Hernandez, B.; Pumares, M.; Marti, P.; Garcia, L.; Page, C.; Hernandez, J.; Pena, A.; Munoz, L.; Parra, J.; Viciana, P.; Leal, M.; Lopez-Cortes, L. F.; Trastoy, M.; Mata, R.; Justice, A. C.; Fiellin, D. A.; Mattocks, K.; Braithwaite, S.; Brandt, C.; Bryant, K.; Cook, R.; Conigliaro, J.; Crothers, K.; Chang, J.; Crystal, S.; Day, N.; Erdos, J.; Freiberg, M.; Kozal, M.; Gandhi, N.; Gaziano, M.; Gerschenson, M.; Good, B.; Gordon, A.; Goulet, J. L.; Hernan, M. A.; Kraemer, K.; Lim, J.; Maisto, S.; Miller, P.; Mole, L.; O'Connor, P.; Papas, R.; Robins, J. M.; Rinaldo, C.; Roberts, M.; Samet, J.; Tierney, B.; Whittle, J.; Rimland, D.; Jones-Taylor, C.; Oursler, K. A.; Titanji, R.; Brown, S.; Garrison, S.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Masozera, N.; Goetz, M.; Leaf, D.; Simberkoff, M.; Blumenthal, D.; Leung, J.; Butt, A.; Hoffman, E.; Gibert, C.; Peck, R.; Brettle, R.; Darbyshire, J.; Fidler, S.; Goldberg, D.; Hawkins, D.; Jaffe, H.; Johnson, A.; McLean, K.; Cursley, A.; Ewings, F.; Fairbrother, K.; Gnatiuc, L.; Lodi, S.; Murphy, B.; Smit, E.; Ward, F.; Douglas, G.; Kennedy, N.; Pritchard, J.; Andrady, U.; Rajda, N.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; Drake, S.; Gilleran, G.; White, D.; Ross, J.; Toomer, S.; Hewart, R.; Wilding, H.; Woodward, R.; Dean, G.; Heald, L.; Horner, P.; Glover, S.; Bansaal, D.; Eduards, S.; Carne, C.; Browing, M.; Das, R.; Stanley, B.; Estreich, S.; Magdy, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Fraser, P.; Hayman, B.; Jebakumar, S. P. R.; Joshi, U.; Ralph, S.; Wade, A.; Mette, R.; Lalik, J.; Summerfield, H.; El-Dalil, A.; France, A. J.; White, C.; Robertson, R.; Gordon, S.; McMillan, S.; Morris, S.; Lean, C.; Vithayathil, K.; McLean, L.; Winter, A.; Gale, D.; Jacobs, S.; Goorney, B.; Howard, L.; Tayal, S.; Short, L.; Green, S.; Williams, G.; Sivakumar, K.; Bhattacharyya, D. N.; Monteiro, E.; Minton, J.; Dhar, J.; Nye, F.; DeSouza, C. B.; Isaksen, A.; McDonald, L.; Franca, A.; William, L.; Jendrulek, I.; Peters, B.; Shaunak, S.; El-Gadi, S.; Easterbrook, P. J.; Mazhude, C.; Johnstone, R.; Fakoya, A.; Mchale, J.; Waters, A.; Kegg, S.; Mitchell, S.; Byrne, P.; Rice, P.; Mullaney, S. A.; McCormack, S.; David, D.; Melville, R.; Phillip, K.; Balachandran, T.; Mabey, S.; Sukthankar, A.; Murphy, C.; Wilkins, E.; Ahmad, S.; Haynes, J.; Evans, E.; Ong, E.; Grey, R.; Meaden, J.; Bignell, C.; Loay, D.; Peacock, K.; Girgis, M. R.; Morgan, B.; Palfreeman, A.; Wilcox, J.; Tobin, J.; Tucker, L.; Saeed, A. M.; Chen, F.; Deheragada, A.; Williams, O.; Lacey, H.; Herman, S.; Kinghorn, D.; Devendra, S. V.; Wither, J.; Dawson, S.; Rowen, D.; Harvey, J.; Bridgwood, A.; Singh, G.; Chauhan, M.; Kellock, D.; Young, S.; Dannino, S.; Kathir, Y.; Rooney, G.; Currie, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Devendra, S.; Keane, F.; Booth, G.; Green, T.; Arumainayyagam, J.; Chandramani, S.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Robinson, T.; Curless, E.; Gokhale, R.; Tariq, A.; Luzzi, G.; Fairley, I.; Wallis, F.; Loze, B.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Prevoteau, F.; Morel, P.; Timsit, J.; Oksenhendeler, E.; Morlat, P.; Bonarek, M.; Bonnet, F.; Nouts, C.; Louis, I.; Reliquet, V.; Sauser, F.; Biron, C.; Mounoury, O.; Hue, H.; Brosseau, D.; Ghosn, J.; Rannou, M. T.; Bergmann, J. F.; Badsi, E.; Rami, A.; Parrinello, M.; Samanon-Bollens, D.; Campa, P.; Tourneur, M.; Desplanques, N.; Cabane, J.; Tredup, J.; Herriot, E.; Jeanblanc, F.; Chiarello, P.; Makhloufi, D.; Blanc, A. P.; Baillat, V.; Lemoing, V.; Merle de Boever, C.; Tramoni, C.; Sobesky, G.; Abel, S.; Beaujolais, V.; Slama, L.; Chakvetadze, C.; Berrebi, V.; Fournier, I.; Gerbe, J.; Leport, C.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Longuet, P.; Boucherit, S.; Koffi, K.; Augustin-Normand, C.; Miailhes, P.; Thoirain, V.; Brochier, C.; Souala, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Montpied, G.; Beytoux, J.; Jacomet, C.; Pare, A.; Morelon, S.; Olivier, C.; Lortholary, O.; Dupont, B.; Maignan, A.; Ragnaud, J. M.; Raymond, I.; Mondor, H.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Lelievre, J. D.; Dominguez, S.; Dumont, C.; Aumaitre, H.; Delmas, B.; Saada, M.; Medus, M.; Guillevin, L.; Tahi, T.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Pavel, S.; Marien, M. C.; Muller, E.; Drenou, B.; Beck, C.; Benomar, M.; Tubiana, R.; Ait Mohand, H.; Chermak, A.; Ben Abdallah, S.; Amirat, N.; Brancion, C.; Touam, F.; Drobacheff, C.; Folzer, A.; Obadia, M.; Prudhomme, L.; Bonnet, E.; Balzarin, F.; Pichard, E.; Chennebault, J. M.; Fialaire, P.; Loison, J.; Galanaud, P.; Bornarel, D.; Six, M.; Ferret, P.; Batisse, D.; Gonzales-Canali, G.; Devidas, A.; Chevojon, P.; Turpault, I.; Lafeuillade, A.; Cheret, A.; Philip, G.; Stein, A.; Ravault, I.; Chavanet, C.; Buisson, M.; Treuvetot, S.; Nau, P.; Bastides, F.; Boyer, L.; Wassoumbou, S.; Bernard, L.; Domart, Y.; Merrien, D.; Mignot, A.; Greder Belan, A.; Gayraud, M.; Bodard, L.; Meudec, A.; Beuscart, C.; Daniel, C.; Pape, E.; Mourier, L.; Vinceneux, P.; Simonpoli, A. M.; Zeng, A.; Jacquet, M.; Fournier, L.; Fuzibet, J. G.; Sohn, C.; Rosenthal, E.; Quaranta, M.; Chaillou, S.; Sabah, M.; Pasteur, L.; Audhuy, B.; Schieber, A.; Moreau, P.; Niault, M.; Vaillant, O.; Huchon, G.; Compagnucci, A.; de Lacroix Szmania, I.; Richier, L.; Lamaury, I.; Saint-Dizier, F.; Garipuy, D.; Drogoul, M. P.; Poizot Martin, I.; Fabre, G.; Lambert de Cursay, G.; Abraham, B.; Perino, C.; Lagarde, P.; David, F.; Veil, S.; Roche-Sicot, J.; Saraux, J. L.; Lepretre, A.; Fampin, B.; Uludag, A.; Morin, A. S.; Bletry, O.; Zucman, D.; Regnier, A.; Girard, J. J.; Quinsat, D. T.; Heripret, L.; Grihon, F.; Houlbert, D.; Ruel, M.; Chemlal, K.; Nicolle, C.; Debab, Y.; Tremollieres, F.; Perronne, V.; Duffaut, H.; Slama, B.; Perre, P.; Miodovski, C.; Guermonprez, G.; Dulioust, A.; Ballanger, R.; Boudon, P.; Malbec, D.; Patey, O.; Semaille, C.; Deville, J.; Beguinot, I.; Chambrin, V.; Pignon, C.; Estocq, G. A.; Levy, A.; Duracinsky, M.; Le Bras, P.; Ngussan, M. S.; Peretti, D.; Medintzeff, N.; Lambert, T.; Segeral, O.; Lezeau, P.; Laurian, Y.; Piketty, C.; Karmochkine, M.; Eliaszewitch, M.; Jayle, D.; Kazatchkine, M.; Colasante, U.; Nouaouia, W.; Vilde, J. L.; Bollens, D.; Binet, D.; Diallo, B.; Fonquernie, L.; Lagneau, J. L.; Pietrie, M. P.; Sicard, D.; Stieltjes, N.; Michot, J.; Bourdillon, F.; Obenga, G.; Escaut, L.; Bolliot, C.; Schneider, L.; Iguertsira, M.; Tomei, C.

    2011-01-01

    Most clinical guidelines recommend that AIDS-free, HIV-infected persons with CD4 cell counts below 0.350 × 10(9) cells/L initiate combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), but the optimal CD4 cell count at which cART should be initiated remains a matter of debate. To identify the optimal CD4 cell

  1. Curative Metatarsal Bone Surgery Combined with Intralesional Administration of Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor in Diabetic Neuropathic Ulceration of the Forefoot: A Prospective, Open, Uncontrolled, Nonrandomized, Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristides L. Garcia Herrera, MD, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The combination of curative metatarsal bone surgery with intralesional administration of recombinant human EGF resulted in a significant reduction in the re-epithelization time, recidivism, and development of new diabetic lesions. The safety profile was appropriate. However, more randomized, triple-blind, and placebo trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this new therapy.

  2. The Added Value of the Combined Use of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule: Diagnostic Validity in a Clinical Swedish Sample of Toddlers and Young Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Eric; Sturm, Harald; Bölte, Sven

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic validity of the new research algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the revised algorithms of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule was examined in a clinical sample of children aged 18-47 months. Validity was determined for each instrument separately and their combination against a clinical consensus…

  3. Combining litter observations with a regional ocean model to identify sources and sinks of floating debris in a semi-enclosed basin: The Adriatic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Daniel F.; Suaria, Giuseppe; Aliani, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    or to predict its fate, crucial information for management and mitigation policies. Particle tracking techniques have seen extensive use in these roles, however, most previous studies have used simplistic initial conditions based on bulk average inputs of debris to the system. Here, observations of floating...... anthropogenic macro debris in the Adriatic Sea are used to define initial conditions (number of particles, location, and time) in a Lagrangian particle tracking model. Particles are advected backward and forward in time for 60 days (120 days total) using surface velocities from an operational regional ocean...... model. Sources and sinks for debris observed in the central and southern Adriatic in May 2013 and March 2015 included the Italian coastline from Pescara to Brindisi, the Croatian island of Mljet, and the coastline from Dubrovnik through Montenegro to Albania. Debris observed in the northern Adriatic...

  4. Ecological change, sliding baselines and the importance of historical data: lessons from Combining [corrected] observational and quantitative data on a temperate reef over 70 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Gatti

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of environmental change on ecosystems requires the identification of baselines that may act as reference conditions. However, the continuous change of these references challenges our ability to define the true natural status of ecosystems. The so-called sliding baseline syndrome can be overcome through the analysis of quantitative time series, which are, however, extremely rare. Here we show how combining historical quantitative data with descriptive 'naturalistic' information arranged in a chronological chain allows highlighting long-term trends and can be used to inform present conservation schemes. We analysed the long-term change of a coralligenous reef, a marine habitat endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. The coralligenous assemblages of Mesco Reef (Ligurian Sea, NW Mediterranean have been studied, although discontinuously, since 1937 thus making available both detailed descriptive information and scanty quantitative data: while the former was useful to understand the natural history of the ecosystem, the analysis of the latter was of paramount importance to provide a formal measure of change over time. Epibenthic assemblages remained comparatively stable until the 1990s, when species replacement, invasion by alien algae, and biotic homogenisation occurred within few years, leading to a new and completely different ecosystem state. The shift experienced by the coralligenous assemblages of Mesco Reef was probably induced by a combination of seawater warming and local human pressures, the latter mainly resulting in increased water turbidity; in turn, cumulative stress may have favoured the establishment of alien species. This study showed that the combined analysis of quantitative and descriptive historical data represent a precious knowledge to understand ecosystem trends over time and provide help to identify baselines for ecological management.

  5. Ecological change, sliding baselines and the importance of historical data: lessons from Combining [corrected] observational and quantitative data on a temperate reef over 70 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Giulia; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Parravicini, Valeriano; Rovere, Alessio; Peirano, Andrea; Montefalcone, Monica; Massa, Francesco; Morri, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of environmental change on ecosystems requires the identification of baselines that may act as reference conditions. However, the continuous change of these references challenges our ability to define the true natural status of ecosystems. The so-called sliding baseline syndrome can be overcome through the analysis of quantitative time series, which are, however, extremely rare. Here we show how combining historical quantitative data with descriptive 'naturalistic' information arranged in a chronological chain allows highlighting long-term trends and can be used to inform present conservation schemes. We analysed the long-term change of a coralligenous reef, a marine habitat endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. The coralligenous assemblages of Mesco Reef (Ligurian Sea, NW Mediterranean) have been studied, although discontinuously, since 1937 thus making available both detailed descriptive information and scanty quantitative data: while the former was useful to understand the natural history of the ecosystem, the analysis of the latter was of paramount importance to provide a formal measure of change over time. Epibenthic assemblages remained comparatively stable until the 1990s, when species replacement, invasion by alien algae, and biotic homogenisation occurred within few years, leading to a new and completely different ecosystem state. The shift experienced by the coralligenous assemblages of Mesco Reef was probably induced by a combination of seawater warming and local human pressures, the latter mainly resulting in increased water turbidity; in turn, cumulative stress may have favoured the establishment of alien species. This study showed that the combined analysis of quantitative and descriptive historical data represent a precious knowledge to understand ecosystem trends over time and provide help to identify baselines for ecological management.

  6. Combining litter observations with a regional ocean model to identify sources and sinks of floating debris in a semi-enclosed basin: The Adriatic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Daniel F.; Suaria, Giuseppe; Aliani, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Visual ship transect surveys provide crucial information about the density, and spatial distribution of floating anthropogenic litter in a basin. However, such observations provide a 'snapshot' of local conditions at a given time and cannot be used to deduce the provenance of the litter or to pre......Visual ship transect surveys provide crucial information about the density, and spatial distribution of floating anthropogenic litter in a basin. However, such observations provide a 'snapshot' of local conditions at a given time and cannot be used to deduce the provenance of the litter...

  7. Cortico-cortical connectivity between right parietal and bilateral primary motor cortices during imagined and observed actions: A combined TMS/tDCS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eFeurra

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous TMS studies showed functional connections between the parietal cortex (PC and the primary motor cortex (M1 during tasks of different reaching-to-grasp movements. Here, we tested whether the same network is involved in cognitive processes such as imagined or observed actions. Single pulse TMS of the right and left M1 during rest and during a motor imagery and an action observation task (i.e. an index-thumb pinch grip in both cases was used to measure corticospinal excitability changes before and after conditioning of the right PC by 10 minutes of cathodal, anodal or sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. Corticospinal excitability was indexed by the size of motor evoked potentials (MEPs from the contralateral FDI (target and ADM (control muscles. Results showed selective ipsilateral effects on the M1 excitability, exclusively for motor imagery processes: anodal tDCS enhanced the MEPs’ size from the FDI muscle, whereas cathodal tDCS decreased it. Only cathodal tDCS impacted corticospinal facilitation induced by action observation. Sham stimulation was always uneffective. These results suggest that motor imagery, differently from action observation, is sustained by a strictly ipsilateral parieto-motor cortex circuits. Results might have implication for neuromodulatory rehabilitative purposes.

  8. Assessing total water storage and identifying flood events over Tonlé Sap basin in Cambodia using GRACE and MODIS satellite observations combined with hydrological models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangdamrongsub, N.; Ditmar, P.G.; Steele-Dunne, S.C.; Gunter, B.C.; Sutanudjaja, E.H.

    Abstract In this study, satellite observations including gravity (GRACE), terrestrial reflectance (MODIS), and global precipitation (TRMM) data, along with the output from the PCR-GLOBWB hydrological model, are used to generate monthly and sub-monthly terrestrial water storage (TWS) estimates and

  9. EU HELCATS Project WP7: Combining Observations of Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) and Heliospheric Visible-Light Imaging of CMEs and SIRs for Space-Weather Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Mario Mark; Barnes, David; Eastwood, Jonathan; Krupar, Vratislav; Magdalenic, Jasmina; Harrison, Richard; Davies, Jackie; Fallows, Richard

    2017-04-01

    The Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service (HELCATS) project is one of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (EU FP7) projects. The project is primarily targeted to the cataloguing of transient and background structures observed in the heliosphere by the visible-light Heliospheric Imagers (HIs) on board the twin spacecraft STEREO mission, including identification of their source regions and in-situ signatures. The current version of the HELCATS manually-generated Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) Catalogue contains more than 1,000 CMEs observed between 2007 and 2016, and the current HELCATS Stream Interaction Region (SIR) Catalogue contains signatures of nearly 200 co-rotating density structures in the ecliptic plane. HELCATS also includes an assessment of the complementary nature of ground-based radio observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS), which is yielding catalogues of IPS features (from EISCAT/MERLIN/ESR and/or LOFAR data, where available) that are being compared to the STEREO HI catalogues. Here we discuss the near-final status of this aspects of HELCATS and provide any insights that have been gleaned from initial analyses of this joint cataloguing exercise. Such insights relate, in particular, to the space-weather exploitation of these two complementary observational techniques. For example, there are cases where a CME is imaged by the STEREO HI instruments but then not detected using IPS, and vice versa, and preliminary investigations of these will be discussed.

  10. The mechanism of mid-latitude Pi2 waves in the upper ionosphere as revealed by combined Doppler and magnetometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Pilipenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of simultaneous ionospheric Doppler sounding and ground magnetometer observations of low-latitude Pi2 waves is revised. We compare the theoretical estimates of the ionospheric Doppler velocity for the same amplitude of the ground magnetic disturbances produced by a large-scale compressional mode and an Alfvén mode. The plasma vertical displacement caused by the wave electric field is shown to be the dominating effect. Taking into account the correction of the previous paper, the observations of low-latitude Pi2 in the F layer ionosphere by Doppler sounding and SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radars give consistent results. We suggest that the Doppler response to Pi2 waves is produced by the Alfvén wave component, but not the fast-mode component, whereas the ground magnetic signal is composed from both Alfvén and fast magnetosonic modes.

  11. Towards combining GPM and MFG observations to monitor near real time heavy precipitation at fine scale over India and nearby oceanic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anoop; Rafiq, Mohammd

    2017-12-01

    This is the first attempt to merge highly accurate precipitation estimates from Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) with gap free satellite observations from Meteosat to develop a regional rainfall monitoring algorithm to estimate heavy rainfall over India and nearby oceanic regions. Rainfall signature is derived from Meteosat observations and is co-located against rainfall from GPM to establish a relationship between rainfall and signature for various rainy seasons. This relationship can be used to monitor rainfall over India and nearby oceanic regions. Performance of this technique was tested by applying it to monitor heavy precipitation over India. It is reported that our algorithm is able to detect heavy rainfall. It is also reported that present algorithm overestimates rainfall areal spread as compared to rain gauge based rainfall product. This deficiency may arise from various factors including uncertainty caused by use of different sensors from different platforms (difference in viewing geometry from MFG and GPM), poor relationship between warm rain (light rain) and IR brightness temperature, and weak characterization of orographic rain from IR signature. We validated hourly rainfall estimated from the present approach with independent observations from GPM. We also validated daily rainfall from this approach with rain gauge based product from India Meteorological Department (IMD). Present technique shows a Correlation Coefficient (CC) of 0.76, a bias of -2.72 mm, a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 10.82 mm, Probability of Detection (POD) of 0.74, False Alarm Ratio (FAR) of 0.34 and a Skill score of 0.36 with daily rainfall from rain gauge based product of IMD at 0.25° resolution. However, FAR reduces to 0.24 for heavy rainfall events. Validation results with rain gauge observations reveal that present technique outperforms available satellite based rainfall estimates for monitoring heavy rainfall over Indian region.

  12. Monitoring the regional ocean circulation around New Caledonia from a combination of repeated glider measurements and other in situ observing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Frédéric; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Durand, Fabien; Terre, Thierry; Panché, Jean-Yves; Mahiouz, Karim; Béguery, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    The South-West Pacific basin is a key region for the ocean circulation and the climate system of the tropical Pacific. First it is the region where a broad westward-flowing current - the South Equatorial Current - encounters a large number of islands and subdivides into multiple intense zonal jets. Second it is the region where thermocline waters of subtropical origin transit in their route towards the equator, giving to this area a potential role for the low-frequency modulation of El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The main objective of the present poster is to describe a multi-observational program (AltiGlidEx) to monitor two major currents of the South-West Pacific ocean - the East Caledonian Current and the South Caledonian Jet - that flow respectively along the East coast of New Caledonia (167°E-168°E, 22°S-17°S) and South of New Caledonia (27°S-23°S). One expected achievement of the AltiGlidEx program is to provide a platform of multiple in situ observations, including repeated sections with SLOCUM and SPRAY gliders, a long-term subsurface current mooring and dedicated cruises, to ultimately assess the performance of the new AltiKa altimeter - that will be embarked on the SARAL satellite in 2013 - to observe swift boundary currents near the coast of New Caledonia in 2013-2014. This program takes full advantage of the potential of gliders to estimate (i) the geostrophic component of the velocity from the surface down to 1000 meters from hydrological measurements and (ii) the depth-averaged currents during each dive through the GPS-derived dead-reckoning of the vehicle (based on the comparison of the total horizontal distance during each dive that can be computed from the GPS positions of the diving/surfacing points with the one that would be expected in the absence of ocean currents from a flight model, once an adequate flight model is known for the glider). In this presentation, the preliminary results of the first 3 glider experiments (2010, 2011

  13. Long-term behavior understanding based on the expert-based combination of short-term observations in high-resolution CCTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Klamer; Burghouts, Gertjan; van der Stap, Nanda; Westerwoudt, Victor; Bouma, Henri; Kruithof, Maarten; Baan, Jan; ten Hove, Johan-Martijn

    2016-10-01

    The bottleneck in situation awareness is no longer in the sensing domain but rather in the data interpretation domain, since the number of sensors is rapidly increasing and it is not affordable to increase human data-analysis capacity at the same rate. Automatic image analysis can assist a human analyst by alerting when an event of interest occurs. However, common state-of-the-art image recognition systems learn representations in high-dimensional feature spaces, which makes them less suitable to generate a user-comprehensive message. Such data-driven approaches rely on large amounts of training data, which is often not available for quite rare but high-impact incidents in the security domain. The key contribution of this paper is that we present a novel real-time system for image understanding based on generic instantaneous low-level processing components (symbols) and flexible user-definable and user-understandable combinations of these components (sentences) at a higher level for the recognition of specific relevant events in the security domain. We show that the detection of an event of interest can be enhanced by utilizing recognition of multiple short-term preparatory actions.

  14. Comparative effectiveness of injectable penicillin versus a combination of penicillin and gentamicin in children with pneumonia characterised by indrawing in Kenya: protocol for an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Lucas; Perera-Salazar, Rafael; McFadden, Emily; English, Mike

    2017-09-18

    WHO treatment guidelines are widely recommended for guiding treatment for millions of children with pneumonia every year across multiple low-income and middle-income countries. Guidelines are based on synthesis of available evidence that provides moderate certainty in evidence of effects for forms of pneumonia that can result in hospitalisation. However, trials have included fewer children from Africa than other settings, and it is suggested that African children with pneumonia have higher mortality. Thus, despite improving access to recommended treatments and deployment with high coverage of childhood vaccines, pneumonia remains one of the top causes of mortality for children in Kenya. Establishing whether there are benefits of alternative treatment regimens to help reduce mortality would require pragmatic clinical trials. However, these remain relatively expensive and time consuming. This protocol describes an approach to using secondary analysis of a new, large observational dataset as a potentially cheaper and quicker way to examine the comparative effectiveness of penicillin versus penicillin plus gentamicin in treatment of indrawing pneumonia. Addressing this question is important, as although it is now recommended that this form of pneumonia is treated with oral medication as an outpatient, it remains associated with non-trivial mortality that may be higher outside trial populations. We will use a large observational dataset that captures data on all admissions to 13 Kenyan county hospitals. These data represent the findings of clinicians in practice and, because the system was developed for large observational research, pose challenges of non-random treatment allocation and missing data. To overcome these challenges, this analysis will use a rigorous approach to study design, propensity score methods and multiple imputation to minimise bias. The primary data are held by hospitals participating in the Kenyan Clinical Information Network project with de

  15. Ashra Neutrino Telescope Array (NTA): Combined Imaging Observation of Astroparticles — For Clear Identification of Cosmic Accelerators and Fundamental Physics Using Cosmic Beams —

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Kifune, Tadashi

    In VHEPA (very high energy particle astronomy) 2014 workshop, focused on the next generation explorers for the origin of cosmic rays, held in Kashiwa, Japan, reviewing and discussions were presented on the status of the observation of GeV-TeV photons, TeV-PeV neutrinos, EeV-ZeV hadrons, test of interaction models with Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and theoretical aspects of astrophysics. The acceleration sites of hadrons, i.e., sources of PeV-EeV cosmic rays, should exist in the universe within the GZK-horizon even in the remotest case. We also affirmed that the hadron acceleration mechanism correlates with cosmic ray composition so that it is important to investigate the acceleration mechanism in relevance to the composition survey at PeV-EeV energy. We regard that LHC and astrophysics theories are ready to be used to probe into hadron acceleration mechanism in the universe. Recently, IceCube has reported detection of three events of neutrinos with energies around 1 PeV and additional events at lower energies, which significantly deviate from the expected level of background events. It is necessary to observe GeV-TeV photon, EeV-ZeV hadron and TeV-PeV neutrino all together, in order to understand hadronic interactions of cosmic rays in the PeV-EeV energy region. It is required to make a step further toward exploring the PeV-EeV universe with high accuracy and high statistics observations for both neutrinos and gamma rays simultaneously, by using the instrument such as Ashra Neutrino Telescope Array (NTA). Wide and fine survey of gamma-rays and neutrinos with simultaneously detecting Cherenkov and fluorescence light with NTA will guide us to a new intriguing stage of recognizing astronomical objects and non-thermal phenomena in ultra-high energy region, in addition, new aspect about the fundamental concepts of physics beyond our presently limited understanding; the longstanding problem of cosmic ray origin, the radiation mechanism of gamma-rays, neutrino and

  16. Derivation of Land Surface Albedo at High Resolution by Combining HJ-1A/B Reflectance Observations with MODIS BRDF Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Land surface albedo is an essential parameter for monitoring global/regional climate and land surface energy balance. Although many studies have been conducted on global or regional land surface albedo using various remote sensing data over the past few decades, land surface albedo product with a high spatio–temporal resolution is currently very scarce. This paper proposes a method for deriving land surface albedo with a high spatio–temporal resolution (space: 30 m and time: 2–4 days. The proposed method works by combining the land surface reflectance data at 30 m spatial resolution obtained from the charge-coupled devices in the Huanjing-1A and -1B (HJ-1A/B satellites with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS land surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF parameters product (MCD43A1, which is at a spatial resolution of 500 m. First, the land surface BRDF parameters for HJ-1A/B land surface reflectance with a spatial–temporal resolutions of 30 m and 2–4 day are calculated on the basis of the prior knowledge from the MODIS BRDF product; then, the calculated high resolution BRDF parameters are integrated over the illuminating/viewing hemisphere to produce the white- and black-sky albedos at 30 m resolution. These results form the basis for the final land surface albedo derivation by accounting for the proportion of direct and diffuse solar radiation arriving at the ground. The albedo retrieved by this novel method is compared with MODIS land surface albedo products, as well as with ground measurements. The results show that the derived land surface albedo during the growing season of 2012 generally achieved a mean absolute accuracy of ±0.044, and a root mean square error of 0.039, confirming the effectiveness of the newly proposed method.

  17. Relativistic Electron Response to the Combined Magnetospheric Impact of a Coronal Mass Ejection Overlapping with a High-Speed Stream: Van Allen Probes Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, W.; Fennell, J. F.; Zheng, Y.; Richardson, I. G.; Jones, A.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; hide

    2015-01-01

    During early November 2013, the magnetosphere experienced concurrent driving by a coronal mass ejection (CME) during an ongoing high-speed stream (HSS) event. The relativistic electron response to these two kinds of drivers, i.e., HSS and CME, is typically different, with the former often leading to a slower buildup of electrons at larger radial distances, while the latter energizing electrons rapidly with flux enhancements occurring closer to the Earth. We present a detailed analysis of the relativistic electron response including radial profiles of phase space density as observed by both Magnetic Electron and Ion Sensor (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instruments on the Van Allen Probes mission. Data from the MagEIS instrument establish the behavior of lower energy (electrons which span both intermediary and seed populations during electron energization. Measurements characterizing the plasma waves and magnetospheric electric and magnetic fields during this period are obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on board Van Allen Probes, Search Coil Magnetometer and Flux Gate Magnetometer instruments on board Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and the low-altitude Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites. These observations suggest that during this time period, both radial transport and local in situ processes are involved in the energization of electrons. The energization attributable to radial diffusion is most clearly evident for the lower energy (electrons, while the effects of in situ energization by interaction of chorus waves are prominent in the higher-energy electrons.

  18. First Report on the 2016 March 9 Total Solar Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2016-06-01

    Totality swept across Indonesia and into the Pacific on 2016 March 9, lasting up to 2 min 45 s on Ternate in the Spice Islands (Malukus). I provide a first report on our observations. Our scientific goal is to follow changes in the corona over the solar-activity cycle, now past its 2012 and 2014 double peak, and to measure temporal changes in the corona on the scale of minutes or hours by comparing eclipse observations made at several sites along the path. I also discuss the near-simultaneous coronal observations made with SOHO/LASCO, SDO/AIA, STEREO/SECCHI, PROBA2/SWAP, and Hinode XRT.For the forthcoming 2017 eclipse, we acknowledge grants to JMP and Williams College from the Solar Terrestrial Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation and from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  19. Temporal trend of the snow-related variables in Sierra Nevada in the last years: An analysis combining Earth Observation and hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Luque, Antonio J.; Herrero, Javier; Bonet, Francisco J.; Pérez-Pérez, Ramón

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is causing declines in snow-cover extent and duration in European mountain ranges. This is especially important in Mediterranean mountain ranges where the observed trends towards precipitation and higher temperatures can provoke problems of water scarcity. In this work, we analyzed temporal trends (2000 to 2014) of snow-related variables obtained from satellite and modelling data in Sierra Nevada, a Mediterranean high-mountain range located in Southern Spain, at 37°N. Snow cover indicators (snow-cover duration, snow-cover onset dates and snow-cover melting dates) were obtained by processing images of MOD10A2 MODIS product using an automated workflow. Precipitation data were obtained using WiMMed, a complete and fully distributed hydrological model that is used to map the annual rainfall and snowfall with a resolution of 30x30 m over the whole study area. It uses expert algorithms to interpolate precipitation and temperature at an hourly scale, and simulates partition of precipitation into snowfall with several methods. For each snow-related indicator (snow-covers and snowfall), a trend analysis was applied at the MODIS pixel scale during the study period (2000-2014). We applied Mann-Kendall test and Theil-Sen slope estimation in each of the pixels comprising Sierra Nevada. The trend analysis assesses the intensity, magnitude and degree of statistical significance during the period analysed. The spatial pattern of these trends was explored according to elevation ranges. Finally, we explored the relationship between trends of snow-cover related indicators and precipitation trends. Our results show that snow-cover has undergone significant changes in the last 14 years. 80 % of the pixels covering Sierra Nevada showed a negative trend in the duration of snow-cover. We also observed a delay in the snow-cover onset date (68.03 % pixels showing a positive trend in the snow-cover onset date) and an advance in the melt date (80.72 % of pixels followed a

  20. Incidence of virological failure and major regimen change of initial combination antiretroviral therapy in the Latin America and the Caribbean: an observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar, Carina; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Padgett, Denis; Mejía, Fernando; Ribeiro, Sayonara Rocha; Cortes, Claudia P.; Pape, Jean W.; Madero, Juan Sierra; Fink, Valeria; Sued, Omar; McGowan, Catherine; Cahn, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Access to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is expanding in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). There is little information in this region regarding incidence of and factors associated with regimen failure and regimen change. Methods Antiretroviral-naïve adults starting cART from 2000-2014 at sites in seven countries throughout LAC were included. Cumulative incidence of virologic failure and major regimen change were estimated with death considered a competing event. Findings 14,027 cART initiators (60% male, median age 37 years, median CD4 156 cells/mm3, median HIV-RNA 5·0 log10 copies/mL, and 28% with clinical AIDS) were followed for a median of 3·9 years. 1,719 patients presented virologic failure and 1,955 had a major regimen change. Excluding GHESKIO-Haiti (which did not regularly measure HIV-RNA), cumulative incidence of virologic failure was 7·8%, 19·2%, and 25·8% at one, three, and five years after cART initiation, respectively; cumulative incidence of major regimen change was 5·9%, 12·7%, and 18·2%. Incidence of major regimen change at GHESKIO-Haiti at five years was 10·7%. Virologic failure was associated with younger age (adjusted hazard ratio[aHR]=2·03 for 20 vs. 40 years; 95% confidence interval[CI] 1·68-2·44), infection through injection-drug use (IDU) (aHR=1·60; 95%CI 1·02-2·52), initiation in earlier calendar years (aHR=1·28 for 2002 vs. 2006; 95%CI 1·13-1·46), and starting with a boosted protease inhibitor (aHR=1·17 vs. non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor; 95%CI 1·00-1·64). Interpretation Incidence of virologic failure was generally lower than in North America/Europe. Our results suggest the need to design strategies to reduce failure and major regimen change among younger patients and those with a history of IDU. Funding US National Institutes of Health: U01 AI069923. PMID:26520929

  1. Observation of the rare B(s)(0) →µ+µ− decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-04

    The standard model of particle physics describes the fundamental particles and their interactions via the strong, electromagnetic and weak forces. It provides precise predictions for measurable quantities that can be tested experimentally. The probabilities, or branching fractions, of the strange B meson (B(s)(0)) and the B0 meson decaying into two oppositely charged muons (μ+ and μ−) are especially interesting because of their sensitivity to theories that extend the standard model. The standard model predicts that the B(s)(0) →µ+µ− and B(0) →µ+µ− decays are very rare, with about four of the former occurring for every billion mesons produced, and one of the latter occurring for every ten billion B0 mesons. A difference in the observed branching fractions with respect to the predictions of the standard model would provide a direction in which the standard model should be extended. Before the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN started operating, no evidence for either decay mode had been found. Upper limits on the branching fractions were an order of magnitude above the standard model predictions. The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) collaborations have performed a joint analysis of the data from proton–proton collisions that they collected in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of seven teraelectronvolts and in 2012 at eight teraelectronvolts. Here we report the first observation of the B(s)(0) → µ+µ− decay, with a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations, and the best measurement so far of its branching fraction. Furthermore, we obtained evidence for the B(0) → µ+µ− decay with a statistical significance of three standard deviations. Both measurements are statistically compatible with standard model predictions and allow stringent constraints to be placed on theories beyond the standard model. The LHC experiments will resume taking data in 2015, recording proton–proton collisions at a

  2. Influence of ocean acidification on the organic complexation of iron and copper in Northwest European shelf seas; a combined observational and model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth eAvendaño

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The pH of aqueous solutions is known to impact the chemical speciation of trace metals. In this study we conducted titrations of coastal seawaters with iron and copper at pH 7.91, 7.37 and 6.99 (expressed on the total pH scale. Changes in the concentration of iron and copper that complexed with the added ligands 1-nitroso-2-napthol and salicylaldoxime respectively were determined by adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry - competitive ligand equilibrium (AdCSV-CLE. Interpretation of the results, assuming complexation by a low concentration of discrete ligands, showed that conditional stability constants for iron complexes increased relative to inorganic iron complexation as pH decreased by approximately 1 log unit per pH unit, whilst those for copper did not change. No trend was observed for concentrations of iron and copper complexing ligands over the pH range examined. We also interpreted our titration data by describing chemical binding and polyelectrolytic effects using non-ideal competitive adsorption in Donnan-like gels (NICA-Donnan model in a proof of concept study. The NICA-Donnan approach allows for the development of a set of model parameters that are independent of ionic strength and pH, and thus calculation of metal speciation can be undertaken at ambient sample pH or the pH of a future, more acidic ocean. There is currently a lack of basic NICA-Donnan parameters applicable to marine dissolved organic matter (DOM so we assumed that the measured marine dissolved organic carbon could be characterized as terrestrial fulvic acids. Generic NICA-Donnan parameters were applied within the framework of the software program visual MINTEQ and the metal –added ligand concentrations [MeAL] calculated for the AdCSV-CLE conditions. For copper, calculated [MeAL] using the NICA-Donnan model for DOM were consistent with measured [MeAL], but for iron an inert fraction with kinetically inhibited dissolution was required in addition to the NICA

  3. Lowest Glucose Variability and Hypoglycemia Are Observed With the Combination of a GLP-1 Receptor Agonist and Basal Insulin (VARIATION Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Harpreet S; Venn, Karri; Ye, Chenglin; Patrick, Avril; Kalra, Shivani; Khandwala, Hasnain; Aslam, Nadeem; Twum-Barima, David; Aronson, Ronnie

    2017-02-01

    There is a dearth of published literature comparing glucose variability (GV) between different insulin regimens in type 2 diabetes. This cohort study compares GV using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes using four common insulin regimens: basal insulin + oral drugs (BO), basal insulin + glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA) (BGLP), premixed insulin (PM), and basal-bolus insulin (BB). Consecutive patients from three endocrinology clinics who met study criteria-type 2 diabetes, age 18 to 80 years, BMI ≤ 45 kg/m2, stable insulin regimen for a minimum of 6 months, and stable A1C value ≤7.5% (58 mmol/mol) before study enrollment-underwent 6-day masked CGM. Hypoglycemia was defined as a sensor glucose concentration insulin regimen cohorts. The daily glucose SD (the primary outcome) was significantly lower in the BGLP cohort versus the BO, PM, and BB cohorts (P = 0.03, P = 0.01, and P insulin with a GLP-1 RA, supporting the complementary glycemic action of these agents in type 2 diabetes. These observed benefits in GV and hypoglycemia may contribute to the cardiovascular outcome reduction seen with GLP-1 RA therapy and should be investigated further. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  5. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  6. Combined optical, EISCAT and magnetic observations of the omega bands/Ps6 pulsations and an auroral torch in the late morning hours: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We present here the results of multi-instrument observations of auroral torch and Ps6 magnetic pulsations, which are assumed to be the magnetic signature of the spatially periodic optical auroras known as omega bands. Data from TV and ASC cameras in Barentsburg and Ny Ålesund, EISCAT radars in Longyearbyen and Tromsø, as well as IMAGE network were used in this study. The auroral phenomenon which was considered differed from that previously discussed, as it occurred both in an unusual place (high latitudes and at an unusual time (late morning hours. We show that this might occur due to specific conditions in the interplanetary medium, causing the appropriate deformation of the magnetosphere. In such a case, the IMF turned out to be an additional factor in driving the regime of Ps6/omega bands, namely, only by acting together could a substorm onset in the night sector and Bz variations result in their generation. Since the presumable source of Ps6/omega bands does not co-locate with convection reversal boundaries, we suggest the interpretation of the phenomena in the frame of the interchange instability instead of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that is widely discussed in the literature in connection with omega auroras. Some numerical characteristics of the auroral torch were obtained. We also emphasize to the dark hole in the background luminosity and the short-lived azimuthally-restricted auroral arc, since their appearance could initiate the auroral torch development.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena; Plasma convection; Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction

  7. Diagnostic Support for Selected Paediatric Pulmonary Diseases Using Answer-Pattern Recognition in Questionnaires Based on Combined Data Mining Applications--A Monocentric Observational Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Katrin Rother

    Full Text Available Clinical symptoms in children with pulmonary diseases are frequently non-specific. Rare diseases such as primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD, cystic fibrosis (CF or protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB can be easily missed at the general practitioner (GP.To develop and test a questionnaire-based and data mining-supported tool providing diagnostic support for selected pulmonary diseases.First, interviews with parents of affected children were conducted and analysed. These parental observations during the pre-diagnostic time formed the basis for a new questionnaire addressing the parents' view on the disease. Secondly, parents with a sick child (e.g. PCD, PBB answered the questionnaire and a data base was set up. Finally, a computer program consisting of eight different classifiers (support vector machine (SVM, artificial neural network (ANN, fuzzy rule-based, random forest, logistic regression, linear discriminant analysis, naive Bayes and nearest neighbour and an ensemble classifier was developed and trained to categorise any given new questionnaire and suggest a diagnosis. For estimating the diagnostic accuracy, we applied ten-fold stratified cross validation.All questionnaires of patients suffering from CF, asthma (AS, PCD, acute bronchitis (AB and the healthy control group were correctly diagnosed by the fusion algorithm. For the pneumonia (PM group 19/21 (90.5% and for the PBB group 17/18 (94.4% correct diagnoses could be reached. The program detected the correct diagnoses with an overall sensitivity of 98.8%. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC analyses confirmed the accuracy of this diagnostic tool. Case studies highlighted the applicability of the tool in the daily work of a GP.For children with symptoms of pulmonary diseases a questionnaire-based diagnostic support tool using data mining techniques exhibited good results in arriving at diagnostic suggestions. In the hands of a doctor, this tool could be of value in arousing awareness for

  8. Prevalence of Past and Reactivated Viral Infections and Efficacy of Cyclosporine A as Monotherapy or in Combination in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis—Synergy Study: A Longitudinal Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Colombo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have prospectively evaluated psoriatic arthritis (PsA patients for (1 seropositivity for former viral infections and seroconversion and (2 efficacy of cyclosporine A (CsA alone or in combination with other immunosuppressants in a time period of 12 months. Screening included HBV antibodies and antigens, HCV antibodies and RNA, HSV 1-2, HZV, EBV, and CMV IgG, and IgM, HHV-6 DNA, and HIV 1-2 antibodies. PsA was evaluated by the Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI, and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. At baseline, 126 (56% out of 225 evaluable patients had 2 or more seropositivities indicative of former infections, and 31 patients (13.8% presented seropositivity for HCV, HBV, HSV-1 and -2, HHV-6, EBV, or parvovirus infection; one of them, positive for HBAg, was treated with lamivudine, while the remaining 30 received no specific treatment. None of the 31 patients developed virus reactivation. A reduction (P<0.001 of PASI, BASDAI, and VAS scores was observed at 6 and 12 months. The treatment of PsA with CsA as monotherapy or in combination was safe and effective. In vitro experiments and clinical findings, including those from our study, suggest that CsA as monotherapy or in combination with biologics might be the treatment of choice in PsA HCV-positive patients.

  9. Analysis of selected microflares observed by SphinX over the last minimum of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarkowski, Marek; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Gryciuk, Magdalena

    The Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was designed to observe soft X-ray solar emission in the energy range between 1 keV and 15 keV with the resolution better than 0.5 keV. The instrument operated from February until November 2009 aboard CORONAS-Photon satellite, during the phase of exceptionally low minimum of solar activity. Here we use SphinX data for analysis of selected microflare-class events. We selected events of unusual lightcurves or location. Our study involves determination of temporal characteristics (times of start, maximum and end of flares) and analysis of physical conditions in flaring plasma (temperature, emission measure). Dedicated method has been used in order to remove emission not related to flare. Supplementary information about morphology and evolution of investigated events has been derived from the analysis of XRT/Hinode and SECCHI /STEREO images.

  10. Optical and thermal design of 1.5-m aperture solar UV visible and IR observing telescope for Solar-C mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Shimizu, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Horiuchi, T.; Matsumoto, Y.; Takeyama, N.

    2017-11-01

    The next Japanese solar mission, SOLAR-C, which has been envisaged after successful science operation of Hinode (SOLAR-B) mission, is perusing two plans: plan-A and plan-B, and under extensive study from science objectives as well as engineering point of view. The plan-A aims at performing out-of-ecliptic observations for investigating, with helioseismic approach, internal structure and dynamo mechanisms of the Sun. It also explores polar regions where fast solar wind is believed to originate. A baseline orbit for plan-A is a circular orbit of 1 AU distance from the Sun with its inclination at around or greater than 40 degrees. The plan-B aims to study small-scale plasma processes and structures in the solar atmosphere which attract researchers' growing interest, followed by many Hinode discoveries [1], for understanding fully dynamism and magnetic nature of the atmosphere. With plan-B, high-angular-resolution investigation of the entire solar atmosphere (from the photosphere to the corona, including their interface layers, i.e., chromosphere and transition region) is to be performed with enhanced spectroscopic and spectro-polarimetric capability as compared with Hinode, together with enhanced sensitivity towards ultra-violet wavelengths. The orbit of plan-B is either a solar synchronous polar orbit of altitude around 600 km or a geosynchronous orbit to ensure continuous solar observations. After the decision of any one of the two plans, the SOLAR-C will be proposed for launch in mid-2010s. In this paper, we will present a basic design of one of major planned instrumental payload for the plan-B: the Solar Ultra-violet Visible and near IR observing Telescope (hereafter referred to as SUVIT). The basic concept in designing the SUVIT is to utilize as much as possible a heritage of successful telescope of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard Hinode [2]. Major differences of SUVIT from SOT are the three times larger aperture of 1.5 m, which enables to collect one

  11. Multi-Wavelength Spectroscopic Observations of a White Light Flare Produced Directly by Non-thermal Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Kyoko; Bamba, Yumi; Brooks, David

    2017-08-01

    An X1.6 flare on 2014 October 22 was observed by multiple spectrometers in UV, EUV and X-ray (Hinode/EIS, IRIS, and RHESSI), and multi-wavelength imaging observations (SDO/AIA and HMI). We analyze a bright kernel that produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Taking advantage of the spectroscopic observations of IRIS and Hinode/EIS, we measure the temporal variation of the plasma properties in the bright kernel in the chromosphere and corona. We find that explosive evaporation was observed when the WL emission occurred. The temporal correlation of the WL emission, HXR peak, and evaporation flows indicates that the WL emission was produced by accelerated electrons. We calculated the energy flux deposited by non-thermal electrons (observed by RHESSI) and compared it to the dissipated energy estimated from a chromospheric line (Mg II triplet) observed by IRIS. The deposited energy flux from the non-thermal electrons is about (3-7.7)x1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for a given low-energy cutoff of 30-40 keV, assuming the thick-target model. The energy flux estimated from the changes in temperature in the chromosphere measured using the Mg II subordinate line is about (4.6-6.7)×109 erg cm-2 s-1: ˜6%-22% of the deposited energy. This comparison of estimated energy fluxes implies that the continuum enhancement was directly produced by the non-thermal electrons.

  12. Monitoring and near-real time forecasting of landslide surface displacements using continuous GNSS observations and a combined statistical-mechanical model: the service of the French Landslide Observatory - OMIV. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malet, J.; Deprez, A.; Bernardie, S.; Desramaut, N.; Ulrich, P.; Masson, F.; Grandjean, G.

    2013-12-01

    present the permanent GNSS monitoring system and data transfer system installed on several landslides in France, (2) to present the automatic processing of the data using the GAMIT/GLOBK analysis package, and (3) to define quantitatively the contribution of permanent GPS observations for the fast detection of small displacements. Further, a combined statistical-mechanical approach to predict changes in landslide displacement rates from the observed changes in rainfall amounts is presented. The forecasting tool called FLAME (Forecasting Landslides Accelerations induced by Meteorological Events) associates a statistical Impulse Response (IR) model to simulate the changes in landslide rates by computing a transfer function between the input signal (e.g. rainfall) and the output signal (e.g. displacements) and a simple 1D MechAnical (MA) model (e.g. visco-plastic rheology) to take into account changes in pore water pressures. The performance of different combinations of models (IR model alone, MA model alone, and a combination of the IR and MA models) is evaluated against observed changes in pore water pressures and the GNSS surface displacement rates. The approach constitutes however a robust tool to predict changes in displacement rates from rainfall or groundwater time series.

  13. No additional cholesterol-lowering effect observed in the combined treatment of red yeast rice and Lactobacillus casei in hyperlipidemic patients: A double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Ying; Yu, Min-Chien; Perng, Wu-Tsun; Lin, Chun-Che; Lee, Ming-Yung; Chang, Ya-Lan; Lai, Ya-Yun; Lee, Yi-Ching; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Shih, Hung-Che

    2017-08-01

    To observe the effect of combining red yeast rice and Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) in lowering cholesterol in patients with primary hyperlipidemia, the later has also been shown to remove cholesterol in in vitro studies. A double-blind clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the cholesterol-lowering effect of the combination of red yeast rice and L. casei. Sixty patients with primary hyperlipidemia were recruited and randomized equally to either the treatment group (red yeast rice + L. casei) or the control group (red yeast rice + placebo). One red yeast rice capsule and two L. casei capsules were taken twice a day. The treatment lasted for 8 weeks, with an extended follow-up period of 4 weeks. The primary endpoint was a difference of serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level at week 8. At week 8, the LDL-C serum level in both groups was lower than that at baseline, with a decrease of 33.85±26.66 mg/dL in the treatment group and 38.11±30.90 mg/dL in the control group; however, there was no statistical difference between the two groups (P>0.05). The total cholesterol was also lower than the baseline in both groups, yet without a statistical difference between the two groups. The only statistically signifificant difference between the two groups was the average diastolic pressure at week 12, which dropped by 2.67 mm Hg in the treatment group and increased by 4.43 mm Hg in the placebo group (Pcasei. Red yeast rice can signifificantly reduce LDL-C, total cholesterol and triglyceride. The combination of red yeast rice and L. casei did not have an additional effect on lipid profifiles.

  14. Doppler Shift Oscillations from a Hot Line Observed by IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Huang, Y.; Chen, N.-H.; Zhang, Q. M.; Su, Y. N.; Su, W.

    2017-11-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the Doppler shift oscillations in a hot loop during an M7.1 flare on 2014 October 27 observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. The periodic oscillations are observed in the Doppler shift of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å (log T˜ 7.05), and the dominant period is about 3.1 minutes. However, such 3.1 minute oscillations are not found in the line-integrated intensity of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å, AIA EUV fluxes, or microwave emissions. Solar Dynamics Observatory/AIA and Hinode/XRT imaging observations indicate that the Doppler shift oscillations locate at the hot loop-top region (≥11 MK). Moreover, the differential emission measure results show that the temperature is increasing rapidly when the Doppler shift oscillates, but the number density does not exhibit the corresponding increases nor oscillations, implying that the flare loop is likely to oscillate in an incompressible mode. All of these facts suggest that the Doppler shift oscillations at the shorter period are most likely the standing kink oscillations in a flare loop. Meanwhile, a longer period of about 10 minutes is identified in the time series of Doppler shift and line-integrated intensity, GOES SXR fluxes, and AIA EUV light curves, indicating the periodic energy release in this flare, which may be caused by a slow mode wave.

  15. Prominence and tornado dynamics observed with IRIS and THEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Levens, Peter; Labrosse, Nicolas; Mein, Pierre; Lopez Ariste, Arturo; Zapior, Maciek

    2017-08-01

    Several prominences were observed during campaigns in September 2013 and July 2014 with the IRIS spectrometer and the vector magnetograph THEMIS (Tenerife). SDO/AIA and IRIS provided images and spectra of prominences and tornadoes corresponding to different physical conditions of the transition region between the cool plasma and the corona. The vector magnetic field was derived from THEMIS observations by using the He D3 depolarisation due to the magnetic field. The inversion code (PCA) takes into account the Hanle and Zeeman effects and allows us to compute the strength and the inclination of the magnetic field which is shown to be mostly horizontal in prominences as well as in tornadoes. Movies from SDO/AIA in 304 A and Hinode/SOT in Ca II show the highly dynamic nature of the fine structures. From spectra in Mg II and Si IV lines provided by IRIS and H-alpha observed by the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass (MSDP) spectrograph in the Meudon Solar Tower we derived the Doppler shifts of the fine structures and reconstructed the 3D structure of tornadoes. We conclude that the apparent rotation of AIA tornadoes is due to large-scale quasi-periodic oscillations of the plasma along more or less horizontal magnetic structures.

  16. Observational study on the fine structure and dynamics of a solar jet. II. Energy release process revealed by spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, Takahito; Tei, Akiko; Asai, Ayumi; Ueno, Satoru; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2018-01-01

    We report on a solar jet phenomenon associated with the C5.4 class flare on 2014 November 11. The data of the jet was provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) at Hida Observatory, Kyoto University. These plentiful data enabled us to present this series of papers to discuss all the processes of the observed phenomena, including energy storage, event trigger, and energy release. In this paper, we focus on the energy release process of the observed jet, and mainly describe our spectral analysis on the Hα data of DST to investigate the internal structure of the Hα jet and its temporal evolution. This analysis reveals that in the physical quantity distributions of the Hα jet, such as line-of-sight velocity and optical thickness, there is a significant gradient in the direction crossing the jet. We interpret this internal structure as the consequence of the migration of the energy release site, based on the idea of ubiquitous reconnection. Moreover, by measuring the horizontal flow of the fine structures in the jet, we succeeded in deriving the three-dimensional velocity field and the line-of-sight acceleration field of the Hα jet. The analysis result indicates that part of the ejecta in the Hα jet experienced additional acceleration after it had been ejected from the lower atmosphere. This secondary acceleration was found to occur in the vicinity of the intersection between the trajectories of the Hα jet and the X-ray jet observed by Hinode/XRT. We propose that a fundamental cause of this phenomenon is magnetic reconnection involving the plasmoid in the observed jet.

  17. Solvent and H/D isotope effects on the proton transfer pathways in heteroconjugated hydrogen-bonded phenol-carboxylic acid anions observed by combined UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppe, Benjamin; Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-05-22

    Heteroconjugated hydrogen-bonded anions A···H···X(-) of phenols (AH) and carboxylic/inorganic acids (HX) dissolved in CD2Cl2 and CDF3/CDF2Cl have been studied by combined low-temperature UV-vis and (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy (UVNMR). The systems constitute small molecular models of hydrogen-bonded cofactors in proteins such as the photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Thus, the phenols studied include the PYP cofactor 4-hydroxycinnamic acid methyl thioester, and the more acidic 4-nitrophenol and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol which mimic electronically excited cofactor states. It is shown that the (13)C chemical shifts of the phenolic residues of A···H···X(-), referenced to the corresponding values of A···H···A(-), constitute excellent probes for the average proton positions. These shifts correlate with those of the H-bonded protons, as well as with the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts. A combined analysis of UV-vis and NMR data was employed to elucidate the proton transfer pathways in a qualitative way. Dual absorption bands of the phenolic moiety indicate a double-well situation for the shortest OHO hydrogen bonds studied. Surprisingly, when the solvent polarity is low the carboxylates are protonated whereas the proton shifts toward the phenolic oxygens when the polarity is increased. This finding indicates that because of stronger ion-dipole interactions small anions are stabilized at high solvent polarity and large anions exhibiting delocalized charges at low solvent polarities. It also explains the large acidity difference of phenols and carboxylic acids in water, and the observation that this difference is strongly reduced in the interior of proteins when both partners form mutual hydrogen bonds.

  18. Combination vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David AG Skibinski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines into a single product has been central to the protection of the pediatric population over the past 50 years. The addition of inactivated polio, Haemophilus influenzae, and hepatitis B vaccines into the combination has facilitated the introduction of these vaccines into recommended immunization schedules by reducing the number of injections required and has therefore increased immunization compliance. However, the development of these combinations encountered numerous challenges, including the reduced response to Haemophilus influenzae vaccine when given in combination; the need to consolidate the differences in the immunization schedule (hepatitis B; and the need to improve the safety profile of the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis combination. Here, we review these challenges and also discuss future prospects for combination vaccines.

  19. Observation of Mesoscale Instabilities of the Northern Current in the North Western Mediterranean Sea : a Combined Study Using Gliders, Surface Drifters, Moving Vessel Profiler and Vessel Data in the Ligurian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pairaud, I. L.; Garreau, P.; Le Berre, D.; Fernandez Bruyère, D.; Bellomo, L.; Garnier, V.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern Current (NC) is a branch of the general North-Western Mediterranean cyclonic circulation extending from the Ligurian to the Catalan Sea (Millot, Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans, vol. 15, 1991). In winter and early spring, instabilities of this slope current are intense and can generate eddies, meanders and filaments. The study of mesoscale structures is crucial in the coastal area because of their physical and biogeochemical impact on ecosystems. They play a role in water, chemicals and nutrients transport, vertical mixing and possible trapping of biological materials. Results from a combined observational effort put forth in March 2012 during the IMEDIA cruise dedicated to eddy tracking are presented. This work aims at providing experimental evidence of the effects that mesoscale exerts on the NC dynamics via an innovative and complementary data set. A Slocum Glider equipped with a CTD was deployed along the French coast from Nice to Toulon for one month and performed cross-current sections down to 600m depth. Drifters were deployed before the cruise in the Corsica Channel and close to Italy. Concurrent observations were obtained along the vessel track by a thermosalinograph and a fluorometer (subsurface measurements), and using a CTD and a Vessel-Mounted ADCP during the 11-day oceanographic cruise on board of the Research Vessel Tethys II. Additional water profiling was performed using a Moving Vessel Profiler (MVP) equipped with a CTD and capable of profiling down to 400m depth at a speed of 4 knots. The combined use of data from the MVP and the ship-based ADCP measurements reveals the presence of an instability of the NC north of the Corsica Island. The main branch of the current is moved westward and forms a meander. It is characterized by a density decrease down to 350m of the water column, associated with a salinity decrease of 0.4-0.6 psu (see Figure). Its location is confirmed by high-resolution satellite images as the associated water

  20. First Observation of CP Violation in B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} Decays by a Combined Time-Dependent Analysis of BABAR and Belle Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Adametz, A; Adye, T; Ahmed, H; Aihara, H; Akar, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Al Said, S; Andreassen, R; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arinstein, K; Arnaud, N; Asner, D M; Aston, D; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barberio, E; Bard, D J; Barlow, R J; Batignani, G; Beaulieu, A; Bellis, M; Ben-Haim, E; Bernard, D; Bernlochner, F U; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biswal, J; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Bobrov, A; Bomben, M; Bondar, A; Bonneaud, G R; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bozzi, C; Bračko, M; Briand, H; Browder, T E; Brown, D N; Brown, D N; Bünger, C; Burchat, P R; Buzykaev, A R; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Casarosa, G; Cenci, R; Červenkov, D; Chang, P; Chao, D S; Chauveau, J; Cheaib, R; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, C; Cheng, C H; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, H H F; Choi, S-K; Chrzaszcz, M; Cibinetto, G; Cinabro, D; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Cremaldi, L; Dalseno, J; Dasu, S; Davier, M; Davis, C L; De Mori, F; De Nardo, G; Denig, A G; Derkach, D; de Sangro, R; Dey, B; Di Lodovico, F; Dingfelder, J; Dittrich, S; Doležal, Z; Dorfan, J; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Dutta, D; Ebert, M; Echenard, B; Eidelman, S; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Faccini, R; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Ferber, T; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Filippi, A; Finocchiaro, G; Fioravanti, E; Flood, K T; Ford, W T; Forti, F; Franco Sevilla, M; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gabyshev, N; Gamba, D; Garmash, A; Gary, J W; Garzia, I; Gaspero, M; Gaur, V; Gaz, A; Gershon, T J; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Li Gioi, L; Giorgi, M A; Glattauer, R; Godang, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Golubev, V B; Gorodeisky, R; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Grauges, E; Griessinger, K; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Grünberg, O; Guttman, N; Haba, J; Hafner, A; Hamilton, B; Hara, T; Harrison, P F; Hast, C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hearty, C; He, X H; Hess, M; Hitlin, D G; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Huard, Z; Hutchcroft, D E; Iijima, T; Inguglia, G; Innes, W R; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Izen, J M; Jaegle, I; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kass, R; Kawasaki, T; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, P; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; King, G J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Koch, H; Kodyš, P; Kolomensky, Yu G; Korpar, S; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R; Kravchenko, E A; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lacker, H M; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Leddig, T; Le Diberder, F; Lee, D H; Lee, I S; Lee, M J; Lees, J P; Leith, D W G S; Leruste, Ph; Lewczuk, M J; Lewis, P; Libby, J; Lockman, W S; Long, O; Lopes Pegna, D; LoSecco, J M; Lou, X C; Lueck, T; Luitz, S; Lukin, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Luth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; MacFarlane, D B; Malaescu, B; Mallik, U; Manoni, E; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Martellotti, S; Martinez-Vidal, F; Masuda, M; Mattison, T S; Matvienko, D; McKenna, J A; Meadows, B T; Miyabayashi, K; Miyashita, T S; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Monge, M R; Moon, H K; Morandin, M; Muller, D R; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakazawa, H; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nayak, M; Neal, H; Neri, N; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nugent, I M; Oberhof, B; Ocariz, J; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olaiya, E O; Olsen, J; Ongmongkolkul, P; Onorato, G; Onuchin, A P; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Oyanguren, A; Pakhlova, G; Pakhlov, P; Palano, A; Pal, B; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panduro Vazquez, W; Paoloni, E; Park, C W; Park, H; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pedlar, T K; Peimer, D R; Peruzzi, I M; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Piilonen, L E; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Prasad, V; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Puccio, E M T; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Pushpawela, B G; Rama, M; Randle-Conde, A; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Ribežl, E; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Röhrken, M; Roney, J M; Roodman, A; Rossi, A; Rostomyan, A; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Sacco, R; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Santoro, V; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schindler, R H; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schroeder, T; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Serednyakov, S I; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Simard, M; Simi, G; Simon, F; Simonetto, F; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snyder, A; So, R Y; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sohn, Y-S; Sokoloff, M D; Sokolov, A; Solodov, E P; Solovieva, E; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Starič, M; Stocchi, A; Stroili, R; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Summers, D J; Sun, L; Tamponi, U; Taras, P; Tasneem, N; Teramoto, Y; Tisserand, V; Todyshev, K Yu; Toki, W H; Touramanis, C; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Uwer, U; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vasseur, G; Va'vra, J; Verderi, M; Vinokurova, A; Vitale, L; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Wagner, M N; Wagner, S R; Waldi, R; Walsh, J J; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; West, C A; Williams, K M; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wisniewski, W J; Won, E; Wormser, G; Wright, D M; Wu, S L; Wulsin, H W; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zallo, A; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-09-18

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} decays, where the light neutral hadron h^{0} is a π^{0}, η, or ω meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the CP eigenstates K^{+}K^{-}, K_{S}^{0}π^{0}, or K_{S}^{0}ω. The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the ϒ(4S) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (471±3)×10^{6} BB[over ¯] pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (772±11)×10^{6} BB[over ¯] pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters -η_{f}S=+0.66±0.10(stat)±0.06(syst) and C=-0.02±0.07(stat)±0.03(syst). These results correspond to the first observation of CP violation in B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} decays. The hypothesis of no mixing-induced CP violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  1. Clinical efficacy of β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations for the treatment of bloodstream infection due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in haematological patients with neutropaenia: a study protocol for a retrospective observational study (BICAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiol, C; Royo-Cebrecos, C; Tebe, C; Abdala, E; Akova, M; Álvarez, R; Maestro-de la Calle, G; Cano, A; Cervera, C; Clemente, W T; Martín-Dávila, P; Freifeld, A; Gómez, L; Gottlieb, T; Gurguí, M; Herrera, F; Manzur, A; Maschmeyer, G; Meije, Y; Montejo, M; Peghin, M; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Ruiz-Camps, I; Sukiennik, T C; Carratalà, J

    2017-01-23

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacilli (ESBL-GNB) is increasing at an alarming pace worldwide. Although β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor (BLBLI) combinations have been suggested as an alternative to carbapenems for the treatment of BSI due to these resistant organisms in the general population, their usefulness for the treatment of BSI due to ESBL-GNB in haematological patients with neutropaenia is yet to be elucidated. The aim of the BICAR study is to compare the efficacy of BLBLI combinations with that of carbapenems for the treatment of BSI due to an ESBL-GNB in this population. A multinational, multicentre, observational retrospective study. Episodes of BSI due to ESBL-GNB occurring in haematological patients and haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with neutropaenia from 1 January 2006 to 31 March 2015 will be analysed. The primary end point will be case-fatality rate within 30 days of onset of BSI. The secondary end points will be 7-day and 14-day case-fatality rates, microbiological failure, colonisation/infection by resistant bacteria, superinfection, intensive care unit admission and development of adverse events. The number of expected episodes of BSI due to ESBL-GNB in the participant centres will be 260 with a ratio of control to experimental participants of 2. The protocol of the study was approved at the first site by the Research Ethics Committee (REC) of Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge. Approval will be also sought from all relevant RECs. Any formal presentation or publication of data from this study will be considered as a joint publication by the participating investigators and will follow the recommendations of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE). The study has been endorsed by the European Study Group for Bloodstream Infection and Sepsis (ESGBIS) and the European Study Group for Infections in Compromised Hosts (ESGICH). Published by the BMJ

  2. Prospective Observational Post-marketing Study of Tafluprost 0.0015%/Timolol 0.5% Combination Ophthalmic Solution for Glaucoma and Ocular Hypertension: Short-Term Efficacy and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yasutaka; Osaki, Hirotaka; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kai, Yasuhiko

    2016-12-01

    The intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering effect and safety of tafluprost 0.0015%/timolol maleate 0.5% combination ophthalmic solution (Taf-TFC) were investigated in a real-world clinical setting. A prospective up to 2-year (more than 1 year) observational study has been initiated to collect data on the IOP, conjunctival hyperemia score, corneal staining score, and adverse events suffered by patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension treated at 3 months, and up to 2 years (more than 1 year) after initiating treatment with Taf-TFC. The 3-month findings are reported here. Among 439 patients enrolled at 100 institutions in Japan, most had normal tension glaucoma (45.3%) or primary open angle glaucoma (36.0%). Adverse drug reaction (ADR) occurred in 5.01%. The important ADRs were conjunctival hyperemia (five patients), blepharitis (four patients), and punctate keratitis (two patients). Serious adverse reactions occurred in two patients (three events). In 410 patients with data both before and after treatment, baseline mean IOP was 17.5 ± 5.0 mmHg, and it was significantly decreased after 1, 2, and 3 months (all P < 0.05, paired-t test). IOP was significantly reduced in patients switched to Taf-TFC from either prostaglandin or β-blocker monotherapy. IOP also decreased significantly in patients switched from a prostaglandin/timolol fixed combination, but not in patients switched from concomitant use of a prostaglandin analog and a β-blocker. The use of Taf-TFC did not worsen the adherence in most patients. Taf-TFC significantly reduced the IOP in patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension treated in daily clinical practice with controllable or recoverable ADRs in short period. Taf-TFC was effective regardless of treatment patterns, and particularly, Taf-TFC significantly reduced IOP in cases in which requiring the second line therapy as insufficient of monotherapy. Santen Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan.

  3. combination Dictionary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    advanced-level Spanish-speaking EFL learners. 2. Word combinations ... a certain process of segregation as a separate branch of linguistics. While lexi- ... As substantiated by Ilson's investigation of lexicographic practices, most dictionaries ...

  4. First observation of CP violation in B¯0 → D(*)CP h0 decays by a combined time-dependent analysis of BaBar And Belle Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdesselam, A. [Univ. of Tabuk, Tabuk (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia). et al.

    2015-09-16

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B¯0 → D(*)CPh0 decays, where the light neutral hadron h0 is a π0, η, or ω meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the CP eigenstates K+K, K0Sπ0, or K0Sω. The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the Υ(4S) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (471±3)×106 BB¯ pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (772±11)×106 BB¯ pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters –ηfS=+0.66±0.10(stat)±0.06(syst) and C=–0.02±0.07(stat)±0.03(syst). These results correspond to the first observation of CP violation in B¯0 → D(*)CPh0 decays. As a result, the hypothesis of no mixing-induced CP violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  5. A study of the combined impact of boundary layer height and near-surface meteorology on the CO diurnal cycle at a low mountaintop site using simultaneous lidar and in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, S.; Lee, T. R.; De Wekker, S. F. J.

    2017-09-01

    Evaluations of air pollutants and trace gas measurements over mountaintop sites and their application in inverse transport models to estimate regional scale fluxes are oftentimes challenging due to the influences associated with atmospheric transport at both local and regional scales. The objective of this study is to investigate the diurnal cycle pattern of CO mixing ratio over a low mountaintop influenced by: (1) two different convective boundary layer (CBL) regimes (shallow and deep) and associated growth rates over the mountaintop, (2) the combined effect of a deep CBL with and without diurnal wind shift, and (3) slope flows and associated air mass transport. For this purpose, we used simultaneous measurements of lidar-derived CBL heights, standard meteorological variables, and CO2 and CO mixing ratio from Pinnacles, a mountaintop monitoring site in the Appalachian Mountains. We used both water vapor and CO2 mixing ratio as tracers for upslope flow air masses. We used case studies to focus on two different scenarios of daytime CO mixing ratio variability: (1) a gradual increase in the morning with a maximum in the afternoon, and (2) a gradual decrease in the morning with a minimum in the late afternoon. The second scenario is similar to the CO variability observed atop tall towers in flat terrain. Using the lidar-derived CBL height evolution and in situ CO, CO2 and meteorological measurements over the mountaintop, we found that the CBL height dynamics, regional scale wind shift, and upslope flow air masses arriving at the mountaintop in the morning affect the CO mixing ratio variability during the remaining part of the diurnal cycle. These findings help introduce a conceptual framework that can explain and differentiate the opposite patterns (i.e. daytime increase versus daytime decrease) in the CO diurnal cycles over a mountaintop site affected by upslope flows and provide new roadmaps for monitoring and assimilating trace gas mixing ratios into applications

  6. Winning Combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Criscuolo, Paola; Laursen, Keld; Reichstein, Toke

    2017-01-01

    Searching for the most rewarding sources of innovative ideas remains a key challenge in management of technological innovation. Yet, little is known about which combinations of internal and external knowledge sources are triggers for innovation. Extending theories about searching for innovation, ...

  7. Connecting Participant Observation Positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCurdy, Patrick; Uldam, Julie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we argue for the importance of considering participant observation roles in relation to both insider/outsider and overt/covert roles. Through combining key academic debates on participant observation, which have separately considered insider/outsider and overt/covert participant...... observation, we develop a reflexive framework to assist researchers in (1) locating the type of participant observation research; (2) identifying implications of participant observation for both the research and the subjects under study; and (3) reflecting on how one’s role as participant observer shifts over...

  8. Turbulent Fluctuations in G-band and K-line Intensities Observed with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.

    2012-12-01

    Using the Rapid Oscillation in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope we have found that the spectra of fluctuations of the G-band (cadence 1.05 s) and Ca II K-line (cadence 4.2 s) intensities show correlated fluctuations above white noise out to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and up to 70 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum presents a scaling range (Ultra High Frequency “UHF”) for f = 25-100 mHz, with an exponent consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. The UHF power, is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes, it is highly intermittent in time and characterized by a positive kurtosis κ. Combining values of G-band and K-line intensities, the UHF power, and κ, reveals two distinct “states” of the internetwork solar atmosphere. State 1, with κ ≍ 6, which includes almost all the data, is characterized by low intensities and low UHF power. State 2, with κ ≍ 3, including a very small fraction of the data, is characterized by high intensities and high UHF power. Superposed epoch analysis shows that for State 1, the K-line intensity presents 3.5 min chromospheric oscillations with maxima occurring 21 s after G-band intensity maxima implying a 150-210 km effective height difference. For State 2, the G-band and K-line intensity maxima are simultaneous, suggesting that in the highly magnetized environment sites of G-band and K-line emission may be spatially close together. Analysis of observations obtained with Hinode/SOT confirm a scaling range in the G-band spectrum up to 53 mHz also consistent with turbulent motions as well as the identification of two distinct states in terms of the H-line intensity and G-band power as functions of G-band intensity.

  9. A Nanoflare-Based Cellular Automaton Model and the Observed Properties of the Coronal Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Fuentes, Marcelo; Klimchuk, James Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We use the cellular automaton model described in Lopez Fuentes and Klimchuk to study the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model, based on the idea of a critical misalignment angle in tangled magnetic fields, produces nanoflares of varying frequency with respect to the plasma cooling time. We compare the results of the model with active region (AR) observations obtained with the Hinode/XRT and SDOAIA instruments. The comparison is based on the statistical properties of synthetic and observed loop light curves. Our results show that the model reproduces the main observational characteristics of the evolution of the plasma in AR coronal loops. The typical intensity fluctuations have amplitudes of 10 percent - 15 percent both for the model and the observations. The sign of the skewness of the intensity distributions indicates the presence of cooling plasma in the loops. We also study the emission measure (EM) distribution predicted by the model and obtain slopes in log(EM) versus log(T) between 2.7 and 4.3, in agreement with published observational values.

  10. Direct observations of plasma upflows and condensation in a catastrophically cooling solar transition region loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orange, N. B.; Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Hesterly, K.; Patel, M.; Champey, P. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, we observe fast upflows (v {sub λ} ≤ –10 km s{sup –1}) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8 ≤log T ≤ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop (log T ≤ 6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of +5 km s{sup –1} and –60 km s{sup –1} are observed at footpoint sites. These flows, speeds, and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at the site of upflows only) derived from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic Magnetic Imager's line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30% mass influx at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic cooling event, with subsequent plasma evaporation indicating that the TR is the heating site. From the magnetic flux evolution, we conclude that magnetic reconnection between the footpoint and background field is responsible for the observed fast TR plasma upflows.

  11. Combined homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slović Živana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Combined homicide is a combination of two or more different modes of killing. These homicides occur when multiple perpetrators have different mode of killing, to hide the true manner of death, or when an initially unsuccessful attack with one weapon is abandoned and changed by another mode which is more successful, or due to availability of weapons at the scene of homicide, or unexpected appearance of possible eyewitness, or else. Case report: This case report is about 65-year old woman who was found in her residence on the floor next to the bed lying on her back with two kitchen knives in her neck. Autopsy revealed an abrasion on the frontal part of the neck and a bruise of the soft tissues of the neck with a double fracture of both greater horns of the hyoid bone and a fracture of both superior horns of the thyroid cartilage. The cause of death was exsanguination into right half of the thoracic cavity from the left subclavian artery which was cut, on the spot of stab wound in the neck. Conclusion: Hemorrhage in the soft tissue near broken hyoid bone and thyroid cartilage indicate that the victim was first strangulated and then stabbed with kitchen knives. Combined homicides are caused by one or more killers in order to accelerate the killing, or to be sure to provide the fatal outcome. This case is also interesting because the killer left weapon in the victim's neck.

  12. The diagnostic accuracy of dual-view digital mammography, single-view breast tomosynthesis and a dual-view combination of breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography in a free-response observer performance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svahn, T; Andersson, I; Chakraborty, D; Svensson, S; Ikeda, D; Förnvik, D; Mattsson, S; Tingberg, A; Zackrisson, S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of dual-view digital mammography (DM), single-view breast tomosynthesis (BT) and BT combined with the opposite DM view. Patients with subtle lesions were selected to undergo BT examinations. Two radiologists who are non-participants in the study and have experience in using DM and BT determined the locations and extents of lesions in the images. Five expert mammographers interpreted the cases using the free-response paradigm. The task was to mark and rate clinically reportable findings suspicious for malignancy and clinically relevant benign findings. The marks were scored with reference to the outlined regions into lesion localization or non-lesion localization, and analysed by the jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic method. The analysis yielded statistically significant differences between the combined modality and dual-view DM (p < 0.05). No differences were found between single-view BT and dual-view DM or between single-view BT and the combined modality.

  13. Ship Observations - VOS and Navy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Combination of Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) and US Navy Ship weather observations. Obs generally taken 2-4 times daily at 00, 06, 12, and 18z.

  14. Observations of Reconnection Flows in a Flare on the Solar Disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Juntao; Simões, P. J. A.; Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Fletcher, L.; Wright, P. J.; Hannah, I. G., E-mail: j.wang.4@research.gla.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-20

    Magnetic reconnection is a well-accepted part of the theory of solar eruptive events, though the evidence is still circumstantial. Intrinsic to the reconnection picture of a solar eruptive event, particularly in the standard model for two-ribbon flares (CSHKP model), are an advective flow of magnetized plasma into the reconnection region, expansion of field above the reconnection region as a flux rope erupts, retraction of heated post-reconnection loops, and downflows of cooling plasma along those loops. We report on a unique set of Solar Dynamics Observatory /Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imaging and Hinode /EUV Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopic observations of the disk flare SOL2016-03-23T03:54 in which all four flows are present simultaneously. This includes spectroscopic evidence for a plasma upflow in association with large-scale expanding closed inflow field. The reconnection inflows are symmetric, and consistent with fast reconnection, and the post-reconnection loops show a clear cooling and deceleration as they retract. Observations of coronal reconnection flows are still rare, and most events are observed at the solar limb, obscured by complex foregrounds, making their relationship to the flare ribbons, cusp field, and arcades formed in the lower atmosphere difficult to interpret. The disk location and favorable perspective of this event have removed these ambiguities giving a clear picture of the reconnection dynamics.

  15. Observations of Reconnection Flows in a Flare on the Solar Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juntao; Simões, P. J. A.; Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Fletcher, L.; Wright, P. J.; Hannah, I. G.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a well-accepted part of the theory of solar eruptive events, though the evidence is still circumstantial. Intrinsic to the reconnection picture of a solar eruptive event, particularly in the standard model for two-ribbon flares (CSHKP model), are an advective flow of magnetized plasma into the reconnection region, expansion of field above the reconnection region as a flux rope erupts, retraction of heated post-reconnection loops, and downflows of cooling plasma along those loops. We report on a unique set of Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imaging and Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopic observations of the disk flare SOL2016-03-23T03:54 in which all four flows are present simultaneously. This includes spectroscopic evidence for a plasma upflow in association with large-scale expanding closed inflow field. The reconnection inflows are symmetric, and consistent with fast reconnection, and the post-reconnection loops show a clear cooling and deceleration as they retract. Observations of coronal reconnection flows are still rare, and most events are observed at the solar limb, obscured by complex foregrounds, making their relationship to the flare ribbons, cusp field, and arcades formed in the lower atmosphere difficult to interpret. The disk location and favorable perspective of this event have removed these ambiguities giving a clear picture of the reconnection dynamics.

  16. Controlled, prospective, observational study on the efficiency and tolerability of a combination of potential Nrf2-inducing antioxidants and micronutrients as pre-treatment for ICSI in dyspermic patients with previous failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, R; Gallo, M; Dal Lago, A; Licata, E; Paciotti, G; Amodei, M; Meneghini, C; Fabiani, C; Dani, G; Liberanome, C; Antonaci, D; Corno, R; Miriello, D; Giuffrida, G; Giammusso, B

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of pre-treatment in dyspermic males in IVF couples with a combination of micronutrients, for the purpose of improving the fertilization rate, the implantation rate and the outcome of the pregnancy. This controlled prospective clinical study was performed in two medically assisted reproduction centers. 59 males with mild oligo-astheno-teratospermia (OAT) were admitted to the study. All of them had a history of previous in vitro fertilization (IVF) attempts with female partners aged micronutrients in dyspermic subjects can improve the reproductive outcome of the IVF procedure.

  17. Observation of online communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Sladjana V.; Rask, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the application of observation to online settings with a special focus on observer roles. It draws on a study of online observation of a virtual community, i.e. an open source software (OSS) community. The paper examines general and specific advantages and disadvantages...... of the observer roles in online settings by relating these roles to the same roles assumed in offline settings. The study suggests that under the right circumstances online and offline observation may benefit from being combined as they complement each other well. Quality issues and factors important to elicit...... trustworthy observational data from online study settings, such as OSS communities, are discussed. A proposition is made concerning how threats to credibility and transferability in relation to online observation (i.e. lack of richness and detail, risk of misunderstandings) can be diminished, while...

  18. Comparison of dynamic monitoring strategies based on CD4 cell counts in virally suppressed, HIV-positive individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy in high-income countries: a prospective, observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caniglia, Ellen C.; Cain, Lauren E.; Sabin, Caroline A.; Robins, James M.; Logan, Roger; Abgrall, Sophie; Mugavero, Michael J.; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Remonie; Drozd, Daniel R.; Seage, George R.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Dabis, Francois; Moore, Richard D.; Reiss, Peter; van Sighem, Ard; Mathews, William C.; del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Deeks, Steven G.; Muga, Roberto; Boswell, Stephen L.; Ferrer, Elena; Eron, Joseph J.; Napravnik, Sonia; Jose, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Justice, Amy C.; Tate, Janet P.; Gill, John; Pacheco, Antonio; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Bucher, Heiner C.; Egger, Matthias; Furrer, Hansjakob; Porter, Kholoud; Touloumi, Giota; Crane, Heidi; Miro, Jose M.; Sterne, Jonathan A.; Costagliola, Dominique; Saag, Michael; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines vary with respect to the optimal monitoring frequency of HIV-positive individuals. We compared dynamic monitoring strategies based on time-varying CD4 cell counts in virologically suppressed HIV-positive individuals. Methods In this observational study, we used data

  19. Observation Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher integrates science observations into the writing center. At the observation station, students explore new items with a science theme and use their notes and questions for class writings every day. Students are exposed to a variety of different topics and motivated to write in different styles all while…

  20. Observing nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book enables anyone with suitable instruments to undertake an examination of nebulae and see or photograph them in detail. Nebulae, ethereal clouds of gas and dust, are among the most beautiful objects to view in the night sky. These star-forming regions are a common target for observers and photographers. Griffiths describes many of the brightest and best nebulae and includes some challenges for the more experienced observer. Readers learn the many interesting astrophysical properties of these clouds, which are an important subject of study in astronomy and astrobiology. Non-mathematical in approach, the text is easily accessible to anyone with an interest in the subject. A special feature is the inclusion of an observational guide to 70 objects personally observed or imaged by the author. The guide also includes photographs of each object for ease of identification along with their celestial coordinates, magnitudes and other pertinent information. Observing Nebulae provides a ready resource to allow an...

  1. Is poststroke complex regional pain syndrome the combination of shoulder pain and soft tissue injury of the wrist?: A prospective observational study: STROBE of ultrasonographic findings in complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Wook; Kim, Yoon; Kim, Jong Moon; Hong, Ji Seong; Lim, Hyun Sun; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-08-01

    Patients with poststroke complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) show different symptoms compared to other types of CRPS, as they usually complain of shoulder and wrist pain with the elbow relatively spared. It is thus also known by the term "shoulder-hand syndrome."The aim of this study is to present a possible pathophysiology of poststroke CRPS through ultrasonographic observation of the affected wrist before and after steroid injection at the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendon in patients suspected with poststroke CRPS.Prospective evaluation and observation, the STROBE guideline checklist was used.Twenty-three patients diagnosed as poststroke CRPS in accordance to clinical criteria were enrolled. They had a Three Phase Bone Scan (TPBS) done and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of EDC tendon was measured by using ultrasonography. They were then injected with steroid at the EDC tendon. The CSA of EDC tendon, visual analogue scale (VAS), and degree of swelling of the wrist were followed up 1 week after the injection.TPBS was interpreted as normal for 4 patients, suspected CRPS for 10 patients, and CRPS for 9 patients. Ultrasonographic findings of the affected wrist included swelling of the EDC tendon. After the injection of steroid to the wrist, CSA and swelling of the affected wrist compared to that before the treatment was significantly decreased (P shoulder or rotator cuff tear of shoulder and soft tissue injury of the wrist caused by the hemiplegic nature of patients with stroke.

  2. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Léna, Pierre; Lebrun, François; Mignard, François; Pelat, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This is the updated, widely revised, restructured and expanded third edition of Léna et al.'s successful work Observational Astrophysics. It presents a synthesis on tools and methods of observational astrophysics of the early 21st century. Written specifically for astrophysicists and graduate students, this textbook focuses on fundamental and sometimes practical limitations on the ultimate performance that an astronomical system may reach, rather than presenting particular systems in detail. In little more than a decade there has been extraordinary progress in imaging and detection technologies, in the fields of adaptive optics, optical interferometry, in the sub-millimetre waveband, observation of neutrinos, discovery of exoplanets, to name but a few examples. The work deals with ground-based and space-based astronomy and their respective fields. And it also presents the ambitious concepts behind space missions aimed for the next decades. Avoiding particulars, it covers the whole of the electromagnetic spec...

  3. Observable supertranslations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Raphael; Porrati, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    We show that large gauge transformations in asymptotically flat spacetime can be implemented by sandwiching a shell containing the ingoing hard particles between two finite-width shells of soft gauge excitations. Integration of the graviton Dirac bracket implies that our observable soft degrees of freedom obey the algebra imposed by Strominger et al. on unobservable boundary degrees of freedom. Thus, we provide both a derivation and an observable realization of this algebra. We recently showed that soft charges fail to constrain the hard scattering problem, and so cannot be relevant to the black hole information paradox. By expressing the Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) algebra in terms of observable quantities, the present work shows that this conclusion was not an artifact of working with strictly zero frequency soft modes. The conservation laws associated with asymptotic symmetries are seen to arise physically from free propagation of infrared modes.

  4. Rationale and design of the participant, investigator, observer, and data-analyst-blinded randomized AGENDA trial on associations between gene-polymorphisms, endophenotypes for depression and antidepressive intervention: the effect of escitalopram versus placebo on the combined dexamethasone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, Ulla; Vinberg, Maj; Klose, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    , a 60% power is obtained to detect a clinically relevant difference in the primary outcome between the intervention and the placebo group. Secondary outcome measures are changes from baseline to four weeks in scores of: 1) cognition and 2) neuroticism. Tertiary outcomes measures are changes from...... hypothesize that potential endophenotypes for depression may be affected by selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor antidepressants in healthy first-degree relatives of depressed patients. The primary outcome measure is the change in plasma cortisol in the dexamethasone-corticotrophin releasing hormone test...... from baseline to the end of intervention. METHODS: The AGENDA trial is designed as a participant, investigator, observer, and data-analyst-blinded randomized trial. Participants are 80 healthy first-degree relatives of patients with depression. Participants are randomized to escitalopram 10 mg per day...

  5. Intraocular pressure-lowering effects of latanoprost monotherapy versus latanoprost or pilocarpine in combination with timolol: a randomized, observer-masked multicenter study in patients with open-angle glaucoma. Italian Latanoprost Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, M G

    1999-02-01

    To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) after adding either latanoprost or pilocarpine to timolol treatment or switching to latanoprost monotherapy in glaucomatous eyes in which IOP was inadequately controlled with timolol. This 6-month randomized study comprised 148 patients with primary open-angle or pseudoexfoliation glaucoma, which was inadequately controlled with topical beta-adrenergic antagonists. After a 2- to 4-week run-in period with timolol 0.5% twice daily, patients were assigned in randomized fashion to three study groups: one group received add-on therapy of latanoprost 0.005% once daily, the second group received add-on therapy of pilocarpine 2% three times daily, and the third group switched to latanoprost 0.005% once daily. Mean diurnal IOP was measured at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of treatment. At 6 months, 128 patients had completed the study. Diurnal IOP was significantly reduced from baseline in all groups. Adding latanoprost to timolol treatment reduced diurnal IOP by 6.1+/-0.3 mmHg (-28%), adding pilocarpine to timolol treatment reduced diurnal IOP by 4.2+/-0.3 mmHg (-19%), and switching from timolol to latanoprost monotherapy reduced diurnal IOP by 5.5+/-0.3 mmHg (-25%). A significantly greater reduction in diurnal IOP was achieved after addition of latanoprost than after addition of pilocarpine in patients in whom IOP was not adequately controlled with timolol alone. Further, the results of this study indicate that a switch to latanoprost monotherapy can be attempted before combination treatment is initiated.

  6. Comparison of response to 2-years’ growth hormone treatment in children with isolated growth hormone deficiency, born small for gestational age, idiopathic short stature, or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency: combined results from two large observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peter A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have compared the response to growth hormone (GH treatment between indications such as isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD, born small for gestational age (SGA, idiopathic short stature (ISS, and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD. The aim of this analysis of data, collected from two large ongoing observational outcome studies, was to evaluate growth and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I response data for children of short stature with IGHD, MPHD, SGA, or ISS following two years of treatment with the recombinant GH product Norditropin® (Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark. Methods Analysis of auxologic data from two ongoing prospective observational studies, NordiNet® International Outcomes Study (NordiNet® IOS and NovoNet®/American Norditropin® Studies: Web-enabled Research (ANSWER Program®. Results 4,582 children aged p = 0.047; p  0.001 vs. IGHD, respectively. Height gain was comparable between IGHD and MPHD. In pre-pubertal children vs. total population, height SDS change after two years was: IGHD, +1.24 vs. +0.97; SGA, +1.17 vs. +1.03; ISS, +1.04 vs. +0.84; and MPHD, +1.16 vs. +0.99 (all p  Conclusions After two years’ GH treatment, change in height SDS was greater in SGA and less in ISS, compared with IGHD; the discrepancy in responses may be due to the disease nature or confounders (i.e. age. Height SDS increase was greatest in pre-pubertal children, supporting early treatment initiation to optimize growth outcomes.

  7. Deltagende observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, H.

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen er en introduktion til deltagende observation som samfundsvidenskabelig metode. I artiklen introduceres til de teorihistoriske rødder, forskellige tilgange til metoden, den konkrete fremgangsmåde og de dermed forbundne overvejelser. Endvidere eksemplificeres metoden, og der opstilles en...

  8. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benz Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  9. Combined observations of Arctic sea ice with near-coincident colocated X-band, C-band, and L-band SAR satellite remote sensing and helicopter-borne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A. M.; King, J. A.; Doulgeris, A. P.; Gerland, S.; Singha, S.; Spreen, G.; Busche, T.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we compare colocated near-coincident X-, C-, and L-band fully polarimetry SAR satellite images with helicopter-borne ice thickness measurements acquired during the Norwegian Young sea ICE 2015 (N-ICE2015) expedition in the region of the Arctic Ocean north of Svalbard in April 2015. The air-borne surveys provide near-coincident snow plus ice thickness, surface roughness data, and photographs. This unique data set allows us to investigate how the different frequencies can complement one another for sea ice studies, but also to raise awareness of limitations. X-band and L-band satellite scenes were shown to be a useful complement to the standard SAR frequency for sea ice monitoring (C-band) for lead ice and newly formed sea ice identification. This may be in part be due to the frequency but also the high spatial resolution of these sensors. We found a relatively low correlation between snow plus ice thickness and surface roughness. Therefore, in our dataset ice thickness cannot directly be observed by SAR which has important implications for operational ice charting based on automatic segmentation.

  10. T20QoL: an observational multicenter cohort study to evaluate the quality of life in HIV-patients treated with enfuvirtide (ENF, T-20 in combination with an optimized background therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Bucciardini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available R Bucciardini1, M Massella1, A Corpolongo2, P Narciso2, V Fragola1, M Mirra1, S Donnini1, O Viganò3, S Costarelli4, V Tozzi21Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy; 2IRCCS L. Spallanzani, Rome, Italy; 3Ospedale L. Sacco, Milan, Italy; 4Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, ItalyAim: To evaluate the impact of health-related quality of life (HRQoL enfuvirtide-based (ENF-based salvage regimens of treatment-experienced HIV patients, in an observational multicenter cohort study.Methods: HRQoL was measured in a cohort of 16 patients over a 6-month follow-up using 2 instruments: the ISSQoL (Istituto Superiore di Sanità Quality of Life, a recently validated HIV-specific questionnaire; the EQ-5D (EuroQol, a generic widely used instrument. ENF was given at standard dosage along with an optimized background regimen.Results: Most of HRQoL dimensions showed improvement in ENF-treated patients at the post-baseline time points. Social functioning was the only dimension showing a negative effect. Monthly care costs of antiretroviral drugs for HIV patients taking ENF plus an optimized background regimen were approximately €2,348 per patient-month (range €382– €2,940.Conclusion: Our results show that the addition of ENF to an optimized background salvage-HAART may positively affect HRQoL not only in clinical trials but also in a sample population of patients used in a routine clinical practice.Keywords: enfuvirtide, HRQoL, HIV

  11. Short-Term Immunogenicity and Safety of an Accelerated Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Regimen With Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine in Combination With a Rabies Vaccine: A Phase III, Multicenter, Observer-Blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Tomas; Burchard, Gerd D; Dieckmann, Sebastian; Bühler, Silja; Paulke-Korinek, Maria; Nothdurft, Hans D; Reisinger, Emil; Ahmed, Khaleel; Bosse, Dietrich; Meyer, Seetha; Costantini, Marco; Pellegrini, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The current Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccination regimen requires two doses and 4 weeks to complete, which may not always be feasible for travelers on short notice. One of the primary endpoints of this phase III study was to demonstrate noninferiority of immune responses to a JE vaccine following an accelerated 1-week JE vaccination regimen administered concomitantly with a rabies vaccine as compared to a standard 4-week JE regimen alone. In addition, the immunogenicity of concomitant administration of JE and rabies vaccines following standard regimens was evaluated, as well as the tolerability and safety profile of each regimen under study. Healthy adults aged 18 to ≤65 years were randomized to regimens with an accelerated or standard schedule: JE+rabies-standard (n = 167), JE+rabies-accelerated (n = 217) or JE-standard (n = 56). Immunogenicity against JE antigen was assessed by a 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50 ) titer of ≥1 : 10, measured 28 days after last active vaccine (LAV) administration. Solicited reactions were collected 7 days after each vaccination; spontaneously reported adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs were monitored up to day 57. This paper reports results until day 57. Noninferiority of immune responses was established for JE+rabies-accelerated compared to the JE-standard regimen 28 days after LAV administration. Overall, 99% and 100% of subjects in the JE+rabies-accelerated and JE-standard groups, respectively, achieved PRNT50 titers of ≥1 : 10 at 28 days after LAV administration. No impact of concomitant rabies vaccination was observed either on immune responses or on the safety profile of the JE vaccine. This was the first randomized, controlled trial that demonstrated the strong short-term immunogenicity of a new, accelerated, 1-week JE-regimen, which was noninferior to that of the standard regimen, with a satisfactory tolerability and safety profile and no impact of concomitant rabies vaccination. This accelerated

  12. Les observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergounioux Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    jacents ? Au cours de cette table ronde, la question des observables sera interrogée en partant d’une réflexion concernant les études qui se fondent sur l’inventaire empirique des données pour construire leurs analyses (statistique lexicale, Labphon, corpus-guided linguistics, sociolinguistique variationniste, linguistique cognitive… et en allant jusqu’aux théories qui postulent l’existence de formalismes préalables dont les discours et les textes ratifieraient, par l’actualisation et la distribution de leurs occurrences, la pertinence épistémologique.

  13. Comparison of dynamic monitoring strategies based on CD4 cell counts in virally suppressed, HIV-positive individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy in high-income countries: a prospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniglia, Ellen C; Cain, Lauren E; Sabin, Caroline A; Robins, James M; Logan, Roger; Abgrall, Sophie; Mugavero, Michael J; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Remonie; Drozd, Daniel R; Seage, George R; Bonnet, Fabrice; Dabis, Francois; Moore, Richard D; Reiss, Peter; van Sighem, Ard; Mathews, William C; Del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Deeks, Steven G; Muga, Roberto; Boswell, Stephen L; Ferrer, Elena; Eron, Joseph J; Napravnik, Sonia; Jose, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Justice, Amy C; Tate, Janet P; Gill, John; Pacheco, Antonio; Veloso, Valdilea G; Bucher, Heiner C; Egger, Matthias; Furrer, Hansjakob; Porter, Kholoud; Touloumi, Giota; Crane, Heidi; Miro, Jose M; Sterne, Jonathan A; Costagliola, Dominique; Saag, Michael; Hernán, Miguel A

    2017-06-01

    Clinical guidelines vary with respect to the optimal monitoring frequency of HIV-positive individuals. We compared dynamic monitoring strategies based on time-varying CD4 cell counts in virologically suppressed HIV-positive individuals. In this observational study, we used data from prospective studies of HIV-positive individuals in Europe (France, Greece, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK) and North and South America (Brazil, Canada, and the USA) in The HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration and The Centers for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems. We compared three monitoring strategies that differ in the threshold used to measure CD4 cell count and HIV RNA viral load every 3-6 months (when below the threshold) or every 9-12 months (when above the threshold). The strategies were defined by the threshold CD4 counts of 200 cells per μL, 350 cells per μL, and 500 cells per μL. Using inverse probability weighting to adjust for baseline and time-varying confounders, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) of death and of AIDS-defining illness or death, risk ratios of virological failure, and mean differences in CD4 cell count. 47 635 individuals initiated an antiretroviral therapy regimen between Jan 1, 2000, and Jan 9, 2015, and met the eligibility criteria for inclusion in our study. During follow-up, CD4 cell count was measured on average every 4·0 months and viral load every 3·8 months. 464 individuals died (107 in threshold 200 strategy, 157 in threshold 350, and 200 in threshold 500) and 1091 had AIDS-defining illnesses or died (267 in threshold 200 strategy, 365 in threshold 350, and 459 in threshold 500). Compared with threshold 500, the mortality HR was 1·05 (95% CI 0·86-1·29) for threshold 200 and 1·02 (0·91·1·14) for threshold 350. Corresponding estimates for death or AIDS-defining illness were 1·08 (0·95-1·22) for threshold 200 and 1·03 (0·96-1·12) for threshold 350. Compared with threshold 500, the 24 month risk ratios of

  14. Photometric Observations of 1969 Alain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes-Gehrke, Melissa N.; Leffler, Taylor; Hampton, Karley; Chavis, Jacob; Fong, Josef; Wang, Yu; Hung, Andrew; Mahoney, James; Rizal, Muhammad Haziq Aiman Saiful Rizal

    2018-01-01

    CCD photometric observations of minor planet 1969 Alain by the T17 Telescope in Siding Spring, Australia in March and April 2017 were combined for lightcurve analysis. The combined data set led to a rotation period of P = 32.4 ± 0.4 h.

  15. Combining thermal comfort models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, A.

    1999-07-01

    Two models commonly used in thermal comfort studies were combined to develop a two-dimensional computer model that estimates the resistance to dry and evaporative heat transfer for a clothing system from fabric resistance data, fabric thickness data, and information concerning the amount of body surface area covered by different fabric layers and the amount of air trapped between fabric layers. Five different clothing ensembles with different total thermal insulation and very different distributions of the insulation on the body were simulated with 16 sedentary subjects. This paper first evaluates total thermal insulation predictions from the Fanger steady-state model and then uses these data in the Gagge two-compartment (or two-node) model. The combined model uses the transient heat balance of each segment and the whole body. It estimates total insulation value and then uses this value to calculate transient temperature and wettedness. By application of the combined model, predictions of human responses to a wide range of thermal conditions are compared with the responses of human subjects as described in reports of laboratory experiments. Possible reasons for discrepancies between the observed data and predictions of the model are briefly discussed.

  16. CHILD WITH COMBINED CARDIORESPIRATORY PATHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    N.D. Vashakmadze; G. V. Revunenkov; E. G. Chernavina; O. V. Kustova; M. V. Tarayan; I. V. Davydova; A. K. Gevorkyan

    2013-01-01

    The course of a secondary pulmonary hypertension in a child with congenital heart disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in anamnesis is retraced in the article using a concrete clinical case. An assessment of echocardiographic and radiologic disease signs at a prolonged follow-up observation of a child with combined cardiorespiratory pathology was conducted. The main therapeutic approaches to this category of patients were covered.

  17. GRBs: Recent Observational Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy ORB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission. This talk will highlight recent findings.

  18. Application of Gelatin Sponge Impregnated with a Mixture of 3 Drugs to Intraoperative Nerve Root Block Combined with Robot-Assisted Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery in the Treatment of Adult Degenerative Scoliosis: A Clinical Observation Including 96 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jin Peng; Fan, Yong; Liu, Ji Jun; Zhang, Jia Nan; Chang Liu, Shi; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-12-01

    Application of nerve root block is mainly for diagnosis with less application in intraoperative treatment. The aim of this study was to observe clinical and imaging outcomes of application of gelatin sponge impregnated with a mixture of 3 drugs to intraoperative nerve root block combined with robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery in to treat adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis. From January 2012 to November 2014, 108 patients with adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis were treated with robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery combined with intraoperative gelatin sponge impregnated with a mixture of 3 drugs. Visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index scores were used to evaluate postoperative improvement of back and leg pain, and clinical effects were assessed according to the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Imaging was obtained preoperatively, 1 week and 3 months postoperatively, and at the last follow-up. Fusion status, complications, and other outcomes were assessed. Follow-up was complete for 96 patients. Visual analog scale scores of leg and back pain on postoperative days 1-7 were decreased compared with preoperatively. At 1 week postoperatively, 3 months postoperatively, and last follow-up, visual analog scale score, Oswestry Disability Index score, coronal Cobb angle, and coronal and sagittal deviated distance decreased significantly (P = 0.000) and lumbar lordosis angle increased (P = 0.000) compared with preoperatively. Improvement rate of Oswestry Disability Index was 81.8% ± 7.4. Fusion rate between vertebral bodies was 92.7%. Application of gelatin sponge impregnated with 3 drugs combined with robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis is safe and feasible with advantages of good short-term analgesia effect, minimal invasiveness, short length of stay, and good long-term clinical

  19. Birth control pills - combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000655.htm Birth control pills - combination To use the sharing features on ... both progestin and estrogen. What Are Combination Birth Control Pills? Birth control pills help keep you from ...

  20. COMBINE 2 seminar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Jacobsen, Kim

    1995-01-01

    A seminar about the COMBINE project was described. Further, the project was described in generel, i.e. the COMBINE´s data model (IDM), the data exchange system (DES) and the different I/O-systems included in COMBINE 2......A seminar about the COMBINE project was described. Further, the project was described in generel, i.e. the COMBINE´s data model (IDM), the data exchange system (DES) and the different I/O-systems included in COMBINE 2...

  1. Observational study on the fine structure and dynamics of a solar jet. I. Energy build-up process around a satellite spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, Takahito; Tei, Akiko; Asai, Ayumi; Ueno, Satoru; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-10-01

    We report on a solar jet phenomenon associated with successive flares on 2014 November 10. These explosive events were involved with the satellite spots' emergence around a δ-type sunspot in the decaying active region NOAA 12205. The data for this jet were provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the X-Ray Telescope aboard Hinode, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida Observatory, Kyoto University. These abundant data enabled us to present this series of papers to discuss the entire process of the observed phenomena, including the energy storage, event trigger, and energy release. In this paper, we focus on the energy build-up and trigger phases, by analyzing the photospheric horizontal flow field around the active region by an optical flow method. The analysis shows the following results: (1) The observed explosive phenomena involved three satellite spots, the magnetic fluxes of which successively reconnected with their pre-existing ambient fields; (2) All of these satellite spots emerged in the moat region of a pivotal δ-type sunspot, especially near its convergent boundary with the neighboring supergranules or moat regions of adjacent sunspots; (3) Around the jet ejection site, the positive polarities of the satellite spot and adjacent emerging flux encountered the global magnetic field with a negative polarity in the moat region of the pivotal δ-type sunspot, and thus the polarity inversion line was formed along the convergent boundary of the photospheric horizontal flow channels.

  2. CHILD WITH COMBINED CARDIORESPIRATORY PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Vashakmadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The course of a secondary pulmonary hypertension in a child with congenital heart disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in anamnesis is retraced in the article using a concrete clinical case. An assessment of echocardiographic and radiologic disease signs at a prolonged follow-up observation of a child with combined cardiorespiratory pathology was conducted. The main therapeutic approaches to this category of patients were covered.

  3. Spatial Standard Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to devices and methods for the measurement and/or for the specification of the perceptual intensity of a visual image, or the perceptual distance between a pair of images. Grayscale test and reference images are processed to produce test and reference luminance images. A luminance filter function is convolved with the reference luminance image to produce a local mean luminance reference image. Test and reference contrast images are produced from the local mean luminance reference image and the test and reference luminance images respectively, followed by application of a contrast sensitivity filter. The resulting images are combined according to mathematical prescriptions to produce a Just Noticeable Difference, JND value, indicative of a Spatial Standard Observer, SSO. Some embodiments include masking functions, window functions, special treatment for images lying on or near borders and pre-processing of test images.

  4. Combined zenithal tropospheric delay during CONT08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, A.; Coulot, D.; Bock, O.; Nahmani, S.

    2012-12-01

    CONT08 is a two-week campaign of continuous VLBI observations. The IERS working group on Combination at the Observation Level (COL) has chosen this campaign in order to study such combination. In the COL framework, the French Groupe de Recherche en Géodésie Spatiale (GRGS) studies this approach, which directly combines the space geodetic observations of DORIS, GPS, SLR, and VLBI techniques using the same models and software for all the individual data processing. The purpose is to better use all the information provided by the different techniques through the interaction between the observations of the different techniques and to use more common parameters than a combination carried out at the solution level. In this work, combinations of DORIS, GPS, SLR, and VLBI technique measurements are studied during CONT08. We present different results concerning the use of common zenithal tropospheric delay (ZTD) during the combination. We compare the ZTD obtained separately with each individual technique data processing, the combined ZTD, and the ZTD derived from a meteorological model. We conclude with the benefit of the combined estimation of these parameters.

  5. Practical, general parser combinators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Izmaylova (Anastasia); A. Afroozeh (Ali); T. van der Storm (Tijs)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractParser combinators are a popular approach to parsing where contextfree grammars are represented as executable code. However, conventional parser combinators do not support left recursion, and can have worst-case exponential runtime. These limitations hinder the expressivity and

  6. Combinators for Paraconsistent Attitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    In order to analyse the semantics of natural language sentences a translation into a partial type logic using lexical and logical combinators is presented. The sentences cover a fragment of English with propositional attitudes like knowledge, belief and assertion. A combinator is a closed term of...

  7. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  8. Binocular combination of luminance profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian; Levi, Dennis M

    2017-11-01

    We develop and test a new two-dimensional model for binocular combination of the two eyes' luminance profiles. For first-order stimuli, the model assumes that one eye's luminance profile first goes through a luminance compressor, receives gain-control and gain-enhancement from the other eye, and then linearly combines the other eye's output profile. For second-order stimuli, rectification is added in the signal path of the model before the binocular combination site. Both the total contrast and luminance energies, weighted sums over both the space and spatial-frequency domains, were used in the interocular gain-control, while only the total contrast energy was used in the interocular gain-enhancement. To challenge the model, we performed a binocular brightness matching experiment over a large range of background and target luminances. The target stimulus was a dichoptic disc with a sharp edge that has an increment or decrement luminance from its background. The disk's interocular luminance ratio varied from trial to trial. To refine the model we tested three luminance compressors, five nested binocular combination models (including the Ding-Sperling and the DSKL models), and examined the presence or absence of total luminance energy in the model. We found that (1) installing a luminance compressor, either a logarithmic luminance function or luminance gain-control, (2) including both contrast and luminance energies, and (3) adding interocular gain-enhancement (the DSKL model) to a combined model significantly improved its performance. The combined model provides a systematic account of binocular luminance summation over a large range of luminance input levels. It gives a unified explanation of Fechner's paradox observed on a dark background, and a winner-take-all phenomenon observed on a light background. To further test the model, we conducted two additional experiments: luminance summation of discs with asymmetric contour information (Experiment 2), similar to

  9. Combination of antiarrhythmic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, B; Mletzko, R; Jung, W; Manz, M

    1991-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic treatment with single agents is often ineffective and can be limited by dose-dependent side effects. Therefore, combinations of antiarrhythmic drugs in smaller and well-tolerated doses are advocated in cases refractory to single antiarrhythmic drugs. Basically, substances belonging to the same electrophysiologic class should not be combined. However, drugs of different subsets of class I may be combined. Agents that have pharmacokinetic interactions, such as quinidine and amiodarone, should not be given together because this combination may be associated with a considerable proarrhythmic effect. A combination of beta-adrenoreceptor blockers with class I antiarrhythmic drugs may be effective, mainly in cases in which the arrhythmia is dependent on adrenergic stimulation. The combination of class III and IB substances can be useful in some cases, from the electrophysiological and clinical point of view. Among the successful combinations of this type are amiodarone and mexiletine, sotalol and mexiletine, or sotalol and tocainide. In 34 patients, the reduction of ventricular premature beats by sotalol alone was 28%, and by sotalol plus mexiletine or tocainide was 79%. Complex ventricular arrhythmias were suppressed by sotalol alone by less than 40% and by sotalol plus mexiletine or tocainide by more than 80%. There was no difference in the effectiveness of mexiletine and tocainide (both of them being class IB drugs) in this combination. However, mexiletine was associated with fewer adverse effects than was tocainide. In patients refractory to amiodarone alone or to a combination with mexiletine, the combined treatment with amiodarone and class IC drugs such as flecainide and encainide prolongs the cycle length of ventricular tachycardia, but does not suppress induction of ventricular tachycardia during programmed stimulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Combined autophagy and proteasome inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Dan T; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Tan, Kay-See; Heitjan, Daniel F; Davis, Lisa E; Pontiggia, Laura; Rangwala, Reshma; Piao, Shengfu; Chang, Yunyoung C; Scott, Emma C; Paul, Thomas M; Nichols, Charles W; Porter, David L; Kaplan, Janeen; Mallon, Gayle; Bradner, James E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of proteasome inhibition for myeloma is limited by therapeutic resistance, which may be mediated by activation of the autophagy pathway as an alternative mechanism of protein degradation. Preclinical studies demonstrate that autophagy inhibition with hydroxychloroquine augments the antimyeloma efficacy of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. We conducted a phase I trial combining bortezomib and hydroxychloroquine for relapsed or refractory myeloma. We enrolled 25 patients, including 11 (44%) refractory to prior bortezomib. No protocol-defined dose-limiting toxicities occurred, and we identified a recommended phase 2 dose of hydroxychloroquine 600 mg twice daily with standard doses of bortezomib, at which we observed dose-related gastrointestinal toxicity and cytopenias. Of 22 patients evaluable for response, 3 (14%) had very good partial responses, 3 (14%) had minor responses, and 10 (45%) had a period of stable disease. Electron micrographs of bone marrow plasma cells collected at baseline, after a hydroxychloroquine run-in, and after combined therapy showed therapy-associated increases in autophagic vacuoles, consistent with the combined effects of increased trafficking of misfolded proteins to autophagic vacuoles and inhibition of their degradative capacity. Combined targeting of proteasomal and autophagic protein degradation using bortezomib and hydroxychloroquine is therefore feasible and a potentially useful strategy for improving outcomes in myeloma therapy. PMID:24991834

  11. 米非司酮配合舌下含服低剂量米索前列醇的催经止孕的效果观察%Observation of the Effect on Mifepristone Combined With Low Dose Misoprostol Under the Tongue in Menstruation and Terminating Pregnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛海峰

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨米非司酮配合舌下含服低剂量米索前列醇的催经止孕效果及安全性。方法收集2012年5月~2014年8月在我院门诊就诊的月经延迟妇女120例。采用随机数字表法将患者分为试验组和对照组,每组60例。对照组按常规口服米非司酮和米索前列醇催经止孕。试验组采用米非司酮联合低剂量米索前列醇舌下含服催经止孕。比较两组的治疗结局:完全流产、不全流产、异位妊娠、月经来潮、失败情况。同时观察两组服药期间不良反应及阴道流血情况。结果试验组和对照组的完全流产率、不完全流产率、异位妊娠率、月经来潮率、失败率比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。治疗期间,试验组患者恶心、呕吐及腹泻发生率低于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。试验组、对照组的阴道流血时间比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论米非司酮联合舌下含服小剂量米索前列醇对经期延迟不足1周的女性,能起到较佳的催经止孕的效果,其能减少消化道症状的发生。%Objective To investigate the effect and safety of mifepristone combined with low dose misoprostol under the tongue in menstruation and terminating pregnan.Methods120 delayed menstruation women who doctored in our hospital from May 2012 to August 2014 were collected. They were randomly divided into experimental group and control group, there were 60 patientes in each group. The control group were received routine oral mifepristone and misoprostol for menstruation and terminating pregnan. The experimental group was treated with mifepristone combined with low dose of misoprostol under the tongue, the treatment outcome: complete abortion, incomplete abortion, ectopic pregnancy, menstruation, failure were compared between the two groups. And the adverse reactions and vaginal bleeding were observered between the two groups.Results The complete

  12. Subacute combined degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the term "combined." At first, the nerve covering (myelin sheath) is damaged. Later, the entire nerve cell is affected. Doctors do not know exactly how a lack of vitamin B12 damages the nerves. It is possible that the lack ...

  13. Resonant High Power Combiners

    CERN Document Server

    Langlois, Michel; Peillex-Delphe, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Particle accelerators need radio frequency sources. Above 300 MHz, the amplifiers mostly used high power klystrons developed for this sole purpose. As for military equipment, users are drawn to buy "off the shelf" components rather than dedicated devices. IOTs have replaced most klystrons in TV transmitters and find their way in particle accelerators. They are less bulky, easier to replace, more efficient at reduced power. They are also far less powerful. What is the benefit of very compact sources if huge 3 dB couplers are needed to combine the power? To alleviate this drawback, we investigated a resonant combiner, operating in TM010 mode, able to combine 3 to 5 IOTs. Our IOTs being able to deliver 80 kW C.W. apiece, combined power would reach 400 kW minus the minor insertion loss. Values for matching and insertion loss are given. The behavior of the system in case of IOT failure is analyzed.

  14. Combine Harvester Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Ole; Sørlie, James Arnold

    1999-01-01

    A simulator for training pilots in the operation of a modern high-tech combine harvester is presented. The new simulator application is based on DMI´s well-known DMS maritime simulator architecture. Two major challenges have been encountered in the development of the simulator: 1) interfacing the...

  15. Fourier Plane Image Combination by Feathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, W. D.

    2017-09-01

    Astronomical objects frequently exhibit structure over a wide range of scales whereas many telescopes, especially interferometer arrays, only sample a limited range of spatial scales. To properly image these objects, images from a set of instruments covering the range of scales may be needed. These images then must be combined in a manner to recover all spatial scales. This paper describes the feathering technique for image combination in the Fourier transform plane. Implementations in several packages are discussed and example combinations of single dish and interferometric observations of both simulated and celestial radio emission are given.

  16. The Observation Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Once the reasons for habitual observation in the classroom have been established, and the intent to observe has been settled, the practical details of observation must be organized. In this article, O'Shaughnessy gives us a model for the implementation of observation. She thoroughly reviews Montessori's work curves and how they can be used to show…

  17. Combination Chemotherapy for Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Webster

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in April 2009 and the continuous evolution of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses underscore the urgency of novel approaches to chemotherapy for human influenza infection. Anti-influenza drugs are currently limited to the neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir and to M2 ion channel blockers (amantadine and rimantadine, although resistance to the latter class develops rapidly. Potential targets for the development of new anti-influenza agents include the viral polymerase (and endonuclease, the hemagglutinin, and the non-structural protein NS1. The limitations of monotherapy and the emergence of drug-resistant variants make combination chemotherapy the logical therapeutic option. Here we review the experimental data on combination chemotherapy with currently available agents and the development of new agents and therapy targets.

  18. Combination-Combination Hyperchaos Synchronization of Complex Memristor Oscillator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jin-E

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination-combination synchronization scheme is based on combination of multidrive systems and combination of multiresponse systems. In this paper, we investigate combination-combination synchronization of hyperchaotic complex memristor oscillator system. Several sufficient conditions are provided to ascertain the combination of two drive hyperchaotic complex memristor oscillator systems to synchronize the combination of two response hyperchaotic complex memristor oscillator systems. These new conditions improve and extend the existing synchronization results for memristive systems. A numerical example is given to show the feasibility of theoretical results.

  19. Transfer function combinations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Liang

    2012-10-01

    Direct volume rendering has been an active area of research for over two decades. Transfer function design remains a difficult task since current methods, such as traditional 1D and 2D transfer functions, are not always effective for all data sets. Various 1D or 2D transfer function spaces have been proposed to improve classification exploiting different aspects, such as using the gradient magnitude for boundary location and statistical, occlusion, or size metrics. In this paper, we present a novel transfer function method which can provide more specificity for data classification by combining different transfer function spaces. In this work, a 2D transfer function can be combined with 1D transfer functions which improve the classification. Specifically, we use the traditional 2D scalar/gradient magnitude, 2D statistical, and 2D occlusion spectrum transfer functions and combine these with occlusion and/or size-based transfer functions to provide better specificity. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new method by comparing to the following previous techniques: 2D gradient magnitude, 2D occlusion spectrum, 2D statistical transfer functions and 2D size based transfer functions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Chemistry of combined residual chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

  1. Lightship Daily Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations taken on board lightships along the United States coasts from 1936 - 1983. Generally 4-6 observations daily. Also includes deck logs, which give...

  2. JAPANSE LONGLINE OBSERVER JPLL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data that were collected by trained observers aboard Japanese pelagic longline vessels operating in the US EEZ. Observers collected...

  3. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  4. OBSCAN Observer Scanning System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Paper logs are the primary data collection tool used by observers of the Northeast Fisheries Observer Program deployed on commercial fishing vessels. After the data...

  5. Bottomfish Observer Database - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data collected by at sea observers in the Bottomfish Observer Program in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands from October 2003 - April 2006.

  6. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  7. Regional National Cooperative Observer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA publication dedicated to issues, news and recognition of observers in the National Weather Service Cooperative Observer program. Issues published regionally...

  8. Coherent laser beam combining

    CERN Document Server

    Brignon, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the improvement of diode pumping in solid state lasers and the development of double clad fiber lasers have allowed to maintain excellent laser beam quality with single mode fibers. However, the fiber output power if often limited below a power damage threshold. Coherent laser beam combining (CLBC) brings a solution to these limitations by identifying the most efficient architectures and allowing for excellent spectral and spatial quality. This knowledge will become critical for the design of the next generation high-power lasers and is of major interest to many industrial, environme

  9. Cloning of observables

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraro, Alessandro; Galbiati, Matteo; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the concept of cloning for classes of observables and classify cloning machines for qubit systems according to the number of parameters needed to describe the class under investigation. A no-cloning theorem for observables is derived and the connections between cloning of observables and joint measurements of noncommuting observables are elucidated. Relationships with cloning of states and non-demolition measurements are also analyzed.

  10. Feature selection based classifier combination approach for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Conditional mutual information based feature selection when driving the ensemble of classifier produces improved recognition results for most of the benchmarking datasets. The improve- ment is also observed with maximum relevance minimum redundancy based feature selection when used in combination with ensemble ...

  11. Being observed magnifies action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinmetz, J.; Xu, Q.; Fishbach, A.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that people, when observed, perceive their actions as more substantial because they add the audience’s perspective to their own perspective. We find that participants who were observed while eating (Study 1) or learned they were observed after eating (Study 2) recalled eating

  12. Identifying Causality from Alarm Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhübel, Denis; Zhang, Xinxin; Lind, Morten

    on an abstracted model of the mass and energy flows in the system. The application of MFM for root cause analysis based alarm grouping has been demonstrated and can be extended to reason about the direction of causality considering the entirety of the alarms present in the system for more comprehensive decision...... and consequences. This extended analysis results in causal paths from likely root causes to tentative consequences, providing the operator with a comprehensive tool to not only identify but also rank the criticality of a large number of concurrent alarms in the system....... support. This contribution presents the foundation for combining the cause and consequence propagation of multiple observations from the system based on an MFM model. The proposed logical reasoning matches actually observed alarms to the propagation analysis in MFM to distinguish plausible causes...

  13. Ziconotide combination intrathecal therapy: rationale and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Mark S; Rauck, Richard L; Deer, Timothy

    2010-09-01

    Ziconotide is a nonopioid intrathecal analgesic used to manage moderate to severe chronic pain. Although ziconotide is approved in the United States for intrathecal monotherapy only, it is often used in combination with other intrathecal drugs in clinical practice. The need exists for a critical assessment of the currently available published literature on ziconotide combination therapy. This review summarizes and evaluates the publications from preclinical and clinical peer-reviewed experiments that have investigated the safety and effectiveness of ziconotide in combination with a variety of other drugs. Eleven relevant publications were identified through a systematic search of multiple databases. In preclinical studies, additive or synergistic antinociceptive effects were discovered when ziconotide was used in combination with morphine, clonidine, or baclofen; however, no additional antinociceptive effects were observed when bupivacaine was added to ziconotide therapy. Safety data from animal studies revealed that ziconotide did not exacerbate morphine-induced respiratory depression, or clonidine-induced hypotension or bradycardia; however, ziconotide did potentiate morphine-induced hypotension and inhibition of gastrointestinal tract motility. Results from 2 open-label trials indicated that combination ziconotide and morphine therapy produced greater analgesia than was produced by the use of either drug alone. Preliminary support for the use of ziconotide in combination with morphine, baclofen, or hydromorphone was provided by case studies. Although clinical and preclinical studies provide some support for the use of ziconotide in combination with morphine, hydromorphone, clonidine, or baclofen, strong evidence-based data are limited. Controlled, long-term clinical trials are warranted.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Observational Cosmology Observational Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Observational Cosmology by Stephen Serjeant fills a niche that was underserved in the textbook market: an up-to-date, thorough cosmology textbook focused on observations, aimed at advanced undergraduates. Not everything about the book is perfect - some subjects get short shrift, in some cases jargon dominates, and there are too few exercises. Still, on the whole, the book is a welcome addition. For decades, the classic textbooks of cosmology have focused on theory. But for every Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect there is a Butcher-Oemler effect; there are as many cosmological phenomena established by observations, and only explained later by theory, as there were predicted by theory and confirmed by observations. In fact, in the last decade, there has been an explosion of new cosmological findings driven by observations. Some are so new that you won't find them mentioned in books just a few years old. So it is not just refreshing to see a book that reflects the new realities of cosmology, it is vital, if students are to truly stay up on a field that has widened in scope considerably. Observational Cosmology is filled with full-color images, and graphs from the latest experiments. How exciting it is that we live in an era where satellites and large experiments have gathered so much data to reveal astounding details about the origin of the universe and its evolution. To have all the latest data gathered together and explained in one book will be a revelation to students. In fact, at times it was to me. I've picked up modern cosmological knowledge through a patchwork of reading papers, going to colloquia, and serving on grant and telescope allocation panels. To go back and see them explained from square one, and summarized succinctly, filled in quite a few gaps in my own knowledge and corrected a few misconceptions I'd acquired along the way. To make room for all these graphs and observational details, a few things had to be left out. For one, there are few derivations

  15. Combining classical metrology models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Roldán

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The results obtained in the graphic analysis of the modulation of the Cuarto Real de Santo Domingo building in Granada, Spain, (ROLDÁN, 2011 have provided new insights to further approach the research on possible use the double-scale in historical monumental architecture. We propose the characterization of the singularities of the system, from the implications and graphic representation required by the metrological scheme identified, as well as the variety of typologies that are presented in their modular frames, and the iterative combination of two-scale modules which allow operational approximations to fractions and ratios not explicitly present in the system.

  16. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  17. Combined Heat and Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    At their 2007 Summit in Heiligendamm, G8 leaders called on countries to 'adopt instruments and measures to significantly increase the share of combined heat and power (CHP) in the generation of electricity.' As a result, energy, economic, environmental and utility regulators are looking for tools and information to understand the potential of CHP and to identify appropriate policies for their national circumstances. This report forms the first part of the response. It includes answers to policy makers' questions about the potential economic, energy and environmental benefits of an increased policy commitment to CHP. It also includes for the first time integrated IEA data on global CHP installations, and analyses the benefits of increased CHP investment in the G8+5 countries. A companion report will be produced later in 2008 to document best practice policy approaches that have been used to expand the use of CHP in a variety of countries.

  18. Statistical evolution of quiet-Sun small-scale magnetic features using Sunrise observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusha, L. S.; Solanki, S. K.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of small magnetic features in quiet regions of the Sun provides a unique window for probing solar magneto-convection. Here we analyze small-scale magnetic features in the quiet Sun, using the high resolution, seeing-free observations from the Sunrise balloon borne solar observatory. Our aim is to understand the contribution of different physical processes, such as splitting, merging, emergence and cancellation of magnetic fields to the rearrangement, addition and removal of magnetic flux in the photosphere. We have employed a statistical approach for the analysis and the evolution studies are carried out using a feature-tracking technique. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the feature-tracking algorithm that we have newly developed and we present the results of a statistical study of several physical quantities. The results on the fractions of the flux in the emergence, appearance, splitting, merging, disappearance and cancellation qualitatively agrees with other recent studies. To summarize, the total flux gained in unipolar appearance is an order of magnitude larger than the total flux gained in emergence. On the other hand, the bipolar cancellation contributes nearly an equal amount to the loss of magnetic flux as unipolar disappearance. The total flux lost in cancellation is nearly six to eight times larger than the total flux gained in emergence. One big difference between our study and previous similar studies is that, thanks to the higher spatial resolution of Sunrise, we can track features with fluxes as low as 9 × 1014 Mx. This flux is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the smallest fluxes of the features tracked in the highest resolution previous studies based on Hinode data. The area and flux of the magnetic features follow power-law type distribution, while the lifetimes show either power-law or exponential type distribution depending on the exact definitions used to define various birth and death events. We have

  19. Does Observation Influence Learning?

    OpenAIRE

    Olivier Armantier

    2001-01-01

    A common value auction experiment is run to compare the relative influence of observation and experience on learning. It is shown that the ex-post observation of opponents' actions and payoffs homogenizes behavior and accelerates learning toward the Nash equilibrium. Besides, experiential and observational learning are both relevant and of comparable magnitude. A general reinforcement model for continuous strategies, encompassing choice reinforcement learning, direction learning and payoff de...

  20. Leishmania donovani develops resistance to drug combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel García-Hernández

    Full Text Available Drug combinations for the treatment of leishmaniasis represent a promising and challenging chemotherapeutic strategy that has recently been implemented in different endemic areas. However, the vast majority of studies undertaken to date have ignored the potential risk that Leishmania parasites could develop resistance to the different drugs used in such combinations. As a result, this study was designed to elucidate the ability of Leishmania donovani to develop experimental resistance to anti-leishmanial drug combinations. The induction of resistance to amphotericin B/miltefosine, amphotericin B/paromomycin, amphotericin B/Sb(III, miltefosine/paromomycin, and Sb(III/paromomycin was determined using a step-wise adaptation process to increasing drug concentrations. Intracellular amastigotes resistant to these drug combinations were obtained from resistant L. donovani promastigote forms, and the thiol and ATP levels and the mitochondrial membrane potential of the resistant lines were analysed. Resistance to drug combinations was obtained after 10 weeks and remained in the intracellular amastigotes. Additionally, this resistance proved to be unstable. More importantly, we observed that promastigotes/amastigotes resistant to one drug combination showed a marked cross-resistant profile to other anti-leishmanial drugs. Additionally, the thiol levels increased in resistant lines that remained protected against the drug-induced loss of ATP and mitochondrial membrane potential. We have therefore demonstrated that different resistance patterns can be obtained in L. donovani depending upon the drug combinations used. Resistance to the combinations miltefosine/paromomycin and Sb(III/paromomycin is easily obtained experimentally. These results have been validated in intracellular amastigotes, and have important relevance for ensuring the long-term efficacy of drug combinations.

  1. Observations in public settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Lee

    1977-01-01

    Straightforward observation of children in their everyday environments is a more appropriate method of discovering the meaning of their relationships to nature than complex methodologies or reductionist commonsense thinking. Observational study requires an explicit conceptual framework and adherence to procedures that allow scientific inference. Error may come from...

  2. Maximally incompatible quantum observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Schultz, Jussi, E-mail: jussi.schultz@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ziman, Mario, E-mail: ziman@savba.sk [RCQI, Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, Botanická 68a, 60200 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-01

    The existence of maximally incompatible quantum observables in the sense of a minimal joint measurability region is investigated. Employing the universal quantum cloning device it is argued that only infinite dimensional quantum systems can accommodate maximal incompatibility. It is then shown that two of the most common pairs of complementary observables (position and momentum; number and phase) are maximally incompatible.

  3. The observer's sky atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Karkoschka, E

    2007-01-01

    This title includes a short introduction to observing, a thorough description of the star charts and tables, a glossary and much more. It is perfect for both the beginner and seasoned observer. It is fully revised edition of a best-selling and highly-praised sky atlas.

  4. Participation beyond observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    , however, the researchers typically uphold the notion that all they methodically engage in is participant observation. The paper argues that important aspects of children’s living and understanding may be lost when considering them mere objects of one’s visual and verbal research practices. First I delve...... on investigating children’s perspectives through participant observation, but also ontological and political ones....

  5. Deltagende observation 2. udgave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Krogstrup, Hanne Kathrine

    Denne bog er en teoretisk og praktisk introduktion til deltagende observation, og giver konkrete anvisninger, som er nyttige for såvel erfarne som den uprøvede feltforsker.......Denne bog er en teoretisk og praktisk introduktion til deltagende observation, og giver konkrete anvisninger, som er nyttige for såvel erfarne som den uprøvede feltforsker....

  6. Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judith A. Kieffer

    2000-07-01

    Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

  7. Integral display for non-static observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado, Adrian; Hong, Seokmin; Saavedra, Genaro; Martinez-Corral, Manuel; Javidi, B.

    2017-05-01

    We propose to combine the Kinect and the Integral-Imaging technologies for the implementation of Integral Display. The Kinect device permits the determination, in real time, of (x,y,z) position of the observer relative to the monitor. Due to the active condition of its IR technology, the Kinect provides the observer position even in dark environments. On the other hand, SPOC 2.0 algorithm permits to calculate microimages adapted to the observer 3D position. The smart combination of these two concepts permits the implementation, for the first time we believe, of an Integral Display that provides the observer with color 3D images of real scenes that are viewed with full parallax and which are adapted dynamically to its 3D position.

  8. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  9. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-06-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  10. Combined oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C; Murtagh, J

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of prescribing combined oral contraceptives (OCs) is achievement of good cycle control and effective contraception with the least side effects, using an OC with the lowest possible dose of estrogen. Triphasil, Triquilar, Nordette, Microgynon 30, and Brevinor are good 1st choices because of the low estrogen dose (30-35 mcg). Women who probably cannot tolerate breakthrough bleeding and who need simple packaging should use a monophasic, more progestogenic OC, e.g., Nordette or Microgynon 30. Physicians should suggest a low dose estrogen and low dose antiandrogenic progestogen (OC) (e.g., Diane-35 ED) for women who have acne. They should advise patients that when they take OCs, their menstrual periods usually become shorter, regular, and lighter. Women need not take a break from OC usage. Vitamin C, antibiotics, griseofulvin, rifampicin, and anticonvulsants (except sodium valproate) interact with OCs. Women using warfarin and oral hypoglycemics and wanting to start using OCs need to consult their physician about changing requirements for warfarin and oral hypoglycemics. The effectiveness of OCs can be diminished by diarrhea and vomiting. Absolute contraindications to OCs include pregnancy, use during the first 2 weeks postpartum, history of thromboembolism, undiagnosed abnormal vaginal bleeding, focal migraine, coronary heart disease, steroid-dependent tumors, recent impaired liver function, and cardiovascular accidents. Some relative contraindications are older than 35 years old and smoking, breast feeding, and hypertension. This article provides a section on how to manage common side effects. For example, if the side effect is acne, the physician should prescribe an OC with increased estrogen and reduced progestogen (e.g., Triphasil/Triquilar to Biphasil/Sequilar). This article lists trade names of various OCs and their estrogen and progestogen doses, e.g., Nordette has 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol and 150 mcg levonorgestrel.

  11. Combined dyslipidemia in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavey, Rae-Ellen W

    2015-01-01

    Combined dyslipidemia (CD) is now the predominant dyslipidemic pattern in childhood, characterized by moderate-to-severe elevation in triglycerides and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), minimal elevation in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and reduced HDL-C. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy shows that the CD pattern is represented at the lipid subpopulation level as an increase in small, dense LDL and in overall LDL particle number plus a reduction in total HDL-C and large HDL particles, a highly atherogenic pattern. In youth, CD occurs almost exclusively with obesity and is highly prevalent, seen in more than 40% of obese adolescents. CD in childhood predicts pathologic evidence of atherosclerosis and vascular dysfunction in adolescence and young adulthood, and early clinical cardiovascular events in adult life. There is a tight connection between CD, visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and the metabolic syndrome, suggesting an integrated pathophysiological response to excessive weight gain. Weight loss, changes in dietary composition, and increases in physical activity have all been shown to improve CD significantly in children and adolescents in short-term studies. Most importantly, even small amounts of weight loss are associated with significant decreases in triglyceride levels and increases in HDL-C levels with improvement in lipid subpopulations. Diet change focused on limitation of simple carbohydrate intake with specific elimination of all sugar-sweetened beverages is very effective. Evidence-based recommendations for initiating diet and activity change are provided. Rarely, drug therapy is needed, and the evidence for drug treatment of CD in childhood is reviewed. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Propagating Class and Method Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a mixin based class and method combination mechanism with block structure propagation. Traditionally, mixins can be composed to form new classes, possibly merging the implementations of methods (as in CLOS). In our approach, a class or method combination operation may cause any...... number of implicit combinations. For example, it is possible to specify separate aspects of a family of classes, and then combine several aspects into a full-fledged class family. The combination expressions would explicitly combine whole-family aspects, and by propagation implicitly combine the aspects...... for each member of the class family, and again by propagation implicitly compose each method from its aspects. As opposed to CLOS, this is type-checked statically; and as opposed to other systems for advanced class combination/ merging/weaving, it is integrated directly in the language, ensuring a clear...

  13. Combining Evidence from Homologous Datasets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feng, Ao; Allan, James

    2006-01-01

    .... We argue that combining evidence from these "homologous" datasets can give us better representation of the original data, and our experiments show that a model combining all sources outperforms each...

  14. Belladonna Alkaloid Combinations and Phenobarbital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belladonna alkaloid combinations and phenobarbital are used to relieve cramping pains in conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and ... Belladonna alkaloid combinations and phenobarbital come as a regular tablet, a slow-acting tablet, capsule, and liquid to take ...

  15. [Combined radiotherapy of uveal melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovkina, A F; Kesheleva, V V; Fridman, F E; Fishkin, I G

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen patients with uveal melanoma were exposed to combined radiotherapy: transscleral exposure of melanoma using a ruthenium ophthalmoapplicator and intracorporeal administration of 59Fe. Radiation reaction of the tumor was potentiated by combined exposure.

  16. Recent Observations of the Early Stage of Solar Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    We examine the onset of two solar eruptions, using data from Hinode STEREO, TRACE, and SOHO, and other sources. One eruption occurred on 2007 March 2, and the other occurred on 2007 May 20. The first eruption involves a filament that erupts, and motions of the filament begin at least 20 min prior to onset of the main eruption; magnetic cancellation occurs beneath the filament among opposite polarity magnetic elements for at least six hours prior to the eruption.. In the second case, a surge-like filament is ejected from a location north of the main erupting magnetic neutral line; in this case magnetic cancellation occurs both along the main neutral line and also at the sight of the surge source north of the main neutral line. Thus in both cases, magnetic cancellation prior to eruption plays a crucial role in releasing the magnetic energy responsible for the respective eruptions.

  17. Astrolabe observations of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, E. M.; Debarbat, S.; Sanchez, M.

    1981-01-01

    A previously reported bias in the right ascension residuals of astrolabe observations of Mars is removed by correcting for equinox motion and relating the observations to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's planetary ephemeris, DE111. The remaining residuals show a 'phase effect', the magnitude of which is solved for and compared with that previously found for meridian transit observations. The final residuals reveal no significant offset in either right ascension or declination. In modifying the residuals, use is also made of Fricke's (1980) correction for the motion of the FK 4 equinox.

  18. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  19. Surface Weather Observations Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms is a set of historical manuscript records for the period 1893-1948. The collection includes two very similar form types: Form...

  20. NWS Corrections to Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Form B-14 is the National Weather Service form entitled 'Notice of Corrections to Weather Records.' The forms are used to make corrections to observations on forms...

  1. Water Current Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tidal, river and ocean current observations collected by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. Period of record is late 1800s to mid-1980s.

  2. Oil Rig Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather observations taken at offshore platforms along the United States coastlines. The majority are located in oil-rich areas of the Gulf of Mexico, Gulf of...

  3. Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Surface Weather Observation Collection consists primarily of hourly, synoptic, daily, and monthly forms submitted to the archive by the National Weather Service...

  4. Longline Observer Data System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LODS, the Hawaii Longline Observer Data System, is a complete suite of tools designed to collect, process, and manage quality fisheries data and information. Guided...

  5. Cooperative Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly logs include a daily account of temperature extremes and precipitation, along with snow data at some locations. U.S. Cooperative Observer Program (COOP)...

  6. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  7. Coastal research: Observational challenge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.

    applications to rapid response as well as climatic scale problems. Ships have played important roles in providing access to coastal observations since early expeditionary voyages begin ning several centuries ago. Today they are important for: (1) direct... observations and data collection and (2) deployment of other sampling platforms such as moor ings, drifters, and others described below. One of the ad vantages of ships is that advanced analytical instrumen tation, which cannot presently be deployed in situ...

  8. Observing Photons in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Pauluhn, Anuschka; Timothy, J. Gethyn

    This first chapter of the book "Observing Photons in Space" serves to illustrate the rewards of observing photons in space, to state our aims, and to introduce the structure and the conventions used. The title of the book reflects the history of space astronomy: it started at the high-energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum, where the photon aspect of the radiation dominates. Nevertheless, both the wave and the photon aspects of this radiation will be considered extensively. In this first chapter we describe the arduous efforts that were needed before observations from pointed, stable platforms, lifted by rocket above the Earth"s atmosphere, became the matter of course they seem to be today. This exemplifies the direct link between technical effort -- including proper design, construction, testing and calibration -- and some of the early fundamental insights gained from space observations. We further report in some detail the pioneering work of the early space astronomers, who started with the study of γ- and X-rays as well as ultraviolet photons. We also show how efforts to observe from space platforms in the visible, infrared, sub-millimetre and microwave domains developed and led to today"s emphasis on observations at long wavelengths.

  9. FuzzObserver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ayanna; Bayard, David

    2006-01-01

    Fuzzy Feature Observation Planner for Small Body Proximity Observations (FuzzObserver) is a developmental computer program, to be used along with other software, for autonomous planning of maneuvers of a spacecraft near an asteroid, comet, or other small astronomical body. Selection of terrain features and estimation of the position of the spacecraft relative to these features is an essential part of such planning. FuzzObserver contributes to the selection and estimation by generating recommendations for spacecraft trajectory adjustments to maintain the spacecraft's ability to observe sufficient terrain features for estimating position. The input to FuzzObserver consists of data from terrain images, including sets of data on features acquired during descent toward, or traversal of, a body of interest. The name of this program reflects its use of fuzzy logic to reason about the terrain features represented by the data and extract corresponding trajectory-adjustment rules. Linguistic fuzzy sets and conditional statements enable fuzzy systems to make decisions based on heuristic rule-based knowledge derived by engineering experts. A major advantage of using fuzzy logic is that it involves simple arithmetic calculations that can be performed rapidly enough to be useful for planning within the short times typically available for spacecraft maneuvers.

  10. Conceptual Combination During Sentence Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, David; Love, Tracy; Walenski, Matthew; Smith, Edward E.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment examined the time course of integration of modifier-noun (conceptual) combinations during auditory sentence comprehension using cross-modal lexical priming. The study revealed that during ongoing comprehension, there is initial activation of features of the noun prior to activation of (emergent) features of the entire conceptual combination. These results support compositionality in conceptual combination; that is, they indicate that features of the individual words constituting a conceptual combination are activated prior to combination of the words into a new concept. PMID:17576278

  11. Combining Narrative and Numerical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sanne; Ladeby, Klaes Rohde; Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2011-01-01

    Strategic simulation is the combination of narrative and numerical simulation and can be used as a tool to support strategic decision making by providing different scenarios in combination with computer modelling. The core of the combined simulation approach (CSA) is to make it possible for decis......Strategic simulation is the combination of narrative and numerical simulation and can be used as a tool to support strategic decision making by providing different scenarios in combination with computer modelling. The core of the combined simulation approach (CSA) is to make it possible...... to the decision making in operations and production management by providing new insights into modelling and simulation based on the combined narrative and numerical simulation approach as a tool for strategy making. The research question asks, “How can the CSA be applied in a practical context to support strategy...

  12. Predicting observational signatures of coronal heating by Alfvén waves and Nanoflares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolin, Patrick

    2009-09-01

    conducted where different parameters of the loop are varied, such as the loop's length, the loop expansion factor, the magnetic field strength at the footpoints of the loop (in the photosphere), and the properties of the Alfvén waves generated in the photosphere (a monochromatic and a white noise spectrum are considered). In chapter 4 we link the coronal heating problem to an observational phenomenon known as coronal rain. We start first by reporting limb observations of coronal rain with Hinode/SOT in the Ca II H line. We then attempt to reproduce the phenomenon in simulations. For this, the mechanism of catastrophic cooling is considered and results are compared with the reported observations. Alfvén waves are then generated in the loop and the effect on the thermal stability of the corona is studied. We show that coronal rain is intimately linked with the underlying coronal heating mechanism, and thus can help pointing out the coronal heating agent.

  13. Multifunctional Mesoscale Observing Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabberdt, Walter F.; Schlatter, Thomas W.; Carr, Frederick H.; Friday, Elbert W. Joe; Jorgensen, David; Koch, Steven; Pirone, Maria; Ralph, F. Martin; Sun, Juanzhen; Welsh, Patrick; Wilson, James W.; Zou, Xiaolei

    2005-07-01

    More than 120 scientists, engineers, administrators, and users met on 8 10 December 2003 in a workshop format to discuss the needs for enhanced three-dimensional mesoscale observing networks. Improved networks are seen as being critical to advancing numerical and empirical modeling for a variety of mesoscale applications, including severe weather warnings and forecasts, hydrology, air-quality forecasting, chemical emergency response, transportation safety, energy management, and others. The participants shared a clear and common vision for the observing requirements: existing two-dimensional mesoscale measurement networks do not provide observations of the type, frequency, and density that are required to optimize mesoscale prediction and nowcasts. To be viable, mesoscale observing networks must serve multiple applications, and the public, private, and academic sectors must all actively participate in their design and implementation, as well as in the creation and delivery of value-added products. The mesoscale measurement challenge can best be met by an integrated approach that considers all elements of an end-to-end solution—identifying end users and their needs, designing an optimal mix of observations, defining the balance between static and dynamic (targeted or adaptive) sampling strategies, establishing long-term test beds, and developing effective implementation strategies. Detailed recommendations are provided pertaining to nowcasting, numerical prediction and data assimilation, test beds, and implementation strategies.

  14. Visually observing comets

    CERN Document Server

    Seargent, David A J

    2017-01-01

    In these days of computers and CCD cameras, visual comet observers can still contribute scientifically useful data with the help of this handy reference for use in the field. Comets are one of the principal areas for productive pro-amateur collaboration in astronomy, but finding comets requires a different approach than the observing of more predictable targets. Principally directed toward amateur astronomers who prefer visual observing or who are interested in discovering a new comet or visually monitoring the behavior of known comets, it includes all the advice needed to thrive as a comet observer. After presenting a brief overview of the nature of comets and how we came to the modern understanding of comets, this book details the various types of observations that can usefully be carried out at the eyepiece of a telescope. Subjects range from how to search for new comets to visually estimating the brightness of comets and the length and orientation of tails, in addition to what to look for in comet heads a...

  15. Solar Prominences: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Parenti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar prominences are one of the most common features of the solar atmosphere. They are found in the corona but they are one hundred times cooler and denser than the coronal material, indicating that they are thermally and pressure isolated from the surrounding environment. Because of these properties they appear at the limb as bright features when observed in the optical or the EUV cool lines. On the disk they appear darker than their background, indicating the presence of a plasma absorption process (in this case they are called filaments. Prominence plasma is embedded in a magnetic environment that lies above magnetic inversion lines, denoted a filament channel. This paper aims at providing the reader with the main elements that characterize these peculiar structures, the prominences and their environment, as deduced from observations. The aim is also to point out and discuss open questions on prominence existence, stability and disappearance. The review starts with a general introduction of these features and the instruments used for their observation. Section 2 presents the large scale properties, including filament morphology, thermodynamical parameters, magnetic fields, and the properties of the surrounding coronal cavity, all in stable conditions. Section 3 is dedicated to small-scale observational properties, from both the morphological and dynamical points of view. Section 4 introduces observational aspects during prominence formation, while Section 5 reviews the sources of instability leading to prominence disappearance or eruption. Conclusions and perspectives are given in Section 6.

  16. Astrometrical Observations of the Selected WDS Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodryagin, D.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of double stars observations, which were carried out at the Research Institute NAO during the 2013-2016 years are presented. Astrometric reduction of the received frames until the equatorial coordinates of binary and multiple systems components at the time of observation was made. The combination of the CCD received data with other Strasbourg base catalogs allowed to determine the new values of the observed stars’ proper motions. Parameters of mutual component configuration (position angle and separation were measured for the 214 double stars. The analysis of the measurement results was carried out. The measurement results were added to the WDS directory database.

  17. Observing workplace incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Tara C; Hershcovis, M Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Interpersonal mistreatment at work often occurs in the presence of others; however, these "others" are rarely examined in empirical research despite their importance to the context of the negative interaction. We conducted 2 experiments to examine how witnessing incivility affects observer reactions toward instigators and targets. In Study 1, participants (N = 60) worked virtually with an ostensible instigator and target. In Study 2, participants (N = 48) worked in vivo with confederates (hired actors) on a job task. Across these 2 studies, we found that observers of incivility tend to punish instigators while their reactions to targets were generally unaffected. Further, the effect of witnessing incivility was mediated by observers' negative emotional reaction toward the instigator. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  19. Observed climate change hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, M.; Palazzi, E.; Hardenberg, J.; Provenzale, A.

    2015-05-01

    We quantify climate change hotspots from observations, taking into account the differences in precipitation and temperature statistics (mean, variability, and extremes) between 1981-2010 and 1951-1980. Areas in the Amazon, the Sahel, tropical West Africa, Indonesia, and central eastern Asia emerge as primary observed hotspots. The main contributing factors are the global increase in mean temperatures, the intensification of extreme hot-season occurrence in low-latitude regions and the decrease of precipitation over central Africa. Temperature and precipitation variability have been substantially stable over the past decades, with only a few areas showing significant changes against the background climate variability. The regions identified from the observations are remarkably similar to those defined from projections of global climate models under a "business-as-usual" scenario, indicating that climate change hotspots are robust and persistent over time. These results provide a useful background to develop global policy decisions on adaptation and mitigation priorities over near-time horizons.

  20. Inappropriate combination of warfarin and aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Burak; Demir, Hakan; Mutlu, Ayhan; Daşlı, Tolga; Erkol, Ayhan; Erden, İsmail

    2016-03-01

    A combination of warfarin and aspirin is associated with increased bleeding compared with warfarin monotherapy. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence and appropriateness of the combination of warfarin and aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or mechanical heart valve (MHV). This cross-sectional study included consecutive patients with AF or MHV on chronic warfarin therapy (>3 months) without acute coronary syndrome or have not undergone a revascularization procedure in the preceding year. Medical history, concomitant diseases, and treatment data were acquired through patient interviews and from hospital records. Three hundred and sixty patients (213 with AF, 147 with MHV) were included. In those with AF, a significantly higher warfarin-aspirin combination was observed with concomitant vascular disease (38.8% vs. 14.6%), diabetes (36.6% vs. 16.3%), statin therapy (40% vs. 16.9%), left ventricular systolic dysfunction (33.3% vs. 17.5%) (paspirin combination were concomitant vascular disease, diabetes, and (younger) age in patients with AF and were concomitant AF and male sex in patients with MHV. Interestingly, the incidence of combination therapy was found to increase with a higher HAS-BLED score in both patients with AF and MHV (paspirin was found to be prescribed to patients with AF mainly for the prevention of cardiovascular events, for which warfarin monotherapy usually suffices. On the other hand, co-treatment with aspirin appeared to be underused in patients with MHV.

  1. Confronting theory with observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström... [], Lars; Bjerrum-Bohr, N. Emil J.; Butt, Sharaz

    2011-01-01

    This workshop exposed theoretical cosmologists to some of the important observations that are being made of our universe. The goal was to encourage theorists to think concretely about the questions being raised by these new discoveries and also to acquire a sense of the realistic constaints on th...... on theoretical ideas and models that will be possible from the coming generation of cosmological observations. The atmosphere was kept lively and informal, with relatively few talks each day, which provided plenty of time for discussion and callaboration among the participants...

  2. Observations from Sarmizegetusa Sanctuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosu, M.

    2000 years ago, Sarmizegetusa Regia was the capital of ancient Dacia (today: Romania). It is known that the Dacian high priests used the Sanctuary of Sarmizegetusa not only for religious ceremonies, but also for astronomical observations. After having completed geodesic measurements, we analyzed the architecture of the sanctuary with its main points, directions and circles. We discuss here what kind of astronomical observations could have been made with the scientific knowledge of that time. The final section of this work is dedicated to the remarkable resemblance between Sarmizegztusa and Stonehenge.

  3. Colour harmony of two colour combinations in clothes matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicaksono, Sungging Haryo; Fu, Tzu-Hao; Chen, Liang-Ya; Hou, Chien-Yu; Ou, Li-Chen

    2015-01-01

    There are many definitions and theories about colour harmony. But no consistent rules and definitions can be determined. Some previous researches show that there are many factors that influence the colour harmony. Colour harmony is highly depends on the external factors, including the context of colour besides their colour combinations. In the current research an experiment conducted by observing two colour combinations which applied in shirt and trousers. Twenty observers involved in the experiment, consist of ten male and ten female. Each observer predict colour harmony score in 58 samples of shirt and trouser pairs, the colour combination then applied upside down. Based on the experimental results, male and female group has similar tendency in colour harmony score prediction in the same colour samples (correlation coefficient, r=0.84). Upside down colour combinations will change the impression of observer about colour harmony and yields a different value of colour harmony prediction score which indicated from correlation coefficient results of 0.53.

  4. Combination antiretroviral therapy and the risk of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friis-Moller, N; Sabin, CA; Weber, R; Monforte, AD; El-Sadr, WM; Reiss, P; Thiebaut, R; Morfeldt, L; De Wit, S; Pradier, C; Calvo, G; Law, MG; Kirk, O; Phillips, AN; Lundgren, JD; Lundgren, JD; Weber, R; Monteforte, AD; Bartsch, G; Reiss, P; Dabis, F; Morfeldt, L; De Wit, S; Pradier, C; Calvo, G; Law, MG; Kirk, O; Phillips, AN; Houyez, F; Loeliger, E; Tressler, R; Weller, I.; Friis-Moller, N; Sabin, CA; Sjol, A; Lundgren, JD; Sawitz, A; Rickenbach, M; Pezzotti, P; Krum, E; Meester, R; Lavignolle, V.; Sundstrom, A; Poll, B; Fontas, E; Torres, F; Petoumenos, K; Kjaer, J; Hammer, S; Neaton, J; Sjol, A; de Wolf, F; van der Ven, E; Zaheri, S; Van Valkengoed, L; Meester, R; Bronsveld, W; Weigel, H; Brinkman, K; Frissen, P; ten Veen, J; Hillbrand, M; Schieveld, S; Mulder, J; van Gorp, E; Meenhorst, P; Danner, S; Claessen, F; Perenboom, R; Schattenkerk, JKE; Godfried, M; Lange, J; Lowe, S; van der Meer, J; Nellen, F; Pogany, K; van der Poll, T; Reiss, R; Ruys, T; Wit, F; Richter, C; van Leusen, R; Vriesendorp, R; Jeurissen, F; Kauffmann, R; Koger, E; Brevenboer, B; Sprenger, HG; Law, G; ten Kate, RW; Leemhuis, M; Schippers, E; Schrey, G; van der Geest, S; Verbon, A; Koopmans, P; Keuter, M; Telgt, D; van der Ven, A; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Gyssens, I.; de Marie, S; Juttmann, J; van der Heul, C; Schneider, M; Borleffs, J; Hoepelman, I.; Jaspers, C; Matute, A; Schurink, C; Blok, W; Salamon, R; Beylot, J; Dupon, M; Le Bras, M; Pellegrin, JL; Ragnaud, JM; Dabis, F; Chene, G; Jacqmin-Gadda, H; Rhiebaut, R; Lawson-Ayayi, S; Lavignolle, V.; Balestre, E; Blaizeau, MJ; Decoin, M; Formaggio, AM; Delveaux, S; Labarerre, S; Uwamaliya, B; Vimard, E; Merchadou, L; Palmer, G; Touchard, D; Dutoit, D; Pereira, F; Boulant, B; Beylot, J; Morlat, P; Bonarek, M; Bonnet, F; Coadou, B; Gelie, P; Jaubert, D; Nouts, C; Lacoste, D; Dupon, M; Dutronc, H; Cipriano, G; Lafarie, S; Chossat, I.; Lacut, JY; Leng, B; Pellegrin, JL; Mercie, P; Viallard, JF; Faure, I.; Rispal, P; Cipriano, C; Tchamgoue, S; Le Bras, M; Djossou, F; Malvy, D; Pivetaud, JP; Ragnaud, JM; Chambon, D; De La Taille, C; Galperine, T; Lafarie, S; Neau, D; Ochoa, A; Beylot, C; Doutre, MS; Bezian, JH; Moreau, JF; Taupin, JL; Conri, C; Constans, J; Couzigou, P; Castera, L; Fleury, H; Lafon, ME; Masquelier, B; Pellegrin, I.; Trimoulet, P; Moreau, F; Mestre, C; Series, C; Taytard, A; Law, M; Petoumenos, K; Bal, J; Mijch, A; Watson, K; Roth, N; Wood, H; Austin, D; Gowers, A; Baker, B; McFarlane, R; Carr, A; Cooper, D; Chuah, J; Fankhauser, W; Mallal, S; Skett, J; Calvo, G; Torres, F; Mateau, S; Domingo, P; Sambeat, MA; Gatell, J; Del Cacho, E; Cadafalch, J; Fuster, M; Codina, C; Sirera, G; Vaque, A; Clumeck, N; De Wit, S; Gerard, M; Hildebrand, M; Kabeya, K; Konopnicki, D; Payen, MC; Poll, B; Van Laethem, Y; Neaton, J; Bartsch, G; El-Sadr, WM; Krum, E; Thompson, G; Wentworth, D; Luskin-Hawk, R; Telzak, E; El-Sadr, WM; Abrams, DI; Cohn, D; Markowitz, N; Arduino, R; Mushatt, D; Friedland, G; Perez, G; Tedaldi, E; Fisher, E; Gordin, F; Crane, LR; Sampson, J; Baxter, J; Kirk, O; Mocroft, A; Phillips, AN; Lundgren, JD; Vetter, N; Clumeck, N; Hermans, P; Colebunders, R; Machala, L; Nielsen, J; Benfield, T; Gerstoft, J; Katzenstein, T; Roge, B; Skinhoj, P; Pedersen, C; Katlama, C; Viard, JP; Saint-Marc, T; Vanhems, P; Pradier, C; Dietrich, M; Manegold, C; van Lunzen, J; Miller, V.; Staszewski, S; Bieckel, M; Goebel, FD; Salzberger, B; Rockstroh, J; Kosmidis, J; Gargalianos, P; Sambatakou, H; Perdios, J; Panos, G; Karydis, I.; Filandras, A; Banhegyi, D; Mulcahy, F; Yust, I.; Turner, D; Pollack, S; Ben-Ishai, Z; Bentwich, Z; Maayan, S; Vella, S; Chiesi, A; Arici, C; Pristera, R; Mazzotta, F; Gabbuti, A; Esposito, R; Bedini, A; Chirianni, A; Montesarchio, E; Vullo, V.; Santopadre, P; Narciso, P; Antinori, A; Franci, P; Zaccarelli, M; Lazzarin, A; Finazzi, R; Monforte, VO; Hemmer, R; Staub, T; Reiss, P; Bruun, J; Maeland, A; Ormaasen, V.; Knysz, B; Gasiorowski, J; Horban, A; Prokopowicz, D; Boron-Kaczmarska, A; Pnyka, M; Beniowski, M; Trocha, H; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Proenca, R; Gonzalez-Lahoz, J; Diaz, B; Garcia-Benayas, T; Martin-Carbonero, L; Soriano, V.; Clotet, B; Jou, A; Conejero, J; Tural, C; Gatell, JM; Miro, JM; Blaxhult, A; Heidemann, B; Pehrson, P; Ledergerber, B; Weber, R; Francioli, P; Telenti, A; Hirschel, B; Soravia-Dunand, V.; Furrer, H; Fisher, M; Brettle, R; Barton, S; Johnson, AM; Mercey, D; Loveday, C; Johnson, MA; Pinching, A; Parkin, J; Weber, J; Scullard, G; Morfeldt, L; Thulin, G; Sunstrom, A; Akerlund, B; Koppel, K; Karlsson, A; Flamholc, L; Hakangard, C; Monforte, AD; Pezzotti, P; Moroni, M; Monforte, AD; Cargnel, A; Merli, S; Vigevani, GM; Pastecchia, C; Lazzarin, A; Novati, R; Caggese, L; Moioli, C; Mura, MS; Mannazzu, M; Suter, F; Arici, C; Manconi, PE; Piano, P; Mazzotta, F; Lo Caputo, S; Poggio, A; Bottari, G; Pagano, G; Alessandrini, A; Scasso, A; Vincenti, A; Abbadesse, V.; Mancuso, S; Alberici, F; Ruggieri, A; Arlotti, M; Ortolani, P; De Lalla, F; Tositti, G; Piersantelli, N; Piscopo, R; Raise, E; Pasquinucci, S; Soscia, F; Tacconi, L; Tirelli, U; Nasti, G; Santoro, D; Pusterla, L; Carosi, G; Castelli, F; Cadeo, G; Vangi, D; Carnevale, G; Galloni, D; Filice, G; Bruno, R; Sinicco, A; Sciandra, M; Caramello, P; Gennero, L; Soranzo, ML; Bonasso, M; Rizzardini, G; Migliorino, G; Chiodo, F; Colangeli, V.; Magnani, G; Ursitti, M; Menichetti, F; Martinelli, C; Esposito, R; Mussini, C; Ghinelli, F; Sighinolfi, L; Coronado, O; Zauli, T; Ballardini, G; Montroni, M; Zoli, A; Petrelli, E; Cioppi, A; Ortona, L; De Luca, A; Petrosillo, N; Noto, P; Narciso, P; Salcuni, P; Antinori, A; De Longis, P; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M; Pastore, G; Minafra, G; Chiriann, A; Loiacono, L; Piazza, M; Nappa, S; Abrescia, N; De Marco, M; Colomba, A; Prestileo, T; De Stefano, C; La Gala, A; Ferraro, T; Scerbo, A; Grima, P; Tundo, P; Pizzigallo, E; D'Alessandro, M; Grisorio, B; Ferrara, S; Pradier, C; Fontas, E; Caissotti, C; Dellamonica, P; Bentz, L; Bernard, E; Chaillou, S; De Salvador-Guillouet, F; Durant, J; Guttman, R; Heripret, L; Mondain-Miton, V.; Perbost, I.; Prouvost-Keller, B; Pugliese, P; Rahelinirina, V.; Roger, PM; Vandenbos, F; Bernasconi, E; Bucher, H; Burgisser, P; Cattacin, S; Egger, M; Erb, P; Fierz, W; Fischer, M; Flepp, M; Fontana, A; Francioli, P; Furrer, HJ; Gorgievski, M; Hirschel, B; Kaiser, L; Kind, C; Klimkait, T; Ledergerber, B; Lauper, U; Opravil, M; Paccaud, F; Pantaleo, G; Perrin, L; Piffaretti, JC; Rickenbach, M; Rudin, C; Schupbach, J; Speck, R; Telenti, A; Trkola, A; Vernazza, P; Weber, R; Yerly, S; Ten Napel, C.

    2003-01-01

    Background: It remains controversial whether exposure to combination antiretroviral treatment increases the risk of myocardial infarction. Methods: In this prospective observational study, we enrolled 23,468 patients from 11 previously established cohorts from December 1999 to April 2001 and

  5. Observation of Pollution from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, J. P.; Richter, A.; Bovensmann, H.; Buchwitz, M.; Andrés Hernández, M. D.; Hilboll, A.; Schoenhardt, A.; Blechschmidt, A.; Alvarado, L.; Wittrock, F.

    2016-12-01

    The rapid growth of population since the industrial revolution has led to large changes in surface emissions and land use change. It is now over 30 years since the SCIAMACHY project was initiated. This project has led to the GOME (ESA ERS-2 1995-2011), SCIAMACHY (ESA Envisat 2002 to 2011) GOME-2 (EUMETSAT/ESA Metop A, 2006 to present, Metop B 2012 to present, Metop C planned launch 2018) and the spin offs OMI (NASA AURA 2004-present) . This presentation addresses observations of tropospheric trace gas pollutants retrieved these instruments with a focus on recent studies of the ozone precursors NO2, HCHO and CHO.CHO, the halogen oxides BrO, IO and CH4 and CO2. It will discuss the objectives of the DLR HALO EMeRGe mission. The latter is research mission combining satelltie and aircraft observations, whihc aims to study pollution from major pollution centers in Europe and Asia, and is planned to take palce in 2017 and 2018.

  6. Observational Research: Formalized Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaggs, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Design research is a valuable tool to help the designer understand the problem that he/she needs to solve. The purpose of design research is to help state or understand the problems better, which will lead to better solutions. Observational research is a design research method for helping the designer understand and define the problem.…

  7. Fluid overload at start of continuous renal replacement therapy is associated with poorer clinical condition and outcome: a prospective observational study on the combined use of bioimpedance vector analysis and serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Wu, Buyun; Gong, Dehua; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-04-02

    It is unclear whether the fluid status, as determined by bioimpedance vector analysis (BIVA) combined with serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptides (NT-pro-BNP) measurement, is associated with treatment outcome among patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Our objective was to answer this question. Patients who were in the intensive care units of a university teaching hospital and who required CRRT were screened for enrollment. For the enrolled patients, BIVA and serum NT-pro BNP measurement were performed just before the start of CRRT and 3 days afterward. According to the BIVA and NT-pro BNP measurement results, the patients were divided into four groups according to fluid status type: type 1, both normal; type 2, normal BIVA results and abnormal NT-pro BNP levels; type 3, abnormal BIVA results and normal NT-pro BNP levels; and type 4, both abnormal. The associations between fluid status and outcome were analyzed. Eighty-nine patients were enrolled, 58 were males, and the mean age was 49.0 ± 17.2 years. The mean score of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) was 18.8 ± 8.6. The fluid status before CRRT start was as follows: type 1, 21.3% (19 out of 89); type 2, 16.9% (15 out of 89); type 3, 11.2% (10 out of 89); and type 4, 50.6% (45 out of 89). There were significant differences between fluid status types before starting CRRT on baseline values for APACHE II scores, serum creatinine, hemoglobin, platelet count, urine volume, and incidences of oliguria and acute kidney injury (P measurements corresponded to different clinical conditions and treatment outcomes, which implies a value of this method for evaluation of fluid status among patients receiving CRRT.

  8. Combining partially independent belief functions

    OpenAIRE

    Chebbah, Mouna; Martin, Arnaud; Ben Yaghlane, Boutheina

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The theory of belief functions manages uncertainty and also proposes a set of combination rules to aggregate opinions of several sources. Some combination rules mix evidential information where sources are independent; other rules are suited to combine evidential information held by dependent sources. In this paper we have two main contributions: First we suggest a method to quantify sources' degree of independence that may guide the choice of the more appropriate set ...

  9. Combined Environment Acoustic Chamber (CEAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The CEAC imposes combined acoustic, thermal and mechanical loads on aerospace structures. The CEAC is employed to measure structural response and determine...

  10. Saturn Ring Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Answering fundamental questions about ring particle characteristics, and individual and group behavior, appears to require close-proximity (a few km) observations. Saturn's magnificent example of a ring system offers a full range of particle sizes, densities, and behaviors for study, so it is a natural choice for such detailed investigation. Missions implementing these observations require post-approach Delta(V) of approximately 10 km/s or more, so past mission concepts called upon Nuclear Electric Propulsion. The concept described here reduces the propulsive Delta(V) requirement to as little as 3.5 km/s, difficult but not impossible for high-performance chemical propulsion systems. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Observing With NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Simon J.; Dussault, M. E.; Sienkiewicz, F. F.; Deutsch, F. S.; Reinfeld, E. L.; Gould, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    Observing With NASA (OWN) is a new NASA-funded e-learning project developed by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in partnership with the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). The project will allow users to make their OWN astronomical observations and compare their images and data with that of NASA's orbiting telescopes and space probes. OWN will provide NASA's education and public outreach audiences with universal access to the CfA's MicroObservatory online network of robotic educational telescopes. Project staff are developing a customized online interface, curricular support materials, and professional development tutorials for both classroom and informal educators. OWN has the capacity to serve hundreds of thousands of student and public users during the 2009 International Year of Astronomy and beyond.

  12. Special Observance Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Appendix B Simple Timetable ……...……………………………………………………………..…. B – 2 Extensive Timetable …………………………………………………………………….. B – 3 Project Officer Planning... timetables , and other documents that can be tailored for use in developing a special observance event. What is the Observance Theme? The...milestones, and timetables can be found in this guide and can be tailored for unit use. • Funding – Adequate funding is critical. Without it

  13. Observations of Surfzone Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnett, G.; Feddersen, F.

    2014-12-01

    The surfzone environment (where waves break) contains several unique and previously unconsidered processes that affect the heat budget. Entering short-wave radiation is a dominant term in both shelf and surfzone heat budgets. In contrast to the shelf, however, depth limited wave breaking in the surfzone generates spray, whitewater and suspended sediments, elevating the surface albedo (ratio of reflected to incident short-wave radiation). Elevated albedo reduces the level of solar short-wave radiation entering the water, potentially resulting in less heating. Additionally, surfzone water quality is often impacted by fecal bacteria contamination. As bacteria mortality is related to short-wave solar radiation, elevated surfzone albedo could reduce pathogen mortality, impacting human health. Albedo in the open ocean has been frequently studied and parameterizations often consider solar zenith angle, wind speed and ocean chlorophyll concentration, producing albedo values typically near 0.06. However, surfzone albedo observations have been extremely sparse, yet show depth limited wave breaking may increase the albedo by nearly a factor of 10 up to 0.5. Here, we present findings from a field study at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography pier to observe the affect of waves on surfzone albedo. Concurrent measurements were taken with a four-way radiometer (to measure both downwelling and upwelling short-wave and long wave radiation) mounted above the surfzone. A co-located GoPro camera was used to relate visual aspects of the surfzone to measured reflectance, and wave height and period were observed with a bottom mounted pressure sensor in 5 m water depth just outside the surfzone. Wind speed and direction were observed on the pier 10 m above the water surface. Here, we will examine the surfzone albedo dependence on surfzone parameters, such as wave height.

  14. Southern hemisphere observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    Because of insurmountable problems associated with absolute dating, the non-literate cultures of the Southern Hemisphere can contribute little to Applied Historical Astronomy, although Maori traditions document a possible supernova dating to the period 1000-1770 AD. In contrast, the abundant nineteenth century solar, planetary, cometary and stellar observational data provided by Southern Hemisphere professional and amateur observatories can serve as an invaluable mine of information for present-day astronomers seeking to incorporate historical data in their investigations.

  15. AR Sco observing campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2016-08-01

    Dr. Thomas Marsh (University of Warwick) and colleagues have requested AAVSO coverage of the intriguing binary AR Sco in support of upcoming Newton-XMM observations scheduled for 2016 September 10 15:41 - September 11 02:26 UT. This fascinating binary system is the subject of an exciting paper in the July 2016 issue of Nature (Marsh et al., 2016Natur.537..374M; pre-print version at arXiv (http://arxiv.org/abs/1607.08265). Marsh writes of their research on AR Sco: "...it was down to [the amateurs [who are co-authors] on the paper that we got onto it in the first place. Coverage immediately before, after and (especially) during [the XMM observations] would be great. The most challenging aspect is the time resolution: ideally one wants a cadence youtu.be). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  16. Geodetic Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothacher, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Mankind is constantly threatened by a variety of natural disasters and global change phenomena. In order to be able to better predict and assess these catastrophic and disastrous events a continuous observation and monitoring of the causative Earth processes is a necessity. These processes may happen in time scales from extremely short (earthquakes, volcano eruptions, land slides, ...) to very long (melting of ice sheets, sea level change, plate tectonics, ...). Appropriate monitoring and early warning systems must allow, therefore, the detection and quantification of catastrophic events in (near) real-time on the one hand and the reliable identification of barely noticeable, but crucial long-term trends (e.g., sea level rise) on the other hand. The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), established by the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) in 2003, already now contributes in a multitude of ways to meet this challenge, e.g., by providing a highly accurate and stable global reference frame, without which the measurement of a sea level rise of 2-3 mm/y would not be possible; by measuring displacements in near real-time and deformations over decades that offer valuable clues to plate tectonics, earthquake processes, tsunamis, volcanos, land slides, and glaciers dynamics; by observing the mass loss of ice sheets with gravity satellite missions; and by estimating essential variables such as the amount of water vapor in the troposphere relevant for weather predictions and climate and the content of free electrons in the ionosphere crucial for space weather.

  17. Observing with CHEOPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, K. G.

    2017-09-01

    CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) is the first exoplanet mission dedicated to the search for transits of exoplanets by means of ultrahigh precision photometry (optical/near-IR) of bright stars already known to host planets, with launch readiness foreseen by the end of 2018. It is also the first S-class mission in ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. The mission is a partnership between Switzerland and ESA's science programme, with important contributions from 10 other member states. It will provide the unique capability of determining accurate radii for a subset of those planets in the super- Earth to Neptune mass range, for which the mass has already been estimated from ground- based spectroscopic surveys. 20% of the observing time in the 3.5 year nominal mission will be available to Guest Observers from the Community. Proposals will be requested through open calls from ESA that are foreseen to be every year, with the first 6 months before launch. In this poster I will provide an overview of how to obtain data from CHEOPS, with a particular focus on the CHEOPS Guest Observers Programme.

  18. NICER observation of magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Arzoumanian, Zaven

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is a NASA Explorer Misson of Opportunity as an attached payload aboard the International Space Station (ISS), launch in August 2016. The NICER is planned to study the interior composition and structure within neutron stars via high precise measurement of their stellar mass and radius, also to investigate dynamic and energetic behaviors of their activities. This mission will enable pulsar rotation-resolved spectroscopy in the 0.2--12 keV energy band with large collection area (about twice of the XMM-Newton observatory for soft X-ray timing), precise time-tagging resolution (~200 nsec, 25 times better than RXTE), and high sensitivity (about 2e-14 erg/s/cm2 in the 0.5--10 keV, 5-sigma for 10 ksec exposure). As one of prime goals of the mission, we will describe the science planning of the NICER magnetar observations. The NICER is expected to provide monitoring of fainter magnetar sources which cannot be performed by Swift due to its little collective area. Deep observations of quiescent magnetars and high-B radio pulsars can be also performed with the NICER to study their spectral similarity as a key to investigate the connection between these two sub-classes. Finally, ToO programs are suitable to follow-up the magnate outburst relaxation down to much fainter flux level. We will introduce the NICER strategy of the magnetar observation.

  19. R Aqr observing campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2016-01-01

    Dr. George Wallerstein (University of Washington) has requested AAVSO coverage of the long period/symbiotic variable R Aquarii beginning immediately in support of high resolution spectroscopic observations planned for 2016 January 19 and 21. Several other astronomers, including Drs. Lee Anne Willson (Iowa State University), Ulisse Munari (INAF, Astronomical Observatory of Padua, Italy), and Fred Walter (Stony Brook University) are studying R Aqr closely and additional spectroscopic and other observations are planned for the near future. R Aqr is both a Mira (M) and a symbiotic (ZAND) - it is a close binary system consisting of a hot star and a late-type star (the Mira), both enveloped in nebulosity. As a result, the very interesting light curve shows not only the Mira pulsation but also complex eclipse behavior as the two stars interact. The period of Mira variation is 387.0 days; the eclipse period is 43.6-44 years. The cause of the eclipse is unknown; several theories h! ave been proposed, including a focused accretion stream, a disk or cloud around the secondary, and a triggered mass loss that produces an opaque cloud. Careful investigation of this upcoming event should help to resolve this question. The last eclipse of R Aqr was in 1978. The next eclipse is predicted for 2022, but may be early. The current behavior of R Aqr suggests that the eclipse, which lasts for several years, may either be beginning or its beginning may be imminent. R Aqr was at minimum in early December 2015 at magnitude V=11.4, and is currently at visual magnitude 11.0. During this phase of the approximately 44-year eclipse cycle, at maximum it may be as bright as V 6.0-6.5 but is not expected to become brighter. Beginning immediately, nightly BVRI CCD and DSLR photometry and visual observations are requested. As R Aqr brightens towards maximum and is in range, PEP observations are also requested. Ongoing spectroscopy over the next several years will be interesting to see as the system

  20. Efficient power combiner for THz radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamide Seidfaraji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most dangerous explosive materials, both toxic and radioactive, contain nitrogen salts with resonant absorption lines in the frequency range 0.3-10 THz. Therefore, there has been growing interest in remotely detecting such materials by observing the spectrum of reflected signals when the suspicious material is interrogated by THz radiation. Practical portable THz sources available today generate only 20–40 mW output power. This power level is too low to interrogate suspicious material from a safe distance, especially if the material is concealed. Hence, there is a need for sources that can provide greater power in the THz spectrum. Generating and extracting high output power from THz sources is complicated and inefficient. The efficiency of vacuum electronic microwave sources is very low when scaled to the THz range and THz sources based on scaling down semiconductor laser sources have low efficiency as well, resulting in the well known “THz gap.” The reason for such low efficiencies for both source types is material losses in the THz band. In this article an efficient power combiner is described that is based on scaling to higher frequencies a microwave combiner that increases the output power in the THz range of interest in simulation studies. The proposed power combiner not only combines the THz power output from several sources, but can also form a Gaussian wavebeam output. A minimum conversion efficiency of 89% with cophased inputs in a lossy copper power combiner and maximum efficiency of 100% in a Perfect Electric Conductor (PEC-made power combiner were achieved in simulations. Also, it is shown that the TE01 output mode is a reasonable option for THz applications due to the fact that conductive loss decreases for this mode as frequency increases.

  1. Model selection for forecast combination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper it is advocated to select a model only if it significantly contributes to the accuracy of a combined forecast. Using hold-out-data forecasts of individual models and of the combined forecast, a useful test for equal forecast accuracy can be designed. An illustration for

  2. Combined Holographic Infrared Inspection Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Shearography imaging system . As mentioned, the combination of Shearography and Infrared images could prove to be a successful method of defect characterization... system and more recent experience with newly available electronic shearography is that the shearography -infrared combination (Shearo-IR) offers... systems . Nevertheless, operation of the phase-locked Ho!o system requires exteiided control of environmental conditions. The shearography system , on

  3. Binocular combination in abnormal binocular vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian; Klein, Stanley A.; Levi, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated suprathreshold binocular combination in humans with abnormal binocular visual experience early in life. In the first experiment we presented the two eyes with equal but opposite phase shifted sine waves and measured the perceived phase of the cyclopean sine wave. Normal observers have balanced vision between the two eyes when the two eyes' images have equal contrast (i.e., both eyes contribute equally to the perceived image and perceived phase = 0°). However, in observers with strabismus and/or amblyopia, balanced vision requires a higher contrast image in the nondominant eye (NDE) than the dominant eye (DE). This asymmetry between the two eyes is larger than predicted from the contrast sensitivities or monocular perceived contrast of the two eyes and is dependent on contrast and spatial frequency: more asymmetric with higher contrast and/or spatial frequency. Our results also revealed a surprising NDE-to-DE enhancement in some of our abnormal observers. This enhancement is not evident in normal vision because it is normally masked by interocular suppression. However, in these abnormal observers the NDE-to-DE suppression was weak or absent. In the second experiment, we used the identical stimuli to measure the perceived contrast of a cyclopean grating by matching the binocular combined contrast to a standard contrast presented to the DE. These measures provide strong constraints for model fitting. We found asymmetric interocular interactions in binocular contrast perception, which was dependent on both contrast and spatial frequency in the same way as in phase perception. By introducing asymmetric parameters to the modified Ding-Sperling model including interocular contrast gain enhancement, we succeeded in accounting for both binocular combined phase and contrast simultaneously. Adding binocular contrast gain control to the modified Ding-Sperling model enabled us to predict the results of dichoptic and binocular contrast discrimination experiments

  4. Observing with CHEOPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, Kate

    2017-04-01

    CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanet Satellite) is the first exoplanet mission dedicated to the search for transits of exoplanets by means of ultrahigh precision photometry of bright stars already known to host planets, with launch readiness foreseen by the end of 2018. It is also the first S-class mission in ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. The mission is a partnership between Switzerland and ESA's science programme, with important contributions from 10 other member states. It will provide the unique capability of determining accurate radii for a subset of those planets in the super- Earth to Neptune mass range, for which the mass has already been estimated from ground- based spectroscopic surveys. It will also provide precision radii for new planets discovered by the next generation of ground-based transits surveys (Neptune-size and smaller). The high photometric precision of CHEOPS will be achieved using a photometer covering the 0.35 - 1.1um waveband, designed around a single frame-transfer CCD which is mounted in the focal plane of a 30 cm equivalent aperture diameter, f/5 on-axis Ritchey-Chretien telescope. 20% of the observing time in the 3.5 year nominal mission will be available to Guest Observers from the Community. Proposals will be requested through open calls from ESA that are foreseen to be every year, with the first 6 months before launch. In this poster I will provide an overview of how to obtain data from CHEOPS, with a particular focus on the CHEOPS Guest Observers Programme.

  5. Observing farming systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Egon; Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted

    2012-01-01

    of analysis from individual farmers to communication and social relations. This is where Luhmann’s social systems theory can offer new insights. Firstly, it can help observe and understand the operational closure and system logic of a farming system and how this closure is produced and reproduced. Secondly......In Denmark, agriculture is becoming increasingly specialised, and more and more actors are becoming involved in farm decision making. These trends are more or less pronounced in other European countries as well. We therefore find that to understand modern farming systems, we have to shift the focus...

  6. Automation of interferometric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, M.; Degiacomi, C. G.; Danchi, W. C.; Greenhill, L. J.; Townes, C. H.

    The Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI) is a heterodyne interferometer that operates in the 9-12 micron atmospheric window. It is located at Mount Wilson and consists of two 1.65-m Pfund-type telescopes. Presently baselines range up to 35 m. Lately the performance of the ISI was improved significantly, providing higher quality interferometric data. The improvements include all-reflective front-end optics, larger bandwidth and higher quantum efficiency heterodyne detectors, a fringe calibration system, a CCD autoguiding system, and a more advanced computer control system. The newly developed control software allows the observations to be largely automated.

  7. Mars Observer Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Malin, M. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Masursky, H.; J. Veverka(Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, U.S.A.); Ravine, M. A.; Soulanille, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars Observer camera (MOC) is a three-component system (one narrow-angle and two wide-angle cameras) designed to take high spatial resolution pictures of the surface of Mars and to obtain lower spatial resolution, synoptic coverage of the planet's surface and atmosphere. The cameras are based on the “push broom” technique; that is, they do not take “frames” but rather build pictures, one line at a time, as the spacecraft moves around the planet in its orbit. MOC is primarily a telescope f...

  8. Autocorrelation of wind observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, D. P.; Hinton, B. B.; Howland, M. R.; Lord, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Autocorrelation and variance statistics are calculated for cloud motion measurements from four different sources, rawinsonde wind reports, synoptic land station reports, ship reports, aircraft reports, automatic aircraft reports gathered during the Global Weather Experiment, and Seasat scatterometer winds from September 1978. The last of these data sources exhibited the highest autocorrelations and lowest standard deviations over short distances. Structure function plots of autocovariances against separation distance between observations indicated that Seasat was most sensitive to wind field structure by having low autovariance at short distances.

  9. Mars Observer spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Dennis L.

    1989-01-01

    The technical aspects of the spacecraft for the Mars Observer mission are discussed. The spacecraft development focuses on using existing flight subsystem designs and production techniques to offer a low-cost, reliable, production-type spacecraft. The scientific objectives of the mission and the scientific payloads of the spacecraft are considered. The spacecraft system and its performance are discussed. The subsystems are described in detail, including attitude and articulation control, electrical power supply, propulsion, structure, thermal control, command and data handling, telecommunications, mechanics, and flight software.

  10. Geomagnetic Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Mandea, Mioara

    2011-01-01

    This volume provides comprehensive and authoritative coverage of all the main areas linked to geomagnetic field observation, from instrumentation to methodology, on ground or near-Earth. Efforts are also focused on a 21st century e-Science approach to open access to all geomagnetic data, but also to the data preservation, data discovery, data rescue, and capacity building. Finally, modeling magnetic fields with different internal origins, with their variation in space and time, is an attempt to draw together into one place the traditional work in producing models as IGRF or describing the magn

  11. Combined treatment in punctate inner choroidopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terelak-Borys B

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Terelak-Borys, Katarzyna Zagajewska, Irmina Jankowska-Lech, Piotr Tesla, Iwona Grabska-Liberek Department of Ophthalmology, Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Prof W Orlowski Clinical Hospital, Warsaw, Poland Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe a combination treatment for choroidal neovascular (CNV membrane, secondary to punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC.Patient and methods: A 44-year-old female patient was diagnosed with PIC complicated by the development of recurrent juxtafoveal neovascular membrane. The treatment included a sequence of monotherapy regimens: systemic steroid therapy, photodynamic therapy, and intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibitor (anti-VEGF. Owing to the CNV membrane resistance to various types of monotherapy, a combination treatment consisting of local injections of steroid underneath the Tenon’s capsule and intravitreal anti-VEGF injections was used.Results: Systemic steroid therapy resulted in rapid local improvement with a very short remission period. No positive effects of photodynamic therapy were observed. Sequential anti-VEGF injections led to remission periods of several months. Permanent regression of CNV membrane was achieved following combined local application of steroid and intravitreal anti-VEGF injections.Conclusion: A combination treatment including steroid and anti-VEGF medication characterized by anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic effects may be a very beneficial option for the treatment of recurrent CNV membrane as a complication of PIC. Keywords: punctate inner choroidopathy, neovascular membrane, anti-VEGF injections, photodynamic therapy, steroids

  12. Strong horizontal photospheric magnetic field in a surface dynamo simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SchÜssler, M.; Vögler, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323397212

    2008-01-01

    Context. Observations with the Hinode spectro-polarimeter have revealed strong horizontal internetwork magnetic fields in the quiet solar photosphere. Aims. We aim to interpret the observations with results from numerical simulations. Methods. Radiative MHD simulations of dynamo action by

  13. Observing inflationary reheating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jérôme; Ringeval, Christophe; Vennin, Vincent

    2015-02-27

    Reheating is the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot big-bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is, however, observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models of slow-roll inflation. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires incorporating information about its reheating history.

  14. Observations of cold antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, J N; Gabrielse, G; Oxley, P; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Wessels, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Walz, J; Pittner, H; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A

    2004-01-01

    ATRAP's e/sup +/ cooling of p in a nested Penning trap has led to reports of cold H produced during such cooling by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations. To observe H, ATHENA uses coincident annihilation detection and ATRAP uses field ionization followed by p storage. Advantages of ATRAP's field ionization method include the complete absence of any background events, and the first way to measure which H states are produced. ATRAP enhances the H production rate by driving many cycles of e/sup +/ cooling in the nested trap, with more H counted in an hour than the sum of all the other antimatter atoms ever reported. The number of H counted per incident high energy p is also higher than ever observed. The first measured distribution of H states is made using a pre-ionizing electric field between separated production and detection regions. The high rate and the high Rydberg states suggest that the H is formed via three-body recombination, as expected. (22 refs).

  15. Efficient Web Services Policy Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatan, Farrokh; Harman, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale Web security systems usually involve cooperation between domains with non-identical policies. The network management and Web communication software used by the different organizations presents a stumbling block. Many of the tools used by the various divisions do not have the ability to communicate network management data with each other. At best, this means that manual human intervention into the communication protocols used at various network routers and endpoints is required. Developing practical, sound, and automated ways to compose policies to bridge these differences is a long-standing problem. One of the key subtleties is the need to deal with inconsistencies and defaults where one organization proposes a rule on a particular feature, and another has a different rule or expresses no rule. A general approach is to assign priorities to rules and observe the rules with the highest priorities when there are conflicts. The present methods have inherent inefficiency, which heavily restrict their practical applications. A new, efficient algorithm combines policies utilized for Web services. The method is based on an algorithm that allows an automatic and scalable composition of security policies between multiple organizations. It is based on defeasible policy composition, a promising approach for finding conflicts and resolving priorities between rules. In the general case, policy negotiation is an intractable problem. A promising method, suggested in the literature, is when policies are represented in defeasible logic, and composition is based on rules for non-monotonic inference. In this system, policy writers construct metapolicies describing both the policy that they wish to enforce and annotations describing their composition preferences. These annotations can indicate whether certain policy assertions are required by the policy writer or, if not, under what circumstances the policy writer is willing to compromise and allow other assertions to take

  16. Dust in protoplanetary disks: obs