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Sample records for hindlimb muscle blood

  1. Effect of blood flow on muscle lactate release studied in perfused rat hindlimb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, H; Bangsbo, Jens; Henningsen, P

    1995-01-01

    The influence of blood flow on muscle lactate and H+ release as well as muscle glyconeogenesis was studied in the perfused rat hindlimb. After 2 min of supramaximal stimulation the perfusate flow rate was 7 (F7), 12 (F12), or 18 (F18) ml/min for 30 min. Perfusate samples were drawn frequently...... and muscle samples were obtained before stimulation, immediately after stimulation, and at 3, 10, and 30 min of recovery from soleus, white gastrocnemius (WG) and red gastrocnemius. During the first 5 min of recovery lactate release was 35-39% lower (P F7 than in F12 and F18...... but with no differences in total release during recovery. In F7 the concentration of lactate was higher (P F7 than in F12 and F18. The difference...

  2. A model for nonexercising hindlimb muscles in exercising animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonen, A; Blewett, C; McDermott, J C; Elder, G C

    1990-07-01

    Nonexercising muscles appear to be metabolically active during exercise. Animal models for this purpose have not been established. However, we have been able to teach animals to run on their forelimbs while their hindlimbs are suspended above the treadmill with no visible limb movement. To document that indeed this mode of exercise does not provoke additional muscle activity, we have compared the levels of neural activation of the soleus and plantaris muscles using a computer analysis of the electromyographic interference pattern, recorded from bipolar fine wire electrodes implanted across each muscle. Via computer analyses of the electromyographic interference patterns the frequencies and amplitudes of motor unit action potentials were obtained. The data were sampled during 20 s of every minute of observation. Comparisons were made in four conditions: (i) resting on the treadmill while bearing weight on the hindlimbs (normal rest), (ii) running on the treadmill (15 m/min, 8% grade) on all four limbs (normal exercise), (iii) resting while the hindlimbs were suspended in a harness above the treadmill (suspended rest), and (iv) exercising with the forelimbs (15 m/min, 8% grade) while the hindlimbs were suspended above the treadmill (suspended exercise). All four experimental conditions were carried out for 90 min each and were performed by each animal. The results clearly show that muscle activities (frequencies and amplitudes), when the hindlimbs are suspended above the treadmill, at rest or during exercise, are lower than the activities in these same muscles when the animals are at rest, supporting only their body weight. Activities in the same muscles during exercise were from 300 to 2000% greater than during hindlimb suspension.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Atrophy of the soleus muscle by hindlimb unweighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Donald B.; Booth, Frank W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews data derived from the animal hindlimb unweighting model. The review presents the following information about the unweighted soleus muscle: electromyogram activity, the amount and type of protein lost, capillarization, oxidative capacity, glycolytic enzyme activities, fiber cross section, contractile properties, glucose uptake, sensitivity to insulin, the rates of protein synthesis and degradation, the glucocorticoid receptor numbers, the responses of specific mRNAs, and changes in metabolic concentrations. Data of all these studies show that the stress response of the animal to hindlimb suspension is transient and minimal in magnitude (though somewhat variable) and that, after one week of unweighting, the animal exhibits no chronic signs of stress.

  4. Bradykinin does not acutely sensitize the reflex pressor response during hindlimb skeletal muscle stretch in decerebrate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Korynne S; Smith, Joshua R; Esau, Peter J; Kempf, Evan A; Hopkins, Tyler D; Copp, Steven W

    2017-10-01

    Hindlimb skeletal muscle stretch (i.e., selective activation of the muscle mechanoreflex) in decerebrate rats evokes reflex increases in blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity. Bradykinin has been found to sensitize mechanogated channels through a bradykinin B2 receptor-dependent mechanism. Moreover, bradykinin B2 receptor expression on sensory neurons is increased following chronic femoral artery ligation in the rat (a model of simulated peripheral artery disease). We tested the hypothesis that injection of bradykinin into the arterial supply of a hindlimb in decerebrate, unanesthetized rats would acutely augment (i.e., sensitize) the increase in blood pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity during hindlimb muscle stretch to a greater extent in rats with a ligated femoral artery than in rats with a freely perfused femoral artery. The pressor response during static hindlimb muscle stretch was compared before and after hindlimb arterial injection of 0.5 µg of bradykinin. Injection of bradykinin increased blood pressure to a greater extent in "ligated" (n = 10) than "freely perfused" (n = 10) rats. The increase in blood pressure during hindlimb muscle stretch, however, was not different before vs. after bradykinin injection in freely perfused (14 ± 2 and 15 ± 2 mmHg for pre- and post-bradykinin, respectively, P = 0.62) or ligated (15 ± 3 and 14 ± 2 mmHg for pre- and post-bradykinin, respectively, P = 0.80) rats. Likewise, the increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity during stretch was not different before vs. after bradykinin injection in either group of rats. We conclude that bradykinin did not acutely sensitize the pressor response during hindlimb skeletal muscle stretch in freely perfused or ligated decerebrate rats. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Hindlimb unloading increases oxidative stress and disrupts antioxidant capacity in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, John M.; Song, Wook; Demaree, Scott R.; Bloomfield, S. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle disuse with space-flight and ground-based models (e.g., hindlimb unloading) results in dramatic skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness. Pathological conditions that cause muscle wasting (i.e., heart failure, muscular dystrophy, sepsis, COPD, cancer) are characterized by elevated "oxidative stress," where antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed by oxidant production. However, the existence, cellular mechanisms, and ramifications of oxidative stress in skeletal muscle subjected to hindlimb unloading are poorly understood. Thus we examined the effects of hindlimb unloading on hindlimb muscle antioxidant enzymes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase), nonenzymatic antioxidant scavenging capacity (ASC), total hydroperoxides, and dichlorohydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) oxidation, a direct indicator of oxidative stress. Twelve 6 month old Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two groups: 28 d of hindlimb unloading (n = 6) and controls (n = 6). Hindlimb unloading resulted in a small decrease in Mn-superoxide dismutase activity (10.1%) in the soleus muscle, while Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase increased 71.2%. In contrast, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, antioxidant enzymes that remove hydroperoxides, were significantly reduced in the soleus with hindlimb unloading by 54.5 and 16.1%, respectively. Hindlimb unloading also significantly reduced ASC. Hindlimb unloading increased soleus lipid hydroperoxide levels by 21.6% and hindlimb muscle DCFH-DA oxidation by 162.1%. These results indicate that hindlimb unloading results in a disruption of antioxidant status, elevation of hydroperoxides, and an increase in oxidative stress.

  6. A Mathematical Model of Oxygen Transport in Skeletal Muscle During Hindlimb Unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Laura; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    During hindlimb unloading (HU) dramatic fluid shifts occur within minutes of the suspension, leading to a less precise matching of blood flow to O2 demands of skeletal muscle. Vascular resistance directs blood away from certain muscles, such as the soleus (SOL). The muscle volume gradually reduces in these muscles so that eventually the relative blood flow returns to normal. It is generally believed that muscle volume change is not due to O2 depletion, but a consequence of disuse. However, the volume of the unloaded rat muscle declines over the course of weeks, whereas the redistribution of blood flow occurs immediately. Using a Krogh Cylinder Model, the distribution of O2 was predicted in two skeletal muscles: SOL and gastrocnemius (GAS). Effects of the muscle blood flow, volume, capillary density, and O2 uptake, are included to calculate the pO2 at rest and after 10 min and 15 days of unloading. The model predicts that 32 percent of the SOL muscle tissue has a pO2 1.25 mm Hg within 10 min, whereas the GAS maintains normal O2 levels, and that equilibrium is reached only as the SOL muscle cells degenerate. The results provide evidence that there is an inadequate O2 supply to the mitochondria in the SOL muscle after 10 min HU.

  7. (-)-Epicatechin Attenuates Degradation of Mouse Oxidative Muscle Following Hindlimb Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icksoo; Hüttemann, Maik; Malek, Moh H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a 14-day hindlimb suspension (HS) with and without (-)-epicatechin supplementation to determine whether (-)-epicatechin treatment can attenuate the loss in muscle degradation, angiogenesis, and mitochondrial signaling in oxidative skeletal muscle. Adult mice were randomized into 3 groups: (a) control (C); (b) HS with vehicle (HS-V); and (c) HS with (-)-epicatechin (HS-(-)-Epi). Animals in the HS-(-)-Epi group received (-)-epicatechin (1.0 mg · kg(-1) of body mass) twice daily through oral gavage. For markers related to muscle degradation, the HS-V group had significantly higher protein expression compared with the control and HS-(-)-Epi groups. Moreover, protein expression for myosin heavy chain type I was significantly reduced by approximately 45% in the HS-V group compared with the control and HS-(-)-Epi groups. In addition, capillarity contact and capillary-to-fiber ratio were significantly higher in the HS-(-)-Epi group compared with the HS-V group. Furthermore, protein expression for thrombospondin-1 was significantly higher in HS-V group compared with the control and HS-(-)-Epi groups. Hindlimb suspension also significantly reduced protein expression for mitochondrial signaling compared with the control and HS-(-)-Epi groups. These findings suggest that (-)-epicatechin supplementation attenuates degradation in oxidative muscles after HS.

  8. The growth patterns of three hindlimb muscles in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmi, C; Cracraft, J

    1977-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the growth patterns of three hindlimb muscles of the chicken relative to the functional-biomechanical demands of increasing body size. The biceps femoris, a bipennate non-postural muscle, grew relatively faster in terms of wet and dry weight than did the parallel-fibred adductor superficialis or the unipennate adductor profundus, both postural muscles. All three muscles exhibited positive allometry (relative to body weight) in muscle length but only biceps femoris and adductor profundus showed positive allometry in cross sectional area adductor superficialis having isometric growth in this parameter. In biceps femoris and adductor superficialis the lengths of the longest and shortest fasciculi grew at equal rates, whereas in adductor profundus the shortest fasciculi grew faster than the longest. We conclude that muscle weight alone is an insufficient indicator of changing function in growing muscle. Hence, growth studies should include other functionally relevant parameters such as cross sectional area, which is proportional to the force-producing capabilities of the muscle, or fibre (fasciculus) length, which is indicative of the absolute amount of stretching or shortening that is possible and of the contraction velocity.

  9. [Effects of antioxidant on reduction of hindlimb muscle atrophy induced by cisplatin in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin il; Choe, Myoung-Ae

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Cu/Zn SOD on reduction of hindlimb muscular atrophy induced by cisplatin in rats. Forty-two rats were assigned to three groups; control group, Cisplatin (CDDP) group and cisplatin with Cu/Zn SOD (CDDP-SOD) group. At day 35 hindlimb muscles were dissected. Food intake, activity, withdrawal threshold, muscle weight, and Type I, II fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of dissected muscles were measured. Relative SOD activity and expression of MHC and phosphorylated Akt, ERK were measured after dissection. Muscle weight and Type I, II fiber CSA of hindlimb muscles in the CDDP group were significantly less than the control group. Muscle weight and Type I, II fiber CSA of hindlimb muscles, food intake, activity, and withdrawal thresholds of the CDDP-SOD group were significantly greater than the CDDP group. There were no significant differences in relative SOD activities of hindlimb muscles between the CDDP-SOD and CDDP groups. MHC expression and phosphorylated Akt, ERK of hindlimb muscles in the CDDP-SOD group were significantly greater than the CDDP group. Cu/Zn SOD attenuates hindlimb muscular atrophy induced by cisplatin through increased food intake and activity. Increment of phosphorylated Akt, ERK may relate to attenuation of hindlimb muscular atrophy.

  10. Recovery in skeletal muscle contractile function after prolonged hindlimb immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, R. H.; Brimmer, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of three-month hindlimb immobilization (IM) in rats on contractile properties of slow-twitch soleus (SOL), fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus, and fast-twitch superficial region of the vastus lateralis were measured after 0, 14, 28, 60, and 90 days of recovery on excized, horizontally suspended muscles stimulated electrically to maximal twitch tension. IM caused decreases in muscle-to-body weight ratios for all muscles, with no complete recovery even after 90 days. The contractile properties of the fast-twitch muscles were less affected by IM than those of the slow-twitch SOL. The SOL isometric twitch duration was shortened, due to reduced contraction and half-relaxation time, both of which returned to control levels after 14 days of recovery. The peak tetanic tension, P(O), g/sq cm,, decreased with IM by 46 percent in the SOL, but recovered by the 28th day. The maximum shortening velocity was not altered by IM in any of the muscles. Thus, normal contractile function could recover after prolonged limb IM.

  11. l-Carnitine supplement reduces skeletal muscle atrophy induced by prolonged hindlimb suspension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jiwoong; Park, Jonghoon; Chang, Hyukki; Lim, Kiwon

    2016-12-01

    l-Carnitine was recently found to downregulate the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) and increase insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations in animal models. However, the effect of l-carnitine administration on disuse muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb suspension has not yet been studied. Thus, we hypothesized that l-carnitine may have a protective effect on muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb suspension via the Akt1/mTOR and/or UPP. Male Wistar rats were assigned to 3 groups: hindlimb suspension group, hindlimb suspension with l-carnitine administration (1250 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) group, and pair-fed group adjusted hindlimb suspension. l-Carnitine administration for 2 weeks of hindlimb suspension alleviated the decrease in weight and fiber size in the soleus muscle. In addition, l-carnitine suppressed atrogin-1 mRNA expression, which has been reported to play a pivotal role in muscle atrophy. The present study shows that l-carnitine has a protective effect against soleus muscle atrophy caused by hindlimb suspension and decreased E3 ligase messenger RNA expression, suggesting the possibility that l-carnitine protects against muscle atrophy, at least in part, through the inhibition of the UPP. These observations suggest that l-carnitine could serve as an effective supplement in the decrease of muscle atrophy caused by weightlessness in the fields of clinical and rehabilitative research.

  12. Organization of lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups innervating hindlimb, pelvic floor, and axial muscles in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhorst, V G; Holstege, G

    1997-05-26

    In a study on descending pathways from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) to hindlimb motoneurons (see accompanying paper), it appeared impossible, using data from the literature, to precisely determine which muscles were innervated by the motoneurons receiving the NRA fibers. This lack of data made it necessary to produce a detailed map of the lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups in the cat. Therefore, 50 different muscles or muscle compartments of hindlimb, pelvic floor and lower back were injected with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in 135 cases. The respective muscles were divided into ten groups: I, sartorius and iliopsoas; II, quadriceps; III, adductors; IV, hamstrings; V, gluteal and other proximal muscles of the hip; VI, posterior compartment of the distal hindlimb; VII, anterior compartment of the distal hindlimb; VIII, long flexors and intrinsic muscles of the foot; IX, pelvic floor muscles; and X, extensors of the lower back and tail. The L4-S2 segments were cut and incubated, and labeled motoneurons were counted and plotted. A new method was developed that made it possible, despite variations in size and segmental organization between the different cases, to compare the results of different cases. The results show that the spatial interrelationship between the hindlimb and pelvic floor lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups remains constant. This finding enabled the authors to compose an accurate overall map of the location of lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups. The general distribution of the motoneuronal cell groups is also discussed in respect to their dorsoventral, mediolateral, and rostrocaudal position within the lumbosacral ventral horn.

  13. The declined phosphorylation of Heat shock protein 27 in rat cardiac muscle after hindlimb unloading

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    Yuan, Ming; Jiang, Shizhong; Li, Zhili; Yuan, Min; Ting, Li; Ying, Zhang; Wang, Desheng

    2009-07-01

    Hindlimb unloading can induce the cardiac atrophy and diminished cardiac function, however, the mechanisms responsible for which remain elusive. The chronic volume unloading of heart, which decreases the local mechanical stress, may lead to cardiac atrophy after hindlimb unloading. Many studies showed that integrin signaling, p38 MAPK, Heat shock protein 27 and cytoskeleton involved in the hypertrophic growth induced by mechanical stress. However, the mechanisms responsible for cardiac atrophy after hindlimb unloading are still unclear. In this study, we used the tail-suspended, hindlimb unloading rat model to simulate the effects of microgravity. Western blot analysis was used to detect the protein expression of Heat shock protein 27, focal adhesion kinase, p38 MAPK and their phosphorylation levels in rat cardiac muscle after 14d hindlimb unloading. The results showed that the phosphorylation levels of both Heat shock protein 27 and p38 MAPK were decreased significantly in rat cardiac muscle after hindlimb unloading. However, the phosphorylation level of focal adhesion kinase was not decreased significantly. The results suggested that Heat shock protein 27, the downstream of p38 MAPK, might play a critical role in the cardiac atrophy in response to simulated microgravity induced by hindlimb unloading.

  14. The scaling of postcranial muscles in cats (Felidae) II: hindlimb and lumbosacral muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Andrew R; Sparkes, Emily L; Randau, Marcela; Pierce, Stephanie E; Kitchener, Andrew C; Goswami, Anjali; Hutchinson, John R

    2016-07-01

    In quadrupeds the musculature of the hindlimbs is expected to be responsible for generating most of the propulsive locomotory forces, as well as contributing to body support by generating vertical forces. In supporting the body, postural changes from crouched to upright limbs are often associated with an increase of body mass in terrestrial tetrapods. However, felids do not change their crouched limb posture despite undergoing a 300-fold size increase between the smallest and largest extant species. Here, we test how changes in the muscle architecture (masses and lengths of components of the muscle-tendon units) of the hindlimbs and lumbosacral region are related to body mass, to assess whether there are muscular compensations for the maintenance of a crouched limb posture at larger body sizes. We use regression and principal component analyses to detect allometries in muscle architecture, with and without phylogenetic correction. Of the muscle lengths that scale allometrically, all scale with negative allometry (i.e. relative shortening with increasing body mass), whereas all tendon lengths scale isometrically. Only two muscles' belly masses and two tendons' masses scale with positive allometry (i.e. relatively more massive with increasing body mass). Of the muscles that scale allometrically for physiological cross-sectional area, all scale positively (i.e. relatively greater area with increasing body mass). These muscles are mostly linked to control of hip and thigh movements. When the architecture data are phylogenetically corrected, there are few significant results, and only the strongest signals remain. None of the vertebral muscles scaled significantly differently from isometry. Principal component analysis and manovas showed that neither body size nor locomotor mode separate the felid species in morphospace. Our results support the inference that, despite some positively allometric trends in muscle areas related to thigh movement, larger cats have

  15. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  16. Regional organization of fibre types in normal and reinnervated hindlimb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Liangchun

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis concerns the spatial distribution of the "slow" type I fibres within muscles of the hindlimb. It is known since long ago that some muscles may have strikingly heterogeneous distributions of type I and II fibres, but this phenomenon of "fibre type regionalization" has still not att

  17. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  18. Fibre type regionalisation in lower hindlimb muscles of rabbit, rat and mouse : a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, LC; Kernell, D

    2001-01-01

    The topographical distribution of different fibre types in muscles of the lower hindlimb in rabbits and mice was quantitatively determined. The results were compared to those previously obtained, using the same new quantification methods, in homologous muscles of the rat. Type I fibres ('slow') were

  19. Elevated interstitial fluid volume in rat soleus muscles by hindlimb unweighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandarian, S C; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Schulte, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Hindlimb unweighting is a commonly used model to study skeletal muscle atrophy associated with disuse and exposure to microgravity. However, a discrepancy in findings between single fibers and whole muscle has been observed. In unweighted solei, specific tension deficits are greater in whole musc...

  20. Proximo-distal organization and fibre type regionalization in rat hindlimb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, LC; Kernell, D

    2000-01-01

    Five muscles of the rat's lower hindlimb were compared with regard to their histochemical fibre type distribution at seven different proximo-distal levels. The muscles were: extensor digitorum longus (ED), flexor digitorum and hallucis longus (FD), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), peroneus longus (PE) a

  1. Injectable skeletal muscle matrix hydrogel promotes neovascularization and muscle cell infiltration in a hindlimb ischemia model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JA DeQuach

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery disease (PAD currently affects approximately 27 million patients in Europe and North America, and if untreated, may progress to the stage of critical limb ischemia (CLI, which has implications for amputation and potential mortality. Unfortunately, few therapies exist for treating the ischemic skeletal muscle in these conditions. Biomaterials have been used to increase cell transplant survival as well as deliver growth factors to treat limb ischemia; however, existing materials do not mimic the native skeletal muscle microenvironment they are intended to treat. Furthermore, no therapies involving biomaterials alone have been examined. The goal of this study was to develop a clinically relevant injectable hydrogel derived from decellularized skeletal muscle extracellular matrix and examine its potential for treating PAD as a stand-alone therapy by studying the material in a rat hindlimb ischemia model. We tested the mitogenic activity of the scaffold’s degradation products using an in vitro assay and measured increased proliferation rates of smooth muscle cells and skeletal myoblasts compared to collagen. In a rat hindlimb ischemia model, the femoral artery was ligated and resected, followed by injection of 150 µL of skeletal muscle matrix or collagen 1 week post-injury. We demonstrate that the skeletal muscle matrix increased arteriole and capillary density, as well as recruited more desmin-positive and MyoD-positive cells compared to collagen. Our results indicate that this tissue-specific injectable hydrogel may be a potential therapy for treating ischemia related to PAD, as well as have potential beneficial effects on restoring muscle mass that is typically lost in CLI.

  2. Tendon material properties vary and are interdependent among turkey hindlimb muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Matson, Andrew; KONOW, NICOLAI; Miller, Samuel; Konow, Pernille P.; Roberts, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The material properties of a tendon affect its ability to store and return elastic energy, resist damage, provide mechanical feedback and amplify or attenuate muscle power. While the structural properties of a tendon are known to respond to a variety of stimuli, the extent to which material properties vary among individual muscles remains unclear. We studied the tendons of six different muscles in the hindlimb of Eastern wild turkeys to determine whether there was variation in elastic modulus...

  3. Musculoskeletal Geometry, Muscle Architecture and Functional Specialisations of the Mouse Hindlimb.

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    James P Charles

    Full Text Available Mice are one of the most commonly used laboratory animals, with an extensive array of disease models in existence, including for many neuromuscular diseases. The hindlimb is of particular interest due to several close muscle analogues/homologues to humans and other species. A detailed anatomical study describing the adult morphology is lacking, however. This study describes in detail the musculoskeletal geometry and skeletal muscle architecture of the mouse hindlimb and pelvis, determining the extent to which the muscles are adapted for their function, as inferred from their architecture. Using I2KI enhanced microCT scanning and digital segmentation, it was possible to identify 39 distinct muscles of the hindlimb and pelvis belonging to nine functional groups. The architecture of each of these muscles was determined through microdissections, revealing strong architectural specialisations between the functional groups. The hip extensors and hip adductors showed significantly stronger adaptations towards high contraction velocities and joint control relative to the distal functional groups, which exhibited larger physiological cross sectional areas and longer tendons, adaptations for high force output and elastic energy savings. These results suggest that a proximo-distal gradient in muscle architecture exists in the mouse hindlimb. Such a gradient has been purported to function in aiding locomotor stability and efficiency. The data presented here will be especially valuable to any research with a focus on the architecture or gross anatomy of the mouse hindlimb and pelvis musculature, but also of use to anyone interested in the functional significance of muscle design in relation to quadrupedal locomotion.

  4. Sexual Dimorphism in Mass of the Hindlimb Muscles of the Piebald Odorous Frog (Odorrana schmackeri)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixia ZHANG; Yunyun ZHAO; Ling SHI Xiaohong CHEN; Youqiang LU; Liang QIAO

    2014-01-01

    Male-biased sexual dimorphism in hind limb muscles is widespread in anuran species where scramble competition is common among males. Such sexual difference is thought to result from sexual selection.In this view, we tested the differences in muscle mass between the sexes and between amplectant and non-amplectant males by quantifying the mass of four hindlimb muscles (triceps femoris, sartorius, gracilis and plantaris longus) of females and males ofOdorrana schmackeri. The results showed that females signiifcantly exceeded males for muscle triceps femoris, gracilis, plantaris longus and total mass when controlled for body size. There are no signiifcant differences between amplectant and non-amplectant males. It is probable that the maintenance of the amplectant position inO. schmackeri may depend on the strength of hindlimb muscles in females to support the pair.

  5. Long-chain n-3 DHA reduces the extent of skeletal muscle fatigue in the rat in vivo hindlimb model.

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    Peoples, Gregory E; McLennan, Peter L

    2014-03-28

    Dietary fish oil modifies skeletal muscle membrane fatty acid composition and oxygen efficiency similar to changes in the myocardium. Oxygen efficiency is a key determinant of sustained force in mammalian skeletal muscle. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the effects of a fish-oil diet on skeletal muscle fatigue under the stress of contraction using the rat in vivo autologous perfused hindlimb model. For 8 weeks, male Wistar rats were fed a diet rich in saturated fat (SF), a diet rich in n-6 PUFA or a diet rich in long-chain (LC) n-3 PUFA DHA derived from fish oil. In anaesthetised, mechanically ventilated rats, with their hindlimbs perfused with arterial blood at a constant flow, the gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus muscle bundle was stimulated via sciatic nerve (2 Hz, 6-12 V, 0·05 ms) to contract repetitively for 30 min. Rats fed the n-3 PUFA diet developed higher maximum twitch tension than those fed the SF and n-6 PUFA diets (PDHA into skeletal muscle membranes increases the efficiency of oxygen use over a range of contractile force and this is expressed as a higher sustained force and prolonged time to fatigue.

  6. Organization Of Lumbosacral Motoneuronal Cell Groups Innervating Hindlimb, Pelvic Floor And Axial Muscles In The Cat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstege, G.; VanderHorst, V.G.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In a study on descending pathways from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) to hindlimb motoneurons (see accompanying paper), it appeared impossible, using data from the literature, to precisely determine which muscles were innervated by the motoneurons receiving the NRA fibers. This lack of data made it

  7. Organization of lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups innervating hindlimb, pelvic floor, and axial muscles in the cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderhorst, VGJM; Holstege, G

    1997-01-01

    In a study on descending pathways from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) to hindlimb motoneurons (see accompanying paper), it appeared impossible, using data from the literature, to precisely determine which muscles were innervated by the motoneurons receiving the NRA fibers. This lack of data made it

  8. Soy germ protein concentrate diet decreased body fat weight and increased hindlimb muscle weight in rats.

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    Kataoka, Hisashi; Saito, Sanshiro; Itoh, Atsushi; Matsuo, Tatsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of soy germ protein intake on body composition. Wistar rats were fed experimental diets for 16 weeks. These consisted of soy germ protein, soy protein, or casein. Abdominal adipose tissue weights significantly lower and hindlimb muscle weights were significantly higher in the soy germ protein group than in the casein group.

  9. A brain-machine-muscle interface for restoring hindlimb locomotion after complete spinal transection in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monzurul Alam

    Full Text Available A brain-machine interface (BMI is a neuroprosthetic device that can restore motor function of individuals with paralysis. Although the feasibility of BMI control of upper-limb neuroprostheses has been demonstrated, a BMI for the restoration of lower-limb motor functions has not yet been developed. The objective of this study was to determine if gait-related information can be captured from neural activity recorded from the primary motor cortex of rats, and if this neural information can be used to stimulate paralysed hindlimb muscles after complete spinal cord transection. Neural activity was recorded from the hindlimb area of the primary motor cortex of six female Sprague Dawley rats during treadmill locomotion before and after mid-thoracic transection. Before spinal transection there was a strong association between neural activity and the step cycle. This association decreased after spinal transection. However, the locomotive state (standing vs. walking could still be successfully decoded from neural recordings made after spinal transection. A novel BMI device was developed that processed this neural information in real-time and used it to control electrical stimulation of paralysed hindlimb muscles. This system was able to elicit hindlimb muscle contractions that mimicked forelimb stepping. We propose this lower-limb BMI as a future neuroprosthesis for human paraplegics.

  10. Trans-illuminated laser speckle imaging of collateral artery blood flow in ischemic mouse hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Joshua K; Niu, Jacqueline; Sumer, Suna; Price, Richard J

    2013-09-01

    The mouse ischemic hindlimb model is used widely for studying collateral artery growth (i.e., arteriogenesis) in response to increased shear stress. Nonetheless, precise measurements of regional shear stress changes along individual collateral arteries are lacking. Our goal is to develop and verify trans-illumination laser speckle flowmetry (LSF) for this purpose. Studies of defibrinated bovine blood flow through tubes embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms indicate that trans-illumination LSF better maintains sensitivity with an increasing tissue depth when compared to epi-illumination, with an ∼50% reduction in the exponential decay of the speckle velocity signal. Applying trans-illuminated LSF to the gracilis muscle collateral artery network in vivo yields both improved sensitivity and reduced noise when compared to epi-illumination. Trans-illuminated LSF images reveal regional differences in collateral artery blood velocity after femoral artery ligation and are used to measure an ∼2-fold increase in the shear stress at the entrance regions to the muscle. We believe these represent the first direct measurements of regional shear stress changes in individual mouse collateral arteries. The ability to capture deeper vascular signals using a trans-illumination configuration for LSF may expand the current applications for LSF, which could have bearing on determining how shear stress magnitude and direction regulate arteriogenesis.

  11. Contractile function of single muscle fibers after hindlimb suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardetto, P. R.; Schluter, J. M.; Fitts, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of two weeks of hind-limb suspension (HS) on the functional properties of slow-twitch and fast-twitch single fibers isolated from the predominantly slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch gastrocnemius of the suspended leg of rats were investigated. Single fibers were suspended between a motor arm and force transducer, and, after their functional properties were studied, the fiber type was established by the myosin heavy chain analysis. It was found that, after HS, the greatest decrease in diameter and a reduction in peak tension occurred in slow-twitch fibers from soleus, followed by slow-twitch fibers from gastrocnemius. Fast-twitch fibers from the red gastrocnemius showed a significant reduction in diameter but no change in peak tension. No effect of HS was observed on the diameter of the fast-twitch fibers from the white gastsrocnemius (which is known to contain 87 percent fast glycolytic fibers).

  12. Hindlimb perfusion induces GLUT-1 and immediate early gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufer, P D; Devente, J E; Tapscott, E B; Dohm, G L

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the suitability of the rat hindlimb perfusion technique for studying the acute regulation of the GLUT-1 and GLUT-4 glucose transporter genes in adult skeletal muscle. To further examine the stability of the technique, we also monitored the transcription rate and mRNA content of selected immediate early genes. Nuclei and total RNA were isolated from red and white hindlimb muscle from perfused (2 h) and nonperfused control animals. Although GLUT-4 transcription and mRNA content remained stable, perfusion elicited a marked 3.5-fold increase in GLUT-1 mRNA in red and 2.2-fold increase in white skeletal muscle in the absence of any detectable change in transcription. In contrast to both GLUT-1 and GLUT-4, transcription originating from the c-fos and c-myc immediate early genes increased from 2.0- to 2.7-fold with perfusion in both red and white skeletal muscle, whereas transcription of the beta-actin gene decreased by 40-60%. Both c-fos and c-myc mRNA levels also increased with perfusion, whereas beta-actin mRNA remained unchanged. These findings clearly demonstrate that the current method of performing the hindlimb perfusion technique rapidly and dramatically alters the regulation of selected genes in skeletal muscle.

  13. Force-velocity properties of two avian hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Frank E; Gabaldón, Annette M; Roberts, Thomas J

    2004-04-01

    Recent work has provided measurements of power output in avian skeletal muscles during running and flying, but little is known about the contractile properties of avian skeletal muscle. We used an in situ preparation to characterize the force-velocity properties of two hind limb muscles, the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) and peroneus longus (PL), in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo). A servomotor measured shortening velocity for at least six different loads over the plateau region of the length-tension curve. The Hill equation was fit to the data to determine maximum shortening velocity and peak instantaneous power. Maximum unloaded shortening velocity was 13.0+/-1.6 L s(-1) for the LG muscle and 14.8+/-1.0 L s(-1) for the PL muscle (mean+/-S.E.M.). These velocities are within the range of values published for reptilian and mammalian muscles. Values recorded for maximum isometric force per cross-sectional area, 271+/-28 kPa for the LG and 257+/-30.5 kPa for the PL, and peak instantaneous power output, 341.7+/-36.4 W kg(-1) for the LG and 319.4+/-42.5 W kg(-1) for the PL, were also within the range of published values for vertebrate muscle. The force-velocity properties of turkey LG and PL muscle do not reveal any extreme differences in the mechanical potential between avian and other vertebrate muscle.

  14. Recovery of skeletal muscle after 3 mo of hindlimb immobilization in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F. W.; Seider, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    During immobilization, skeletal muscle undergoes decreases in size and strength with concomitant atrophic and degenerative changes in slow-twitch muscle fibers. Currently there are no objective data in slow-twitch muscle demonstrating recovery of biochemical or physiological indices following termination of immobilization. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the soleus, a slow-twitch muscle, could recover normal biochemical or physiological levels following termination of immobilization. Adenosine triphosphate, glycogen, and protein concentration (mg/g wet wt) all significantly decreased following 90 days of hindlimb immobilization, but these three values returned to control levels by the 60th recovery day. Similarly, soleus muscle wet weight and protein content (mg protein/muscle) returned to control levels by the 14th recovery day. In contrast, maximal isometric tension did not return to normal until the 120th day. These results indicate that following muscular atrophy, which was achieved through 90 days of hindlimb immobilization, several biochemical and physiological values in skeletal muscle are recovered at various times after the end of immobilization.

  15. Fiber-type composition of hindlimb muscles in the turtle, Pseudemys (Trachemys) scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, D H; Callister, R J; Stuart, D G

    1995-08-01

    A description is provided of the fiber-type composition of several hindlimb muscles of the adult turtle, Pseudemys (Trachemys) scripta elegans. In addition, cross-section areas of each fiber type and an estimation of the relative (weighted) cross-section area (wCSA) occupied by the different fiber types are also provided. Seven muscles were selected for study, based on their suitability for future neurophysiological analysis as components of the segmental motor system, and on their homologies with muscles in other vertebrates. The test muscles were iliofibularis (ILF), ambiens (AMB), external gastrocnemius (EG), extensor digitorum communis (EDC), flexor digitorum longus (FDL), tibialis anterior (TA), and peroneus anterior (PA). Serial sections of these muscles were stained for myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), NADH-diaphorase, and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-GPDH), thereby enabling fiber-type classification on the basis of indirect markers for contraction speed and oxidative (aerobic) vs. glycolytic (anaerobic) metabolism. All muscles contained three fiber types: slow oxidative (SO; possibly including some non-twitch tonic fibers); fast oxidative glycolytic (FOG); and fast glycolytic (Fg). There were at least 30% FOG and 50% FOG + Fg fibers in the seven muscles, the extreme distributions being the predominantly glycolytic ILF vs. the predominantly oxidative FDL muscle (ILF--15.5% SO, 35.2% FOG, 49.3% Fg vs. FDL--49.1% SO, 41.1% FOG, 9.8% Fg). As in other species, the test muscles exhibited varying degrees of regional concentration (compartmentalization) of the different fiber types. This feature was most striking in ILF. Pronounced compartmentalization was also observed in AMB, EG, PA, TA, and EDC, whereas the distribution of fiber types in the highly oxidative FDL was homogeneous. In five of the seven muscles, fiber size was ranked with Fg > FOG > SO. In terms of wCSA, which provides a coarse-grain measure of the different fiber types

  16. Myosin heavy chain composition of tiger (Panthera tigris) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K; Roy, Roland R; Rugg, Stuart; Talmadge, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Felids have a wide range of locomotor activity patterns and maximal running speeds, including the very fast cheetah (Acinonyx jubatas), the roaming tiger (Panthera tigris), and the relatively sedentary domestic cat (Felis catus). As previous studies have suggested a relationship between the amount and type of activity and the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition of a muscle, we assessed the MHC isoform composition of selected hindlimb muscles from these three felid species with differing activity regimens. Using gel electrophoresis, western blotting, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry with MHC isoform-specific antibodies, we compared the MHC composition in the tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius (MG), plantaris (Plt), and soleus muscles of the tiger, cheetah, and domestic cat. The soleus muscle was absent in the cheetah. At least one slow (type I) and three fast (types IIa, IIx, and IIb) MHC isoforms were present in the muscles of each felid. The tiger had a high combined percentage of the characteristically slower isoforms (MHCs I and IIa) in the MG (62%) and the Plt (86%), whereas these percentages were relatively low in the MG (44%) and Plt (55%) of the cheetah. In general, the MHC isoform characteristics of the hindlimb muscles matched the daily activity patterns of these felids: the tiger has daily demands for covering long distances, whereas the cheetah has requirements for speed and power. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Defective excitation-contraction coupling is partially responsible for impaired contractility in hindlimb muscles of Stac3 knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaofei; Doering, Jonathan; Grange, Robert W.; Jiang, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    The Stac3 gene is exclusively expressed in skeletal muscle, and Stac3 knockout is perinatal lethal in mice. Previous data from Stac3-deleted diaphragms indicated that Stac3-deleted skeletal muscle could not contract because of defective excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. In this study, we determined the contractility of Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle. In response to frequent electrostimulation, Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle contracted but the maximal tension generated was only 20% of that in control (wild type or heterozygous) muscle (P < 0.05). In response to high [K+], caffeine, and 4-chloro-m-cresol (4-CMC), the maximal tensions generated in Stac3-deleted muscle were 29% (P < 0.05), 58% (P = 0.08), and 55% (P < 0.05) of those in control muscle, respectively. In response to 4-CMC or caffeine, over 90% of myotubes formed from control myoblasts contracted, but only 60% of myotubes formed from Stac3-deleted myoblasts contracted (P = 0.05). However, in response to 4-CMC or caffeine, similar increases in intracellular calcium concentration were observed in Stac3-deleted and control myotubes. Gene expression and histological analyses revealed that Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle contained more slow type-like fibers than control muscle. These data together confirm a critical role of STAC3 in EC coupling but also suggest that STAC3 may have additional functions in skeletal muscle, at least in the hindlimb muscle. PMID:27184118

  18. In situ estimation of tendon material properties: differences between muscles of the feline hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lei; Maas, Huub; Perreault, Eric J; Sandercock, Thomas G

    2009-04-16

    Recent experiments to characterize the short-range stiffness (SRS)-force relationship in several cat hindlimb muscles suggested that the there are differences in the tendon elastic moduli across muscles [Cui, L., Perreault, E.J., Maas, H., Sandercock, T.G., 2008. Modeling short-range stiffness of feline lower hindlimb muscles. J. Biomech. 41 (9), 1945-1952.]. Those conclusions were inferred from whole muscle experiments and a computational model of SRS. The present study sought to directly measure tendon elasticity, the material property most relevant to SRS, during physiological loading to confirm the previous modeling results. Measurements were made from the medial gastrocnemius (MG), tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles during loading. For the latter, the model indicated a substantially different elastic modulus than for MG and TA. For each muscle, the stress-strain relationship of the external tendon was measured in situ during the loading phase of isometric contractions conducted at optimum length. Young's moduli were assessed at equal strain levels (1%, 2% and 3%), as well as at peak strain. The stress-strain relationship was significantly different between EDL and MG/TA, but not between MG and TA. EDL had a more apparent toe region (i.e., lower Young's modulus at 1% strain), followed by a more rapid increase in the slope of the stress-strain curve (i.e., higher Young's modulus at 2% and 3% strain). Young's modulus at peak strain also was significantly higher in EDL compared to MG/TA, whereas no significant difference was found between MG and TA. These results indicate that during natural loading, tendon Young's moduli can vary considerably across muscles. This creates challenges to estimating muscle behavior in biomechanical models for which direct measures of tendon properties are not available.

  19. Nerve Growth Factor Promotes Angiogenesis and Skeletal Muscle Fiber Remodeling in a Murine Model of Hindlimb Ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Peng Diao; Feng-Kui Cui; Sheng Yan; Zuo-Guan Chen; Li-Shan Lian; Li-Long Guo; Yong-Jun Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic angiogenesis has been shown to promote blood vessel growth and improve tissue perfusion.Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been reported to play an important role in both physiological and pathological angiogenesis.This study aimed to investigate the effects of NGF on angiogenesis and skeletal muscle fiber remodeling in a murine model of hindlimb ischemia and study the relationship between NGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in angiogenesis.Methods: Twenty-four mice were randomly allocated to normal control group (n =6), blank control group (n =6), VEGF gene transfection group (n =6), and NGF gene transfection group (n =6).The model of left hindlimb ischemia model was established by ligating the femoral artery.VEGF165 plasmid (125 μg) and NGF plasmid (125 μg) was injected into the ischemic gastrocnemius of mice from VEGF group and NGF group, respectively.Left hindlimb function and ischemic damage were assessed with terminal points at 21th day postischemia induction.The gastrocnemius of four groups was tested by hematoxylin-eosin staining, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and CD34 immunohistochemistry staining, and myosin ATPase staining.NGF and VEGF protein expression was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: On the 21th day after surgery, the functional assessment score and skeletal muscle atrophy degree of VEGF group and NGF group were significantly lower than those of normal control group and blank control group.The endothelial cell proliferation index and the capillary density of VEGF group and NGF group were significantly increased compared with normal control group and blank control group (P < 0.05).The NGF and VEGF protein expression of NGF group showed a significant rise when compared with blank control group (P < 0.05).Similarly, the VEGF protein expression of VEGF group was significantly higher than that of blank control group (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference of the NGF protein

  20. Atrophy and growth failure of rat hindlimb muscles in tail-cast suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study is related to an evaluation of a modified tail-cast suspension model as a means of identifying metabolic factors which control or are associated with muscle atrophy and growth failure. Two different control conditions (normal and tail-casted weight bearing) were studied to determine the appropriate control for tail-cast suspension. A description is presented of a model which is most useful for studying atrophy of hindlimb muscles under certain conditions. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were employed in the experiments. Attention is given to growth rate and urinary excretion of urea and ammonia in different types of rats, the relationship between body weight and skeletal muscle weight, and the relationship between animal body weight and rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation.

  1. Atrophy and growth failure of rat hindlimb muscles in tail-cast suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study is related to an evaluation of a modified tail-cast suspension model as a means of identifying metabolic factors which control or are associated with muscle atrophy and growth failure. Two different control conditions (normal and tail-casted weight bearing) were studied to determine the appropriate control for tail-cast suspension. A description is presented of a model which is most useful for studying atrophy of hindlimb muscles under certain conditions. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were employed in the experiments. Attention is given to growth rate and urinary excretion of urea and ammonia in different types of rats, the relationship between body weight and skeletal muscle weight, and the relationship between animal body weight and rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation.

  2. Effect of hindlimb suspension on VO2 max and regional blood flow responses to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, J M; Woodman, C R; Tipton, C M

    1989-02-01

    Male rodents were studied before and after undergoing one of three treatment conditions for 9 days: 1) cage control (n = 15, CON), 2) horizontal suspension (n = 15, HOZ), and 3) head-down suspension (n = 18, HDT). Testing included measurements of maximal O2 uptake (VO2 max) and select cardiovascular responses to graded treadmill exercise. VO2 max expressed on an absolute basis (ml/min) was significantly decreased after HOZ (-14.1 +/- 2.5%) and HDT (-14.3 +/- 2.0%), while being essentially unchanged in CON (-1.0 +/- 3.3%). Significant reductions in body weight were observed after both HOZ (-10.1 +/- 4.2 g) and HDT (-22.5 +/- 3.3 g), whereas CON animals exhibited a significant increase in weight (10.4 +/- 3.8 g). As a result, when VO2 max was normalized for body weight, all groups exhibited similar significant reductions of 6-7%. Although no differences in heart rate and blood pressure response to graded exercise were observed, the HDT group exhibited greater increases in mesenteric resistance at the same absolute exercise intensity. Furthermore, both suspended groups had higher iliac resistance values during exercise at similar relative exercise conditions, suggesting that muscle blood flow during treadmill running may have been reduced after suspension. In general, the decrements associated with the HOZ and HDT conditions were similar. It was concluded that reduction in exercise capacity and altered cardiovascular responses to exercise observed after 6-9 days of suspension were attributable to a combination of hypokinesia, lack of hindlimb weight bearing, or restraint, rather than to hydrostatic influences associated with HDT.

  3. Electrophysiological, histochemical, and hormonal adaptation of rat muscle after prolonged hindlimb suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Kyparos, Antonios; Albani, Maria; Frossinis, Athanasios; Papadelis, Christos L.; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Vivas, Ana; Guiba-Tziampiri, Olympia

    2004-05-01

    The perspective of long-duration flights for future exploration, imply more research in the field of human adaptation. Previous studies in rat muscles hindlimb suspension (HLS), indicated muscle atrophy and a change of fibre composition from slow-to-fast twitch types. However, the contractile responses to long-term unloading is still unclear. Fifteen adult Wistar rats were studied in 45 and 70 days of muscle unweighting and soleus (SOL) muscle as well as extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were prepared for electrophysiological recordings (single, twitch, tetanic contraction and fatigue) and histochemical stainings. The loss of muscle mass observed was greater in the soleus muscle. The analysis of electrophysiological properties of both EDL and SOL showed significant main effects of group, of number of unweighting days and fatigue properties. Single contraction for soleus muscle remained unchanged but there was statistically significant difference for tetanic contraction and fatigue. Fatigue index showed a decrease for the control rats, but increase for the HLS rats. According to the histochemical findings there was a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism during HLS. The data suggested that muscles atrophied, but they presented an adaptation pattern, while their endurance in fatigue was decreased.

  4. Trans-illuminated laser speckle imaging of collateral artery blood flow in ischemic mouse hindlimb

    OpenAIRE

    Meisner, Joshua K.; Niu, Jacqueline; Sumer, Suna; Price, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The mouse ischemic hindlimb model is used widely for studying collateral artery growth (i.e., arteriogenesis) in response to increased shear stress. Nonetheless, precise measurements of regional shear stress changes along individual collateral arteries are lacking. Our goal is to develop and verify trans-illumination laser speckle flowmetry (LSF) for this purpose. Studies of defibrinated bovine blood flow through tubes embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms indicate that trans-illumi...

  5. Adaptations in muscle activity to induced, short-term hindlimb lameness in trotting dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Fischer

    Full Text Available Muscle tissue has a great intrinsic adaptability to changing functional demands. Triggering more gradual responses such as tissue growth, the immediate responses to altered loading conditions involve changes in the activity. Because the reduction in a limb's function is associated with marked deviations in the gait pattern, understanding the muscular responses in laming animals will provide further insight into their compensatory mechanisms as well as help to improve treatment options to prevent musculoskeletal sequelae in chronic patients. Therefore, this study evaluated the changes in muscle activity in adaptation to a moderate, short-term, weight-bearing hindlimb lameness in two leg and one back muscle using surface electromyography (SEMG. In eight sound adult dogs that trotted on an instrumented treadmill, bilateral, bipolar recordings of the m. triceps brachii, the m. vastus lateralis and the m. longissimus dorsi were obtained before and after lameness was induced. Consistent with the unchanged vertical forces as well as temporal parameters, neither the timing nor the level of activity changed significantly in the m. triceps brachii. In the ipsilateral m. vastus lateralis, peak activity and integrated SEMG area were decreased, while they were significantly increased in the contralateral hindlimb. In both sides, the duration of the muscle activity was significantly longer due to a delayed offset. These observations are in accordance with previously described kinetic and kinematic changes as well as changes in muscle mass. Adaptations in the activity of the m. longissimus dorsi concerned primarily the unilateral activity and are discussed regarding known alterations in trunk and limb motions.

  6. Estimation of musculoskeletal models from in situ measurements of muscle action in the rat hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sang Hoon; Mullens, Christopher H; Sandercock, Thomas G; Pai, Dinesh K; Tresch, Matthew C

    2011-03-01

    Musculoskeletal models are often created by making detailed anatomical measurements of muscle properties. These measurements can then be used to determine the parameters of canonical models of muscle action. We describe here a complementary approach for developing and validating muscle models, using in situ measurements of muscle actions. We characterized the actions of two rat hindlimb muscles: the gracilis posticus (GRp) and the posterior head of biceps femoris (BFp; excluding the anterior head with vertebral origin). The GRp is a relatively simple muscle, with a circumscribed origin and insertion. The BFp is more complex, with an insertion distributed along the tibia. We measured the six-dimensional isometric forces and moments at the ankle evoked from stimulating each muscle at a range of limb configurations. The variation of forces and moments across the workspace provides a succinct characterization of muscle action. We then used this data to create a simple muscle model with a single point insertion and origin. The model parameters were optimized to best explain the observed force-moment data. This model explained the relatively simple muscle, GRp, very well (R(2)>0.85). Surprisingly, this simple model was also able to explain the action of the BFp, despite its greater complexity (R(2)>0.84). We then compared the actions observed here with those predicted using recently published anatomical measurements. Although the forces and moments predicted for the GRp were very similar to those observed here, the predictions for the BFp differed. These results show the potential utility of the approach described here for the development and refinement of musculoskeletal models based on in situ measurements of muscle actions.

  7. Hindlimb unloading-induced muscle atrophy and phenotype transition is attenuated in Smad3+/- mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. P.; Zhang, P.; Liu, S. H.; Wang, F.; Ge, X.; Wu, Y.; Fan, M.

    Currently it has been well defined that the microgravity-induced muscle disuse characterized by atrophy and slow-to-fast phenotype transition of the postural muscles such as soleus muscle but the basic mechanism underlying the atrophy and phenotype transition of soleus muscle is still unclear To investigate the developmental mechanisms of muscle atrophy and its phenotype transition under microgravity the soleus muscle of Smad3 and Smad3 - mice after 14 days hindlimb unloading was examined Using histology and immunohistochemistry assay we found that the soleus muscle volume and fiber number appeared a remarkable increases in Smad3 - mice compared to those in Smad3 control In addition Western blot analysis showed that the expression level of myosin heavy chain MHC -slow myofiber specific protein in soleus muscle was visibly higher in Smad3 - mice than in Smad3 mice In contrast the expression level of MHC-fast myofiber specific protein in soleus muscle was visibly lower in Smad3 - mice than in Smad3 mice Furthermore RT-PCR revealed that the expression of Smad3 and myogenic regulatory factor MRF mRNA was inversely regulated Finally we determined that either Smad3 mRNA or Smad3 protein were selectively distributed in quiescent satellite cells in vivo and in reserve cells in vitro Therefore our findings suggested that Smad3 might be a key transcriptional factor for soleus muscle atrophy and slow-to-fast phenotype transition of the slow muscle under microgravity In the future an agent that regulates Smad3 expression may be used to prevent

  8. The analysis of antioxidant expression during muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb suspension in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuoc, Tran-Non; Kim, Suhee; Ahn, Sun Hee; Lee, Jin-Sil; Park, Byung-Ju; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to acceleration of muscle atrophy. However, it is still not completely understood what triggers the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during muscle atrophy. The objective of this study was to investigate redox balance during muscle atrophy. ROS generators and antioxidants were analyzed in atrophied soleus muscles after 2 weeks of hindlimb suspension (HLS) in mice. The HLS group showed an increase in lipid peroxidation, upregulated NOX1 and NOXO1, and downregulated mitochondrial complex I subunits NDUFS5 and NDUFV2. Additionally, HLS mice demonstrated a decrease in Prdx5 and MnSOD, but an increase in GPX2 and GPX3 in both mRNA and protein levels. As expected, MnSOD activity declined in the HLS group, while GPX activity was enhanced. These results suggest that redox imbalance occurs during muscle atrophy through NOX1 activation, mitochondrial complex I deficiency, and disturbance of antioxidants. Antioxidants altered by HLS may represent potential therapeutic targets for the protection against muscle atrophy.

  9. Hindlimb muscle anatomical mechanical advantage differs among joints and stride phases in basilisk lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Philip J; Hare-Drubka, Meredith

    2015-08-01

    The vertebrate musculoskeletal system is composed of skeletal levers powered by muscles. Effective mechanical advantage (EMA) and muscle properties influence organismal performance at various tasks. Anatomical mechanical advantage (AMA) is a proxy for EMA that facilitates the study of preserved specimens when many muscles or many species are of interest. AMA is the quotient of in-lever to out-lever length, and quantifies the force-velocity trade-off of a lever, where high AMAs translate into high force, low velocity levers. We studied AMAs, physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs), fiber lengths, and fiber widths for 20 hindlimb muscles of the lizard Basiliscus vittatus, moving the hip, knee, and ankle during both the stance and swing phases of the stride. We tested the hypotheses that muscles moving proximal limb joints, and those active during stance, would have characteristics that maximize force. We also tested whether adults had more force-optimized levers than juveniles to compensate for higher body mass. We found no differences between adults and juveniles, but found differences among joints and between stride phases. AMAs were lowest and PCSAs highest for the knee, and PCSA was higher for stance than swing muscles. Fiber width decreased distally, but did not differ between stride phases. Fiber length of stance muscles decreased distally and was highest for swing muscles of the knee. Our findings show that different muscle and lever characteristics allow the knee to be both force- and velocity-optimized, indicating its important role in locomotion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Postnatal development and plasticity of specialized muscle fiber characteristics in the hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, D J; Bassel-Duby, R S; Richardson, J A; Grayson, J; Neufer, P D; Williams, R S

    1996-01-01

    Recent progress in defining molecular components of pathways controlling early stages of myogenesis has been substantial, but regulatory factors that govern the striking functional specialization of adult skeletal muscle fibers in vertebrate organisms have not yet been identified. A more detailed understanding of the temporal and spatial patterns by which specialized fiber characteristics arise may provide clues to the identity of the relevant regulatory factors. In this study, we used immunohistochemical, in situ hybridization, and Northern blot analyses to examine the time course and spatial characteristics of expression of myoglobin protein and mRNA during development of the distal hindlimb in the mouse. In adult animals, myoglobin is expressed selectively in oxidative, mitochondria-rich, fatigue-resistant myofibers, and it provides a convenient marker for this particular subset of specialized fibers. We observed only minimal expression of myoglobin in the hindlimb prior to the second day after birth, but a rapid and large (50-fold) induction of this gene in the ensuing neonatal period. Myoglobin expression was limited, however, to fibers located centrally within the limb which coexpress myosin isoforms characteristic of type I, IIA, and IIX fibers. This induction of myoglobin expression within the early postnatal period was accompanied by increased expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins, and exhibited a time course similar to the upregulation of myoglobin and mitochondrial proteins, and exhibited a time course similar to the upregulation of myoglobin and mitochondrial protein expression that can be induced in adult muscle fibers by continuous motor nerve stimulation. This comparison suggests that progressive locomotor activity of neonatal animals may provide signals which trigger the development of the specialized features of oxidative, fatigue-resistant skeletal muscle fibers.

  11. Is salamander hindlimb regeneration similar to that of the forelimb? Anatomical and morphogenetic analysis of hindlimb muscle regeneration in GFP-transgenic axolotls as a basis for regenerative and developmental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, R; Murawala, P; Tanaka, E M

    2014-01-01

    The axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum is one of the most used model organisms in developmental and regenerative studies because it is commonly said that it can reconstitute a normal and fully functional forelimb/hindlimb after amputation. However, there is not a publication that has described in detail the regeneration of the axolotl hindlimb muscles. Here we describe and illustrate, for the first time, the regeneration of the thigh, leg and foot muscles in transgenic axolotls that express green fluorescent protein in muscle fibers and compare our results with data obtained by us and by other authors about axolotl forelimb regeneration and about fore-and hindlimb ontogeny in axolotls, frogs and other tetrapods. Our observations and comparisons point out that: (1) there are no muscle anomalies in any regenerated axolotl hindlimbs, in clear contrast to our previous study of axolotl forelimb regeneration, where we found muscle anomalies in 43% of the regenerated forelimbs; (2) during axolotl hindlimb regeneration there is a proximo-distal and a tibio-fibular morphogenetic gradient in the order of muscle regeneration and differentiation, but not a ventro-dorsal gradient, whereas our previous studies showed that in axolotl forelimb muscle regeneration there are proximo-distal, radio-ulnar and ventro-dorsal morphogenetic gradients. We discuss the broader implications of these observations for regenerative, evolutionary, developmental and morphogenetic studies. PMID:24325444

  12. Is salamander hindlimb regeneration similar to that of the forelimb? Anatomical and morphogenetic analysis of hindlimb muscle regeneration in GFP-transgenic axolotls as a basis for regenerative and developmental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, R; Murawala, P; Tanaka, E M

    2014-04-01

    The axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum is one of the most used model organisms in developmental and regenerative studies because it is commonly said that it can reconstitute a normal and fully functional forelimb/hindlimb after amputation. However, there is not a publication that has described in detail the regeneration of the axolotl hindlimb muscles. Here we describe and illustrate, for the first time, the regeneration of the thigh, leg and foot muscles in transgenic axolotls that express green fluorescent protein in muscle fibers and compare our results with data obtained by us and by other authors about axolotl forelimb regeneration and about fore- and hindlimb ontogeny in axolotls, frogs and other tetrapods. Our observations and comparisons point out that: (1) there are no muscle anomalies in any regenerated axolotl hindlimbs, in clear contrast to our previous study of axolotl forelimb regeneration, where we found muscle anomalies in 43% of the regenerated forelimbs; (2) during axolotl hindlimb regeneration there is a proximo-distal and a tibio-fibular morphogenetic gradient in the order of muscle regeneration and differentiation, but not a ventro-dorsal gradient, whereas our previous studies showed that in axolotl forelimb muscle regeneration there are proximo-distal, radio-ulnar and ventro-dorsal morphogenetic gradients. We discuss the broader implications of these observations for regenerative, evolutionary, developmental and morphogenetic studies. © 2013 Anatomical Society.

  13. A comparison of umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor and mononuclear cell transplantation for the treatment of acute hindlimb ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Van Pham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lower limb ischemia is a common peripheral artery disease whose treatment presents many difficulties. Stem cell transplantation is considered a novel and promising method of treating this disease. Umbilical cord blood (UCB is rich in stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs. However, historically, banked umbilical cord blood has been used mainly to treat blood-related diseases. Therefore, this study compared the efficacy of umbilical cord bloodderived mononuclear cells (UCB-MNCs with EPC transplantation for the treatment of acute hindlimb ischemia (ALI in mouse models. MNCs were isolated from UCB by Ficoll gradient centrifugation, after which the EPCs were sorted based on CD34+ and CD133+ markers and cultured according to a previously published protocol. To induce ALI, mice were immuno-suppressed using busulfan (BU and cyclophosphamide (CY, after which the femoral arteries were burned. Induction of ALI in the immune suppressed mice was confirmed by the grade of tissue damage, pedal frequency in water, tissue edema, changes in histology, total white blood cell count, and white blood cell composition. Model mice were injected with a dose of MNCs or EPCs and un-treated control mice were injected with phosphate buffered saline. The efficiency of treatment was evaluated by comparing the grade of tissue damage between the three groups of mice. Mice aged 6 and ndash;12 months were suitable for ALI, with 100% of mice exhibiting ischemia from grade I 10%, grade III 50%, grade IV 40%. For all ALI mice, a gradual increase in pedal frequency in water, increased tissue edema, necrosis of muscle tissue, and loss of hindlimb function were observed after 20 days. Transplanted MNCs and EPCs significantly improved hindlimb ischemia compared with control treatment. Moreover, EPC transplantation significantly improved hindlimb ischemia compared with MNC transplantation. Following

  14. Adaptation of fibers in fast-twitch muscles of rats to spaceflight and hindlimb suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bian; Ohira, Yoshi; Roy, Roland R.; Nguyen, Quyet; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptation of single fibers in medial gastrocnemius (MG), a fast-twitch extensor, and in tibialis anterior (TA), a fast-twitch flexor, was studied after 14 days of spaceflight onboard Cosmos 2044 or hindlimb suspension. Quantitative myosin ATPase activities of single fibers were measured in flight and suspended rats. Each of the enzyme and size measurements were directly correlated within each fiber with respect to its qualitative myosin ATPase staining properties and its expression of fast, slow, or both myosin heavy chains (MHC). The percentage of slow- and fast-twitch fibers of the MG and TA were found to be unchanged. Mean fiber size of all fibers was unaffected after flight or suspension. The ATPase activity in the MG was higher in flight than in control or suspended rats. In comparison to Cosmos 1887 spaceflight, the adaptations in the muscle fibers of the MG were more moderate.

  15. The Effects of Ligustrazine on the Ca2+ Concentration of Soleus and Gastrocnemius Muscle Fibers in Hindlimb Unloaded Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yunfang; Goswami, Nandu; Du, Bei; Hu, Huanxin; Wu, Xue

    Background:Spaceflight or inactivity (bed rest, limb immobilization, hindlimb unloading) causes skeletal muscle atrophy. Recent studies show that an increase in protein degradation is an important mechanism for disuse atrophy. Furthermore, the calcium overload of disuse-atrophied muscle fiber has been shown to initiate the skeletal muscle proteolysis in disuse atrophy. Ligustrazine (tetramethylpyrazine, TMP), one of the important active ingredient extracted from Chuanxiong, has been shown by our group to increase muscle fiber cross-sectional area in atrophied soleus induced by 14 days hindlimb unloading. However, the underlying mechanisms of ligustrazine effects on disuse-atrophied muscle fibers remain unknown. Objective: We investigated the effects of ligustrazine on the cytoplasmic calcium overloading in soleus and gastrocnemius in 14 days hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats. Methods: Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for body mass and randomly assigned to three groups (n=8, each group): 1) synchronous control (CON); HU + intragastric water instillation (HU+W); HU + intragastric 60.0 mg kg-1 ligustrazine instillation (HU+Tmp). Laser scanning confocal microscope assessed the concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium ions. Spaceflight disuse atrophy was simulated by hindlimb unloading, provided by tail suspension. Results: 1) Compared with CON, the concentration of soleus intracellular calcium ion in HU+W and HU+Tmp increased 330% and 86% respectively(P<0.01). Compared with HU+W, the concentration of soleus intracellular calcium ion in HU+Tmp decreased by 130%(P<0.01). 2) Compared with CON, the concentration of gastrocnemius intracellular calcium ion in HU+W and HU+Tmp increased 189.8% and 32.1% respectively(P<0.01). Compared with HU+W, the concentration of gastrocnemius intracellular calcium ion in HU+Tmp decreased by 119.3% (P<0.01). Conclusion: After 14 days of hindlimb unloading, cytoplasmic calcium of soleus (slow-twitch muscle) and gastrocnemius (fast

  16. Development of contractile and energetic capacity in anuran hindlimb muscle during metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Cheol; Kim, Han Suk; Yamashita, Masamichi; Choi, Inho

    2003-01-01

    Anuran larvae undergo water-to-land transition during late metamorphosis. We investigated the development of the iliofibularis muscle in bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana) between Gosner's stage 37 and stage 46 (the last stage). The tadpoles began staying in shallow water at least as early as stage 37, kicking from stage 39, active hindlimb swimming from stage 41, and emerging onto shore from stage 42. For control tadpoles kept in water throughout metamorphosis, muscle mass and length increased two- to threefold between stages 37 and 46, with rapid increases at stage 40. Large, steady increases were found in femur mass, tetanic tension, contraction rate, and power between stages 37 and 46. Concentrations of ATP and creatine phosphate and rates of the phosphagen depletion and the activity of creatine kinase increased significantly, mainly after stage 43. Shortening velocity, tetanic rise time, and half-relaxation time varied little. Energy charge (the amount of metabolically available energy stored in the adenine nucleotide pool) remained unchanged until stage 43 but decreased at stage 46. Compared with the control, experimental tadpoles that were allowed access to both water and land exhibited 1.2- to 1.8-fold greater increases in femur mass, tetanic tension, power, phosphagen depletion rates, and creatine kinase activities at late metamorphic stages but no significant differences for other parameters measured. In sum, most hindlimb development proceeds on the basis of the increasingly active use of limbs for locomotion in water. The further increases in tension, mechanical power, and "chemical power" on emergence would be advantageous for terrestrial antigravity performance.

  17. Size and metabolic properties of fibers in rat fast-twitch muscles after hindlimb suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Roland R.; Bello, Maureen A.; Bouissou, Phillip; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb suspension (HS) on single fibers of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were studied in rats. Fiber area and the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) were determined in tissue sections using an image analysis system. After 28 days of HS, the MG atrophied 28 percent, whereas the TA weight was maintained. Both dark- and light-ATPase fibers in the deep region of the MG had decreased cross-sectional areas following HS, with the atrophic response being twice as great in the light-ATPase fibers than in the dark-ATPase fibers. Following HS, mean SDH activities of both fiber types were significantly lower in the MG and TA than in the CON; by contrast, mean GPD activities were either maintained at the CON level or were higher in both MG and TA muscles. The data suggest an independence of the mechanisms determining the muscle fiber size and the metabolic adaptations associated with HS.

  18. Intramyocellular ceramides and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration are partially regulated by Toll-like receptor 4 during hindlimb unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Sung; Nelson, Daniel S; Barrows, Katherine M; O'Connell, Ryan M; Drummond, Micah J

    2016-11-01

    Physical inactivity and disuse result in skeletal muscle metabolic disruption, including insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. The role of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway in contributing to metabolic decline with muscle disuse is unknown. Therefore, our goal was to determine whether TLR4 is an underlying mechanism of insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, and skeletal muscle ceramide accumulation following muscle disuse in mice. To address this hypothesis, we subjected (n = 6-8/group) male WT and TLR4(-/-) mice to 2 wk of hindlimb unloading (HU), while a second group of mice served as ambulatory wild-type controls (WT CON, TLR4(-/-) CON). Mice were assessed for insulin resistance [homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glucose tolerance], and hindlimb muscles (soleus and gastrocnemius) were used to assess muscle sphingolipid abundance, mitochondrial respiration [respiratory control ratio (RCR)], and NF-κB signaling. The primary finding was that HU resulted in insulin resistance, increased total ceramides, specifically Cer18:0 and Cer20:0, and decreased skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration. Importantly, TLR4(-/-) HU mice were protected from insulin resistance and altered NF-κB signaling and were partly resistant to muscle atrophy, ceramide accumulation, and decreased RCR. Skeletal muscle ceramides and RCR were correlated with insulin resistance. We conclude that TLR4 is an upstream regulator of insulin sensitivity, while partly upregulating muscle ceramides and worsening mitochondrial respiration during 2 wk of HU.

  19. Comparative functional anatomy of hindlimb muscles and bones with reference to aquatic adaptation of the sea otter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kent; Suzuki, Satoshi; Koyabu, Daisuke; Kimura, Junpei; Han, Sung-Yong; Endo, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    Although the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a complete aquatic species, spending its entire life in the ocean, it has been considered morphologically to be a semi-aquatic animal. This study aimed to clarify the unique hindlimb morphology and functional adaptations of E. lutris in comparison to other Mustelidae species. We compared muscle mass and bone measurements of five Mustelidae species: the sea otter, Eurasian river otter (Lutra lutra), American mink (Neovison vison), Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi) and Siberian weasel (M. sibirica). In comparison with the other 4 species, E. lutris possessed significantly larger gluteus, popliteus and peroneus muscles, but smaller adductor and ischiopubic muscles. The popliteus muscle may act as a medial rotator of the crus, and the peroneus muscle may act as an abductor of the fifth toe and/or the pronator of the foot. The bundles of the gluteus superficialis muscle of E. lutris were fused with those of the tensor fasciae latae muscle and gluteofemoralis muscles, and they may play a role in femur abduction. These results suggest that E. lutris uses the abducted femur, medially rotated crus, eversion of the ankle and abducted fifth digit or extended interdigital web as a powerful propulsion generator. Therefore, we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids.

  20. Tendon material properties vary and are interdependent among turkey hindlimb muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Andrew; Konow, Nicolai; Miller, Samuel; Konow, Pernille P.; Roberts, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The material properties of a tendon affect its ability to store and return elastic energy, resist damage, provide mechanical feedback and amplify or attenuate muscle power. While the structural properties of a tendon are known to respond to a variety of stimuli, the extent to which material properties vary among individual muscles remains unclear. We studied the tendons of six different muscles in the hindlimb of Eastern wild turkeys to determine whether there was variation in elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and resilience. A hydraulic testing machine was used to measure tendon force during quasi-static lengthening, and a stress–strain curve was constructed. There was substantial variation in tendon material properties among different muscles. Average elastic modulus differed significantly between some tendons, and values for the six different tendons varied nearly twofold, from 829±140 to 1479±106 MPa. Tendons were stretched to failure, and the stress at failure, or ultimate tensile stress, was taken as a lower-limit estimate of tendon strength. Breaking tests for four of the tendons revealed significant variation in ultimate tensile stress, ranging from 66.83±14.34 to 112.37±9.39 MPa. Resilience, or the fraction of energy returned in cyclic length changes was generally high, and one of the four tendons tested was significantly different in resilience from the other tendons (range: 90.65±0.83 to 94.02±0.71%). An analysis of correlation between material properties revealed a positive relationship between ultimate tensile strength and elastic modulus (r2=0.79). Specifically, stiffer tendons were stronger, and we suggest that this correlation results from a constrained value of breaking strain, which did not vary significantly among tendons. This finding suggests an interdependence of material properties that may have a structural basis and may explain some adaptive responses observed in studies of tendon plasticity. PMID:22771746

  1. Tendon material properties vary and are interdependent among turkey hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Andrew; Konow, Nicolai; Miller, Samuel; Konow, Pernille P; Roberts, Thomas J

    2012-10-15

    The material properties of a tendon affect its ability to store and return elastic energy, resist damage, provide mechanical feedback and amplify or attenuate muscle power. While the structural properties of a tendon are known to respond to a variety of stimuli, the extent to which material properties vary among individual muscles remains unclear. We studied the tendons of six different muscles in the hindlimb of Eastern wild turkeys to determine whether there was variation in elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and resilience. A hydraulic testing machine was used to measure tendon force during quasi-static lengthening, and a stress-strain curve was constructed. There was substantial variation in tendon material properties among different muscles. Average elastic modulus differed significantly between some tendons, and values for the six different tendons varied nearly twofold, from 829±140 to 1479±106 MPa. Tendons were stretched to failure, and the stress at failure, or ultimate tensile stress, was taken as a lower-limit estimate of tendon strength. Breaking tests for four of the tendons revealed significant variation in ultimate tensile stress, ranging from 66.83±14.34 to 112.37±9.39 MPa. Resilience, or the fraction of energy returned in cyclic length changes was generally high, and one of the four tendons tested was significantly different in resilience from the other tendons (range: 90.65±0.83 to 94.02±0.71%). An analysis of correlation between material properties revealed a positive relationship between ultimate tensile strength and elastic modulus (r(2)=0.79). Specifically, stiffer tendons were stronger, and we suggest that this correlation results from a constrained value of breaking strain, which did not vary significantly among tendons. This finding suggests an interdependence of material properties that may have a structural basis and may explain some adaptive responses observed in studies of tendon plasticity.

  2. Musculotopic organization of the motor neurons supplying the mouse hindlimb muscles: a quantitative study using Fluoro-Gold retrograde tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bácskai, Tímea; Rusznák, Zoltán; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We have mapped the motor neurons (MNs) supplying the major hindlimb muscles of transgenic (C57/BL6J-ChAT-EGFP) and wild-type (C57/BL6J) mice. The fluorescent retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold was injected into 19 hindlimb muscles. Consecutive transverse spinal cord sections were harvested, the MNs counted, and the MN columns reconstructed in 3D. Three longitudinal MN columns were identified. The dorsolateral column extends from L4 to L6 and consists of MNs innervating the crural muscles and the foot. The ventrolateral column extends from L1 to L6 and accommodates MNs supplying the iliopsoas, gluteal, and quadriceps femoris muscles. The middle part of the ventral horn hosts the central MN column, which extends between L2 and L6 and consists of MNs for the thigh adductor, hamstring, and quadratus femoris muscles. Within these longitudinal columns, the arrangement of the different MN groups reflects their somatotopic organization. MNs innervating muscles developing from the dorsal (e.g., quadriceps) and ventral muscle mass (e.g., hamstring) are situated in the lateral and medial part of the ventral gray, respectively. MN pools belonging to proximal muscles (e.g., quadratus femoris and iliopsoas) are situated ventral to those supplying more distal ones (e.g., plantar muscles). Finally, MNs innervating flexors (e.g., posterior crural muscles) are more medial than those belonging to extensors of the same joint (e.g., anterior crural muscles). These data extend and modify the MN maps in the recently published atlas of the mouse spinal cord and may help when assessing neuronal loss associated with MN diseases.

  3. Amelioration of capillary regression and atrophy of the soleus muscle in hindlimb-unloaded rats by astaxanthin supplementation and intermittent loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazashi, Miho; Tanaka, Masayuki; Murakami, Shinichiro; Kondo, Hiroyo; Nagatomo, Fumiko; Ishihara, Akihiko; Roy, Roland R; Fujino, Hidemi

    2014-08-01

    A chronic decrease in neuromuscular activity (activation and/or loading) results in muscle atrophy and capillary regression that are due, in part, to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species. We have reported that antioxidant treatment with astaxanthin attenuates the overexpression of reactive oxygen species in atrophied muscles that, in turn, ameliorates capillary regression in hindlimb-unloaded rats. Astaxanthin supplementation, however, had little effect on muscle mass and fibre cross-sectional area. In contrast, intermittent loading of the hindlimbs of hindlimb-unloaded rats ameliorates muscle atrophy. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of astaxanthin supplementation and intermittent loading would attenuate both muscle atrophy and capillary regression during hindlimb unloading. As expected, 2 weeks of hindlimb unloading resulted in atrophy, a decrease in capillary volume and a shift towards smaller-diameter capillaries in the soleus muscle. Intermittent loading alone (1 h of cage ambulation per day) attenuated atrophy of the soleus, while astaxanthin treatment alone maintained the capillary network to near control levels. The combination of intermittent loading and astaxanthin treatment, however, ameliorated atrophy of the soleus and maintained the capillary volume and luminal diameters and the superoxide dismutase-1 protein levels near control values. These results indicate that intermittent loading combined with astaxanthin supplementation could be an effective therapy for both the muscle atrophy and the capillary regression associated with a chronic decrease in neuromuscular activity.

  4. The Combined Effect of Electrical Stimulation and High-Load Isometric Contraction on Protein Degradation Pathways in Muscle Atrophy Induced by Hindlimb Unloading

    OpenAIRE

    Naoto Fujita; Shinichiro Murakami; Hidemi Fujino

    2011-01-01

    High-load isometric exercise is considered an effective countermeasure against muscle atrophy, but therapeutic electrical stimulation for muscle atrophy is often performed without loading. In the present study, we investigated the combined effectiveness of electrical stimulation and high-load isometric contraction in preventing muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb unloading. Electrical stimulation without loading resulted in slight attenuation of muscle atrophy. Moreover, combining electrical s...

  5. Balanced Diet-Fed Fat-1 Transgenic Mice Exhibit Lower Hindlimb Suspension-Induced Soleus Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzuca-Nassr, Gabriel Nasri; Murata, Gilson Masahiro; Martins, Amanda Roque; Vitzel, Kaio Fernando; Crisma, Amanda Rabello; Torres, Rosângela Pavan; Mancini-Filho, Jorge; Kang, Jing Xuan; Curi, Rui

    2017-10-06

    The consequences of two-week hindlimb suspension (HS) on skeletal muscle atrophy were investigated in balanced diet-fed Fat-1 transgenic and C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Body composition and gastrocnemius fatty acid composition were measured. Skeletal muscle force, cross-sectional area (CSA), and signaling pathways associated with protein synthesis (protein kinase B, Akt; ribosomal protein S6, S6, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, 4EBP1; glycogen synthase kinase3-beta, GSK3-beta; and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2, ERK 1/2) and protein degradation (atrophy gene-1/muscle atrophy F-box, atrogin-1/MAFbx and muscle RING finger 1, MuRF1) were evaluated in the soleus muscle. HS decreased soleus muscle wet and dry weights (by 43% and 26%, respectively), muscle isotonic and tetanic force (by 29% and 18%, respectively), CSA of the soleus muscle (by 36%), and soleus muscle fibers (by 45%). Fat-1 transgenic mice had a decrease in the ω-6/ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ratio as compared with C57BL/6 wild-type mice (56%, p Fat-1 mice had lower soleus muscle dry mass loss (by 10%) and preserved absolute isotonic force (by 17%) and CSA of the soleus muscle (by 28%) after HS as compared with C57BL/6 wild-type mice. p-GSK3B/GSK3B ratio was increased (by 70%) and MuRF-1 content decreased (by 50%) in the soleus muscle of Fat-1 mice after HS. Balanced diet-fed Fat-1 mice are able to preserve in part the soleus muscle mass, absolute isotonic force and CSA of the soleus muscle in a disuse condition.

  6. Growth hormone/IGF-I and/or resistive exercise maintains myonuclear number in hindlimb unweighted muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D. L.; Linderman, J. K.; Roy, R. R.; Grindeland, R. E.; Mukku, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study of rats, we examined the role, during 2 wk of hindlimb suspension, of growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I (GH/IGF-I) administration and/or brief bouts of resistance exercise in ameliorating the loss of myonuclei in fibers of the soleus muscle that express type I myosin heavy chain. Hindlimb suspension resulted in a significant decrease in mean soleus wet weight that was attenuated either by exercise alone or by exercise plus GH/IGF-I treatment but was not attenuated by hormonal treatment alone. Both mean myonuclear number and mean fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain decreased after 2 wk of suspension compared with control (134 vs. 162 myonuclei/mm and 917 vs. 2,076 micron2, respectively). Neither GH/IGF-I treatment nor exercise alone affected myonuclear number or fiber CSA, but the combination of exercise and growth-factor treatment attenuated the decrease in both variables. A significant correlation was found between mean myonuclear number and mean CSA across all groups. Thus GH/IGF-I administration and brief bouts of muscle loading had an interactive effect in attenuating the loss of myonuclei induced by chronic unloading.

  7. Growth hormone/IGF-I and/or resistive exercise maintains myonuclear number in hindlimb unweighted muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D. L.; Linderman, J. K.; Roy, R. R.; Grindeland, R. E.; Mukku, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study of rats, we examined the role, during 2 wk of hindlimb suspension, of growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I (GH/IGF-I) administration and/or brief bouts of resistance exercise in ameliorating the loss of myonuclei in fibers of the soleus muscle that express type I myosin heavy chain. Hindlimb suspension resulted in a significant decrease in mean soleus wet weight that was attenuated either by exercise alone or by exercise plus GH/IGF-I treatment but was not attenuated by hormonal treatment alone. Both mean myonuclear number and mean fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain decreased after 2 wk of suspension compared with control (134 vs. 162 myonuclei/mm and 917 vs. 2,076 micron2, respectively). Neither GH/IGF-I treatment nor exercise alone affected myonuclear number or fiber CSA, but the combination of exercise and growth-factor treatment attenuated the decrease in both variables. A significant correlation was found between mean myonuclear number and mean CSA across all groups. Thus GH/IGF-I administration and brief bouts of muscle loading had an interactive effect in attenuating the loss of myonuclei induced by chronic unloading.

  8. Potential benefits of taurine in the prevention of skeletal muscle impairment induced by disuse in the hindlimb-unloaded rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M; De Bellis, Michela; Cannone, Maria; Gramegna, Gianluca; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Simonetti, Simonetta; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Basco, Davide; Svelto, Maria; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2012-07-01

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) in rats induces severe atrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotype transition in postural slow-twitch muscles, as occurs in human disuse conditions, such as spaceflight or bed rest. In rats, a reduction of soleus muscle weight and a decrease of cross-sectional area (CSA) were observed as signs of atrophy. An increased expression of the fast-isoform of myosin heavy chain (MHC) showed the phenotype transition. In parallel the resting cytosolic calcium concentration (restCa) was decreased and the resting chloride conductance (gCl), which regulates muscle excitability, was increased toward the values of the fast-twitch muscles. Here, we investigated the possible role of taurine, which is known to modulate calcium homeostasis and gCl, in the restoration of muscle impairment due to 14-days-HU. We found elevated taurine content and higher expression of the taurine transporter TauT in the soleus muscle as compared to the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of control rats. Taurine level was reduced in the HU soleus muscle, although, TauT expression was not modified. Taurine oral supplementation (5 g/kg) fully prevented this loss, and preserved resting gCl and restCa together with the slow MHC phenotype. Taurine supplementation did not prevent the HU-induced drop of muscle weight or fiber CSA, but it restored the expression of MURF-1, an atrophy-related gene, suggesting a possible early protective effect of taurine. In conclusion, taurine prevented the HU-induced phenotypic transition of soleus muscle and might attenuate the atrophic process. These findings argue for the beneficial use of taurine in the treatment of disuse-induced muscle dysfunction.

  9. PGC-1α over-expression suppresses the skeletal muscle atrophy and myofiber-type composition during hindlimb unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hongju; He, Jian; Zhang, Chenyu; Fan, Ming; Chen, Xiaoping

    2017-03-01

    Disuse leads to severe muscle atrophy and a slow-to-fast myofiber-type transition. PGC-1α (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α) is documented to play an important role in muscle atrophy and slow-twitch myofiber determination. Transcription of atrophy-related Atrogin-1 by FoxO3 can be reduced by PGC-1α. While Smad3 augments FoxO3-induced Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 promoter activity. So PGC-1α, as a transcription co-activator, may regulate hindlimb unloading (HU)-induced myofiber-type transition and muscle atrophy through Smad3. Our results showed that transgenic PGC-1α mice resisted HU-induced muscle loss, atrophy-related genes expression, and slow-to-fast myofiber-type transition. Furthermore, over-expression of PGC-1α resisted the increase in pSmad3 during muscle atrophy in vivo and in vitro. And, PGC-1α over-expression inhibited the expression of atrogenes via suppressing the phosphorylation of Smad3 in vitro. Thus, PGC-1α is effective in regulating myofiber-type transition during HU, and it alleviates skeletal muscle atrophy partially through suppressing the activation of Smad3.

  10. Chronic hindlimb suspension unloading markedly decreases turnover rates of skeletal and cardiac muscle proteins and adipose tissue triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bederman, Ilya R; Lai, Nicola; Shuster, Jeffrey; Henderson, Leigh; Ewart, Steven; Cabrera, Marco E

    2015-07-01

    We previously showed that a single bolus of "doubly-labeled" water ((2)H2 (18)O) can be used to simultaneously determine energy expenditure and turnover rates (synthesis and degradation) of tissue-specific lipids and proteins by modeling labeling patterns of protein-bound alanine and triglyceride-bound glycerol (Bederman IR, Dufner DA, Alexander JC, Previs SF. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 290: E1048-E1056, 2006). Using this novel method, we quantified changes in the whole body and tissue-specific energy balance in a rat model of simulated "microgravity" induced by hindlimb suspension unloading (HSU). After chronic HSU (3 wk), rats exhibited marked atrophy of skeletal and cardiac muscles and significant decrease in adipose tissue mass. For example, soleus muscle mass progressively decreased 11, 43, and 52%. We found similar energy expenditure between control (90 ± 3 kcal · kg(-1)· day(-1)) and hindlimb suspended (81 ± 6 kcal/kg day) animals. By comparing food intake (∼ 112 kcal · kg(-1) · day(-1)) and expenditure, we found that animals maintained positive calorie balance proportional to their body weight. From multicompartmental fitting of (2)H-labeling patterns, we found significantly (P triglycerides. Specifically, we found that synthesis rates of skeletal and cardiac muscle proteins were affected to a much greater degree compared with the decrease in degradation rates, resulting in large negative balance and significant tissue loss. In contrast, we found a small decrease in adipose tissue triglyceride synthesis paired with a large decrease in degradation, resulting in smaller negative energy balance and loss of fat mass. We conclude that HSU in rats differentially affects turnover of muscle proteins vs. adipose tissue triglycerides.

  11. Comparison of hindlimb unloading and partial weight suspension models for spaceflight-type condition induced effects on white blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jolaine M; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Wagner, Erika B.; Mick, Rosemarie; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models are frequently used to assist in the determination of the long- and short-term effects of space flight. The space environment, including microgravity, can impact many physiological and immunological system parameters. It has been found that ground based models of microgravity produce changes in white blood cell counts, which negatively affects immunologic function. As part of the Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR), we compared the acute effects on white blood cell parameters induced by the more traditionally used animal model of hindlimb unloading (HU) with a recently developed reduced weightbearing analog known as partial weight suspension (PWS). Female ICR mice were either hindlimb unloaded or placed in the PWS system at 16% quadrupedal weightbearing for 4 h, 1, 2, 7 or 10 days, at which point complete blood counts were obtained. Control animals (jacketed and non-jacketed) were exposed to identical conditions without reduced weightbearing. Results indicate that significant changes in total white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte and eosinophil counts were observed within the first 2 days of exposure to each system. These differences in blood cell counts normalized by day 7 in both systems. The results of these studies indicate that there are some statistically significant changes observed in the blood cell counts for animals exposed to both the PWS and HU simulated microgravity systems. PMID:23766550

  12. Effects of 20-week intermittent cold-water-immersion on phenotype and myonuclei in single fibers of rat hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Han, E Y; Kang, M S; Kawano, F; Kim, H J; Ohira, Y; Kim, C K

    2004-08-01

    The effects of 20 weeks of intermittent cold-water-immersion on myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression,cross-sectional area (CSA), myonuclear number, and myonuclear domain size in isolated single fiber of soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were studied in male Wistar rats. Cold exposure was accomplished by submerging the rats in shoulder-deep water, maintained at approximately 18 degrees C, for 1 hour/day, 5 days/week and for 20 weeks. Cold exposure resulted in a significant inhibition of body and soleus muscle weight gain. The percent type IIa MHC fibers of EDL muscle was increased, whereas that of type IIa + b MHC fibers was less in cold-exposed group than controls (p muscle in cold-exposed group were significantly less than controls. Myonuclear domain in type IIa fibers of EDL in the cold-exposed group was greater than controls (p cold exposure causes the fiber-type-specific adaptation in rat hindlimb muscles. It is further indicated that cold-exposure-related modulation of myonuclear number was closely related to reduction of fiber CSA, not the shift of fiber phenotype.

  13. THE EFFECT OF INSULIN AND CARBOHYDRATE SUPPLEMENTATION ON GLYCOGEN REPLENISHMENT AMONG DIFFERENT HINDLIMB MUSCLES IN RATS FOLLOWING PROLONGED SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chich Hsu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the interactive effects of insulin and carbohydrate on glycogen replenishment in different rat hindlimb muscles. Forty male Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to 5 groups, including 1 sedentary control with carbohydrate supplement (2 g glucose · kg body wt-1, 2 sedentary rats with 16 hours recovery, carbohydrate and insulin (0.5 U · kg body wt-1, 3 swimming without recovery, 4 swimming with 16 hours recovery and carbohydrate supplement, and 5 swimming with 16 hours recovery, carbohydrate and insulin. The swimming protocol consisted of two 3 h swimming sections, which were separated by a 45 min rest. The insulin and carbohydrate were administered to the rats immediately after exercise. At the end of the experiment, the soleus (S, plantaris (P, quadriceps (Q and gastrocnemius (G were surgically excised to evaluate glycogen utilization and replenishment. We observed that glycogen utilization was significantly lower in G and Q than S and P during swimming (p <0.05, and S showed the greatest capacity of glycogen resynthesis after post-exercise recovery (p <0.05. In the sedentary state, the glycogen synthesis did not differ among hindlimb muscles during insulin and carbohydrate treatments. Interestingly, with insulin and carbohydrate, the glycogen resynthesis in S and P were significantly greater than in Q and G following post-exercise recovery (p <0.05. We therefore concluded that the soleus and plantaris are the primary working muscles during swimming, and the greatest glycogen replenishment capacity of the soleus during post-exercise recovery is likely due to its highest insulin sensitivity.

  14. PGC1-α over-expression prevents metabolic alterations and soleus muscle atrophy in hindlimb unloaded mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavino, Jessica; Brocca, Lorenza; Sandri, Marco; Bottinelli, Roberto; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2014-10-15

    Prolonged skeletal muscle inactivity causes muscle fibre atrophy. Redox imbalance has been considered one of the major triggers of skeletal muscle disuse atrophy, but whether redox imbalance is actually the major cause or simply a consequence of muscle disuse remains of debate. Here we hypothesized that a metabolic stress mediated by PGC-1α down-regulation plays a major role in disuse atrophy. First we studied the adaptations of soleus to mice hindlimb unloading (HU) in the early phase of disuse (3 and 7 days of HU) with and without antioxidant treatment (trolox). HU caused a reduction in cross-sectional area, redox status alteration (NRF2, SOD1 and catalase up-regulation), and induction of the ubiquitin proteasome system (MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 mRNA up-regulation) and autophagy (Beclin1 and p62 mRNA up-regulation). Trolox completely prevented the induction of NRF2, SOD1 and catalase mRNAs, but not atrophy or induction of catabolic systems in unloaded muscles, suggesting that oxidative stress is not a major cause of disuse atrophy. HU mice showed a marked alteration of oxidative metabolism. PGC-1α and mitochondrial complexes were down-regulated and DRP1 was up-regulated. To define the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and disuse muscle atrophy we unloaded mice overexpressing PGC-1α. Transgenic PGC-1α animals did not show metabolic alteration during unloading, preserving muscle size through the reduction of autophagy and proteasome degradation. Our results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a major role in disuse atrophy and that compounds inducing PGC-1α expression could be useful to treat/prevent muscle atrophy. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  15. The adaptational strategies of the hindlimb muscles in the Tenrecidae species including the aquatic web-footed tenrec (Limnogale mergulus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hideki; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Rakotondraparany, Felix; Sasaki, Motoki; Hasegawa, Masami

    2006-07-01

    The hindlimb muscles in four species of Tenrecidae (Oryzoryctinae: Talazac long-tailed tenrec and web-footed tenrec, Tenrecinae: lesser hedgehog tenrec, and streaked tenrec), were examined macroscopically. The weight ratios of the muscles to the body in the oryzoryctinid species are larger than those in Tenrecinae, since the Oryzoryctinae species have an obviously smaller body from the evolutionary point of view. It can be primarily pointed out that the adaptation of the body size is different between the two subfamilies, and secondarily, that functional adaptation to locomotion is complete within each subfamily. The weight data and the morphological findings demonstrate that the web-footed tenrec possesses an extraordinary large M. semimembranosus in comparison to the Talazac long-tailed tenrec in their weight ratios. This muscle may act as a strong flexor motor in the knee joint during the aquatic locomotion of the web-footed tenrec. Since the other muscles of the web-footed tenrec are similar to those of the Talazac long-tailed tenrec regards weight ratio data, we think that the web-footed tenrec may have derived from a terrestrial ancestor such as the long-tailed tenrecs. In Tenrecinae the streaked tenrec is equipped with larger Mm. adductores, M. semimembranosus and M. triceps surae than the lesser hedgehog tenrec. This species is adapted to fossorial life derived from non-specialized ancestors within the evolutionary lines of the spiny tenrecs.

  16. Muscle fibre type distribution of the thoracolumbar and hindlimb regions of horses: relating fibre type and functional role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyytiäinen, Heli K; Mykkänen, Anna K; Hielm-Björkman, Anna K; Stubbs, Narelle C; McGowan, Catherine M

    2014-01-27

    Although the majority of equine muscles have a mixed fibre type distribution indicative of diverse functional roles, the predominance of a fibre type can indicate the primary function of a muscle. The deep epaxial musculature has an important role in core spinal stability in humans, reflected as a predominantly muscle fibre type (MFT) I or postural fibre type. The fibre type of the deep epaxial musculature has not been determined in horses. The objective of the study was to determine the MFT distribution in selected muscles of thoracolumbar and hindlimb region of horses. This included deep epaxial and hypaxial muscles that were hypothesised to have a postural stabilising role. A second objective was to examine differences in MFT distribution between horses bred for endurance (Arabian) and sprinting (Quarter horse). Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from selected thoracolumbar and hind limb muscles of 5 Quarter horses, 4 Arabians, and 2 Thoroughbreds. The myosin heavy chain distribution was determined by gel electrophoresis. Mann-Whitney rank test was used to compare the proportional MFT and differences between breeds. Mm. sacrocaudalis dorsalis medialis and diaphragm had the highest proportion of MFT-I. The remaining deep epaxial muscles and the hypaxial muscle m. psoas minor had approximately equal MFT I and II proportions. Mm. psoas major, iliocostalis, longissimus dorsi and the hind limb muscles contained mostly MFT-IIX. The fibre type distribution was similar between Arabians and Quarter horses, although Quarter horses had more MFT-IIX fibres in psoas major (P = 0.02) while Arabians had more MFT-I fibres in m. longissimus dorsi (P = 0.03). The fibre type distribution of the deep epaxial muscles, mm psoas minor and diaphragm varied from approximately equal MFT-I and II proportions to predominantly MFT-I suggesting a postural stabilising role possibly important in core spinal stability. In contrast the fibre type proportions of mm psoas major

  17. Modulation of Muscle Atrophy, Fatigue and MLC Phosphorylation by MuRF1 as Indicated by Hindlimb Suspension Studies on MuRF1-KO Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Labeit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MuRF1 is a member of the TRIM/RBCC superfamily, a gene family that encompasses a large variety of proteins, all sharing the conserved TRIM (Tripartite Motive sequential array of RING, B-box, and coiled-coil domains. Within this family, MuRF1(also named TRIM63 is a specialized member that contributes to the development of muscle atrophy and sarcopenia. Here we studied MuRF1's role in muscle atrophy during muscle unloading induced by hindlimb suspension. Consistent with previous studies, we found that MuRF1 inactivation leads to an attenuated muscle atrophy response. The amount of protection was higher as compared to the denervation model, and within the 10 day-suspension period the soleus muscle was spared from atrophy in MuRF1-KO mice. Contractility studies on hindlimb suspended muscle tissues suggested that MuRF1's functions extend beyond muscle trophicity and implicate MuRF1 in muscle fatigue and MLC phosphorylation control: soleus muscle from MuRF1-KO mice fatigued significantly faster and in addition showed a reduced posttetanic twitch potentiation. Thus the present work further established the role of MuRF1 in muscle atrophy and for the first time shows that MuRF1 plays a role in muscle fatigue and twitch potentiation.

  18. Effects Of treadmill training on hindlimb muscles of spinal cord–injured mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistuzzo, Camila R.; Rank, Michelle M.; Flynn, Jamie R.; Morgan, David L.; Callister, Robin; Callister, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Treadmill training is known to prevent muscle atrophy after spinal cord injury (SCI), but the training duration required to optimize recovery has not been investigated. Methods: Hemisected mice were randomized to 3, 6, or 9 weeks of training or no training. Muscle fiber type composition and fiber cross‐sectional area (CSA) of medial gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (SOL), and tibialis anterior (TA) were assessed using ATPase histochemistry. Results: Muscle fiber type composition of SCI animals did not change with training. However, 9 weeks of training increased the CSA of type IIB and IIX fibers in TA and MG muscles. Conclusions: Nine weeks of training after incomplete SCI was effective in preventing atrophy of fast‐twitch muscles, but there were limited effects on slow‐twitch muscles and muscle fiber type composition. These data provide important evidence of the benefits of exercising paralyzed limbs after SCI. Muscle Nerve, 2016 Muscle Nerve 55: 232–242, 2017 PMID:27273462

  19. Fiber-type susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage of hindlimb-unloaded rat AL muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, K.; Thompson, J. L.; Norenberg, K. M.; Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Slow oxidative (SO) fibers of the adductor longus (AL) were predominantly damaged during voluntary reloading of hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats and appeared explainable by preferential SO fiber recruitment. The present study assessed damage after eliminating the variable of voluntary recruitment by tetanically activating all fibers in situ through the motor nerve while applying eccentric (lengthening) or isometric contractions. Muscles were aldehyde fixed and resin embedded, and semithin sections were cut. Sarcomere lesions were quantified in toluidine blue-stained sections. Fibers were typed in serial sections immunostained with antifast myosin and antitotal myosin (which highlights slow fibers). Both isometric and eccentric paradigms caused fatigue. Lesions occurred only in eccentrically contracted control and HU muscles. Fatigue did not cause lesions. HU increased damage because lesioned- fiber percentages within fiber types and lesion sizes were greater than control. Fast oxidative glycolytic (FOG) fibers were predominantly damaged. In no case did damaged SO fibers predominate. Thus, when FOG, SO, and hybrid fibers are actively lengthened in chronically unloaded muscle, FOG fibers are intrinsically more susceptible to damage than SO fibers. Damaged hybrid-fiber proportions ranged between these extremes.

  20. Detrimental effects of reloading recovery on force, shortening velocity, and power of soleus muscles from hindlimb-unloaded rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrick, J J; Maddalozzo, G F; Hu, H; Herron, J C; Iwaniec, U T; Turner, R T

    2008-11-01

    To better understand how atrophied muscles recover from prolonged nonweight-bearing, we studied soleus muscles (in vitro at optimal length) from female rats subjected to normal weight bearing (WB), 15 days of hindlimb unloading (HU), or 15 days HU followed by 9 days of weight bearing reloading (HU-R). HU reduced peak tetanic force (P(o)), increased maximal shortening velocity (V(max)), and lowered peak power/muscle volume. Nine days of reloading failed to improve P(o), while depressing V(max) and intrinsic power below WB levels. These functional changes appeared intracellular in origin as HU-induced reductions in soleus mass, fiber cross-sectional area, and physiological cross-sectional area were partially or completely restored by reloading. We calculated that HU-induced reductions in soleus fiber length were of sufficient magnitude to overextend sarcomeres onto the descending limb of their length-tension relationship upon the resumption of WB activity. In conclusion, the force, shortening velocity, and power deficits observed after 9 days of reloading are consistent with contraction-induced damage to the soleus. HU-induced reductions in fiber length indicate that sarcomere hyperextension upon the resumption of weight-bearing activity may be an important mechanism underlying this response.

  1. Modulation of forelimb and hindlimb muscle activity during quadrupedal tied-belt and split-belt locomotion in intact cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigon, A; Thibaudier, Y; Hurteau, M-F

    2015-04-02

    The modulation of the neural output to forelimb and hindlimb muscles when the left and right sides step at different speeds from one another in quadrupeds was assessed by obtaining electromyography (EMG) in seven intact adult cats during split-belt locomotion. To determine if changes in EMG during split-belt locomotion were modulated according to the speed of the belt the limb was stepping on, values were compared to those obtained during tied-belt locomotion (equal left-right speeds) at matched speeds. Cats were chronically implanted for EMG, which was obtained from six muscles: biceps brachii, triceps brachii, flexor carpi ulnaris, sartorius, vastus lateralis and medial gastrocnemius. During tied-belt locomotion, cats stepped from 0.4 to 1.0m/s in 0.1m/s increments whereas during split-belt locomotion, cats stepped with left-right speed differences of 0.1 to 0.4m/s in 0.1m/s increments. During tied-belt locomotion, EMG burst durations and mean EMG amplitudes of all muscles respectively decreased and increased with increasing speed. During split-belt locomotion, there was a clear differential modulation of the EMG patterns between flexors and extensors and between the slow and fast sides. Changes in the EMG pattern of some muscles could be explained by the speed of the belt the limb was stepping on, while in other muscles there were clear dissociations from tied-belt values at matched speeds. Therefore, results show that EMG patterns during split-belt locomotion are modulated to meet task requirements partly via signals related to the stepping speed of the homonymous limb and from the other limbs.

  2. Passive stiffness of hindlimb muscles in anurans with distinct locomotor specializations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danos, Nicole; Azizi, Emanuel

    2015-08-01

    Anurans (frogs and toads) have been shown to have relatively compliant skeletal muscles. Using a meta-analysis of published data we have found that muscle stiffness is negatively correlated with joint range of motion when examined across mammalian, anuran and bird species. Given this trend across a broad phylogenetic sample, we examined whether the relationship held true within anurans. We identified four species that differ in preferred locomotor mode and hence joint range of motion (Lithobates catesbeianus, Rhinella marina, Xenopus laevis and Kassina senegalensis) and hypothesized that smaller in vivo angles (more flexed) at the knee and ankle joint would be associated with more compliant extensor muscles. We measured passive muscle tension during cyclical stretching (20%) around L0 (sarcomere lengths of 2.2 μm) in fiber bundles extracted from cruralis and plantaris muscles. We found no relationship between muscle stiffness and range of motion for either muscle-joint complex. There were no differences in the passive properties of the cruralis muscle among the four species, but the plantaris muscles of the Xenopus and Kassina were significantly stiffer than those of the other two species. Our results suggest that in anurans the stiffness of muscle fibers is a relatively minor contributor to stiffness at the level of joints and that variation in other anatomical properties including muscle-tendon architecture and joint mechanics as well as active control likely contribute more significantly to range of motion during locomotion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Hindlimb immobilization - Length-tension and contractile properties of skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Kim, D. H.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Casts were placed around rat feet in plantar flexion position to immobilize the soleus muscle in a shortened position, while the other foot was fixed in dorsal flexion to set the extensor digitorum longus in a shortened position. The total muscular atrophy and contractile properties were measured at 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days after immobilization, with casts being replaced every two weeks. The slow twitch soleus and the fast-twitch vastus lateralis and longus muscles were excised after termination of the experiment. The muscles were then stretched and subjected to electric shock to elicit peak tetanic tension and peak tetanic tension development. Force velocity features of the three muscles were assayed in a series of afterloaded contractions and fiber lengths were measured from subsequently macerated muscle. All muscles atrophied during immobilization, reaching a new steady state by day 21. Decreases in fiber and sarcomere lengths were also observed.

  4. Size and metabolic properties of single muscle fibers in rat soleus after hindlimb suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschka, Edward O.; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1987-01-01

    The effect of 28-day-long hind-limb suspension (HS) combined with 10 daily forceful lengthening contractions of the limb on the morphological and metabolic properties of individual fibers of the soleus was studied in rats, using quantitative histochemical techniques. Compared with nonsuspended controls (CON), soleus wet weights of HS rats were decreased by 49 percent; the fibers staining lightly for myosin ATPase ('light-ATPase' fibers) atrophied more than the 'dark-ATPase' fibers. Single-fiber alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities were higher in HS than in CON rats. Daily forceful lengthening contractions did not prevent the HS-induced changes. The results support the view that the soleus fibers can change from a slow-twitch oxidative to a fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic profile, but rarely to a fast-twitch glycolytic one, and that the SDH and GPD activities per volume of tissue can be increased even when there are severe losses of contractile proteins.

  5. Circadian force and EMG activity in hindlimb muscles of rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, J. A.; Wichayanuparp, S.; Recktenwald, M. R.; Roy, R. R.; McCall, G.; Day, M. K.; Washburn, D.; Fanton, J. W.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Continuous intramuscular electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from the soleus (Sol), medial gastrocnemius (MG), tibialis anterior (TA), and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of Rhesus during normal cage activity throughout 24-h periods and also during treadmill locomotion. Daily levels of MG tendon force and EMG activity were obtained from five monkeys with partial datasets from three other animals. Activity levels correlated with the light-dark cycle with peak activities in most muscles occurring between 08:00 and 10:00. The lowest levels of activity generally occurred between 22:00 and 02:00. Daily EMG integrals ranged from 19 mV/s in one TA muscle to 3339 mV/s in one Sol muscle: average values were 1245 (Sol), 90 (MG), 65 (TA), and 209 (VL) mV/s. The average Sol EMG amplitude per 24-h period was 14 microV, compared with 246 microV for a short burst of locomotion. Mean EMG amplitudes for the Sol, MG, TA, and VL during active periods were 102, 18, 20, and 33 microV, respectively. EMG amplitudes that approximated recruitment of all fibers within a muscle occurred for 5-40 s/day in all muscles. The duration of daily activation was greatest in the Sol [151 +/- 45 (SE) min] and shortest in the TA (61 +/- 19 min). The results show that even a "postural" muscle such as the Sol was active for only approximately 9% of the day, whereas less active muscles were active for approximately 4% of the day. MG tendon forces were generally very low, consistent with the MG EMG data but occasionally reached levels close to estimates of the maximum force generating potential of the muscle. The Sol and TA activities were mutually exclusive, except at very low levels, suggesting very little coactivation of these antagonistic muscles. In contrast, the MG activity usually accompanied Sol activity suggesting that the MG was rarely used in the absence of Sol activation. The results clearly demonstrate a wide range of activation levels among muscles of the same animal as well as among different

  6. Force-Velocity and Power Characteristics of Rat Soleus Muscle Fibers after Hindlimb Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, K. S.; Blaser, C. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of 1, 2, and 3 wk of Hindlimb Suspension (HS) on force-velocity and power characteristics of single rat soleus fibers were determined. After 1, 2, or 3 wk of HS, small fiber bundles were isolated, placed in skinning solution, and stored at -20 C until studied. Single fibers were isolated and placed between a motor arm and force transducer, functional properties were studied, and fiber protein content was subsequently analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Additional fibers were isolated from soleus of control and after 1 and 3 wk of HS, and fiber type distribution and myosin light chain stoichiometry were determined from SDS-PAGE analysis. After 1 wk of HS, percent type I fibers declined from 82 to 74%, whereas hybrid fibers increased from 10 to 18%. Percent fast type 11 fibers increased from 8% in control and 1 wk of HS to 26% by 3 wk of HS. Most fibers showed an increased unloaded maximal shortening velocity (V(sub 0)), but myosin heavy chain remained entirely slow type I. The mechanism for increased V(sub 0) is unknown. There was a progressive decrease in fiber diameter (14, 30, and 38%) and peak force (38, 56, and 63%) after 1, 2, and 3 wk of HS, respectively. One week of HS resulted in a shift of the force-velocity curve, and between 2 and 3 wk of HS the curve shifted further such that V(sub 0) was higher than control at all relative loads less than 45% peak isometric force. Peak absolute power output of soleus fibers progressively decreased through 2 wk of HS but showed no further change at 3 wk. The results suggest that between 2 and 3 wk the HS-induced alterations in the force-velocity relationship act to maintain the power output of single soleus fibers despite a continued reduction in fiber force.

  7. The evolution of hindlimb tendons and muscles on the line to crown-group birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, John R

    2002-12-01

    The anatomy and functions of muscle-tendon complexes and their bony attachments in birds and their outgroups show how the major pelvic limb muscle groups evolved. Fossils reveal that most changes evolved after the divergence of archosaurs in the Triassic, particularly in the dinosaurian precursors to birds. Three-dimensional limb control became concentrated at the hip joint; more distal joints and muscles were restricted to flexion or extension early in dinosaur evolution. Hip extensors expanded even though the primary femoral retractor M. caudofemoralis longus was reduced. Hip flexors and two-joint "hamstring" muscles were simplified to a few large heads. Knee extensors increased their sizes and moment arms early in bipedal dinosaurs, but the patella and cranial cnemial crest evolved later in birds. Lower limb muscles expanded as ossifications such as the hypotarsus increased their moment arms. The ossification of lower limb tendons, particularly in extensors, is a recent novelty of birds. Muscles and tendons that develop large forces, stresses, and moments to stabilize or move the limbs became increasingly prominent on the line to birds. Locomotion evolved in a stepwise pattern that only recently produced the derived limb control mechanisms of crown-group birds, such as the strongly flexed hip and knee joints.

  8. CHANGES IN THE ELECTROMYOGRAM OF 2 MAJOR HINDLIMB MUSCLES DURING LOCOMOTOR DEVELOPMENT IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WESTERGA, J; GRAMSBERGEN, A

    1993-01-01

    The development of the electromyogram (EMG) of tibialis anterior (TA) and medial gastrocnemius (GM) during locomotion was studied in normal rats from the onset of quadruped walking (postnatal day 10, P10) until P42. The objectives were to relate signal properties of the EMG and coordination of muscl

  9. [Hindlimb antigravity muscles' reaction in male and female rats to the deficit of functional loading].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'ina-Kakueva, E I

    2002-01-01

    Histological and histomorphometric comparison of the antigravity muscles of rats of both sexes was performed following 30-d unloading of their hind limbs by head-down suspension. It was shown that growth rate of control males was higher as compared to control females. This is attributed to the synergic effects of somatotropin and testosterone on metabolism and growth of males and only somatotropin in females. Load deprivation of the hind limbs inhibited body mass gain in all animals; however, this inhibition was twice as great in males. Increase of the soleus and gastrocnemius in the control males in this experiment was slightly ahead of the muscle mass gain in the females. The histomorphometric investigation of the cross-section area of myofibers did not reveal differences between males and females either in the control or suspension. No difference was found in percent of various types of fibers in the control males and females. In the soleus of the suspended rats, a part of slow fibers had transformed into fast ones without any sex-related particularities. The conclusion was made that despite the significant difference in the hormonal profile, the reaction of males and females to insufficient weight loading of the antigravity muscles was alike.

  10. Analysis by two-dimensional Blue Native/SDS-PAGE of membrane protein alterations in rat soleus muscle after hindlimb unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basco, Davide; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria

    2010-12-01

    Muscle atrophy occurring in several pathophysiological conditions determines decreases in muscle protein synthesis, increases in the rate of proteolysis and changes in muscle fiber composition. To determine the effect of muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb unloading (HU) on membrane proteins from rat soleus, a proteomic approach based on two-dimensional Blue Native/SDS-PAGE was performed. Proteomic analysis of normal and HU soleus muscle demonstrates statistically significant changes in the relative level of 36 proteins. Among the proteins identified by mass spectrometry, most are involved in pathways associated with muscle fuel utilization, indicating a shift in metabolism from oxidative to glycolytic. Moreover, immunoblotting analysis revealed an increase in aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel and an alteration of proteins belonging to the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC). AQP4 and DGC are regulated in soleus muscle subjected to simulated microgravity in response to compensatory mechanisms induced by muscle atrophy, and they parallel the slow-to-fast twitch conversion that occurs in soleus fibers during HU. In conclusion, the alterations of soleus muscle membrane proteome may play a pivotal role in the mechanisms involved in disuse-induced muscle atrophy.

  11. [Contractile properties of fibers and cytoskeletal proteins of gerbil's hindlimb muscles after space flight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipets, E N; Ponomareva, E V; Ogneva, I V; Vikhliantsev, I M; Karaduleva, E V; Kratashkina, N L; Kuznetsov, S L; Podlubnaia, Z A; Shenkman, B S

    2009-01-01

    The work had the goal to compare the microgravity effects on gerbil's muscles-antagonists, m. soleus and m. tibialis anterior. The animals were exposed in 12-d space microgravity aboard Earth's artificial satellite "Foton-M3". Findings of the analysis of single skinned fibers contractility are 19.7% diminution of the diameter and 21.8% loss of the total contractive force of m. soleus fibers post flight. However, there was no significant difference in calcium sensitivity which agrees with the absence of changes in the relative content of several major cytoskeletal proteins (titin and nebulin ratios to heavy chains of myosin were identical in the flight and control groups) and a slight shifting of the myosin phenotype toward the "fast type" (9%, p < 0.05). These parameters were mostly unaffected by the space flight in m. tibialis anterior. To sum up, the decline of contractility and diminution of gerbil's myofibers after the space flight were less significant as compared with rats and did not impact the sytoskeletal protein ratios.

  12. Associations between force and fatigue in fast-twitch motor units of a cat hindlimb muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laouris, Y; Bevan, L; Reinking, R M; Stuart, D G

    2004-01-01

    Associations were quantified between the control force and fatigue-induced force decline in 22 single fast-twitch-fatigable motor units of 5 deeply anesthetized adult cats. The units were subjected to intermittent stimulation at 1 train/s for 360 s. Two stimulation patterns were delivered in a pseudo-random manner. The first was a 500-ms train with constant interpulse intervals. The second pattern had the same number of stimuli, mean stimulus rate, and stimulus duration, but the stimulus pulses were rearranged to increase the force produced by the units in the control (prefatigue) state. The associations among the control peak tetanic force of these units, 3 indices of fatigue, and total cumulative force during fatiguing contractions were dependent, in part, on the stimulation pattern used to produce fatigue. The associations were also dependent, albeit to a lesser extent, on the force measure (peak vs. integrated) and the fatigue index used to quantify fatigue. It is proposed that during high-force fatiguing contractions, neural mechanisms are potentially available to delay and reduce the fatigue of fast-twitch-fatigable units for brief, but functionally relevant, periods. In contrast, the fatigue of slow-twitch fatigue-resistant units seems more likely to be controlled largely, if not exclusively, by metabolic processes within their muscle cells.

  13. Dietary fish oil delays hypoxic skeletal muscle fatigue and enhances caffeine-stimulated contractile recovery in the rat in vivo hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Gregory E; McLennan, Peter L

    2017-06-01

    Oxygen efficiency influences skeletal muscle contractile function during physiological hypoxia. Dietary fish oil, providing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), reduces the oxygen cost of muscle contraction. This study used an autologous perfused rat hindlimb model to examine the effects of a fish oil diet on skeletal muscle fatigue during an acute hypoxic challenge. Male Wistar rats were fed a diet rich in saturated fat (SF), long-chain (LC) n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 PUFA), or LC n-3 PUFA DHA from fish oil (FO) (8 weeks). During anaesthetised and ventilated conditions (normoxia 21% O2 (SaO2-98%) and hypoxia 14% O2 (SaO2-89%)) the hindlimb was perfused at a constant flow and the gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus muscle bundle was stimulated via sciatic nerve (2 Hz, 6-12V, 0.05 ms) to established fatigue. Caffeine (2.5, 5, 10 mM) was supplied to the contracting muscle bundle via the arterial cannula to assess force recovery. Hypoxia, independent of diet, attenuated maximal twitch tension (normoxia: 82 ± 8; hypoxia: 41 ± 2 g·g(-1) tissue w.w.). However, rats fed FO sustained higher peak twitch tension compared with the SF and n-6 PUFA groups (P recovery was enhanced in the FO-fed animals (SF: 41 ± 3; n-6 PUFA: 40 ± 4; FO: 52 ± 7% recovery; P < 0.05). These results support a physiological role of DHA in skeletal muscle membranes when exposed to low-oxygen stress that is consistent with the attenuation of muscle fatigue under physiologically normoxic conditions.

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) responses elicited in hindlimb muscles as an assessment of synaptic plasticity in spino-muscular circuitry after chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Alessi, Valentina; Sisto, Sue A; Kaufman, Mark; Arvanian, Victor L

    2017-03-06

    Electromagnetic stimulation applied at the cranial level, i.e. transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), is a technique for stimulation and neuromodulation used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in clinical and research settings. Although recordings of TMS elicited motor-evoked potentials (MEP) are an essential diagnostic tool for spinal cord injured (SCI) patients, they are reliably recorded from arm, and not leg muscles. Mid-thoracic contusion is a common SCI that results in locomotor impairments predominantly in legs. In this study, we used a chronic T10 contusion SCI rat model and examined whether (i) TMS-responses in hindlimb muscles can be used for evaluation of conduction deficits in cortico-spinal circuitry and (ii) if plastic changes at spinal levels will affect these responses. In this study, plastic changes of transmission in damaged spinal cord were achieved by repetitive electro-magnetic stimulation applied over the spinal level (rSEMS). Spinal electro-magnetic stimulation was previously shown to activate spinal nerves and is gaining large acceptance as a non-invasive alternative to direct current and/or epidural electric stimulation. Results demonstrate that TMS fails to induce measurable MEPs in hindlimbs of chronically SCI animals. After facilitation of synaptic transmission in damaged spinal cord was achieved with rSEMS, however, MEPs were recorded from hindlimb muscles in response to single pulse TMS stimulation. These results provide additional evidence demonstrating beneficial effects of TMS as a diagnostic technique for descending motor pathways in uninjured CNS and after SCI. This study confirms the ability of TMS to assess plastic changes of transmission occurring at the spinal level. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyo Eun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do-Sun, E-mail: dslmd@kumc.or.kr [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  16. FoxO-dependent atrogenes vary among catabolic conditions and play a key role in muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocca, Lorenza; Toniolo, Luana; Reggiani, Carlo; Bottinelli, Roberto; Sandri, Marco; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2017-02-15

    Muscle atrophy is a debilitating condition that affects a high percentage of the population with a negative impact on quality of life. Dissecting the molecular level of the atrophy process, and the similarities/dissimilarities among different catabolic conditions, is a necessary step for designing specific countermeasures to attenuate/prevent muscle loss. The FoxO family transcription factors represent one of the most important regulators of atrophy programme stimulating the expression of many atrophy-related genes. The findings of the present study clearly indicate that the signalling network controlling the atrophy programme is specific for each catabolic condition. Muscle atrophy is a complex process that is in common with many different catabolic diseases including disuse/inactivity and ageing. The signalling pathways that control the atrophy programme in the different disuse/inactivity conditions have not yet been completely dissected. The inhibition of FoxO is considered to only partially spare muscle mass after denervation. The present study aimed: (i) to determine the involvement of FoxOs in hindlimb suspension disuse model; (ii) to define whether the molecular events of protein breakdown are shared among different unloaded muscles; and finally (iii) to compare the data obtained in this model with another model of inactivity such as denervation. Both wild-type and muscle-specific FoxO1,3,4 knockout (FoxO1,3,4(-/-) ) mice were unloaded for 3 and 14 days and muscles were characterized by functional, morphological, biochemical and molecular assays. The data obtained show that FoxOs are required for muscle loss and force drop during unloading. Moreover, we found that FoxO-dependent atrogenes vary in different unloaded muscles and that they diverge from denervation. The findings of the present study clearly indicate that the signalling network that controls the atrophy programme is specific for each catabolic condition. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of

  17. The effect of fiber-type heterogeneity on optimized work and power output of hindlimb muscles of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley-Ross, M A; Barker, J U

    2002-09-01

    Most vertebrate muscles are composed of a mixture of fiber types. However, studies of muscle mechanics have concentrated on homogeneous bundles of fibers. Hindlimb muscles of the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum, present an excellent system to explore the consequences of fiber heterogeneity. Isometric twitches and work loops were obtained in vitro from two muscles, the m. iliotibialis pars posterior (heterogeneous, containing types I, IIa and IIb fibers) and the m. iliofibularis (nearly homogeneous for type IIa fibers). Maximal isometric twitch and tetanic stresses in m. iliotibialis posterior were significantly greater than in iliofibularis. Work loops were obtained over a range of frequencies (0.5-3.0 Hz) and strains (2-6% muscle length) that encompassed the observed ranges in vivo. Work per cycle from the homogeneous iliofibularis declined from 1.5-3.0 Hz, while that from the heterogeneous m. iliotibialis posterior increased from 0.5 Hz to 2.5 Hz and declined at 3.0 Hz. Power output from the iliofibularis rose with frequency to at least 3 Hz; power from the iliotibialis posterior rose with frequency to 2.5 Hz and declined thereafter. Mass-specific work per cycle and power output were higher in iliofibularis than iliotibialis posterior over most frequencies and strains tested.

  18. High-field (11.75T) multimodal MR imaging of exercising hindlimb mouse muscles using a non-invasive combined stimulation and force measurement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondin, Julien; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bendahan, David; Duhamel, Guillaume

    2014-08-01

    We have designed and constructed an experimental set-up allowing electrical stimulation of hindlimb mouse muscles and the corresponding force measurements at high-field (11.75T). We performed high-resolution multimodal MRI (including T2 -weighted imaging, angiography and diffusion) and analysed the corresponding MRI changes in response to a stimulation protocol. Mice were tested twice over a 1-week period to investigate the reliability of mechanical measurements and T2 changes associated with the stimulation protocol. Additionally, angiographic images were obtained before and immediately after the stimulation protocol. Finally, multislice diffusion imaging was performed before, during and immediately after the stimulation session. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated on the basis of diffusion weighted images (DWI). Both force production and T2 values were highly reproducible as illustrated by the low coefficient of variation (muscle contractions, motion artifacts were minimal for DWI recorded under exercising conditions, thereby underlining the robustness of the measurements. Mean ADC values increased under exercising conditions and were higher during the recovery period as compared with the corresponding control values. The proposed experimental approach demonstrates accurate high-field multimodal MRI muscle investigations at a preclinical level which is of interest for monitoring the severity and/or the progression of neuromuscular diseases but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The role of alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and PGC-1α over-expression in fast muscle atrophy following hindlimb unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavino, Jessica; Brocca, Lorenza; Sandri, Marco; Grassi, Bruno; Bottinelli, Roberto; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2015-04-15

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs as a result of disuse. Although several studies have established that a decrease in protein synthesis and increase in protein degradation lead to muscle atrophy, little is known about the triggers underlying such processes. A growing body of evidence challenges oxidative stress as a trigger of disuse atrophy; furthermore, it is also becoming evident that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a causative role in determining muscle atrophy. Mitochondrial fusion and fission have emerged as important processes that govern mitochondrial function and PGC-1α may regulate fusion/fission events. Although most studies on mice have focused on the anti-gravitary slow soleus muscle as it is preferentially affected by disuse atrophy, several fast muscles (including gastrocnemius) go through a significant loss of mass following unloading. Here we found that in fast muscles an early down-regulation of pro-fusion proteins, through concomitant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, can activate catabolic systems, and ultimately cause muscle mass loss in disuse. Elevated muscle PGC-1α completely preserves muscle mass by preventing the fall in pro-fusion protein expression, AMPK and catabolic system activation, suggesting that compounds inducing PGC-1α expression could be useful to treat and prevent muscle atrophy. The mechanisms triggering disuse muscle atrophy remain of debate. It is becoming evident that mitochondrial dysfunction may regulate pathways controlling muscle mass. We have recently shown that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a major role in disuse atrophy of soleus, a slow, oxidative muscle. Here we tested the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading-induced atrophy could be due to mitochondrial dysfunction in fast muscles too, notwithstanding their much lower mitochondrial content. Gastrocnemius displayed atrophy following both 3 and 7 days of unloading. SOD1 and catalase up-regulation, no H2 O2 accumulation and no increase of protein

  20. Ager Deletion Enhances Ischemic Muscle Inflammation, Angiogenesis, and Blood Flow Recovery in Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Díez, Raquel; Shen, Xiaoping; Daffu, Gurdip; Khursheed, Md; Hu, Jiyuan; Song, Fei; Rosario, Rosa; Xu, Yunlu; Li, Qing; Xi, Xiangmei; Zou, Yu Shan; Li, Huilin; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Yan, Shi Fang

    2017-08-01

    Diabetic subjects are at higher risk of ischemic peripheral vascular disease. We tested the hypothesis that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) block angiogenesis and blood flow recovery after hindlimb ischemia induced by femoral artery ligation through modulation of immune/inflammatory mechanisms. Wild-type mice rendered diabetic with streptozotocin and subjected to unilateral femoral artery ligation displayed increased accumulation and expression of AGEs and RAGE in ischemic muscle. In diabetic wild-type mice, femoral artery ligation attenuated angiogenesis and impaired blood flow recovery, in parallel with reduced macrophage content in ischemic muscle and suppression of early inflammatory gene expression, including Ccl2 (chemokine [C-C motif] ligand-2) and Egr1 (early growth response gene-1) versus nondiabetic mice. Deletion of Ager (gene encoding RAGE) or transgenic expression of Glo1 (reduces AGEs) restored adaptive inflammation, angiogenesis, and blood flow recovery in diabetic mice. In diabetes mellitus, deletion of Ager increased circulating Ly6C(hi) monocytes and augmented macrophage infiltration into ischemic muscle tissue after femoral artery ligation. In vitro, macrophages grown in high glucose display inflammation that is skewed to expression of tissue damage versus tissue repair gene expression. Further, macrophages grown in high versus low glucose demonstrate blunted macrophage-endothelial cell interactions. In both settings, these adverse effects of high glucose were reversed by Ager deletion in macrophages. These findings indicate that RAGE attenuates adaptive inflammation in hindlimb ischemia; underscore microenvironment-specific functions for RAGE in inflammation in tissue repair versus damage; and illustrate that AGE/RAGE antagonism may fill a critical gap in diabetic peripheral vascular disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Effects of hindlimb unloading and ionizing radiation on skeletal muscle resistance artery vasodilation and its relation to cancellous bone in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisby, Rhonda D; Alwood, Joshua S; Behnke, Brad J; Stabley, John N; McCullough, Danielle J; Ghosh, Payal; Globus, Ruth K; Delp, Michael D

    2016-01-15

    Spaceflight has profound effects on vascular function as a result of weightlessness that may be further compounded by radiation exposure. The purpose of the present study was to assess the individual and combined effects of hindlimb unloading (HU) and radiation (Rad) on vasodilator responses in the skeletal muscle vasculature. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were randomized to one of four groups: control (Con), HU (tail suspension for 15 days), Rad (200 cGy of (137)Cs), and HU-Rad (15-day tail suspension and 200 cGy of (137)Cs). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation of gastrocnemius feed arteries was assessed in vitro using acetylcholine (ACh, 10(-9)-10(-4) M) and inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX). Endothelium-independent vasodilation was assessed using Dea-NONOate (10(-9)-10(-4) M). Endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilator responses were impaired relative to Con responses in all treatment groups; however, there was no further impairment from the combination of treatments (HU-Rad) relative to that in the HU and Rad groups. The NOS-mediated contribution to endothelium-dependent vasodilation was depressed with HU and Rad. This impairment in NOS signaling may have been partially compensated for by an enhancement of PGI2-mediated dilation. Changes in endothelium-dependent vasodilation were also associated with decrements in trabecular bone volume in the proximal tibia metaphysis. These data demonstrate that the simulated space environment (i.e., radiation exposure and unloading of muscle and bone) significantly impairs skeletal muscle artery vasodilation, mediated through endothelium-dependent reductions in NOS signaling and decrements in vascular smooth muscle cell responsiveness to NO.

  2. Hindlimb-unloading suppresses B cell population in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation associated with OPN expression in circulating blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezura, Yoichi; Nagata, Junji; Nagao, Masashi; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Rittling, Susan; Denhardt, David T; Noda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Rodent hindlimb unloading (HU) by tail-suspension is a model to investigate disuse-induced bone loss in vivo. Previously, we have shown that osteopontin (OPN, also known as Spp1) is required for unloading-induced bone loss. However, how unloading affects OPN expression in the body is not fully understood. Here, we examined OPN expression in peripheral blood of mice subjected to HU. Real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that OPN expression is increased in circulating peripheral blood cells. This HU-induced increase in OPN mRNA expression was specific in circulating peripheral blood cells, as OPN was not increased in the blood cells in bone marrow. HU-induced enhancement in OPN expression in peripheral blood cells was associated with an increase in the fraction of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells in the peripheral blood. In contrast, HU decreased the fraction size of B-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. We further examined if B-lymphogenesis is affected in the mice deficient for osteopontin subjected to HU. In bone marrow, HU decreased the population of the B-lymphocyte lineage cells significantly, whereas it did not alter the population of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. HU also increased the cells in T-lymphocyte lineage in bone marrow. Interestingly, these changes were observed similarly both in OPN-deficient and wild-type mice. These results indicate for the first time that HU increases OPN expression in circulating cells and suppresses bone marrow B-lymphogenesis.

  3. Medial prefrontal cortex acetylcholine injection-induced hypotension: the role of hindlimb vasodilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, G. E.; Lewis, S. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Correa, F. M.

    2000-01-01

    The injection of acetylcholine (ACh) into the cingulate region of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) causes a marked fall in arterial blood pressure which is not accompanied by changes in heart rate. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the hemodynamic basis for this stimulus-induced hypotension in Sprague-Dawley rats. The study was designed to determine whether a change in the vascular resistance of hindlimb, renal or mesenteric vascular beds contributes to the fall in arterial pressure in response to ACh injection into the cingulate cortex. Miniature pulsed-Doppler flow probes were used to measure changes in regional blood flow and vascular resistance. The results indicated that the hypotensive response was largely due to a consistent and marked vasodilation in the hindlimb vascular bed. On this basis, an additional experiment was then undertaken to determine the mechanisms that contribute to hindlimb vasodilation. The effect of interrupting the autonomic innervation of one leg on the hindlimb vasodilator response was tested. Unilateral transection of the lumbar sympathetic chain attenuated the cingulate ACh-induced vasodilation in the ipsilateral, but not in the contralateral hindlimb. These results suggest that the hypotensive response to cingulate cortex-ACh injection is caused by skeletal muscle vasodilation mediated by a sympathetic chain-related vasodilator system.

  4. Musculus gastrocnemius tetanus kinetics in alcohol-intoxicated rats with experimentally-induced hindlimb vascular ischemia under conditions of low-frequence muscle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Melnychuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol intoxication and ischemic injury of skeletal muscles often accompany each other. It is shown that patients hospitalized with chronic alcoholism develop muscle fatigue. Skeletal muscle dysfunction in alcohol-dependent patients is caused by ethanol-associated myofibrillar atrophy and metabolic disbalance, while compression-ischemic lesions result from unconsciousness of the patient, in case of taking the critical alcohol dose. Therefore, the aim of this study is to discover typical m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanic kinetics changes in alcohol intoxicated rats with experimentally induced vascular ischemia of hindlimb muscles under conditions of low-frequency progressive muscle fatigue. Experiments were carried out on 10 young male Wistar rats (149.5 ± 5.8 g kept under standard vivarium conditions and diet. The investigation was conducted in two phases: chronic (30 days and acute (3 hours experiment. All surgical procedures were carried out aseptically under general anesthesia. Ishemic m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanic kinetic changes and force productivity in alcohol intoxicated rats were investigated in the isometric mode, with direct electrical stimulation. The fatigue of m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. was evaluated by three characteristic criteria: the first sag effect, the secondary force rise, the second sag effect. There have been 10 similar experiments: 5 series in each study group with 10 tetanic runs in each series. The highest amplitude of the native m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanus relative to isoline was taken as 100% force response. The same pattern of m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. low-frequency fatigue development was found in both rat groups under study. It is evidenced by the absence of substantial m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanus kinetics differences in alcohol intoxicated rats, compared with non-alcohol intoxicated rats during fatigue test. However, the appreciable m. gastrocnemius (cap. med. tetanic force reduction

  5. Denervation produces different single fiber phenotypes in fast- and slow-twitch hindlimb muscles of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, M F; Stephenson, G M M; Stephenson, D G

    2006-09-01

    Using a single, mechanically skinned fiber approach, we tested the hypothesis that denervation (0 to 50 days) of skeletal muscles that do not overlap in fiber type composition [extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles of Long-Evans hooded rats] leads to development of different fiber phenotypes. Denervation (50 day) was accompanied by 1) a marked increase in the proportion of hybrid IIB/D fibers (EDL) and I/IIA fibers (SOL) from 30% to >75% in both muscles, and a corresponding decrease in the proportion of pure fibers expressing only one myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform; 2) complex muscle- and fiber-type specific changes in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-loading level at physiological pCa approximately 7.1, with EDL fibers displaying more consistent changes than SOL fibers; 3) decrease by approximately 50% in specific force of all fiber types; 4) decrease in sensitivity to Ca(2+), particularly for SOL fibers (by approximately 40%); 5) decrease in the maximum steepness of the force-pCa curves, particularly for the hybrid I/IIA SOL fibers (by approximately 35%); and 6) increased occurrence of biphasic behavior with respect to Sr(2+) activation in SOL fibers, indicating the presence of both slow and fast troponin C isoforms. No fiber types common to the two muscles were detected at any time points (day 7, 21, and 50) after denervation. The results provide strong evidence that not only neural factors, but also the intrinsic properties of a muscle fiber, influence the structural and functional properties of a particular muscle cell and explain important functional changes induced by denervation at both whole muscle and single cell levels.

  6. Responses of amino acids in hindlimb muscles to recovery from hypogravity and unloading by tail-cast suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, M. E.; Henriksen, E. J.; Jacob, S.; Cook, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Amino acids were assayed in muscles from rats exposed to 7 days of hypogravity and 12 h of gravity (F) or 6 days of suspension with (R) or without (H) 12 h of loading. In these groups, lower aspartate was common only to the soleus (SOL) relative to control muscles, the smallest difference being in group R. This difference in aspartate for F and H, but not for R, correlated with lower malate suggesting diminution of citric acid cycle intermediates. The R SOL value was increased over the H SOL. Therefore desite 12 h of loading, the F SOL was more comparable to the H SOL. The role of stress in preventing recovery of the F SOL was apparent from the ratios of glutamine/glutamate. Synthesis of glutamine is enhanced by glucocorticoids and is reflected by an increased ratio. In 5 of the 6 F muscles studied, this ratio was greater than in controls. In contrast, the ratio in all R muscles was similar to controls and showed recovery from the values in H muscles. Hence the post-flight treatment of F rats may have produced additional stress. Despite this stress, in some respects the SOL responses to hypogravity were similar to its responses to unloding by suspension.

  7. A marginal level of dystrophin partially ameliorates hindlimb muscle passive mechanical properties in dystrophin-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether a minimal level of dystrophin expression improves the passive mechanical properties of skeletal muscle in the murine Duchenne muscular dystrophy model. We compared the elastic and viscous properties of the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) in mdx3cv and mdx4cv mice at 6, 14, and 20 months of age. Both strains are on the C57Bl/6 background, and both lose the full-length dystrophin protein. Interestingly, mdx3cv mice express a near full-length dystrophin at ≈ 5% of the normal level. We found that the stress-strain profile and the stress relaxation rate of the EDL in mdx3cv mice were partially preserved in all age groups compared with age-matched mdx4cv mice. Our results suggest that a low level of dystrophin expression may treat muscle stiffness in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effects of alprostadil and iloprost on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle injury following hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erer, Dilek; Özer, Abdullah; Demirtaş, Hüseyin; Gönül, İpek Işık; Kara, Halil; Arpacı, Hande; Çomu, Faruk Metin; Oktar, Gürsel Levent; Arslan, Mustafa; Küçük, Ayşegül

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of alprostadil (prostaglandin [PGE1] analog) and iloprost (prostacyclin [PGI2] analog) on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle tissues after ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury in an experimental rat model. Wistar albino rats underwent 2 hours of ischemia via infrarenal aorta clamping with subsequent 2 hours of reperfusion. Alprostadil and iloprost were given starting simultaneously with the reperfusion period. Effects of agents on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) tissue specimens were examined. Renal medullary congestion, cytoplasmic swelling, and mean tubular dilatation scores were significantly lower in the alprostadil-treated group than those found in the I/R-only group (Piloprost-treated groups (P=0.017 and P=0.001; Piloprost-treated group than the scores found in the nontreated I/R group (Piloprost significantly reduce lung tissue I/R injury. Alprostadil has more prominent protective effects against renal I/R injury, while iloprost is superior in terms of protecting the skeletal muscle tissue against I/R injury.

  9. Effects of alprostadil and iloprost on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle injury following hindlimb ischemia–reperfusion injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erer, Dilek; Özer, Abdullah; Demirtaş, Hüseyin; Gönül, İpek Işık; Kara, Halil; Arpacı, Hande; Çomu, Faruk Metin; Oktar, Gürsel Levent; Arslan, Mustafa; Küçük, Ayşegül

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of alprostadil (prostaglandin [PGE1] analog) and iloprost (prostacyclin [PGI2] analog) on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle tissues after ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods Wistar albino rats underwent 2 hours of ischemia via infrarenal aorta clamping with subsequent 2 hours of reperfusion. Alprostadil and iloprost were given starting simultaneously with the reperfusion period. Effects of agents on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) tissue specimens were examined. Results Renal medullary congestion, cytoplasmic swelling, and mean tubular dilatation scores were significantly lower in the alprostadil-treated group than those found in the I/R-only group (Palprostadil- and iloprost-treated groups (P=0.017 and P=0.001; PAlprostadil and iloprost significantly reduce lung tissue I/R injury. Alprostadil has more prominent protective effects against renal I/R injury, while iloprost is superior in terms of protecting the skeletal muscle tissue against I/R injury. PMID:27601882

  10. Estimation of rat muscle blood flow by microdialysis probes perfused with ethanol, [14C]ethanol, and 3H2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Donsmark, M; Enevoldsen, L H;

    1999-01-01

    We used the perfused rat hindquarter to evaluate whether the microdialysis ethanol technique can be used to qualitatively estimate nutritive skeletal muscle blood flow. Four microdialysis probes were inserted in different hindlimb muscles in each of 16 rats. Hindquarters were perfused at blood flow...... rates ranging from 0 to 21 ml. 100 g-1. min-1. The microdialysis probes were perfused at 2 microliter/min with perfusate containing ethanol, [14C]ethanol, and 3H2O. Within and between experiments outflow-to-inflow ratios (o/i) generally varied inversely with blood flow. When a low flow or no flow...... was maintained in hindquarters, o/i ratios first increased with time (for at least 60 min) and then leveled off. The long time constant impaired detection of rapid oscillations in blood flow, especially at low blood flow rates. Contractions per se apparently decreased o/i ratios independent of blood flow...

  11. Effects of alprostadil and iloprost on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle injury following hindlimb ischemia–reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erer D

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dilek Erer,1,* Abdullah Özer,1,* Hüseyin Demirtaş,1 İpek Işık Gönül,2 Halil Kara,3 Hande Arpacı,4 Faruk Metin Çomu,5 Gürsel Levent Oktar,1 Mustafa Arslan,6 Ayşegül Küçük7 1Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Department of Pathology, Gazi University Medical Faculty, 3Department of Pharmacology, Yıldırım Beyazıt University Medical Faculty, 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ankara University Faculty of Dentistry, Besevler, Ankara, 5Department of Physiology, Kırıkkale University Medical Faculty, Kırıkkale, 6Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Gazi University Medical Faculty, Ankara, 7Department of Physiology, Dumlupınar University Medical Faculty, Kütahya, Turkey *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: To evaluate the effects of alprostadil (prostaglandin [PGE1] analog and iloprost (prostacyclin [PGI2] analog on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle tissues after ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury in an experimental rat model.Materials and methods: Wistar albino rats underwent 2 hours of ischemia via infrarenal aorta clamping with subsequent 2 hours of reperfusion. Alprostadil and iloprost were given starting simultaneously with the reperfusion period. Effects of agents on renal, lung, and skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius tissue specimens were examined.Results: Renal medullary congestion, cytoplasmic swelling, and mean tubular dilatation scores were significantly lower in the alprostadil-treated group than those found in the I/R-only group (P<0.0001, P=0.015, and P<0.01, respectively. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary partial destruction, consolidation, alveolar edema, and hemorrhage scores were significantly lower in alprostadil- and iloprost-treated groups (P=0.017 and P=0.001; P<0.01 and P<0.0001. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration scores in skeletal muscle tissue were significantly lower in the iloprost-treated group than the scores found in the nontreated I

  12. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  13. Effects of Hindlimb Unweighting on Arterial Contractile Responses in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jia; Ren, Xin-Ling; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine if hindlimb unweighting in mice alters arterial contractile responses. Sixteen male C57B/6 mice and 16 male Chinese Kunming mice were divided into control and 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting groups, respectively. Using isolated arterial rings from different arteries of mouse, effects of 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting on arterial contractile responsiveness were examined in vitro. The results showed that, in arterial rings from both C57B/6 and Chinese Kunming mice, maximum isometric contractile tensions evoked by either KCl or phenylephrine were significantly lower in abdominal aortic, mesenteric arterial and femoral arterial rings from hindlimb unweighting, compared to control mice. However, the maximal contractile responses of common carotid rings to KCl and PE were not significantly different between control and hindlimb unweighting groups. The sensitivity (EC(sub 50)) of all arteries to KCl or PE showed no significant differences between control and hindlimb unweighting mice. These data indicated that 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting results in a reduced capacity of the arterial smooth muscle of the hindquarter to develop tension. In addition, the alterations in arterial contractile responses caused by hindlimb unweighting in mice are similar as those in rats. Our work suggested that hindlimb unweighting mouse model may be used as a model for the study of postflight cardiovascular deconditioning.

  14. Metabolic control of muscle blood flow during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2003-01-01

    During muscle contraction, several mechanisms regulate blood flow to ensure a close coupling between muscle oxygen delivery and metabolic demand. No single factor has been identified to constitute the primary metabolic regulator, yet there are signal transduction pathways between skeletal muscle...

  15. Unilateral hindlimb casting induced a delayed generalized muscle atrophy during rehabilitation that is prevented by a whey or a high protein diet but not a free leucine-enriched diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues Magne

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is the general muscle mass and strength loss associated with ageing. Muscle atrophy could be made worse by exposure to acute periods of immobilization, because muscle disuse by itself is a stimulus for atrophy. Using a model of unilateral hindlimb casting in old adult rats, we have already demonstrated that the primary effect of immobilization was atrophy in the casted leg, but was also surprisingly associated with a retarded atrophy in the non-casted leg during rehabilitation. In search of mechanisms involved in this generalized atrophy, we demonstrated in the present study that contrary to pair-fed non-immobilized control animals, muscle protein synthesis in the non-immobilized limb was unable to adapt and to respond positively to food intake. Because pair-fed control rats did not lose muscle mass, this defect in muscle protein synthesis may represent one of the explanation for the muscle mass loss observed in the non-immobilized rats. Nevertheless, in order to stimulate protein turn over and generate a positive nitrogen balance required to maintain the whole muscle mass in immobilized rats, we tested a dietary free leucine supplementation (an amino acid known for its stimulatory effect on protein metabolism during the rehabilitation period. Leucine supplementation was able to overcome the anabolic resistance in the non-immobilized limb. A greater muscle protein synthesis up-regulation associated with a stimulation of the mTOR signalling pathway was indeed recorded but it remained inefficient to prevent the loss of muscle in the non-immobilized limb. By contrast, we demonstrated here that whey protein or high protein diets were able to prevent the muscle mass loss of the non-immobilized limb by sustaining muscle protein synthesis during the entire rehabilitation period.

  16. Muscle Tissue Saturation Compared With Muscle Tissue Perfusion During Low Blood Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Sisse Anette; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Olsen Alstrup, Aage Kristian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether changes in muscle tissue perfusion measured with positron emission tomography would be reflected by parallel changes in muscle tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) measured using near-infrared spectroscopy during high and low blood flow levels achieved using...... blood flow of either 47.5 or 35 mL/kg/min was applied for 1 hour followed by a blood flow of 60 mL/kg/min for an additional hour. Regional StO2 was measured continuously by placing a near-infrared spectroscopy electrode on the skin above the gracilis muscle of the noncannulated back leg. Muscle tissue...... systemic ischemia during low CPB blood flow. StO2 remained high until muscle tissue perfusion decreased to about 50%, after which StO2 paralleled the linear decrease in muscle tissue perfusion. CONCLUSION: In an experimental CPB animal model, StO2 was stable until muscle tissue perfusion was reduced...

  17. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Song

    Full Text Available During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group: (1 non-sensitized, (2 anaphylaxis, (3 anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS and (4 anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP, heart rate (HR, central venous pressure (CVP, FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats.

  18. The relationship between exercise-induced muscle fatigue, arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion after 56 days local muscle unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Beijer, Åsa; Herrera, Frankyn; Zange, Jochen; Degens, Hans; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    In the light of the dynamic nature of habitual plantar flexor activity, we utilized an incremental isokinetic exercise test (IIET) to assess the work-related power deficit (WoRPD) as a measure for exercise-induced muscle fatigue before and after prolonged calf muscle unloading and in relation to arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion. Eleven male subjects (31 ± 6 years) wore the HEPHAISTOS unloading orthosis unilaterally for 56 days. It allows habitual ambulation while greatly reducing plantar flexor activity and torque production. Endpoint measurements encompassed arterial blood flow, measured in the femoral artery using Doppler ultrasound, oxygenation of the soleus muscle assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy, lactate concentrations determined in capillary blood and muscle activity using soleus muscle surface electromyography. Furthermore, soleus muscle biopsies were taken to investigate morphological muscle changes. After the intervention, maximal isokinetic torque was reduced by 23·4 ± 8·2% (PBlood flow, tissue oxygenation, lactate concentrations and EMG median frequency kinematics during the exercise test were comparable before and after the intervention, whereas the increase of RMS in response to IIET was less following the intervention (P = 0·03). In conclusion, following submaximal isokinetic muscle work exercise-induced muscle fatigue is unaffected after prolonged local muscle unloading. The observation that arterial blood flow was maintained may underlie the unchanged fatigability.

  19. An Electrical Muscle Stimulation Suit for Increasing Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    being painful . The arterial blood pressure increases from baseline were reg- istered with noninvasive Portapres® equipment (FMS, Amsterdam, The...thighs and over the gluteal and abdominal muscles to create a positive and negative pole over the muscle areas. For better electrical contact... pain . Each subject was instructed to have the investigator lower the intensity or stop the stimulation if muscle contraction pain was experienced

  20. Vasodilator interactions in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Jensen, Lasse Gliemann;

    2012-01-01

    that this remaining hyperemia may be explained by cAMP and cGMP independent smooth muscle relaxation, such as effects of endothelial derived hyperpolarization factors (EDHFs) or through metabolic modulation of sympathetic effects. The nature and role of EDHF as well as potential novel mechanisms in muscle blood flow...

  1. Expiratory muscle loading increases intercostal muscle blood flow during leg exercise in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Andrianopoulos, Vasilis; Roussos, Charis; Zakynthinos, Spyros

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether expiratory muscle loading induced by the application of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) during exercise in healthy subjects causes a reduction in quadriceps muscle blood flow in favor of the blood flow to the intercostal muscles. We hypothesized that, during exercise with EFL quadriceps muscle blood flow would be reduced, whereas intercostal muscle blood flow would be increased compared with exercise without EFL. We initially performed an incremental exercise test on eight healthy male subjects with a Starling resistor in the expiratory line limiting expiratory flow to ∼ 1 l/s to determine peak EFL exercise workload. On a different day, two constant-load exercise trials were performed in a balanced ordering sequence, during which subjects exercised with or without EFL at peak EFL exercise workload for 6 min. Intercostal (probe over the 7th intercostal space) and vastus lateralis muscle blood flow index (BFI) was calculated by near-infrared spectroscopy using indocyanine green, whereas cardiac output (CO) was measured by an impedance cardiography technique. At exercise termination, CO and stroke volume were not significantly different during exercise, with or without EFL (CO: 16.5 vs. 15.2 l/min, stroke volume: 104 vs. 107 ml/beat). Quadriceps muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (5.4 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.043) lower compared with exercise without EFL (7.6 nM/s), whereas intercostal muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (3.5 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.021) greater compared with that recorded during control exercise (0.4 nM/s). In conclusion, increased respiratory muscle loading during exercise in healthy humans causes an increase in blood flow to the intercostal muscles and a concomitant decrease in quadriceps muscle blood flow. PMID:20507965

  2. Adipose derived stem cell transplantation is better than bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in treating hindlimb ischemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc Bich Vu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs and adipose derived MSCs (AD-MSCs are among the types of stem cells most commonly studied. Our study aims to compare the therapeutic efficacy of allograft AD-MSCs versus BM-MSCs in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. Methods: AD-MSCs were isolated from belly fat and BM-MSCs were isolated from femur bone marrow. They were used to treat mice with acute hindlimb ischemia. Treatment efficacy was compared among 4 groups: injected with BM-MSCs, injected with AD-MSCs, non-treated and injected with phosphate buffered saline. Mice in the groups were evaluated for the following: necrosis grade of leg, leg edema, blood flow, muscle cell restructure and new blood vessel formation. Results: Results showed that AD-MSC transplantation significantly recovered acute limb ischemia, with 76.5% of mice fully recovered, while the ratio was only 48.5% in BM-MSC transplanted group, and 0% in the non-treated and PBS groups. Evaluation of leg edema, blood flow, muscle cell restructure and new blood vessel formation also supported the observation that AD-MSC transplantation was superior over BM-MSC transplantation. Conclusion: Therefore, AD-MSCs may serve as the more suitable MSC for hindlimb ischemia treatment and angiogenesis therapy. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(9.000: 844-856

  3. Vascular smooth muscle progenitor cells: building and repairing blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majesky, Mark W; Dong, Xiu Rong; Regan, Jenna N; Hoglund, Virginia J

    2011-02-04

    Molecular pathways that control the specification, migration, and number of available smooth muscle progenitor cells play key roles in determining blood vessel size and structure, capacity for tissue repair, and progression of age-related disorders. Defects in these pathways produce malformations of developing blood vessels, depletion of smooth muscle progenitor cell pools for vessel wall maintenance and repair, and aberrant activation of alternative differentiation pathways in vascular disease. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that uniquely specify and maintain vascular smooth muscle cell precursors is essential if we are to use advances in stem and progenitor cell biology and somatic cell reprogramming for applications directed to the vessel wall.

  4. Effects of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated Fatty acids on the skeletal-muscle blood-flow response to exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Charles L; Hammel, Lauren E; Marshal, Benjamin J; Spangenberg, Espen E; Musch, Timothy I

    2010-12-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) affect vascular relaxation and involve factors (e.g., nitric oxide) that contribute to exercise-induced increases in skeletal-muscle blood flow (Q). The authors investigated whether DHA and EPA supplementation augments skeletal-muscle Q and vascular conductance (VC) and attenuates renal and splanchnic Q and VC in exercising rats. Rats were fed a diet of 5% lipids by weight, of which 20% was DHA and 30% EPA (PUFA group, n = 9), or 5% safflower oil (SO group, n = 8) for 6 wk. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (MAP), and hind-limb, renal, and splanchnic Q were measured at rest and during moderate treadmill running. MAP, HR, and renal and splanchnic Q and VC were similar between the 2 groups at rest and during exercise. In the PUFA group, Q (158 ± 27 vs. 128 ± 28 ml × min⁻¹ × 100 g⁻¹) and VC (1.16 ± 0.21 vs. 0.92 ± 0.23 ml × min⁻¹ × 100 g⁻¹ × mm Hg⁻¹) were greater in the exercising hind-limb muscle. Q and VC were also higher in 8 of 28 and 11 of 28 muscles and muscle parts, respectively. These increases were positively correlated to the percent sum of Types I and IIa fibers. Results suggest that DHA+EPA (a) enhances Q and VC in active skeletal muscle (especially Type I and IIa fibers) and that the increase in Q is due to an increase in cardiac output secondary to increases in VC and (b) has no apparent influence on vasoconstriction in renal and splanchnic tissue.

  5. Repeated blood flow restriction induces muscle fiber hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Mizuki; Ando, Soichi; Kano, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    We recently developed an animal model to investigate the effects of eccentric contraction (ECC) and blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscle tissue at the cellular level. This study clarified the effects of repeated BFR, ECC, and BFR combined with ECC (BFR+ECC) on muscle fiber hypertrophy. Male Wistar rats were assigned to 3 groups: BFR, ECC, and BFR+ECC. The contralateral leg in the BFR group served as a control (CONT). Muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of the tibialis anterior was determined after the respective treatments for 6 weeks. CSA was greater in the BFR+ECC group than in the CONT (P muscle fiber hypertrophy at the cellular level. Muscle Nerve 55: 274-276, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fiber-type-specific alphaB-crystallin distribution and its shifts with T(3) and PTU treatments in rat hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atomi, Y; Toro, K; Masuda, T; Hatta, H

    2000-04-01

    Changes in alphaB-crystallin content in adult rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were examined after 8 wk of 3,5, 3'-triiodothyronine (T(3)) and propylthiouracil (PTU) treatments. Cellular distributions of alphaB-crystallin expression related to fiber type, and distribution shifts with these treatments were also examined in detail from the gray level of reactivity to specific anti-alphaB-crystallin antibody. alphaB-crystallin content in both soleus and EDL muscles was significantly decreased after T(3), and that in EDL was significantly increased over twofold after PTU treatment. In both control soleus and EDL muscles, the gray level of type I fibers was higher than that of type II fibers. alphaB-crystallin expression among type II subtypes was muscle specific; the order was type I > IIa > IIx > IIb in control EDL muscle and type IIx > or = IIa in soleus muscle. The relation was basically unchanged in both muscles after T(3) treatment and was, in particular, well maintained in EDL muscle. Under hypothyroidism conditions with PTU, the mean alphaB-crystallin levels of type IIa and IIx fibers were significantly lower than levels under control conditions. Thus the relation between fiber type and the expression manner of stress protein alphaB-crystallin is muscle specific and also is well regulated under thyroid hormone, especially in fast EDL muscle.

  7. IMPAIRED ANGIOGENESIS FOLLOWING HIND-LIMB ISCHEMIA IN DIABETES MELLITUS MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-jun Li; Heng Guan; Surovi Hazarika; Chang-wei Liu; Brain H Annex

    2007-01-01

    To investigate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its signaling pathway spontaneous response in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) mice to surgery-induced hind-limb ischemia.Methods Sixty mice were randomly divided into two groups, one was fed with normal chow as control, and another was fed with high fat diet to induce T2DM. Fourteen weeks later, mice were surgically induced to hind-limb ischemia. Blood flow restoration was monitored with laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Tibialis anterior muscle was collected after 3 days of hind-limb ischemia. VEGF mRNA and protein expressions were analyzed using real-time PCR and ELISA; expressions of VEGF downstream signal molecules and receptors were analyzed using Western blotting and RTPCR, respectively.Results Perfusion recovery 10, 20, 30 days after ischemia was significantly attenuated in T2DM compared with control group ( P < 0.05 ). T2DM impaired VEGF signaling pathway although VEGF levels increased in T2DM group.After ischemia, T2DM group had a comparable increase in VEGF expression compared with control group, but still had an impaired VEGF signaling pathway.Conclusion VEGF signaling pathway is abnormal in T2DM mice, although VEGF had a response to the ischemic stimulation.

  8. Decreasing systolic blood pressure with isometric muscle training: a CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Espinoza Salinas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease or heart failure. One of the interventions for the management of this disorder is isometric muscle training on upper and lower limbs. PURPOSE To prove the validity and applicability of results regarding the effectiveness of isometric training in hypertensive subjects. We also attempt to answer the following question: what is the effectiveness of isometric muscle training on the decrease of systolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients? METHODS Critical appraisal of the systematic review and meta-analysis “Isometric exercise training for blood pressure management”. RESULTS Isometric training reduces systolic blood pressure in normotensive and medicated hypertensive subjects, with a standardized mean difference of 6.77 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: 7.93-5.62. CONCLUSION It is reasonable to recommend isometric muscle training with the aim of lowering systolic blood pressure, considering the impact of the results of the articles analyzed and the applicability of this type of training.

  9. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell could participate in angiogenesis in a mouse model of acute hindlimb ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Thi-Thanh Dao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs transplantation for the treatment of acute hindlimb ischemia is recently attracting the attention of many scientists. Identifying the role of donor cells in the host is a crucial factor for improving the efficiency of treatment. This study evaluated the injury repair role of xenogeneic adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC transplantation in acute hindlimb ischemia mouse model. Methods: Human ADSCs were transplanted into the limb of ischemic mouse. The survival rate of grafted cells and expression of human VEGF-R2 and CD31 positive cells were assessed in the mouse. In addition, the morphological and functional recovery of ischemic hindlimb was also assessed. Results: The results showed that one-day post cell transplantation, the survival percentage of grafted cells was 3.62% +/- 2.06% at the injection site and 15.71% +/- 12.29% around the injection site. The rate of VEGFR2-positive cells had highest expression at 4 days post transplantation, 5.46% +/- 2.13% at the injection site; 9.12% +/- 7.17% at the opposite of injection site, and 7.22% +/- 4.59% at the lateral gastrocnemius. The percentage of CD31 positive cells increased on day 4 at the injection site to 0.8% +/- 1.60%, and further increased on day 8 at the lateral gastrocnemius site and the opposite injection site to 1.56% +/- 0.44% and 1.17% +/- 1.69%, respectively. After 14 days, the cell presentation and the angiogenesis marker expression were decreased to zero, except for CD31 expression at the opposite of injection site (0.72% +/- 1.03%. Histological structure of the cell-injected muscle tissue remained stable as that of the normal muscle. New small blood vessels were found growing in hindlimb. On the other hand, approximately 66.67% of mice were fully recovered from ischemic hindlimb at grade 0 and I after cell injection. Conclusion: Thus, xenotransplantation of human ADSCs might play a significant role in the formation of new blood vessel and can

  10. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle blood flow during mental stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linde, B.; Hjemdahl, P.; Freyschuss, U.; Juhlin-Dannfelt, A.

    1989-01-01

    Mental stress (a modified Stroop color word conflict test (CWT)) increased adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF; 133Xe clearance) by 70% and reduced adipose tissue vascular resistance (ATR) by 25% in healthy male volunteers. The vasculatures of adipose tissue (abdomen as well as thigh), skeletal muscle of the calf (133Xe clearance), and the entire calf (venous occlusion plethysmography) responded similarly. Arterial epinephrine (Epi) and glycerol levels were approximately doubled by stress. Beta-Blockade by metoprolol (beta 1-selective) or propranolol (nonselective) attenuated CWT-induced tachycardia similarly. Metoprolol attenuated stress-induced vasodilation in the calf and tended to do so in adipose tissue. Propranolol abolished vasodilation in the calf and resulted in vasoconstriction during CWT in adipose tissue. Decreases in ATR, but not in skeletal muscle or calf vascular resistances, were correlated to increases in arterial plasma glycerol (r = -0.42, P less than 0.05), whereas decreases in skeletal muscle and calf vascular resistances, but not in ATR, were correlated to increases in arterial Epi levels (r = -0.69, P less than 0.01; and r = -0.43, P less than 0.05, respectively). The results suggest that mental stress increases nutritive blood flow in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle considerably, both through the elevation of perfusion pressure and via vasodilatation. Withdrawal of vasoconstrictor nerve activity, vascular beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation by circulating Epi, and metabolic mechanisms (in adipose tissue) may contribute to the vasodilatation.

  11. Reduced blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle in ageing humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Hellsten, Ylva

    2016-01-01

    consequences of ageing and physical inactivity can be challenging; yet, observations from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on the effects of physical activity have provided some insight. Physical activity has the potential to offset the age-related decline in blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle...... and the ability for functional sympatholysis; an attenuation of the vasoconstrictor effect of sympathetic nervous activity. These vascular adaptations with physical activity are likely to be an effect of improved nitric oxide and ATP signaling. Collectively, precise matching of blood flow and O2 delivery to meet...

  12. Extracellular Matrix Hydrogel Promotes Tissue Remodeling, Arteriogenesis, and Perfusion in a Rat Hindlimb Ischemia Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Ungerleider, BS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although surgical and endovascular revascularization can be performed in peripheral arterial disease (PAD, 40% of patients with critical limb ischemia do not have a revascularization option. This study examines the efficacy and mechanisms of action of acellular extracellular matrix-based hydrogels as a potential novel therapy for treating PAD. We tested the efficacy of using a tissue-specific injectable hydrogel derived from decellularized porcine skeletal muscle (SKM and compared this to a new human umbilical cord-derived matrix (hUC hydrogel, which could have greater potential for tissue regeneration because of the younger age of the tissue source. In a rodent hindlimb ischemia model, both hydrogels were injected 1-week post-surgery and perfusion was regularly monitored with laser speckle contrast analysis to 35 days post-injection. There were significant improvements in hindlimb tissue perfusion and perfusion kinetics with both biomaterials. Histologic analysis indicated that the injected hydrogels were biocompatible, and resulted in arteriogenesis, rather than angiogenesis, as well as improved recruitment of skeletal muscle progenitors. Skeletal muscle fiber morphology analysis indicated that the muscle treated with the tissue-specific SKM hydrogel more closely matched healthy tissue morphology. Whole transcriptome analysis indicated that the SKM hydrogel caused a shift in the inflammatory response, decreased cell death, and increased blood vessel and muscle development. These results show the efficacy of an injectable ECM hydrogel alone as a potential therapy for treating patients with PAD. Our results indicate that the SKM hydrogel improved functional outcomes through stimulation of arteriogenesis and muscle progenitor cell recruitment.

  13. Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Relieve Hindlimb Ischemia through Enhancing Angiogenesis in Tree Shrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunping Yin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hindlimb ischemia is still a clinical problem with high morbidity and mortality. Patients suffer from consequent rest pain, ulcers, cool limbs, and even amputation. Angiogenesis is a promising target for the treatment of ischemic limbs, providing extra blood for the ischemic region. In the present study, we investigated the role of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs in regulating angiogenesis and relieving hindlimb ischemia. UC-MSCs were isolated from the umbilical cord of tree shrews. Angiography results showed that UC-MSCs injection significantly promoted angiogenesis in tree shrews. Moreover, the ankle brachial index, transcutaneous oxygen pressure, blood perfusion, and capillary/muscle fiber ratio were all markedly increased by the application of UC-MSCs. In addition, the conditioned culture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells using medium collected from UC-MSCs showed higher expression of angiogenic markers and improved migration ability. In short, the isolated UC-MSCs notably contributed to restoring blood supply and alleviating the symptoms of limb ischemia through enhancing angiogenesis.

  14. Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Relieve Hindlimb Ischemia through Enhancing Angiogenesis in Tree Shrews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Cunping; Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Jian; Ruan, Guangping; Li, Zian; Pang, Rongqing; Pan, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    Hindlimb ischemia is still a clinical problem with high morbidity and mortality. Patients suffer from consequent rest pain, ulcers, cool limbs, and even amputation. Angiogenesis is a promising target for the treatment of ischemic limbs, providing extra blood for the ischemic region. In the present study, we investigated the role of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) in regulating angiogenesis and relieving hindlimb ischemia. UC-MSCs were isolated from the umbilical cord of tree shrews. Angiography results showed that UC-MSCs injection significantly promoted angiogenesis in tree shrews. Moreover, the ankle brachial index, transcutaneous oxygen pressure, blood perfusion, and capillary/muscle fiber ratio were all markedly increased by the application of UC-MSCs. In addition, the conditioned culture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells using medium collected from UC-MSCs showed higher expression of angiogenic markers and improved migration ability. In short, the isolated UC-MSCs notably contributed to restoring blood supply and alleviating the symptoms of limb ischemia through enhancing angiogenesis.

  15. Therapeutic angiogenesis induced by human hepatocyte growth factor gene in hindlimb ischemia of dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A preclinical study of treating peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAD) was performed by using a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene-expressing vector, plasmid pUDKH, in a dog model with complete ischemia of one hindlimb. After ligation of femoral artery of one hindlimb, pUDKH was transferred directly into the ischemic limb muscles. The angiogenic activity of the plasmid pUDKH was evaluated. On D 30 after injecting once of pUDKH at different doses into local muscles immediately after operation, the degree of augmentation of collateral vessel formation was significantly greater than that treated by blank vector. In addition, the blood flow rate of femoral artery in dogs treated with pUDKH was recovered on D 90, while the flow rate was only 1/5 to 1/3 in control dogs. The pulse amplitude of pUDKH-treated dogs was recovered on D 90, but it was hardly detectable in most of the control dogs. The side effects of intramuscular transfection of pUDKH were also investigated, and no significant positive change was found. It is suggested that angiogenesis induced by HGF gene has the potential for clinical use in the treatment of peripheral arterial diseases.

  16. Regulation of the skeletal muscle blood flow in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan; Saltin, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    In humans, skeletal muscle blood flow is regulated by an interaction between several locally formed vasodilators including nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins. In plasma, ATP is a potent vasodilator that stimulates the formation of NO and prostaglandins and very importantly can offset local...... sympathetic vasoconstriction. ATP is released into plasma from erythrocytes and endothelial cells and the plasma concentration increases in both the feeding artery and the vein draining the contracting skeletal muscle. Adenosine also stimulates the formation of NO and prostaglandins, but the plasma adenosine...... and endothelial cells. In the interstitium, both ATP and adenosine stimulate the formation of NO and prostaglandins, but ATP has also been suggested to induce vasoconstriction and stimulate afferent nerves that signal to increase sympathetic nerve activity. Adenosine has been shown to contribute to exercise...

  17. An electrical muscle stimulation suit for increasing blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balldin, Ulf; Annicelli, Lance; Gibbons, John; Kisner, James

    2008-09-01

    Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) is used to strengthen muscles in rehabilitation of patients and for training of athletes. Voluntary muscle straining and an inflated anti-G suit increase the arterial blood pressure (BP) and give a pilot G protection during increased +Gz. This study's aim was to measure whether BP also increases with EMS of lower body muscles. A suit with new cloth electrodes sewn into the garment was developed. There were 12 subjects who were tested in sitting position during 3 conditions with 10 consecutive periods of EMS, inflated anti-G suit (GS), or lower body muscle anti-G straining maneuvers (AGSM). BP was continuously measured noninvasively. The means of the baseline systolic BP, before each of the test conditions, were 127 +/- 16, 128 +/- 1, and 145 +/- 14 mmHg for GS, AGSM, and EMS, respectively. During inflation of the GS, execution of the AGSM, and EMS, mean systolic BP during the first 10 s was 143 +/- 15, 146 +/- 13, and 150 +/- 13 mmHg, respectively, with no statistical difference between the conditions. The corresponding mean resting heart rate before each test was 57-63 bpm for all conditions. During the test periods with GS, AGSM, and EMS, heart rate was 59 +/- 11, 79 +/- 16, and 61 +/- 15 bpm, respectively, with statistical differences (P < 0.001) between AGSM and the other two conditions. EMS created similar BP as GS and AGSM at 1 G and also had higher pre- and post-control values. Further studies are required to evaluate if this principle may be used for G protection of pilots.

  18. Influence of relative blood flow restriction pressure on muscle activation and muscle adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counts, Brittany R; Dankel, Scott J; Barnett, Brian E; Kim, Daeyeol; Mouser, J Grant; Allen, Kirsten M; Thiebaud, Robert S; Abe, Takashi; Bemben, Michael G; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic skeletal muscle response to differing levels of blood flow restriction (BFR) pressure. Fourteen participants completed elbow flexion exercise with pressures from 40% to 90% of arterial occlusion. Pre/post torque measurements and electromyographic (EMG) amplitude of each set were quantified for each condition. This was followed by a separate 8-week training study of the effect of high (90% arterial occlusion) and low (40% arterial occlusion) pressure on muscle size and function. For the acute study, decreases in torque were similar between pressures [-15.5 (5.9) Nm, P = 0.344]. For amplitude of the first 3 and last 3 reps there was a time effect. After training, increases in muscle size (10%), peak isotonic strength (18%), peak isokinetic torque (180°/s = 23%, 60°/s = 11%), and muscular endurance (62%) changed similarly between pressures. We suggest that higher relative pressures may not be necessary when exercising under BFR. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Exercise intensity and muscle hypertrophy in blood flow-restricted limbs and non-restricted muscles: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Fahs, Christopher A; Rossow, Lindy M; Thiebaud, Robert S; Bemben, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    Although evidence for high-intensity resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy has accumulated over the last several decades, the basic concept of the training can be traced back to ancient Greece: Milo of Croton lifted a bull-calf daily until it was fully grown, which would be known today as progressive overload. Now, in the 21st century, different types of training are being tested and studied, such as low-intensity exercise combined with arterial as well as venous blood flow restriction (BFR) to/from the working muscles. Because BFR training requires the use of a cuff that is placed at the proximal ends of the arms and/or legs, the BFR is only applicable to limb muscles. Consequently, most previous BFR training studies have focused on the physiological adaptations of BFR limb muscles. Muscle adaptations in non-BFR muscles of the hip and trunk are lesser known. Recent studies that have reported both limb and trunk muscle adaptations following BFR exercise training suggest that low-intensity (20-30% of 1RM) resistance training combined with BFR elicits muscle hypertrophy in both BFR limb and non-BFR muscles. However, the combination of leg muscle BFR with walk training elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the BFR leg muscles. In contrast to resistance exercise with BFR, the exercise intensity may be too low during BFR walk training to cause muscle hypertrophy in the non-BFR gluteus maximus and other trunk muscles. Other mechanisms including hypoxia, local and systemic growth factors and muscle cell swelling may also potentially affect the hypertrophic response of non-BFR muscles to BFR resistance exercise. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2012 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  20. Effects of hindlimb unloading on neuromuscular development of neonatal rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckstorf, B. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Bain, J. L.; Reiser, P. M.; Sedlak, F. R.; Wong-Riley, M. T.; Riley, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    We hypothesized that hindlimb suspension unloading of 8-day-old neonatal rats would disrupt the normal development of muscle fiber types and the motor innervation of the antigravity (weightbearing) soleus muscles but not extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. Five rats were suspended 4.5 h and returned 1.5 h to the dam for nursing on a 24 h cycle for 9 days. To control for isolation from the dam, the remaining five littermates were removed on the same schedule but not suspended. Another litter of 10 rats housed in the same room provided a vivarium control. Fibers were typed by myofibrillar ATPase histochemistry and immunostaining for embryonic, slow, fast IIA and fast IIB isomyosins. The percentage of multiple innervation and the complexity of singly-innervated motor terminal endings were assessed in silver/cholinesterase stained sections. Unique to the soleus, unloading accelerated production of fast IIA myosin, delayed expression of slow myosin and retarded increases in standardized muscle weight and fiber size. Loss of multiple innervation was not delayed. However, fewer than normal motor nerve endings achieved complexity. Suspended rats continued unloaded hindlimb movements. These findings suggest that motor neurons resolve multiple innervation through nerve impulse activity, whereas the postsynaptic element (muscle fiber) controls endplate size, which regulates motor terminal arborization. Unexpectedly, in the EDL of unloaded rats, transition from embryonic to fast myosin expression was retarded. Suspension-related foot drop, which stretches and chronically loads EDL, may have prevented fast fiber differentiation. These results demonstrate that neuromuscular development of both weightbearing and non-weightbearing muscles in rats is dependent upon and modulated by hindlimb loading.

  1. Acupuncture - effects on muscle blood flow and aspects of treatment in the clinicla context

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to elucidate and investigate psychophysiological aspects and effects of acupuncture and needle stimulation. Within this framework emphasis was directed toward the effects of needle stimulation (acupuncture) on muscle blood flow in the tibialis anterior and trapezius muscles in healthy subjects and patients suffering from chronic muscle pain. This study also included evaluation of a new application of photoplethysmography in noninvasive monitoring of muscle b...

  2. Peripheral vascular responses to heat stress after hindlimb suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looft-Wilson, Robin C.; Gisolfi, Carl V.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether hindlimb suspension (which simulates the effects of microgravity) results in impaired hemodynamic responses to heat stress or alterations in mesenteric small artery sympathetic nerve innervation. METHODS: Over 28 d, 16 male Sprague-Dawley rats were hindlimb-suspended, and 13 control rats were housed in the same type of cage. After the treatment, mean arterial pressure (MAP), colonic temperature (Tcol), and superior mesenteric and iliac artery resistances (using Doppler flowmetry) were measured during heat stress [exposure to 42 degrees C until the endpoint of 80 mm Hg blood pressure was reached (75 +/- 9 min); endpoint Tcore = 43.6 +/- 0.2] while rats were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital, 50 mg x kg(-1) BW). RESULTS: Hindlimb-suspended and control rats exhibited similar increases in Tcol, MAP, and superior mesenteric artery resistance, and similar decreases in iliac resistance during heat stress (endpoint was a fall in MAP below 80 mm Hg). Tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining indicated similar sympathetic nerve innervation in small mesenteric arteries from both groups. CONCLUSION: Hindlimb suspension does not alter the hemodynamic or thermoregulatory responses to heat stress in the anesthetized rat or mesenteric sympathetic nerve innervation, suggesting that this sympathetic pathway is intact.

  3. Relationship between muscle oxygenation by NIRS and blood lactate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Guodong [School of Physical Education, Jianghan University, Hubei Wuhan 430056 (China); Mao Zongzhen; Ye Yanjie; Lv Kunru, E-mail: xguodong@wipe.edu.cn [School of Health Sciences, Wuhan Institute of Physical Education, Hubei Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of muscle oxygenation in term of oxy-hemoglobin concentration change ({Delta}HbO{sub 2}) by NIRS and blood lactate (BLA) in local skeletal muscle and evaluate the capability of NIRS in the research of exercise physiology Twenty-three athlete in the national fin-swimming team took the increasing load training on the power bicycle while their {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and BLA were simultaneously recorded. The initial powers used in the training were set as 100 w for males and 40 w for females. During the experiment, the power kept constant for 3 min before each abrupt increment of 30 w until the limit of the athlete's capability. Statistical analysis and data visualization were performed. Following the increasing load training, {Delta}HbO{sub 2} step-likely increased in the phase of aerobic metabolism but linearly decreased in the phase of anaerobic metabolism. The variation tendency of BLA was the same as {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and the concurrency of crucial turning points between {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and BLA was revealed. This relationship between {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and BLA presented in the increasing load training suggested that {Delta}HbO{sub 2} might be capable for taking the place of the invasively measured parameter BLA. Considering that {Delta}HbO{sub 2} can be noninvasively measured by NIRS, {Delta}HbO{sub 2} has the potential in the evaluation of athletes' physiological function and training effect on the athletes and accordingly NIRS can be well used in this field.

  4. Vascular Function and Regulation of Blood Flow in Resting and Contracting Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin

    in the regulation of exercise hyperemia. Furthermore, blood flow to contracting leg skeletal muscles is reduced both in essential hypertension and with aging. The potential difference in vasoactive system(s) responsible for the reduction in blood flow in the two conditions is in agreement with the suggestion......The precise matching of blood flow, oxygen delivery and metabolism is essential as it ensures that any increase in muscle work is precisely matched by increases in oxygen delivery. Therefore, understanding the control mechanisms of skeletal muscle blood flow regulation is of great biological...... importance. The present work provides new insight in to vasodilator interactions important for exercise hyperemia and sheds light on mechanisms important for vascular function and regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow in essential hypertension (high blood pressure) and aging and identifies mechanisms...

  5. Influence of dehydration on locally mediated hindlimb vasodilation in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, R M; Proppe, D W

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies indicate that the heat stress-induced cutaneous vasodilation in baboons is attenuated during dehydration by mechanisms other than the well-known neurohumoral vasoconstrictor mechanisms. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether dehydration also attenuates locally mediated maximum hindlimb blood flow and vascular conductance in baboons. Five baboons were chronically instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and mean external iliac artery blood flow (MIBF). Hindlimb vasodilation was induced by occlusions of the external iliac artery for 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 min and by close-arterial injections of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (NP) in graded doses. These vasodilatory stimuli were applied in euhydrated and dehydrated states, the latter being produced by water deprivation for 64-68 h. Maximum MIBF and iliac vascular conductance (IVC) after arterial occlusion were reduced by 67-70% during dehydration. Also, maximum MIBF and IVC produced by ACh in the dehydrated state were 46-52% lower than in the euhydrated state. A similar reduction in the responses to NP occurred during dehydration. It is concluded that the maximum hindlimb blood flow and vascular conductance produced by local, nonneurohumoral mechanisms are attenuated in the baboon during dehydration.

  6. Effect of extraluminal ATP application on vascular tone and blood flow in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Al-Khazraji, Baraa K; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2013-01-01

    During skeletal muscle contractions, the concentration of ATP increases in muscle interstitial fluid as measured by microdialysis probes. This increase is associated with the magnitude of blood flow, suggesting that interstitial ATP may be important for contraction-induced vasodilation. However......, interstitial ATP has solely been described to induce vasoconstriction in skeletal muscle. To examine whether interstitial ATP induces vasodilation in skeletal muscle and to what extent this vasoactive effect is mediated by formation of nitric oxide (NO) and prostanoids, three different experimental models were...... studied. The rat gluteus maximus skeletal muscle model was used to study changes in local skeletal muscle hemodynamics. Superfused ATP at concentrations found during muscle contractions (1-10 µM) increased blood flow by up to 400%. In this model, the underlying mechanism was also examined by inhibition...

  7. The application of blood flow measurements to the study of aging muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, K K; Posner, J D

    1995-11-01

    Blood flow to skeletal muscle is a potentially important factor in the reduction of muscle function associated with aging (sarcopenia). The main influence of reduced blood flow capacity on muscle function is in limiting oxidative metabolism. Direct measures of blood flow include: intravital-microscopy, plethysmography, radioactive microspheres, 133Xenon washout, thermodilution, and Doppler ultrasound. Indirect measurement of blood flow includes arm-to-ankle pressure index and the rate of phosphocreatine recovery after exercise. Several new methodologies have been developed to evaluate muscle blood flow, including color-Doppler imaging, magnetic resonance imaging/angiography (MRI/MRA), and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). As adaptations of traditional techniques, these methods promise more precise information under less invasive conditions. MRI is an expensive and technically challenging method able to measure vessel location, blood flow, and wall diameter in blood vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. Color-Doppler provides excellent temporal resolution blood flow throughout the cardiac cycle, along with some anatomical information. NIRS is an inexpensive and portable technology that can measure changes in oxygen saturation and provide information on tissue oxygen delivery in studies of frailer and more difficult-to-study subjects. Muscle blood flow is not thought to limit oxidative metabolism under normal conditions in young individuals. However, it is not clear what happens to muscle blood flow in healthy older individuals. Reduced capillary density, less maximal blood flow, and a slower hyperemic flow response have been reported in some, but not all, studies. Further studies with the newer methodologies are needed to re-examine age-related changes in muscle blood flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, R; Langberg, Henning; Green, Stefan Mathias;

    2000-01-01

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise......, and (2) whether blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism. 2. Seven individuals performed dynamic plantar flexion from 1 to 9 W. Radial artery and popliteal venous blood were sampled for O2, peritendinous blood flow was determined by 133Xe-washout, calf blood flow by plethysmography, cardiac output...... by dye dilution, arterial pressure by an arterial catheter-transducer, and muscle and peritendinous O2 saturation by spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). 3. Calf blood flow rose 20-fold with exercise, reaching 44 +/- 7 ml (100 g)-1 min-1 (mean +/- s.e.m. ) at 9 W, while Achilles' peritendinous flow...

  9. Caveolin-1, caveolin-3 and VEGF expression in the masticatory muscles of mdx mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Spassov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and murine X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx, its murine model, are characterized by muscle damage and muscle weakness associated with inflammation and new vessel formation. Caveolins, dystrophin-associated proteins, are involved in the pathogenesis of DMD, because increased numbers of caveolae are found in DMD and mdx hindlimb muscles. Caveolae influence angiogenesis due to their content of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors. Orofacial muscles in mdx mice undergo muscle necrosis followed by muscle regeneration. To ascertain the role of caveolins and VEGF in the pathogenesis of dystrophic masticatory muscles, we examined the expression of caveolin-1 (cav-1, caveolin-3 (cav-3 and VEGF in control and mdx mice. In mdx masticatory muscles, no changes in transcript and protein levels of VEGF were found, whereas cav-1 and cav-3 expression was increased. Using immunohistochemistry, a strong sarcolemmal staining of caveolin-3 in regenerated muscle fibers was found. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry with the caveolin-1 antibody showed an increase in the amount of blood vessels in areas with regenerating muscle fibers. Dystrophic masticatory muscles showed changes comparable to those of hindlimb muscles in the expression of cav-1 and cav-3. The angiogenesis seems to be unaffected in the jaw muscles of mdx mice. We speculate that the increased caveolin expression could cause extensive and efficient muscle regeneration. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 291–298

  10. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, H; Green, Sara Marie Ehrenreich

    2000-01-01

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise...... with a rise in leg vascular conductance and microvascular haemoglobin volume, despite elevated systemic vascular resistance. 4. The parallel rise in calf muscle and peritendinous blood flow and fall in O2 saturation during exercise indicate that blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism in both tissue...... by dye dilution, arterial pressure by an arterial catheter-transducer, and muscle and peritendinous O2 saturation by spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). 3. Calf blood flow rose 20-fold with exercise, reaching 44 +/- 7 ml (100 g)-1 min-1 (mean +/- s.e.m. ) at 9 W, while Achilles' peritendinous flow...

  11. Increased serotonergic innervation of lumbosacral motoneurons of rolling mouse Nagoya in correlation with abnormal hindlimb extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Y; Sawada, K; Sakata-Haga, H; Jeong, Y-G; Fukui, Y

    2006-12-01

    Rolling Mouse Nagoya (RMN) carries a mutation in a gene encoding for alpha(1A) subunit of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel (Ca(v)2.1). In addition to ataxia, this mutant mouse exhibits abnormal hindlimb extension, which is characterized by a sustained excessive tone of hindlimb extensor muscles. This study aimed to clarify whether serotonergic (5-HTergic) innervation of the spinal motoneurons was altered in RMN in relation to the abnormal hindlimb extension. The density of 5-HT immunoreactive fibres in the ventral horn of lumbar and sacral regions of spinal cord was significantly greater in RMN than in controls. Retrograde wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) labelling combined with 5-HT immunostaining revealed that the number of 5-HT immunoreactive terminals adjoining femoris quadriceps motoneurons was about 2.5-fold greater in RMN than in controls. Furthermore, 5-HT immunostaining in the lumbar cord ventral horn was examined in three other Ca(v)2.1 mutant mice (tottering, leaner and pogo) as to whether or not they showed the abnormal hindlimb extension. Among these mutants, the increased density of 5-HT immunoreactive fibres was observed in correlation with the presence of the abnormal hindlimb extension. The results suggest an increased 5-HTergic innervation of the lumbosacral motoneurons in correlation with the abnormal hindlimb extension in RMN and other Ca(v)2.1 mutant mice. As 5-HT is known to induce the sustained membrane depolarizations without continuous excitatory synaptic inputs (plateau potentials) in spinal motoneurons, the increased 5-HTergic innervation may cause the sustained excitation of hindlimb extensor motoneurons, resulting in the abnormal hindlimb extension.

  12. Increased blood pressure can reduce fatigue of thenar muscles paralyzed after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, JE; Ribot-Ciscar, E; Zijdewind, Inge; Thomas, CK

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether increases in blood pressure, and presumably muscle perfusion pressure, improve the endurance of thenar muscles paralyzed chronically by cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Resting mean arterial pressure (MAP) was low in all eight subjects (64 +/- 2 mmHg).

  13. High-energy proton irradiation of C57Bl6 mice under hindlimb unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Marc; Todd, Paul; Orschell, Christie; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Farr, Jonathan; Klein, Susan; Sokol, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) pose substantial risk for crewmembers on deep space missions. It has been shown that low gravity and ionizing radiation both produce transient anemia and immunodeficiencies. We utilized the C57Bl/6 based hindlimb suspension model to investigate the consequences of hindlimb-unloading induced immune suppression on the sensitivity to whole body irradiation with modulated 208 MeV protons. Eight-week old C57Bl/6 female mice were conditioned by hindlimb-unloading. Serial CBC and hematocrit assays by HEMAVET were accumulated for the hindlimb-unloaded mice and parallel control animals subjected to identical conditions without unloading. One week of hindlimb-unloading resulted in a persistent, statistically significant 10% reduction in RBC count and a persistent, statistically significant 35% drop in lymphocyte count. This inhibition is consistent with published observations of low Earth orbit flown mice and with crewmember blood analyses. In our experiments the cell count suppression was sustained for the entire six-week period of observation and persisted for at least 7 days beyond the period of active hindlimb-unloading. C57Bl/6 mice were also irradiated with 208 MeV Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) protons at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. We found that at 8.5 Gy hindlimb-unloaded mice were significantly more radiation sensitive with 35 lethalities out of 51 mice versus 15 out of 45 control (non-suspended) mice within 30 days of receiving 8.5 Gy of SOBP protons (p =0.001). Both control and hindlimb-unloaded stocktickerCBC analyses of 8.5 Gy proton irradiated and control mice by HEMAVET demonstrated severe reductions in WBC counts (Lymphocytes and PMNs) by day 2 post-irradiation, followed a week to ten days later by reductions in platelets, and then reductions in RBCs about 2 weeks post-irradiation. Recovery of all blood components commenced by three weeks post-irradiation. CBC analyses of 8

  14. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (\\Vdot O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and \\Vdot O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (r\\Vdot O2). The rBF and r\\Vdot O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and \\Vdot O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology.

  15. DNA and RNA analysis of blood and muscle from bodies with variable postmortem intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob; Lesnikova, Iana; Funder, Anette Mariane Daa

    2014-01-01

    ranging from one to more than 14 days. It was not possible to collect blood from 38 % of the autopsy cases due to severe coagulation and hemolysis, whereas muscle tissue was available for all cases. PCR-amplifiable DNA could be extracted from 96 % of the frozen muscle specimens and from 93......The breakdown of DNA and RNA in decomposing human tissue represents a major obstacle for postmortem forensic molecular analysis. This study investigated the feasibility of performing PCR-based molecular analysis of blood and muscle tissue from 45 autopsy cases with defined postmortem intervals......) DNA fragments from all samples with postmortem intervals below 3 days whereas 400-600 bp long fragments typically could be amplified from the most decomposed muscle specimens. RNA was less stable than DNA in postmortem muscle tissue, yet selected mRNA molecules could be detected by reverse...

  16. Does blood flow restriction result in skeletal muscle damage? A critical review of available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Abe, T

    2014-12-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) alone or in combination with exercise has been shown to result in muscle hypertrophy and strength gain across a variety of populations. Although there are numerous studies in the literature showing beneficial muscular effects following the application of BFR, questions have been raised over whether BFR may lead to or even increase the incidence of muscle damage. The purpose of this review is to examine the proposed mechanisms behind muscle damage and critically review the available BFR literature. The available evidence does not support the hypothesis that BFR in combination with low-intensity exercise increases the incidence of muscle damage. Instead, the available literature suggests that minimal to no muscle damage is occurring with this type of exercise. This conclusion is drawn from the following observations: (a) no prolonged decrements in muscle function; (b) no prolonged muscle swelling; (c) muscle soreness ratings similar to a submaximal low load control; and (d) no elevation in blood biomarkers of muscle damage.

  17. Blood flow response to electrically induced twitch and tetanic lower-limb muscle contractions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, T.W.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of electric stimulation (ES)-induced twitch with tetanic leg muscle contractions on blood flow responses and to assess blood flow responses in the contralateral inactive leg. DESIGN: Intervention with within-subject comparisons. SETTING: University research laborato

  18. Effects of High-Intensity Blood Flow Restriction Exercise on Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Gabriel R.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Strength training combined with blood flow restriction (BFR have been used to improve the levels of muscle adaptation. The aim of this paper was to investigate the acute effect of high intensity squats with and without blood flow restriction on muscular fatigue levels. Twelve athletes (aged 25.95 ± 0.84 years were randomized into two groups: without Blood Flow Restriction (NFR, n = 6 and With Blood Flow Restriction (WFR, n = 6 that performed a series of free weight squats with 80% 1-RM until concentric failure. The strength of the quadriceps extensors was assessed in a maximum voluntary isometric contraction integrated to signals from the surface electromyogram. The average frequency showed significant reductions in the WFR group for the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles, and intergroup only for the vastus medialis. In conclusion, a set of squats at high intensity with BFR could compromise muscle strength immediately after exercise, however, differences were not significant between groups.

  19. An experimental study and mathematical simulation of adrenergic control of hindlimb vessels in rats after 3-week tail suspension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodionov, Ivan M; Timin, Eugeny N; Matchkov, Vladimir

    1999-01-01

    Adrenoreactivity of rat hindlimb vessels was studied in experiments with constant-pressure saline perfusion. An original mathematical model was applied to evaluate the mechanism of changes in vascular tone regulation. A 3-week suspension resulted in decreased responses to sympathetic nerve...... stimulation, as well as to exogenous noradrenaline, the latter effect being registered when the pressure level was close to normal. Mathematical simulation indicated that long-term suspension induces both structural and functional changes in the vascular bed of the hind limbs, one of which is a disorder...... in the myogenic mechanisms of vascular tone regulation. In suspended rats, suppression of the myogenic response can be one of the reasons for decreased vessel reactivity to constrictor stimuli and, consequently, for disturbances in blood flow regulation in skeletal muscles of the hind limbs....

  20. Skin and muscle components of forearm blood flow in directly heated resting man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detry, J.-M. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Rowell, L. B.; Wyss, C.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in forearm muscle blood flow (FMBF) during direct whole-body heating were measured in 17 normal subjects using three different methods. We conclude that FMBF is not increased by direct whole-body heating. Since renal and splanchnic blood flow fall 30% under these conditions, maximal total skin blood flow in 12 previously studied subjects can be estimated from the rise in cardiac output to be 7.6 L/min (3.0-11.1 L/min).

  1. Functional anatomy of the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Penny E; Corr, Sandra A; Payne-Davis, Rachel C; Clancy, Sinead N; Lane, Emily; Wilson, Alan M

    2011-04-01

    The cheetah is capable of a top speed of 29 ms(-1) compared to the maximum speed of 17 ms(-1) achieved by the racing greyhound. In this study of the hindlimb and in the accompanying paper on the forelimb we have quantified the musculoskeletal anatomy of the cheetah and greyhound and compared them to identify any differences that may account for this variation in their locomotor abilities. Specifically, bone length, mass and mid-shaft diameter were measured, along with muscle mass, fascicle lengths, pennation angles and moment arms to enable estimates of maximal isometric force, joint torques and joint rotational velocities to be calculated. Surprisingly the cheetahs had a smaller volume of hip extensor musculature than the greyhounds, and we therefore propose that the cheetah powers acceleration using its extensive back musculature. The cheetahs also had an extremely powerful psoas muscle which could help to resist the pitching moments around the hip associated with fast accelerations. The hindlimb bones were proportionally longer and heavier, enabling the cheetah to take longer strides and potentially resist higher peak limb forces. The cheetah therefore possesses several unique adaptations for high-speed locomotion and fast accelerations, when compared to the racing greyhound. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2010 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  2. The hindlimb myology of Milvago chimango (Polyborinae, Falconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosto, María Clelia; Carril, Julieta; Picasso, Mariana Beatriz Julieta

    2013-10-01

    We describe the hindlimb myology of Milvago chimango. This member of the Falconidae: Polyborinae is a generalist and opportunist that can jump and run down prey on the ground, unlike Falconinae that hunt birds in flight and kill them by striking with its talons. Due to differences in the locomotion habits between the subfamilies, we hypothesized differences in their hindlimb myology. Gross dissections showed that the myology of M. chimango is concordant with that described of other falconids, except for the following differences: the m. flexor cruris medialis has one belly with a longitudinal division; the m. iliotibialis lateralis does not have a connection with the m. iliofibularis; the m. fibularis longus is strongly aponeurotic; the m. tibialis cranialis lacks an accessory tendons and the m. flexor hallucis longus has one place of origin, instead of two. The presence of the m. flexor cruris lateralis can be distinguished as it has been described absent for the Falconidae. We associated its presence with the predominant terrestrial habit of the M. chimango. Each muscle dissected was weighed and the relationship between flexors and extensors at each joint was assessed. The extensor muscles predominated in all joints in M. chimango. Among the flexors, the m. flexor hallucis longus was the heaviest, which could be related to the importance of the use of its talons to obtain food.

  3. Evaluation of sedentary women’s ambulatory blood pressure and its relation to muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramires Alsamir Tibana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the ambulatory blood pressure in women with different values of relative muscle strength. Methods: Data from 21 (aged 33.8±8.0 years sedentary women from Vila Telebrasília was collected during the period of November 2010 to July 2011. The volunteers were submitted to the evaluation of the handgrip strength and ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (AMBP for a 72-hour period. Following the evaluation of handgrip strength to determine the absolute muscle strength, an adjustment in the body mass was made, in order to determine the relative muscle strength. Based on the relative value of muscular strength, the sample was divided into tertiles to compare systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure during the periods of 24 hours, daytime and night-time, by using an one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni test when appropriate, with a significance level of p<0.05. Results: Significant differences were found for systolic blood pressure between tertile 1 (99.3±12.2 and tertile 3 (106.8±11.1 in the night-time (P<0.05. Values of mean blood pressure were also significantly different between tertile 1 (70.2±6.3 and tertile 3 (80.3 ± 8.8 in the night-time (p<0,05. Conclusion: Women with higher relative muscle strength present lower values of blood pressure during night-time

  4. Blood flow measurement of human skeletal muscle during various exercise intensity using diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yuya; Ono, Yumie; Ichinose, Masashi

    2017-02-01

    We studied blood flow dynamics of active skeletal muscle using diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), an emerging optical modality that is suitable for noninvasive quantification of microcirculation level in deep tissue. Seven healthy subjects conducted 0.5 Hz dynamic handgrip exercise for 3 minutes at intensities of 10, 20, 30, and 50 % of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). DCS could detect the time-dependent increase of the blood flow response of the forearm muscle for continuous exercises, and the increase ratios of the mean blood flow through the exercise periods showed good correlation with the exercise intensities. We also compared blood flow responses detected from DCS with two different photon sampling rates and found that an appropriate photon sampling rates should be selected to follow the wide-ranged increase in the muscle blood flow with dynamic exercise. Our results demonstrate the possibility for utilizing DCS in a field of sports medicine to noninvasively evaluate the dynamics of blood flow in the active muscles.

  5. Modification of a Rodent Hindlimb Model of Secondary Lymphedema: Surgical Radicality versus Radiotherapeutic Ablation

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    Hyung Sub Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary lymphedema is an intractable disease mainly caused by damage of the lymphatic system during surgery, yet studies are limited by the lack of suitable animal models. The purpose of this study was to create an improved model of secondary lymphedema in the hindlimbs of rodents with sustained effects and able to mimic human lymphedema. This was achieved by combining previously reported surgical methods and radiation to induce chronic lymphedema. Despite more radical surgical destruction of superficial and deep lymphatic vessels, surgery alone was not enough to sustain increased hindlimb volume. Radiotherapy was necessary to prolong these effects, with decreased lymphatic flow on lymphoscintigraphy, but hindlimb necrosis occurred after 4 weeks due to radiation toxicity. The applicability of this model for studies of therapeutic lymphangiogenesis was subsequently tested by injecting muscle-derived stem cells previously cocultured with the supernatant of human lymphatic endothelial cells in vitro. There was a tendency for increased lymphatic flow which significantly increased lymphatic vessel formation after cell injection, but attenuation of hindlimb volume was not observed. These results suggest that further refinement of the rodent hindlimb model is needed by titration of adequate radiation dosage, while stem cell lymphangiogenesis seems to be a promising approach.

  6. Nitric oxide and prostaglandins influence local skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise in humans: coupling between local substrate uptake and blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Langberg, Henning; Ryberg, Ann Kathrine;

    2006-01-01

    skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle blood flow was measured in seven healthy young men using near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green and muscle glucose uptake using positron emission tomography and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-[(18)F]glucose without and with local blockade of NO and PG at rest and during one-legged...... dynamic knee-extension exercise. Local blockade was produced by infusing nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and indomethacin directly in the muscle via a microdialysis catheter. Blood flow and glucose uptake were measured in the region of blockade and in two additional regions of vastus lateralis muscle 1......Synergic action of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG) in the regulation of muscle blood flow during exercise has been demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated whether these vasodilators also regulate local blood flow, flow heterogeneity, and glucose uptake within the exercising...

  7. New, puzzling insights from comparative myological studies on the old and unsolved forelimb/hindlimb enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Rui; Linde-Medina, Marta; Abdala, Virginia; Ashley-Ross, Miriam A

    2013-02-01

    Most textbooks and research reports state that the structures of the tetrapod forelimbs and hindlimbs are serial homologues. From this view, the main challenge of evolutionary biologists is not to explain the similarity between tetrapod limbs, but instead to explain why and how they have diverged. However, these statements seem to be related to a confusion between the serial homology of the vertebrate pelvic and pectoral appendages as a whole, and the serial homology of the specific soft- and hard-tissue structures of the tetrapod forelimbs and hindlimbs, leading to an even more crucial and puzzling question being overlooked: why are the skeletal and particularly the muscle structures of the forelimb and hindlimb actually so strikingly similar to each other? Herein we provide an updated discussion of these questions and test two main hypotheses: (i) that the similarity of the limb muscles is due to serial homology; and (ii) that tetrapods that use hindlimbs for a largely exclusive function (e.g. bipedalism in humans) exhibit fewer cases of similarity between forelimbs and hindlimbs than do quadrupedal species. Our review shows that of the 23 arm, forearm and hand muscles/muscle groups of salamanders, 18 (78%) have clear 'topological equivalents' in the hindlimb; in lizards, 14/24 (58%); in rats, 14/35 (40%); and in modern humans, 19/37 (51%). These numbers seem to support the idea that there is a plesiomorphic similarity and subsequent evolutionary divergence, but this tendency actually only applies to the three former quadrupedal taxa. Moreover, if one takes into account the total number of 'correspondences', one comes to a surprising and puzzling conclusion: in modern humans the number of forelimb muscles/muscle groups with clear 'equivalents' in the hindlimb (19) is substantially higher than in quadrupedal mammals such as rats (14), lizards (14) and even salamanders (18). These data contradict the hypothesis that divergent functions lead to divergent

  8. Influence of muscle length on muscle atrophy in the mouse tibialis anterior and soleus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naoto; Fujimoto, Taro; Tasaki, Hiromitsu; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Matsubara, Takako; Miki, Akinori

    2009-02-01

    The tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were fixed at the stretched or shortened positions to examine the influence of muscle length on muscle atrophy. Mice were divided into control (C), hindlimb suspension (HS), hindlimb suspension with ankle joint fixation at the maximum dorsiflexion (HSD), and hindlimb suspension with ankle joint fixation at the maximum plantarflexion (HSP). During the hindlimb suspension, the length of these muscles in the HS and HSP groups was very similar. Fourteen days after the hindlimb suspension, the atrophy of the tibialis anterior muscle in the HS and HSP groups was evidently milder than that in the HSD group, and that in the HS and HSP groups was very similar, suggesting that atrophy of the tibialis anterior muscle might largely depend on muscle length. Atrophy of the soleus muscle in the HSD group was milder than that in the HS and HSP groups, indicating that atrophy of the soleus muscle might also depend on muscle length. But atrophy of this muscle in the HSP group was milder than that in the HS group. These results demonstrate that some factors induced by the joint immobilization might be effective in preventing atrophy of the soleus muscle.

  9. Muscle and Blood Metabolites during a Soccer Game: Implications for Sprint Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni; Steensberg, Adam

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose: To examine muscle and blood metabolites during soccer match play and relate it to possible changes in sprint performance. Methods: Thirty-one Danish fourth division players took part in three friendly games. Blood samples were collected frequently during the game, and muscle...... biopsies were taken before and after the game as well as immediately after an intense period in each half. The players performed five 30-m sprints interspersed by 25-s recovery periods before the game and immediately after each half (N = 11) or after an intense exercise period in each half (N = 20...

  10. Respiratory muscle blood flow during exercise: effects of sex and ovarian cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Hageman, K Sue; Harms, Craig A; Poole, David C; Musch, Timothy I

    2017-01-26

    Sex and ovarian cycle have been speculated to modify respiratory muscle(s) blood flow control during exercise, but the findings are inconclusive. We tested the hypotheses that females would have higher respiratory muscle blood flow and vascular conductance (VC) compared to males during exercise and that this difference would be accentuated in proestrus versus ovariectomized (OVA) females. Mean arterial pressure (carotid artery catheter) and respiratory muscle blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres) were measured during moderate-intensity (24m/min, 10% grade) exercise in male (n=9), female (n=9), and OVA female (n=7) rats and near-maximal (60m/min, 5% grade) exercise in male (n=5) and female (n=7) rats. At rest, diaphragm, intercostal, and transversus abdominis blood flow were not different (p=0.33) among groups. During moderate-intensity exercise, diaphragm (M: 124±16; F: 140±14; OVA: 140±20mL/min/100g), intercostal (M: 33±5; F: 34±5; OVA: 30±5mL/min/100g), and transversus abdominis blood flow (M: 24±4; F: 35±7; OVA: 35±9mL/min/100g) significantly increased in all groups compared to rest, but were not different (p=0.12) among groups. From rest to moderate-intensity exercise, diaphragm (p0.13) existed in VC among groups. During near-maximal exercise, diaphragm (M: 304±62; F: 283±17mL/min/100g), intercostal (M: 29±8; F: 40±6mL/min/100g), and transversus abdominis (M: 85±14; F: 86±9mL/min/100g) blood flow and VC were not different (p>0.27) between males and females. These data demonstrate that respiratory muscle blood flow and vascular conductance at rest and during exercise are not affected by sex or ovarian cycle in rats.

  11. Gene networks in skeletal muscle following endurance exercise are co-expressed in blood neutrophils and linked with blood inflammation markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, James A; Sampson, Dayle; Sabapathy, Surendran; Haseler, Luke J; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Bulmer, Andrew Cameron; Peake, Jonathan M; Neubauer, Oliver

    2017-01-19

    It remains incompletely understood whether there is an association between the transcriptome profiles of skeletal muscle and blood leukocytes in response to exercise or other physiological stressors. We have previously analyzed the changes in the muscle and blood neutrophil transcriptome in eight trained men before and 3 h, 48 h and 96 h after 2 h cycling and running. Because we collected muscle and blood in the same individuals and under the same conditions, we were able to directly compare gene expression between the muscle and blood neutrophils. Applying weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) as an advanced network-driven method to these original datasets enabled us to compare the muscle and neutrophil transcriptomes in a rigorous and systematic manner. Two gene networks were identified that were preserved between skeletal muscle and blood neutrophils, functionally related to mitochondria and post-translational processes. Strong preservation measures (Zsummary > 10) for both muscle-neutrophil gene networks were evident within the post-exercise recovery period. Muscle and neutrophil gene co-expression was strongly correlated in the mitochondria-related network (r = 0.97; p = 3.17E-2). We also identified multiple correlations between muscular gene sub-networks and exercise-induced changes in blood leukocyte counts, inflammation and muscle damage markers. These data reveal previously unidentified gene co-expression between skeletal muscle and blood neutrophils following exercise, showing the value of WGCNA to understand exercise physiology. Furthermore, these findings provide preliminary evidence in support of the notion that blood neutrophil gene networks may potentially help us to track physiological and pathophysiological changes in the muscle.

  12. Effects of acupuncture on skin and muscle blood flow in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Margareta; Lundeberg, Thomas; Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Gerdle, Björn

    2003-09-01

    In 14 healthy female subjects, the effects of needle stimulation (acupuncture) on skin and muscle blood flow were investigated using a non-invasive custom-designed probe and photoplethysmography (PPG). In randomised order, 2-7 days apart, three modes of needle stimulation were performed on the anterior aspect of the tibia: superficial insertion (SF), insertion into the anterior tibial muscle (Mu), and insertion into the muscle including manipulation of the needle in order to elicit a distinct sensation of distension, heaviness or numbness (DeQi). Before intervention, the subjects rested for 30 min. After the intervention, the needle was left in situ for 20 min. Blood flow recordings were performed intermittently from 10 min prior to the intervention to the end of the trial. In a fourth session, serving as control, corresponding measurements were performed without any needle stimulation. Area under curve was calculated for 5-min periods prior to and after stimulation, respectively, and for the remaining 15-min period after stimulation. Compared to the control situation, muscle blood flow increased following both Mu and DeQi for 20 min, with the latter being more pronounced for the initial 5 min. Skin blood flow increased for 5 min following DeQi. However, no increase was found following SF. The DeQi stimulation was preceded by higher visual analogue scale ratings of anxiety prior to stimulation, which might have influenced skin blood flow to some extent. The results indicate that the intensity of the needling is of importance, the DeQi stimulation resulting in the most pronounced increase in both skin and muscle blood flow.

  13. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee...

  14. Blood vessels and desmin control the positioning of nuclei in skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Lu, Z; Biscocho, N

    2006-01-01

    . Here we show that the nuclei are preferentially localized near blood vessels (BV), particularly in slow-twitch, oxidative fibers. Thus, in rat soleus muscle fibers, 81% of the nuclei appear next to BV. Lack of desmin markedly perturbs the distribution of nuclei along the fibers but does not prevent...

  15. Magnesium enhances exercise performance via increasing glucose availability in the blood, muscle, and brain during exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Ying Chen

    Full Text Available Glucose mobilization and utilization in the periphery and central nervous system are important during exercise and are responsible for exercise efficacy. Magnesium (Mg is involved in energy production and plays a role in exercise performance. This study aimed to explore the effects of Mg on the dynamic changes in glucose and lactate levels in the muscle, blood and brain of exercising rats using a combination of auto-blood sampling and microdialysis. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with saline or magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, 90 mg/kg, i.p. 30 min before treadmill exercise (20 m/min for 60 min. Our results indicated that the muscle, blood, and brain glucose levels immediately increased during exercise, and then gradually decreased to near basal levels in the recovery periods of both groups. These glucose levels were significantly enhanced to approximately two-fold (P<0.05 in the Mg group. Lactate levels in the muscle, blood, and brain rapidly and significantly increased in both groups during exercise, and brain lactate levels in the Mg group further elevated (P<0.05 than those in the control group during exercise. Lactate levels significantly decreased after exercise in both groups. In conclusion, Mg enhanced glucose availability in the peripheral and central systems, and increased lactate clearance in the muscle during exercise.

  16. Low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5 minute one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24+/-1 (+/-S.D.) W) without (CON) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of i...

  17. Combined inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins reduces human skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, Henning; Gemmer, Carsten;

    2002-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is an important mediator of tissue vasodilatation, yet the role of the specific substances, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG), in mediating the large increases in muscle perfusion during exercise in humans is unclear. Quadriceps microvascular blood flow was quanti...

  18. Reducing body fat with altitude hypoxia training in swimmers: role of blood perfusion to skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Michael; Liao, Chin-An; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Wen-Chih; Hou, Chien-Wen; Yu, Szu-Hsien; Harris, M Brennan; Hsu, Tung-Shiung; Lee, Shin-Da; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2013-02-28

    Swimmers tend to have greater body fat than athletes from other sports. The purpose of the study was to examine changes in body composition after altitude hypoxia exposure and the role of blood distribution to the skeletal muscle in swimmers. With a constant training volume of 12.3 km/day, young male swimmers (N = 10, 14.8 ± 0.5 years) moved from sea-level to a higher altitude of 2,300 meters. Body composition was measured before and after translocation to altitude using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) along with 8 control male subjects who resided at sea level for the same period of time. To determine the effects of hypoxia on muscle blood perfusion, total hemoglobin concentration (THC) was traced by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in the triceps and quadriceps muscles under glucose-ingested and insulin-secreted conditions during hypoxia exposure (16% O2) after training. While no change in body composition was found in the control group, subjects who trained at altitude had unequivocally decreased fat mass (-1.7 ± 0.3 kg, -11.4%) with increased lean mass (+0.8 ± 0.2 kg, +1.5%). Arterial oxygen saturation significantly decreased with increased plasma lactate during hypoxia recovery mimicking 2,300 meters at altitude (~93% versus ~97%). Intriguingly, hypoxia resulted in elevated muscle THC, and sympathetic nervous activities occurred in parallel with greater-percent oxygen saturation in both muscle groups. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that increased blood distribution to the skeletal muscle under postprandial condition may contribute to the reciprocally increased muscle mass and decreased body mass after a 3-week altitude exposure in swimmers.

  19. Blood flow restriction prevents muscle damage but not protein synthesis signaling following eccentric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Mizuki; Ando, Soichi; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2015-07-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that resistance training exercise combined with blood flow restriction (BFR) increases muscle size and strength in humans. Eccentric contraction (ECC) frequently induces severe muscle damage. However, it is not known whether and to what extent muscle damage occurs following ECC + BFR due to the difficulty of conducting definitive invasive studies. The purpose of this study was to examine muscle fiber damage following ECC + BFR at the cellular level. High-intensity ECC was purposefully selected to maximize the opportunity for muscle damage and hypertrophic signaling in our novel in vivo animal model. Male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to the following groups: ECC and ECC + BFR at varying levels of occlusion pressure (140, 160, and 200 Torr). In all conditions, electrical stimulation was applied to the dorsiflexor muscles simultaneously with electromotor-induced plantar flexion. We observed severe histochemical muscle fiber damage (area of damaged fibers/total fiber area analyzed) following ECC (26.4 ± 4.0%). Surprisingly, however, muscle damage was negligible following ECC + BFR140 (2.6 ± 1.2%), ECC+BFR160 (3.0 ± 0.5%), and ECC + BFR200 (0.2 ± 0.1%). Ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation, a downstream target of rapamycin (mTOR)-phosphorylation kinase, increased following ECC + BFR200 as well as ECC. In contrast, S6K1 phosphorylation was not altered by BFR alone. The present findings suggest that ECC combined with BFR, even at high exercise intensities, may enhance muscle protein synthesis without appreciable muscle fiber damage.

  20. Role of adenosine in regulating the heterogeneity of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Nesterov, Sergey V; Kemppainen, Jukka;

    2007-01-01

    ) muscles during exercise, measured using positron emission tomography. In six healthy young women, BF was measured at rest and then during three incremental low and moderate intermittent isometric one-legged knee-extension exercise intensities without and with theophylline-induced nonselective adenosine...... exercise intensity in the QF muscle group. Adenosine seems to play a role in muscle BF heterogeneity even in the absence of changes in bulk BF at low and moderate one-leg intermittent isometric exercise intensities.......Evidence from both animal and human studies suggests that adenosine plays a role in the regulation of exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle. We tested whether adenosine also plays a role in the regulation of blood flow (BF) distribution and heterogeneity among and within quadriceps femoris (QF...

  1. Transcriptional profiling of rat skeletal muscle hypertrophy under restriction of blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shouyu; Liu, Xueyun; Chen, Zhenhuang; Li, Gaoquan; Chen, Qin; Zhou, Guoqing; Ma, Ruijie; Yao, Xinmiao; Huang, Xiao

    2016-12-15

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) under low-intensity resistance training (LIRT) can produce similar effects upon muscles to that of high-intensity resistance training (HIRT) while overcoming many of the restrictions to HIRT that occurs in a clinical setting. However, the potential molecular mechanisms of BFR induced muscle hypertrophy remain largely unknown. Here, using a BFR rat model, we aim to better elucidate the mechanisms regulating muscle hypertrophy as induced by BFR and reveal possible clinical therapeutic targets for atrophy cases. We performed genome wide screening with microarray analysis to identify unique differentially expressed genes during rat muscle hypertrophy. We then successfully separated the differentially expressed genes from BRF treated soleus samples by comparing the Affymetrix rat Genome U34 2.0 array with the control. Using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) we also analyzed other related differentially expressed genes. Results suggested that muscle hypertrophy induced by BFR is essentially regulated by the rate of protein turnover. Specifically, PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways act as positive regulators in controlling protein synthesis where ubiquitin-proteasome acts as a negative regulator. This represents the first general genome wide level investigation of the gene expression profile in the rat soleus after BFR treatment. This may aid our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating and controlling muscle hypertrophy and provide support to the BFR strategies aiming to prevent muscle atrophy in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. TRPA1 Mediates Amplified Sympathetic Responsiveness to Activation of Metabolically Sensitive Muscle Afferents in Rats with Femoral Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong eXing

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic responses to stimulation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1 has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA and arterial blood pressure (BP responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves’ TRPA1plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24-72 hrs of femoral artery occlusion 1 upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG tissues; 2 selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV; and 3 enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist injected into the arterial blood supply of the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves’TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia.

  3. Blood-feeding induces reversible functional changes in flight muscle mitochondria of Aedes aegypti mosquito.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata L S Gonçalves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hematophagy poses a challenge to blood-feeding organisms since products of blood digestion can exert cellular deleterious effects. Mitochondria perform multiple roles in cell biology acting as the site of aerobic energy-transducing pathways, and also an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, modulating redox metabolism. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial function should be relevant for hematophagous arthropods. Here, we investigated the effects of blood-feeding on flight muscle (FM mitochondria from the mosquito Aedes aegypti, a vector of dengue and yellow fever. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Blood-feeding caused a reversible reduction in mitochondrial oxygen consumption, an event that was parallel to blood digestion. These changes were most intense at 24 h after blood meal (ABM, the peak of blood digestion, when oxygen consumption was inhibited by 68%. Cytochromes c and a+a(3 levels and cytochrome c oxidase activity of the electron transport chain were all reduced at 24 h ABM. Ultrastructural and molecular analyses of FM revealed that mitochondria fuse upon blood meal, a condition related to reduced ROS generation. Consistently, BF induced a reversible decrease in mitochondrial H(2O(2 formation during blood digestion, reaching their lowest values at 24 h ABM where a reduction of 51% was observed. CONCLUSION: Blood-feeding triggers functional and structural changes in hematophagous insect mitochondria, which may represent an important adaptation to blood feeding.

  4. Blood-Feeding Induces Reversible Functional Changes in Flight Muscle Mitochondria of Aedes aegypti Mosquito

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Renata L. S.; Machado, Ana Carolina L.; Paiva-Silva, Gabriela O.; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Momoli, Marisa M.; Oliveira, Jose Henrique M.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Galina, Antonio; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hematophagy poses a challenge to blood-feeding organisms since products of blood digestion can exert cellular deleterious effects. Mitochondria perform multiple roles in cell biology acting as the site of aerobic energy-transducing pathways, and also an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), modulating redox metabolism. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial function should be relevant for hematophagous arthropods. Here, we investigated the effects of blood-feeding on flight muscle (FM) mitochondria from the mosquito Aedes aegypti, a vector of dengue and yellow fever. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood-feeding caused a reversible reduction in mitochondrial oxygen consumption, an event that was parallel to blood digestion. These changes were most intense at 24 h after blood meal (ABM), the peak of blood digestion, when oxygen consumption was inhibited by 68%. Cytochromes c and a+a3 levels and cytochrome c oxidase activity of the electron transport chain were all reduced at 24 h ABM. Ultrastructural and molecular analyses of FM revealed that mitochondria fuse upon blood meal, a condition related to reduced ROS generation. Consistently, BF induced a reversible decrease in mitochondrial H2O2 formation during blood digestion, reaching their lowest values at 24 h ABM where a reduction of 51% was observed. Conclusion Blood-feeding triggers functional and structural changes in hematophagous insect mitochondria, which may represent an important adaptation to blood feeding. PMID:19924237

  5. Functional morphology of the hindlimb in some lacertilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsmeer, J M

    1990-01-01

    Based on a global exploration of the hindlimb in some lacertilian species, an equally global functional approach has been undertaken, which led to the concept of the crural mechanism, an integral mechanism comprising the knee joint and the joints between respectively tibia and fibula on the one hand and the astragalocalcaneum on the other. Simple models explain the position of muscles and ligaments in relation to the homonymous rotation of tibia and fibula as well as the relative anterior displacement of fibula in front of the tibia. The linkage of knee and ankle joints appears to be based on those morphological features in both proximal and distal joints, that preclude pure axial rotations of tibia and fibula without deviation of these bones, again in both knee and ankle. The final result appears to be an integral mechanism endowed with one degree of freedom. An attempt has been made to identify the significance of the crural mechanism for function of the hindlimb in sprawling gait.

  6. Precocial hindlimbs and altricial forelimbs: partitioning ontogenetic strategies in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, Terry R; Carrier, David R

    2012-11-01

    Precocial development, in which juveniles are relatively mature at hatching or birth, is more common among vertebrates than altricial development, and is likely to be the basal condition. Altricial development characterizes many birds and mammals and is generally viewed as an alternate strategy, promoting fast growth rates, short developmental periods and relatively poor locomotor performance prior to attaining adult size. Many aquatic birds such as Anseriformes (ducks, geese and swans), Charadriformes (gulls and terns) and Gruiformes (rails) undergo distinctive developmental trajectories, in that hatchlings are able to run and swim the day they hatch, yet they do not begin to fly until fully grown. We hypothesized that there should be tradeoffs in apportioning bone and muscle mass to the hindlimb and forelimb that could account for these patterns in locomotor behavior within the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). Growth of the musculoskeletal system in the forelimbs and hindlimbs was measured and compared with maximal aquatic and terrestrial sprint speeds and aerial descent rates throughout the 2-month-long mallard ontogenetic period. At 30 days post hatching, when body mass is 50% of adult values, hindlimb muscle mass averages 90% and forelimb muscle mass averages 10% of adult values; similarly, bone growth (length and width) in the hindlimbs and forelimbs averages 90 and 60% of adult values, respectively. The attainment of mallard locomotor performance parallels the morphological maturation of forelimb and hindlimb morphometrics - hindlimb performance initiates just after hatching at a relatively high level (~50% adult values) and gradually improves throughout the first month of development, while forelimb performance is relatively non-existent at hatching (~10% adult values), experiencing delayed and dramatic improvement in function, and maturing at the time of fledging. This divergence in ontogenetic strategy between locomotor modules could allow developing

  7. Characterization of the arterial anatomy of the murine hindlimb: functional role in the design and understanding of ischemia models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kochi

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Appropriate ischemia models are required for successful studies of therapeutic angiogenesis. While collateral routes are known to be present within the innate vasculature, there are no reports describing the detailed vascular anatomy of the murine hindlimb. In addition, differences in the descriptions of anatomical names and locations in the literature impede understanding of the circulation and the design of hindlimb ischemia models. To understand better the collateral circulation in the whole hindlimb, clarification of all the feeding arteries of the hindlimb is required. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to reveal the detailed arterial anatomy and collateral routes in murine hindlimb to enable the appropriate design of therapeutic angiogenesis studies and to facilitate understanding of the circulation in ischemia models. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arterial anatomy in the murine hindlimb was investigated by contrast-enhanced X-ray imaging and surgical dissection. The observed anatomy is shown in photographic images and in a schema. Previously unnoticed but relatively large arteries were observed in deep, cranial and lateral parts of the thigh. The data indicates that there are three collateral routes through the medial thigh, quadriceps femoris, and the biceps femoris muscles. Furthermore, anatomical variations were found at the origins of the three feeding arteries. CONCLUSIONS: The detailed arterial anatomy of murine hindlimb and collateral routes deduced from the anatomy are described. Limitations on designs of ischemia models in view of anatomical variations are proposed. These observations will contribute to the development of animal studies of therapeutic angiogenesis using murine hindlimb ischemia models.

  8. Therapeutic targeting of the stem cell niche in experimental hindlimb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Claudio; William-Ignarro, Sharon; Byrns, Russell; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; Crimi, Ettore; Farzati, Bartolomeo; Mancini, Francesco P; de Nigris, Filomena; Matarazzo, Angelo; D'Amora, Maurizio; Abbondanza, Ciro; Fiorito, Carmela; Giovane, Alfonso; Florio, Anna; Varricchio, Ettore; Palagiano, Antonio; Minucci, Pellegrino Biagio; Tecce, Mario Felice; Giordano, Antonio; Pavan, Antonio; Ignarro, Louis J

    2008-09-01

    The custom microenvironment 'vascular niche' is a potential therapeutic target for several pathophysiological conditions. Osteoblasts regulate the hematopoietic stem cell niche, and activation of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor can increase the number of cells mobilized into the bloodstream. C57Bl/6 mice were randomly assigned treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), PTH, G-CSF plus PTH or saline. All mice underwent hindlimb ischemia. Blood flow was measured by laser Doppler imaging. Indices of capillary activity were determined by electron microscopy in muscle tissue. CD34(+) and Ki67(+) cells were detected and evaluated by immunofluorescence, apoptosis by TUNEL, surface antigen and endothelial progenitor cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and vascular endothelial growth factor-164 and angiopoietin-1 expression by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Frozen bone marrow sections were stained for antigen-specific B cells and fibronectin and analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Following mobilization induced by G-CSF treatment, mice also treated with PTH showed increases in blood flow, capillary density, nitrite/nitrate release, angiogenic factors and circulating progenitor cells, as well as reduced apoptosis, fibrosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in ischemic muscles. Furthermore, hematopoietic antigen-specific B cells in the bone marrow were also increased by G-CSF alone and in combination with PTH. PTH might increase the efficiency of hematopoietic stem-cell-based therapy in a recognized model of peripheral ischemia. Our translational experimental therapeutic targeting of the vascular niche points to novel clinical targets for the hematopoietic stem-cell treatment of ischemic vascular diseases.

  9. Differentiation of smooth muscle progenitor cells in peripheral blood and its application in tissue engineered blood vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang-zhe XIE; Ning-tao FANG; Shui LIU; Ping ZHOU; Yi ZHANG; Song-mei WANG; Hong-yang GAO; Luan-feng PAN

    2008-01-01

    Background: A major shortcoming in tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) is the lack of healthy and easily attainable smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Smooth muscle progenitor cells (SPCs), especially from peripheral blood, may offer an alternative cell source for tissue engineering involving a less invasive harvesting technique. Methods: SPCs were isolated from 5-ml fresh rat peripheral blood by density-gradient centrifugation and cultured for 3 weeks in endothelial growth medium-2-MV (EGM-2-MV) medium containing platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF BB). Before seeded on the synthesized scaffold, SPC-derived smooth muscle outgrowth cell (SOC) phenotypes were assessed by immuno-fluorescent staining, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The cells were seeded onto the silk fibroin-modified poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (SF-PHBHHx) scaffolds by 6×104 cells/cm'2 and cultured under the static con-dition for 3 weeks. The growth and proliferation of the seeded cells on the scaffold were analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Results: SOCs displayed specific "hill and valley" morphology, expressed the specific markers of the SMC lineage: protein, and extracellular matrix components elastin and matrix Gla protein (MGP), as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). After seeded on the SF-PHBHHx scaffold, the cells showed excellent metabolic activity and proliferation. Conclusion: SPCs isolated from peripheral blood can be differentiated into the SMCs in vitro and have an impressive growth potential in the biodegradable synthesized scaffold. Thus, SPCs may be a promising cell source for constructing TEBVs.

  10. Effects of respiratory muscle unloading on leg muscle oxygenation and blood volume during high-intensity exercise in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Carrascosa, Cláudia; Oliveira, Cristino Carneiro; Barroco, Adriano C; Berton, Danilo C; Vilaça, Debora; Lira-Filho, Edgar B; Ribeiro, Dirceu; Nery, Luiz Eduardo; Neder, J Alberto

    2008-06-01

    Blood flow requirements of the respiratory muscles (RM) increase markedly during exercise in chronic heart failure (CHF). We reasoned that if the RM could subtract a fraction of the limited cardiac output (QT) from the peripheral muscles, RM unloading would improve locomotor muscle perfusion. Nine patients with CHF (left ventricle ejection fraction = 26 +/- 7%) undertook constant-work rate tests (70-80% peak) receiving proportional assisted ventilation (PAV) or sham ventilation. Relative changes (Delta%) in deoxy-hemoglobyn, oxi-Hb ([O2Hb]), tissue oxygenation index, and total Hb ([HbTOT], an index of local blood volume) in the vastus lateralis were measured by near infrared spectroscopy. In addition, QT was monitored by impedance cardiography and arterial O2 saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2). There were significant improvements in exercise tolerance (Tlim) with PAV. Blood lactate, leg effort/Tlim and dyspnea/Tlim were lower with PAV compared with sham ventilation (P 0.05). Unloaded breathing, however, was related to enhanced leg muscle oxygenation and local blood volume compared with sham, i.e., higher Delta[O2Hb]% and Delta[HbTOT]%, respectively (P < 0.05). We conclude that RM unloading had beneficial effects on the oxygenation status and blood volume of the exercising muscles at similar systemic O2 delivery in patients with advanced CHF. These data suggest that blood flow was redistributed from respiratory to locomotor muscles during unloaded breathing.

  11. Muscle activation and blood flow do not explain the muscle length-dependent variation in quadriceps isometric endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, R D; de Ruiter, C J; de Haan, A

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the role of central activation in muscle length-dependent endurance. Central activation ratio (CAR) and rectified surface electromyogram (EMG) were studied during fatigue of isometric contractions of the knee extensors at 30 and 90 degrees knee angles (full extension = 0 degree). Subjects (n = 8) were tested on a custom-built ergometer. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extension with supramaximal superimposed burst stimulation (three 100-mus pulses; 300 Hz) was performed to assess CAR and maximal torque capacity (MTC). Surface EMG signals were obtained from vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles. At each angle, intermittent (15 s on 6 s off) isometric exercise at 50% MTC with superimposed stimulation was performed to exhaustion. During the fatigue task, a sphygmomanometer cuff around the upper thigh ensured full occlusion (400 mmHg) of the blood supply to the knee extensors. At least 2 days separated fatigue tests. MTC was not different between knee angles (30 degrees : 229.6 +/- 39.3 N.m vs. 90 degrees: 215.7 +/- 13.2 N.m). Endurance times, however, were significantly longer (P muscle length-related differences in metabolic cost.

  12. A streamlined protocol for extracting RNA and genomic DNA from archived human blood and muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Gipsy; Vera, Santiago; Elam, Marshall B; Raghow, Rajendra

    2015-04-01

    We combined the TRIzol method of nucleic acid extraction with QIAamp columns to achieve coextraction of RNA and genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and biopsied skeletal muscle, both stored at -80 °C for many months. Total RNA was recovered from the upper aqueous phase of TRIzol. The interphase and organic phases were precipitated with ethanol, digested with proteinase K, and filtered through QIAamp MinElute columns to recover DNA. The combined protocol yielded excellent quality and quantity of nucleic acids from archived human PBMCs and muscle and may be easily adapted for other tissues.

  13. Hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Aves, Psittaciformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carril, Julieta; Mosto, María C; Picasso, Mariana B J; Tambussi, Claudia P

    2014-07-01

    We studied the hindlimb myology of the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). Like all parrots, it has zygodactyl feet enabling perching, climbing, hanging, moving easily among trees, and handling food. Muscles were described and weighed, and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of four flexors and one extensor was calculated. In comparison to other muscles, the M. tibialis cranialis and the M. fibularis brevis show increased development and high PCSA values, and therefore, large potential force production. Also, a large proportion of muscle mass was involved in flexing the digits. We hypothesize that these muscle traits are associated with the arboreal locomotion and food manipulation habits. In the monk parakeet, the M. extensor digitorum longus sends a branch to the hallux, and the connection between the M. flexor digitorum longus and the M. flexor hallucis longus is type I (Gadow's classification). We reaffirm the presence of the M. ambiens as a plesiomorphic condition that disappears in most members of the order. Among Psittaciformes, the M. fibularis brevis is stronger and the M. fibularis weaker in arboreal species than in basal terrestrial ones (e.g., Strigops). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Rat hindlimb joint immobilization with acrylic resin orthoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. da Silva

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to propose an orthosis of light material that would be functional for the animal and that would maintain only the ankle joint immobilized. Male Wistar rats (3 to 4 months old, 250-300 g were divided into 2 groups (N = 6: control and immobilized for 7 days. Rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg weight and the left hindlimb was immobilized with the orthoses composed of acrylic resin model, abdominal belt and lateral supports. The following analyses were performed: glycogen content of the soleus, extensor digitorum longus, white gastrocnemius, red gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles by the phenol sulfuric method, and the weight, fiber area and intramuscular connective tissue of the soleus by the planimetric system. Data were analyzed statistically by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Student t and Wilcoxon tests. Immobilization decreased glycogen in all muscles (P < 0.05; soleus: 31.6%, white gastrocnemius: 56.6%, red gastrocnemius: 39%, extensor digitorum longus: 41.7%, tibialis anterior: 45.2% in addition to reducing soleus weight by 34% (P < 0.05. Furthermore, immobilization promoted reduction of the fiber area (43%, P < 0.05 and increased the connective tissue (200%, P < 0.05. The orthosis model was efficient comparing with another alternative immobilization model, like plaster casts, in promoting skeletal muscle alterations, indicating that it could be used as a new model in other studies related to muscle disuse.

  15. Practical blood flow restriction training increases muscle hypertrophy during a periodized resistance training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Loenneke, Jeremy P; de Souza, Eduardo O; Machado, Marco; Dudeck, Joshua E; Wilson, Jacob M

    2014-07-01

    Resistance training in combination with practical blood flow restriction (pBFR) is thought to stimulate muscle hypertrophy by increasing muscle activation and muscle swelling. Most previous studies used the KAATSU device; however, little long-term research has been completed using pBFR. To investigate the effects of pBFR on muscle hypertrophy. Twenty college-aged male participants with a minimum of 1 year of resistance training experience were recruited for this study. Our study consisted of a randomized, crossover protocol consisting of individuals either using pBFR for the elbow flexors during the first 4 weeks (BFR-HI) or the second 4 weeks (HI-BFR) of an 8-week resistance training programme. Direct ultrasound-determined bicep muscle thickness was assessed collectively at baseline and at the end of weeks 4 and 8. There were no differences in muscle thickness between groups at baseline (P = 0·52). There were time (Pmuscle thickness in which the combined values of both groups increased on average from week 0 (3·66 ± 0·06) to week 4 (3·95 ± 0·05) to week 8 (4·11 ± 0·07). However, both the BFR-HI and HI-BFR increased significantly from baseline to week 4 (6·9% and 8·6%, Pmuscle hypertrophy to the same degree to that of high-intensity resistance training. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effect of blood volume in resting muscle on heart rate upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takehide; Matsuura, Ryouta; Arimitsu, Takuma; Yunoki, Takahiro; Yano, Tokuo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the increase in blood volume in resting muscle during moderately prolonged exercise is related to heart rate (HR) upward drift. Eight healthy men completed both arm-cranking moderately prolonged exercise (APE) and leg-pedaling moderately prolonged exercise (LPE) for 30 min. Exercise intensity was 120 bpm of HR that was determined by ramp incremental exercise. During both APE and LPE, HR significantly increased from 3 to 30 min (from 108±9.3 to 119±12 bpm and from 112±8.9 to 122±11 bpm, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between HR in APE and that in LPE. Oxygen uptake was maintained throughout the two exercises. Skin blood flow, deep temperature, and total Hb (blood volume) in resting muscle continuously increased for 30 min of exercise during both APE and LPE. During both APE and LPE, there was a significant positive correlation between total Hb and deep temperature in all subjects. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between HR and total Hb (in seven out of eight subjects) during LPE. However, during APE, there was no positive correlation between HR and total Hb (r=0.391). These findings suggest that an increase of blood pooling in resting muscle could be proposed as one of the mechanisms underlying HR upward drift during moderately prolonged exercise.

  17. Influence of Androgen Receptor in Vascular Cells on Reperfusion following Hindlimb Ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxi Wu

    Full Text Available Studies in global androgen receptor knockout (G-ARKO and orchidectomised mice suggest that androgen accelerates reperfusion of the ischaemic hindlimb by stimulating angiogenesis. This investigation used novel, vascular cell-specific ARKO mice to address the hypothesis that the impaired hindlimb reperfusion in G-ARKO mice was due to loss of AR from cells in the vascular wall.Mice with selective deletion of AR (ARKO from vascular smooth muscle cells (SM-ARKO, endothelial cells (VE-ARKO, or both (SM/VE-ARKO were compared with wild type (WT controls. Hindlimb ischaemia was induced in these mice by ligation and removal of the femoral artery. Post-operative reperfusion was reduced in SM-ARKO and SM/VE-ARKO mice. Immunohistochemistry indicated that this was accompanied by a reduced density of smooth muscle actin-positive vessels but no change in the density of isolectin B4-positive vessels in the gastrocnemius muscle. Deletion of AR from the endothelium (VE-ARKO did not alter post-operative reperfusion or vessel density. In an ex vivo (aortic ring culture model of angiogenesis, AR was not detected in vascular outgrowths and angiogenesis was not altered by vascular ARKO or by exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT 10-10-10-7M; 6 days.These results suggest that loss of AR from vascular smooth muscle, but not from the endothelium, contributes to impaired reperfusion in the ischaemic hindlimb of G-ARKO. Impaired reperfusion was associated with reduced collateral formation rather than reduced angiogenesis.

  18. Acylcarnitine ester utilization by the hindlimb of warmblood horses at rest and following low intensity exercise and carnitine supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, L W E; Smiet, E; de Sain-van der Velden, M G M; van der Kolk, J H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acylcarnitines play an important role in fuel metabolism in skeletal muscle. OBJECTIVE: To assess acylcarnitine ester utilization by the hindlimb of horses at rest and following low intensity exercise and carnitine supplementation. ANIMALS AND METHODS: Acylcarnitine ester uptake by the h

  19. [Ultrastructure of the blood vessels and muscle fibers in the skeletal muscle of rats flown on the Kosmos-605 and Kosmos-782 biosatellites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savik, Z F; Rokhlenko, K D

    1981-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to study ultrastructures of the wall of blood vessels and muscle fibers of the red (soleus) and mixed (gastrocnemius) muscles of rats flown on Cosmos-605 for 22.5 days and on Cosmos-782 for 19,5 days and sacrificed 4-6 hours, 48 hours and 25-27 days postflight. It was demonstrated that the orbital flight did not induce significant changes in the ultrastructure of blood vessels of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles but caused atrophy of muscle fibers and reduction of the number of functioning capillaries. Readaptation of the soleus vascular system to 1 g led to degradation of permeability of capillary and venular walls and development of edema of the perivascular connective tissue. This may be one of the factors responsible for dystrophic changes in muscle fibers.

  20. Contribution of respiratory muscle blood flow to exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue in trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether the greater degree of exercise-induced diaphragmatic fatigue previously reported in highly trained athletes in hypoxia (compared with normoxia) could have a contribution from limited respiratory muscle blood flow. Seven trained cyclists completed three constant load 5 min...... exercise tests at inspired O(2) fractions (FIO2) of 0.13, 0.21 and 1.00 in balanced order. Work rates were selected to produce the same tidal volume, breathing frequency and respiratory muscle load at each FIO2 (63 +/- 1, 78 +/- 1 and 87 +/- 1% of normoxic maximal work rate, respectively). Intercostals......(-1) and 95.1 +/- 7.8 ml (100 ml)(-1) min(-1), respectively). Neither IMBF was different across hypoxia, normoxia and hyperoxia (53.6 +/- 8.5, 49.9 +/- 5.9 and 52.9 +/- 5.9 ml (100 ml)(-1) min(-1), respectively). We conclude that when respiratory muscle energy requirement is not different between...

  1. Deoxypyridinoline in the Urine of Rats with Unloaded Hindlimbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, M.; Wren, J.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The urinary excretion of deoxypyridinoline (U-Dpd), a nonreducible collagen crosslink in bone released by osteoclastic activity, is thought to be an accurate marker of bone resorption. The role of increased resorption in the osteopenia of a space flight model which unloads the hindlimbs by suspending the tail is controversial. To assess skeletal resorption in the model we measured U-Dpd (Pyrilinks-D, Metro Biosystems, Inc.) in serial 24 hour urine specimens collected from 250 a (Y) and 450 a (M) male rats with unloaded hindlimbs for four weeks. Both groups of rats were fed AIN76 diets with calcium restricted to 0.2% in Y and to 0.1 % in M. Blood was obtained after 28 days for parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-D) and alkaline phosphatase (Alkptase). Basal U-Dpd was higher and more variable in Y than M (475+/-200 vs 67+/-9, nM/mM creatinine, prats (prats exposed to a space flight model. U-Dpd reflects reduced growth from the diet change in young control and experimental rats and loss of Bill in mature animals exposed to the space flight model, 2 situations with opposite effects on bone resorption.

  2. Vascular Function and Regulation of Blood Flow in Resting and Contracting Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin

    importance. The present work provides new insight in to vasodilator interactions important for exercise hyperemia and sheds light on mechanisms important for vascular function and regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow in essential hypertension (high blood pressure) and aging and identifies mechanisms...... by which physical activity affects the function of the vascular network. Conclusion The vasodilators ATP and adenosine stimulate the nitric oxide and prostanoid systems in skeletal muscle. These vasodilator interactions may, at least in part, explain the central role of nitric oxide and prostanoids...... that no single compound can explain exercise hyperemia and indicates that any condition associated with reduced oxygen delivery needs to be investigated independently. Physical activity can attenuate or even counteract the effects of essential hypertension and aging on vascular function and exercise hyperemia....

  3. Genetic analysis of blood vessel formation role of endothelial versus smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmeliet, P; Collen, D

    1997-11-01

    Formation of new blood vessels is vital during embryogenesis, essential for reproduction and wound healing during adulthood, and required to rescue tissue during ischemia. Neovascularization may, however, also contribute to the pathogenesis of several disorders, including tumorigenesis, diabetic vasculopathy, and chronic inflammation. Initially, blood vessels form as endothelium-lined channels by in situ differentiation of endothelial cells. Subsequently, they sprout and remodel into a highly organized and interconnected vascular network. During further maturation of the blood vessels, a sheet of primitive vascular smooth muscle cells surrounds the endothelium-lined channels, which controls endothelial cell function and provides structural support. Recent molecular analyses have identified candidate molecules that affect these processes. Their in vivo role has been further established by targeted gene manipulation in transgenic mice. This review highlights recent developments in the genetic analysis of blood vessel formation, as deduced from analysis of gene-inactivated mice. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:271-281). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  4. Insulin action in muscle and adipose tissue in type 2diabetes: The significance of blood flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Under normal metabolic conditions insulin stimulatesmicrovascular perfusion (capillary recruitment) ofskeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue andthus increases blood flow mainly after meal ingestionor physical exercise. This helps the delivery of insulinitself but also that of substrates and of other signallingmolecules to multiple tissues beds and facilitatesglucose disposal and lipid kinetics. This effect is impairedin insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes early in thedevelopment of metabolic dysregulation and reflectsearly-onset endothelial dysfunction. Failure of insulinto increase muscle and adipose tissue blood flowresults in decreased glucose handling. In fat depots, ablunted postprandial blood flow response will result inan insufficient suppression of lipolysis and an increasedspill over of fatty acids in the circulation, leading toa more pronounced insulin resistant state in skeletalmuscle. This defect in blood flow response is apparenteven in the prediabetic state, implying that it is afacet of insulin resistance and exists long before overthyperglycaemia develops. The following review intendsto summarize the contribution of blood flow impairmentto the development of the atherogenic dysglycemia anddyslipidaemia.

  5. Dynamics of Muscle Microcirculatory and Blood-myocyte O2 Flux During Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, David C.; Copp, Steven W.; Hirai, Daniel M.; Musch, Timothy I.

    2011-01-01

    The O2 requirements of contracting skeletal muscle may increase 100-fold above rest. In 1919 August Krogh’s brilliant insights recognized the capillary as the principal site for this increased blood-myocyte O2 flux. Based on the premise that most capillaries did not sustain RBC flux at rest Krogh proposed that capillary recruitment (i.e., initiation of red blood cell (RBC) flux in previously non-flowing capillaries) increased the capillary surface area available for O2 flux and reduced mean capillary-to-mitochondrial diffusion distances. More modern experimental approaches reveal that most muscle capillaries may support RBC flux at rest. Thus, rather than contraction-induced capillary recruitment per se, increased RBC flux and hematocrit within already-flowing capillaries likely elevate perfusive and diffusive O2 conductances and hence blood-myocyte O2 flux. Additional surface area for O2 exchange is recruited but, crucially, this may occur along the length of already-flowing capillaries (i.e. longitudinal recruitment). Today, the capillary is still considered the principal site for O2 and substrate delivery to contracting skeletal muscle. Indeed, the presence of very low intramyocyte O2 partial pressures (PO2’s) and the absence of PO2 gradients, whilst refuting the relevance of diffusion distances, place an even greater importance on capillary hemodynamics. This emergent picture calls for a paradigm-shift in our understanding of the function of capillaries by de-emphasizing de novo ‘capillary recruitment.’ Diseases such as heart failure impair blood-myocyte O2 flux, in part, by decreasing the proportion of RBC-flowing capillaries. Knowledge of capillary function in healthy muscle is requisite for identification of pathology and efficient design of therapeutic treatments. PMID:21199399

  6. Muscle blood flow and muscle metabolism during exercise and heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bodil; Savard, G; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    environment a steady state was reached at 30 min. When the subjects were shifted to the hot room, the core temperature and heart rate started to rise and reached values greater than 39 degrees C and near-maximal values, respectively, at the termination of the exercise. The leg blood flow (thermodilution......The effect of heat stress on blood flow and metabolism in an exercising leg was studied in seven subjects walking uphill (12-17%) at 5 km/h on a treadmill for 90 min or until exhaustion. The first 30 min of exercise were performed in a cool environment (18-21 degrees C); then subjects moved...... to an adjacent room at 40 degrees C and continued to exercise at the same speed and inclination for a further 60 min or to exhaustion, whichever occurred first. The rate of O2 consumption, 2.6 l/min (1.8-3.3) (average from cool and hot conditions), corresponded to 55-77% of their individual maximums. In the cool...

  7. Determination and Difference Analysis of DNA Methylation Content Both in Blood and Muscle Tissue of Pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, DNA samples from parental lines Large White, Landrace, and Meishan pigs, and their hybrids Large White×Landrace, Landrace×Large White, Large White×Meishan, and Meishan×Large White pigs were used for the determination of DNA methylation content in both blood and muscle tissue. The differences about DNA methylation content between parental lines and their hybrids were analyzed. These will offer theoretical support from molecular level for heterosis. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was firstly used to detect DNA methylation content. The average DNA methylation content in 163 DNA samples of muscle tissue was 16.92%, whereas, the average DNA methylation content in 182 samples of blood was 6.49%, the difference between which was especially prominent (P 0.05); and the differences between reciprocal cross hybrids in both hybrid systems were not significant (P > 0.05), but between different hybrid systems, the hybrids had a significant difference (P<0.05). The average methylation content in muscle samples was higher than that in blood samples, and the methylation in different tissues was different.

  8. Skeletal muscle adaptations following blood flow-restricted training during 30 days of muscular unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Summer B; Brown, Kimberly A; Deruisseau, Keith; Kanaley, Jill A; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of low-load resistance training with a blood flow restriction (LL(BFR)) to attenuate muscle loss and weakness after 30 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS). Sixteen subjects (ages 18-50 yr) underwent 30 days of ULLS. Measurements of muscle strength, cross-sectional area, and endurance on the knee extensors and plantar flexors were collected before and after ULLS. Plasma concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were also assessed. During ULLS, eight subjects (5 males, 3 females) participated in LL(BFR) three times per week (ULLS + Exercise) while eight subjects (4 males, 4 females) did not exercise (ULLS). The blood flow-restricted exercise consisted of dynamic knee extension at 20% of the subject's isometric maximum voluntary contraction coupled with a suprasystolic blood flow restriction. After 30 days of limb suspension, the ULLS + Exercise group experienced minimal and insignificant losses in knee extensor cross-sectional area and strength (1.2% and 2.0%, respectively; P 0.05). Muscular endurance in the knee extensors improved 31% in the ULLS + Exercise group, while it decreased 24% in the ULLS group (P = 0.01). No changes were seen in hormone concentrations throughout the study. In conclusion, LL(BFR) of the knee extensors is effective in maintaining muscle strength and size during 30 days of ULLS and results in improved knee extensor muscular endurance.

  9. Blood vessels and desmin control the positioning of nuclei in skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, E; Lu, Z; Biscocho, N; Soumaka, E; Mavroidis, M; Prats, C; Lømo, T; Capetanaki, Y; Ploug, T

    2006-12-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers contain hundreds to thousands of nuclei which lie immediately under the plasmalemma and are spaced out along the fiber, except for a small cluster of specialized nuclei at the neuromuscular junction. How the nuclei attain their positions along the fiber is not understood. Here we show that the nuclei are preferentially localized near blood vessels (BV), particularly in slow-twitch, oxidative fibers. Thus, in rat soleus muscle fibers, 81% of the nuclei appear next to BV. Lack of desmin markedly perturbs the distribution of nuclei along the fibers but does not prevent their close association with BV. Consistent with a role for desmin in the spacing of nuclei, we show that denervation affects the organization of desmin filaments as well as the distribution of nuclei. During chronic stimulation of denervated muscles, new BV form, along which muscle nuclei align themselves. We conclude that the positioning of nuclei along muscle fibers is plastic and that BV and desmin intermediate filaments each play a distinct role in the control of this positioning.

  10. Blood flow and muscle oxygenation during low, moderate, and maximal sustained isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Chris J; Allen, Matti D; Olympico, Eric; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rice, Charles L

    2015-09-01

    A reduction of blood flow to active muscle will precipitate fatigue, and sustained isometric contractions produce intramuscular and compartmental pressures that can limit flow. The present study explored how blood flow and muscle oxygenation respond to isometric contractions at low, moderate, and maximal intensities. Over two visits, 10 males (26 ± 2 yr; means ± SD) performed 1-min dorsiflexion contractions at 30, 60, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Doppler ultrasound of the anterior tibial artery was used to record arterial diameter and mean blood velocity and to calculate absolute blood flow. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of tibialis anterior was acquired with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). There was a progressive increase in blood flow at 30% MVC (peak of 289 ± 139% resting value), no change from rest until an increase in the final 10 s of exercise at 60% MVC (peak of 197 ± 102% rest), and an initial decrease (59 ± 30% resting value) followed by a progressive increase at 100% MVC (peak of 355 ± 133% rest). Blood flow was greater at 30 and 100% than 60% MVC during the last 30 s of exercise. TOI was ∼63% at rest and, within 30 s of exercise, reached steady-state values of ∼42%, ∼22%, and ∼22% for 30, 60, and 100% MVC, respectively. Even maximal contraction of the dorsiflexors is unable to cause more than a transient decrease of flow in the anterior tibial artery. Unlike dynamic or intermittent isometric exercise, our results indicate blood flow is not linearly graded with intensity or directly coupled with oxygenation during sustained isometric contractions.

  11. Hindlimb motion during steady flight of the lesser dog-faced fruit bat, Cynopterus brachyotis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorn A Cheney

    Full Text Available In bats, the wing membrane is anchored not only to the body and forelimb, but also to the hindlimb. This attachment configuration gives bats the potential to modulate wing shape by moving the hindlimb, such as by joint movement at the hip or knee. Such movements could modulate lift, drag, or the pitching moment. In this study we address: 1 how the ankle translates through space during the wingbeat cycle; 2 whether amplitude of ankle motion is dependent upon flight speed; 3 how tension in the wing membrane pulls the ankle; and 4 whether wing membrane tension is responsible for driving ankle motion. We flew five individuals of the lesser dog-faced fruit bat, Cynopterus brachyotis (Family: Pteropodidae, in a wind tunnel and documented kinematics of the forelimb, hip, ankle, and trailing edge of the wing membrane. Based on kinematic analysis of hindlimb and forelimb movements, we found that: 1 during downstroke, the ankle moved ventrally and during upstroke the ankle moved dorsally; 2 there was considerable variation in amplitude of ankle motion, but amplitude did not correlate significantly with flight speed; 3 during downstroke, tension generated by the wing membrane acted to pull the ankle dorsally, and during upstroke, the wing membrane pulled laterally when taut and dorsally when relatively slack; and 4 wing membrane tension generally opposed dorsoventral ankle motion. We conclude that during forward flight in C. brachyotis, wing membrane tension does not power hindlimb motion; instead, we propose that hindlimb movements arise from muscle activity and/or inertial effects.

  12. A review on the mechanisms of blood-flow restriction resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Stephen John; Hussain, Syed Robiul

    2015-02-01

    It has traditionally been believed that resistance training can only induce muscle growth when the exercise intensity is greater than 65% of the 1-repetition maximum (RM). However, more recently, the use of low-intensity resistance exercise with blood-flow restriction (BFR) has challenged this theory and consistently shown that hypertrophic adaptations can be induced with much lower exercise intensities (training being demonstrated by numerous studies, the underlying mechanisms responsible for such effects are not well defined. Metabolic stress has been suggested to be a primary factor responsible, and this is theorised to activate numerous other mechanisms, all of which are thought to induce muscle growth via autocrine and/or paracrine actions. However, it is noteworthy that some of these mechanisms do not appear to be mediated to any great extent by metabolic stress but rather by mechanical tension (another primary factor of muscle hypertrophy). Given that the level of mechanical tension is typically low with BFR resistance exercise (adaptations reported with BFR resistance training. However, despite the low level of mechanical tension, it is plausible that the effects induced by the primary factors (mechanical tension and metabolic stress) are, in fact, additive, which ultimately contributes to the adaptations seen with BFR resistance training. Exercise-induced mechanical tension and metabolic stress are theorised to signal a number of mechanisms for the induction of muscle growth, including increased fast-twitch fibre recruitment, mechanotransduction, muscle damage, systemic and localised hormone production, cell swelling, and the production of reactive oxygen species and its variants, including nitric oxide and heat shock proteins. However, the relative extent to which these specific mechanisms are induced by the primary factors with BFR resistance exercise, as well as their magnitude of involvement in BFR resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy

  13. Smooth Muscle Endothelin B Receptors Regulate Blood Pressure but Not Vascular Function or Neointimal Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eileen; Czopek, Alicja; Duthie, Karolina M; Kirkby, Nicholas S; van de Putte, Elisabeth E Fransen; Christen, Sibylle; Kimmitt, Robert A; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Castellan, Raphael F P; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Kuc, Rhoda E; Davenport, Anthony P; Dhaun, Neeraj; Webb, David J; Hadoke, Patrick W F

    2017-02-01

    The role of smooth muscle endothelinB (ETB) receptors in regulating vascular function, blood pressure (BP), and neointimal remodeling has not been established. Selective knockout mice were generated to address the hypothesis that loss of smooth muscle ETB receptors would reduce BP, alter vascular contractility, and inhibit neointimal remodeling. ETB receptors were selectively deleted from smooth muscle by crossing floxed ETB mice with those expressing cre-recombinase controlled by the transgelin promoter. Functional consequences of ETB deletion were assessed using myography. BP was measured by telemetry, and neointimal lesion formation induced by femoral artery injury. Lesion size and composition (day 28) were analyzed using optical projection tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Selective deletion of ETB was confirmed by genotyping, autoradiography, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. ETB-mediated contraction was reduced in trachea, but abolished from mesenteric veins, of knockout mice. Induction of ETB-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries was also abolished in these mice. Femoral artery function was unaltered, and baseline BP modestly elevated in smooth muscle ETB knockout compared with controls (+4.2±0.2 mm Hg; P<0.0001), but salt-induced and ETB blockade-mediated hypertension were unaltered. Circulating endothelin-1 was not altered in knockout mice. ETB-mediated contraction was not induced in femoral arteries by incubation in culture medium or lesion formation, and lesion size was not altered in smooth muscle ETB knockout mice. In the absence of other pathology, ETB receptors in vascular smooth muscle make a small but significant contribution to ETB-dependent regulation of BP. These ETB receptors have no effect on vascular contraction or neointimal remodeling.

  14. Maternal blood pressure and heart rate response to pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cristine H; Naldoni, Luciane M V; Ribeiro, Juliana Dos Santos; Meirelles, Maria Cristina C C; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Bø, Kari

    2014-07-01

    To assess whether maternal blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) change significantly in response to pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy. Longitudinal exploratory study with repeated measurements. Twenty-seven nulliparous healthy women of mean age 23.3 years (range 18-36) and mean body mass index 23.4 (range 23.1-29.5). Individual supervised pelvic floor muscle training from gestational week 20 till 36 with assessment of BP and HR at gestational weeks 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36. Systolic and diastolic BP was measured before and after each training session and HR was monitored during each session. Pelvic floor muscle training did not change BP. 77% (n = 21) of participants exceeded 70% of estimated maximum HR during at least one session. The time for exceeding 70% of estimated maximum HR was between 2.2 and 3.2 % of the total exercise session. Increases in BP and HR from gestational weeks 20 till 36 were within normal limits for pregnant women. Pelvic floor muscle training in nulliparous sedentary pregnant women does not increase BP. It significantly increases HR during the exercise sessions, but only for a limited period of time and with no negative long-term effect on BP or HR. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Impaired Muscle Oxygenation and Elevated Exercise Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients: Links With Vascular Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipla, Konstantina; Triantafyllou, Areti; Koletsos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Stavros; Sachpekidis, Vasileios; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Douma, Stella

    2017-08-01

    This study examined in vivo (1) skeletal muscle oxygenation and microvascular function, at rest and during handgrip exercise, and (2) their association with macrovascular function and exercise blood pressure (BP), in newly diagnosed, never-treated patients with hypertension and normotensive individuals. Ninety-one individuals (51 hypertensives and 40 normotensives) underwent office and 24-hour ambulatory BP, arterial stiffness, and central aortic BP assessment, followed by a 5-minute arterial occlusion and a 3-minute submaximal handgrip exercise. Changes in muscle oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy and beat-by-beat BP by Finapres. Hypertensives had higher (Pexercising at the same submaximal intensity, hypertensives required a significantly greater (Pexercise. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Thenar muscle blood flow and bone mineral in the forearms of lumberjacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, P; Alhava, E M; Valtola, J

    1975-02-01

    Forty lumberjacks who had used a chain saw for 0-20 years and who had no general disease affecting the bones were studied by measuring the thenar muscle blood flow of both hands by the 133-Xe local clearance method. Bone mineral in the left forearm in the region of cancellous and cortical bone was assessed by the 241-Am gamma ray attenuation method. Virbration was found to decrease the blood flow in the saw-bearing left hand compared with the right hand of the lumberjacks. The bone mineral density (g/vm-3) was lower in the forearm bones of the lumberjacks than in controls of the same age with healthy bones. Moreover the poorer the thenar muscle blood flow, the greater was the decrease in the mineral density of the distal radius. Measurement of the mineral density of the forearm bones by the gramma ray attenuation method can be used for early detection of bone lesions in traumatic vasospastic disease.

  17. Muscle contraction increases carnitine uptake via translocation of OCTN2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuichi, Yasuro [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Sugiura, Tomoko; Kato, Yukio [Faculty of Pharmacy, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Takakura, Hisashi [Faculty of Human Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Hanai, Yoshiteru [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Hashimoto, Takeshi [Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu (Japan); Masuda, Kazumi, E-mail: masuda@ed.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Human Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscle contraction augmented carnitine uptake into rat hindlimb muscles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in carnitine uptake was due to an intrinsic clearance, not blood flow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histochemical analysis showed sarcolemmal OCTN2 was emphasized after contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OCTN2 protein in sarcolemmal fraction was increased in contracting muscles. -- Abstract: Since carnitine plays an important role in fat oxidation, influx of carnitine could be crucial for muscle metabolism. OCTN2 (SLC22A5), a sodium-dependent solute carrier, is assumed to transport carnitine into skeletal muscle cells. Acute regulation of OCTN2 activity in rat hindlimb muscles was investigated in response to electrically induced contractile activity. The tissue uptake clearance (CL{sub uptake}) of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine during muscle contraction was examined in vivo using integration plot analysis. The CL{sub uptake} of [{sup 14}C]iodoantipyrine (IAP) was also determined as an index of tissue blood flow. To test the hypothesis that increased carnitine uptake involves the translocation of OCTN2, contraction-induced alteration in the subcellular localization of OCTN2 was examined. The CL{sub uptake} of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine in the contracting muscles increased 1.4-1.7-fold as compared to that in the contralateral resting muscles (p < 0.05). The CL{sub uptake} of [{sup 14}C]IAP was much higher than that of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine, but no association between the increase in carnitine uptake and blood flow was obtained. Co-immunostaining of OCTN2 and dystrophin (a muscle plasma membrane marker) showed an increase in OCTN2 signal in the plasma membrane after muscle contraction. Western blotting showed that the level of sarcolemmal OCTN2 was greater in contracting muscles than in resting muscles (p < 0.05). The present study showed that muscle contraction facilitated carnitine uptake in skeletal muscles, possibly

  18. Effects of Chronic Blood-Flow Restriction Exercise on Skeletal Muscle Size and Myogenic Satellite Cell Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Per; Jacobsen, Mikkel; Jensen, Kasper Yde

    2016-01-01

    of continued sports activity, resulting in visible hypertrophy of his left leg. AIM: To study the effect of chronic blood-flow restricted (BFR) exercise conditions on skeletal muscle size and myogenic satellite cell (SC) expression in an arterio-venous shunt patient. METHODS: Muscle biopsies were obtained from......-regulation in myogenic satellite cell activity within all stages of the cell cycle, which was accompanied by substantial muscle hypertrophy. Specifically, muscle fiber cross-sectional area (40%) and myonuclei number (15%) were elevated in the affected leg, together with an elevated myonuclear domain (20%). This single......-case study confirms previous result from our Lab demonstrating that blood-flow restricted muscle exercise leads to a marked activation of myogenic SCs, upregulated myonuclei number and marked myofiber hypertrophy....

  19. SDF-1 controls the muscle and blood vessel formation of the somite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduelmula, Aisha; Huang, Ruijin; Pu, Qin; Tamamura, Hirokazu; Morosan-Puopolo, Gabriela; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), the only ligand of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, is involved in skeletal muscle development. However, its role in the proliferation, differentiation and migration of somite cells is not well understood. Here, we investigated its function during somite development in chicken embryos by using gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments. Overexpression of SDF-1 was performed by electroporating SDF-1 constructs into the ventrolateral part of the somite, or by injecting SDF-1-expressing cells into the somites of stages HH14-16 chicken embryos. We found that enhanced SDF-1 signaling induced cell proliferation in the somite. This resulted in an increase in number of both myotomal and endothelial cells. In contrast, inhibition of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling led to a reduction of myotomal cells. Injection of SDF-1 producing cells into the somite induced ectopic localization of myotomal cells in the sclerotome. Although many SDF-1-expressing somite cells colonized the limb, only a few of them developed into muscle cells. This resulted in a reduction of the limb muscle mass. This means that most myogenic progenitors were stopped on their migration towards the limb due to the high concentration of the SDF-1 signal in the somite. Most of the SDF-1-expressing somite cells found in the limb were of endothelial cell fate and they contributed to the increase in limb blood vessels. These results reveal that SDF-1 promotes the proliferation of both myogenic and angiogenic progenitor cells of the somite and controls myotome formation. Furthermore, SDF-1 controls muscle and blood vessel formation in the limb in different ways.

  20. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  1. Evaluation of low level laser therapy irradiation parameters on rat muscle inflammation through systemic blood cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantineo, Matias; Pinheiro, João. P.; Morgado, António M.

    2014-02-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used for inflammation treatment. Here, we evaluate the effect of different doses, using continuous (830 and 980 nm) and pulsed illumination (830 nm), in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats, through cytokines concentration in systemic blood and histological analysis of muscle tissue. Animals were randomly divided into five groups per wavelength (5 animals per group: 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mW) plus a control group. LLLT was applied during five days, with constant exposure time and irradiated area (3 minutes; 0.5026 cm2). Blood was collected on days 0, 3 and 6. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2 and IL-6 cytokines were quantified by ELISA. Rats were killed on day 6. Muscle inflammatory cells were counted using optical microscopy. Treatment effects occurred for all applied doses (largest effect at 40 mW: 7.2 J, 14 J/cm2 per irradiation), with reduction of proinflammatory TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 cytokines and lower number of inflammatory cells. Results were better for 830 nm. Identical methodology was used with pulsed illumination. Average power (40 mW) and duty cycle were kept constant (80%) at five frequencies (5, 25, 50, 100 and 200 Hz). Treatment effects were observed at higher frequencies, with no significant differences between them. However, the treatment effect was lower than for continuous illumination. LLLT effect on inflammation treatment can be monitored by measuring systemic blood cytokines. A larger treatment effect was observed with continuous illumination, where results seem to be compatible with a biphasic dose response.

  2. Blood flow index using near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green as a minimally invasive tool to assess respiratory muscle blood flow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenette, Jordan A; Henderson, William R; Dominelli, Paolo B; Querido, Jordan S; Brasher, Penelope M; Griesdale, Donald E G; Boushel, Robert; Sheel, A William

    2011-04-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in combination with indocyanine green (ICG) dye has recently been used to measure respiratory muscle blood flow (RMBF) in humans. This method is based on the Fick principle and is determined by measuring ICG in the respiratory muscles using transcutaneous NIRS in relation to the [ICG] in arterial blood as measured using photodensitometry. This method is invasive since it requires arterial cannulation, repeated blood withdrawals, and reinfusions. A less invasive alternative is to calculate a relative measure of blood flow known as the blood flow index (BFI), which is based solely on the NIRS ICG curve, thus negating the need for arterial cannulation. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine whether BFI can be used to measure RMBF at rest and during voluntary isocapnic hyperpnea at 25, 40, 55, and 70% of maximal voluntary ventilation in seven healthy humans. BFI was calculated as the change in maximal [ICG] divided by the rise time of the NIRS-derived ICG curve. Intercostal and sternocleidomastoid muscle BFI were correlated with simultaneously measured work of breathing and electromyography (EMG) data from the same muscles. BFI showed strong relationships with the work of breathing and EMG for both respiratory muscles. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) comparing BFI vs. the work of breathing for the intercostal and sternocleidomastoid muscles were 0.887 (P < 0.001) and 0.863 (P < 0.001), respectively, whereas the R(2) for BFI vs. EMG for the intercostal and sternocleidomastoid muscles were 0.879 (P < 0.001) and 0.930 (P < 0.001), respectively. These data suggest that the BFI closely reflects RMBF in conscious humans across a wide range of ventilations and provides a less invasive and less technically demanding alternative to measuring RMBF.

  3. Pre-diabetes augments neuropeptide Y1- and α1-receptor control of basal hindlimb vascular tone in young ZDF rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Novielli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peripheral vascular disease in pre-diabetes may involve altered sympathetically-mediated vascular control. Thus, we investigated if pre-diabetes modifies baseline sympathetic Y(1-receptor (Y(1R and α(1-receptor (α(1R control of hindlimb blood flow (Q(fem and vascular conductance (VC. METHODS: Q(fem and VC were measured in pre-diabetic ZDF rats (PD and lean controls (CTRL under infusion of BIBP3226 (Y(1R antagonist, prazosin (α(1R antagonist and BIBP3226+prazosin. Neuropeptide Y (NPY concentration and Y(1R and α(1R expression were determined from hindlimb skeletal muscle samples. RESULTS: Baseline Q(fem and VC were similar between groups. Independent infusions of BIBP3226 and prazosin led to increases in Q(fem and VC in CTRL and PD, where responses were greater in PD (p<0.05. The percent change in VC following both drugs was also greater in PD compared to CTRL (p<0.05. As well, Q(fem and VC responses to combined blockade (BIBP3226+prazosin were greater in PD compared to CTRL (p<0.05. Interestingly, an absence of synergistic effects was observed within groups, as the sum of the VC responses to independent drug infusions was similar to responses following combined blockade. Finally, white and red vastus skeletal muscle NPY concentration, Y(1R expression and α(1R expression were greater in PD compared to CTRL. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we report heightened baseline Y(1R and α(1R sympathetic control of Q(fem and VC in pre-diabetic ZDF rats. In support, our data suggest that augmented sympathetic ligand and receptor expression in pre-diabetes may contribute to vascular dysregulation.

  4. [The effect of prostatilen on the contractile activity of the smooth-muscle cells of the blood vessels and bladder in cats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Shchukri, S Kh; Barabanov, S V; Barabanova, V V; Bobkov, Iu A; Gorbachev, A G; Parastaeva, M M

    1996-07-01

    Prostatilene enhanced the functional activity of the bladder and blood vessels' smooth muscle cells. A possibility of activation of the smooth muscle cells contractility with prostatilene by a pharmaco-mechanical association, is discussed.

  5. Muscle contraction increases carnitine uptake via translocation of OCTN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Sugiura, Tomoko; Kato, Yukio; Takakura, Hisashi; Hanai, Yoshiteru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Masuda, Kazumi

    2012-02-24

    Since carnitine plays an important role in fat oxidation, influx of carnitine could be crucial for muscle metabolism. OCTN2 (SLC22A5), a sodium-dependent solute carrier, is assumed to transport carnitine into skeletal muscle cells. Acute regulation of OCTN2 activity in rat hindlimb muscles was investigated in response to electrically induced contractile activity. The tissue uptake clearance (CL(uptake)) of l-[(3)H]carnitine during muscle contraction was examined in vivo using integration plot analysis. The CL(uptake) of [(14)C]iodoantipyrine (IAP) was also determined as an index of tissue blood flow. To test the hypothesis that increased carnitine uptake involves the translocation of OCTN2, contraction-induced alteration in the subcellular localization of OCTN2 was examined. The CL(uptake) of l-[(3)H]carnitine in the contracting muscles increased 1.4-1.7-fold as compared to that in the contralateral resting muscles (pmuscle plasma membrane marker) showed an increase in OCTN2 signal in the plasma membrane after muscle contraction. Western blotting showed that the level of sarcolemmal OCTN2 was greater in contracting muscles than in resting muscles (pmuscle contraction facilitated carnitine uptake in skeletal muscles, possibly via the contraction-induced translocation of its specific transporter OCTN2 to the plasma membrane.

  6. Blood flow after contraction and cuff occlusion is reduced in subjects with muscle soreness after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Silva, E; Christensen, S W; Hirata, R P; Larsen, R G; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2017-04-28

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occurs within 1-2 days after eccentric exercise, but the mechanism mediating hypersensitivity is unclear. This study hypothesized that eccentric exercise reduces the blood flow response following muscle contractions and cuff occlusion, which may result in accumulated algesic substances being a part of the sensitization in DOMS. Twelve healthy subjects (five women) performed dorsiflexion exercise (five sets of 10 repeated eccentric contractions) in one leg, while the contralateral leg was the control. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the tibialis anterior muscle was recorded. Blood flow was assessed by ultrasound Doppler on the anterior tibialis artery (ATA) and within the anterior tibialis muscle tissue before and immediately after 1-second MVC, 5-seconds MVC, and 5-minutes thigh cuff occlusion. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded on the tibialis anterior muscle. All measures were done bilaterally at day 0 (pre-exercise), day 2, and day 6 (post-exercise). Subjects scored the muscle soreness on a Likert scale for 6 days. Eccentric exercise increased Likert scores at day 1 and day 2 compared with day 0 (Pexercise (day 0), reduced PPT (~25%, Peccentric contractions decreased vessel diameter, impaired the blood flow response, and promoted hyperalgesia. Thus, the results suggest that the blood flow reduction may be involved in the increased pain response after eccentric exercise. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green derived blood flow index for noninvasive measurement of muscle perfusion during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habazettl, Helmut; Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Wagner, Harrieth; Roussos, Charis; Wagner, Peter D; Ungruhe, Juergen; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Vogiatzis, Ioannis

    2010-04-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with the tracer indocyanine green (ICG) may be used for measuring muscle blood flow (MBF) during exercise, if arterial ICG concentration is measured simultaneously. Although pulse dye densitometry allows for noninvasive measurement of arterial dye concentration, this technique is sensitive to motion and may not be applicable during exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate a noninvasive blood flow index (BFI), which is derived solely from the muscle ICG concentration curve. In 10 male cyclists 5 mg ICG were injected into an antecubital vein at rest and during cycling at 30, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100% of previously determined maximal work load. Simultaneously blood was withdrawn through a photodensitometer at 20 ml/min from the radial artery to measure arterial ICG concentration. To measure muscle tissue ICG concentrations, two sets of NIRS optodes were positioned on the skin, one over the left seventh intercostal space and the other over the left vastus lateralis muscle. MBF was calculated from the arterial and muscle concentration data according to Fick's principle. BFI was calculated solely from the muscle concentration curve as ICG concentration difference divided by rise time between 10 and 90% of peak. During exercise mean BFI values changed similarly to MBF in both intercostal and quadriceps muscles and showed excellent correlations with MBF: r = 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. Individual data showed some scattering among BFI and MBF values but still reasonable correlations of BFI with MBF: r = 0.73 and 0.72 for intercostal and quadriceps muscles, respectively. Interobserver variability, as analyzed by Bland-Altman plots, was considerably less for BFI than MBF. These data suggest that BFI can be used for measuring changes in muscle perfusion from rest to maximal exercise. Although absolute blood flow cannot be determined, BFI has the advantages of being essentially noninvasive and having low interobserver variability.

  8. A model for investigating the control of muscle blood flow: the masseteric artery in conscious rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Mohammed, M; Turturici, M; Milano, L; Passatore, M

    2010-09-01

    The complex interplay of neural, metabolic, myogenic and mechanical mechanisms that regulate blood flow in skeletal muscle (MBF) is still incompletely understood. For the first time, a method is presented for high time-resolution recording of MBF from a purely muscular artery in physiological conditions. Ultrasound perivascular flow probes were implanted (n = 15) mono- or bilaterally around the masseteric branch of the facial artery in nine rabbits and tested up to 16 days after implant. Reliable and stable recordings were achieved in 50% of implants. Blood flow was observed to increase from a resting level of 0.2-0.3 ml min(-1) up to 4.0-6.0 ml min(-1) during spontaneous masticatory activity. In addition, within single masticatory cycles marked back flow transients could be observed (peak flow = -10 ml min(-1)) during powerful masticatory strokes but not during mild mastication. The possibility of (1) surgically removing the sympathetic supply to the relevant vascular bed and of (2) bilaterally monitoring the perfusion of masseter muscles thus allowing to use one side as control side for different types of interventions makes this model a useful tool for disentangling the different mechanisms involved in the control of MBF.

  9. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L; Terry, Michael H; Wilson, Sean M; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was infused into one femoral artery to raise the nitrite concentration in the femoral vein by 10 to 15-fold while the sheep breathed 50%, 14% or 12% oxygen in inspired air. In contrast to reports in humans and rats, the nitrite infusion had no measurable effect on mean femoral blood flows or vascular conductances, regardless of inspired O2 levels. In vitro experiments showed no significant difference in the release of NO from nitrite in sheep and human red blood cells. Further experiments demonstrated nitrite is converted to NO in rat artery homogenates faster than sheep arteries, and that this source of NO production is attenuated in the presence of a heme oxidizer. Finally, western blots indicate that concentrations of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin, but not myoglobin, are markedly lower in sheep arteries compared with rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that nitrite is not a physiological vasodilator in sheep. This is likely due to a lack of conversion of nitrite to NO within the vascular smooth muscle, perhaps due to deficient amounts of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin.

  10. Mercury correlations among blood, muscle, and hair of northern elephant seals during the breeding and molting fasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sarah; Ackerman, Josh; Costa, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) biomonitoring and toxicological risk assessments for marine mammals commonly sample different tissues, making comparisons to toxicity benchmarks and among species and regions difficult. Few studies have examined how life history events, such as fasting, influence the relationship between total Hg (THg) concentrations in different tissues. We evaluated the relationships between THg concentrations in blood, muscle, and hair of female and male northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) at the start and end of the breeding and molting fasts. The relationships between tissues varied among tissue pairs and differed by sampling period and sex. Blood and muscle were generally related at all time periods; however, hair, an inert tissue, did not strongly represent the metabolically active tissues (blood and muscle) at all times of year. The strongest relationships between THg concentrations in hair and those in blood or muscle were observed during periods of active hair growth (end of the molting period) or during time periods when internal body conditions were similar to those when the hair was grown (end of the breeding fast). Our results indicate that THg concentrations in blood or muscle can be translated to the other tissue type using the equations we developed, but that THg concentrations in hair were generally a poor index of internal THg concentrations except during the end of fasting periods.

  11. Relationships among arteriolar, regional, and whole organ blood flow in cremaster muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proctor, K.G.; Busija, D.W.

    1985-07-01

    The relationship between microvessel and tissue blood flow (BF) was determined with two different techniques during changes in local vasomotor tone in the rat cremaster muscle. Whole organ and regional BF were measured with the radioactive microsphere technique (BFms) and compared with values calculated in individual arterioles (BFc) using the dual-slit cross-correlation technique. In the muscle prepared for microcirculatory observation (i.e., dissected, surgically divided into a flattened sheet, and covered with clear plastic), resting BFms was 43 +/- 3 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1, which was significantly higher than paired BFms in the contralateral undisturbed muscle (24 +/- 7 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1). Over a range in vasomotor tone, regional BFms to the edge of the tissue, which was exposed to the trauma of the surgery, was 56 +/- 7 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1 compared with 38 +/- 5 in the less traumatized center region, a significant difference of 79 +/- 31%. There was no linear relationship between arteriolar BFc and BFms. The correlation was not improved if the factors of vessel size, vasomotor tone, animal size, or muscle size were considered. Changes in arteriolar BFc (y) overestimated changes in total tissue BFms (x) by a factor of 2 (y = 2.01x - 0.6; r = 0.86), but changes in arteriolar BFc were proportional to changes in BFms if only the center region (x) of the tissue was considered (y = 1.08x - 0.1; r = 0.84). The general implication from these results is that factors that influence perfusion heterogeneity, such as surgical trauma, should be carefully considered when correlating macro- and microcirculatory measurements of BF.

  12. Pyruvate-Enhanced Resuscitation for Hemorrhagic Shock and Hindlimb Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-06

    Pyruvate-Enhanced Resuscitation for Hemorrhagic Shock and Hindlimb Ischemia The overall goals of this investigation were to test the ability of...Final Report: Pyruvate-Enhanced Resuscitation for Hemorrhagic Shock and Hindlimb Ischemia Report Title The overall goals of this investigation were to...during ischemia -reperfusion injury and cause cellular damage which likely contributes to myocardial contractile dysfunction. ROS oxidize and

  13. Nucleoprotein supplementation enhances the recovery of rat soleus mass with reloading after hindlimb unloading-induced atrophy via myonuclei accretion and increased protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Ryosuke; Hirayama, Yusuke; Tanaka, Minoru; Maeshige, Noriaki; Kondo, Hiroyo; Ishihara, Akihiko; Roy, Roland R; Fujino, Hidemi

    2016-12-01

    Hindlimb unloading results in muscle atrophy and a period of reloading has been shown to partially recover the lost muscle mass. Two of the mechanisms involved in this recovery of muscle mass are the activation of protein synthesis pathways and an increase in myonuclei number. The additional myonuclei are provided by satellite cells that are activated by the mechanical stress associated with the reloading of the muscles and eventually incorporated into the muscle fibers. Amino acid supplementation with exercise also can increase skeletal muscle mass through enhancement of protein synthesis and nucleotide supplements can promote cell cycle activity. Therefore, we hypothesized that nucleoprotein supplementation, a combination of amino acids and nucleotides, would enhance the recovery of muscle mass to a greater extent than reloading alone after a period of unloading. Adult rats were assigned to 4 groups: control, hindlimb unloaded (HU; 14 days), reloaded (5 days) after hindlimb unloading (HUR), and reloaded after hindlimb unloading with nucleoprotein supplementation (HUR + NP). Compared with the HUR group, the HUR + NP group had larger soleus muscles and fiber cross-sectional areas, higher levels of phosphorylated rpS6, and higher numbers of myonuclei and myogenin-positive cells. These results suggest that nucleoprotein supplementation has a synergistic effect with reloading in recovering skeletal muscle properties after a period of unloading via rpS6 activation and satellite cell differentiation and incorporation into the muscle fibers. Therefore, this supplement may be an effective therapeutic regimen to include in rehabilitative strategies for a variety of muscle wasting conditions such as aging, cancer cachexia, muscular dystrophy, bed rest, and cast immobilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Muscle disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  15. Mercury in human brain, blood, muscle and toenails in relation to exposure: an autopsy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morild Inge

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main forms of mercury (Hg exposure in the general population are methylmercury (MeHg from seafood, inorganic mercury (I-Hg from food, and mercury vapor (Hg0 from dental amalgam restorations. While the distribution of MeHg in the body is described by a one compartment model, the distribution of I-Hg after exposure to elemental mercury is more complex, and there is no biomarker for I-Hg in the brain. The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationships between on the one hand MeHg and I-Hg in human brain and other tissues, including blood, and on the other Hg exposure via dental amalgam in a fish-eating population. In addition, the use of blood and toenails as biological indicator media for inorganic and organic mercury (MeHg in the tissues was evaluated. Methods Samples of blood, brain (occipital lobe cortex, pituitary, thyroid, abdominal muscle and toenails were collected at autopsy of 30 deceased individuals, age from 47 to 91 years of age. Concentrations of total-Hg and I-Hg in blood and brain cortex were determined by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry and total-Hg in other tissues by sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS. Results The median concentrations of MeHg (total-Hg minus I-Hg and I-Hg in blood were 2.2 and 1.0 μg/L, and in occipital lobe cortex 4 and 5 μg/kg, respectively. There was a significant correlation between MeHg in blood and occipital cortex. Also, total-Hg in toenails correlated with MeHg in both blood and occipital lobe. I-Hg in both blood and occipital cortex, as well as total-Hg in pituitary and thyroid were strongly associated with the number of dental amalgam surfaces at the time of death. Conclusion In a fish-eating population, intake of MeHg via the diet has a marked impact on the MeHg concentration in the brain, while exposure to dental amalgam restorations increases the I-Hg concentrations in the brain. Discrimination between mercury species is

  16. Acute effects of blood flow restriction on muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing dynamic knee extensions at low load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernbom, Mathias; Järrebring, Rickard; Andreasson, Mikael A; Augustsson, Jesper

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing low-intensity dynamic knee extension exercise with and without blood flow restriction. Eleven healthy subjects with strength training experience performed 3 sets of unilateral knee extensions with no relaxation between repetitions to concentric torque failure at 30% of the 1 repetition maximum. One leg was randomized to exercise with cuff occlusion and the other leg to exercise without occlusion. The muscle activity in the quadriceps was recorded with electromyography (EMG). Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and acute pain were collected immediately, and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was rated before and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. The results demonstrated high EMG levels in both experimental conditions, but there were no significant differences regarding maximal muscle activity, except for a higher EMG in the eccentric phase in set 3 for the nonoccluded condition (p = 0.005). Significantly more repetitions were performed with the nonoccluded leg in every set (p knee extension decreases the endurance but does not increase the maximum muscle activity compared with training without restriction when both regimes are performed to failure. The high levels of muscle activity suggest that performing low-load dynamic knee extensions in a no-relaxation manner may be a useful method in knee rehabilitation settings when large forces are contraindicated. However, similarly to fatiguing blood flow restricted exercise, this method is associated with ischemic muscle pain, and thus its applications may be limited to highly motivated individuals.

  17. Longer repetition duration increases muscle activation and blood lactate response in matched resistance training protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Cesar Martins-Costa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study analyzed the effect of different repetition durations on electromyographic and blood lactate responses of the bench press exercise. Fifteen recreationally trained male volunteers completed two training protocols, matched for intensity (% one-repetition maximum; 1RM, number of sets, number of repetitions, and rest intervals. One of the protocols was performed with a repetition duration of 4 s (2 s concentric: 2 s eccentric; 2:2 protocol, whereas the second protocol had a repetition duration of 6 s (2 s concentric: 4 s eccentric; 2:4 protocol. The results showed higher normalized integrated electromyography (pectoralis major and triceps brachii for the 2:4 protocol. Blood lactate concentration was also higher in the 2:4 protocol across all sets. These results show that adding 2 s to the eccentric action in matched training protocols increases muscle activation and blood lactate response, which reinforces the notion that increasing repetition duration is an alternative load progression in resistance training.

  18. Effect of combining traction and vibration on back muscles, heart rate and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lizhen; Zhao, Meiya; Ma, Jian; Tian, Shan; Xiang, Pin; Yao, Wei; Fan, Yubo

    2014-11-01

    Eighty-five percent of the population has experienced low back pain (LBP), which may result in decreasing muscle strength and endurance, functional capacity of the spine, and so on. Traction and vibration are commonly used to relieve the low back pain. The effect of the combing traction and vibration on back muscles, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) was investigated in this study. Thirty healthy subjects participated in 12 trials lying supine on the spine-combing bed with different tilt angle (0°, 10°, 20° and 30°) and vibration modes (along with the sagittal and coronal axis with 0 Hz, 2 Hz and 12 Hz separately). EMG was recorded during each trial. Power spectral frequency analysis was applied to evaluate muscle fatigue by the shift of median power frequency (MPF). Pulse pressure (PP) was calculated from BP. HR and PP were used to estimate the effect of the combination of traction and vibration on the cardio-vascular system. It was shown that vibration could increase HR and decrease PP. The combination of traction and vibration (2 Hz vibration along Z-axis and 12 Hz vibration along Y-axis) had no significant effect on the cardio-vascular system. The MPF of lumbar erector spinae (LES) and upper trapezius (UT) decreased significantly when the angle reached 20° under the condition of 2 Hz vibration along Z-axis compared with it of 0°. Furthermore, the MPF also decreased significantly compared with it of static mode at 20° for LES and at 30° for UT. However at 12 Hz vibration along Y-axis, the MPF had significant increase when the angle reached 20° in LES and 30° in UT compared to 0°. For LES, the MPF also had significant difference when the angle was increased from 10° to 20°. Therefore, combining 2 Hz vibration along Z-axis and traction (tilt angles that less than 20°) may to reduce muscle fatigue both for LES and UT compared with either vibration or traction alone. The combination of 12 Hz vibration along Y-axis and traction (tilt angles

  19. The relationship between blood and muscle samples to monitor for residues of the antibiotic enrofloxacin in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Herrera, I; Schneider, M J; Blore, P J; Donoghue, D J

    2011-02-01

    In 2005, the US Food and Drug Administration withdrew approval for use of enrofloxacin in poultry, thus effectively imposing zero tolerance for residues of this antibiotic in poultry. Conventional residue monitoring for most antibiotics, including enrofloxacin, involves removing poultry carcasses from the processing line and collecting muscle tissues for analysis. Because of the loss of valuable edible products and the difficulties and expense of sampling all the carcasses, only a small portion of carcasses are tested for violative residues. Unlike muscle tissue, blood is readily available from all birds at the beginning of processing and may be used to screen for illegal residues in all poultry carcasses. It is unknown, however, if enrofloxacin concentrations in blood are predictive of muscle concentrations. In an effort to evaluate this relationship, 156 broiler chickens, 5 wk of age, were dosed with either 25 or 50 µg/mL of enrofloxacin for 3 or 7 d, respectively, in the drinking water. Blood and muscle samples were collected at 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h (n = 6 birds/group) during the first dosing day, every 48 h during the dosing period, and every 12 h during the withdrawal period for up to 60 h after withdrawal. Enrofloxacin residues were determined in all blood and tissue samples during the dosing periods and in most of the withdrawal period for both doses. These results support the potential to use blood to screen for illegal enrofloxacin residues in edible poultry tissues in an effort to protect the human food supply.

  20. Delayed onset muscle soreness and perceived exertion following blood flow restriction exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandner, Christopher R; Warmington, Stuart A

    2017-01-11

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptual responses to resistance exercise with either heavy-loads (80% 1 repetition maximum [1-RM]), light-loads (20% 1-RM), or light-loads in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR). Despite the use of light-loads, it has been suggested that the adoption of BFR resistance exercise may be limited due to increases in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and perceived exertion. Seventeen healthy untrained males participated in this balanced, randomized cross-over study. Following four sets of elbow-flexion exercise, participants reported ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), with DOMS also recorded for seven days following each trial. DOMS was significantly greater for low-pressure continuous BFR (until 48 h post-exercise) and high-pressure intermittent BFR (until 72 h post-exercise) compared with traditional heavy-load and light-load resistance exercise. In addition, RPE was higher for heavy-load resistance exercise and high-pressure intermittent BFR compared with low-pressure continuous BFR, with all trials greater than light-load resistance exercise. For practitioners working with untrained participants, this study provides evidence to suggest that in order to minimize the perception of effort and post-exercise muscle soreness associated with BFR resistance exercise, continuous low-pressure application may be more preferential compared with intermittent high-pressure application. Importantly, these perceptual responses are relatively short-lived (∼2 days) and have previously been shown to subside after a few exercise sessions. Combined with smaller initial training volumes (set x repetitions) this may limit RPE and DOMS to strengthen uptake and adherence, and assist in program progression for muscle hypertrophy and gains in strength.

  1. Impact of exercising muscles to exhaustion on blood markers in weight-training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Burini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic markers of physical exhaustion were evaluated in venous blood drawn from 8 men (20-30 years old with at least 3 years’ experience in weight-lifting training. They were submitted, in the morning, to an overload (exhaustion test starting at 80% of 1 RM (one repetition maximum on 8 muscle groups. Heart rate (HR was measured and samples of venous blood were collected before and immediately after the exhaustion test (ET and sent to a laboratory for blood gas analysis (pH, lactate, pO2, pCO2 and HCO-3 and measurement of electrolytes (Na+, Cl-, K+ and Ca++ and glycemia. The HR/kg ratios observed were in the following sequence of descending order: arm and hamstrings > shoulder and back > chest > quadriceps > calf. Results for NH4, pH, lactate and HCO-3 levels were changed in all 8 muscle groups, whereas Ca++, K+, Na+, Cl-, and uric acid did not change significantly after the ET. The muscle groups: back, biceps, triceps, chest, and hamstrings exhibited changes in seven to nine indicators while only 4 to 6 biochemical indicators changed in response to shoulder, calf, and quadriceps exercises. Thus, blood markers indicating acidosis, hemoconcentration and hyperglycemia were sensitive markers although with low specificity for the eight muscle groups. Calf and quadriceps had the highest tolerance for weight loading along with the smallest HR increase and lowest number of biochemical indicators changed. Therefore, it appears possible to reach muscle exhaustion with systemic responses in the blood by working out the arm muscles and hamstrings with lighter weights than for quadriceps and calf muscles.ResumoO impacto da exaustão (com pesos de grupos musculares, sobre indicadores sanguíneos de acidose e de hemoconcentração foi estudado em 8 jovens (20-30 anos treinados em musculação. Todos foram submetidos a sobrecarga inicial de 80% de 1RM, até a exaustão (TE, em 8 exercícios distintos, com coleta de sangue e registro da freqüência card

  2. Effects of Changes in Colored Light on Brain and Calf Muscle Blood Concentration and Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Weinzirl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Color light therapy is a therapeutic method in complementary medicine. In color therapy, light of two contrasting colors is often applied in a sequential order. The aim of this study was to investigate possible physiological effects, i.e., changes in the blood volume and oxygenation in the brain and calf muscle of healthy subjects who were exposed to red and blue light in sequential order. The hypothesis was that if a subject is first exposed to blue and then red light, the effect of the red light will be enhanced due to the contrastingly different characteristics of the two colors. The same was expected for blue light, if first exposing a subject to red and then to blue light. Twelve healthy volunteers (six male, six female were measured twice on two different days by near-infrared spectroscopy during exposure to colored light. Two sequences of colored light were applied in a controlled, randomized, crossover design: first blue, then red, and vice versa. For the brain and muscle, the results showed no significant differences in blood volume and oxygenation between the two sequences, and a high interindividual physiological variability. Thus, the hypothesis had to be rejected. Comparing these data to results from a previous study, where subjects were exposed to blue and red light without sequential color changes, shows that the results of the current study appear to be similar to those of red light exposure. This may indicate that the exposure to red light was preponderant and thus effects of blue light were outweighed.

  3. Running Pace Decrease during a Marathon Is Positively Related to Blood Markers of Muscle Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Coso, Juan; Fernández, David; Abián-Vicen, Javier; Salinero, Juan José; González-Millán, Cristina; Areces, Francisco; Ruiz, Diana; Gallo, César; Calleja-González, Julio; Pérez-González, Benito

    2013-01-01

    Background Completing a marathon is one of the most challenging sports activities, yet the source of running fatigue during this event is not completely understood. The aim of this investigation was to determine the cause(s) of running fatigue during a marathon in warm weather. Methodology/Principal Findings We recruited 40 amateur runners (34 men and 6 women) for the study. Before the race, body core temperature, body mass, leg muscle power output during a countermovement jump, and blood samples were obtained. During the marathon (27 °C; 27% relative humidity) running fatigue was measured as the pace reduction from the first 5-km to the end of the race. Within 3 min after the marathon, the same pre-exercise variables were obtained. Results Marathoners reduced their running pace from 3.5 ± 0.4 m/s after 5-km to 2.9 ± 0.6 m/s at the end of the race (P 15% pace reduction) had elevated post-race myoglobin (1318 ± 1411 v 623 ± 391 µg L−1; P<0.05), lactate dehydrogenase (687 ± 151 v 583 ± 117 U L−1; P<0.05), and creatine kinase (564 ± 469 v 363 ± 158 U L−1; P = 0.07) in comparison with marathoners that preserved their running pace reasonably well throughout the race. However, they did not differ in their body mass change (−3.1 ± 1.0 v −3.0 ± 1.0%; P = 0.60) or post-race body temperature (38.7 ± 0.7 v 38.9 ± 0.9 °C; P = 0.35). Conclusions/Significance Running pace decline during a marathon was positively related with muscle breakdown blood markers. To elucidate if muscle damage during a marathon is related to mechanistic or metabolic factors requires further investigation. PMID:23460881

  4. Running pace decrease during a marathon is positively related to blood markers of muscle damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Del Coso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Completing a marathon is one of the most challenging sports activities, yet the source of running fatigue during this event is not completely understood. The aim of this investigation was to determine the cause(s of running fatigue during a marathon in warm weather. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited 40 amateur runners (34 men and 6 women for the study. Before the race, body core temperature, body mass, leg muscle power output during a countermovement jump, and blood samples were obtained. During the marathon (27 °C; 27% relative humidity running fatigue was measured as the pace reduction from the first 5-km to the end of the race. Within 3 min after the marathon, the same pre-exercise variables were obtained. RESULTS: Marathoners reduced their running pace from 3.5 ± 0.4 m/s after 5-km to 2.9 ± 0.6 m/s at the end of the race (P 15% pace reduction had elevated post-race myoglobin (1318 ± 1411 v 623 ± 391 µg L(-1; P<0.05, lactate dehydrogenase (687 ± 151 v 583 ± 117 U L(-1; P<0.05, and creatine kinase (564 ± 469 v 363 ± 158 U L(-1; P = 0.07 in comparison with marathoners that preserved their running pace reasonably well throughout the race. However, they did not differ in their body mass change (-3.1 ± 1.0 v -3.0 ± 1.0%; P = 0.60 or post-race body temperature (38.7 ± 0.7 v 38.9 ± 0.9 °C; P = 0.35. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Running pace decline during a marathon was positively related with muscle breakdown blood markers. To elucidate if muscle damage during a marathon is related to mechanistic or metabolic factors requires further investigation.

  5. Leg crossing with muscle tensing, a physical counter-manoeuvre to prevent syncope, enhances leg blood flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, J.T.; Dijk, N. van; Woerds, W. ter; Wieling, W.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2007-01-01

    In patients with orthostatic intolerance, the mechanisms to maintain BP (blood pressure) fail. A physical counter-manoeuvre to postpone or even prevent orthostatic intolerance in these patients is leg crossing combined with muscle tensing. Although the central haemodynamic effects of physical counte

  6. Effects of blood flow restricted low-intensity concentric or eccentric training on muscle size and strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Yasuda

    Full Text Available We investigated the acute and chronic effects of low-intensity concentric or eccentric resistance training with blood flow restriction (BFR on muscle size and strength. Ten young men performed 30% of concentric one repetition maximal dumbbell curl exercise (four sets, total 75 reps 3 days/week for 6 weeks. One arm was randomly chosen for concentric BFR (CON-BFR exercise only and the other arm performed eccentric BFR (ECC-BFR exercise only at the same exercise load. During the exercise session, iEMG for biceps brachii muscles increased progressively during CON-BFR, which was greater (p<0.05 than that of the ECC-BFR. Immediately after the exercise, muscle thickness (MTH of the elbow flexors acutely increased (p<0.01 with both CON-BFR and ECC-BFR, but was greater with CON-BFR (11.7% (p<0.01 than ECC-BFR (3.9% at 10-cm above the elbow joint. Following 6-weeks of training, MRI-measured muscle cross-sectional area (CSA at 10-cm position and mid-upper arm (12.0% and 10.6%, respectively as well as muscle volume (12.5% of the elbow flexors were increased (p<0.01 with CON-BFR. Increases in muscle CSA and volume were lower in ECC-BFR (5.1%, 0.8% and 2.9%, respectively than in the CON-BFR and only muscle CSA at 10-cm position increased significantly (p<0.05 after the training. Maximal voluntary isometric strength of elbow flexors was increased (p<0.05 in CON-BFR (8.6%, but not in ECC (3.8%. These results suggest that CON-BFR training leads to pronounced acute changes in muscle size, an index of muscle cell swelling, the response to which may be an important factor for promoting muscle hypertrophy with BFR resistance training.

  7. Glucose predictability, blood capillary permeability, and glucose utilization rate in subcutaneous, skeletal muscle, and visceral fat tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutny, Tomas

    2013-11-01

    This study suggests an approach for the comparison and evaluation of particular compartments with modest experimental setup costs. A glucose level prediction model was used to evaluate the compartment's glucose transport rate across the blood capillary membrane and the glucose utilization rate by the cells. The glucose levels of the blood, subcutaneous tissue, skeletal muscle tissue, and visceral fat were obtained in experiments conducted on hereditary hypertriglyceridemic rats. After the blood glucose level had undergone a rapid change, the experimenter attempted to reach a steady blood glucose level by manually correcting the glucose infusion rate and maintaining a constant insulin infusion rate. The interstitial fluid glucose levels of subcutaneous tissue, skeletal muscle tissue, and visceral fat were evaluated to determine the reaction delay compared with the change in the blood glucose level, the interstitial fluid glucose level predictability, the blood capillary permeability, the effect of the concentration gradient, and the glucose utilization rate. Based on these data, the glucose transport rate across the capillary membrane and the utilization rate in a particular tissue were determined. The rates obtained were successfully verified against positron emission tomography experiments. The subcutaneous tissue exhibits the lowest and the most predictable glucose utilization rate, whereas the skeletal muscle tissue has the greatest glucose utilization rate. In contrast, the visceral fat is the least predictable and has the shortest reaction delay compared with the change in the blood glucose level. The reaction delays obtained for the subcutaneous tissue and skeletal muscle tissue were found to be approximately equal using a metric based on the time required to reach half of the increase in the interstitial fluid glucose level. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Treatment with a nitric oxide-donating NSAID alleviates functional muscle ischemia in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gail D; Ye, Jianfeng; De Nardi, Claudio; Monopoli, Angela; Ongini, Ennio; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the standard mdx mouse model of DMD, dystrophin deficiency causes loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma, producing functional ischemia when the muscles are exercised. We asked if functional muscle ischemia would be eliminated and normal blood flow regulation restored by treatment with an exogenous nitric oxide (NO)-donating drug. Beginning at 8 weeks of age, mdx mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1% soybean oil alone or in combination with a low (15 mg/kg) or high (45 mg/kg) dose of HCT 1026, a NO-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent which has previously been shown to slow disease progression in the mdx model. After 1 month of treatment, vasoconstrictor responses to intra-arterial norepinephrine (NE) were compared in resting and contracting hindlimbs. In untreated mdx mice, the usual effect of muscle contraction to attenuate NE-mediated vasoconstriction was impaired, resulting in functional ischemia: NE evoked similar decreases in femoral blood flow velocity and femoral vascular conductance (FVC) in the contracting compared to resting hindlimbs (ΔFVC contraction/ΔFVC rest=0.88 ± 0.03). NE-induced functional ischemia was unaffected by low dose HCT 1026 (ΔFVC ratio=0.92 ± 0.04; P>0.05 vs untreated), but was alleviated by the high dose of the drug (ΔFVC ratio=0.22 ± 0.03; P<0.05 vs untreated or low dose). The beneficial effect of high dose HCT 1026 was maintained with treatment up to 3 months. The effect of the NO-donating drug HCT 1026 to normalize blood flow regulation in contracting mdx mouse hindlimb muscles suggests a putative novel treatment for DMD. Further translational research is warranted.

  9. Efficacy of fragmin/protamine microparticles containing fibroblast growth factor-2 (F/P MPs/FGF-2) to induce collateral vessels in a rabbit model of hindlimb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horio, Takuya; Fujita, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Ishihara, Masayuki; Kishimoto, Satoko; Nakamura, Shingo; Hase, Kazuo; Maehara, Tadaaki

    2011-09-01

    The localized delivery of exogenous, angiogenic growth factors such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 has become a promising alternative treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD) and critical limb ischemia (CLI). The present study describes the efficacy of fragmin/protamine microparticles containing FGF-2 (F/P-MPs/FGF-2) to promote vessel growth in a rabbit model of hindlimb ischemia. A total of 24 rabbits were used to construct a model of hindlimb ischemia by resection of the left femoral artery. The rabbits were randomly divided into four groups 10 days after surgery (day 0); group A: control (non-treated; 1 mL of phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]); group B: FGF-2 (100 μg FGF-2 in 1 mL PBS)-treated; group C: F/P-MPs (12 mg dried F/P MPs in 1 mL PBS)-treated; and group D; F/P MPs/FGF-2 (100 μg FGF-2 and 12 mg dried F/P MPs in 1 mL PBS)-treated (n = 6 each). The drugs were administered intramuscularly to each group. Blood flow and blood pressure were measured in each group on days 0, 14, and 28. Angiography was performed to assess arteriogenesis on day 28. The number of capillaries on day 28 was determined by direct counting CD31(-) and α-smooth muscle antibody (α-SMA)-positive vessels. Neither death nor wound infection was observed throughout the experiment. The F/P MPs/FGF-2-treated group showed marked improvement in the blood flow ratio, blood pressure ratio, and capillary number in comparison to the control group, FGF-2-treated group, and F/P MPs-treated group. The F/P MPs-treated group showed intermediate improvement in blood flow ratio and capillary number in comparison to the control group and FGF-2-treated group. The F/P MPs/FGF-2-treated group strongly induced functional collateral vessels in the rabbit model of hindlimb ischemia, indicating a possible therapy for PAD. Copyright © 2011 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hindlimb musculature of the largest living rodent Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (Caviomorpha): Adaptations to semiaquatic and terrestrial styles of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Esponda, César M; Candela, Adriana M

    2016-03-01

    The caviomorph species Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (Cavioidea), or capybara, is the largest living rodent. This species is widely distributed, from northern South America to Uruguay and eastern Argentina, inhabiting in a wide variety of densely vegetated lowlands habitats in the proximity of water. Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris not only runs with agility, like other members of the Cavioidea, but it can also swim and dive easily. For these reasons, it has been classified as a cursorial as well as semiaquatic species. However, comprehensive anatomical descriptions of the osteology and myology of the capybara are not available in the literature and analyses on its swimming abilities are still required. We hypothesize that some of the characters of the hindlimb of H. hydrochaeris could reveal a unique morphological arrangement associated with swimming abilities. In this study, an anatomical description of the hindlimb musculature of H. hydrochaeris, and a discussion of the possible functional significance of the main muscles is provided. In addition, we explore the evolution of some myological and osteological characters of the capybara in the context of the cavioids. We concluded that most of the muscular and osteological features of the hindlimb of H. hydrochaeris are neither adaptations to a specialized cursoriality, nor major modifications for an aquatic mode of life. Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris share several features with other cavioids, being a generalized cursorial species in the context of this clade. However, it shows some adaptations of the hindlimb for enhancing propulsion through water, of which the most notable seems to be the shortening of the leg, short tendons of most muscles of the leg, and a well-developed soleus muscle. These adaptations to a semiaquatic mode of life could have been acquired during the most recent evolutionary history of the hydrochoerids.

  11. Joint work and power for both the forelimb and hindlimb during trotting in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutto, Darren J; Hoyt, Donald F; Clayton, Hilary M; Cogger, Edward A; Wickler, Steven J

    2006-10-01

    The net work of the limbs during constant speed over level ground should be zero. However, the partitioning of negative and positive work between the fore- and hindlimbs of a quadruped is not likely to be equal because the forelimb produces a net braking force while the hindlimb produces a net propulsive force. It was hypothesized that the forelimb would do net negative work while the hindlimb did net positive work during trotting in the horse. Because vertical and horizontal impulses remain unchanged across speeds it was hypothesized that net work of both limbs would be independent of speed. Additionally because the major mass of limb musculature is located proximally, it was hypothesized that proximal joints would do more work than distal joints. Kinetic and kinematic analysis were combined using inverse dynamics to calculate work and power for each joint of horses trotting at between 2.5 and 5.0 m s(-1). Work done by the hindlimb was indeed positive (consistently 0.34 J kg(-1) across all speeds), but, contrary to our hypothesis, net work by the forelimb was essentially zero (but also independent of trotting speed). The zero net work of the forelimb may be the consequence of our not being able to account, experimentally, for the negative work done by the extrinsic muscles connecting the scapula and the thorax. The distal three joints of both limbs behaved elastically with a period of energy absorption followed by energy return. Proximal forelimb joints (elbow and shoulder) did no net work, because there was very little movement of the elbow and shoulder during the portion of stance when an extensor moment was greatest. Of the two proximal hindlimb joints, the hip did positive work during the stride, generating energy almost throughout stance. The knee did some work, but like the forelimb proximal joints, had little movement during the middle of stance when the flexion moment was the greatest, probably serving to allow the efficient transmission of energy from the

  12. Dense distributed processing in a hindlimb scratch motor network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzulaitis, Robertas; Hounsgaard, Jørn Dybkjær

    2014-01-01

    In reduced preparations, hindlimb movements can be generated by a minimal network of neurons in the limb innervating spinal segments. The network of neurons that generates real movements is less well delineated. In an ex vivo carapace-spinal cord preparation from adult turtles (Trachemys scripta ...... of a distributed motor network that secures motor coherence.......In reduced preparations, hindlimb movements can be generated by a minimal network of neurons in the limb innervating spinal segments. The network of neurons that generates real movements is less well delineated. In an ex vivo carapace-spinal cord preparation from adult turtles (Trachemys scripta...... elegans), we show that ventral horn interneurons in mid-thoracic spinal segments are functionally integrated in the hindlimb scratch network. First, mid-thoracic interneurons receive intense synaptic input during scratching and behave like neurons in the hindlimb enlargement. Second, some mid...

  13. Folic acid ingestion improves skeletal muscle blood flow during graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise in aged humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Steven A; Gagnon, Daniel; Adams, Amy N; Moralez, Gilbert; Kouda, Ken; Jaffery, Manall F; Cramer, Matthew N; Crandall, Craig G

    2017-09-01

    Skeletal muscle blood flow is attenuated in aged humans performing dynamic exercise, which is due, in part, to impaired local vasodilatory mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that folic acid improves cutaneous vasodilation during localized and whole body heating through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms. However, it is unclear whether folic acid improves vasodilation in other vascular beds during conditions of increased metabolism (i.e., exercise). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that folic acid ingestion improves skeletal muscle blood flow in aged adults performing graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise via increased vascular conductance. Nine healthy, aged adults (two men and seven women; age: 68 ± 5 yr) performed graded handgrip and plantar flexion exercise before (control), 2 h after (acute, 5 mg), and after 6 wk (chronic, 5 mg/day) folic acid ingestion. Forearm (brachial artery) and leg (superficial femoral artery) blood velocity and diameter were measured via Duplex ultrasonography and used to calculate blood flow. Acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased serum folate (both P < 0.05 vs. control). During handgrip exercise, acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased forearm blood flow (both conditions P < 0.05 vs. control) and vascular conductance (both P < 0.05 vs. control). During plantar flexion exercise, acute and chronic folic acid ingestion increased leg blood flow (both P < 0.05 vs. control), but only acute folic acid ingestion increased vascular conductance (P < 0.05 vs. control). Taken together, folic acid ingestion increases blood flow to active skeletal muscle primarily via improved local vasodilation in aged adults.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our findings demonstrate that folic acid ingestion improves blood flow via enhanced vascular conductance in the exercising skeletal muscle of aged humans. These findings provide evidence for the therapeutic use of folic acid to improve skeletal muscle blood flow, and perhaps

  14. Thigh muscle size and vascular function after blood flow-restricted elastic band training in older women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Fukumura, Kazuya; Tomaru, Takanobu; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of elastic band training with blood flow restriction (BFR) on thigh muscle size and vascular function in older women. Older women were divided into three groups: low-intensity elastic band BFR training (BFR-Tr, n = 10), middleto high-intensity elastic band training (MH-Tr, n = 10), and no training (Ctrl, n = 10) groups. BFR-Tr and MH-Tr groups performed squat and knee extension exercises using elastic band, 2 days/week for 12 weeks. During BFR-Tr exercise session, subjects wore pressure cuffs around the most proximal region of both thighs. The following measurements were taken before (pre) and 3-5 days after (post) the final training session: MRI-measured muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) at mid-thigh, maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of knee extension, central systolic blood pressure (c-SBP), central-augmentation index (c-AIx), cardio-ankle vascular index testing (CAVI), ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI). Quadriceps muscle CSA (6.9%) and knee extension MVIC (13.7%) were increased (p muscle CSA as well as maximal muscle strength, but does not decrease vascular function in older women. PMID:27244884

  15. Chronic impairment of leg muscle blood flow following cardiac catheterization in childhood. [/sup 133/Xe clearance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skovranek, J.; Samanek, M.

    1979-01-01

    In 99 patients with congenital heart defects or chronic respiratory disease without clinical symptoms of disturbances in peripheral circulation, resting and maximal blood flow in the anterior tibial muscle of both extremities were investigated 2.7 yrs (average) after cardiac catheterization. The method used involved /sup 133/Xe clearance. Resting blood flow was normal and no difference could be demonstrated between the extremity originally used for catheterization and the contralateral control extremity. No disturbance in maximal blood flow could be proved in the extremity used for catheterization by the venous route only. Maximal blood flow was significantly lower in that extremity where the femoral artery had been catheterized or cannulated for pressure measurement and blood sampling. The disturbance in maximal flow was shown regardless of whether the arterial catheterization involved the Seldinger percutaneous technique, arteriotomy, or mere cannulation of the femoral artery. The values in the involved extremity did not differ significantly from the values in a healthy population.

  16. Effects of aging on time course of neovascularization-related gene expression following acute hindlimb ischemia in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jin-song; LIU Xia; XUE Zhen-yi; Lee Alderman; Justin U. Tilan; Remi Adenika; Stephen E. Epstein; Mary Susan Burnett

    2011-01-01

    Background Molecular analysis of neovascularization related genes by time course in response to ischemia has not been described in the context of aging. We aimed to provide a progressively deeper understanding of how aging compromises neovascularization.Methods Young (3-month) and old (18-month) C57BI mice were subjected to left hindlimb ischemia. Necrosis score was evaluated in calf muscles. Calf muscles,peripheral blood,bone marrow were harvested at different time points. The expressions of matrix metalloproteiniase-9 (MMPg),endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS),vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF),stromal derived growth factor-1 (SDF1),hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α),VEGF receptor-1(Fit1),VEGF receptor-2 (Flk1),angiopoietin-1 (Ang1),CD133,CD26 were detected by RT-PCR or Western blotting.White blood cells were counted in the peripheral blood. Gene expression data were compared by two-way analysis of variance.Results MMP9,HIF-1α and SDF-1 were more upregulated during acute ischemia in old vs. young mice,reflecting increased ischemia in aging mice. However VEGF and eNOS exhibited lower expression in old vs. young mice,despite greater ischemia intensity. Ang1 and Flk1 showed similar expression in old vs. young mice. MMP9 peaked earlier in peripheral blood in young vs. old mice. Concurrent decreasing CD26 and increasing CD133 expression in aging bonemarrow suggest aging impairs progenitor cell mobilization,Conclusions Our results indicate that a complex array of defects occur with aging that interfere with optimal neovascularization. These include potential impaired mobilization of progenitor cells to ischemic tissue,decreased levels of eNOS and VEGF and delayed responses to ischemia.ZLEr. WANG Jin-song,Division of Vascular Surgery,the First Affiliated Hospital,Sun Yat-sen University,Guangzhou,Guangdong 510080,China (Tel:86-20-87333440.Fax:86-20-87333242. Email:wangjs@mail.sysu.edu.cn)This work was supported by NIH RO1 HL085003-01A2,NNSF30100179.

  17. Effects of detraining after blood flow-restricted low-intensity concentric or eccentric training on muscle size and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S; Abe, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 6 weeks of detraining on muscle size and strength in young men who had previously participated in 6 weeks (3 days/week) of 30 % of concentric one-repetition maximal (1-RM) dumbbell curl training [one arm: concentric blood flow restricted (BFR) exercise (CON-BFR); the other arm: eccentric BFR exercise (ECC-BFR)]. MRI-measured muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) at 10 cm above the elbow joint increased from pre to post (p hypertrophy.

  18. Effect of change in blood volume in skin plus active muscle on heart rate drift during submaximal exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Yano,T.; T Yunoki; Matsuura, R.; Arimitsu, T.; Kimura, T.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of change in blood volume in skin plus active muscle on heart rate drift during moderate exercise and heavy exercise for 30 min. Total hemoglobin concentration (Total Hb) in the vastus lateralis muscle plus its skin was determined by near-infrared spectroscopy. Total Hb significantly increased and remained stable from 20 min in moderate exercise and from 10 min in heavy exercise. Heart rate (HR) rapidly increased until 3 min and showe...

  19. Effects of short-term detraining following blood flow restricted low-intensity training on muscle size and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Ogasawara, Riki; Abe, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 3 weeks of detraining on muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and one-repetition maximum strength (1-RM) in young men who had previously participated in 6 weeks (3 days week(-1) ) of bench press training [blood flow restricted low-intensity (LI-BFR; n = 10, 20% 1-RM) or high-intensity (HI; n = 7, 75% 1-RM)]. Bench press 1-RM and muscle CSA of triceps brachii (TB) and pectoralis major (PM) were evaluated before (pre) and after training period (post) as well as after detraining period (detraining). Bench press 1-RM was higher at both post and detraining than at pre for LI-BFR (Pmuscle CSA were higher at both post and detraining than at pre for the HI group (Pmuscle CSA) was higher at both post and detraining than at pre for the HI group (Pmuscle strength following 6 weeks of training with LI-BFR as well as HI was well preserved at 3 weeks of detraining. HI-induced muscle strength appears to be dependent upon both neural adaptations and muscle hypertrophy with training and detraining. On the other hand, LI-BFR-induced muscle strength appears to be related primarily to muscle hypertrophy with training and to neural adaptations with detraining.

  20. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise: insight from heart rate pacing during exercise with a trained and a deconditioned muscle group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads; Hellsten, Ylva; Secher, Niels H; Saltin, Bengt

    2013-05-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee-extensor training and 2 weeks of deconditioning of the other leg (leg cast). Hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotides were determined during exercise with the (1) deconditioned leg, (2) trained leg, and (3) trained leg with atrial pacing to the heart rate obtained with the deconditioned leg. Heart rate was ≈ 15 bpm lower during exercise with the trained leg (Prate-pressure product, and ventilation were lower during exercise with the trained leg (Pheart rate was controlled by atrial pacing, stroke volume decreased (Pblood flow, arterial pressures, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure remained unchanged. Circulating [norepinephrine], [lactate] and [K(+)] were lower and interstitial [ATP] and pH were higher in the trained leg (Pexercise with the trained leg is partly coupled to a reduced signaling from skeletal muscle likely mediated by K(+), lactate, or pH, whereas the lower cardiac afterload increases stroke volume. These results demonstrate that skeletal muscle training reduces the cardioventilatory response to exercise without compromising O2 delivery, and it can therefore be used to reduce the load on the heart during physical activity.

  1. A novel laser-Doppler flowmetry assisted murine model of acute hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion for free flap research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Taha Sönmez

    Full Text Available Suitable and reproducible experimental models of translational research in reconstructive surgery that allow in-vivo investigation of diverse molecular and cellular mechanisms are still limited. To this end we created a novel murine model of acute hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion to mimic a microsurgical free flap procedure. Thirty-six C57BL6 mice (n = 6/group were assigned to one control and five experimental groups (subject to 6, 12, 96, 120 hours and 14 days of reperfusion, respectively following 4 hours of complete hindlimb ischemia. Ischemia and reperfusion were monitored using Laser-Doppler Flowmetry. Hindlimb tissue components (skin and muscle were investigated using histopathology, quantitative immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Despite massive initial tissue damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury, the structure of the skin component was restored after 96 hours. During the same time, muscle cells were replaced by young myotubes. In addition, initial neuromuscular dysfunction, edema and swelling resolved by day 4. After two weeks, no functional or neuromuscular deficits were detectable. Furthermore, upregulation of VEGF and tissue infiltration with CD34-positive stem cells led to new capillary formation, which peaked with significantly higher values after two weeks. These data indicate that our model is suitable to investigate cellular and molecular tissue alterations from ischemia-reperfusion such as occur during free flap procedures.

  2. Differential responses of mechanosensitive osteocyte proteins in fore- and hindlimbs of hindlimb-unloaded rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Corinne E; Brezicha, Jessica E; Elizondo, Jon P; Narayanan, S Anand; Hogan, Harry A; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2017-08-03

    Osteocytes are believed to be the primary mechanosensors of bone tissue, signaling to osteoblasts and osteoclasts by releasing specific proteins. Sclerostin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) are osteocyte proteins that signal to osteoblasts. The primary objective of this study was to determine if osteocyte protein response to mechanical unloading is restricted to the unloaded bone using the hindlimb unloading (HU) rodent model. We also examined tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) due to its interactions with all three osteocyte proteins. We hypothesized that unloaded hindlimb cancellous bone would have an altered osteocyte protein (sclerostin, IL-6, and IGF-I) response compared to controls, while the response in the weight-bearing forelimb would not differ from ambulating controls. Male Sprague Dawley rats (7-mo old) experienced either HU (n=7) or normal cage activity (CON; n=7) for 28days. The unloaded distal femur and the weight-bearing proximal humerus were compared in HU vs CON. Metaphyseal bone density was reduced in the HU rats' hindlimb, but not in the proximal humerus, compared to CON values. Osteocyte density was 30% lower in the HU distal femur, but not different from CON in the proximal humerus. %Sclerostin+osteocytes in the distal femur were higher in HU compared to CON, but lower in the proximal humerus. Both %IGF-I+ and %IL-6+ osteocytes were lower in the distal femur for HU, but higher in the proximal humerus for HU. Osterix surface, a marker of osteoblasts, was lower in HU in the distal femur; however, the proximal humerus had more %osterix+surface in HU. In HU %Cathepsin K+ surface, a marker of osteoclasts, was higher in the distal femur and lower in the proximal humerus. %TNF-α+osteocytes were no different from CON in either bone site. HU proximal humerus osteocyte protein responses of sclerostin, IL-6, and IGF-I changed in the opposite direction as observed in the distal femur within the same animal. The opposite

  3. Branched-chain amino acids increase arterial blood ammonia in spite of enhanced intrinsic muscle ammonia metabolism in patients with cirrhosis and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Gitte; Keiding, Susanne; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2011-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are used in attempts to reduce blood ammonia in patients with cirrhosis and intermittent hepatic encephalopathy based on the hypothesis that BCAA stimulate muscle ammonia detoxification. We studied the effects of an oral dose of BCAA on the skeletal muscle...... the metabolism of blood-supplied ammonia and the A-V measurements were used to measure the total ammonia metabolism across the thigh muscle. After intake of BCAA, blood ammonia increased more than 30% in both groups of subjects (both P ....05). BCAA intake led to a massive glutamine release from the muscle (cirrhotic patients, P BCAA enhanced the intrinsic muscle metabolism of ammonia but not the metabolism of blood-supplied ammonia in both the patients with cirrhosis and in the healthy...

  4. Are blood flow and lipolysis in subcutaneous adipose tissue influenced by contractions in adjacent muscles in humans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, Bente; Dela, Flemming; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2006-01-01

    Aerobic exercise increases whole body adipose tissue lipolysis, but is lipolysis higher in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) adjacent to contracting muscles than in SCAT adjacent to resting muscles? Ten healthy, overnight-fasted males performed one-legged knee extension exercise at 25% of maximal...... workload (W(max)) for 30 min followed by exercise at 55% W(max) for 120 min with the other leg and finally exercised at 85% W(max) for 30 min with the first leg. Subjects rested for 30 min between exercise periods. Femoral SCAT blood flow was estimated from washout of (133)Xe, and lipolysis was calculated...... from femoral SCAT interstitial and arterial glycerol concentrations and blood flow. In general, blood flow and lipolysis were higher in femoral SCAT adjacent to contracting than adjacent to resting muscle (time 15-30 min; blood flow: 25% W(max) 6.6 +/- 1.0 vs. 3.9 +/- 0.8 ml x 100 g(-1) x min(-1), P...

  5. Neuronal control of turtle hindlimb motor rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, P S G

    2005-03-01

    The turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans, uses its hindlimb during the rhythmic motor behaviors of walking, swimming, and scratching. For some tasks, one or more motor strategies or forms may be produced, e.g., forward swimming or backpaddling. This review discusses experiments that reveal characteristics of the spinal neuronal networks producing these motor behaviors. Limb-movement studies show shared properties such as rhythmic alternation between hip flexion and hip extension, as well as variable properties such as the timing of knee extension in the cycle of hip movements. Motor-pattern studies show shared properties such as rhythmic alternation between hip flexor and hip extensor motor activities, as well as variable properties such as modifiable timing of knee extensor motor activity in the cycle of hip motor activity. Motor patterns also display variations such as the hip-extensor deletion of rostral scratching. Neuronal-network studies reveal mechanisms responsible for movement and motor-pattern properties. Some interneurons in the spinal cord have shared activities, e.g., each unit is active during more than one behavior, and have distinct characteristics, e.g., each unit is most excited during a specific behavior. Interneuronal recordings during variations support the concept of modular organization of central pattern generators in the spinal cord.

  6. SDF-1 combined with peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells transplantation for the treatment of hindlimb ischemia in nude mice%基质细胞衍生因子联合外周血内皮祖细胞移植治疗裸鼠肢体缺血

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛新宝; 胡何节; 邓福生; 王晓天; 方征东; 孙小杰

    2011-01-01

    目的 应用基质细胞衍生因子(SDF-1)结合外周血内皮祖细胞(EPCs)移植治疗裸鼠肢体缺血,探讨其促进血管新生的能力.方法 建立裸鼠后肢缺血模型,随机分为缺血对照组、EPCs移植组、SDF-1组、SDF-1联合EPCs移植组及SDF-1联合AMD3100处理后的EPCs移植组.移植第3、7天检测后肢腓肠肌CD34+VEGFR+细胞数,第28天检测缺血区新生血管密度.结果 移植第3天对照组、EPCs组、SDF-1组、SDF-1+EPCs组、SDF-1+AMD3100 EPCs组双阳性细胞数分别为0.00±0.00个/HP、5.30±0.65个/HP、0.00±0.00个/HP、10.31±0.63个/HP及1.86±0.17个/HP;第7天分别为0.00±0.00个/HP、7.05±0.18个/HP、0.00±0.00个/HP、11.81±0.53个/HP及2.83±0.48个/HP,第28天新生毛细血管数分别为3.00 ±0.13个/HP、6.15±0.04个/HP、6.20±0.10个/HP、10.65 ±0.08个/HP、6.21±0.08个/HP.SDF-1可增加缺血区CD34+ VEGFR+细胞浸润数量(P<0.05),提高新生血管数量(P<0.05),SDF-1联合外周血EPCs可进一步提高新生血管数量(P<0.05).结论 SDF-1能够促进EPCs归巢,增强血管形成能力,促进血管新生;AMD3100能够阻断SDF-1的诱导迁移效应.%Objective To explore the effect of stromal cell-derived factor-1 ( SDF-1 ) in combination with transplantation of peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for the treatment of nude mice hindlimb ischemia. Methods Hindlimb ischemia model was established in nude mice, mice were then divided into five groups randomly: ischemic control group, peripheral blood EPCs transplantation group, SDF-1 local application group, SDF-1 combined with EPCs group, SDF-1 combined with AMD3100 treated EPCs group. Local CD34+VEGFR+ cells in the hind gastrocnemius were detected at day 3,7 after transplantation. The intensity of neovasculorization were evaluated at day 28. Results The double-positive cells number of control group, EPCs group, SDF-1 group, SDF-1 + EPCs group, SDF-1 + AMD3100 EPCs group were 0.00 ±0.00,5. 30 ±0

  7. A Chinese 2-herb formula (NF3) promotes hindlimb ischemia-induced neovascularization and wound healing of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Jacqueline Chor-Wing; Ko, Chun-Hay; Lau, Kit-Man; To, Ming-Ho; Kwok, Hin-Fai; Chan, Yuet-Wa; Siu, Wing-Sum; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Lau, Ching-Po; Chan, Wai-Yee; Leung, Ping-Chung; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is closely associated with peripheral vascular disease. Enhancement of tissue oxidative stress, reduction of nitric oxide (NO) and angiogenic growth factors, and abnormal matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity are pathophysiological factors in post-ischemic neovascularization and diabetic wound healing. Our previous study demonstrated that the Chinese 2-herb formula, NF3, showed significant wound healing effects on diabetic foot ulcer rats. A novel rat diabetic foot ulcer with hindlimb ischemia model was established in order to strengthen our claims on the diabetic wound healing and post-ischemic neovascularization effects of NF3. Our results demonstrate that NF3 can significantly reduce the wound area of the diabetic foot ulcer rat with hindlimb ischemia by 21.6% (poxidative stress of ischemic muscles (p<0.001). NF3 significantly stimulated MMP activity involved in angiogenesis. Our study shows, for the first time, the beneficial effects of NF3 in wound healing and post-ischemic neovascularization in diabetes.

  8. Modulation of spontaneous locomotor and respiratory drives to hindlimb motoneurons temporally related to sympathetic drives as revealed by Mayer waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienecke, Jacob; Denton, Manuel Enríquez; Stecina, Katinka

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated how the networks mediating respiratory and locomotor drives to lumbar motoneurons interact and how this interaction is modulated in relation to periodic variations in blood pressure (Mayer waves). Seven decerebrate cats, under neuromuscular blockade, were used to study...... central respiratory drive potentials (CRDPs, usually enhanced by added CO2) and spontaneously occurring locomotor drive potentials (LDPs) in hindlimb motoneurons, together with hindlimb and phrenic nerve discharges. In four of the cats both drives and their voltage-dependent amplification were absent...... or modest, but in the other three, one or other of these drives was common and the voltage-dependent amplification was frequently strong. Moreover, in these three cats the blood pressure showed marked periodic variation (Mayer waves), with a slow rate (periods 9-104 s, mean 39 ± 17 SD). Profound modulation...

  9. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  10. Characterization of GLPG0492, a selective androgen receptor modulator, in a mouse model of hindlimb immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanqué, Roland; Lepescheux, Liên; Auberval, Marielle; Minet, Dominique; Merciris, Didier; Cottereaux, Céline; Clément-Lacroix, Philippe; Delerive, Philippe; Namour, Florence

    2014-09-03

    Muscle wasting is a hallmark of many chronic conditions but also of aging and results in a progressive functional decline leading ultimately to disability. Androgens, such as testosterone were proposed as therapy to counteract muscle atrophy. However, this treatment is associated with potential cardiovascular and prostate cancer risks and therefore not acceptable for long-term treatment. Selective Androgen receptor modulators (SARM) are androgen receptor ligands that induce muscle anabolism while having reduced effects in reproductive tissues. Therefore, they represent an alternative to testosterone therapy. Our objective was to demonstrate the activity of SARM molecule (GLPG0492) on a immobilization muscle atrophy mouse model as compared to testosterone propionate (TP) and to identify putative biomarkers in the plasma compartment that might be related to muscle function and potentially translated into the clinical space. GLPG0492, a non-steroidal SARM, was evaluated and compared to TP in a mouse model of hindlimb immobilization. GLPG0492 treatment partially prevents immobilization-induced muscle atrophy with a trend to promote muscle fiber hypertrophy in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, GLPG0492 was found as efficacious as TP at reducing muscle loss while sparing reproductive tissues. Furthermore, gene expression studies performed on tibialis samples revealed that both GLPG0492 and TP were slowing down muscle loss by negatively interfering with major signaling pathways controlling muscle mass homeostasis. Finally, metabolomic profiling experiments using 1H-NMR led to the identification of a plasma GLPG0492 signature linked to the modulation of cellular bioenergetic processes. Taken together, these results unveil the potential of GLPG0492, a non-steroidal SARM, as treatment for, at least, musculo-skeletal atrophy consecutive to coma, paralysis, or limb immobilization.

  11. Your Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develops. There they help to push the baby out of the mother's body when it's time to be born. You'll find smooth muscles at work behind the scenes in your eyes, too. These muscles keep the eyes ... thick muscles of the heart contract to pump blood out and then relax to let blood back in ...

  12. Effects of blood flow restricted low-intensity concentric or eccentric training on muscle size and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S; Abe, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the acute and chronic effects of low-intensity concentric or eccentric resistance training with blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscle size and strength. Ten young men performed 30% of concentric one repetition maximal dumbbell curl exercise (four sets, total 75 reps) 3 days/week for 6 weeks. One arm was randomly chosen for concentric BFR (CON-BFR) exercise only and the other arm performed eccentric BFR (ECC-BFR) exercise only at the same exercise load. During the exercise session, iEMG for biceps brachii muscles increased progressively during CON-BFR, which was greater (pexercise, muscle thickness (MTH) of the elbow flexors acutely increased (phypertrophy with BFR resistance training.

  13. Forelimb-hindlimb developmental timing changes across tetrapod phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selwood Lynne

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetrapods exhibit great diversity in limb structures among species and also between forelimbs and hindlimbs within species, diversity which frequently correlates with locomotor modes and life history. We aim to examine the potential relation of changes in developmental timing (heterochrony to the origin of limb morphological diversity in an explicit comparative and quantitative framework. In particular, we studied the relative time sequence of development of the forelimbs versus the hindlimbs in 138 embryos of 14 tetrapod species spanning a diverse taxonomic, ecomorphological and life-history breadth. Whole-mounts and histological sections were used to code the appearance of 10 developmental events comprising landmarks of development from the early bud stage to late chondrogenesis in the forelimb and the corresponding serial homologues in the hindlimb. Results An overall pattern of change across tetrapods can be discerned and appears to be relatively clade-specific. In the primitive condition, as seen in Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes, the forelimb/pectoral fin develops earlier than the hindlimb/pelvic fin. This pattern is either retained or re-evolved in eulipotyphlan insectivores (= shrews, moles, hedgehogs, and solenodons and taken to its extreme in marsupials. Although exceptions are known, the two anurans we examined reversed the pattern and displayed a significant advance in hindlimb development. All other species examined, including a bat with its greatly enlarged forelimbs modified as wings in the adult, showed near synchrony in the development of the fore and hindlimbs. Conclusion Major heterochronic changes in early limb development and chondrogenesis were absent within major clades except Lissamphibia, and their presence across vertebrate phylogeny are not easily correlated with adaptive phenomena related to morphological differences in the adult fore- and hindlimbs. The apparently conservative nature of this

  14. Knockdown of parathyroid hormone related protein in smooth muscle cells alters renal hemodynamics but not blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raison, Denis; Coquard, Catherine; Hochane, Mazène; Steger, Jacques; Massfelder, Thierry; Moulin, Bruno; Karaplis, Andrew C; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Helwig, Jean-Jacques; Barthelmebs, Mariette

    2013-08-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) belongs to vasoactive factors that regulate blood pressure and renal hemodynamics both by reducing vascular tone and raising renin release. PTHrP is expressed in systemic and renal vasculature. Here, we wanted to assess the contribution of vascular smooth muscle cell endogenous PTHrP to the regulation of cardiovascular and renal functions. We generated a mouse strain (SMA-CreERT2/PTHrPL2/L2 or premutant PTHrPSM-/-), which allows temporally controlled, smooth muscle-targeted PTHrP knockdown in adult mice. Tamoxifen treatment induced efficient recombination of PTHrP-floxed alleles and decreased PTHrP expression in vascular and visceral smooth muscle cells of PTHrPSM-/- mice. Blood pressure remained unchanged in PTHrPSM-/- mice, but plasma renin concentration and creatinine clearance were reduced. Renal hemodynamics were further analyzed during clearance measurements in anesthetized mice. Conditional knockdown of PTHrP decreased renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate with concomitant reduction in filtration fraction. Similar measurements were repeated during acute saline volume expansion. Saline volume expansion induced a rise in renal plasma flow and reduced filtration fraction; both were blunted in PTHrPSM-/- mice leading to impaired diuresis. These findings show that endogenous vascular smooth muscle PTHrP controls renal hemodynamics under basal conditions, and it is an essential factor in renal vasodilation elicited by saline volume expansion.

  15. Speech therapy changes blood circulation and oxygenation in the brain and muscle: a near-infrared spectrophotometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Martin; von Bonin, Dietrich; Wolf, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that artistic speech therapy (AST) has effects on heart rate variability. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether AST also affects hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation in the brain and skeletal muscle measured by near infrared spectrophotometry(NIRS). The results show that ATS has effects on important physiological parameters, i.e., it leads to a decrease in cerebral blood flow during recitation and to brain activation thereafter.

  16. Impaired axonal Na+ current by hindlimb unloading: implication for disuse neuromuscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimeglkham eBanzrai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize the excitability changes in peripheral motor axons caused by hindlimb unloading, which is a model of disuse neuromuscular atrophy. Hindlimb unloading was performed in normal 6-week-old male mice by fixing the proximal tail by a clip connected to the top of the animal’s cage for 3 weeks. Axonal excitability studies were performed by stimulating the sciatic nerve at the ankle and recording the compound muscle action potential from the foot. The amplitudes of the motor responses of the unloading group were 51% of the control amplitudes (2.2 ± 1.3 mV [HLU] vs. 4.3 ± 1.2 mV [Control], P = 0.03. Multiple axonal excitability analysis showed that the unloading group had a smaller strength-duration time constant (SDTC and late subexcitability (recovery cycle than the controls (0.075 ± 0.01 [HLU] vs. 0.12 ± 0.01 [Control], P < 0.01; 5.4 ± 1.0 [HLU] vs. 10.0 ± 1.3 % [Control], P = 0.01, respectively. Three weeks after releasing from HLU, the SDTC became comparable to the control range. Using a modeling study, the observed differences in the waveforms could be explained by reduced persistent Na+ currents along with parameters related to current leakage. Quantification of RNA of a SCA1A gene coding a voltage-gated Na+ channel tended to be decreased in the sciatic nerve in HLU. The present study suggested that axonal ion currents are altered in vivo by hindlimb unloading. It is still undetermined whether the dysfunctional axonal ion currents have any pathogenicity on neuromuscular atrophy or are the results of neural plasticity by atrophy.

  17. [Electrolyte makeup of the blood plasma and skeletal muscles of rats after a flight on the Kosmos-690 biosatellite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, V P; Tigranian, R A

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations in the functionally different muscles (soleus, plantaris, diaphragm muscles) and plasma of the rats flown for 20.5 days aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-690 did not show any significant changes as compared with the controls. At the same time a decrease of the K+/Na+ ratio and a similar shift of Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations in plasma of irradiated rats as compared with these of non-irradiated animals demonstrated that the combined effects of space flight factors and gamma-irradiation influenced the system of ionic homeostasis in the blood. In the animals sacrificed on the R + 1 day the K+/Na+ ratio in the soleus muscle changed in favor of Na+ and in the plantaris muscle in favor of K+, and remained essentially unchanged in the diaphragm. The comparison of the flight experiments with the ground-based controls showed that ion changes in muscles occurred due to ionizing radiation rather than due to weightlessness.

  18. Positive net movements of amino acids in the hindlimb after overnight food deprivation contribute to sustaining the elevated anabolism of neonatal pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thivierge, M Carole; Bush, Jill A; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Orellana, Renan A; Burrin, Douglas G; Jahoor, Farook; Davis, Teresa A

    2008-12-01

    During the neonatal period, high protein breakdown rate is a metabolic process inherent to elevated rates of protein accretion in skeletal muscle. To determine the relationship between hindlimb net movements of essential and nonessential amino acids in the regulation of hindlimb protein breakdown during an overnight fasting-feeding cycle, we infused overnight-food-deprived 10- and 28-day-old piglets with [1-(13)C]phenylalanine and [ring-(2)H(4)]tyrosine over 7 h (during 3 h of fasting and then during 4 h of feeding). Extraction rates for aspartate and glutamate after an overnight fast were 15% and 51% in the 10-day-old compared with 6% and 25% in the 28-day-old (P overnight fast, with negative net release of many nonessential amino acids, such as alanine, asparagine, glutamine, glycine, and proline. This suggests that newborn muscle does not undergo significant protein mobilization after a short period of fasting in support of an elevated rate of protein accretion. Furthermore, tyrosine efflux from hindlimb breakdown between overnight fasting and feeding periods was not different in the 10-day-old piglets, for which tyrosine was limiting, but when tyrosine supply balanced requirements in the 28-day-old piglet, hindlimb efflux was increased (P = 0.01). The results of the present study indicate that proteolysis and net movements of amino acids are coordinated mechanisms that sustain the elevated rate of net protein accretion during overnight feeding-fasting cycles in the neonate.

  19. Synthetic smooth muscle in the outer blood plexus of the rhinarium skin of Lemur catta L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elofsson, Rolf; Kröger, Ronald H H

    2017-01-01

    The skin of the lemur nose tip (rhinarium) has arterioles in the outer vascular plexus that are endowed with an unusual coat of smooth muscle cells. Comparison with the arterioles of the same area in a number of unrelated mammalians shows that the lemur pattern is unique. The vascular smooth muscle cells belong to the synthetic type. The function of synthetic smooth muscles around the terminal vessels in the lemur rhinarium is unclear but may have additional functions beyond regulation of vessel diameter.

  20. Muscle biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inflammatory diseases of muscle (such as polymyositis or dermatomyositis ) Diseases of the connective tissue and blood vessels ( ... disease that involves inflammation and a skin rash ( dermatomyositis ) Inherited muscle disorder ( Duchenne muscular dystrophy ) Inflammation of ...

  1. Partial neuromuscular blockade in humans enhances muscle blood flow during exercise independently of muscle oxygen uptake and acetylcholine receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Krustrup, Peter; Iaia, F Marcello

    2009-01-01

    conductance during exercise, events that are not associated with either acetylcholine or an increased oxygen demand. The results do not support an essential role for acetylcholine, released form the neuromuscular junction, in exercise hyperaemia or for the enhanced blood flow during neuromuscular blockade...

  2. Effect of strength training with blood flow restriction on muscle power and submaximal strength in eumenorrheic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana L S; Neto, Gabriel R; Sousa, Maria S C; Dias, Ingrid; Vianna, Jeferson; Nunes, Rodolfo A M; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2017-03-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) training stimulates muscle size and strength by increasing muscle activation, accumulation of metabolites and muscle swelling. This method has been used in different populations, but no studies have evaluated the effects of training on muscle power and submaximal strength (SS) in accounted for the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of strength training (ST) with BFR on the muscle power and SS of upper and lower limbs in eumenorrheic women. Forty untrained women (18-40 years) were divided randomly and proportionally into four groups: (i) high-intensity ST at 80% of 1RM (HI), (ii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM combined with partial blood flow restriction (LI + BFR), (iii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM (LI) and d) control group (CG). Each training group performed eight training sessions. Tests with a medicine ball (MB), horizontal jump (HJ), vertical jump (VJ), biceps curls (BC) and knee extension (KE) were performed during the 1st day follicular phase (FP), 14th day (ovulatory phase) and 26-28th days (luteal phase) of the menstrual cycle. There was no significant difference among groups in terms of the MB, HJ, VJ or BC results at any time point (P>0·05). SS in the KE exercise was significantly greater in the LI + BFR group compared to the CG group (P = 0·014) during the LP. Therefore, ST with BFR does not appear to improve the power of upper and lower limbs and may be an alternative to improve the SS of lower limbs of eumenorrheic women.

  3. Effects of blood-flow-restricted resistance training on muscle function in a 74-year-old male with sporadic inclusion body myositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Nørkær; Aagaard, P; Nielsen, J L

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) is a systemic disease that is characterized by substantial skeletal muscle weakness and muscle inflammation, leading to impaired physical function. The objective was to investigate the effect of low-load resistance exercise with concurrent partial blood flow...

  4. Analysis of the effects of androgens and training on myostatin propeptide and follistatin concentrations in blood and skeletal muscle using highly sensitive Immuno PCR

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Myostatin propeptide (MYOPRO) and follistatin (FOLLI) are potent myostatin inhibitors. In this study we analysed effects of training and androgens on MYOPRO and FOLLI concentrations in blood and skeletal muscle using Immuno PCR. Young healthy males performed either a 3-month endurance-training or a strength-training. Blood and biopsy samples were analysed. Training did not significantly affect MYOPRO and FOLLI concentrations in serum and muscle. To investigate whether tota...

  5. Stimulation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors evokes counteracting effects on hindlimb vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Joseph M; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2005-12-01

    Our previous studies concluded that stimulation of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) A2a receptors evokes preferential hindlimb vasodilation mainly via inducing increases in preganglionic sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) directed to the adrenal medulla. This increase in pre-ASNA causes the release of epinephrine and subsequent activation of beta-adrenergic receptors that are preferentially located in the skeletal muscle vasculature. Selective activation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors evokes variable, mostly pressor effects and increases pre-ASNA, as well as lumbar sympathetic activity, which is directed to the hindlimb. These counteracting factors may have opposite effects on the hindlimb vasculature resulting in mixed vascular responses. Therefore, in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized rats, we evaluated the contribution of vasodilator versus vasoconstrictor effects of stimulation of NTS A1 receptors on the hindlimb vasculature. We compared the changes in iliac vascular conductance evoked by microinejctions into the NTS of the selective A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (330 pmol in 50 nl volume) in intact animals with the responses evoked after beta-adrenergic blockade, bilateral adrenalectomy, bilateral lumbar sympathectomy, and combined adrenalectomy + lumbar sympathectomy. In intact animals, stimulation of NTS A1 receptors evoked variable effects: increases and decreases in mean arterial pressure and iliac conductance with prevailing pressor and vasoconstrictor effects. Peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor blockade and bilateral adrenalectomy eliminated the depressor component of the responses, markedly potentiated iliac vasoconstriction, and tended to increase the pressor responses. Lumbar sympathectomy tended to decrease the pressor and vasoconstrictor responses. After bilateral adrenalectomy plus lumbar sympathectomy, a marked vasoconstriction in iliac vascular bed still persisted, suggesting that the vasoconstrictor component of the

  6. Opposite effects of WEB2086 on angiogenesis in atheromas and ischemic hindlimb of apoE gene deficient mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuang; TANG Ya-ling; YANG Yong-zong; XU Zeng-xiang; PENG Kuang

    2007-01-01

    Background Our previous research has suggested that platelet activating factor receptor was related to atherosclerosis. The present study investigated the effect of a platelet activating factor receptor antagonist- WEB2086 on angiogenesis in aortal plaque and ischemic hindlimb of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.Methods Eight-week-old apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were fed with a 0.15% cholesterol diet to develop advanced lesions. At age 32 weeks unilateral hindlimb ischemia was surgically induced and the mice were divided into two groups:with or without WEB2086 mixed with their drinking water (4.3 mg in 100 ml). At age 40 weeks blood was collected from the orbit for measurement of serum lipids and an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine platelet activating factor and oxidized low density lipoprotein in the gastrocnemius and aorta. Whole-Mount CD31 stain and plaque-associated sprouting have been used to estimate angiogenesis in plaque from the aorta and laser Doppler perfusion imaging and immunohistochemical expression of von Willebrand factor have been used to estimate angiogenesis in ischemic hindlimb.Results The lipid composition of serum was not different between the groups. However, the amount of platelet activating factor and oxidized low density lipoprotein detected in the aorta was significantly higher than that in the gastrocnemius of ischemic hindlimb. The ratio of lesion to aorta levels was significantly reduced by administration of WEB2086, (31.52±6.18)% vs (55.58±8.34)%, P<0.01. The mean density of intimal capillaries in atherosclerotic plaque,(31.13±9.20)% vs (57.74±11.28)%, P<0.01, and the mean number of sprouts per aorta were significantly reduced,183.92±34.17 vs 392.54±76.79, P<0.01, in the WEB2086 group. Blood flow (0.85±0.12 vs 0.45±0.06, P<0.01) and capillary density of ischemic hindlimb (1.18±0.17 vs 0.53±0.09, P<0.01) were markedly increased in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice treated with WEB2086 versus

  7. Heterogenic feedback between hindlimb extensors in the spontaneously locomoting premammillary cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kyla T; Nichols, T Richard

    2009-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies in anesthetized animals have revealed that pathways carrying force information from Golgi tendon organs in antigravity muscles mediate widespread inhibition among other antigravity muscles in the feline hindlimb. More recent evidence in paralyzed or nonparalyzed decerebrate cats has shown that some inhibitory pathways are suppressed and separate excitatory pathways from Golgi tendon organ afferents are opened on the transition from steady force production to locomotor activity. To obtain additional insight into the functions of these pathways during locomotion, we investigated the distribution of force-dependent inhibition and excitation during spontaneous locomotion and during constant force exertion in the premammillary decerebrate cat. We used four servo-controlled stretching devices to apply controlled stretches in various combinations to the gastrocnemius muscles (G), plantaris muscle (PLAN), flexor hallucis longus muscle (FHL), and quadriceps muscles (QUADS) during treadmill stepping and the crossed-extension reflex (XER). We recorded the force responses from the same muscles and were therefore able to evaluate autogenic (intramuscular) and heterogenic (intermuscular) reflexes among this set of muscles. In previous studies using the intercollicular decerebrate cat, heterogenic inhibition among QUADS, G, FHL, and PLAN was bidirectional. During treadmill stepping, heterogenic feedback from QUADS onto G and G onto PLAN and FHL remained inhibitory and was force-dependent. However, heterogenic inhibition from PLAN and FHL onto G, and from G onto QUADS, was weaker than during the XER. We propose that pathways mediating heterogenic inhibition may remain inhibitory under some forms of locomotion on a level surface but that the strengths of these pathways change to result in a proximal to distal gradient of inhibition. The potential contributions of heterogenic inhibition to interjoint coordination and limb stability are discussed.

  8. Mitochondrial therapy improves limb perfusion and myopathy following hindlimb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Terence E; Schmidt, Cameron A; Alleman, Rick J; Tsang, Alvin M; Green, Thomas D; Neufer, P Darrell; Brown, David A; McClung, Joseph M

    2016-08-01

    Critical limb ischemia is a devastating manifestation of peripheral arterial disease with no effective strategies for improving morbidity and mortality outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that cellular mitochondrial function is a key component of limb pathology and that improving mitochondrial function represents a novel paradigm for therapy. BALB/c mice were treated with a therapeutic mitochondrial-targeting peptide (MTP-131) and subjected to limb ischemia (HLI). Compared to vehicle control, MTP-131 rescued limb muscle capillary density and blood flow (64.7±11% of contralateral vs. 39.9±4%), and improved muscle regeneration. MTP-131 also increased electron transport system flux across all conditions at HLI day-7. In vitro, primary muscle cells exposed to experimental ischemia demonstrated markedly reduced (~75%) cellular respiration, which was rescued by MTP-131 during a recovery period. Compared to muscle cells, endothelial cell (HUVEC) respiration was inherently protected from ischemia (~30% reduction), but was also enhanced by MTP-131. These findings demonstrate an important link between ischemic tissue bioenergetics and limb blood flow and indicate that the mitochondria may be a pharmaceutical target for therapeutic intervention during critical limb ischemia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Fasting increases palmitic acid incorporation into rat hind-limb intramuscular acylglycerols while short-term cold exposure has no effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synak, M; Zarzeczny, R; Górecka, M; Langfort, J; Kaciuba-Uściłko, H; Zernicka, Ewa

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the palmitic acid incorporation into intramuscular acylglycerols in perfused hind-limb skeletal muscles of different fibre types in rats either fasted for 48 h or exposed to cold (6 °C) for 12 h. Hind-limb preparations of fasted and cold exposed rats were perfused with buffers containing tritium labelled and cold palmitic acid. Palmitic acid incorporation into intracellular lipid pools in the soleus, plantaris, red and white gastrocnemius and red and white quadriceps was measured. It was found that fasting increased approximately 2-fold palmitic acid incorporation in all muscles examined regardless of the fibre type composition of the muscle. On the other hand, exposure to cold had no effect on the palmitic acid incorporation into intramuscular acylglycerols regardless the muscle fibre type. The increased incorporation of palmitic acid into acylglycerols in fasted animals is in line with data showing that 48 h fasting stimulates the expression of plasma membrane proteins putatively facilitating fatty acid uptake. It appears that although 12 h cold exposure increases the use of fatty acids as energy substrates it does not alter the incorporation of palmitic acid into intramuscular acylglycerols in the perfused rat hind-limb.

  10. Postexercise blood flow restriction does not enhance muscle hypertrophy induced by multiple-set high-load resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madarame, Haruhiko; Nakada, Satoshi; Ohta, Takahisa; Ishii, Naokata

    2017-04-27

    To test the applicability of postexercise blood flow restriction (PEBFR) in practical training programmes, we investigated whether PEBFR enhances muscle hypertrophy induced by multiple-set high-load resistance exercise (RE). Seven men completed an eight-week RE programme for knee extensor muscles. Employing a within-subject design, one leg was subjected to RE + PEBFR, whereas contralateral leg to RE only. On each exercise session, participants performed three sets of unilateral knee extension exercise at approximately 70% of their one-repetition maximum for RE leg first, and then performed three sets for RE + PEBFR leg. Immediately after completion of the third set, the proximal portion of the RE + PEBFR leg was compressed with an air-pressure cuff for 5 min at a pressure ranging from 100 to 150 mmHg. If participants could perform 10 repetitions for three sets in two consecutive exercise sessions, the work load was increased by 5% at the next exercise session. Muscle thickness and strength of knee extensor muscles were measured before and after the eight-week training period and after the subsequent eight-week detraining period. There was a main effect of time but no condition × time interaction or main effect of condition for muscle thickness and strength. Both muscle thickness and strength increased after the training period independent of the condition. This result suggests that PEBFR would not be an effective training method at least in an early phase of adaptation to high-load resistance exercise. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Obesity, type 2 diabetes, and impaired insulin-stimulated blood flow: role of skeletal muscle NO synthase and endothelin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Leryn J; Credeur, Daniel P; Manrique, Camila; Padilla, Jaume; Fadel, Paul J; Thyfault, John P

    2017-01-01

    Increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) and reduced endothelial nitric oxide phosphorylation (peNOS) are hypothesized to reduce insulin-stimulated blood flow in type 2 diabetes (T2D), but studies examining these links in humans are limited. We sought to assess basal and insulin-stimulated endothelial signaling proteins (ET-1 and peNOS) in skeletal muscle from T2D patients. Ten obese T2D [glucose disposal rate (GDR): 6.6 ± 1.6 mg·kg lean body mass (LBM)(-1)·min(-1)] and 11 lean insulin-sensitive subjects (Lean GDR: 12.9 ± 1.2 mg·kg LBM(-1)·min(-1)) underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with vastus lateralis biopsies taken before and 60 min into the clamp. Basal biopsies were also taken in 11 medication-naïve, obese, non-T2D subjects. ET-1, peNOS (Ser1177), and eNOS protein and mRNA were measured from skeletal muscle samples containing native microvessels. Femoral artery blood flow was assessed by duplex Doppler ultrasound. Insulin-stimulated blood flow was reduced in obese T2D (Lean: +50.7 ± 6.5% baseline, T2D: +20.8 ± 5.2% baseline, P 0.05). Obese non-T2D subjects tended to also display elevated basal ET-1 (P = 0.06). In summary, higher basal skeletal muscle expression of ET-1 and reduced peNOS/eNOS may contribute to a reduced insulin-stimulated leg blood flow response in obese T2D patients.

  12. Effect of change in blood volume in skin plus active muscle on heart rate drift during submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, T; Yunoki, T; Matsuura, R; Arimitsu, T; Kimura, T

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of change in blood volume in skin plus active muscle on heart rate drift during moderate exercise and heavy exercise for 30 min. Total hemoglobin concentration (Total Hb) in the vastus lateralis muscle plus its skin was determined by near-infrared spectroscopy. Total Hb significantly increased and remained stable from 20 min in moderate exercise and from 10 min in heavy exercise. Heart rate (HR) rapidly increased until 3 min and showed a steady state in moderate exercise. HR at 30 min was significantly higher than that at 3 min in moderate exercise. HR rapidly increased until 3 min and then gradually but significantly increased in heavy exercise. Increase in total Hb was not significantly related with HR after 3 min of exercise when HR was around 120 beats per min in moderate exercise. Increase in total Hb was significantly related with HR from 3 min to 10 min in the heavy exercise (correlation coefficients ranged from 0.959 to 0.702). It is concluded that an increase in the blood volume in skin plus active muscle is not simply associated with HR drift.

  13. Short-term low-intensity blood flow restricted interval training improves both aerobic fitness and muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, M F M; Caputo, F; Corvino, R B; Denadai, B S

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to analyze and compare the effects of four different interval-training protocols on aerobic fitness and muscle strength. Thirty-seven subjects (23.8 ± 4 years; 171.7 ± 9.5 cm; 70 ± 11 kg) were assigned to one of four groups: low-intensity interval training with (BFR, n = 10) or without (LOW, n = 7) blood flow restriction, high-intensity interval training (HIT, n = 10), and combined HIT and BFR (BFR + HIT, n = 10, every session performed 50% as BFR and 50% as HIT). Before and after 4 weeks training (3 days a week), the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ), maximal power output (Pmax ), onset blood lactate accumulation (OBLA), and muscle strength were measured for all subjects. All training groups were able to improve OBLA (BFR, 16%; HIT, 25%; HIT + BFR, 22%; LOW, 6%), with no difference between groups. However, VO2max and Pmax improved only for BFR (6%, 12%), HIT (9%, 15%) and HIT + BFR (6%, 11%), with no difference between groups. Muscle strength gains were only observed after BFR training (11%). This study demonstrates the advantage of short-term low-intensity interval BFR training as the single mode of training able to simultaneously improve aerobic fitness and muscular strength.

  14. Roles for C-X-C chemokines and C5a in lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bless, N M; Warner, R L; Padgaonkar, V A;

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the roles of the C-X-C chemokines cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) as well as the complement activation product C5a in development of lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion in rats. During reperfusion, CD11b...... and CD18, but not CD11a, were upregulated on neutrophils [bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood] and lung macrophages. BAL levels of CINC and MIP-2 were increased during the ischemic and reperfusion periods. Treatment with either anti-CINC or anti-MIP-2 IgG significantly reduced lung vascular......, 58, and 23%, respectively (P MIP-2 as well as the complement activation product C5a are required for lung neutrophil recruitment and full induction of lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion in rats....

  15. Enhanced collateral growth by double transplantation of gene-nucleofected fibroblasts in ischemic hindlimb of rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Induction of neovascularization by releasing therapeutic growth factors is a promising application of cell-based gene therapy to treat ischemia-related problems. In the present study, we have developed a new strategy based on nucleofection with alternative solution and cuvette to promote collateral growth and re-establishment of circulation in ischemic limbs using double transplantation of gene nucleofected primary cultures of fibroblasts, which were isolated from rat receiving such therapy. METHODS AND RESULTS: Rat dermal fibroblasts were nucleofected ex vivo to release bFGF or VEGF165 in a hindlimb ischemia model in vivo. After femoral artery ligation, gene-modified cells were injected intramuscularly. One week post injection, local confined plasmid expression and transient distributions of the plasmids in other organs were detected by quantitative PCR. Quantitative micro-CT analyses showed improvements of vascularization in the ischemic zone (No. of collateral vessels via micro CT: 6.8±2.3 vs. 10.1±2.6; p<0.05. Moreover, improved collateral proliferation (BrdU incorporation: 0.48±0.05 vs. 0.57±0.05; p<0.05 and increase in blood perfusion (microspheres ratio: gastrocnemius: 0.41±0.10 vs. 0.50±0.11; p<0.05; soleus ratio: soleus: 0.42±0.08 vs. 0.60±0.08; p<0.01 in the lower hindlimb were also observed. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of double transplantation of gene nucleofected primary fibroblasts in producing growth factors and promoting the formation of collateral circulation in ischemic hindlimb, suggesting that isolation and preparation of gene nucleofected cells from individual accepting gene therapy may be an alternative strategy for treating limb ischemia related diseases.

  16. Antiangiogenic effect of angiotensin II type 2 receptor in ischemia-induced angiogenesis in mice hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Tamarat, Radia; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Icchiki, Toshihiro; Ebrahimian, Teni; Iglarz, Marc; Besnard, Sandrine; Duriez, Micheline; Inagami, Tadashi; Lévy, Bernard I

    2002-05-31

    This study examined the potential role of angiotensin type 2 (AT(2)) receptor on angiogenesis in a model of surgically induced hindlimb ischemia. Ischemia was produced by femoral artery ligature in both wild-type and AT(2) gene-deleted mice (Agtr2(-)/Y). After 28 days, angiogenesis was quantitated by microangiography, capillary density measurement, and laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), Bax, and Bcl-2 were determined by Western blot analysis in hindlimbs. The AT(2) mRNA level (assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR) was increased in the ischemic hindlimb of wild-type mice. Angiographic vessel density and laser Doppler perfusion data showed significant improvement in ischemic/nonischemic leg ratio, 1.9- and 1.7-fold, respectively, in Agtr2(-)/Y mice compared with controls. In ischemic leg of Agtr2(-)/Y mice, revascularization was associated with an increase in the antiapoptotic protein content, Bcl-2 (211% of basal), and a decrease (60% of basal) in the number of cell death, determined by TUNEL method. Angiotensin II treatment (0.3 mg/kg per day) raised angiogenic score, blood perfusion, and both VEGF and eNOS protein content in ischemic leg of wild-type control but did not modulate the enhanced angiogenic response observed in untreated Agtr2(-)/Y mice. Finally, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that VEGF was mainly localized to myocyte, whereas eNOS-positive staining was mainly observed in the capillary of ischemic leg of both wild-type and AT(2)-deficient mice. This study demonstrates for the first time that the AT(2) receptor subtype may negatively modulate ischemia-induced angiogenesis through an activation of the apoptotic process.

  17. Restoration of skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion injury in humanized immunodeficient mice.

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    Sheu, Eric G; Oakes, Sean M; Ahmadi-Yazdi, Cyrus; Afnan, Jalil; Carroll, Michael C; Moore, Francis D

    2009-08-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) of tissue provokes an inflammatory process that is highly dependent on circulating natural immunoglobulin M (IgM) and the complement cascade. In mice, a single IgM specificity produced by peritoneal B cells can initiate reperfusion injury. It is unknown whether humans express natural IgM with a similar specificity. It is also unknown whether pathogenic IgM is produced solely from peritoneal B cells or can also be made by circulating B cells. Immunodeficient mice lacking endogenous immunoglobulin were used. Mice were reconstituted with 0.9% normal saline, human serum, or xenografted human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and then subjected to tourniquet-induced hindlimb I/R. Serum human IgM and immunoglobulin G (IgG) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay. Skeletal muscle was harvested for injury assessment by histology and for immunohistochemistry. Immunodeficient mice were protected from skeletal muscle injury after hindlimb I/R. Transfer of human serum restored skeletal muscle damage. Rag2/gammaR-/- mice that were engrafted with human PBL (huPBL-SCID) had high levels of human IgM. huPBL-SCID mice developed significantly more skeletal muscle injury than control saline-treated mice (P < or = .01) and human serum-reconstituted Rag2/gammaR-/- mice (P < or = 0.01). Sham-treated huPBL-SCID mice had no muscle injury, demonstrating that human lymphocyte engraftment did not cause injury in the absence of ischemia. Deposition of human IgM was observed on injured but not sham-injured muscle. Human serum can initiate murine skeletal muscle I/R injury. Circulating human PBL may be a source of pathogenic IgM. The huPBL-SCID mouse may be a useful model to define the specificity of pathogenic human IgM and to test therapeutics for I/R injury.

  18. Dynamic "Range of Motion" Hindlimb Stretching Disrupts Locomotor Function in Rats with Moderate Subacute Spinal Cord Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Anastasia; Rees, Kathlene; Prince, Daniella; Morehouse, Johnny; Shum-Siu, Alice; Magnuson, David

    2017-06-15

    Joint contractures and spasticity are two common secondary complications of a severe spinal cord injury (SCI), which can significantly reduce quality of life, and stretching is one of the top strategies for rehabilitation of these complications. We have previously shown that a daily static stretching protocol administered to rats at either acute or chronic time points after a moderate or moderate-severe T10 SCI significantly disrupts their hindlimb locomotor function. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of dynamic range of motion (ROM) stretching on the locomotor function of rats with SCI as an alternative to static stretching. Starting at 6 weeks post-injury (T10 moderate contusion) eight adult Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to hindlimb stretching for 4 weeks. Our standard stretching protocol (six maneuvers to stretch the major hindlimb muscle groups) was modified from 1 min static stretch-and-hold at the end ROM of each stretch position to a dynamic 2 sec hold, 1 sec release rhythm repeated for a duration of 1 min. Four weeks of daily (5 days/week) dynamic stretching led to significant disruption of locomotor function as assessed by the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) Open Field Locomotor Scale and three-dimensional (3D) kinematic and gait analyses. In addition, we identified and analyzed an apparently novel hindlimb response to dynamic stretch that resembles human clonus. The results of the current study extend the observation of the stretching phenomenon to a new modality of stretching that is also commonly used in SCI rehabilitation. Although mechanisms and clinical relevance still need to be established, our findings continue to raise concerns that stretching as a therapy can potentially hinder aspects of locomotor recovery.

  19. Heterogeneous blood flow distribution within single skeletal muscles in the rabbit: role of vasomotion, sympathetic nerve activity and effect of vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, P O; Nicolaysen, G

    1989-09-01

    A major heterogeneous distribution of blood flow has been described on a non-microvascular level within single skeletal muscles at rest and during exercise hyperaemia both in the dog and in the rabbit. The heterogeneity in blood flow distribution could be composed of both a steady-state region-to-region variability (spatial) and a time-dependent variability (temporal) in blood flow to each region. In the present study we estimated their relative contributions to the variations in blood flow within the muscles. Furthermore, we determined whether sympathetic nerve activity contributed to and whether pharmacologically induced vasodilation affected the heterogeneous blood flow pattern. Regional blood flow measurements were based on microsphere infusions into anaesthetized rabbits. Blood flow was determined under both resting conditions and during exercise hyperaemia in regions weighing 0.25 g each within hind leg muscles. The coefficient of variation for the spatial variability was twice that of the temporal one: 0.32 and 0.16 (mean) respectively. Neither stimulation of the sympathetic nerves, sympathectomy nor vasodilation affected the heterogeneity in blood flow. When exercise hyperaemia was induced, blood flow increased in all regions so that a positive (P less than 0.05) correlation was present between resting and exercising blood flow values in the individual regions. Although regional variation in vascularization could explain the observations during exercise hyperaemia, we have at present no fully satisfying explanation for the observed regional heterogeneity in blood flow.

  20. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Arterial Blood Oxygen Saturation in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhshandeh Bavarsad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the problems of the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the weakness of the respiratory muscles that causes oxygen desaturation at rest and activity and decreases exercise tolerance. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2. Patients and Methods Forty patients with mild to very severe COPD were recruited for this study, which is a randomized control trail. The patients were randomized to IMT (inspiratory muscle training and control group. Training was performed with Respivol (a kind of inspiratory muscle trainer for 8 weeks (15 min/d for 6 d/week. SPSS software version 16 was used to analyze the data by performing independent t test, paired t test, and Fisher exact test. Results Results showed that, after 8 weeks of inspiratory muscle training, there was a little increase (but not statistically significant improvement in SPO2 (from 92.6 ± 8.71 % to 95.13 ± 7.08 %, with P = 0.06, whereas it remained unchanged in the control group (from 96.0 ± 3.46 % to 96.4 ± 3.35 % with P = 0.51. No statistically significant difference was seen between the two groups (P > 0.05. Conclusions Although inspiratory muscles training can prevent desaturation, which is caused by activity, it fails to improve it.

  1. Relationship between mercury concentrations in the blood with that in the muscle of four estuarine tropical fish species, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro Rodrigues, Ana Paula; Maciel, Patrícia Oliveira; da Silva, Luiz César Cavalcanti Pereira; Almosny, Nádia Regina Pereira; Andreata, José Vanderli; Bidone, Edison Dausacker; Castilhos, Zuleica Carmen

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the relationship between mercury concentrations in the blood with that in muscle for non-invasive mercury contamination assessment in fish. At Ribeira Bay were collected 198 fishes of 4 species (Genidens genidens, Arius luniscutis, Haemulon steindachneri, Micropogonias furnieri). At Guanabara Bay were collected 84 fishes of 2 species (Genidens genidens, Micropogonias furnieri). Means of mercury concentrations in fish muscles in both areas were below 500 ng/g. The mean ratio, including all specimens of all species, for mercury in muscle-to-whole blood was 13.4:1, for muscle-to-erythrocytes, 6.5:1 and for erythrocytes-to-plasma, 6.5:1. Further studies are necessary to insure that blood could be used as an exposure biomarker, in order to assess mercury availability in aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Increased presence of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in inflamed muscle of patients with active juvenile dermatomyositis compared to peripheral blood.

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    Yvonne Vercoulen

    Full Text Available Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease affecting the microvasculature of skin and muscle. CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are key regulators of immune homeostasis. A role for Tregs in JDM pathogenesis has not yet been established. Here, we explored Treg presence and function in peripheral blood and muscle of JDM patients. We analyzed number, phenotype and function of Tregs in blood from JDM patients by flow cytometry and in vitro suppression assays, in comparison to healthy controls and disease controls (Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy. Presence of Tregs in muscle was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Overall, Treg percentages in peripheral blood of JDM patients were similar compared to both control groups. Muscle biopsies of new onset JDM patients showed increased infiltration of numbers of T cells compared to Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. Both in JDM and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy the proportion of FOXP3+ T cells in muscles were increased compared to JDM peripheral blood. Interestingly, JDM is not a self-remitting disease, suggesting that the high proportion of Tregs in inflamed muscle do not suppress inflammation. In line with this, peripheral blood Tregs of active JDM patients were less capable of suppressing effector T cell activation in vitro, compared to Tregs of JDM in clinical remission. These data show a functional impairment of Tregs in a proportion of patients with active disease, and suggest a regulatory role for Tregs in JDM inflammation.

  3. Blood flow and muscle bio-energetics by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance after local cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savourey, G; Clerc, L; Vallerand, A L; Leftheriotis, G; Mehier, H; Bittel, J H

    1992-01-01

    To clarify the origin of local cold adaptation and to define precisely its influence on muscle bio-energetics during local exercise, five subjects were subjected to repeated 5 degrees C cold water immersion of the right hand and forearm. The first aim of our investigation was therefore carried out by measuring local skin temperatures and peripheral blood flow during a cold hand test (5 degrees C, 5 min) followed by a 10-min recovery period. The 31P by nuclear magnetic resonance (31PNMR) muscle bio-energetic changes, indicating possible heat production changes, were measured during the recovery period. The second aim of our investigation was carried out by measuring 31PNMR muscle bioenergetics during handgrip exercise (10% of the maximal voluntary contraction for 5 min followed by a 10-min recovery period) performed both at a comfortable ambient temperature (22 degrees C; E) and after a cold hand test (EC), before and after local cold adaptation. Local cold adaptation, confirmed by warmer skin temperatures of the extremities (+30%, P less than 0.05), was related more to an increased peripheral blood flow, as shown by the smaller decrease in systolic peak [-245 (SEM 30) Hz vs -382 (SEM 95) Hz, P less than 0.05] than to a change in local heat production, because muscle bioenergetics did not vary. Acute local cold immersion decreased the inorganic phosphate:phosphocreatine (PC) ratio during EC compared to E [+0.006 (SEM 0.010) vs +0.078 (SEM 0.002) before acclimation and +0.029 (SEM 0.002) vs +0.090 (SEM 0.002) after acclimation respectively, P less than 0.05] without significant change in the PC:beta-adenosine triphosphate ratio and pH. Local adaptation did not modify these results statistically. The recovery of PC during E increased after acclimation [9.0 (SEM 0.2) min vs 3.0 (SEM 0.4) min, P less than 0.05]. These results suggested that local cold adaptation is related more to peripheral blood flow changes than to increased metabolic heat production in the muscle.

  4. Restricted Blood Flow Exercise in Sedentary, Overweight African-American Females May Increase Muscle Strength and Decrease Endothelial Function and Vascular Autoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Bond

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Exercise with partially restricted blood flow is a low-load, low-intensity resistance training regimen which may have the potential to increase muscle strength in the obese, elderly and frail who are unable to do high-load training. Restricted blood flow exercise has also been shown to affect blood vessel function variably and can, therefore, contribute to blood vessel dysfunction. This pilot study tests the hypothesis that unilateral resistance training of the leg extensors with partially restricted blood flow increases muscle strength and decreases vascular autoregulation. Methods: The subjects were nine normotensive, overweight, young adult African-Americans with low cardiorespiratory fitness who underwent unilateral training of the quadriceps’ femoris muscles with partially restricted blood flow at 30% of the 1-repetition maximum (1-RM load for 3 weeks. The 1-RM load and post-occlusion blood flow to the lower leg (calf were measured during reactive hyperemia. Results: The 1-RM load increased in the trained legs from 77 ± 3 to 84 ± 4 kg (P 0.1. Post-occlusion blood flow decreased significantly in the trained legs from 19 ± 2 to 13 ± 2 mL· min-1· dL-1 (P < 0.05 and marginally in the contralateral untrained legs from 18 ± 2 to 16 ± 1 mL· min-1· dL-1 (P = 0.09. Changes in post-occlusion blood flow to the skin overlying the trained and the contralateral untrained muscles were not significant. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that restricted blood flow exercise, which results in significant gains in muscle strength, may produce decrements in endothelial dysfunction and vascular autoregulation. Future studies should determine whether pharmacopuncture plays a role in treatments for such blood vessel dysfunction.

  5. Impaired autoregulation of blood flow in skeletal muscle and subcutaneous tissue in long-term Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with microangiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faris, I; Vagn Nielsen, H; Henriksen, O

    1983-01-01

    Autoregulation of blood flow was studied in skeletal muscle and subcutaneous tissue in seven Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients (median age: 36 years) with nephropathy and retinopathy and in eight normal subjects of the same age. Blood flow was measured by the local 133Xe washout...

  6. Effect of floorball training on blood lipids, body composition, muscle strength, and functional capacity of elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jacob Vorup; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Melcher, Pia Grethe Sandfeld

    2017-01-01

    Floorball training consists of intense repeated exercise and may offer a motivating and social stimulating team activity in elderly individuals. However, the effect of floorball training in elderly adults on physiological adaptations important for health is not known. Thus, this study examined...... the effect of floorball training on blood lipids, muscle strength, body composition, and functional capacity of men aged 65-76 years. Thirty-nine recreational active men were randomized into a floorball group (FG; n = 22) or petanque group (PG; n = 17), in which training was performed 1 h twice a week for 12...... functional capacity tests were better (P functional capacity, suggesting that floorball training can be used...

  7. Stimulation of Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis in Hindlimb Suspended Rats by Resistance Exercise and Growth Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderman, Jon K.; Whittall, Justen B.; Gosselink, Kristin L.; Wang, Tommy J.; Mukku, Venkat R.; Booth, Frank W.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ability of a single bout of resistance exercise alone or in combination with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to stimulate myofibrillar protein synthesis (Ks) in hindlimb suspended (HLS) adult female rats. Plantar flexor muscles were stimulated with resistance exercise, consisting of 10 repetitions of ladder climbing on a 1 m grid (85 deg.), carrying an additional 50% of their body weight attached to their tails. Saline or rhGH (1 mg/kg) was administered 30' prior to exercise, and Ks was determined with a constant infusion of H-3-Leucine at 15', 60', 180', and 360' following exercise. Three days of HLS depressed Ks is approx. equal to 65% and 30-40% in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, respectively (p is less than or equal to 0.05). Exercise increased soleus Ks in saline-treated rats 149% 60' following exercise (p less than or equal to 0.05), decaying to that of non-exercised animals during the next 5 hours. Relative to suspended, non-exercised rats rhGH + exercise increased soleus Ks 84%, 108%, and 72% at 15', 60' and 360' following exercise (p is less than or equal to 0.05). Gastrocnemius Ks was not significantly increased by exercise or the combination of rhGH and exercise up to 360' post-exercise. Results from this study indicate that resistance exercise stimulated Ks 60' post-exercise in the soleus of HLS rats, with no apparent effect of rhGH to enhance or prolong exercise-induced stimulation. Results suggests that exercise frequency may be important to maintenance of the slow-twitch soleus during non-weightbearing, but that the ability of resistance exercise to maintain myofibrillar protein content in the gastrocnemius of hindlimb suspended rats cannot be explained by acute stimulation of synthesis.

  8. Contribution of the forelimbs and hindlimbs of the horse to mechanical energy changes in jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten F; Santamaría, Susana

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to gain more insight into the contribution of the forelimbs and hindlimbs of the horse to energy changes during the push-off for a jump. For this purpose, we collected kinematic data at 240 Hz from 23 5-year-old Warmbloods (average mass: 595 kg) performing free jumps over a 1.15 m high fence. From these data, we calculated the changes in mechanical energy and the changes in limb length and joint angles. The force carried by the forelimbs and the amount of energy stored was estimated from the distance between elbow and hoof, assuming that this part of the leg behaved as a linear spring. During the forelimb push, the total energy first decreased by 3.2 J kg(-1) and then increased again by 4.2 J kg(-1) to the end of the forelimb push. At the end of the forelimb push, the kinetic energy due to horizontal velocity of the centre of mass was 1.6 J kg(-1) less than at the start, while the effective energy (energy contributing to jump height) was 2.3 J kg(-1) greater. It was investigated to what extent these changes could involve passive spring-like behaviour of the forelimbs. The amount of energy stored and re-utilized in the distal tendons during the forelimb push was estimated to be on average 0.4 J kg(-1) in the trailing forelimb and 0.23 J kg(-1) in the leading forelimb. This means that a considerable amount of energy was first dissipated and subsequently regenerated by muscles, with triceps brachii probably being the most important contributor. During the hindlimb push, the muscles of the leg were primarily producing energy. The total increase in energy was 2.5 J kg(-1) and the peak power output amounted to 71 W kg(-1).

  9. Myoglobin over-expression attenuates angiogenic response in hindlimb ischemia in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yao-guo; GUAN Heng; LIU Chang-wei; LI Yong-jun

    2009-01-01

    Background Myoglobin is expressed exclusively in striated skeletal muscles and has been implicated in nitric oxide scavenging. Accumulating data suggest a critical role for nitric oxide in both the endogenous and therapeutic angiogenic response to ischemia. A clear role for myoglobin in ischemic skeletal muscle is uncertain. We hypothesized that myoglobin overexpression has an adverse impact on the angiogenic response to ischemia.Methods Muscle-specific myoglobin over-expressing transgenic mice (MbTG, n=11), wild type littermates (WT, n=23) underwent unilateral femoral artery ligation and excision. Laser doppler perfusion imaging was used to monitor changes in hindlimb perfusion before surgery and weekly after surgery up to 28 days. Tissue ischemia was assessed by a necrosis incidence. Upon termination of the experiment (28 days after surgery), skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior) were harvested, the distal part of the muscle was frozen and embedded for histology study, the proximal part was used either to detect vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) or to determine the proliferation (proliferating call nuclear antigen (PCNA)) and apoptosis (Bax, and Bcl-2) condition in ischemic muscle by Western blotting. Capillaries were stained with endothelial phosphate alkaline staining and vascular density was expressed in capillaries/fiber.Results The recovery of perfusion in MbTG mice was similar to that of WT mice on day 7 (0.485±0.095 vs 0.500±0.084)but was significantly less on day 14 (0.536±0.086 vs 0.623±0.077, P <0.05), day 21 (0.588±0.082 vs 0.684±0.068, P <0.01) and day 28 (0.606±0.079 VS 0.733±0.093, P<0.01). The necrosis incidence was higher in MbTG than in WT (54.5% vs 21.6%). Vascular density was less in MbTG compared with that in WT (gastrocnemius 0.19±0.08 vs 0.30±0.08, P <0.05; tibialis anterior 0.22±0.11 vs 0.33±0.04, P<0.05). With ischemic injury, the VEGF level was

  10. Afferent roles in hindlimb wipe-reflex trajectories: free-limb kinematics and motor patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargo, W J; Giszter, S F

    2000-03-01

    The hindlimb wiping reflex of the frog is an example of a targeted trajectory that is organized at the spinal level. In this paper, we examine this reflex in 45 spinal frogs to test the importance of proprioceptive afferents in trajectory formation at the spinal level. We tested hindlimb to hindlimb wiping, in which the wiping or effector limb and the target limb move together. Loss of afferent feedback from the wiping limb was produced by cutting dorsal roots 7-9. This caused altered initial trajectory direction, increased ankle path curvature, knee-joint velocity reversals, and overshooting misses of the target limb. We established that these kinematic and motor-pattern changes were due mainly to the loss of ipsilateral muscular and joint afferents. Loss of cutaneous afferents alone did not alter the initial trajectory up to target limb contact. However, there were cutaneous effects in later motor-pattern phases after the wiping and target limb had made contact: The knee extension or whisk phase of wiping was often lost. Finally, there was a minor and nonspecific excitatory effect of phasic contralateral feedback in the motor-pattern changes after deafferentation. Specific muscle groups were altered as a result of proprioceptive loss. These muscles also showed configuration-based regulation during wiping. Biceps, semitendinosus, and sartorius (all contributing knee flexor torques) all were regulated in amplitude based on the initial position of the limb. These muscles contributed to an initial electromyographic (EMG) burst in the motor pattern. Rectus internus and semimembranosus (contributing hip extensor torques) were regulated in onset but not in the time of peak EMG or in termination of EMG based on initial position. These two muscles contributed to a second EMG burst in the motor pattern. After deafferentation the initial burst was reduced and more synchronous with the second burst, and the second burst often was broadened in duration. Ankle path curvature

  11. Mechanisms for exercise training-induced increases in skeletal muscle blood flow capacity: differences with interval sprint training versus aerobic endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, M H; Roseguini, B

    2008-12-01

    Skeletal muscle blood flow capacity (BFC) is increased by exercise training due to structural vascular remodeling (in the form of angiogenesis of capillaries and remodeling of the arterial tree within skeletal muscle) and/or altered control of vascular resistance. Changes in control can be central or the result of changes in reactivity of arteries and arterioles (due to changes in vascular smooth muscle and/or endothelium). The purpose of this review is to evaluate the relative importance of these mechanisms for increased BFC following interval sprint training (IST) and endurance exercise training (ET). Based on the results discussed herein we conclude that the importance of each of these mechanisms varies throughout muscle tissue due to interactions of muscle fiber-type composition and muscle fiber recruitment patterns during exercise. The distribution of vascular adaptive changes varies with mode of training. For example, IST has been shown to produce the greatest relative increase in contractile activity in fast-twitch, white, skeletal muscle (i.e. white gastrocnemius muscle (Gw) and Gw muscle exhibits the largest increase in oxidative capacity, capillary density, BFC, and changes in vascular cells with IST. In contrast, ET has been shown to produce the greatest relative increase in contractile activity in red gastrocnemius muscle (Gr), and Gr muscle exhibits the largest increase in oxidative capacity, capillary density, and BFC after ET training. Results demonstrate that the increases in BFC are not mediated solely by structural adaptation. Rather, changes in vascular control predominate in Gr and soleus muscle, while increases in arteriolar and capillary density predominate following IST in Gw. Finally, evidence indicates that ET and IST induce non-uniform changes in smooth muscle and endothelium throughout skeletal muscle arteriolar networks.

  12. [Tissue variability of androgen receptor gene in bulbospinal muscular atrophy--comparison of the number of CAG repeats between muscles and peripheral blood leukocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, H; Kimura, F; Shinoda, K; Ohsawa, N; Nakagawa, T; Shimizu, A

    1993-10-01

    We investigated an expansion of CAG repeats in exon 1 of androgen receptor gene in skeletal muscle tissue obtained from the patients with various neuro-muscular disorders (5 BSMA, 33 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 3 patients with spinal progressive muscular atrophy and 2 patients with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy), by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification according to LaSpadas' description. These muscle tissues had been stored at -70 degrees C freezer during 7 years. We also studied the tissue variation of CAG repeats size between muscles and peripheral blood leukocytes in 4 patients with BSMA. And we confirmed the increased number of CAG repeats in all 5 BSMA except for other patients with neurogenic muscular atrophy. In the 4 BSMA patients, we subcloned the PCR products from muscles tissues and peripheral blood leukocytes, and we determined the number of CAG repeats by sequencing. The repeats of them were 43-51, and all BSMA patients showed the same number of CAG repeats in muscles tissues and peripheral blood leukocytes. The CAG repeats fragment of BSMA may be stable region in frozen storage state for 7 years, and we didn't recognized the somatic variation at least between muscles tissues and peripheral blood leukocytes.

  13. The phylogeny of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens): evidence from the hindlimb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Rebecca E; Adrian, Brent; Elrod, Clay; Hicks, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is an endangered carnivore living in the temperate forests of the Himalayas and southern China. The phylogeny of the red panda has been the subject of much debate. Morphological and molecular studies have supported a wide range of possible relationships, including close ties to procyonids, ursids, mustelids, and mephitids. This study provides additional morphological data, including muscle maps, for Ailurus. The hindlimbs of four cadavers from the National Zoological Park were dissected. Red pandas retain a number of muscles lost in other carnivore groups, including muscles and tendons related to their robust and weight-bearing hallux. Three features, including a single-bellied m. sartorius, a proximal insertion for m. abductor digiti V, and an absent m. articularis coxae, are found in all terrestrial arctoids, including Ailurus. In addition, red pandas are similar to ursids and canids in lacking a caudal belly of m. semitendinosus, while they resemble procyonids and mustelids in the degree of fusion observed between mm. gluteus medius and piriformis. Furthermore, Ailurus and procyonids are characterized by numerous subdivisions within the adductor compartment, while red pandas and raccoons share a variable m. semimembranosus, composed of one, two, or three bellies. Lastly, a deep plantar muscle inserting onto the metatarsophalangeal joint of the hallux is described for Ailurus. This muscle has not been previously described and is given the name m. flexor hallucis profundus. Additional dissections of the forelimb and axial musculature of red pandas may shed further light on the phylogeny of this species. In addition, the muscle maps presented here offer a valuable resource for interpreting the functional anatomy of fossil ailurids. PMID:19014366

  14. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity and blood flow during exercise and muscle ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Perko, M; Hanel, B

    1992-01-01

    ," mechanoreceptors, and/or muscle "metaboreceptors" on cerebral perfusion. Ten healthy subjects performed two levels of dynamic exercise corresponding to a heart rate of 110 (range 89-134) and 148 (129-170) beats/min, respectively, and exhaustive one-legged static knee extension. Measurements were continued during 2......-2.5 min of muscle ischemia. MAP increased similarly during static [114 (102-133) mmHg] and heavy dynamic exercise [121 (104-136) mmHg] and increased during muscle ischemia after dynamic exercise. During heavy dynamic exercise, Vmean increased 24% (10-47%; P less than 0.01) over approximately 3 min despite...... constant arterial carbon dioxide tension. In contrast, static exercise with a higher rate of perceived exertion [18 (13-20) vs. 15 (12-18) units; P less than 0.01] was associated with no significant change in Vmean. Muscle ischemia after exercise was not associated with an elevation in Vmean, and it did...

  15. Heterogeneity of Muscle Blood Flow and Metabolism: Influence of Exercise, Aging, and Disease States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Heinonen (Ilkka); S. Koga (Shunsaku); K.K. Kalliokoski (Kari); T.I. Musch (Timothy I.); D.C. Poole (David C.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe systematic increase in VO2 uptake and O2 extraction with increasing work rates conceals a substantial heterogeneity of O2 delivery (QO2)-to-VO2 matching across and within muscles and other organs. We hypothesize that whether increased/decreased QO2/VO2 heterogeneity can be judged as

  16. Metal levels in blood, muscle and liver of water snakes (Nerodia spp.) from New Jersey, Tennessee and South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, Nelson Biological Lab., Rutgers Univ., 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)]|[Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)]. E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Campbell, Kym Rouse [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)]|[Biological Research Associates, 3910 U.S. Highway 301 North, Suite 180, Tampa, Florida 33619 (United States); Murray, Stephanie; Jeitner, Christian; Burke, Sean [Div. of Life Sciences, Nelson Biological Lab., Rutgers Univ., 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)]|[Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, New Jersey (United States); Campbell, Todd S. [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)]|[Dept. of Biology, Box 3F, Univ. of Tampa, 401 West Kennedy Boulevard, Tampa, Florida 33606-1490 (United States); Gaines, Karen F. [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)]|[Savannah River Ecology Lab., Univ. of Georgia, P.A. Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802 (United States)]|[Dept. of Biology, Univ. of South Dakota, 414 E. Clark St., Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States); Shukla, Tara; Gochfeld, Michael [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)]|[Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Reptiles, particularly snakes, could serve as bioindicators of contamination because some are comparatively long-lived, exhibit different trophic levels, and are at the top of their food chains. We test the null hypothesis that there are no differences in the concentrations of heavy metals in the blood, muscle and liver of water snakes (Nerodia spp.) from rivers in New Jersey, Tennessee and South Carolina. While the former site is in an urban/suburban area, the latter two sites are relatively rural and are located on Department of Energy sites. For the snakes from New Jersey, there were significant differences in metal concentrations among tissues for all metals, the highest levels for arsenic and selenium were in liver and kidney, for cadmium were in the liver, for chromium and lead were in skin, and for mercury and manganese were in the muscle. Body length was not correlated with metal levels, and there were more significant correlations for skin with internal tissues than for blood with other tissues. There were more significant correlations for mercury than for other metals. In comparing metal levels among states, levels were generally higher for snakes collected from South Carolina. These data indicate that, since water snakes accumulate contaminants differentially as a function of location, they can be useful bioindicators of environmental exposure to contaminants. Moreover, because of their wide geographical distribution and use of varying trophic compartments, this genus can be useful for cross-site comparisons.

  17. Effects of cardioplegia induced by a Young's solution (YNG solution) on the blood-perfused canine papillary muscle preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, H; Ohkubo, K; Suzuki, K; Katano, Y; Otorii, T; Kawada, T; Yoshida, S; Imai, S

    1984-03-01

    Experiments were carried out in the blood-perfused canine papillary muscle preparation to evaluate the protective effect of a cardioplegic solution, Young's solution (YNG solution), on the myocardial function. Both in spontaneously contracting preparations and in electrically paced (2 Hz) preparations, the time to the cardiac arrest and the time to the maximum blood flow were found to be significantly shorter when the cardiac arrest was induced with cardioplegic solutions than when it was induced with the cold modified Krebs-Ringer's solution (cold cardioplegia). The maximum blood flow of the paced preparation tended to be greater with cardioplegic solutions. The time to resumption of regular contractions was significantly shorter with YNG solution as compared with cold cardioplegia. The developed tension and the blood flow at the time of resumption of the regular contractions tended to approach the control value more quickly with YNG solution, as compared with other cardioplegic solutions and cold cardioplegia. It is concluded that YNG solution represents an optimal cardioplegic solution.

  18. Leukocytes, cytokines, growth factors and hormones in human skeletal muscle and blood after uphill or downhill running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christer; Sjödin, Bertil; Sjöberg, Berit; Lenkei, Rodica; Renström, Per; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Ekblom, Björn

    2004-01-01

    Muscular adaptation to physical exercise has previously been described as a repair process following tissue damage. Recently, evidence has been published to question this hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate inflammatory processes in human skeletal muscle and epimysium after acute physical exercise with large eccentric components. Three groups of subjects (n= 19) performed 45 min treadmill running at either 4 deg (n= 5) or 8 deg (n= 9) downhill or 4 deg uphill (n= 5) and one group served as control (n= 9). One biopsy was taken from each subject 48 h post exercise. Blood samples were taken up to 7 days post exercise. Compared to the control group, none of the markers of inflammation in muscle and epimysium samples was different in any exercised group. Only subjects in the Downhill groups experienced delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) and increased serum creatine kinase activity (CK). The detected levels of immunohistochemical markers for T cells (CD3), granulocytes (CD11b), leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1β (HIF-1β) were greater in epimysium from exercised subjects with DOMS ratings >3 (0–10 scale) compared to exercised subjects without DOMS but not higher than controls. Eccentric physical exercise (downhill running) did not result in skeletal muscle inflammation 48 h post exercise, despite DOMS and increased CK. It is suggested that exercise can induce DOMS by activating inflammatory factors present in the epimysium before exercise. Repeated physical training may alter the content of inflammatory factors in the epimysium and thus reduce DOMS. PMID:14766942

  19. Bone, blood vessels, and muscle detection algorithm and creating database based on dynamic and non-dynamic multi-slice CT image of head and neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir Ahamed, Mohammed; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Iwasaki, Hirokazu

    2007-03-01

    Nowadays, dental CT images play more and more important roles in oral clinical applications. Our research is important particularly in the field of dentistry. We are using non-dynamic and dynamic CT image for our research. We are creating our database of bone, blood vessels and muscles of head and neck. This database contains easy case and difficult case of head and neck's bone, blood vessels and muscle. There are lots of difficult cases in our database. Teeth separation and condylar process separation is difficult case. External carotid artery has many branches and they are attached with vain so it is difficult to separate. All muscle threshold value is same and they are attaching with each other so muscle separation is very difficult. These databases also contain different age's patients. For this reason our database becomes an important tool for dental students and also important assets for diagnosis. After completion our database we can link it with other dental application.

  20. Seasonal variation in blood and muscle oxygen stores attributed to diving behavior, environmental temperature and pregnancy in a marine predator, the California sea lion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Amtmann, Stella; Atkinson, Shannon; Paras-Garcia, Alberto; Costa, Daniel P

    2012-08-01

    Survival depends on an animal's ability to find and acquire prey. In diving vertebrates, this ability is directly related to their physiological capability (e.g. oxygen stores). We studied the seasonal variation in oxygen stores, body temperature and body condition in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) (CSL) as a function of seasonal variation in temperature, primary productivity, diving behavior and reproductive stage. During summer, blood oxygen stores were significantly greater and muscle oxygen stores were significantly lower than in winter. Total oxygen stores, body condition and body temperature did not change between seasons but variations in body temperature were greater during summer. Changes in oxygen stores are partly attributed to diving behavior, temperature and pregnancy that could increase oxygen consumption. Blood and muscle oxygen stores appear to be influenced by reproductive state. Blood oxygen stores are more likely influenced by diving behavior and temperature than muscle oxygen stores.

  1. Expression of IGF-I and Protein Degradation Markers During Hindlimb Unloading and Growth Hormone Administration in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinsoo, T. A.; Turtikova, O. V.; Shenkman, B. S.

    2013-02-01

    It is known that hindlimb unloading or spaceflight produce atrophy and a number of phenotypic alterations in skeletal muscles. Many of these processes are triggered by the axis growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I. However growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) expression relationship in rodent models of gravitational unloading is weakly investigated. We supposed the IGF-I is involved in regulation of protein turnover. In this study we examined the IGF-I expression by RT-PCR assay in the rat soleus, tibialis anterior and liver after 3 day of hindlimb suspension with growth hormone administration. Simultaneously were studied expression levels of MuRF-1 and MAFbx/atrogin as a key markers of intracellular proteolysis. We demonstrated that GH administration did not prevent IGF-I expression decreasing under the conditions of simulated weightlessness. It was concluded there are separate mechanisms of action of GH and IGF-I on protein metabolism in skeletal muscles. Gravitational unloading activate proteolysis independently of growth hormone activity.

  2. Effects of three days of dry immersion on muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, S; Sugiyama, Y; Miwa, C; Kamiya, A; Mano, T; Ohira, Y; Shenkman, B; Egorov, A I; Kozlovskaya, I B

    2000-03-15

    The present study was performed to determine how sympathetic function is altered by simulated microgravity, dry immersion for 3 days, and to elucidate the mechanism of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance in humans. Six healthy men aged 21-36 years old participated in the study. Before and after the dry immersion, subjects performed head-up tilt (HUT) test to 30 degrees and 60 degrees (5 min each) with recordings of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, by microneurography), electrocardiogram, and arterial blood pressure (Finapres). Resting MSNA was increased after dry immersion from 23.7+/-3.2 to 40.9+/-3.0 bursts/min (p<0.005) without significant changes in resting heart rate (HR). MSNA responsiveness to orthostasis showed no significant difference but HR response was significantly augmented after dry immersion (p<0. 005). A significant diastolic blood pressure fall at 5th min of 60 degrees HUT was observed in five orthostatic tolerant subjects despite enough MSNA discharge after dry immersion. A subject suffered from presyncope at 2 min after 60 degrees HUT. He showed gradual blood pressure fall 10 s after 60 degrees HUT with initially well-maintained MSNA response and then with a gradually attenuated MSNA, followed by a sudden MSNA withdrawal and abrupt blood pressure drop. In conclusion, dry immersion increased MSNA without changing MSNA response to orthostasis, and resting HR, while increasing the HR response to orthostasis. Analyses of MSNA and blood pressure changes in orthostatic tolerant subjects and a subject with presyncope suggested that not only insufficient vasoconstriction to sympathetic stimuli, but also a central mechanism to induce a sympathetic withdrawal might play a role in the development of orthostatic intolerance after microgravity exposure.

  3. Acute supplementation of N-acetylcysteine does not affect muscle blood flow and oxygenation characteristics during handgrip exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Broxterman, Ryan M; Ade, Carl J; Evans, Kara K; Kurti, Stephanie P; Hammer, Shane M; Barstow, Thomas J; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC; antioxidant and thiol donor) supplementation has improved exercise performance and delayed fatigue, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. One possibility isNACsupplementation increases limb blood flow during severe-intensity exercise. The purpose was to determine ifNACsupplementation affected exercising arm blood flow and muscle oxygenation characteristics. We hypothesized thatNACwould lead to higher limb blood flow and lower muscle deoxygenation characteristics during severe-intensity exercise. Eight healthy nonendurance trained men (21.8 ± 1.2 years) were recruited and completed two constant power handgrip exercise tests at 80% peak power until exhaustion. Subjects orally consumed either placebo (PLA) orNAC(70 mg/kg) 60 min prior to handgrip exercise. Immediately prior to exercise, venous blood samples were collected for determination of plasma redox balance. Brachial artery blood flow (BABF) was measured via Doppler ultrasound and flexor digitorum superficialis oxygenation characteristics were measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. FollowingNACsupplementaiton, plasma cysteine (NAC: 47.2 ± 20.3 μmol/L vs.PLA: 9.6 ± 1.2 μmol/L;P = 0.001) and total cysteine (NAC: 156.2 ± 33.9 μmol/L vs.PLA: 132.2 ± 16.3 μmol/L;P = 0.048) increased. Time to exhaustion was not significantly different (P = 0.55) betweenNAC(473.0 ± 62.1 sec) andPLA(438.7 ± 58.1 sec). RestingBABFwas not different (P = 0.79) withNAC(99.3 ± 31.1 mL/min) andPLA(108.3 ± 46.0 mL/min).BABFwas not different (P = 0.42) during exercise or at end-exercise (NAC: 413 ± 109 mL/min;PLA: 445 ± 147 mL/min). Deoxy-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] and total-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were not significantly different (P = 0.73 andP = 0.54, respectively) at rest or during exercise between conditions. We conclude that acuteNACsupplementation does not alter oxygen delivery during exercise in men.

  4. [Characterization of the latent periods of excitation and shortening of anterior tibial muscle of white rats depending on the blood level of triiodothyronine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanishevs'ka, T I; Soboliev, V I

    2012-01-01

    In experiments in situ it was shown an expressed negative correlation between the duration of latent periods of excitation and contraction of the anterior tibial muscle of white rats and the blood level of free triiodothyronine. The difference in mean values of latent periods at starting and final points of scale of physiological fluctuations of triiodothyronine level amounted 15.5% and 37.0% respectively. In parallel with lengthening of latent period of anterior tibial muscle excitation it was found an increase in latent period of this muscle contraction. Interestingly, at high values of the latent periods of excitation such dependence disappeared.

  5. Contraction-induced skeletal muscle FAT/CD36 trafficking and FA uptake is AMPK independent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Albers, Peter Hjorth; Rose, Adam John

    2011-01-01

    translocation and fatty acid uptake in response to muscle contractions was investigated in the perfused rat hindlimb. Exercise induced a similar increase in skeletal muscle cell surface membrane FAT/CD36 content in WT (+34%) and AMPK KD (+37%) mice. In contrast, AICAR only induced an increase in cell surface...... FAT/CD36 content in WT (+29%) mice. Furthermore, in the perfused rat hindlimb, muscle contraction induced a rapid (1 min, +15%) and sustained (10 min, +24%) FAT/CD36 relocation to cell surface membranes. The increase in cell surface FAT/CD36 protein content with muscle contractions associated...... with increased fatty acid uptake, both in EDL and SOL muscle from WT and AMPK KD mice and in the perfused rat hindlimb. This suggests that AMPK is not essential in regulation of FAT/CD36 translocation and fatty acid uptake in skeletal muscle during contractions. However, AMPK could be important in regulation...

  6. Role of eicosanoids and white blood cells in the beneficial effects of limited reperfusion after ischemia-reperfusion injury in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.J.; Cambria, R.A.; Dikdan, G.; Lysz, T.W.; Hobson, R.W. II (UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Limiting the rate of reperfusion blood flow has been shown to be beneficial locally in models of ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated the effects of this on eicosanoids (thromboxane B2, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and leukotriene B4), white blood cell activation, and skeletal muscle injury as quantitated by triphenyltetrazolium chloride and technetium-99m pyrophosphate after ischemia-reperfusion injury in an isolated gracilis muscle model in 16 anesthetized dogs. One gracilis muscle in each dog was subjected to 6 hours of ischemia followed by 1 hour of limited reperfusion and then by a second hour of normal reperfusion. The other muscle was subjected to 6 hours of ischemia followed by 2 hours of normal reperfusion. Six dogs each were used as normal reperfusion controls (NR) and limited reperfusion controls (LR), with 5 dogs being treated with a thromboxane synthetase inhibitor (LR/TSI) and another five with a leukotriene inhibitor (LR/LI). LR in all three groups (LR, LR/TSI, and LR/LI) showed a benefit in skeletal muscle injury as measured by triphenyltetrazolim chloride and technetium-99m pyrophosphate when compared with NR. However, there was no significant difference between the groups with LR regarding eicosanoid levels and white blood cell activation when compared with NR. These results demonstrate that LR produces benefits by mechanisms other than those dependent upon thromboxane A2, prostacyclin, or white blood cell activation.

  7. Increased muscle blood supply and transendothelial nutrient and insulin transport induced by food intake and exercise: effect of obesity and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenmakers, Anton J M; Strauss, Juliette A; Shepherd, Sam O; Keske, Michelle A; Cocks, Matthew

    2016-04-15

    This review concludes that a sedentary lifestyle, obesity and ageing impair the vasodilator response of the muscle microvasculature to insulin, exercise and VEGF-A and reduce microvascular density. Both impairments contribute to the development of insulin resistance, obesity and chronic age-related diseases. A physically active lifestyle keeps both the vasodilator response and microvascular density high. Intravital microscopy has shown that microvascular units (MVUs) are the smallest functional elements to adjust blood flow in response to physiological signals and metabolic demands on muscle fibres. The luminal diameter of a common terminal arteriole (TA) controls blood flow through up to 20 capillaries belonging to a single MVU. Increases in plasma insulin and exercise/muscle contraction lead to recruitment of additional MVUs. Insulin also increases arteriolar vasomotion. Both mechanisms increase the endothelial surface area and therefore transendothelial transport of glucose, fatty acids (FAs) and insulin by specific transporters, present in high concentrations in the capillary endothelium. Future studies should quantify transporter concentration differences between healthy and at risk populations as they may limit nutrient supply and oxidation in muscle and impair glucose and lipid homeostasis. An important recent discovery is that VEGF-B produced by skeletal muscle controls the expression of FA transporter proteins in the capillary endothelium and thus links endothelial FA uptake to the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle, potentially preventing lipotoxic FA accumulation, the dominant cause of insulin resistance in muscle fibres.

  8. Effect of insulin in combination with selenium on blood glucose and GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of low-dose insulin [1 U/(kg·d)] in combination with selenium [180 g/(kg·d)] on general physiological parameters and glucose transporter (GLUT4) level in skeletal muscle of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Methods Diabetic rats were treated with insulin,selenium,and insulin and selenium in combination for four weeks. The level of blood glucose was determined using One Touch SureStep Blood Glucose meter and the level of GLUT4 in skeletal muscle was examined by immu...

  9. Changes in Systolic Blood Pressure during Isometric Contractions of Different Size Muscle Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    flexion), fine motor control is required to produce index finger adduction as an isolated i contraction (37,38). with this in mind , one should...efficacy of drugs used for treating I hypertension. Clinicians, using biofeedback techniques, could teach individuals hcw to relax certain muscles. i...I APP ~NDhX E CLLIBRATION CF FO~C~ £~EASIJBING TR&NSDUC~B5 I I ii I I H. I I’ I.. I 106 The calibration for each ’t0" ring force transducer I was

  10. Misexpression experiment of Tbx5 in axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) hindlimb blastema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Takashi; Kominami, Rieko; Yasutaka, Satoru; Shinohara, Harumichi

    2013-01-01

    Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) have the ability to regenerate amputated limbs throughout their life span. In the present study, we attempted to elucidate how axolotls can specify limb type correctly during the regeneration process. We misexpressed Tbx5 in regenerating hindlimb blastema, and consequently a forelimb-like hindlimb regenerated from the hindlimb blastema. On the other hand, no change was observed in Tbx5-overexpressing forelimb blastema, and thus we considered that Tbx5 plays a key role in the specification of forelimb during the regeneration process of axolotl limbs. However, axolotls' fore- and hindlimbs have very similar structures except for the number of fingers, and it was very difficult to judge whether the forelimb-like regenerate was a true forelimb or merely a forelimb-like hindlimb. Therefore, in order to confirm our conclusion, we have to investigate other genes that are expressed differentially between fore- and hindlimbs in future experiments.

  11. Combined intermittent hypoxia and surface muscle electrostimulation as a method to increase peripheral blood progenitor cell concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azqueta Carmen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our goal was to determine whether short-term intermittent hypoxia exposure, at a level well tolerated by healthy humans and previously shown by our group to increase EPO and erythropoiesis, could mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and increase their presence in peripheral circulation. Methods Four healthy male subjects were subjected to three different protocols: one with only a hypoxic stimulus (OH, another with a hypoxic stimulus plus muscle electrostimulation (HME and the third with only muscle electrostimulation (OME. Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia exposure consisted of only three sessions of three hours at barometric pressure 540 hPa (equivalent to an altitude of 5000 m for three consecutive days, whereas muscular electrostimulation was performed in two separate periods of 25 min in each session. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein on three consecutive days immediately before the experiment and 24 h, 48 h, 4 days and 7 days after the last day of hypoxic exposure. Results There was a clear increase in the number of circulating CD34+ cells after combined hypobaric hypoxia and muscular electrostimulation. This response was not observed after the isolated application of the same stimuli. Conclusion Our results open a new application field for hypobaric systems as a way to increase efficiency in peripheral HSC collection.

  12. NGF promotes hemodynamic recovery in a rabbit hindlimb ischemic model through trkA- and VEGFR2-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatzas, Andreas; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Lilis, Ioannis; Papadaki, Helen; Kitrou, Panagiotis; Lecht, Shimon; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Siablis, Dimitris; Lelkes, Peter I; Lazarovici, Philip; Tsopanoglou, Nikos E

    2013-09-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been reported to play an important role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that NGF may induce the formation of functional blood vessels in a hindlimb ischemic rabbit model. Hindlimb ischemia was induced in 34 rabbits bilaterally by endovascular embolization of femoral arteries. On the 7th, 14th, and 20th postembolization days, NGF was injected intramuscularly, in 1 ischemic limb, and vehicle was injected in the contralateral control limb. On the 40th day, newly developed collateral vessels (diameter >500 μm) were quantified by transauricular intraarterial subtraction angiography. Perfusion analysis of an in vivo dynamic computed tomography study was performed to the limbs to investigate the hemodynamic recovery of the distal ischemic tissues. Functional estimation of limb perfusion showed a statistically significant increase of blood flow and blood volume for NGF. However, the increase of the collateral vessels was not detectable angiographically, providing evidence for the existence of a NGF-stimulated capillary angiogenic network but not increase of arteriogenesis. The combination of NGF with either tropomyosin-related kinase type A or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antagonists abolished the NGF-induced hemodynamic recovery. These findings provide new insights into understanding the involvement of NGF in vascular formation and its applications in therapeutic angiogenesis.

  13. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  14. A 3D map of the hindlimb motor representation in the lumbar spinal cord in Sprague Dawley rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Jordan A.; Frost, Shawn B.; Peterson, Jeremy; Nudo, Randolph J.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological trauma with a prevalence of about 282 000 people living with an SCI in the United States in 2016. Advances in neuromodulatory devices hold promise for restoring function by incorporating the delivery of electrical current directly into the spinal cord grey matter via intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS). In such designs, detailed topographic maps of spinal cord outputs are needed to determine ISMS locations for eliciting hindlimb movements. The primary goal of the present study was to derive a topographic map of functional motor outputs in the lumbar spinal cord to hindlimb skeletal muscles as defined by ISMS in a rat model. Approach. Experiments were carried out in nine healthy, adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats. After a laminectomy of the T13-L1 vertebrae and removal of the dura mater, a four-shank, 16-channel microelectrode array was inserted along a 3D (200 µm) stimulation grid. Trains of three biphasic current pulses were used to determine evoked movements and electromyographic (EMG) activity. Via fine wire EMG electrodes, stimulus-triggered averaging (StTA) was used on rectified EMG data to determine response latency. Main results. Hindlimb movements were elicited at a median current intensity of 6 µA, and thresholds were significantly lower in ventrolateral sites. Movements typically consisted of whole leg, hip, knee, ankle, toe, and trunk movements. Hip movements dominated rostral to the T13 vertebral segment, knee movements were evoked at the T13-L1 vertebral junction, while ankle and digit movements were found near the rostral L1 vertebra. Whole leg movements spanned the entire rostrocaudal region explored, while trunk movements dominated medially. StTAs of EMG activity demonstrated a latency of ~4 ms. Significance. The derived motor map provides insight into the parameters needed for future neuromodulatory devices.

  15. Modulation of spontaneous locomotor and respiratory drives to hindlimb motoneurons temporally related to sympathetic drives as revealed by Mayer waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katinka eStecina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated how the networks mediating respiratory and locomotor drives to lumbar motoneurons interact and how this interaction is modulated in relation to periodic variations in blood pressure (Mayer waves. Seven decerebrate cats, under neuromuscular blockade, were used to study central respiratory drive potentials (CRDPs, usually enhanced by added CO2 and spontaneously occurring locomotor drive potentials (LDPs in hindlimb motoneurons, together with hindlimb and phrenic nerve discharges. In four of the cats both drives and their voltage-dependent amplification were absent or modest, but in the other three, one or other of these drives was common and the voltage-dependent amplification was frequently strong. Moreover, in these three cats the blood pressure showed marked periodic variation (Mayer waves, with a slow rate (periods 9 - 104 s, mean 39 ± 17 SD. Profound modulation, synchronized with the Mayer waves was seen in the occurrence and/or in the amplification of the CRDPs or LDPs. In one animal, where CRDPs were present in most cells and the amplification was strong, the CRDP consistently triggered sustained plateaux at one phase of the Mayer wave cycle. In the other two animals, LDPs were common, and the occurrence of the locomotor drive was gated by the Mayer wave cycle, sometimes in alternation with the respiratory drive. Other interactions between the two drives involved respiration providing leading events, including co-activation of flexors and extensors during post-inspiration or a locomotor drive gated or sometimes entrained by respiration. We conclude that the respiratory drive in hindlimb motoneurons is transmitted via elements of the locomotor central pattern generator. The rapid modulation related to Mayer waves suggests the existence of a more direct and specific descending modulatory control than has previously been demonstrated.

  16. Exercise increases sphingoid base-1-phosphate levels in human blood and skeletal muscle in a time- and intensity-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baranowski, Marcin; Błachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka U; Charmas, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates cardiovascular function and plays an important role in muscle biology. We have previously reported that cycling exercise increased plasma S1P. Here, we investigated the effect of exercise duration and intensity on plasma and skeletal muscle S1P...... levels. METHODS: In the first experiment, 13 male athletes performed a 60-min exercise at 65 % of VO2max and a graded exercise until exhaustion on a rowing ergometer. Samples of the venous blood were taken, and plasma, erythrocytes and platelets were isolated. In the second experiment, ten male...... moderately active subjects performed three consecutive periods of one-leg knee extension exercise (at 25, 55 and 85 % of the maximal workload). Muscle biopsies and blood samples from the radial artery and femoral veins were taken. RESULTS: Under basal conditions, S1P was released from the leg, as its...

  17. Diminished Lipid Raft SNAP23 Increases Blood Pressure by Inhibiting the Membrane Fluidity of Vascular Smooth-Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mi So; Won, Kyung-Jong; Kim, Do-Yoon; Hwang, Dae Il; Yoon, Seok Won; Jung, Seung Hyo; Lee, Kang Pa; Jung, Dongju; Choi, Wahn Soo; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Hwan Myung

    2015-01-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein 23 (SNAP23) is involved in microvesicle trafficking and exocytosis in various cell types, but its functional role in blood pressure (BP) regulation has not yet been defined. Here, we found that lipid raft SNAP23 expression was much lower in vascular smooth-muscle cells (VSMCs) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) than in those from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. This led us to investigate the hypothesis that this lower expression may be linked to the spontaneous hypertension found in SHR. The expression level of lipid raft SNAP23 and the fluidity in the plasma membrane of VSMCs were lower in SHR than in WKY rats. Cholesterol content in the VSMC membrane was higher, but the secreted cholesterols found in VSMC-conditioned medium and in the blood serum were lower in SHR than in WKY rats. SNAP23 knockdown in WKY rat VSMCs reduced the membrane fluidity and increased the membrane cholesterol level. Systemic overexpression of SNAP23 in SHR resulted in an increase of cholesterol content in their serum, a decrease in cholesterol in their aorta and the reduction of their BP. Our findings suggest that the low expression of the lipid raft SNAP23 in VSMCs might be a potential cause for the characteristic hypertension of SHR.

  18. Gluteal blood flow and oxygenation during electrical stimulation-induced muscle activation versus pressure relief movements in wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C. A. J.; Zwinkels, M.; van Dijk, T.; de Groot, S.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J. M.; Janssen, T. W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prolonged high ischial tuberosities pressure (IT pressure), decreased regional blood flow (BF) and oxygenation (%SO2) are risk factors for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES)-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activati

  19. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Also, blood is either Rh-positive or Rh-negative. So if you have type A blood, it's either A positive or A negative. Which type you are is important if you need a blood transfusion. And your Rh factor could be important ...

  20. Vascular smooth muscle G(q) signaling is involved in high blood pressure in both induced renal and genetic vascular smooth muscle-derived models of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M; Cohn, Heather I; Pesant, Stéphanie; Zhou, Rui-Hai; Eckhart, Andrea D

    2007-11-01

    More than 30% of the US population has high blood pressure (BP), and less than a third of people treated for hypertension have it controlled. In addition, the etiology of most high BP is not known. Having a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying hypertension could potentially increase the effectiveness of treatment. Because G(q) signaling mediates vasoconstriction and vascular function can cause BP abnormalities, we were interested in determining the role of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) G(q) signaling in two divergent models of hypertension: a renovascular model of hypertension through renal artery stenosis and a genetic model of hypertension using mice with VSM-derived high BP. Inhibition of VSM G(q) signaling attenuated BP increases induced by renal artery stenosis to a similar extent as losartan, an ANG II receptor blocker and current antihypertensive therapy. Inhibition of G(q) signaling also attenuated high BP in our genetic VSM-derived hypertensive model. In contrast, BP remained elevated 25% following treatment with losartan, and prazosin, an alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, only decreased BP by 35%. Inhibition of G(q) signaling attenuated VSM reactivity to ANG II and resulted in a 2.4-fold rightward shift in EC(50). We also determined that inhibition of G(q) signaling was able to reverse VSM hypertrophy in the genetic VSM-derived hypertensive model. These results suggest that G(q) signaling is an important signaling pathway in two divergent models of hypertension and, perhaps, optimization of antihypertensive therapy could occur with the identification of particular G(q)-coupled receptors involved.

  1. Blood flow index using near-infrared spectroscopy and indocyanine green as a minimally invasive tool to assess respiratory muscle blood flow in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guenette, Jordan A; Henderson, William R; Dominelli, Paolo B

    2011-01-01

    humans. BFI was calculated as the change in maximal [ICG] divided by the rise time of the NIRS-derived ICG curve. Intercostal and sternocleidomastoid muscle BFI were correlated with simultaneously measured work of breathing and electromyography (EMG) data from the same muscles. BFI showed strong...... relationships with the work of breathing and EMG for both respiratory muscles. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) comparing BFI vs. the work of breathing for the intercostal and sternocleidomastoid muscles were 0.887 (P ... for the intercostal and sternocleidomastoid muscles were 0.879 (P

  2. Systematic Sensitivity Analysis of Metabolic Controllers During Reductions in Skeletal Muscle Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Cabrera, Marco

    2000-01-01

    An acute reduction in oxygen delivery to skeletal muscle is generally associated with profound derangements in substrate metabolism. Given the complexity of the human bioenergetic system and its components, it is difficult to quantify the interaction of cellular metabolic processes to maintain ATP homeostasis during stress (e.g., hypoxia, ischemia, and exercise). Of special interest is the determination of mechanisms relating tissue oxygenation to observed metabolic responses at the tissue, organ, and whole body levels and the quantification of how changes in oxygen availability affect the pathways of ATP synthesis and their regulation. In this study, we apply a previously developed mathematical model of human bioenergetics to study effects of ischemia during periods of increased ATP turnover (e.g., exercise). By using systematic sensitivity analysis the oxidative phosphorylation rate was found to be the most important rate parameter affecting lactate production during ischemia under resting conditions. Here we examine whether mild exercise under ischemic conditions alters the relative importance of pathways and parameters previously obtained.

  3. Development and evolution of the muscles of the pelvic fin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Cole

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Locomotor strategies in terrestrial tetrapods have evolved from the utilisation of sinusoidal contractions of axial musculature, evident in ancestral fish species, to the reliance on powerful and complex limb muscles to provide propulsive force. Within tetrapods, a hindlimb-dominant locomotor strategy predominates, and its evolution is considered critical for the evident success of the tetrapod transition onto land. Here, we determine the developmental mechanisms of pelvic fin muscle formation in living fish species at critical points within the vertebrate phylogeny and reveal a stepwise modification from a primitive to a more derived mode of pelvic fin muscle formation. A distinct process generates pelvic fin muscle in bony fishes that incorporates both primitive and derived characteristics of vertebrate appendicular muscle formation. We propose that the adoption of the fully derived mode of hindlimb muscle formation from this bimodal character state is an evolutionary innovation that was critical to the success of the tetrapod transition.

  4. Development and Evolution of the Muscles of the Pelvic Fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Nicholas J.; Hall, Thomas E.; Don, Emily K.; Berger, Silke; Boisvert, Catherine A.; Neyt, Christine; Ericsson, Rolf; Joss, Jean; Gurevich, David B.; Currie, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Locomotor strategies in terrestrial tetrapods have evolved from the utilisation of sinusoidal contractions of axial musculature, evident in ancestral fish species, to the reliance on powerful and complex limb muscles to provide propulsive force. Within tetrapods, a hindlimb-dominant locomotor strategy predominates, and its evolution is considered critical for the evident success of the tetrapod transition onto land. Here, we determine the developmental mechanisms of pelvic fin muscle formation in living fish species at critical points within the vertebrate phylogeny and reveal a stepwise modification from a primitive to a more derived mode of pelvic fin muscle formation. A distinct process generates pelvic fin muscle in bony fishes that incorporates both primitive and derived characteristics of vertebrate appendicular muscle formation. We propose that the adoption of the fully derived mode of hindlimb muscle formation from this bimodal character state is an evolutionary innovation that was critical to the success of the tetrapod transition. PMID:21990962

  5. Erythrocytes and the regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery: role of erythrocyte count and oxygenation state of haemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Dawson, Ellen A; Secher, Niels H; Damsgaard, Rasmus

    2006-04-01

    Blood flow to dynamically contracting myocytes is regulated to match O(2) delivery to metabolic demand. The red blood cell (RBC) itself functions as an O(2) sensor, contributing to the control of O(2) delivery by releasing the vasodilators ATP and S-nitrosohaemoglobin with the offloading of O(2) from the haemoglobin molecule. Whether RBC number is sensed remains unknown. To investigate the role of RBC number, in isolation and in combination with alterations in blood oxygenation, on muscle and systemic perfusion, we measured local and central haemodynamics during one-legged knee-extensor exercise ( approximately 50% peak power) in 10 healthy males under conditions of normocythaemia (control), anaemia, anaemia + plasma volume expansion (PVX), anaemia + PVX + hypoxia, polycythaemia, polycythaemia + hyperoxia and polycythaemia + hypoxia, which changed either RBC count alone or both RBC count and oxyhaemoglobin. Leg blood flow (LBF), cardiac output (Q) and vascular conductance did not change with either anaemia or polycythaemia alone. However, LBF increased with anaemia + PVX (28 +/- 4%) and anaemia + PVX + hypoxia (46 +/- 6%) and decreased with polycythaemia + hyperoxia (18 +/- 5%). LBF and Q with anaemia + PVX + hypoxia (8.0 +/- 0.5 and 15.8 +/- 0.7 l min(-1), respectively) equalled those during maximal knee-extensor exercise. Collectively, LBF and vascular conductance were intimately related to leg arterial-venous (a-v) O(2) difference (r(2)= 0.89-0.93; P < 0.001), suggesting a pivotal role of blood O(2) gradients in muscle microcirculatory control. The systemic circulation accommodated to the changes in muscle perfusion. Our results indicate that, when coping with severe haematological challenges, local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and O(2) delivery primarily senses alterations in the oxygenation state of haemoglobin and, to a lesser extent, alterations in the number of RBCs and haemoglobin molecules.

  6. Arterial and venous vasodilator actions of RS-1893, a novel cardiotonic agent, in the hindlimb preparation of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, S; Shiga, H; Koike, H

    1989-10-01

    RS-1893, an orally active cardiotonic agent, has been suggested to dilate venous blood vessels, because it markedly decreases central venous pressure in anesthetized dogs. In order to evaluate venous vasodilator action of the agent, we measured hindlimb volume (HLV) in anesthetized dogs using a plethysmographic technique. RS-1893 (1-10 micrograms/kg, i.v.) produced dose-dependent increases in HLV, femoral blood flow, and left ventricular (LV)dP/dt, and a decrease in central venous pressure (CVP). In another series of experiments, we autoperfused the hindlimb with a constant flow and injected the drugs intraarterially (i.a.) to separately evaluate arterial and venous vasodilator actions. In this preparation, a decrease in perfusion pressure and an increase in HLV were considered to reflect arterial vasodilatation and venous vasodilatation, respectively. RS-1893 (0.3-3 micrograms i.a.) produced a dose-dependent increase in HLV and a decrease in perfusion pressure. Comparison of doses which increased HLV by 0.3 ml revealed that RS-1893 was about 20 times more potent than milrinone. The arterial vasodilator action of RS-1893 was about 15 times more potent than that of milrinone. We conclude that RS-1893 is a potent venous and arterial vasodilator with cardiotonic activity.

  7. Impaired training-induced adaptation of blood pressure in COPD patients: implication of the muscle capillary bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouzi F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fares Gouzi,1,2 Jonathan Maury,1,3 François Bughin,1,2 Marine Blaquière,1,2 Bronia Ayoub,1,2 Jacques Mercier,1,2 Antonia Perez-Martin,4,5 Pascal Pomiès,1 Maurice Hayot1,2 1PhyMedExp, INSERM U1046, CNRS UMR 9214, University of Montpellier, 2Department of Clinical Physiology, Montpellier University Hospital, Montpellier, 3Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center “La Solane”, 5 Santé Group, Osséja, 4Dysfunction of Vascular Interfaces Laboratory, EA 2992, University of Montpellier, 5Department of Vascular Medicine and Investigations, Nîmes University Hospital, Nîmes, France Background and aims: Targeting the early mechanisms in exercise-induced arterial hypertension (which precedes resting arterial hypertension in its natural history may improve cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in COPD patients. Capillary rarefaction, an early event in COPD before vascular remodeling, is a potential mechanism of exercise-induced and resting arterial hypertension. Impaired training-induced capillarization was observed earlier in COPD patients; thus, this study compares the changes in blood pressure (BP during exercise in COPD patients and matches control subjects (CSs after a similar exercise training program, in relationship with muscle capillarization. Methods: Resting and maximal exercise diastolic pressure (DP and systolic pressure (SP were recorded during a standardized cardiopulmonary exercise test, and a quadriceps muscle biopsy was performed before and after training.Results: A total of 35 CSs and 49 COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second=54%±22% predicted completed a 6-week rehabilitation program and improved their symptom-limited maximal oxygen uptake (VO2SL: 25.8±6.1 mL/kg per minute vs 27.9 mL/kg per minute and 17.0±4.7 mL/kg per minute vs 18.3 mL/kg per minute; both P<0.001. The improvement in muscle capillary-to-fiber (C/F ratio was significantly greater in CSs vs COPD patients (+11%±9% vs +23%±21%; P<0.05. Although maximal

  8. Role of simvastatin and/or antioxidant vitamins in therapeutic angiogenesis in experimental diabetic hindlimb ischemia: effects on capillary density, angiogenesis markers, and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Azab, Mona F; Hazem, Reem M; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2012-09-05

    Therapeutic angiogenesis has emerged as an attractive approach for the management of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic patients. Oxidative stress generated and aggravated by prolonged hyperglycemia may interfere with and destroy the newly formed blood vessels. Angiogenic effect of simvastatin has been reported; however, its exact mechanism is yet to be evaluated. In addition, the exact role of antioxidant vitamins in diabetic peripheral arterial disease is still controversial. The present study was undertaken to investigate the therapeutic potential of simvastatin and antioxidant vitamins (E and C) and their combined effects on angiogenesis in diabetic hind-limb ischemia. Streptozotocin diabetic rats were treated for 6 weeks with simvastatin either alone or in combination with vitamin E or vitamin C. Parameters of angiogenesis, nitric oxide, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and oxidative stress markers were evaluated. CD31 immunostaining revealed an increased capillary density in ischemic gastrocnemious tissue of diabetic rats treated with either simvastatin or its combination with vitamin C. This effect was accompanied by up-regulated plasma levels of HO-1, nitric oxide, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its intra-muscular receptor type-2 (Flk-1). Tissue reduced glutathione and antioxidant enzymes activities were normalized in groups treated with antioxidant vitamins or their combination with simvastatin with concomitant blunting of lipid peroxidation. Vitamins E and C, through their antioxidant effects, evidently enhanced the angiogenic effect of simvastatin in ischemic diabetic muscle. Hence, the use of antioxidant vitamins combined with statins to induce therapeutic angiogenesis is a promising strategy in the management of diabetes-associated peripheral arterial disease.

  9. Influence of menstrual cycle phase on muscle metaboreflex control of cardiac baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate and blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwich, Doreen; Aldred, Sarah; Fisher, James P

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine whether menstrual cycle phase influences muscle metaboreflex control of spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS), blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Twenty-three young women not taking oral contraceptives were studied during the early (EF; low oestrogen, low progesterone) and late follicular menstrual phases (LF; high oestrogen, low progesterone). Protocol 1 consisted of leg cycling at low (21 ± 2 W) and moderate workloads (71 ± 3 W) in free-flow conditions and with partial flow restriction (bilateral thigh-cuff inflation at 100 mmHg) to activate the muscle metaboreflex. Protocol 2 consisted of rhythmic hand-grip exercise with incremental upper arm-cuff inflation (0, 80, 100 and 120 mmHg) to elicit graded metaboreflex activation. Both protocols were followed by post-exercise ischaemia. Leg cycling decreased cBRS (EF, 20 ± 5, 6 ± 1 and 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 19 ± 3, 6 ± 0.4, 1 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1) during rest, low- and moderate-intensity leg cycling, respectively) and increased HR in an intensity-dependent manner, while BP remained unchanged. Partial flow restriction during leg cycling decreased cBRS, and increased HR and BP. During post-exercise ischaemia, HR and BP remained elevated, while cBRS remained suppressed (EF, 4.2 ± 0.6 ms mmHg(-1); and LF, 4.7 ± 0.5 ms mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 versus rest). Cardiac baroreflex sensitivity was unchanged during hand-grip with and without partial flow restriction and post-exercise ischaemia. No differences in cBRS, HR or BP responses were observed between EF and LF at any time during either protocol. These data indicate that endogenous fluctuations in oestrogen between the EF and LF phases of the menstrual cycle do not influence muscle metaboreflex control of cBRS, BP or HR in young women.

  10. Glycogen synthesis from lactate in skeletal muscle of the lizard Dipsosaurus dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, T T

    1985-01-01

    The capacity of skeletal muscle to synthesize glycogen from lactate was tested in the iliofibularis muscle of the desert iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Like other reptiles, Dipsosaurus accumulates significant lactic acid concentrations following vigorous exercise. After 5 min of progressively faster treadmill running at 35 degrees C (final speed = 2.2 km/h), blood lactate concentration increased over 14 mM, which decreased 11 mM after 2 h of recovery. Blood glucose concentration remained unchanged throughout at 8.6 +/- 0.46 mM. The role that muscle gluconeogenesis might play in the removal of post-exercise lactate was evaluated. Animals were run to exhaustion at 1.5 km/h on a treadmill thermostatted at 35 degrees C. Animals (n = 43) ran 6.9 +/- 0.75 min prior to exhaustion. Animals were sacrificed and iliofibularis muscles of both hindlimbs removed and stimulated at 2 Hz for 5 min, reducing twitch tension to 6% of prestimulus tension. Fatigued muscles were then split into red and white fiber bundles and incubated 2 h or 5 h at 35 degrees C in Ringer solution or in Ringer plus 20 mM lactate. In muscles tested in August, red fiber bundles incubated in lactate demonstrated a rate of glycogen synthesis of approximately 1 mg/(g muscle . h). In muscles tested in December, red fiber bundles synthesized glycogen at a reduced rate that was not statistically different than in fiber bundles incubated in Ringer solution without lactate. Glycogen synthesis from lactate was not evident in white fiber bundles in either August or December. The period of peak gluconeogenic capacity coincides with the field active season of Dipsosaurus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. [Comparing the results of the serological detection of Salmonella antibodies in blood serum and meat juice from different muscles from slaughter pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobmann, Juliane Annette; Blaha, Thomas; Beyerbach, Martin; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Meemken, Diana

    2011-01-01

    The German Salmonella Monitoring Programme started by the QS-System in 2002 (Blaha, 2004) is mandatory due to the so-called "Salmonella Regulation for Pigs" since 2007 (Anonym, 2007). The Regulation does not clearly prescribe the specific muscle which is to be taken as source of the meat juice. Thus, at different slaughter plants meat samples are also taken from different muscles and several scientific papers describe various muscles as source of the meat juice, too. The objective of this study was to compare the serological results of meat juices from three different locations (diaphragm pillar, neck, belly muscle) to each other and to those of the blood serum from exactly the same animals. All samples were simultaneously tested for Salmonella antibodies by two serological tests (Salmo-type Pig Screen, LDL, Germany; HerdChek Swine Salmonella, IDEXX, Germany). Comparisons were carried out between the various sample kinds per animal and between the two test systems. The analysis of all results of the meat juices revealed in both test systems a clear decline of the OD% values from the diaphragm pillar to the neck to the belly muscle. The average OD% values of all samples were higher when measured by the HerdChek ELISA (IDEXX, Germany) than by the Salmotype ELISA (LDL, Germany), especially in blood serum. Since the results of the meat juice samples gained from the diaphragm pillar were in both test systems by far the closest to the results of the corresponding serum blood samples, it is recommended to amend the "Salmonella Regulation for Pigs" by prescribing meat from the diaphragm pillar as the only muscle for gaining meat juice.

  12. Skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake at rest and during exercise in humans: a PET study with nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Saltin, Bengt; Kemppainen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nitric oxide and prostanoids on microcirculation and oxygen uptake specifically in the active skeletal muscle by use of positron emission tomography (PET). Healthy males performed 3 five min bouts of light knee-extensor exercise. Skeletal...... muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake were measured at rest and during the exercise using PET with H(2)O(15) and (15)O(2) during: 1) control conditions; 2) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition by arterial infusion of L-NMMA and 3) combined NOS and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition by arterial infusion of L...

  13. Paw withdrawal thresholds and persistent hindlimb flexion in experimental mononeuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallas, Tanya R; Winterson, Barbara J; Ransil, Bernard J; Bove, Geoffrey M

    2003-05-01

    Hypersensitivity of the foot produced by a number of sciatic mononeuropathies was assessed and compared. A new tool was used, the strain-gauge algometer, that delivers a noxious stimulus and gives a direct measurement of the force for paw withdrawal. In addition, we report observations of another alteration of the flexion reflex, persistent hindlimb flexion. The mean mechanical threshold for naive rats was 5.9 +/- 0.97 centinewton (standard deviation). A superficial surgical procedure had no effect on mechanical sensitivity. Sham surgeries and a surgery in which a silicone pellet was glued to the sciatic nerve produced moderate increases in mechanical sensitivity. Interventions that produced the greatest reductions in thresholds were carrageenan neuritis, complete Freund's adjuvant neuritis, and the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Mechanical thresholds returned to baseline in 2 weeks in all groups. Neuropathic behaviors (licking and holding the paw after the stimulus) were observed more frequently in the CCI group. Persistent hindlimb flexion was only observed in the CCI group. The results support that midaxonal inflammation is sufficient to induce hyperalgesia. The strain-gauge algometer proved to be efficient and reliable, and calculations support that used as described in this report one can demonstrate changes in paw withdrawal thresholds as small as 15%.

  14. Adaptation of the hindlimbs for climbing in bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Motoki; Endo, Hideki; Wiig, Oystein; Derocher, Andrew E; Tsubota, Toshio; Taru, Hajime; Yamamoto, Masako; Arishima, Kazuyoshi; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Kitamura, Nobuo; Yamada, Junzo

    2005-04-01

    The hindlimbs of the Malayan sun bear (Helarctos malayanus), the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), the brown bear (Ursus arctos) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) have been anatomically and osteometrically studied. The Musculus tibialis cranialis of the Malayan sun bear and the giant panda possessed a well-developed rich fleshy portion until the distal end of the tibia. In the polar bear and the brown bear, however, the fleshy portion of the M. tibialis cranialis was not developed until the distal end of the tibia. The tendon of the M. tibialis cranialis inserting on the proximal end of the Ossa metatarsalia was shorter in the Malayan sun bear and the giant panda than in the polar bear and the brown bear. In the Malayan sun bear and the giant panda, moreover, the M. popliteus was attached more distally to the tibia than in the polar bear and the brown bear. The stable dorsiflexion and supination of the foot and the efficient pronation of the crus are important for skillful tree climbing. The present study suggests that the Malayan sun bear and the giant panda have hindlimbs especially adapted to tree climbing by the well-developed fleshy portion of the M. tibialis cranialis reaching the distal end of the tibia, its short tendon, and the M. popliteus inserting near the distal end of the tibia.

  15. Effects of Short-term Feeding Magnesium before Slaughter on Blood Metabolites and Postmortem Muscle Traits of Halothane-carrier Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-four, mixed-sex, halothane-carrier crossbred (Yorkshire×Landrace pigs with an average initial BW of 108.2±0.8 kg were randomly allotted to one of three dietary treatments for 5 d before slaughter: i a control corn-soybean meal finisher diet devoid of supplemental magnesium; ii a diet supplemented with 1.5 g/kg of elemental Mg from magnesium acetate; and iii a diet supplemented with 1.5 g/kg of elemental Mg from magnesium sulfate heptahydrate. Serum creatine kinase (CK, lactate and glucose were analyzed at slaughter. Muscles from longissimus (LM were packaged and stored to simulate display storage for muscle lactate and glycogen determinations at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 d. Mg supplementation reduced (p0.05 on serum glucose. Daily change of muscle lactate concentration linearly increased (p<0.01, while glucose concentration linearly decreased (p<0.05 as storage time increased in all treatments. However, dietary Mg acetate and Mg sulfate supplementation in pigs elevated (p<0.05 muscle glycogen and reduced (p<0.05 muscle lactate concentrations, especially during the first 2 d of display, compared with pigs fed the control diet. This study suggests that short-term feeding of magnesium acetate and magnesium sulfate to heterozygous carriers of the halothane gene has beneficial effects on stress response and pork quality by improving blood and muscle biochemical indexes.

  16. Cesium radioactivity in peripheral blood is linearly correlated to that in skeletal muscle: analyses of cattle within the evacuation zone of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tomokazu; Kino, Yasushi; Abe, Yasuyuki; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Jin; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Takahashi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Chiba, Mirei; Takahashi, Shintaro; Inoue, Kazuya; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Morimoto, Motoko; Shinoda, Hisashi; Hiji, Masahiro; Sekine, Tsutomu; Fukumoto, Manabu; Isogai, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) released a large amount of radioactive substances into the environment. Furthermore, beef contaminated with radioactive cesium above the 500 Bq/kg safety standard was circulated in the food chain in 2011. Japanese consumers remain concerned about the safety of radioactively contaminated food. In our previous study, we detected a linear correlation between radioactive cesium ((137) Cs) activity in blood and muscle around 500 to 2500 Bq/kg in cattle. However, it was unclear whether the correlation was maintained at a lower radioactivity close to the current safety standard of 100 Bq/kg. In this study, we evaluated 17 cattle in the FNPP evacuation zone that had a (137) Cs blood level less than 10 Bq/kg. The results showed a linear correlation between blood (137) Cs and muscle (137) Cs (Y = 28.0X, R(2)  = 0.590) at low radioactivity concentration, indicating that cesium radioactivity in the muscle can be estimated from blood radioactivity. This technique would be useful in detecting high-risk cattle before they enter the market, and will contribute to food safety.

  17. Presence of (phospho)creatine in developing and adult skeletal muscle of mice without mitochondrial and cytosolic muscle creatine kinase isoforms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandt, H.J.A. in t; Groof, A.J.C. de; Renema, W.K.J.; Oerlemans, F.T.J.J.; Klomp, D.W.J.; Wieringa, B.; Heerschap, A.

    2003-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) content and creatine kinase (CK) activity in skeletal muscle of mice. The PCr and total Cr (tCr) concentrations, as well as CK activity, in hindlimb muscles of mice, with or without the cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms

  18. Biomimetic control of vascular smooth muscle cell morphology and phenotype for functional tissue-engineered small-diameter blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan-Park, Mary B; Shen, Jin Ye; Cao, Ye; Xiong, Yun; Liu, Yunxiao; Rayatpisheh, Shahrzad; Kang, Gavin Chun-Wei; Greisler, Howard P

    2009-03-15

    Small-diameter blood vessel substitutes are urgently needed for patients requiring replacements of their coronary and below-the-knee vessels and for better arteriovenous dialysis shunts. Circulatory diseases, especially those arising from atherosclerosis, are the predominant cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. Current therapies include the use of autologous vessels or synthetic materials as vessel replacements. The limited availability of healthy vessels for use as bypass grafts and the failure of purely synthetic materials in small-diameter sites necessitate the development of a biological substitute. Tissue engineering is such an approach and has achieved promising results, but reconstruction of a functional vascular tunica media, with circumferentially oriented contractile smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and extracellular matrix, appropriate mechanical properties, and vasoactivity has yet to be demonstrated. This review focuses on strategies to effect the switch of SMC phenotype from synthetic to contractile, which is regarded as crucial for the engineering of a functional vascular media. The synthetic SMC phenotype is desired initially for cell proliferation and tissue remodeling, but the contractile phenotype is then necessary for sufficient vasoactivity and inhibition of neointima formation. The factors governing the switch to a more contractile phenotype with in vitro culture are reviewed.

  19. Functional Coupling of Human Microphysiology Systems: Intestine, Liver, Kidney Proximal Tubule, Blood-Brain Barrier and Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernetti, Lawrence; Gough, Albert; Baetz, Nicholas; Blutt, Sarah; Broughman, James R.; Brown, Jacquelyn A.; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; Hasan, Nesrin; In, Julie; Kelly, Edward; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Repper, Jonathan; Senutovitch, Nina; Stabb, Janet; Yeung, Catherine; Zachos, Nick C.; Donowitz, Mark; Estes, Mary; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Truskey, George; Wikswo, John P.; Taylor, D. Lansing

    2017-01-01

    Organ interactions resulting from drug, metabolite or xenobiotic transport between organs are key components of human metabolism that impact therapeutic action and toxic side effects. Preclinical animal testing often fails to predict adverse outcomes arising from sequential, multi-organ metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics. Human microphysiological systems (MPS) can model these interactions and are predicted to dramatically improve the efficiency of the drug development process. In this study, five human MPS models were evaluated for functional coupling, defined as the determination of organ interactions via an in vivo-like sequential, organ-to-organ transfer of media. MPS models representing the major absorption, metabolism and clearance organs (the jejunum, liver and kidney) were evaluated, along with skeletal muscle and neurovascular models. Three compounds were evaluated for organ-specific processing: terfenadine for pharmacokinetics (PK) and toxicity; trimethylamine (TMA) as a potentially toxic microbiome metabolite; and vitamin D3. We show that the organ-specific processing of these compounds was consistent with clinical data, and discovered that trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) crosses the blood-brain barrier. These studies demonstrate the potential of human MPS for multi-organ toxicity and absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME), provide guidance for physically coupling MPS, and offer an approach to coupling MPS with distinct media and perfusion requirements. PMID:28176881

  20. Impact of gender on benefits of exercise training on sympathetic nerve activity and muscle blood flow in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes-Correa, Ligia M; Melo, Ruth C; Nobre, Thais S; Ueno, Linda M; Franco, Fabio G M; Braga, Ana M W; Rondon, Maria U P B; Brum, Patricia C; Barretto, Antonio C P; Middlekauff, Holly R; Negrao, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    We compared the effects of exercise training on neurovascular control and functional capacity in men and women with chronic heart failure (HF). Forty consecutive HF outpatients from the Heart Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil were divided into the following four groups matched by age: men exercise-trained (n = 12), men untrained (n = 10), women exercise-trained (n = 9), women untrained (n = 9). Maximal exercise capacity was determined from a maximal progressive exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded directly using the technique of microneurography. There were no differences between groups in any baseline parameters. Exercise training produced a similar reduction in resting MSNA (P = 0.000002) and forearm vascular resistance (P = 0.0003), in men and women with HF. Peak VO(2) was similarly increased in men and women with HF (P = 0.0003) and VE/VCO(2) slope was significantly decreased in men and women with HF (P = 0.0007). There were no significant changes in left-ventricular ejection fraction in men and women with HF. The benefits of exercise training on neurovascular control and functional capacity in patients with HF are independent of gender.

  1. Forelimb EMG-based trigger to control an electronic spinal bridge to enable hindlimb stepping after a complete spinal cord lesion in rats

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    Gad Parag

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A complete spinal cord transection results in loss of all supraspinal motor control below the level of the injury. The neural circuitry in the lumbosacral spinal cord, however, can generate locomotor patterns in the hindlimbs of rats and cats with the aid of motor training, epidural stimulation and/or administration of monoaminergic agonists. We hypothesized that there are patterns of EMG signals from the forelimbs during quadrupedal locomotion that uniquely represent a signal for the “intent” to step with the hindlimbs. These observations led us to determine whether this type of “indirect” volitional control of stepping can be achieved after a complete spinal cord injury. The objective of this study was to develop an electronic bridge across the lesion of the spinal cord to facilitate hindlimb stepping after a complete mid-thoracic spinal cord injury in adult rats. Methods We developed an electronic spinal bridge that can detect specific patterns of EMG activity from the forelimb muscles to initiate electrical-enabling motor control (eEmc of the lumbosacral spinal cord to enable quadrupedal stepping after a complete spinal cord transection in rats. A moving window detection algorithm was implemented in a small microprocessor to detect biceps brachii EMG activity bilaterally that then was used to initiate and terminate epidural stimulation in the lumbosacral spinal cord. We found dominant frequencies of 180–220 Hz in the EMG of the forelimb muscles during active periods, whereas these frequencies were between 0–10 Hz when the muscles were inactive. Results and conclusions Once the algorithm was validated to represent kinematically appropriate quadrupedal stepping, we observed that the algorithm could reliably detect, initiate, and facilitate stepping under different pharmacological conditions and at various treadmill speeds.

  2. Dynamic Foot Pressure as a Countermeasure to Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyparos, A.; Layne, C. S.; Martinez, D. A.; Clarke, M. S. F.; Feeback, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical unloading of skeletal muscle (SKM) as a consequence of space flight or ground-based analogues, such as human bedrest and rodent hindlimb suspension (HLS) models, induces SKM atrophy particularly affecting the anti-gravity musculature of the lower limbs. In the context of manned space flight, the subsequent loss of muscle strength and functionality will pose operational implications jeopardizing mission success. Exercise, currently the primary muscle degradation countermeasure, has not proven completely effective in preventing muscle atrophy. It is therefore imperative that some other forms of in- flight countermeasure be also developed to supplement the prescribed exercise regimen the astronauts follow during spaceflight. Previous work in both humans and rats has shown that mechanical stimulation of the soles of the feet increases neuromuscular activation in the lower limb musculature and that such stimulation results in the limited prevention of atrophy in the soleus muscle of unloaded rats. This study was designed to investigate the effect of cutaneous mechanoreceptor stimulation on hindlimb unloading- induced SKM atrophy in rats. It was hypothesized that mechanical stimulation of the plantar surface of the rat foot during hindlimb suspension (HLS), utilizing a novel stimulation paradigm known as Dynamic Foot Pressure (DFP), would attenuate unloading-induced SKM atrophy. Mature adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups of 10 rats each as follows: sedentary controls (Ctrl), hindlimb suspended only (HLS), hindlimb suspended wearing an inflatable boot (HLS-IFL) and hindlimb suspended rats wearing a non-inflatable boot (HLS-NIFL). The stimulation of mechanoreceptors was achieved by applying pressure to the plantar surface of the foot during the 10-day period of HLS using a custom-built boot. The anti-atrophic effects of DFP application was quantified directly by morphological (muscle wet weight, myofiber cross-sectional area

  3. Tramadol Alleviates Myocardial Injury Induced by Acute Hindlimb Ischemia Reperfusion in Rats

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    Hamed Ashrafzadeh Takhtfooladi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organ injury occurs not only during periods of ischemia but also during reperfusion. It is known that ischemia reperfusion (IR causes both remote organ and local injuries. Objective: This study evaluated the effects of tramadol on the heart as a remote organ after acute hindlimb IR. Methods: Thirty healthy mature male Wistar rats were allocated randomly into three groups: Group I (sham, Group II (IR, and Group III (IR + tramadol. Ischemia was induced in anesthetized rats by left femoral artery clamping for 3 h, followed by 3 h of reperfusion. Tramadol (20 mg/kg, intravenous was administered immediately prior to reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion, animals were euthanized, and hearts were harvested for histological and biochemical examination. Results: The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were higher in Groups I and III than those in Group II (p < 0.05. In comparison with other groups, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA levels in Group II were significantly increased (p < 0.05, and this increase was prevented by tramadol. Histopathological changes, including microscopic bleeding, edema, neutrophil infiltration, and necrosis, were scored. The total injuryscore in Group III was significantly decreased (p < 0.05 compared with Group II. Conclusion: From the histological and biochemical perspectives, treatment with tramadol alleviated the myocardial injuries induced by skeletal muscle IR in this experimental model.

  4. Tramadol Alleviates Myocardial Injury Induced by Acute Hindlimb Ischemia Reperfusion in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Asl, Adel Haghighi Khiabanian [Department of Pathobiology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahzamani, Mehran [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh, E-mail: dr-ashrafzadeh@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elites Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Allahverdi, Amin [Department of Surgery, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khansari, Mohammadreza [Department of Physiology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Organ injury occurs not only during periods of ischemia but also during reperfusion. It is known that ischemia reperfusion (IR) causes both remote organ and local injuries. This study evaluated the effects of tramadol on the heart as a remote organ after acute hindlimb IR. Thirty healthy mature male Wistar rats were allocated randomly into three groups: Group I (sham), Group II (IR), and Group III (IR + tramadol). Ischemia was induced in anesthetized rats by left femoral artery clamping for 3 h, followed by 3 h of reperfusion. Tramadol (20 mg/kg, intravenous) was administered immediately prior to reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion, animals were euthanized, and hearts were harvested for histological and biochemical examination. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were higher in Groups I and III than those in Group II (p < 0.05). In comparison with other groups, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in Group II were significantly increased (p < 0.05), and this increase was prevented by tramadol. Histopathological changes, including microscopic bleeding, edema, neutrophil infiltration, and necrosis, were scored. The total injuryscore in Group III was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) compared with Group II. From the histological and biochemical perspectives, treatment with tramadol alleviated the myocardial injuries induced by skeletal muscle IR in this experimental model.

  5. Randomized Comparison of the Therapeutic Effect of Acupuncture, Massage, and Tachibana-Style-Method on Stiff Shoulders by Measuring Muscle Firmness, VAS, Pulse, and Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Tachibana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the therapeutic efficacy of acupuncture, massage, and Tachibana-Ryojutsu (one of Japanese traditional body balance therapy techniques (SEITAI, on stiff shoulders, the subjects’ muscle firmness, blood pressure, pulse, VAS, and body temperature were measured before and after the treatment. Forty-seven volunteer subjects gave written informed consent to participate in this study. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups to receive acupuncture, massage, or Tachibana-Ryojutsu. Each therapy lasted for 90 seconds. The acupuncture treatment was applied by a retaining-needle at GB-21, massage was conducted softly on the shoulders, and Tachibana-Ryojutsu treated only the muscles and joints from the legs to buttocks without touching the shoulders or backs. The study indicated that the muscle firmness and VAS of the Tachibana-Ryojutsu group decreased significantly in comparison with the acupuncture and massage groups after treatment.

  6. Effect of ThermaCare HeatWraps and Icy Hot Cream/Patches on Skin and Quadriceps Muscle Temperature and Blood Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott; Laymon, Michael; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of over-the-counter treatments-ThermaCare HeatWraps (chemical reaction to produce heat above the skin), Icy Hot Patch, and Icy Hot Cream (topically applied menthol)-on skin and deep tissue temperature. This was a longitudinal crossover study. On each of 3 days, a ThermaCare HeatWrap, Icy Hot Cream, or Icy Hot Patch was applied randomly over the quadriceps muscle in 15 healthy volunteers with normal body mass. Skin and muscle temperature and blood flow were measured by laser flowmetry every 15 minutes for 2 hours. After 2 hours, mean temperature decreased by 2.1°C (7.0%; P = .02) in skin and 1.0°C (2.9%; P = .01) in muscle with Icy Hot Cream. Icy Hot Patch decreased skin and muscle temperature by 1.7°C (5.4%; P = .03) and 1.3°C (3.8%; P = .01), respectively. In contrast, ThermaCare raised skin and muscle temperature by 7.8°C (25.8%; P = .001) and 2.7°C (7.7%; P = .002), respectively; both were significantly warmer with ThermaCare vs either Icy Hot product (all P Cream: 56.7 flux [39.3%; P = .003]; Patch: 19.1 flux [16.7%; P = .045]). Muscle blood flow decreased with the Patch (6.7 flux [7.0%; P = .02]). After a period of fluctuations, Icy Hot Cream produced a net increase vs baseline of 7.0 flux (16.9%; P = .02). ThermaCare more than doubled blood flow in skin (83.3 flux [109.7%; P = .0003]) and muscle (25.1 flux [148.5%; P = .004]). In this group of 15 healthy volunteers, ThermaCare HeatWraps provided the greatest degree of tissue warming and increase in tissue blood flow.

  7. Assessment of hindlimb locomotor strength in spinal cord transected rats through animal-robot contact force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessler, Jeff A; Moustafa-Bayoumi, Moustafa; Soto, Dalziel; Duhon, Jessica; Schmitt, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    measurement of animal-robot contact forces using the instrumented rat stepper can provide a sensitive and reliable measure of hindlimb locomotor strength and control of flexor and extensor muscle activity in neurologically impaired animals. Additionally, these measures may be useful as a means to quantify training intensity or dose-related functional outcomes of automated training.

  8. Hindlimb heating increases vascular access of large molecules to murine tibial growth plates measured by in vivo multiphoton imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrat, Maria A; Efaw, Morgan L; Williams, Rebecca M

    2014-02-15

    Advances in understanding the molecular regulation of longitudinal growth have led to development of novel drug therapies for growth plate disorders. Despite progress, a major unmet challenge is delivering therapeutic agents to avascular-cartilage plates. Dense extracellular matrix and lack of penetrating blood vessels create a semipermeable "barrier," which hinders molecular transport at the vascular-cartilage interface. To overcome this obstacle, we used a hindlimb heating model to manipulate bone circulation in 5-wk-old female mice (n = 22). Temperatures represented a physiological range of normal human knee joints. We used in vivo multiphoton microscopy to quantify temperature-enhanced delivery of large molecules into tibial growth plates. We tested the hypothesis that increasing hindlimb temperature from 22°C to 34°C increases vascular access of large systemic molecules, modeled using 10, 40, and 70 kDa dextrans that approximate sizes of physiological regulators. Vascular access was quantified by vessel diameter, velocity, and dextran leakage from subperichondrial plexus vessels and accumulation in growth plate cartilage. Growth plate entry of 10 kDa dextrans increased >150% at 34°C. Entry of 40 and 70 kDa dextrans increased plates, suggesting that temperature could be a noninvasive strategy for modulating delivery of therapeutics to impaired growth plates of children.

  9. Circadian and individual variations in duration of spontaneous activity among ankle muscles of the cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensbergen, E; Kernell, D

    This article concerns the spontaneous motor behavior of cat hindlimb muscles and muscle regions using 24-h electromyographic (EMG) recordings. Previously, we found marked differences in average daily "duty time" (i.e., the percentage of total sampling time filled with EMG activity) between different

  10. [Actomyosin ATPase activity of skeletal muscles and the markers of tissue damage in the blood of rats under prolonged chronic alcoholization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseĭslier, Iu V; Podpalova, O M; Nuryshchenko, N Ie; Martyniuk, V S

    2014-01-01

    The activity of creatine kinase and indices of lipid metabolism in the blood and also actomyosin ATPase activity of skeletal muscles of rats under chronic 8-month alcohol abuse were investigated. It is shown that actomyosin K+-ATPase activity of skeletal muscles increases from two months of ethanol use, but actomyosin Mg2+-ATPase activity decreases during 6-8 months of alcoholization. From two months of ethanol use the creatine kinase activity, as an enzyme marker of muscle tissue damage, statistically significantly increases during all the period of the animals alcoholization. The level of total lipid increases after two months of alcohol consumption (in blood plasma by 30% and in erythrocyte mass by 65%). For longer periods of alcoholization (4-8 months) the level of lipids remains almost the same, whereas in erythrocyte mass it does not differ from control values. The level of diene conjugates in the blood plasma reduces and the amount of ketone derivatives of fatty acid residues increases that points to the inhibition of some components of the antioxidant system that control detoxification of hydroperoxides of fatty acids and also to activation of free radical damage of tissues. There were no significant changes of lipid peroxidation level in erythrocyte mass at any stage of alcoholization.

  11. Effects of low-intensity concentric and eccentric exercise combined with blood flow restriction on indices of exercise-induced muscle damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomohiro; Loenneke, Jeremy P.; Abe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Low-intensity blood-flow restriction (BFR) resistance training significantly increases strength and muscle size, but some studies report it produces exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) in the lower body after exercise to failure. Purpose: To investigate the effects of a pre-set number of repetitions of upper body concentric and eccentric exercise when combined with BFR on changes in EIMD. Methods: Ten young men had arms randomly assigned to either concentric BFR (CON-BFR) or eccentric BFR (ECC-BFR) dumbbell curl exercise (30% one-repetition maximum (1-RM), 1 set of 30 repetitions followed by 3 sets of 15 repetitions). Maximal isometric voluntary contraction force (MVC), muscle thickness (MTH), circumference, range of motion (ROM), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately after, and daily for 4 days post-exercise. Results: MVC decreased by 36% for CON-BFR and 12% for ECC-BFR immediately after exercise but was not changed 1–4 days post-exercise (p > 0.05). Only CON-BFR had significant changes in MTH and circumference immediately after exercise (p exercise. Conclusions: Low-intensity ECC-BFR produces significant muscle soreness at 24 h but neither ECC-BFR nor CON-BFR exercise produces significant changes in multiple indices of EIMD. PMID:24265891

  12. Therapeutic isolation and expansion of human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells for the use of muscle-nerve-blood vessel reconstitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro eTamaki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle makes up 40-50% of body mass, and is thus considered to be a good adult stem cell source for autologous therapy. Although, several stem/progenitor cells have been fractionated from mouse skeletal muscle showing a high potential for therapeutic use, it is unclear whether this is the case in human. Differentiation and therapeutic potential of human skeletal muscle-derived cells (Sk-Cs was examined. Samples (5-10 g were obtained from the abdominal and leg muscles of 36 patients (age, 17-79 years undergoing prostate cancer treatment or leg amputation surgery. All patients gave informed consent. Sk-Cs were isolated using conditioned collagenase solution, and were then sorted as CD34-/CD45-/CD29+ (Sk-DN/29+ and CD34+/CD45- (Sk-34 cells, in a similar manner as for the previous mouse Sk-Cs. Both cell fractions were appropriately expanded using conditioned culture medium for about 2 weeks. Differentiation potentials were then examined during cell culture and in vivo transplantation into the severely damaged muscles of athymic nude mice and rats. Interestingly, these two cell fractions could be divided into highly myogenic (Sk-DN/29+ and multipotent stem cell (Sk-34 fractions, in contrast to mouse Sk-Cs, which showed comparable capacities in both cells. At 6 weeks after the separate transplantation of both cell fractions, the former showed an active contribution to muscle fiber regeneration, but the latter showed vigorous engraftment to the interstitium associated with differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial/endoneurial cells, and vascular endothelial cells and pericytes, which corresponded to previous observations with mouse SK-Cs. Importantly, mixed cultures of both cells resulted the reduction of tissue reconstitution capacities in vivo, whereas co-transplantation after separate expansion showed favorable results. Therefore, human Sk-Cs are potentially applicable to therapeutic autografts and show multiple differentiation

  13. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-1 attenuates skeletal muscle damage and accelerates muscle regeneration and functional recovery after disuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fan; Mathur, Sunita; Liu, Min; Borst, Stephen E; Walter, Glenn A; Sweeney, H Lee; Vandenborne, Krista

    2013-05-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly dynamic tissue that responds to endogenous and external stimuli, including alterations in mechanical loading and growth factors. In particular, the antigravity soleus muscle experiences significant muscle atrophy during disuse and extensive muscle damage upon reloading. Given that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has been implicated as a central regulator of muscle repair and modulation of muscle size, we examined the effect of virally mediated overexpression of IGF-1 on the soleus muscle following hindlimb cast immobilization and upon reloading. Recombinant IGF-1 cDNA virus was injected into one of the posterior hindlimbs of the mice, while the contralateral limb was injected with saline (control). At 20 weeks of age, both hindlimbs were immobilized for 2 weeks to induce muscle atrophy in the soleus and ankle plantarflexor muscle group. Subsequently, the mice were allowed to reambulate, and muscle damage and recovery were monitored over a period of 2-21 days. The primary finding of this study was that IGF-1 overexpression attenuated reloading-induced muscle damage in the soleus muscle, and accelerated muscle regeneration and force recovery. Muscle T2 assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, a non-specific marker of muscle damage, was significantly lower in IGF-1-injected compared with contralateral soleus muscles at 2 and 5 days reambulation (Pmuscle damage in IGF-1-injected soleus muscles was confirmed on histology, with a lower fractional area of abnormal muscle tissue in IGF-1-injected muscles at 2 days reambulation (33.2±3.3 versus 54.1±3.6%, Pmuscle regeneration included timely increases in the number of central nuclei (21% at 5 days reambulation), paired-box transcription factor 7 (36% at 5 days), embryonic myosin (37% at 10 days) and elevated MyoD mRNA (7-fold at 2 days) in IGF-1-injected limbs (Pmuscles from damage and accelerating muscle repair and regeneration.

  14. Influence of exercise intensity on skeletal muscle blood flow, O2 extraction and O2 uptake on-kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Andrew M; Krustrup, Peter; Wilkerson, Daryl P;

    2012-01-01

    Key points Following the start of low-intensity exercise in healthy humans, it has been established that the kinetics of muscle O(2) delivery is faster than, and does not limit, the kinetics of muscle O(2) uptake. Direct data are lacking, however, on the question of whether O(2) delivery might li...

  15. Blood flow after contraction and cuff occlusion is reduced in subjects with muscle soreness after eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza-Silva, Eduardo; Wittrup Christensen, Steffan; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto

    2017-01-01

    anterior muscle. All measures were done bilaterally at day-0 (pre-exercise), day-2 and day-6 (post-exercise). Subjects scored the muscle soreness on a Likert scale for 6 days. Results: Eccentric exercise increased Likert scores at day-1 and day-2 compared with day-0 (P

  16. Effect of insulin in combination with selenium on blood glucose and GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-jiao Xu; Bing-xiang Yuan; Ya-min Zou

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of low-dose insulin [1 U/(kg · d)] in combination with selenium [180 g/(kg · d)] on general physiological parameters and glucose transporter (GLUT4) level in skeletal mnscle of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Methods Diabetic rats were treated with insulin, selenium, and insulin and selenium in combination for four weeks. The level of blood glucose was determined using One Tonch SnreStep Blood Glucose meter and the level of GLUT4 in skeletal muscle was examined by immunobiotting and immnnohistochemistry. Results Our data showed that insulin in combination with selenium could significantly lower blood glucose level and restore the disturbance in GLUT4 level in skeletal muscle. Treatment with insulin was only partially effective in restoring diabetic alterations. Conclusion It can be concluded that there is a synergistic action between insulin and selenium, and that treatment of diabetic rats with combined doses of insulin and selenium is effective in the normalization of blood glucose level and correction of altered GLUT4 distribution in skeletal mnscle of diabetic rats.

  17. A new device for simultaneous measurement of pelvic floor muscle activity and vaginal blood flow: a test in a nonclinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Stephanie; van Lunsen, Rik; Weijenborg, Philomeen; Laan, Ellen

    2012-11-01

    Dyspareunia in women, defined as persistent or recurrent genital pain associated with sexual intercourse, is hypothesized to be related to (fear associated) pelvic floor hyperactivity and to diminished sexual arousal. Psychophysiological research to support these hypotheses is scarce and concentrates mostly on the role of either pelvic floor activity or sexual arousal. To investigate both factors, a measurement device that enables simultaneous assessment of pelvic floor muscle activity and genital sexual arousal would be most optimal. The aim of this study was to test a new vaginal device0-a vaginal photoplethysmograph with build-in surface electromyography (EMG)--that allows simultaneous assessment of pelvic floor muscle activity and vaginal blood flow. Genital arousal measured as vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA) and vaginal surface EMG. Thirty-six sexually functional women participated. To investigate the sensitivity of the device for changes in genital blood flow and involuntary changes in pelvic floor activity, VPA and vaginal surface EMG were monitored during exposure to sexual and anxiety-evoking film clips. In addition, vaginal surface EMG was monitored during voluntary flick and hold contractions. VPA increased in response to the sexual film, and EMG values were significantly higher in response to the anxiety-evoking film. Higher EMG values in response to the anxiety film were associated with lower VPA. EMG during the instructed 3-second hold pelvic floor contractions showed, as expected, higher values during pelvic floor contractions with support of surrounding muscle groups, compared with pelvic floor muscles alone. The device is sensitive to changes in vaginal blood flow in response to sexual stimuli, and it is able to pick up small, involuntary changes in pelvic floor activity associated with anxiety. Also, the device is able to record changes in pelvic floor activity during voluntary pelvic floor contractions. This new device will be a valuable tool in

  18. Effect of acute inspiratory muscle exercise on blood flow of resting and exercising limbs and glucose levels in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula dos Santos Corrêa

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of inspiratory loading on blood flow of resting and exercising limbs in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Ten diabetic patients without cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DM, 10 patients with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (DM-CAN and 10 healthy controls (C were randomly assigned to inspiratory muscle load of 60% or 2% of maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax for approximately 5 min, while resting calf blood flow (CBF and exercising forearm blood flow (FBF were measured. Reactive hyperemia was also evaluated. From the 20 diabetic patients initially allocated, 6 wore a continuous glucose monitoring system to evaluate the glucose levels during these two sessions (2%, placebo or 60%, inspiratory muscle metaboreflex. Mean age was 58 ± 8 years, and mean HbA1c, 7.8% (62 mmol/mol (DM and DM-CAN. A PImax of 60% caused reduction of CBF in DM-CAN and DM (P<0.001, but not in C, whereas calf vascular resistance (CVR increased in DM-CAN and DM (P<0.001, but not in C. The increase in FBF during forearm exercise was blunted during 60% of PImax in DM-CAN and DM, and augmented in C (P<0.001. Glucose levels decreased by 40 ± 18.8% (P<0.001 at 60%, but not at 2%, of PImax. A negative correlation was observed between reactive hyperemia and changes in CVR (Beta coefficient = -0.44, P = 0.034. Inspiratory muscle loading caused an exacerbation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex in patients with diabetes, regardless of the presence of neuropathy, but influenced by endothelial dysfunction. High-intensity exercise that recruits the diaphragm can abruptly reduce glucose levels.

  19. Vitamin D Receptor gene (VDR) transcripts in bone, cartilage, muscles and blood and microarray analysis of vitamin D responsive genes expression in paravertebral muscles of Juvenile and Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background VDR may be considered as a candidate gene potentially related to Idiopathic Scoliosis susceptibility and natural history. Transcriptional profile of VDR mRNA isoforms might be changed in the structural tissues of the scoliotic spine and potentially influence the expression of VDR responsive genes. The purpose of the study was to determine differences in mRNA abundance of VDR isoforms in bone, cartilage and paravertebral muscles between tissues from curve concavity and convexity, between JIS and AIS and to identify VDR responsive genes differentiating Juvenile and Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in paravertebral muscles. Methods In a group of 29 patients with JIS and AIS, specimens of bone, cartilage, paravertebral muscles were harvested at the both sides of the curve apex together with peripheral blood samples. Extracted total RNA served as a matrix for VDRs and VDRl mRNA quantification by QRT PCR. Subsequent microarray analysis of paravertebral muscular tissue samples was performed with HG U133A chips (Affymetrix). Quantitative data were compared by a nonparametric Mann Whitney U test. Microarray results were analyzed with GeneSpring 11GX application. Matrix plot of normalized log-intensities visualized the degree of differentiation between muscular tissue transcriptomes of JIS and AIS group. Fold Change Analysis with cutoff of Fold Change ≥2 identified differentially expressed VDR responsive genes in paravertebral muscles of JIS and AIS. Results No significant differences in transcript abundance of VDR isoforms between tissues of the curve concavity and convexity were found. Statistically significant difference between JIS and AIS group in mRNA abundance of VDRl isoform was found in paravertebral muscles of curve concavity. Higher degree of muscular transcriptome differentiation between curve concavity and convexity was visualized in JIS group. In paravertebral muscles Tob2 and MED13 were selected as genes differentially expressed in JIS and AIS

  20. Evaluation of blood and muscle tissues for molecular detection and characterization of hematozoa infections in northern pintails (Anas acuta) wintering in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andy M.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Yabsley, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Information on the molecular detection of hematozoa from different tissue types and multiple years would be useful to inform sample collection efforts and interpret results of meta-analyses or investigations spanning multiple seasons. In this study, we tested blood and muscle tissue collected from northern pintails (Anas acuta) during autumn and winter of different years to evaluate prevalence and genetic diversity ofLeucocytozoon, Haemoproteus, and Plasmodium infections in this abundant waterfowl species of the Central Valley of California. We first compared results for paired blood and wing muscle samples to assess the utility of different tissue types for molecular investigations of haemosporidian parasites. Second, we explored inter-annual variability of hematozoa infection in Central Valley northern pintails and investigated possible effects of age, sex, and sub-region of sample collection on estimated parasite detection probability and prevalence. We found limited evidence for differences between tissue types in detection probability and prevalence ofLeucocytozoon, Haemoproteus, and Plasmodium parasites, which supports the utility of both sample types for obtaining information on hematozoan infections. However, we detected 11 haemosporidian mtDNA cyt bhaplotypes in blood samples vs. six in wing muscle tissue collected during the same sample year suggesting an advantage to using blood samples for investigations of genetic diversity. Estimated prevalence ofLeucocytozoon parasites was greater during 2006–2007 as compared to 2011–2012 and four unique haemosporidian mtDNA cyt b haplotypes were detected in the former sample year but not in the latter. Seven of 15 mtDNA cyt b haplotypes detected in northern pintails had 100% identity with previously reported hematozoa lineages detected in waterfowl (Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon) or other avian taxa (Plasmodium) providing support for lack of host specificity for some parasite lineages.

  1. Gene Regions Responding to Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Frank W.

    1997-01-01

    Our stated specific aims for this project were: 1) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb myosin heavy chain (MHC) promoter necessary for in vivo expression in mouse fast-twitch muscle, and 2) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb MHC promoter responsive to immobilization in mouse slow-twitch muscle in vivo. We sought to address these specific aims by introducing various MHC IIb promoter/reporter gene constructs directly into the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of living mice. Although the method of somatic gene transfer into skeletal muscle by direct injection has been successfully used in our laboratory to study the regulation of the skeletal alpha actin gene in chicken skeletal muscle, we had many difficulties utilizing this procedure in the mouse. Because of the small size of the mouse soleus and the difficulty in obtaining consistent results, we elected not to study this muscle as first proposed. Rather, our MHC IIb promoter deletion experiments were performed in the gastrocnemius. Further, we decided to use hindlimb unloading via tail suspension to induce an upregulation of the MHC IIb gene, rather than immobilization of the hindlimbs via plaster casts. This change was made because tail suspension more closely mimics spaceflight, and this procedure in our lab results in a smaller loss of overall body mass than the mouse hindlimb immobilization procedure. This suggests that the stress level during tail suspension is less than during immobilization. This research has provided an important beginning point towards understanding the molecular regulation of the MHC lIb gene in response to unweighting of skeletal muscle Future work will focus on the regulation of MHC IIb mRNA stability in response to altered loading of skeletal muscle

  2. Activation of ATP/UTP-selective receptors increases blood flow and blunts sympathetic vasoconstriction in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yegutkin, G.G.; Gonzalez-Alonso, J.; Rosenmeier, Jaya Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    and sympatholytic effects of exogenous ATP in the skeletal muscle vasculature are largely mediated via ATP itself rather than its dephosphorylated metabolites, most likely via binding to endothelial ATP/UTP-selective P2Y(2) receptors. These data are consistent with a role of ATP in skeletal muscle hyperaemia......Sympathetic vasoconstriction is blunted in the vascular beds of contracting skeletal muscle in humans, presumably due to the action of vasoactive metabolites (functional sympatholysis). Recently, we demonstrated that infusion of ATP into the arterial circulation of the resting human leg increases...

  3. Different forms of impairment of the fore-hindlimb coordination after partial spinal lesions in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górska, T; Bem, T; Majczyński, H; Zmysłowski, W

    1996-01-01

    Effects of large low thoracic (T10-T11) partial spinal lesions involving either the ventral quadrants of the spinal cord and, to a different extent the dorsolateral funiculi, or different extent of the lateral funiculi and/or the dorsal columns, on the fore-hindlimb coordination were examined in cats walking overground at moderate speeds. In both groups of operated cats, except those in which the lesion was essentially confined to dorsal columns, three different forms of impairment of fore-hindlimb coordination were observed, depending on the extent of lesion: (1) a change of locomotion towards pacing with preservation of the equality rhythms in the fore- and the hindlimbs; (2) episodes of fore- and hindlimb rhythm dissociation and (3) a permanent dissociation of the fore- and hindlimb rhythms. A comparison of the results obtained in these two groups of operated cats points to the more important role played by the lateral funiculi, than by other parts of the spinal white matter, in controlling the fore-hindlimb coordination in cats.

  4. Intermittent acceleration as a countermeasure to soleus muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aunno, Dominick S.; Robinson, Ronald R.; Smith, Gregory S.; Thomason, Donald B.; Booth, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of using intermittent acceleration as a countermeasure to muscle atrophy was investigated in rats subjected to 7 days of hindlimb suspension interrupted by daily periods of 1.2 g acceleration, for 15-min periods evenly spaced over 12-hr interval. It was found that this regimen, when repeated for 7 days, failed to completely maintain the mass of soleus muscle, which was 84 percent of control.

  5. Multi-scale finite element analyses for stress and strain evaluations of braid fibril artificial blood vessel and smooth muscle cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Uchida, Takahiro; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Morita, Yusuke

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we developed a multi-scale finite element (FE) analysis code to obtain the stress and strain that occurred in the smooth muscle cell (SMC) at micro-scale, which was seeded in the real fabricated braid fibril artificial blood vessel. This FE code can predict the dynamic response of stress under the blood pressure loading. We try to establish a computer-aided engineering (CAE)-driven scaffold design technique for the blood vessel regeneration. Until now, there occurred the great progresses for the endothelial cell activation and intima layer regeneration in the blood vessel regeneration study. However, there remains the difficulty of the SMC activation and media layer regeneration. Therefore, many researchers are now studying to elucidate the fundamental mechanism of SMC activation and media layer regeneration by using the biomechanical technique. As the numerical tool, we used the dynamic-explicit FE code PAM-CRASH, ESI Ltd. For the material models, the nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive law was adapted for the human blood vessel, SMC and the extra-cellular matrix, and the elastic law for the polyglycolic acid (PGA) fiber. Through macro-FE and micro-FE analyses of fabricated braid fibril tubes by using PGA fiber under the combined conditions of the orientation angle and the pitch of fiber, we searched an appropriate structure for the stress stimulation for SMC functionalization. Objectives of this study are indicated as follows: 1. to analyze the stress and strain of the human blood vessel and SMC, and 2. to calculate stress and strain of the real fabricated braid fibril artificial blood vessel and SMC to search an appropriate PGA fiber structure under combined conditions of PGA fiber numbers, 12 and 24, and the helical orientation angles of fiber, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 degrees. Finally, we found a braid fibril tube, which has an angle of 15 degree and 12 PGA fibers, as a most appropriate artificial blood vessel for SMC functionalization.

  6. Temporal extracellular matrix adaptations in ligament during wound healing and hindlimb unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D A; Vailas, A C; Vanderby, R; Grindeland, R E

    2007-10-01

    Previous data from spaceflight studies indicate that injured muscle and bone heal slowly and abnormally compared with ground controls, strongly suggesting that ligaments or tendons may not repair optimally as well. Thus the objective of this study was to investigate the biochemical and molecular gene expression of the collagen extracellular matrix in response to medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury repair in hindlimb unloaded (HLU) rodents. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing (Amb-healing), and HLU-healing groups. Amb- and HLU-healing animals underwent bilateral surgical transection of their MCLs, whereas control animals were subjected to sham surgeries. All surgeries were performed under isoflurane anesthesia. After 3 wk or 7 wk of HLU, rats were euthanized and MCLs were surgically isolated and prepared for molecular or biochemical analyses. Hydroxyproline concentration and hydroxylysylpyridinoline collagen cross-link contents were measured by HPLC and showed a substantial decrement in surgical groups. MCL tissue cellularity, quantified by DNA content, remained significantly elevated in all HLU-healing groups vs. Amb-healing groups. MCL gene expression of collagen type I, collagen type III, collagen type V, fibronectin, decorin, biglycan, lysyl oxidase, matrix metalloproteinase-2, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, measured by real-time quantitative PCR, demonstrated differential expression in the HLU-healing groups compared with Amb-healing groups at both the 3- and 7-wk time points. Together, these data suggest that HLU affects dense fibrous connective tissue wound healing and confirms previous morphological and biomechanical data that HLU inhibits the ligament repair processes.

  7. Detrimental effect of class-selective histone deacetylase inhibitors during tissue regeneration following hindlimb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallotta, Francesco; Tardivo, Silvia; Nanni, Simona; Rosati, Jessica D; Straino, Stefania; Mai, Antonello; Vecellio, Matteo; Valente, Sergio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Farsetti, Antonella; Martone, Julie; Bozzoni, Irene; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Gaetano, Carlo; Colussi, Claudia

    2013-08-09

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (DIs) are promising drugs for the treatment of several pathologies including ischemic and failing heart where they demonstrated efficacy. However, adverse side effects and cardiotoxicity have also been reported. Remarkably, no information is available about the effect of DIs during tissue regeneration following acute peripheral ischemia. In this study, mice made ischemic by femoral artery excision were injected with the DIs MS275 and MC1568, selective for class I and IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), respectively. In untreated mice, soon after damage, class IIa HDAC phosphorylation and nuclear export occurred, paralleled by dystrophin and neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) down-regulation and decreased protein phosphatase 2A activity. Between 14 and 21 days after ischemia, dystrophin and nNOS levels recovered, and class IIa HDACs relocalized to the nucleus. In this condition, the MC1568 compound increased the number of newly formed muscle fibers but delayed their terminal differentiation, whereas MS275 abolished the early onset of the regeneration process determining atrophy and fibrosis. The selective DIs had differential effects on the vascular compartment: MC1568 increased arteriogenesis whereas MS275 inhibited it. Capillarogenesis did not change. Chromatin immunoprecipitations revealed that class IIa HDAC complexes bind promoters of proliferation-associated genes and of class I HDAC1 and 2, highlighting a hierarchical control between class II and I HDACs during tissue regeneration. Our findings indicate that class-selective DIs interfere with normal mouse ischemic hindlimb regeneration and suggest that their use could be limited by alteration of the regeneration process in peripheral ischemic tissues.

  8. Decrease of Na, K-ATPase Electrogenic Contribution and Resting Membrane Potential of Rat Soleus after 3 Days of Hindlimb Unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoi, I. I.; Kravtsova, V. V.; Drabkina, T. M.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Shenkman, B. S.

    2008-06-01

    The Na,K-ATPase activity is critically important for excitability, electrogenesis and contractility of skeletal muscle expressing ? and ? isoforms of the enzyme [6, 9]. It is well known that disuse induced by hindlimb unloading (HU) leads to progressive atrophy of skeletal muscle; the muscle undergoes a number of dramatic remodeling events. In particular, changes in ion channel expression in response to muscle unweighting were observed [1, 8]. Decrease of resting membrane potential (RMP), electrogenic contribution of Na,K-ATPase and membrane resistance during 7-28 days of HU was shown [8, 10]. The intrinsic mechanisms involved in the process have not been revealed until present. At the same time, the understanding of these mechanisms could be crucial for the disclosing the mechanisms underlying the resting Ca2+ accumulation in the cytoplasm of the unloaded muscle [3, 7]. In the present study, the effect of early (3 days) HU-induced disuse of slow-twitch soleus muscle on membrane electrogenesis as well as on electrogenic contribution of Na,K-ATPase isoforms was investigated.

  9. Adipose stromal cells amplify angiogenic signaling via the VEGF/mTOR/Akt pathway in a murine hindlimb ischemia model: a 3D multimodality imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Fan

    Full Text Available Although adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC transplantation has been demonstrated as a promising therapeutic strategy for peripheral arterial disease (PAD, the mechanism of action behind the observed therapeutic efficacy of ADSCs remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the long-term outcome and therapeutic behavior of engrafted ADSCs in a murine hindlimb ischemia model using multimodality molecular imaging approaches. ADSCs (1.0×10(7 were isolated from Tg(Fluc-egfp mice which constitutively express dual-reporter firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (Fluc(+-eGFP(+, mADSCs(Fluc+GFP+, then intramuscularly injected into the hindlimb of BALB/c-nu mice after unilateral femoral artery ligation and excision. Abbreviated survival (∼5 weeks of post-transplant mADSCs within the ischemic hindlimb was longitudinally monitored using noninvasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI, fluorescence imaging (FRI, and bioluminescence tomography with micro-computed tomography (BLT/micro-CT. Use of the BLT/micro-CT system enabled quantitative 3-dimensional (3D imaging of the cells' distribution and kinetics in vivo. Engrafted mADSCs improved blood perfusion recovery, ambulatory performance and prognosis of the ischemic hindlimb, probably by inducing angiogenesis and formation of collateral vessels, which could be visualized using laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI, micro-CT angiography, vascular-cast imaging, and immunofluorescence. mADSCs augmented activation of the pro-angiogenic VEGF/mTOR/Akt pathway in vivo, even though the cells failed to incorporate into the host microvasculature as functional components. Downregulation of VEGF/mTOR/Akt signaling using small molecule inhibitors counteracted mADSC-induced angiogenesis and perfusion restoration. This study demonstrates for the first time the spatiotemporal kinetics and functional survival of transplanted mADSCs in a PAD model using in vivo 3D multimodality imaging. Our study

  10. Proliferation of myogenic stem cells in human skeletal muscle in response to low-load resistance training with blood-flow restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Lindberg; Aagaard, Per; Bech, Rune Dueholm

    2012-01-01

    exercise (20% 1RM) to concentric failure during blood-flow restriction (BFR) of the proximal thigh (100 mmHg), while eight work-matched controls (21.9±3.0 yrs) trained without BFR (CON). 23 training sessions were performed within 19 days. Maximal isometric knee extensor strength (MVC) was examined pre...... and post training, while muscle biopsies were obtained at baseline (Pre), after 8 days intervention (Mid8) and 3 (Post3) and 10 days (Post10) post training to examine changes in myofibre area (MFA), MSC and myonuclei number. MVC increased by 7.1% (Post5) and 10.6% (Post12) (P...

  11. Clinical signs and symptoms of acute reflex sympathetic dystrophy in one hindlimb of the rat, induced by infusion of a free-radical donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, L; Kapitein, P; Verhofstad, A; Hendriks, T; Goris, R J

    1998-06-01

    The acute phase of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is characterized by the classical signs and symptoms of inflammation (rubor, calor, dolor, tumor and impaired function). As free radicals are involved in acute inflammation, we studied the effects of free radicals in an animal model, especially as to signs and symptoms found in acute RSD. Awake rats were given continuous intra-arterial infusion (1 ml/h) in the left hindlimb, with saline (n = 6) or the free-radical donor tert-butylhydroperoxide (tert-BuOOH, 25 mM, n = 6). During a 24-h infusion period the skin temperature, volume, skin color, function and pain reactions of the paws were observed. After 24 h the rats were killed and both gastrocnemius muscles were histologically analyzed. Infusion with tert-BuOOH induced in the left paw an increased skin temperature, increased volume, redness of the plantar skin, impaired function and increased pain sensation, while these acute RSD signs and symptoms were absent in the saline infused animals. The alterations in pain sensation (spontaneous, mechanical and thermal pain) were similar to findings in the neuropathic animal model. The gastrocnemius muscles of the saline infused rats and the contralateral gastrocnemius muscle of the tert-BuOOH infused rats showed no histological tissue damage. In the left gastrocnemius muscle free-radical-related damage was visible. Induction of free-radical formation in one hindlimb of awake rats mimics the acute signs and symptoms of acute RSD, with alterations in pain sensation as found in the classical neuropathic animal model of RSD, as well as in acute RSD patients.

  12. Muscle metaboreflex activation during dynamic exercise evokes epinephrine release resulting in β2-mediated vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Spranger, Marty D; Hammond, Robert L; Krishnan, Abhinav C; Alvarez, Alberto; Augustyniak, Robert A; O'Leary, Donal S

    2015-03-01

    Muscle metaboreflex-induced increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during submaximal dynamic exercise are mediated principally by increases in cardiac output. To what extent, if any, the peripheral vasculature contributes to this rise in MAP is debatable. In several studies, we observed that in response to muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA; induced by partial hindlimb ischemia) a small but significant increase in vascular conductance occurred within the nonischemic areas (calculated as cardiac output minus hindlimb blood flow and termed nonischemic vascular conductance; NIVC). We hypothesized that these increases in NIVC may stem from a metaboreflex-induced release of epinephrine, resulting in β2-mediated dilation. We measured NIVC and arterial plasma epinephrine levels in chronically instrumented dogs during rest, mild exercise (3.2 km/h), and MMA before and after β-blockade (propranolol; 2 mg/kg), α1-blockade (prazosin; 50 μg/kg), and α1 + β-blockade. Both epinephrine and NIVC increased significantly from exercise to MMA: 81.9 ± 18.6 to 141.3 ± 22.8 pg/ml and 33.8 ± 1.5 to 37.6 ± 1.6 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively. These metaboreflex-induced increases in NIVC were abolished after β-blockade (27.6 ± 1.8 to 27.5 ± 1.7 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)) and potentiated after α1-blockade (36.6 ± 2.0 to 49.7 ± 2.9 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)), while α1 + β-blockade also abolished any vasodilation (33.7 ± 2.9 to 30.4 ± 1.9 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)). We conclude that MMA during mild dynamic exercise induces epinephrine release causing β2-mediated vasodilation.

  13. Relationship of MTT reduction to stimulants of muscle metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J M; DiMaria, C A; Rattigan, S; Steen, J T; Miller, K A; Eldershaw, T P; Clark, M G

    2000-10-16

    MTT, a positively charged tetrazolium salt, is widely used as an indicator of cell viability and metabolism and has potential for histochemical identification of tissue regions of hypermetabolism. In the present study, MTT was infused in the constant-flow perfused rat hindlimb to assess the effect of various agents and particularly vasoconstrictors that increase muscle metabolism. Reduction of MTT to the insoluble formazan in muscles assessed at the end of experiments was linear over a 30 min period and production rates were greater in red fibre types than white fibre types. The vasoconstrictors, norepinephrine (100 nM) and angiotensin (10 nM) decreased MTT formazan production in all muscles but increased hindlimb oxygen uptake and lactate efflux. Veratridine, a Na(+) channel opener that increases hindlimb oxygen uptake and lactate efflux without increases in perfusion pressure, also decreased MTT formazan production. Membrane stabilizing doses (100 microM) of (+/-)-propranolol reversed the inhibitory effects of angiotensin and veratridine on MTT formazan production. Muscle contractions elicited by stimulation of the sciatic nerve, reversed the norepinephrine-mediated inhibitory effects on MTT formazan production, even though oxygen consumption and lactate efflux were further stimulated. Stimulation of hindlimb muscle oxygen uptake by pentachlorophenol, a mitochondrial uncoupler, was not associated with alterations in MTT formazan production. It is concluded that apart from muscle contractions MTT formazan production does not increase with increased muscle metabolism. Since the vasoconstrictors angiotensin and norepinephrine as well as veratridine activate Na(+) channels and the Na(+)/K(+) pump, energy required for Na(+) pumping may be required for MTT reduction. It is unlikely that vasoconstrictors that stimulate oxygen uptake do so by uncoupling respiration.

  14. Prevention of diabetic microangiopathy by prophylactic transplant of mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin ZHOU; Xiao-cang CAO; Zhi-hong FANG; Cui-lin ZHENG; Zhi-bo HAN; He REN; Man-chiu POON; Zhong-chao HAN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the prophylactic local delivery of mobilized periph-eral blood mononuclear cells (M-PBMNC) could prevent peripheral microangio-pathy in diabetic nude mice. Methods: Diabetic nude mice were induced with intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin. With the time course of diabetes, we detected the capillary and arteriole density of mice adductor muscles by immuno-histopathy. In situ apoptosis was detected by using TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) methods. M-PBMNC were labeled and locally delivered to the adductor muscles. Mononuclear cells were also isolated and cultured in vitro for the detection and counting of endothelial progenitor cells(EPC). Results: Rarefication of capillaries and arterioles, enhanced apoptosis in adductor muscles,and reduced circulating EPC in diabetic nude mice. Prophylactic local delivery of M-PBMNC halted the progression of microvascular rarefaction in hind-limb skel-etal muscles by inhibiting apoptosis. We detected the survival, migration and incorporation of transplanted M-PBMNC into the murine vasculature in vivo. In addition, more EPC were available from M-PBMNC than non-mobilized cells.Conclusion: These results suggested that the prophylactic local delivery of M-PBMNC may represent a novel approach for the treatment of microvascular complications in diabetics.

  15. Acute low-intensity cycling with blood-flow restriction has no effect on metabolic signaling in human skeletal muscle compared to traditional exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiles, William J; Conceição, Miguel S; Telles, Guilherme D; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara P T; Cavaglieri, Cláudia R; Vechin, Felipe C; Libardi, Cleiton A; Hawley, John A; Camera, Donny M

    2017-02-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradative system sensitive to hypoxia and exercise-induced perturbations to cellular bioenergetics. We determined the effects of low-intensity endurance-based exercise performed with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on cell signaling adaptive responses regulating autophagy and substrate metabolism in human skeletal muscle. In a randomized cross-over design, nine young, healthy but physically inactive males completed three experimental trials separated by 1 week of recovery consisting of either a resistance exercise bout (REX: 4 × 10 leg press repetitions, 70% 1-RM), endurance exercise (END: 30 min cycling, 70% VO2peak), or low-intensity cycling with BFR (15 min, 40% VO2peak). A resting muscle biopsy was obtained from the vastus lateralis 2 weeks prior to the first exercise trial and 3 h after each exercise bout. END increased ULK1(Ser757) phosphorylation above rest and BFR (~37 to 51%, P exercise-induced changes in select markers of autophagy following BFR. Genes implicated in substrate metabolism (HK2 and PDK4) were increased above rest (~143 to 338%) and BFR cycling (~212 to 517%) with END (P < 0.001). A single bout of low-intensity cycling with BFR is insufficient to induce intracellular "stress" responses (e.g., high rates of substrate turnover and local hypoxia) necessary to activate skeletal muscle autophagy signaling.

  16. The impact of high-frequency magnetic stimulation of peripheral nerves: muscle hardness, venous blood flow, and motor function of upper extremity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okudera, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Sato, Mineyoshi; Chida, Satoaki; Hatakeyama, Kazutoshi; Watanabe, Motoyuki; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of high-frequency peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation on the upper limb function. Twenty-five healthy adults (16 men and 9 women) participated in this study. The radial nerve of the non-dominant hand was stimulated by high-frequency magnetic stimulation device. A total of 600 impulses were applied at a frequency of 20 Hz and intensity of 1.2 resting motor threshold (rMT). At three time points (before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation), muscle hardness of the extensor digitorum muscle on the stimulated side was measured using a mechanical tissue hardness meter and a shear wave imaging device, cephalic venous blood flow on the stimulated side was measured using an ultrasound system, and the Box and Block test (BBT) was performed. Mechanical tissue hardness results did not show any significant differences between before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation. Measurements via shear wave imaging showed that muscle hardness significantly decreased both immediately and 15 min after stimulation compared to before stimulation (P nerve magnetic stimulation can achieve effects similar to electrical stimulation in a less invasive manner, and may therefore become an important element in next-generation rehabilitation.

  17. Skeletal muscle-specific expression of human blood coagulation factor Ⅸ rescues factor Ⅸ deficiency mouse by AAV-mediated gene transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖立辉; 陈立; 卢大儒; 王琪; 高啸波; 邱信芳; Jerry; L.Hsueh; 薛京伦; 王健民; 周虹

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector to deliver and express human blood clotting factor DC (hFIX) gene in skeletal muscle of coagulation factor IX deficiency mouse strain (FactorIX-knockout) is e-valuated. The muscle creatine kinase enhancer (MCK) and βactin promoter ((3A) were used to drive the hFIX minigene (hFIXml), which was flanked by AAV inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). Following intramuscular injection of high liter (2.5 x 1011 vector genomes/mL) of AAV, increased hFIX expression (256 ng/mL of plasma) was achieved. The time course of hFIX expression demonstrated that the expression level gradually increased over a period of two weeks before anti-hFIX antibodies developed in mouse circulating plasma. Those results provided a promising evidence that rAAV-me-diated gene transfer and skeletal muscle-specific expression of hFIX is a feasible strategy for treating patients for hemophilia B.

  18. Relationship between the Carotid Plaque T1 Relaxation Time and the Plaque-to-Muscle Signal Intensity Ratio on Black-Blood Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Ayumu; Kinoshita, Yoshimasa; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Iko, Minoru; Nii, Kouhei; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Sakamoto, Kimiya; Aikawa, Hiroshi; Kazekawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Black-blood magnetic resonance imaging (BB-MRI) is useful for the characterization and assessment of carotid artery plaques. The plaque-to-muscle signal intensity (SI) ratio (plaque/muscle ratio [PMR]) is used widely to evaluate plaques. However, the correlation between the PMR and the T1 relaxation time needs to be determined. We measured the T1 relaxation time of carotid plaques using T1 mapping and compared the results with the PMR on BB-MRI scans. Between April 2014 and July 2015, 20 patients with carotid artery stenosis were treated by carotid artery stenting. All patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance plaque imaging. The ratio of the plaque SI to the sternocleidomastoid muscle was calculated on T1-weighted BB-MRI scans. T1 mapping was performed in the region where the vessel was narrowest using the inversion recovery technique. The T1 relaxation time was recorded to determine whether there was a correlation with the PMR. The plaque T1 value was 577.3 ± 143.2 milliseconds; the PMR value obtained on BB-MRI scans was 1.23 ± .27. There was a statistically significant decrease in the T1 value as the PMR increased (P relaxation time was well correlated with the PMR on BB-MRI scans, the evaluation of vulnerable plaques using the PMR was reliable and convenient. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of high-concentration sevoflurane for induction and nasotracheal intubation without muscle relaxant for infants with different pulmonary blood flow undergoing surgery for congenital heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai-Yuan; Wang, Hong-Wu; Xin, Lian-Feng; Wang, Yong-Wang; Xue, Yu-Liang

    2011-12-01

    Inhalational anesthesia with sevoflurane for endotracheal intubation without muscle relaxant is now used widely for pediatric patients. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of induction with high concentration sevoflurane and of nasotracheal intubation without muscle relaxant in infants with increased or decreased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) and undergoing surgery for congenital heart diseases. Fifty-five infants aged 2 - 12 months, weighing 4.7 - 10.0 kg, and scheduled for congenital cardiac surgery were enrolled. Subjects were divided into those with increased (IPBF group, n = 29) and decreased (DPBF group, n = 26) pulmonary blood flow. All infants received inhalational induction with 8% sevoflurane in 100.0% oxygen at a gas flow rate of 6 L/min. Nasotracheal intubation was performed 4 minutes after induction. Sevoflurane vaporization was decreased to 4.0% for placement of a peripheral intravenous line and invasive hemodynamic monitors. Five minutes later, sedatives and muscle relaxant were administered and the vaporizer was adjusted to 2% for maintenance of anesthesia. Bispectral index (BIS) scores, circulatory parameters, satisfactory and successful intubation ratios, adverse reactions, and complications of intubation were recorded. Times to loss of lash and pain reflexes were longer for the DPBF group (P intubation ratios were 93.1% and 61.5% for the IPBF and DPBF groups, respectively (P = 0.008). Successful intubation ratios were 96.6% and 76.9% for the IPBF and DPBF groups, respectively (P = 0.044). Following sevoflurane inhalation, blood pressures decreased significantly in the IPBF group but remained stable in the DPBF group. BIS scores declined to similar stable values, and a "nadir BIS" was recorded for both groups. No obvious adverse reactions or complications of intubation were noted perioperatively. Induction with high concentration sevoflurane, although faster for infants with IPBF, is safe for infants with IPBF or DPBF. However, nasotracheal

  20. Evaluation of high-concentration sevoflurane for induction and nasotracheal intubation without muscle relaxant for infants with d ifferent pulmonary blood flow undergoing surgery for congenitalheart diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kai-yuan; WANG Hong-wu; XIN Lian-feng; WANG Yong-wang; XUE Yu-liang

    2011-01-01

    Background Inhalational anesthesia with sevoflurane for endotracheal intubation without muscle relaxant is now used widely for pediatric patients.This study assessed the efficacy and safety of induction with high concentration sevoflurane and of nasotracheal intubation without muscle relaxant in infants with increased or decreased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) and undergoing surgery for congenital heart diseases.Methods Fifty-five infants aged 2-12 months,weighing 4.7-10.0 kg,and scheduled for congenital cardiac surgery were enrolled.Subjects were divided into those with increased (IPBF group,n=29) and decreased (DPBF group,n=26) pulmonary blood flow.All infants received inhalational induction with 8% sevoflurane in 100.0% oxygen at a gas flow rate of 6 L/min.Nasotracheal intubation was performed 4 minutes after induction.Sevoflurane vaporization was decreased to 4.0% for placement of a peripheral intravenous line and invasive hemodynamic monitors.Five minutes later,sedatives and muscle relaxant were administered and the vaporizer was adjusted to 2% for maintenance of anesthesia.Bispectral index (BIS) scores,circulatory parameters,satisfactory and successful intubation ratios,adverse reactions,and complications of intubation were recorded.Results Times to loss of lash and pain reflexes were longer for the DPBF group (P <0.01).Satisfactory intubation ratios were 93.1% and 61.5% for the IPBF and DPBF groups,respectively (P=0.008).Successful intubation ratios were 96.6% and 76.9% for the IPBF and DPBF groups,respectively (P=0.044).Following sevoflurane inhalation,blood pressures decreased significantly in the IPBF group but remained stable in the DPBF group.BIS scores declined to similar stable values,and a “nadir BIS” was recorded for both groups.No obvious adverse reactions or complications of intubation were noted perioperatively.Conclusions Induction with high concentration sevoflurane,although faster for infants with IPBF,is safe for infants

  1. Endotoxemia stimulates skeletal muscle Na+-K+-ATPase and raises blood lactate under aerobic conditions in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Henning; Kjeldsen, Keld; Suarez Krabbe, Karen

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the hypothesis that the epinephrine surge present during sepsis accelerates aerobic glycolysis and lactate production by increasing activity of skeletal muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. Healthy volunteers received an intravenous bolus of endotoxin or placebo in a randomized order on two diff...... in acutely and severely ill patients should not be managed only from the point of view that it reflects hypoxia....

  2. Development of a Comprehensive Model of the Apparent Viscosity of Blood for Simulations of the Microcirculation in Rat Spinotrapezius Muscle Fascia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Porterfield, Colin; Engebrecht, Cheryn; Metzger, Ian

    2007-11-01

    A more comprehensive model for the apparent viscosity of blood is proposed and applied to simulations of the microcirculation in rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia. At the microcirculatory level, the apparent viscosity of blood depends on the local vessel diameter, hematocrit, and shear rate. Starting with the apparent viscosity model proposed by Pries, Secomb, Gaehtgens, and Gross (Circulation Research, 67, 826-834, 1990), describing the effect of vessel diameter and hematocrit on the apparent viscosity, and using experimental data presented by Lipowsky, Usami, and Chien (Microvascular Research, 19, 297-319, 1980), describing the shear rate dependence of apparent viscosity, a more comprehensive model is developed. This model is applied to simulations of the microcirculation in rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia. The simulations use realistic vessel topology for the microvasculature, reconstructed from microscope images of tissue samples, and consider passive and active vessel properties. The numerical method is based on a Hagen-Poiseuille balance in the microvessels and a sparse matrix solver is used to obtain the solution. It was found, for example, that the distribution of vessel length follows a log-normal law. The distribution of hematocrit, however, was found to be approximately normal.

  3. Near-infrared monitoring of perfusion and oxygen availability in abdominal organs and skeletal muscle during hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Vari, Sandor G.; Marcu, Laura; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Pergadia, Vani R.; Snyder, Wendy J.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-05-01

    Near-IR spectroscopy was used to quantify blood content and oxygenation dynamics in abdominal organs and skeletal muscle of 18 anesthetized rabbits during hypoxic hypoxia. Liver, kidney, and hindlimb muscle were exposed surgically. Laser diode pulses transmitted across the tissues were detected by means of a photomultiplier. The amount and redox level of tissue hemoglobin were estimated from the near-IR signals and monitored during 5- min-long hypoxic challenges and subsequent recovery periods. In the kidney, exposure to 10% FiO2 resulted in rapid and symmetrical changes in oxygenated and reduced hemoglobin with 50% of the variations occurring within 1 min and a plateau after 3 min. Total hemoglobin did not change and hemoglobin oxygenation returned to baseline within 1 min of hypoxia cessation. Exposure to 6% FiO2 doubled the decrease in oxygenated hemoglobin and induced a sustained vasoconstriction which decreased total hemoglobin content 2 min after initiation of hypoxia. Comparable patterns were observed in the liver and skeletal muscle with the following exceptions: local vasoconstriction was generally not observed at 6% FiO2, return to baseline oxygen availability was much slower in skeletal muscle than in the other organs.

  4. BAG3 (Bcl-2-Associated Athanogene-3) Coding Variant in Mice Determines Susceptibility to Ischemic Limb Muscle Myopathy by Directing Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, Joseph M; McCord, Timothy J; Ryan, Terence E; Schmidt, Cameron A; Green, Tom D; Southerland, Kevin W; Reinardy, Jessica L; Mueller, Sarah B; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Lascola, Christopher D; Keum, Sehoon; Marchuk, Douglas A; Spangenburg, Espen E; Dokun, Ayotunde; Annex, Brian H; Kontos, Christopher D

    2017-07-18

    Critical limb ischemia is a manifestation of peripheral artery disease that carries significant mortality and morbidity risk in humans, although its genetic determinants remain largely unknown. We previously discovered 2 overlapping quantitative trait loci in mice, Lsq-1 and Civq-1, that affected limb muscle survival and stroke volume after femoral artery or middle cerebral artery ligation, respectively. Here, we report that a Bag3 variant (Ile81Met) segregates with tissue protection from hind-limb ischemia. We treated mice with either adeno-associated viruses encoding a control (green fluorescent protein) or 2 BAG3 (Bcl-2-associated athanogene-3) variants, namely Met81 or Ile81, and subjected the mice to hind-limb ischemia. We found that the BAG3 Ile81Met variant in the C57BL/6 (BL6) mouse background segregates with protection from tissue necrosis in a shorter congenic fragment of Lsq-1 (C.B6-Lsq1-3). BALB/c mice treated with adeno-associated virus encoding the BL6 BAG3 variant (Ile81; n=25) displayed reduced limb-tissue necrosis and increased limb tissue perfusion compared with Met81- (n=25) or green fluorescent protein- (n=29) expressing animals. BAG3(Ile81), but not BAG3(Met81), improved ischemic muscle myopathy and muscle precursor cell differentiation and improved muscle regeneration in a separate, toxin-induced model of injury. Systemic injection of adeno-associated virus-BAG3(Ile81) (n=9), but not BAG3(Met81) (n=10) or green fluorescent protein (n=5), improved ischemic limb blood flow and limb muscle histology and restored muscle function (force production). Compared with BAG3(Met81), BAG3(Ile81) displayed improved binding to the small heat shock protein (HspB8) in ischemic skeletal muscle cells and enhanced ischemic muscle autophagic flux. Taken together, our data demonstrate that genetic variation in BAG3 plays an important role in the prevention of ischemic tissue necrosis. These results highlight a pathway that preserves tissue survival and muscle

  5. Analysis of responses to kallidin, DABK, and DAK in feline hindlimb vascular bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, J A; Garrison, E A; Champion, H C; Smith, R E; Del Rio, O; Kadowitz, P J

    1995-12-01

    Responses to kallidin, des-Arg9-bradykinin (DABK), and des-Arg10-kallidin (DAK) were investigated in the hindlimb vascular bed of the cat under constant-flow conditions. Injections of kallidin, DABK, and DAK into the hindlimb perfusion circuit produced dose-dependent vasodilator responses in the hindlimb vascular bed. Vasodilator responses to kallidin and bradykinin (BK) were similar in magnitude and time course, and both peptides were approximately 100-fold more potent than DABK or DAK. Responses to kallidin were decreased by the kinin B2 antagonist, HOE 140, whereas responses to DABK and DAK were reduced by des-Arg9[Leu8]BK, a kinin B1-receptor antagonist. N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) reduced vasodilator responses to kallidin, DABK, and DAK, whereas meclofenamate, atropine, and U-37883A, a vascular selective ATP-sensitive K+ (K+ATP) channel-blocking agent, did not alter responses to the three peptides. These data suggest that both kinin B1 and B2 receptors are normally present in the hindlimb vascular bed. These data also suggest that kinin B1 and B2 receptor-mediated vasodilator responses are mediated by the release of nitric oxide and that the activation of K+ATP channels or muscarinic receptors, or the release of vasodilator prostaglandins play little if any role in mediating responses to kallidin, DABK, or DAK in the hindlimb vascular bed of the cat.

  6. Genetic basis of hindlimb loss in a naturally occurring vertebrate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K. Don

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we genetically characterise pelvic finless, a naturally occurring model of hindlimb loss in zebrafish that lacks pelvic fin structures, which are homologous to tetrapod hindlimbs, but displays no other abnormalities. Using a hybrid positional cloning and next generation sequencing approach, we identified mutations in the nuclear localisation signal (NLS of T-box transcription factor 4 (Tbx4 that impair nuclear localisation of the protein, resulting in altered gene expression patterns during pelvic fin development and the failure of pelvic fin development. Using a TALEN-induced tbx4 knockout allele we confirm that mutations within the Tbx4 NLS (A78V; G79A are sufficient to disrupt pelvic fin development. By combining histological, genetic, and cellular approaches we show that the hindlimb initiation gene tbx4 has an evolutionarily conserved, essential role in pelvic fin development. In addition, our novel viable model of hindlimb deficiency is likely to facilitate the elucidation of the detailed molecular mechanisms through which Tbx4 functions during pelvic fin and hindlimb development.

  7. Increased shelterin mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and skeletal muscle following an ultra-long-distance running event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laye, Matthew J; Solomon, Thomas P J; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Karin K; Nielsen, Susanne D; Pedersen, Bente K

    2012-03-01

    Located at the end of chromosomes, telomeres are progressively shortened with each replication of DNA during aging. Integral to the regulation of telomere length is a group of proteins making up the shelterin complex, whose tissue-specific function during physiological stress is not well understood. In this study, we examine the mRNA and protein levels of proteins within and associated with the shelterin complex in subjects (n = 8, mean age = 44 yr) who completed a physiological stress of seven marathons in 7 days. Twenty-two to 24 h after the last marathon, subjects had increased mRNA levels of DNA repair enzymes Ku70 and Ku80 (P < 0.05) in both skeletal muscle and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Additionally, the PBMCs displayed an increment in three shelterin protein mRNA levels (TRF1, TRF2, and Pot-1, P < 0.05) following the event. Seven days of ultrarunning did not result in changes in mean telomere length, telomerase activity, hTert mRNA, or hterc mRNAs found in PBMCs. Higher protein concentrations of TRF2 were found in skeletal muscle vs. PBMCs at rest. Mean telomere length in skeletal muscle did not change and did not contain detectable levels of htert mRNA or telomerase activity. Furthermore, changes in the PBMCs could not be attributed to changes in the proportion of subtypes of CD4(+) or CD8(+) cells. We have provided the first evidence that, in humans, proteins within and associated with the shelterin complex increase at the mRNA level in response to a physiological stress differentially in PBMCs and skeletal muscle.

  8. The Use of Platelet-Rich and Platelet-Poor Plasma to Enhance Differentiation of Skeletal Myoblasts: Implications for the Use of Autologous Blood Products for Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnychenko, Olga; Chang, Wen-Teh; Dragoo, Jason L

    2017-03-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used to augment tissue repair and regeneration after musculoskeletal injury. However, there is increasing clinical evidence that PRP does not show a consistent clinical effect. Purpose/Hypothesis: This study aimed to compare the effects of the following non-neutrophil-containing (leukocyte-poor) plasma fractions on human skeletal muscle myoblast (HSMM) differentiation: (1) PRP, (2) modified PRP (Mod-PRP), in which transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and myostatin (MSTN) were depleted, and (3) platelet-poor plasma (PPP). The hypothesis was that leukocyte-poor PRP would lead to myoblast proliferation (not differentiation), whereas certain modifications of PRP preparations would increase myoblast differentiation, which is necessary for skeletal muscle regeneration. Controlled laboratory study. Blood from 7 human donors was individually processed to simultaneously create leukocyte-poor fractions: PRP, Mod-PRP, PPP, and secondarily spun PRP and Mod-PRP (PRPss and Mod-PRPss, respectively). Mod-PRP was produced by removing TGF-β1 and MSTN from PRP using antibodies attached to sterile beads, while a second-stage centrifugal spin of PRP was performed to remove platelets. The biologics were individually added to cell culture groups. Analysis for induction into myoblast differentiation pathways included Western blot analysis, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry, as well as confocal microscopy to assess polynucleated myotubule formation. HSMMs cultured with PRP showed an increase in proliferation but no evidence of differentiation. Western blot analysis confirmed that MSTN and TGF-β1 could be decreased in Mod-PRP using antibody-coated beads, but this modification mildly improved myoblast differentiation. However, cell culture with PPP, PRPss, and Mod-PRPss led to a decreased proliferation rate but a significant induction of myoblast differentiation verified by increased multinucleated myotubule

  9. Bradykinin Contributes to Sympathetic and Pressor Responses Evoked by Activation of Skeletal Muscle Afferents P2X in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Xing

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Published data suggest that purinergic P2X receptors of muscle afferent nerves contribute to the enhanced sympathetic nervous activity (SNA and blood pressure (BP responses during static exercise in heart failure (HF. In this study, we examined engagement of bradykinin (BK in regulating responses of SNA and BP evoked by P2X stimulation in rats with HF. We further examined cellular mechanisms responsible for BK. We hypothesized that BK potentiates P2X currents of muscle dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons, and this effect is greater in HF due to upregulation of BK kinin B2 and P2X3 receptor. As a result, BK amplifies muscle afferents P2X-mediated SNA and BP responses. Methods: Renal SNA and BP responses were recorded in control rats and rats with HF. Western Blot analysis and patch-clamp methods were employed to examine the receptor expression and function of DRG neurons involved in the effects of BK. Results: BK injected into the arterial blood supply of the hindlimb muscles heightened the reflex SNA and BP responses induced by P2X activation with α,β-methylene ATP to a greater degree in HF rats. In addition, HF upregulated the protein expression of kinin B2 and P2X3 in DRG and the prior application of BK increased the magnitude of α,β-methylene ATP-induced currents in muscle DRG neurons from HF rats. Conclusion: BK plays a facilitating role in modulating muscle afferent P2X-engaged reflex sympathetic and pressor responses. In HF, P2X responsivness is augmented due to increases in expression of kinin B2 and P2X3 receptors and P2X current activity.

  10. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hindel

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles

  11. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindel, Stefan; Sauerbrey, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF) was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles, as measured by the

  12. Vitamin E provides protection for bone in mature hindlimb unloaded male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. J.; Lucas, E. A.; Turner, R. T.; Evans, G. L.; Lerner, M. R.; Brackett, D. J.; Stoecker, B. J.; Arjmandi, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    The deleterious effects of skeletal unloading on bone mass and strength may, in part, result from increased production of oxygen-derived free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol), a free-radical scavenger with antiinflammatory properties, to protect against bone loss caused by skeletal unloading in mature male Sprague-Dawley rats. A 2 x 3 factorial design was used with either hindlimb unloading (HU) or normal loading (ambulatory; AMB), and low-dose (LD; 15 IU/kg diet), adequate-dose (AD; 75 IU/kg diet), or high-dose (HD; 500 IU/kg diet) vitamin E (DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate). To optimize the effects of vitamin E on bone, dietary treatments were initiated 9 weeks prior to unloading and continued during the 4-week unloading period, at which time animals were euthanized and blood and tissue samples were collected. Serum vitamin E was dose-dependently increased, confirming the vitamin E status of animals. The HD treatment improved oxidation parameters, as indicated by elevated serum ferric-reducing ability and a trend toward reducing tissue lipid peroxidation. Histomorphometric analysis of the distal femur revealed significant reductions in trabecular thickness (TbTh), double-labeled surface (dLS/BS), and rate of bone formation to bone volume (BFR/BV) due by HU. AMB animals on the HD diet and HU animals on the LD diet had reduced bone surface normalized to tissue volume (BS/TV) and trabecular number (TbN); however, the HD vitamin E protected against these changes in the HU animals. Our findings suggest that vitamin E supplementation provides modest bone protective effects during skeletal unloading.

  13. Interaction of medullary P2 and glutamate receptors mediates the vasodilation in the hindlimb of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korim, Willian Seiji; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L; Pedrino, Gustavo R; Pilowsky, Paul M; Cravo, Sergio L

    2012-12-01

    In the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of rats, blockade of extracellular ATP breakdown to adenosine reduces arterial blood pressure (AP) increases that follow stimulation of the hypothalamic defense area (HDA). The effects of ATP on NTS P2 receptors, during stimulation of the HDA, are still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether activation of P2 receptors in the NTS mediates cardiovascular responses to HDA stimulation. Further investigation was taken to establish if changes in hindlimb vascular conductance (HVC) elicited by electrical stimulation of the HDA, or activation of P2 receptors in the NTS, are relayed in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM); and if those responses depend on glutamate release by ATP acting on presynaptic terminals. In anesthetized and paralyzed rats, electrical stimulation of the HDA increased AP and HVC. Blockade of P2 or glutamate receptors in the NTS, with bilateral microinjections of suramin (10 mM) or kynurenate (50 mM) reduced only the evoked increase in HVC by 75 % or more. Similar results were obtained with the blockade combining both antagonists. Blockade of P2 and glutamate receptors in the RVLM also reduced the increases in HVC to stimulation of the HDA by up to 75 %. Bilateral microinjections of kynurenate in the RVLM abolished changes in AP and HVC to injections of the P2 receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (20 mM) into the NTS. The findings suggest that HDA-NTS-RVLM pathways in control of HVC are mediated by activation of P2 and glutamate receptors in the brainstem in alerting-defense reactions.

  14. Melatonin Restores White Blood Cell Count, Diminishes Glycated Haemoglobin Level and Prevents Liver, Kidney and Muscle Oxidative Stress in Mice Exposed to Acute Ethanol Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurhaluk, Natalia; Sliuta, Alina; Kyriienko, Svitlana; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of melatonin impact on changes in haematological profile, biomarkers of oxidative stress (dienes conjugates, malondialdehyde (MDA), oxidatively modified protein levels, total antioxidant capacity and antioxidant enzyme activity) in liver, muscle, kidney and erythrocytes, and glycated haemoglobin (HBA1c) in mice during acute ethanol stress. Assays were carried out in quadruplicate: control, melatonin (10 mg/kg, 10 days), acute ethanol stress (0.75 g/kg/day, 10 days) and acute ethanol stress plus melatonin groups. Acute ethanol stress caused a significant increase in the total number of white blood cells (WBC), especially neutrophils in the blood, and HBA1c levels vs. control mice. The correlation between lipid peroxidation and the glycated haemoglobin level was shown (r = 0.93, P = 0.007). Ethanol reduced the antioxidant capacity by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the level of oxidatively modified protein content, diene conjugates and MDA. Melatonin administration in animals during acute ethanol stress reduced antioxidant stress biomarkers, WBC, HBA1c levels and ROS production. Melatonin had protective effects on liver, kidney and muscle tissues by preventing the intensive lipid peroxidation processes in initial (diene conjugation production) and late stages (MDA level), and significantly reduced the level of aldehyde and ketone protein derivatives. Furthermore, melatonin restored elevated WBC count and HBA1c level and diminished ROS production. Ethanol reduces antioxidant capacity and leads to exaggerated reactive oxygen species production and consequent increases in oxidatively modified proteins. Melatonin exerts protective effects by preventing the intensive lipid peroxidation processes. Melatonin significantly reduces the level of aldehyde and ketone protein derivatives, restores glycated haemoglobin level and white blood cell count.

  15. Behavioural and morphological asymmetries in hindlimbs of Hoplodactylus duvaucelii (Lacertilia: Gekkonomorpha: Gekkota: Diplodactylinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2002-07-01

    This study reports an association of behavioural and morphological directional asymmetries at the level of individual lizards. I counted all subdigital lamellae (scales) under the toes of 57 Hoplodactylus duvaucelii on North Brother Island, New Zealand. Geckos released first from the substrate the hindlimb that had fewer subdigital lamellae than the other hindlimb. Analyses of data from the literature show that in geckos, clinging ability increases with the number of subdigital lamellae, especially after variation in body mass is accounted for. Assuming that grasping (an active process) and clinging (a passive process) abilities are correlated, the association of behavioural and morphological asymmetry among individuals could be interpreted in functional terms: geckos lift first from the substrate the hindlimb that has the lowest ability to stick to the substrate.

  16. Chronic hypoxia increases arterial blood pressure and reduces adenosine and ATP induced vasodilatation in skeletal muscle in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Robach, P;

    2014-01-01

    into the femoral artery at sea level and then after 8-12 days of residence at 4559 m above sea level. At sea level, the infusions were carried out while the subjects breathed room air, acute hypoxia (FI O2 = 0.11) and hyperoxia (FI O2 = 1); and at altitude (FI O2 = 0.21 and 1). Skeletal muscle P2Y2 receptor...

  17. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  18. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  19. Effects of thyme as a feed additive in broiler chickens on thymol in gut contents, blood plasma, liver and muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselmeyer, Alexander; Zentek, Jürgen; Chizzola, Remigius

    2015-02-01

    Aromatic herbs as feed additives in animal production are encountering growing interest, but data on the fate of the aromatic compounds from the plant in the animal body are very scarce. In the present study, thyme (Thymus vulgaris) herb consisting of leaves and flowers without stems was used as an ingredient in the diet for broilers. The herb was fed for 35 days to five groups of broilers (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 1% w/w in the diet). Animal performance and the concentrations of the main essential oil component from thyme, thymol, were measured in gut contents, plasma and liver and muscle tissues using solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. There were no differences between the groups in feed intake, daily weight gain, feed conversion and slaughter weight. Thymol was detected in gut contents, plasma and liver and muscle tissues. Increased intestinal thymol concentrations were found in the group with 1% thyme compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). In liver and muscle tissues the thymol levels were close to the limit of quantification. The data do not indicate a positive effect of thyme on animal performance. With high dietary levels of thyme herb, thymol concentrations increased in gut contents and plasma but were very low in edible tissues such as liver and flesh. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Evidence for a role of nitric oxide in hindlimb vasodilation induced by hypothalamic stimulation in anesthetized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira-Neto Marcos L.; Possas Olga S.; Lopes Oswaldo U.; Cravo Sérgio L.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus produces cardiovascular adjustments consisting of hypertension, tachycardia, visceral vasoconstriction and hindlimb vasodilation. Previous studies have demonstrated that hindlimb vasodilation is due a reduction of sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone and to activation of beta2-adrenergic receptors by catecholamine release. However, the existence of a yet unidentified vasodilator mechanism has also been proposed. Recent studies have suggested that nitric ...

  1. Muscle Moment Arms and Sensitivity Analysis of a Mouse Hindlimb Musculoskeletal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    Straschil B, Hilgers H, et al. (2010) Histomor- phology of the penis bone (Baculum) in the gray long-eared bat Plecotus austriacus (Chiroptera...Vespertilionidae). Anat Rec (Hoboken) 293, 1248–1258. Herdina AN, Kelly DA, Jahelkova H, et al. (2015) Testing hypotheses of bat baculum function with 3D...slack length: a numerical method. J Appl Biomech 20, 195–203. Mancuso R, Olivan S, Osta R, et al. (2011) Evolution of gait abnormalities in SOD1(G93A

  2. Entrenamiento con restricción del flujo sanguíneo e hipertrofia muscular. [Blood flow restriction training and muscle hypertrophy].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Reina-Ramos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available El entrenamiento de fuerza orientado a aumentar la masa muscular se ha convertido en un objetivo común en programas de entrenamiento tanto en deportistas de alto rendimiento como en personas que realizan programas de actividad física con objetivo de mejorar su salud o calidad de vida. Generalmente, el trabajo de fuerza orientado hacia la hipertrofia muscular se ha asociado con la utilización de altas cargas de trabajo (70-85% de 1 RM. Actualmente, se ha propuesto que el entrenamiento de fuerza con cargas de tan solo el 20% de 1 RM realizadas en condiciones de restricción del flujo sanguíneo podría provocar incrementos en los niveles de fuerza y masa muscular similares a los observados al ejercitarse con cargas altas. Dado que ciertos colectivos podrían beneficiarse del empleo de bajas cargas en sus programas de entrenamiento orientados a incrementar la masa muscular, el objetivo del presente trabajo de revisión bibliográfica ha sido el de revisar en la literatura las evidencias que existen en torno a la efectividad del entrenamiento con restricción del flujo sanguíneo a la hora de provocar hipertrofia muscular. Abstract Strength training focuses on increasing muscle mass has become in a frequent target in training programs in both elite athletes and people performing physical activity programs to improve their health or quality of life. Generally, the resistance training oriented muscle hypertrophy has been associated with the use of high workloads (70-85% of 1RM. Currently, it has been proposed that the resistance training with loads of only 20% 1RM under conditions of restricted blood flow can induce increases in strength levels similar to resistance training with high intensities. Because certain groups could benefit from the use of low loads in their strength training programs designed to increase muscle mass, the objective of the present study was to review the literature on the existing evidence about the effectiveness of blood

  3. Mechanical Signal Transduction in Countermeasures to Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidball, James G.; Chu, Amy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have shown that modifications in muscle use result in changes in the expression and activity of calpains and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Although muscle unloading for 10 days produced no change in the concentrations of calpain 1 or 2 and no change in calpain activation, muscle reloading produced a 90% increase in calpain 2 concentration. We developed an in vitro model to test our hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. Talin was selected because it is a well-characterized calpain substrate and it is codistributed with calpain in muscle cells. We found that intermittant loading during hindlimb suspension that is sufficient to prevent muscle mass loss that occurs during muscle unloading is also sufficient to prevent the decrease in NOS expression that normally occurs during hindlimb unloading. These findings indicate that therapeutics directed toward regulating the calpain/calpastatin system may be beneficial in preventing muscle mass loss in muscle injury, unloading and disease.

  4. Contraction-induced skeletal muscle FAT/CD36 trafficking and FA uptake is AMPK independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, J; Albers, P H; Rose, A J; Birk, J B; Schjerling, P; Dzamko, N; Steinberg, G R; Kiens, B

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating FA translocase CD36 (FAT/CD36) translocation and FA uptake in skeletal muscle during contractions. In one model, wild-type (WT) and AMP-dependent protein kinase kinase dead (AMPK KD) mice were exercised or extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles were contracted, ex vivo. In separate studies, FAT/CD36 translocation and FA uptake in response to muscle contractions were investigated in the perfused rat hindlimb. Exercise induced a similar increase in skeletal muscle cell surface membrane FAT/CD36 content in WT (+34%) and AMPK KD (+37%) mice. In contrast, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside only induced an increase in cell surface FAT/CD36 content in WT (+29%) mice. Furthermore, in the perfused rat hindlimb, muscle contraction induced a rapid (1 min, +15%) and sustained (10 min, +24%) FAT/CD36 relocation to cell surface membranes. The increase in cell surface FAT/CD36 protein content with muscle contractions was associated with increased FA uptake, both in EDL and SOL muscle from WT and AMPK KD mice and in the perfused rat hindlimb. This suggests that AMPK is not essential in regulation of FAT/CD36 translocation and FA uptake in skeletal muscle during contractions. However, AMPK could be important in regulation of FAT/CD36 distribution in other physiological situations.

  5. Impairment of recovery of muscle function by residual rocuronium after re-transfusion of intraoperative salvaged blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Geng; Wang Jia; Zhou Haibin; Zhao Xia; Wu Xinmin

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurarization has previously been described in the context of acute normovolemic hemodilution.The aim of this study was to investigate the impairment of recovery of neuromuscular function after re-transfusion of intraoperative salvaged blood in patients treated with rocuronium.Methods We enrolled 50 patients undergoing general anesthesia for lumbar surgery.Intraoperative blood salvage (IBS) was used in 30 patients (group Ⅰ); the remaining 20 comprised a control group (group C).Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl,midazolam,propofol and rocuronium.Rocuronium was infused to maintain neuromuscular blockade during surgery.Blood was collected from the operative field and re-transfused in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU).Neuromuscular function was monitored using the train-of-four ratio (TOFr).Once the train-of-four ratio exceeded 90 in the PACU,neuromuscular function was evaluated every 5 minutes for 30 minutes.The TOFr and incremental recovery of TOFr from baseline were recorded.Salvaged blood was re-transfused at the beginning of the evaluation for patients in group Ⅰ,and afterwards for patients in group C.Blood gas analysis was assessed before anesthesia and in the PACU.Results Incremental recovery of TOFr from baseline was significantly less in group Ⅰ than controls at 25 minutes (6.1±3.2vs.9.1±3.2,respectively; P=0.001) and 30 minutes (7.1±3.2 vs.10.0±2.2,respectively; P=-0.001).There were no significant differences in gas exchange between the groups.Conclusions In patients who had received a rocuronium infusion during anesthesia,re-transfusion of salvaged blood significantly impaired recovery of neuromuscular function recovery in the PACU,but without significant impairment of respiratory function.

  6. Green tea extract attenuates muscle loss and improves muscle function during disuse, but fails to improve muscle recovery following unloading in aged rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brian T.; Wilson, Joseph C.; Sperringer, Justin; Mohamed, Junaith S.; Edens, Neile K.; Pereira, Suzette L.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that green tea extract (GTE) would improve muscle recovery after reloading following disuse. Aged (32 mo) Fischer 344 Brown Norway rats were randomly assigned to receive either 14 days of hindlimb suspension (HLS) or 14 days of HLS followed by normal ambulatory function for 14 days (recovery). Additional animals served as cage controls. The rats were given GTE (50 mg/kg body wt) or water (vehicle) by gavage 7 days before and throughout the experimental periods. Compared with vehicle treatment, GTE significantly attenuated the loss of hindlimb plantaris muscle mass (−24.8% vs. −10.7%, P muscle function or mass compared with vehicle treatment, animals given green tea via gavage maintained the lower losses of muscle mass that were found during HLS (−25.2% vs. −16.0%, P muscle fiber cross-sectional area loss in both plantaris (−39.9% vs. −23.9%, P muscles after HLS. This green tea-induced difference was not transient but was maintained over the reloading period for plantaris (−45.6% vs. −21.5%, P muscle fiber cross-sectional area (−38.7% vs. −10.9%, P muscles during recovery from HLS compared with vehicle-treated muscles and decreased oxidative stress and abundance of the Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), yet this did not further improve muscle recovery in reloaded muscles. These data suggest that muscle recovery following disuse in aging is complex. Although satellite cell proliferation and differentiation are critical for muscle repair to occur, green tea-induced changes in satellite cell number is by itself insufficient to improve muscle recovery following a period of atrophy in old rats. PMID:25414242

  7. Validation of Blood Volume Fraction Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindel, Stefan; Söhner, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Möllmann, Dorothe; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of fractional blood volume (vb) estimates in low-perfused and low-vascularized tissue using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The results of different MRI methods were compared with histology to evaluate the accuracy of these methods under clinical conditions. vb was estimated by DCE-MRI using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space undersampling in five muscle groups in the hind leg of 9 female pigs. Two gadolinium-based contrast agents (CA) were used: a rapidly extravasating, extracellular, gadolinium-based, low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA, gadoterate meglumine) and an extracellular, gadolinium-based, albumin-binding, slowly extravasating blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium). LMCA data were evaluated using the extended Tofts model (ETM) and the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM). The images acquired with administration of the BPCA were used to evaluate the accuracy of vb estimation with a bolus deconvolution technique (BD) and a method we call equilibrium MRI (EqMRI). The latter calculates the ratio of the magnitude of the relaxation rate change in the tissue curve at an approximate equilibrium state to the height of the same area of the arterial input function (AIF). Immunohistochemical staining with isolectin was used to label endothelium. A light microscope was used to estimate the fractional vascular area by relating the vascular region to the total tissue region (immunohistochemical vessel staining, IHVS). In addition, the percentage fraction of vascular volume was determined by multiplying the microvascular density (MVD) with the average estimated capillary lumen, [Formula: see text], where d = 8μm is the assumed capillary diameter (microvascular density estimation, MVDE). Except for ETM values, highly significant correlations were found between most of the MRI methods investigated. In the cranial thigh, for example, the vb medians

  8. Validation of Blood Volume Fraction Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söhner, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Möllmann, Dorothe; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of fractional blood volume (vb) estimates in low-perfused and low-vascularized tissue using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The results of different MRI methods were compared with histology to evaluate the accuracy of these methods under clinical conditions. vb was estimated by DCE-MRI using a 3D gradient echo sequence with k-space undersampling in five muscle groups in the hind leg of 9 female pigs. Two gadolinium-based contrast agents (CA) were used: a rapidly extravasating, extracellular, gadolinium-based, low-molecular-weight contrast agent (LMCA, gadoterate meglumine) and an extracellular, gadolinium-based, albumin-binding, slowly extravasating blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium). LMCA data were evaluated using the extended Tofts model (ETM) and the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM). The images acquired with administration of the BPCA were used to evaluate the accuracy of vb estimation with a bolus deconvolution technique (BD) and a method we call equilibrium MRI (EqMRI). The latter calculates the ratio of the magnitude of the relaxation rate change in the tissue curve at an approximate equilibrium state to the height of the same area of the arterial input function (AIF). Immunohistochemical staining with isolectin was used to label endothelium. A light microscope was used to estimate the fractional vascular area by relating the vascular region to the total tissue region (immunohistochemical vessel staining, IHVS). In addition, the percentage fraction of vascular volume was determined by multiplying the microvascular density (MVD) with the average estimated capillary lumen, π(d2)2, where d = 8μm is the assumed capillary diameter (microvascular density estimation, MVDE). Except for ETM values, highly significant correlations were found between most of the MRI methods investigated. In the cranial thigh, for example, the vb medians (interquartile range

  9. Injection of adjuvant but not acidic saline into craniofacial muscle evokes nociceptive behaviors and neuropeptide expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambalavanar, R; Yallampalli, C; Yallampalli, U; Dessem, D

    2007-11-09

    Craniofacial muscle pain including muscular temporomandibular disorders accounts for a substantial portion of all pain perceived in the head and neck region. In spite of its high clinical prevalence, the mechanisms of chronic craniofacial muscle pain are not well understood. Injection of acidic saline into rodent hindlimb muscles produces pathologies which resemble muscular pathologies in chronic pain patients. Here we investigated whether analogous transformations occur following repeated injections of acidic saline into the rat masseter muscle. Injection of acidic saline (pH 4) into the masseter muscle transiently lowered i.m. pH to levels comparable to those reported for rodent hindlimb muscles. Nevertheless, repeated unilateral or bilateral injections of acidic saline (pH 4) into the masseter muscle failed to alter nociceptive behavioral responses as occurs in the hindlimb. Changing the pH of injected saline to pH 3.0 or 5.0 also did not evoke nocifensive behavior. Acid sensing ion channel 3 receptors, which are implicated in transformations following acidification of hindlimb muscles, were found on trigeminal ganglion muscle afferent neurons via combined neuronal tracing and immunocytochemistry. In contrast to the acidic saline, injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the masseter muscle induced mechanical allodynia for 3 weeks, thermal hyperalgesia for 1 week and an increase in the number of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive muscle afferent neurons in the trigeminal ganglion. Although pH may alter CGRP release in primary afferent neurons, the number of CGRP-muscle afferent neurons did not change following i.m. injection of acidic saline. Further, there was no change in ganglionic iCGRP levels at 1, 4 or 12 days after i.m. injection of acidic saline. While these findings extend our earlier reports that CFA-induced muscle inflammation results in behavioral and neuropeptide changes they further suggest that i.m. acidification in

  10. 后肢失负荷诱导的骨骼肌萎缩中线粒体功能紊乱%Mitochondrial Dysfunction of Skeletal Muscular Atrophy Induced with Hindlimb Unloaded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘静; 龙建纲; 刘健康

    2013-01-01

    后肢失负荷模型被用于模拟空间飞行中由失重引起的骨骼肌萎缩.后肢失负荷引起线粒体结构与功能紊乱,包括线粒体的数目减少,结构受损,分布失常,生成降低,动态变化及降解受到抑制,呼吸功能及酶活性下降.线粒体结构与功能紊乱可以引发细胞内多种途径的损伤,其中包括氧化应激和细胞凋亡.应用靶向于线粒体的营养素,通过降低肌肉中的氧化损伤,促进线粒体生成,改善线粒体功能等不同作用途径,可以抑制或改善肌萎缩的发生.本文总结了后肢失负荷诱导的骨骼肌萎缩的线粒体相关机制及其防治策略.%Hindlimb unloaded model was used to mimic the effect of skeletal muscle atrophy induced by weightlessness in space flight. Hindlimb unloaded led to mitochondrial dysfunction, including mitochondrial loss, structural damage, disruption of distribution, decrease of biogenesis, repression of dynamic activity and degradation, and alterations of respiration and enzyme activity. Mitochondrial structural damage and dysfunction triggered various intracellular damages, including oxidative stress and apoptosis. Nutrients targeting mitochondria were used to ameliorate the muscle atrophy through the inhibition of oxidative stress, promotion mitochondrial biogenesis, and improvement mitochondrial function. This review summarized mitochondria-related mechanisms in hindlimb unloading-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and the preventive and the therapeutic approaches.

  11. Effects of Dietary Garlic Extracts on Whole Body Amino Acid and Fatty Acid Composition, Muscle Free Amino Acid Profiles and Blood Plasma Changes in Juvenile Sterlet Sturgeon,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of studies were carried out to investigate the supplemental effects of dietary garlic extracts (GE on whole body amino acids, whole body and muscle free amino acids, fatty acid composition and blood plasma changes in 6 month old juvenile sterlet sturgeon (Acipenser ruthenus. In the first experiment, fish with an average body weight of 59.6 g were randomly allotted to each of 10 tanks (two groups of five replicates, 20 fish/tank and fed diets with (0.5% or without (control GE respectively, at the level of 2% of fish body weight per day for 5 wks. Whole body amino acid composition between the GE and control groups were not different (p>0.05. Among free amino acids in muscle, L-glutamic acid, L-alanine, L-valine, L-leucine and L-phenylalanine were significantly (p0.05 were noticed at 12 h (74.6 vs 73.0. Plasma insulin concentrations (μIU/ml between the two groups were significantly (p<0.05 different at 1 (10.56 vs 5.06 and 24 h (32.56 vs 2.96 after feeding. The present results suggested that dietary garlic extracts could increase dietary glucose utilization through the insulin secretion, which result in improved fish body quality and feed utilization by juvenile sterlet sturgeon.

  12. Blood flow and muscle oxygen uptake at the onset and end of moderate and heavy dynamic forearm exercise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekvelt, M.C.P. van; Shoemaker, J.K.; Tschakovsky, M.E.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Hughson, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    We hypothesized that forearm blood flow (FBF) during moderate intensity dynamic exercise would meet the demands of the exercise and that postexercise FBF would quickly recover. In contrast, during heavy exercise, FBF would be inadequate causing a marked postexercise hyperemia and sustained increase

  13. An alternant method to the traditional NASA hindlimb unloading model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J Andries; Crissey, Jacqueline M; Brown, Marybeth

    2011-03-10

    The Morey-Holton hindlimb unloading (HU) method is a widely accepted National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ground-based model for studying disuse-atrophy in rodents. Our study evaluated an alternant method to the gold-standard Morey-Holton HU tail-traction technique in mice. Fifty-four female mice (4-8 mo.) were HU for 14 days (n=34) or 28 days (n=20). Recovery from HU was assessed after 3 days of normal cage ambulation following HU (n=22). Aged matched mice (n=76) served as weight-bearing controls. Prior to HU a tail ring was formed with a 2-0 sterile surgical steel wire that was passed through the 5(th), 6(th), or 7(th) inter-vertebral disc space and shaped into a ring from which the mice were suspended. Vertebral location for the tail-ring was selected to appropriately balance animal body weight without interfering with defecation. We determined the success of this novel HU technique by assessing body weight before and after HU, degree of soleus atrophy, and adrenal mass following HU. Body weight of the mice prior to HU (24.3 ± 2.9g) did not significantly decline immediately after 14d of HU (22.7 ± 1.9g), 28d of HU (21.3 + 2.1g) or after 3 days recovery (24.0 ± 1.8g). Soleus muscle mass significantly declined (-39.1%, and -46.6%) following HU for 14 days and 28 days respectively (pmaintenance of animal body weight, comparable adrenal gland weights, and soleus atrophy following HU, corresponding to expected literature values. The primary advantages of this HU method include: 1) ease of tail examination during suspension; 2) decreased likelihood of cyanotic, inflamed, and/or necrotic tails frequently observed with tail-taping and HU; 3) no possibility of mice chewing the traction tape and coming out of the suspension apparatus; and 4) rapid recovery and normal cage activity immediately after HU.

  14. The effect of hypoxia on pulmonary O2 uptake, leg blood flow and muscle deoxygenation during single-leg knee-extension exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorey, Darren S; Shaw, Colin N; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Kowalchuk, John M; Paterson, Donald H

    2004-05-01

    The effect of hypoxic breathing on pulmonary O(2) uptake (VO(2p)), leg blood flow (LBF) and O(2) delivery and deoxygenation of the vastus lateralis muscle was examined during constant-load single-leg knee-extension exercise. Seven subjects (24 +/- 4 years; mean +/-s.d.) performed two transitions from unloaded to moderate-intensity exercise (21 W) under normoxic and hypoxic (P(ET)O(2)= 60 mmHg) conditions. Breath-by-breath VO(2p) and beat-by-beat femoral artery mean blood velocity (MBV) were measured by mass spectrometer and volume turbine and Doppler ultrasound (VingMed, CFM 750), respectively. Deoxy-(HHb), oxy-, and total haemoglobin/myoglobin were measured continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS; Hamamatsu NIRO-300). VO(2p) data were filtered and averaged to 5 s bins at 20, 40, 60, 120, 180 and 300 s. MBV data were filtered and averaged to 2 s bins (1 contraction cycle). LBF was calculated for each contraction cycle and averaged to 5 s bins at 20, 40, 60, 120, 180 and 300 s. VO(2p) was significantly lower in hypoxia throughout the period of 20, 40, 60 and 120 s of the exercise on-transient. LBF (l min(-1)) was approximately 35% higher (P > 0.05) in hypoxia during the on-transient and steady-state of KE exercise, resulting in a similar leg O(2) delivery in hypoxia and normoxia. Local muscle deoxygenation (HHb) was similar in hypoxia and normoxia. These results suggest that factors other than O(2) delivery, possibly the diffusion of O(2,) were responsible for the lower O(2) uptake during the exercise on-transient in hypoxia.

  15. [Exploration of quality control of inorganic elements in Chinese herbal medicines for stimulating blood circulation and relaxing muscles and joints by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-feng; Fan, Mei-mei; Wang, Guan-min; Tu, Long-fei; Wang, Cheng

    2007-12-01

    Researches have shown the close relationships between inorganic elements and curative efficiencies of various Chinese herbal medicines. Yet, in studies of chemical composition and quality control of Chinese herbal medicines for stimulating blood circulation and relaxing muscles and joints, inorganic substances are often overlooked. In order to improve and reestablish the standard of quality control of Chinese herbal medicines, the authors attempted a method that would incorporate the composition of inorganic elements as part of the quality control. In the present study, the authors used atomic absorption spectrophotometry to measure the contents of fifteen inorganic elements, namely, Cu, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mo, Ni, Sr, V, Mn, Zn, Na, Cr, Cd, and Hg, in several Chinese herbal medicines, including Da Huo Luo Wan. The authors then discussed the relationship between these inorganic elements and curative efficiencies of these Chinese herbal medicines. By comparing the levels of inorganic elements found in Da Huo Luo Wan with those found in other Chinese herbal medicines used in the study, it was revealed that trace elements, Fe, Cu, Mn, and Zn, contribute to the curative efficiency of Da Huo Luo Wan. The authors' results showed that the amounts of trace elements Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn found in Chinese herbal medicine Da Huo Luo Wan are related to the following curative effects of Da Huo Luo Wan: relieving rheumatism, rectifying breathing and alleviating phlegm, stimulating blood circulation and relaxing muscles and joints. The measurement and analysis of inorganic elements in Da Huo Luo Wan will also provide evidences and references for the fingerprint establishment of Da Huo Luo Wan in the future.

  16. Vasopressin and angiotensin II stimulate oxygen uptake in the perfused rat hindlimb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colquhoun, E Q; Hettiarachchi, M; Ye, J M;

    1988-01-01

    uptake and pressure were not inhibited by either phentolamine, propranolol or a combination of the two, but were completely inhibited by the vasodilator, nitroprusside. Nitroprusside also inhibited flow-induced increases in hindlimb oxygen uptake and perfusion pressure. The findings indicate a key role...

  17. Endothelial deletion of mTORC1 protects against hindlimb ischemia in diabetic mice via activation of autophagy, attenuation of oxidative stress and alleviation of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wensi; Han, Dong; Sun, Zhongchan; Ma, Sai; Gao, Lei; Chen, Jiangwei; Li, Xiang; Li, Xiujuan; Fan, Miaomiao; Li, Congye; Hu, Dahai; Wang, Yabin; Cao, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) complicated with diabetes mellitus (DM) still remains a thorny issue due to lack of effective strategies. Our previous study has demonstrated that inhibition of mTORC1 protected adipose-derived stromal cells from hindlimb ischemic injury in PAD mice. However, whether inhibition of mTORC1 could protect against PAD in diabetes mellitus and the underlying mechanisms remained elusive. In this study, we employed endothelial-specific raptor (an essential component of the mTORC1 signaling complex) knockout (KO) mice (Tie2-mTORC1(ko)) to investigate whether and how mTORC1 downregulation could alleviate hindlimb ischemic injury in diabetic mice. Tie2-mTORC1(ko) mice and their wild-type littermates were intraperitoneally injected with streptozocin to induce type 1 diabetic model, after which the hyperglycemic mice were randomly allocated to sham operation or PAD operation (femoral artery ligation). The restoration of hindlimb blood perfusion and recovery of limb functions were improved in diabetic Tie2-mTORC1(ko) PAD mice with significant improvements of autophagy, angiogenesis and vascular integrity as well as attenuation of apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. In vitro, high glucose combining with hypoxia/serum deprivation treatment (HG+H/SD) significantly triggered apoptosis, reactive oxygen species generation and inflammation while inhibited autophagy and tube formation in HUVECs. The effect could be accentuated and attenuated by mTORC1 over-expression (TSC2 siRNA) and mTORC1 silencing (raptor siRNA), respectively. Moreover, autophagy inhibitor 3-MA could simulate the effects of TSC2 siRNA while autophagy inducer rapamycin could mimic the effects of raptor siRNA, suggesting that the beneficial effects of mTORC1 deletion were associated with autophagy induction. In conclusion, our present study demonstrates that endothelial mTORC1 deletion protects against hindlimb ischemic injury in diabetic mice possibly via activation of

  18. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  19. Anemia plus hypoproteinemia in dogs; various proteins in diet show various patterns in blood protein production; beef muscle,. egg, lactalbumin, fibrin, viscera, and supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WHIPPLE, G H; ROBSCHEIT-ROBBINS, F S

    1951-09-01

    Dogs with sustained anemia plus hypoproteinemia due to bleeding and a continuing low protein or protein-free diet containing abundant iron have been used in the present work to test food proteins and supplements as to their See PDF for Structure capacity to produce new hemoglobin and plasma proteins. The reserve stores of blood protein-producing materials are thus largely depleted in such animals and sustained levels of 6 to 8 gm. per cent hemoglobin and 4 to 5 gm. per cent plasma protein can be maintained for considerable periods of time. The stimulus of double depletion drives the body to use all protein building materials with the utmost conservation. This represents a severe biological test for food and body proteins and its assay value must have significance. Measured by this biological test in these experiments, casein stands well up among the best food proteins. The ratio of plasma protein to hemoglobin is about 40 to 50 per cent, which emphasizes the fact that these dogs produce on most diets about 2 gm. hemoglobin to 1 gm. plasma protein. The reason for this preference for hemoglobin production is obscure. The mass of circulating hemoglobin is greater even in this degree of anemia and the life cycle of hemoglobin is much longer than that of the plasma protein. Egg protein, egg albumin, and lactalbumin all favor the production of more plasma protein and less hemoglobin as compared with casein. The plasma protein to hemoglobin ratio is increased, sometimes above 100 per cent. Supplements to the above proteins of casein digests or several amino acids may return the response toward that which is standard for casein. Histidine as a supplement to egg protein increases the total blood protein output and brings the ratio of plasma protein to hemoglobin toward that of casein. Beef muscle goes to the other extreme and favors new hemoglobin production up to 4 gm. hemoglobin to 1 gm. plasma protein-a ratio of 25 per cent. The total amounts of new blood proteins are

  20. Skeletal muscle Heat shock protein 60 increases after endurance training and induces peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 α1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Rosario; Macaluso, Filippo; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Campanella, Claudia; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Moresi, Viviana; Coletti, Dario; Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto Jl; Cappello, Francesco; Adamo, Sergio; Farina, Felicia; Zummo, Giovanni; Di Felice, Valentina

    2016-01-27

    Heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) is a chaperone localizing in skeletal muscle mitochondria, whose role is poorly understood. In the present study, the levels of Hsp60 in fibres of the entire posterior group of hindlimb muscles (gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris) were evaluated in mice after completing a 6-week endurance training program. The correlation between Hsp60 levels and the expression of four isoforms of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) were investigated only in soleus. Short-term overexpression of hsp60, achieved by in vitro plasmid transfection, was then performed to determine whether this chaperone could have a role in the activation of the expression levels of PGC1α isoforms. The levels of Hsp60 protein were fibre-type specific in the posterior muscles and endurance training increased its content in type I muscle fibers. Concomitantly with the increased levels of Hsp60 released in the blood stream of trained mice, mitochondrial copy number and the expression of three isoforms of PGC1α increased. Overexpressing hsp60 in cultured myoblasts induced only the expression of PGC1 1α, suggesting a correlation between Hsp60 overexpression and PGC1 1 α activation.

  1. Alpha adrenergic receptor blockade increases capillarisation and fractional O2 extraction and lowers blood flow in contracting human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Egginton, Stuart; Madsen, Mads

    2017-01-01

    ) in 10 healthy untrained young men before and after 4 weeks treatment with an α1 receptor-antagonist (Terazosin, 1-2 mg day(-1) ). Corresponding biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis. RESULTS: Resting leg blood flow was increased by 57% 6 hours following Terazosin treatment (P... basal capillary-to-fibre ratio was 1.69±0.08 and increased to 1.90±0.08 after treatment (PTerazosin treatment...

  2. Muscle-specific androgen receptor deletion shows limited actions in myoblasts but not in myofibers in different muscles in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Kesha; Chiu, Maria W S; Russell, Patricia K; Skinner, Jarrod P; Lee, Nicole K L; Fam, Barbara C; Zajac, Jeffrey D; MacLean, Helen E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the direct muscle cell-mediated actions of androgens by comparing two different mouse lines. The cre-loxP system was used to delete the DNA-binding activity of the androgen receptor (AR) in mature myofibers (MCK mAR(ΔZF2)) in one model and the DNA-binding activity of the AR in both proliferating myoblasts and myofibers (α-actin mAR(ΔZF2)) in another model. We found that hind-limb muscle mass was normal in MCK mAR(ΔZF2) mice and that relative mass of only some hind-limb muscles was reduced in α-actin mAR(ΔZF2) mice. This suggests that myoblasts and myofibers are not the major cellular targets mediating the anabolic actions of androgens on male muscle during growth and development. Levator ani muscle mass was decreased in both mouse lines, demonstrating that there is a myofiber-specific effect in this unique androgen-dependent muscle. We found that the pattern of expression of genes including c-myc, Fzd4 and Igf2 is associated with androgen-dependent changes in muscle mass; therefore, these genes are likely to be mediators of anabolic actions of androgens. Further research is required to identify the major targets of androgen actions in muscle, which are likely to include indirect actions via other tissues.

  3. Acute antibody-directed myostatin inhibition attenuates disuse muscle atrophy and weakness in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kate T; Cobani, Vera; Ryall, James G; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Lynch, Gordon S

    2011-04-01

    Counteracting the atrophy of skeletal muscle associated with disuse has significant implications for minimizing the wasting and weakness in plaster casting, joint immobilization, and other forms of limb unloading, with relevance to orthopedics, sports medicine, and plastic and reconstructive surgery. We tested the hypothesis that antibody-directed myostatin inhibition would attenuate the loss of muscle mass and functional capacity in mice during 14 or 21 days of unilateral hindlimb casting. Twelve-week-old C57BL/10 mice were subjected to unilateral hindlimb plaster casting or served as controls. Mice received subcutaneous injections of saline or a mouse chimera of anti-human myostatin antibody (PF-354, 10 mg/kg; n = 6-9) on days 0 and 7 and were tested for muscle function on day 14, or were treated on days 0, 7, and 14 and tested for muscle function on day 21. Hindlimb casting reduced muscle mass, fiber size, and function of isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles (P casting, when wasting and weakness had plateaued (P casting with reductions in muscle size and strength being most apparent during the first 14 days of disuse. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential of antibody-directed myostatin inhibition for disuse atrophy especially within the first 2 wk of disuse.

  4. Inhibition of PHD3 by salidroside promotes neovascularization through cell–cell communications mediated by muscle-secreted angiogenic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Kasim, Vivi; Xie, Yu-Dan; Huang, Can; Sisjayawan, Julita; Dwi Ariyanti, Agnes; Yan, Xue-Song; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Cai-Ping; Yang, Li; Miyagishi, Makoto; Wu, Shou-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis has been considered as a potential strategy for treating peripheral artery diseases including hind-limb ischemia (HLI); however, no effective drug-based treatment is currently available. Here we showed that intramuscular administration of salidroside, an active compound of Chinese herb Rhodiola, could robustly enhance blood perfusion recovery by promoting neovascularization in HLI mice. We revealed that salidroside promoted skeletal muscle cell migration and paracrine function through inhibiting the transcriptional level of prolyl-hydroxylase domain 3 (PHD3) without affecting PHD1 and PHD2. Paracrine signals from salidroside-treated skeletal muscle cells enhanced endothelial and smooth muscle cells migration, while inhibition of FGF2/FGF2R and PDGF-BB/PDGFR-β pathways abolished this effect, as well as neovascularization in HLI mice. Furthermore, we elucidated that salidroside inhibition on PHD3 might occur through estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Together, our findings highlights the potential application of salidroside as a novel pharmalogical inhibitor of ERα/PHD3 axis for therapeutic angiogenesis in HLI diseases. PMID:28266625

  5. Selective innervation of fast and slow muscle regions during early chick neuromuscular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafuse, V F; Milner, L D; Landmesser, L T

    1996-11-01

    The electrical properties of adult motoneurons are well matched to the contractile properties of the fast or slow muscle fibers that they innervate. How this precise matching occurs developmentally is not known. To investigate whether motoneurons exhibit selectivity in innervating discrete muscle regions, containing either fast or slow muscle fibers during early neuromuscular development, we caused embryonic chick hindlimb muscles to become innervated by segmentally inappropriate motoneurons. We used the in vitro spinal cord-hindlimb preparation to identify electrophysiologically the pools of foreign motoneurons innervating the posterior iliotibialis (pITIB), an all-fast muscle, and the iliofibularis (IFIB), a partitioned muscle containing discrete fast and slow regions. The results showed that the pITIB and the fast region of the IFIB were exclusively innervated by motoneurons that normally supply fast muscles. In contrast, the slow region of the IFIB was always innervated by motoneuron pools that normally supply slow muscles. Some experimental IFIB muscles lacked a fast region and were innervated solely by "slow" motoneurons. In addition, the intramuscular nerve branching patterns were always appropriate to the fast-slow nature of the muscle (region) innervated. The selective innervation was found early in the motoneuron death period, and we found no evidence that motoneurons grew into appropriate muscle regions, but failed to form functional contacts. Together, these results support the hypothesis that different classes of motoneurons exhibit molecular differences that allow them to project selectively to, and innervate, muscle fibers of the appropriate type during early neuromuscular development.

  6. Effect of acute hypoxia on muscle blood flow, VO₂p, and [HHb] kinetics during leg extension exercise in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbini, Livio; Spencer, Matthew D; Grey, Tyler M; Murias, Juan M; Kowalchuk, John M; Schena, Federico; Paterson, Donald H

    2013-07-01

    The adjustment of pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2p), heart rate (HR), limb blood flow (LBF), and muscle deoxygenation [HHb] was examined during the transition to moderate-intensity, knee-extension exercise in six older adults (70 ± 4 years) under two conditions: normoxia (FIO₂ = 20.9 %) and hypoxia (FIO₂ = 15 %). The subjects performed repeated step transitions from an active baseline (3 W) to an absolute work rate (21 W) in both conditions. Phase 2 VO₂p, HR, LBF, and [HHb] data were fit with an exponential model. Under hypoxic conditions, no change was observed in HR kinetics, on the other hand, LBF kinetics was faster (normoxia 34 ± 3 s; hypoxia 28 ± 2), whereas the overall [HHb] adjustment (τ' = TD + τ) was slower (normoxia 28 ± 2; hypoxia 33 ± 4 s). Phase 2 VO₂p kinetics were unchanged (p < 0.05). The faster LBF kinetics and slower [HHb] kinetics reflect an improved matching between O₂ delivery and O₂ utilization at the microvascular level, preventing the phase 2 VO₂p kinetics from become slower in hypoxia. Moreover, the absolute blood flow values were higher in hypoxia (1.17 ± 0.2 L min(-1)) compared to normoxia (0.96 ± 0.2 L min(-1)) during the steady-state exercise at 21 W. These findings support the idea that, for older adults exercising at a low work rate, an increase of limb blood flow offsets the drop in arterial oxygen content (CaO₂) caused by breathing an hypoxic mixture.

  7. A rapid rotation to an inverted seated posture inhibits muscle force, activation, heart rate and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Pramod; Grover, Varun; DiSanto, Mario C; Button, Duane C; Behm, David G

    2013-08-01

    Although previous studies have demonstrated neuromuscular and cardiovascular changes with slow inversion rates, emergencies, such as overturned vehicles and helicopters can occur rapidly. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in neuromuscular and cardiovascular responses with rapid (1 s) and slower (3 s) transitions from upright to inverted seated positions. Twenty-two subjects performed separate and concurrent unilateral elbow flexion and leg extension maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) for 6 s in an upright seated position and when inverted with 1 and 3 s rotations. Elbow flexion and leg extension force; biceps, triceps, quadriceps and hamstrings electromyographic (EMG) activity, heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured. Whether the elbow flexion or leg extension contractions occurred concurrently or individually, significant (p leg extension MVC as compared to the initial second of rotation to inversion. HR, SBP and DBP demonstrated (p < 0.001) decreases when inverted within 1 and 3 s rotations as compared to upright. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that irrespective of rotation speed, inversion inhibited neuromuscular and cardiovascular responses, similar to the more deliberate, slower rotation of previous inversion studies.

  8. Kallikrein gene-modified EPCs induce angiogenesis in rats with ischemic hindlimb and correlate with integrin αvβ3 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Shen Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human tissue kallikrein (hTK plays an essential role in the physiological and pathological mechanisms of blood vessels. This study aimed to determine whether angiogenesis induced by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs transduced with the adenovirus-mediated hTK gene could improve blood flow in rat hindlimb ischemia in vivo and to establish a promising mechanism in vitro. METHODS: EPCs transduced with adenovirus encoding hTK-162 (i.e., Ad/hTK-transduced EPCs or Ad/GFP-transduced EPCs were administered to Wister rats with hindlimb ischemia through therapeutic neovascularization. Muscular capillary density (MCD, blood flow (BF, and the number of myofibers were measured at days 7, 14, and 21 after treatment. Expre