WorldWideScience

Sample records for highly ionised atoms

  1. LOW ENERGY BEAM-GAS SPECTROSCOPY OF HIGHLY IONISED ATOMS

    OpenAIRE

    Desesquelles, J.; DENIS A.; Druetta, M.; Martin, S.

    1989-01-01

    Features of low energy beam-gas spectroscopic source are reviewed and compared to those of other light sources. Measurement techniques are surveyed. They include the study of wavelength of heavy multiply charged ions in visible and u.v. ranges from normal excited states, doubly excited states, high n levels and doubly excited Rydberg levels.

  2. Semiclassical calculation of ionisation rate for Rydberg helium atoms in an electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang De-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The ionisation of Rydberg helium atoms in an electric field above the classical ionisation threshold has been examined using the semiclassical method, with particular emphasis on discussing the influence of the core scattering on the escape dynamics of electrons. The results show that the Rydberg helium atoms ionise by emitting a train of electron pulses. Unlike the case of the ionisation of Rydberg hydrogen atom in parallel electric and magnetic fields,where the pulses of the electron are caused by the external magnetic field, the pulse trains for Rydberg helium atoms are created through core scattering. Each peak in the ionisation rate corresponds to the contribution of one core-scattered combination trajectory. This fact further illustrates that the ionic core scattering leads to the chaotic property of the Rydberg helium atom in external fields. Our studies provide a simple explanation for the escape dynamics in the ionisation of nonhydrogenic atoms in external fields.

  3. Positron-impact ionisation of atomic hydrogen in the presence of a bichromatic laser field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lou Jun; Li Shu-Min

    2010-01-01

    The positron impact-ionisation of atomic hydrogen in the presence of a linearly polarised bichromatic field is investigated in the first Born approximation.The field is composed of a fundamental frequency and its second harmonic.The state of positron in the field is described by the Volkov wavefunction,and the continuum state of the ejected electron is described by the Coulomb-Volkov wavefunction.The dressed ground state of target is a first order time-dependent perturbative wavefunction.The triple differential cross sections and their dependencies on laser field parameters are discussed and compared with the results modified by a monochromatic field.Numerical results show that the coherent phase control is significant and the laser-assisted ionisation cross sections caused by positron and electron are different.

  4. Viscous Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in highly ionised plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Roediger, E; Nulsen, P; Churazov, E; Forman, W; Brueggen, M; Kokotanekova, R

    2013-01-01

    Transport coefficients in highly ionised plasmas like the intra-cluster medium (ICM) are still ill-constrained. They influence various processes, among them the mixing at shear flow interfaces due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). The observed structure of potential mixing layers can be used to infer the transport coefficients, but the data interpretation requires a detailed knowledge of the long-term evolution of the KHI under different conditions. Here we present the first systematic numerical study of the effect of constant and temperature-dependent isotropic viscosity over the full range of possible values. We show that moderate viscosities slow down the growth of the KHI and reduce the height of the KHI rolls and their rolling-up. Viscosities above a critical value suppress the KHI. The effect can be quantified in terms of the Reynolds number Re = U{\\lambda}/{\

  5. Biological effects induced by K photo-ionisation in and near constituent atoms of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touati, A.; Herve du Penhoot, M.A.; Fayard, B.; Champion, C.; Abel, F.; Gobert, F.; Lamoureux, M.; Politis, M.F.; Martins, L.; Ricoul, M.; Sabatier, L.; Sage, E.; Chetioui, A

    2002-07-01

    In order to assess the lethal efficiency and other biological effects of inner shell ionisations of constituent atoms of DNA ('K' events), experiments were developed at the LURE synchrotron facility using ultrasoft X rays as a probe of K events. The lethal efficiency of ultrasoft X rays above the carbon K threshold was especially investigated using V79 cells and compared with their efficiency to induce double strand breaks in dry plasmid-DNA. A correlation between the K event efficiencies for these processes is shown. Beams of 340 eV were found to be twice as efficient at killing cells than were beams at 250 eV. In addition, a rough two-fold increase of the relative biological effectiveness for dicentric+ring induction has also been observed between 250 and 340 eV radiations. (author)

  6. Dedicated Trigger for Highly Ionising Particles at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Katre, Akshay; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a novel strategy was designed to detect signatures of Highly Ionising Particles (HIPs) such as magnetic monopoles, dyons or Qballs with the ATLAS trigger system. With proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass enegy of 8 TeV, the trigger was designed to have unique properties as a tracker for HIPs. It uses only the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) system, applying an algorithm distinct from standard tracking ones. The unique high threshold readout capability of the TRT is used at the location where HIPs in the detector are looked for. In particular the number and the fraction of TRT high threshold hits is used to distinguish HIPs from background processes. The trigger requires significantly lower energy depositions in the electro-magnetic calorimeters as a seed unlike previously used trigger algorithms for such searches. Thus the new trigger is capable of probing a large range of HIP masses and charges. We will give a description of the algorithms for this newly developed trigger for HIP searches...

  7. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal low temperature plasmas are widely used for technological applications. Increased demands on plasma technology have resulted in the development of various discharge concepts based on different power coupling mechanisms. Despite this, power dissipation mechanisms in these discharges are not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are low pressure radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The limited understanding of these discharges is predominantly due to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and difficult diagnostic access to important parameters. Optical measurements are a powerful diagnostic tool offering high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides non-intrusive access, to the physics of the plasma, with comparatively simple experimental requirements. Improved advances in technology and modern diagnostics now allow deeper insight into fundamental mechanisms. In low pressure rf discharges insight into the electron dynamics within the rf cycle can yield vital information. This requires high temporal resolution on a nano-second time scale. The optical emission from rf discharges exhibits temporal variations within the rf cycle. These variations are particularly strong, in for example capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), but also easily observable in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), and can be exploited for insight into power dissipation. Interesting kinetic and non-linear coupling effects are revealed in capacitive systems. The electron dynamics exhibits a complex spatio-temporal structure. Excitation and ionisation, and, therefore, plasma sustainment is dominated through directed energetic electrons created through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. In the relatively simple case of an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf plasma the complexity of the power dissipation is exposed and various mode transitions can be clearly observed and investigated. At higher pressure secondary electrons dominate the

  8. Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Use of Atomic Models in Explaining Subsequent Ionisation Energy Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeldon, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Chemistry students' explanations of ionisation energy phenomena often involve a number of non-scientific or inappropriate ideas being used to form causality arguments. Research has attributed this to many science teachers using these ideas themselves (Tan and Taber, in "J Chem Educ" 86(5):623-629, 2009). This research extends this work by…

  9. Complete Ionisation of the Neutral Gas in High Redshift Radio Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, S J

    2012-01-01

    Cool neutral gas provides the raw material for all star formation in the Universe, and yet, from a survey of the hosts of high redshift radio galaxies and quasars, we find a complete dearth of atomic (HI 21-cm) and molecular (OH, CO, HCO+ & HCN) absorption at redshifts z > 3. Upon a thorough analysis of the optical photometry, we find that all of our targets have ionising ultra-violet continuum luminosities of logL > 23 W/Hz. We therefore attribute this deficit to the traditional optical selection of targets biasing surveys towards the most ultra-violet luminous objects, where the intense radiation excites the neutral gas to the point where it cannot engage in star formation. However, this hypothesis does not explain why there is a critical luminosity, rather than a continuum where the detections gradually become fewer and fewer as the harshness of the radiation increases. We show that by placing a quasar within a galaxy of gas there is always a finite ultra-violet luminosity above which all of the gas is...

  10. The impact of high and low dose ionising radiation on the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calina Betlazar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Responses of the central nervous system (CNS to stressors and injuries, such as ionising radiation, are modulated by the concomitant responses of the brains innate immune effector cells, microglia. Exposure to high doses of ionising radiation in brain tissue leads to the expression and release of biochemical mediators of ‘neuroinflammation’, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to tissue destruction. Contrastingly, low dose ionising radiation may reduce vulnerability to subsequent exposure of ionising radiation, largely through the stimulation of adaptive responses, such as antioxidant defences. These disparate responses may be reflective of non-linear differential microglial activation at low and high doses, manifesting as an anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory functional state. Biomarkers of pathology in the brain, such as the mitochondrial Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO, have facilitated in vivo characterisation of microglial activation and ‘neuroinflammation’ in many pathological states of the CNS, though the exact function of TSPO in these responses remains elusive. Based on the known responsiveness of TSPO expression to a wide range of noxious stimuli, we discuss TSPO as a potential biomarker of radiation-induced effects.

  11. The response of a neutral atom to a strong laser field probed by transient absorption near the ionisation threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, E R; Austin, D R; Diveki, Z; Hutchinson, S E E; Siegel, T; Ruberti, M; Averbukh, V; Miseikis, L; Strüber, C; Chipperfield, L; Marangos, J P

    2015-01-01

    We present transient absorption spectra of an extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse train in helium dressed by an 800 nm laser field with intensity ranging from $2\\times10^{12}$ W/cm$^2$ to $2\\times10^{14}$ W/cm$^2$. The energy range probed spans 16-42 eV, straddling the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). By changing the relative polarisation of the dressing field with respect to the attosecond pulse train polarisation we observe a large change in the modulation of the absorption reflecting the vectorial response to the dressing field. With parallel polarized dressing and probing fields, we observe significant modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. With perpendicularly polarized dressing and probing fields, the modulations of the harmonics above the ionisation threshold are significantly suppressed. A full-dimensionality solution of the single-atom time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation obtained using the recently developed ab-initio time-dependent B-spline...

  12. Field calibration studies for ionisation chambers in mixed high-energy radiation fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, C; Forkel-Wirth, D; Fuerstner, M; Mayer, S; Otto, Th; Roesler, S; Vincke, H

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of ambient doses at work places around high-energy accelerators is a challenging task due the complexity of the mixed stray radiation fields encountered. At CERN, mainly Centronics IG5 high-pressure ionisation chambers are used to monitor radiation exposure in mixed fields. The monitors are calibrated in the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent H*(10) using standard, source-generated photon- and neutron fields. However, the relationship between ionisation chamber reading and ambient dose equivalent in a mixed high-energy radiation field can only be assessed if the spectral response to every component and the field composition is known. Therefore, comprehensive studies were performed at the CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility where the spectral fluence for each particle type has been assessed with Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, studies have been performed in an accessible controlled radiation area in the vicinity of a beam loss point of CERN's proton synchrotron. The comparison of measurements and calculations has shown reasonable agreement for most exposure conditions. The results indicate that conventionally calibrated ionisation chambers can give satisfactory response in terms of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields at high-energy accelerators in many cases. These studies are one step towards establishing a method of 'field calibration' of radiation protection instruments in which Monte Carlo simulations will be used to establish a correct correlation between the response of specific detectors to a given high-energy radiation field.

  13. The effect of highly ionising particles on the CMS silicon strip tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Bouhali, O; Clerbaux, B; De Langhe, E; De Lentdecker, G; De Wolf, E; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Hrubec, Josef; Krammer, Manfred; Pernicka, Manfred; Tasevsky, M; Waltenberger, W

    2005-01-01

    Inelastic nuclear collisions of hadrons incident on silicon sensors can generate secondary highly ionising particles (HIPs) and deposit as much energy within the sensor bulk as several hundred minimum ionising particles. The large signals generated by these 'HIP events' can momentarily saturate the APV25 front-end readout chip for the silicon strip tracker (SST) sub-detector of the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment, resulting in deadtime in the detector readout system. This paper presents studies of this phenomenon through simulation, laboratory measurements and dedicated beam tests. A proposed change to a front-end component to reduce the APV25 sensitivity to HIP events is also examined. The results are used to infer the expected effect on the performance of the CMS SST at the future large hadron collider. The induced inefficiencies are at the percent level and will have a negligible effect on the physics performance of the SST.

  14. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Ionising and non-ionising radiation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Neil; Auvinen, Anssi; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Erdmann, Friederike; de Vries, Esther; Greinert, Rüdiger; Harrison, John; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Ionising radiation can transfer sufficient energy to ionise molecules, and this can lead to chemical changes, including DNA damage in cells. Key evidence for the carcinogenicity of ionising radiation comes from: follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan; other epidemiological studies of groups that have been exposed to radiation from medical, occupational or environmental sources; experimental animal studies; and studies of cellular responses to radiation. Considering exposure to environmental ionising radiation, inhalation of naturally occurring radon is the major source of radiation in the population - in doses orders of magnitude higher than those from nuclear power production or nuclear fallout. Indoor exposure to radon and its decay products is an important cause of lung cancer; radon may cause approximately one in ten lung cancers in Europe. Exposures to radon in buildings can be reduced via a three-step process of identifying those with potentially elevated radon levels, measuring radon levels, and reducing exposure by installation of remediation systems. In the 4th Edition of the European Code against Cancer it is therefore recommended to: "Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels". Non-ionising types of radiation (those with insufficient energy to ionise molecules) - including extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields as well as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields - are not an established cause of cancer and are therefore not addressed in the recommendations to reduce cancer risk.

  15. Extraction of selectively ionised atomic isotopes from a laser-induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arisawa, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Maruyama, Y.; Shiba, K. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki. Tokai Research Establishment)

    1982-10-14

    A laser-induced plasma of alkali atoms was studied with a view to efficient recovery of isotope ions, with small charge exchange losses. The electron temperature was measured by the double-probe method for several kinds of excitation schemes, which gave the relationship between temperature and the energy given to ions by laser photons. A charge exchange process between lithium isotopes was also studied in an electromagnetic field. It was shown that optimum electrostatic and magnetic field strength exist which maximise the 'separative power'.

  16. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  17. Propagation of light in low pressure ionised and atomic hydrogen. Application to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Moret-Bailly, J

    2003-01-01

    The "Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering" (ISRS) performed using ultrashort laser pulses shifts the light frequencies. Tried using ordinary incoherent light, it keeps its qualitative properties except the nonlinearity due to the power of the laser pulses. The relative frequency shifts of the "Coherent Raman Effect on Incoherent Light" (CREIL) which is obtained do not depend on the intensity and, in a first approximation, on the frequency of the light. As CREIL does not blur the images and the spectra, its shifts may be confused with Doppler shifts. ISRS and CREIL are parametric effects which do not excite the matter, transferring energy from hot beams to cold beams; for CREIL, the cold light is thermal radiation which is heated. CREIL requires low pressure gases acting as catalysts. These gases must have Raman transitions in the radiofrequencies range: for instance H2+ or excited atomic hydrogen in a magnetic field. The spectral lines resulting from a simultaneous absorption (or emission) and CREIL have a w...

  18. Determination of potato glycoalkaloids using high-pressure liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Fumio; Morino, Keiko; Miyazawa, Haruna; Miyashita, Masahiro; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    A method for quantifying two toxic glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine, in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber tissue was developed using HPLC-electrospray ionisation (ESI)/MS. Potato samples were extracted with 5% aqueous acetic acid, and the extracts were subjected directly to HPLC-ESI/MS after filtration. By determining the intensities of the protonated molecules of alpha-solanine (m/z 868) and alpha-chaconine (m/z 852) using selected ion monitoring (positive ion mode), a sensitive assay was attained with detection limits of 38 and 14 ppb for the two glycoalkaloids, respectively. The high sensitivity and selectivity of MS detection effectively reduced the time of analysis thus enabling a high throughput assay of glycoalkaloids in potato tubers.

  19. Eddy covariance flux measurements of ammonia by high temperature chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sintermann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A system for fast ammonia (NH3 measurements with chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS based on a commercial Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS is presented. It uses electron transfer reaction as ionisation pathway and features a drift tube of polyetheretherketone (PEEK and silica-coated steel. Heating the instrumental inlet and the drift tube to 180 °C enabled an effective time resolution of ~1 s and made it possible to apply the instrument for eddy covariance (EC measurements. EC fluxes of NH3 were measured over two agricultural fields in Oensingen, Switzerland, following fertilisations with cattle slurry. Air was aspirated close to a sonic anemometer at a flow of 100 STP L min−1 and was directed through a 23 m long 1/2" PFA tube heated to 150 °C to an air-conditioned trailer where the gas was sub-sampled from the large bypass stream. This setup minimised damping of fast NH3 concentration changes between the sampling point and the actual measurement. High-frequency attenuation loss of the NH3 fluxes of 20 to 40% was quantified and corrected for using an empirical ogive method. The instrumental NH3 background signal showed a minor interference with H2O which was characterised in the laboratory. The resulting correction of the NH3 flux after slurry spreading was less than 1‰. The flux detection limit of the EC system was about 5 ng m−2 s−1 while the accuracy of individual flux measurements was estimated 16% for the high-flux regime during these experiments. The NH3 emissions after broad spreading of the slurry showed an initial maximum of 150 μg m−2 s−1 with a fast decline in the following hours.

  20. The electrical charging of inactive aerosols in high ionised atmosphere, the electrical charging of artificial beta radioactive aerosols; Le processus de charge electrique: des aerosols non radioactifs en milieu fortement ionise, des aerosols radioactifs artificiels emetteurs beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gensdarmes, F

    2000-07-01

    The electrical properties of aerosols greatly influence their transport and deposition in a containment. In a bipolar ionic atmosphere, a neutral electric charge on aerosols is commonly assumed. However, many studies report a different charge distribution in some situations, like highly ionised atmosphere or in the case of radioactive aerosols. Such situations could arise from a hypothetical accident in a nuclear power plant. Within the framework of safety studies which are carried out at IPSN, our aims were the study of electrical properties of aerosols in highly ionised atmosphere, and the study of artificial radioactive aerosols, in order to suggest experimental validation of available theories. For this purpose, we designed an experimental device that allows us to measure non-radioactive aerosol charge distribution under high gamma irradiation, up to 10{sup 4} Gy/h. With our experimental device we also studied the properties of small ions in the medium. Our results show a variation of the charge distribution in highly ionised atmosphere. The charge increases with the dose of gamma ray. We have related this variation with the one of the small ions in the gases, according to theoretical prediction. However, the model overestimates slightly our experimental results. In the case of the radioactive aerosols, we have designed an original experimental device, which allows us to study the charge distribution of a {sup 137}Cs aerosol. Our results show that the electric charging of such aerosols is strongly dependent on evolution parameters in a containment. So, our results underline a great enhancement of self-charging of particles which are sampled in a confined medium. Our results are qualitatively in agreement with the theoretical model; nevertheless the latter underestimates appreciably the self-charging, owing to the fact that wall effects are not taken into account. (author)

  1. In situ formation and characterisation of singly ionised atomic europium in rare gas matrices—Luminescence spectroscopy and MP2 calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Owen; Davis, Barry; McCaffrey, John G., E-mail: john.mccaffrey@nuim.ie [Department of Chemistry, Maynooth University, National University of Ireland—Maynooth, County Kildare (Ireland)

    2015-02-07

    Irradiation of atomic europium isolated in the solid rare gases, with low intensity laser excitation of the y{sup 8}P←a{sup 8}S resonance transition at ca. 465 nm, is found to produce singly charged europium cations (Eu{sup +}) in large amounts in xenon and in smaller amounts in argon. Confirmation of the formation of matrix-isolated Eu{sup +} is obtained from characteristic absorption bands in the UV and in the visible spectral regions. The luminescence produced with excitation of the cation bands is presented in greatest detail for Eu/Xe and assigned. Excitation of the 4f{sup 7}({sup 8}S{sub 7/2})6p{sub 3/2} absorption bands of Eu{sup +} between 390 and 410 nm produces emission which is quite distinct from that resulting from excitation of the 4f{sup 7}({sup 8}S{sub 7/2})6p{sub 1/2} absorption (430 to 450 nm) features. The latter consists of narrow, resolved emission bands with Stokes shifts ten times smaller than the former. The observed spectral differences are discussed in relation to the different spatial symmetries of the p{sub 3/2} and p{sub 1/2} orbitals in these j-j coupled (7/2, 3/2){sub J} and the (7/2, 1/2){sub J} levels. Møller-Plesset calculations are conducted to obtain the molecular parameters of the neutral Eu-RG and cationic Eu{sup +}-RG diatomics (RG = Ar, Kr, Xe). From the short bond lengths and the strong binding energies obtained for the Eu{sup +}-RG species, these values suggest the isolation of the ion in small, possibly interstitial sites especially in xenon. In contrast, but consistent with previous work [O. Byrne and J. G. McCaffrey, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 124501 (2011)], the interaction potentials calculated herein for the Eu-RG diatomics suggest that the neutral Eu atom occupies tetra-vacancy (tv) and hexa-vacancy (hv) sites in the solid rare gas hosts. Possible reasons for the facile production of Eu{sup +} in the solid rare gases are discussed. The mechanism proposed is that atomic europium is also acting as an electron acceptor

  2. High-energy atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drukarev, Evgeny G

    2016-01-01

    This self-contained text introduces readers to the field of high-energy atomic physics - a new regime of photon-atom interactions in which the photon energies significantly exceed the atomic or molecular binding energies, and which opened up with the recent advent of new synchrotron sources. From a theoretical point of view, a small-parameter characteristic of the bound system emerged, making it possible to perform analytic perturbative calculations that can in turn serve as benchmarks for more powerful numerical computations. The first part of the book introduces readers to the foundations of this new regime and its theoretical treatment. In particular, the validity of the small-parameter perturbation expansion and of the lowest-order approximation is critically reviewed. The following chapters then apply these insights to various atomic processes, such as photoionization as a many-body problem, dominant mechanisms for the production of ions at higher energies, Compton scattering and ionization accompanied b...

  3. Paramètres de plasma de la colonne positive des lasers hélium-vapeurs métalliques. I. Formule semi-empirique pour la section efficace électronique d'ionisation d'atomes de zinc et de cadmium

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Dans cet article, nous présentons une formule analytique semi-empirique à deux paramètres libres pour la section efficace électronique d'ionisation directe de l'état fondamental des atomes de zinc et de cadmium. Les résultats obtenus se trouvent dans la limite des erreurs des données expérimentales. Les autres processus d'ionisation (ionisation multiple, autoionisation) ont été négligés.

  4. Analysis of wax ester molecular species by high performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Urbanová, Klára; Cvacka, Josef

    2010-06-18

    High chromatographic resolution of wax esters (WEs) was achieved by non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography on a Nova-Pak C18 column by optimising the acetonitrile/ethyl acetate mobile phase gradient. The retention behaviour of WEs was studied in this chromatographic system. The WEs eluted according to their equivalent carbon number (ECN) values; within the group of WEs with the identical ECN, the most unsaturated species tended to elute first. The isobaric WEs with different positions of the ester moiety were separated from each other whenever the lengths of the chains were sufficiently different. The methyl-branched esters eluted at shorter retention times than the straight-chained analogues, and the resolution among methyl-branched WEs depended on the position of the branching. The analytes were detected by atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) using data-dependent scanning. WEs provided simple full-scan spectra with abundant protonated molecules and low-intensity fragments. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) promoted identification of the WE molecular species. The responses of WEs were found to be dependent on the number of double bonds and on the alkyl-chain length; the limits of the detection ranged from 20micromol/L to 200nmol/L. The HPLC/APCI-MS was applied for the analysis of the WEs isolated from honeycomb beeswax, jojoba oil and human hair. Good agreement between reported results and the literature data was achieved, with several novel polyunsaturated WEs also being found.

  5. SU-E-T-150: Brachytherapy QA Employing a High Resolution Liquid Filled Ionisation Chamber Array: Initial Experience and Limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gainey, M; Kollefrath, M; Bruggmoser, G [University Medical Centre Freiburg, Freiburg Im Breisgau, Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Verifying a complex 3D brachytherapy dose distribution by measurement is non-trivial. Ideally a photon detector array should be independent of energy and angle, have high spatial resolution and be robust for routine clinical use. Methods: An iridium-192 source was used. A PMMA jig was constructed comprising an outer slab and a central insert with eight milled channels for 1.33mm (outer diameter) steel needles, see figure. All calculations were performed using an empty CT study reconstructing eight virtual needles (QA-CT), using the v2 source model (Elekta AG, Sweden). A high resolution liquid filled ionisation chamber array SRS1000, together with Verisoft software v6.0 (PTW Freiburg, Germany), was used to perform measurements of plans of increasing complexity to evaluate its suitability for device- and patient-specific QA. The dimension of backscatter material was investigated. The patient plan dwell time distribution was entered manually into the QA-CT and the dose distribution was calculated. Results: Our measurements indicate that the array is independent of energy and angle. The resulting measured dose values are linearly interpolated to 2025 values. Shifts of 1mm of the entire needle are readily detectable. Individual dwell position shifts (2.5mm) are also readily measurable. Moreover a dwell time increase of 1 second both in the edge and central region are detectable. Conclusion: The high resolution SRS1000 array is a powerful instrument for brachytherapy QA enabling 977 simultaneous measurements to be performed. Our measurements suggest 60mm of RW3 backscatter material upstream and downstream are sufficient. Local percentage difference analysis is useful for device based QA, normalized relative percentage difference is arguably better for patient specific QA. Automated transfer of patient plan dwell time distribution to the QA plan is required to enable a comprehensive patient QA study to be performed. Moreover the described measurement technique

  6. Ionisation from the 3s sub-level of highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, L. B.; Sampson, D. H.; Omidvar, K.

    1978-01-01

    Scaled electron-impact cross sections are calculated for ionization from the 3s sublevel of hydrogenic ions with Z equal infinity by use of the Born exchange or the Coulomb-Born Oppenheimer approximation (which is exact, apart from relativistic corrections, in this limit). The results are fitted to an analytic expression which goes into the correct Bethe approximation result at high energies and which can readily be integrated over a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution to obtain collision rates. These results permit calculation of the approximate cross section and collision rate for ionization from the 3s sublevel of any highly charged ion with Z/N larger than approximately 2. Results obtained by the described procedure for Fe-14(+) and Fe-15(+) are compared with results obtained by other procedures.

  7. Practical considerations for the rapid screening for pesticides using ambient pressure desorption ionisation with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, S E; Lin, L A; Parrales, L

    2011-10-01

    A rapid screening method for pesticides has been developed to streamline the processing of produce entering the United States. Foam swabs were used to recover multi-class mixtures of 240, 140, 132 and 60 pesticides from the surfaces of apples, kiwis, peaches and tomatoes. The mixtures were selected to span a large range of chemical classes, polarities, solubilities and sizes to provide a broad look at how this technique will perform for a variety of analytes. The swabs were analysed using direct analysis in real-time (DART) ionisation coupled with a high-resolution Exactive Orbitrap™ mass spectrometer. This study expands the types of commodities analysed using this method and explores the feasibility of compositing multiple units of produce per batch to analyse a representative sample. It was established that whilst smooth-skinned produce, such as apples, maintained a high detection rate for the pesticide mixtures even when ten apples are swabbed with one foam disk, commodities with rougher surfaces, such as peaches, suffered a decrease in detection rate when ten peaches are swabbed with one foam disk. In order to maintain some consistency across the sample preparation process, a composite size of three units was selected. The varying topography of the commodities necessitated minor modifications to the method; for example, analysis of kiwi required that the hair on the surface be shaved prior to swabbing to achieve good recovery. Additionally, the effect of storage conditions on detection rate was analysed by spiking the surface of tomatoes at levels of 5 and 10 ng g(-1) for each pesticide, storing them under refrigeration and ambient conditions for 3 and 8 days, and then analysing the surface using this method. After 8 days of storage under both conditions more than 80% of the pesticides in the mixture were detected. Also, analysis of the multi-class mixtures was performed in both positive- and negative-ion mode and many classes were detected in both modes

  8. Mysteries of LiF TLD response following high ionisation density irradiation: nanodosimetry and track structure theory, dose response and glow curve shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Y; Fuks, E; Datz, H; Oster, L; Livingstone, J; Rosenfeld, A

    2011-06-01

    Three outstanding effects of ionisation density on the thermoluminescence (TL) mechanisms giving rise to the glow peaks of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) are currently under investigation: (1) the dependence of the heavy charged particle (HCP) relative efficiency with increasing ionisation density and the effectiveness of its modelling by track structure theory (TST), (2) the behaviour of the TL efficiency, f(D), as a function of photon energy and dose. These studies are intended to promote the development of a firm theoretical basis for the evaluation of relative TL efficiencies to assist in their application in mixed radiation fields. And (3) the shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve for various HCP types and energies and following high-dose electron irradiation, i.e. the ratio of the intensity of peak 5a to peak 5. Peak 5a is a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from electron-hole capture in a spatially correlated trapping centre/luminescent centre (TC/LC) complex that has been suggested to possess a potential as a solid-state nanodosemeter due to the preferential electron/hole population of the TC/LC at high ionisation density. It is concluded that (1) the predictions of TST are very strongly dependent on the choice of photon energy used in the determination of f(D); (2) modified TST employing calculated values of f(D) at 2 keV is in agreement with 5-MeV alpha particle experimental results for composite peak 5 but underestimates the 1.5-MeV proton relative efficiencies. Both the proton and alpha particle relative TL efficiencies of the high-temperature TL (HTTL) peaks 7 and 8 are underestimated by an order of magnitude suggesting that the HTTL efficiencies are affected by other factors in addition to radial electron dose; (3) the dose-response supralinearity of peaks 7 and 8 change rapidly with photon energy: this behaviour is explained in the framework of the unified interaction model as due to a very strong dependence on photon energy of the relative

  9. Total ionisation cross sections in (e/sup +/-Li) scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, K.K.; Mazumdar, P.S.

    1988-06-28

    Total ionisation cross sections for the positron impact ionisation of the lithium atom are calculated using a distorted-wave approximation in which both the effect of screening in the final state of the system and the distortion of the outgoing waves are taken into account. The present results are different from those using the first Born approximation and from an earlier distorted-wave calculation by other workers.

  10. Method development for the determination of selected pesticides on tobacco by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Helm, Bernhard; Hofbauer, Ludwig; Müller, Jutta

    2008-02-15

    A method was developed for the quantitative determination of alachlor, benalaxyl, clomazone, diflubenzuron, dimethomorph, diphenamid, ethofumesate, metalaxyl, methoprene, metobromuron and piperonyl butoxide on tobacco. The pesticides were extracted with water and methanol from five different types of tobacco. The extracts were purified by partition on an extraction cartridge containing diatomaceous earth. The purified extracts were analysed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography connected to an atmospheric pressure ionisation-electrospray-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in the positive ion mode. Two different transitions and their relative intensities were monitored for unambiguous identification. All pesticides presented overall recovery rates between 35% and 110%. The trueness is near 100% and the interday precision is below 15%. The limits of quantifications are equal or below the guidance residue levels proposed by the Agrochemical Advisory Committee of CORESTA, an association of organisations having scientific research relative to tobacco.

  11. The Suzaku view of highly-ionised outflows in AGN: I - Statistical detection and global absorber properties

    CERN Document Server

    Gofford, Jason; Tombesi, Francesco; Braito, Valentina; Turner, T Jane; Miller, Lance; Cappi, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a new spectroscopic study of Fe K-band absorption in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Using data obtained from the Suzaku public archive we have performed a statistically driven blind search for Fe XXV Hea and/or Fe XXVI Lyb absorption lines in a large sample of 51 type 1.0-1.9 AGN. Through extensive Monte Carlo simulations we find statistically significant absorption is detected at E>6.7 keV in 20/51 sources at the P(MC)>95% level, which corresponds to ~40% of the total sample. In all cases, individual absorption lines are detected independently and simultaneously amongst the two (or three) available XIS detectors which confirms the robustness of the line detections. The most frequently observed outflow phenomenology consists of two discrete absorption troughs corresponding to Fe XXV Hea and Fe XXVI Lyb at a common velocity shift. From xstar fitting the mean column density and ionisation parameter for the Fe K absorption components are log(NH/cm^{-2})~23 and log(xi/erg cm s^{-1})~4.5, ...

  12. Ionisation Potentials of Metal Carbide Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Addicoat, M.; Gascooke, Jason; Buntine, Mark; Metha, Gregory

    2006-03-01

    Photo-Ionisation Efficiency (PIE) experiments have been performed on gas phase niobium and tantalum carbide clusters to determine their ionisation potentials (IPs). For TanCm (n = 3-4, m = 0-4) clusters an oscillatory behaviour is observed such that clusters with an odd number of carbon atoms have higher IPs and clusters with an even number of carbons have lower IPs. Excellent agreement is found with relative IPs calculated using density functional theory for the lowest energy structures, which are consistent with the development of a 2x2x2 face-centred nanocrystal. For the niobium carbide clusters we observe the species Nb4C5 and Nb4C6. Initial calculations suggest that these clusters contain carbon-carbon bonding. Interestingly, the stoichiometry for Nb4C6 is half that of a metcar, M8C12. Preliminary data will also be shown on bimetallic-carbide clusters.

  13. High-power atomic xenon laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteman, W.J.; Peters, P.J.M.; Botma, H.; Botma, H.; Tskhai, S.N.; Udalov, Yu.B.; Mei, Q.C.; Mei, Qi-Chu; Ochkin, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    The high pressure atomic xenon laser is becoming the most promising light source in the wavelength region of a few microns. The merits are high efficiency (so far up to 8 percent), high output energies (15 J/liter at 9 bar), high continuous output power (more than 200 W/liter), no gas dissociation a

  14. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X......-ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation...

  15. Atomic hydrogen at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briggs, FH; Rickman, H

    2002-01-01

    After the production of the ionizing background by the first generation of stars, neutral gas must be confined to sufficiently high density to be self-shielding and remain neutral. Neutral gas is an identifier of the presence of confining gravitational potentials and a tracer of the kinematics of

  16. Atomic hydrogen at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briggs, FH; Rickman, H

    2002-01-01

    After the production of the ionizing background by the first generation of stars, neutral gas must be confined to sufficiently high density to be self-shielding and remain neutral. Neutral gas is an identifier of the presence of confining gravitational potentials and a tracer of the kinematics of th

  17. Influence of ionisation zone motion in high power impulse magnetron sputtering on angular ion flux and NbO$_x$ film growth

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Robert; Kolbeck, Jonathan; Anders, André

    2016-01-01

    The ion energies and fluxes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma from a Nb target were analysed angularly resolved along the tangential direction of the racetrack. A reactive oxygen-containing atmosphere was used as such discharge conditions are typically employed for the synthesis of thin films. Asymmetries in the flux distribution of the recorded ions as well as their energies and charge states were noticed when varying the angle between mass-energy analyser and target surface. More positively charged ions with higher count rates in the medium energy range of their distributions were detected in $+\\mathbf{E}\\times \\mathbf{B}$ than in $-\\mathbf{E}\\times \\mathbf{B}$ direction, thus confirming the notion that ionisation zones are associated with moving potential humps. The motion of the recorded negatively charged high-energy oxygen ions was unaffected. NbO$_x$ thin films at different angles and positions were synthesised and analysed as to their structure and properties in order to correlate ...

  18. The KMOS AGN Survey at High redshift (KASHz): the prevalence and drivers of ionised outflows in the host galaxies of X-ray AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, C M; Mullaney, J R; Stott, J P; Swinbank, A M; Arumugam, V; Bauer, F E; Bower, R G; Bunker, A J; Sharples, R M

    2015-01-01

    We present the first results from the KMOS AGN Survey at High redshift (KASHz), a VLT/KMOS integral-field spectroscopic survey of z>0.6 AGN. We present galaxy-integrated spectra of 89 X-ray AGN (Lx=10^42-10^45 erg/s), for which we observed [O III] (z=1.1-1.7) or Halpha emission (z=0.6-1.1). The targets have X-ray luminosities representative of the parent AGN population and we explore the emission-line luminosities as a function of X-ray luminosity. For the [O III] targets, ~50 per cent have ionised gas velocities indicative of gas that is dominated by outflows and/or highly turbulent material (i.e., overall line-widths >~600 km/s). The most luminous half (i.e., Lx>6x10^43 erg/s) have a >~2 times higher incidence of such velocities. On the basis of our results, we find no evidence that X-ray obscured AGN are more likely to host extreme kinematics than unobscured AGN. Our KASHz sample has a distribution of gas velocities that is consistent with a luminosity-matched sample of z<0.4 AGN. This implies little ev...

  19. The properties of the extended warm ionised gas around low-redshift QSOs and the lack of extended high-velocity outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Husemann, B; Sánchez, S F; Jahnke, K

    2012-01-01

    (Abridged) We present a detailed analysis of a large sample of 31 low-redshift, mostly radio-quiet type 1 QSOs observed with integral field spectroscopy to study their extended emission-line regions (EELRs). We focus on the ionisation state of the gas, size and luminosity of extended narrow line regions (ENLRs), which corresponds to those parts of the EELR dominated by ionisation from the QSO, as well as the kinematics of the ionised gas. We detect EELRs around 19 of our 31 QSOs (61%) after deblending the unresolved QSO emission and the extended host galaxy light in the integral field data. We identify 13 EELRs to be entirely ionised by the QSO radiation, 3 EELRs are composed of HII regions and 3 EELRs display signatures of both ionisation mechanisms at different locations. The typical size of the ENLR is 10kpc at a median nuclear [OIII] luminosity of log(L([OIII])/[erg/s])=42.7+-0.15. We show that the ENLR sizes are least a factor of 2 larger than determined with HST, but are consistent with those of recentl...

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: On the bifurcation of the circular polarisation of the fifth and seventh pump-field harmonics generated in the plasma produced by the ionisation of a gas of excited hydrogen-like atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silin, Viktor P.; Silin, Pavel V.

    2006-05-01

    Within the framework of the Bethe ionisation model we considered theoretically the dependences of the degree of circular polarisation of the fifth and seventh pump-field harmonics, which are generated due to bremsstrahlung, on the electric intensity of the pump field, the degree of its circular polarisation, and the principal quantum number of the excited states of hydrogen-like atoms of a gas ionised by the pump field. A bifurcation of the circular polarisation of these harmonics was discovered, which confirms our previous hypothesis that this effect is common for harmonics generated due to the bremsstrahlung in the pump field when the plasma electrons oscillate in this field. We determined how the relationships under consideration are scaled with VEn/VZ, the product of electron oscillation velocity and the principal quantum number of the excited electron divided by the Coulomb velocity.

  1. Characterisation of chemical components for identifying historical Chinese textile dyes by ultra high performance liquid chromatography - photodiode array - electrospray ionisation mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Wanrooij, Jantien; van Bommel, Maarten; Quye, Anita

    2017-01-06

    This research makes the first attempt to apply Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to both Photodiode Array detection (PDA) and Electrospray Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (ESI-MS) to the chemical characterisation of common textile dyes in ancient China. Three different extraction methods, respectively involving dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-oxalic acid, DMSO and hydrochloric acid, are unprecedentedly applied together to achieve an in-depth understanding of the chemical composition of these dyes. The first LC-PDA-MS database of the chemical composition of common dyes in ancient China has been established. The phenomena of esterification and isomerisation of the dye constituents of gallnut, gardenia and saffron, and the dye composition of acorn cup dyed silk are clarified for the first time. 6-Hydroxyrubiadin and its glycosides are first reported on a dyed sample with Rubia cordifolia from China. UHPLC-PDA-ESI-MS with a C18 BEH shield column shows significant advantages in the separation and identification of similar dye constituents, particularly in the cases of analysing pagoda bud and turmeric dyed sample extracts.

  2. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

  3. High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-07-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.

  4. Entanglement between low- and high-lying atomic spin waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, D. S.; Wang, K.; Zhang, W.; Shi, S.; Dong, M. X.; Yu, Y. C.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Shi, B. S.; Guo, G. C.

    2016-11-01

    Establishing a quantum interface between different physical systems is of special importance for developing the practical versatile quantum networks. Entanglement between low- and high-lying atomic spin waves is essential for building up Rydberg-based quantum information engineering, which is also helpful to study the dynamics behavior of entanglement under external perturbations. Here, we report on the successful storage of a single photon as a high-lying atomic spin wave in a quantum regime. By storing a K-vector entanglement between a single photon and low-lying spin wave, we experimentally realize the entanglement between low- and high-lying atomic spin waves in two separated atomic systems. This makes our experiment a primary demonstration of Rydberg quantum memory of entanglement, representing a primary step toward the construction of a hybrid quantum interface.

  5. Design and test of a scintillation dosimeter for dosimetry measurements of high energy radiotherapy beams; Conception et realisation d'un dosimetre a scintillation adapte a la dosimetrie de faisceaux de rayonnements ionisants en faisceaux de rayonnements ionisants en radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontbonne, J.M

    2002-12-01

    This work describes the design and evaluation of the performances of a scintillation dosimeter developed for the dosimetry of radiation beams used in radiotherapy. The dosimeter consists in a small plastic scintillator producing light which is guided by means of a plastic optical fiber towards photodetectors. In addition to scintillation, high energy ionizing radiations produce Cerenkov light both in the scintillator and the optical fiber. Based on a wavelength analysis, we have developed a deconvolution technique to measure the scintillation light in the presence of Cerenkov light. We stress the advantages that are anticipated from plastic scintillator, in particular concerning tissue or water equivalence (mass stopping power, mass attenuation or mass energy absorption coefficients). We show that detectors based on this material have better characteristics than conventional dosimeters such as ionisation chambers or silicon detectors. The deconvolution technique is exposed, as well as the calibration procedure using an ionisation chamber. We have studied the uncertainty of our dosimeter. The electronics noise, the fiber transmission, the deconvolution technique and the calibration errors give an overall combined experimental uncertainty of about 0,5%. The absolute response of the dosimeter is studied by means of depth dose measurements. We show that absolute uncertainty with photons or electrons beams with energies ranging from 4 MeV to 25 MeV is less than {+-} 1 %. Last, at variance with other devices, our scintillation dosimeter does not need dose correction with depth. (author)

  6. Determination of cholesterol oxides in processed food using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzazi-Fazeli, E; Kleineisen, S; Luf, W

    2000-10-27

    The present work describes the development and application of an on-line atmospheric pressure ionisation (APCI) LC-MS interface for the simultaneous determination of seven toxicologically relevant cholesterol oxides (7alpha-hydroxycholesterol, 7beta-hydroxycholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol, 7-ketocholesterol, 5,6alpha-, 5,6beta-epoxycholesterol and cholestan-3beta,5alpha,6beta-triol). The HPLC method has been optimised to reach better separation of all tested compounds. The influences of APCI parameters (nebulising temperature, cone voltage, source temperature) on signal intensity and fragmentation pattern were investigated for all tested cholesterol oxides compounds. This is the first report on optimisation and determination of two compounds 7alpha-hydroxycholesterol and 5,6beta-epoxycholesterol in processed food using LC-MS. After extraction with hexane, clean-up was carried out using solid-phase extraction on a silica column. For the chromatographic separation of cholesterol oxides an Aquasil C18 column was used with acetonitrile-methanol (60:40) as mobile phase. For the first time we report the use of such a C18 column with a relatively hydrophilic nature for the separation of cholesterol oxides. APCI-MS detection was then applied in selected ion monitoring and positive ion modes by using the molecular ions and the main fragments. The developed method shows good linearity, high repeatability and good recovery for all tested cholesterol oxides. The method was applied for determination of seven selected cholesterol oxidation products in different foodstuffs such as butter, butteroil, lard and egg powder.

  7. Assessment of risk to wildlife from ionising radiation: can initial screening tiers be used with a high level of confidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N A; Barnett, C L [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Hosseini, A; Brown, J E [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Department of Emergency Preparedness and Environmental Radioactivity, Grini naeringspark 13 Postbox 55, NO-1332 Oesteraas (Norway); Cailes, C; Copplestone, D [Environment Agency, PO Box 12, Richard Fairclough House, Knutsford Road, Warrington WA4 1HG (United Kingdom); Beaugelin-Seiller, K, E-mail: nab@ceh.ac.u [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire DEI/SECRE, CE Cadarache-Batiment 159, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2010-06-15

    A number of models are being used to assess the potential environmental impact of releases of radioactivity. These often use a tiered assessment structure whose first tier is designed to be highly conservative and simple to use. An aim of using this initial tier is to identify sites of negligible concern and to remove them from further consideration with a high degree of confidence. In this paper we compare the screening assessment outputs of three freely available models. The outputs of these models varied considerably in terms of estimated risk quotient (RQ) and the radionuclide-organism combinations identified as being the most limiting. A number of factors are identified as contributing to this variability: values of transfer parameters (concentration ratios and K{sub d}) used; organisms considered; different input options and how these are utilised in the assessment; assumptions as regards secular equilibrium; geometries and exposure scenarios. This large variation in RQ values between models means that the level of confidence required by users is not achieved. We recommend that the factors contributing to the variation in screening assessments be subjected to further investigation so that they can be more fully understood and assessors (and those reviewing assessment outputs) can better justify and evaluate the results obtained.

  8. Transient high-frequency ultrasonic water atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreras, F.; Amaveda, H.; Lozano, A.

    2002-06-01

    An experimental study was performed to improve the understanding of the characteristics of ultrasonic water atomization when excited with waves in the MHz range. In the present experiments, small volumes of water were atomized, observing the temporal evolution of the process. Typical diameters of the resulting droplets are of the order of a few microns. To visualize them, images were acquired with very high magnification. Appropriate lenses were used to enable high resolution at a distance from the flow. Droplet size distributions were also calculated with a Malvern diffractometer. Droplet exit velocity was measured using particle image velocimetry. It was noticeable that, as the remaining liquid mass deposited over the ultrasonic transducer decreased, the atomization characteristics changed, and a second peak of larger droplets appeared in the size distribution function. This phenomenon is related to the change in the curvature of the liquid surface. Although results are not conclusive, it appears that, under the conditions in this study, some observations about droplet formation are better described by cavitation phenomena rather than by the simplified surface wave theory usually invoked to explain these processes.

  9. Muon Ionisation Cooling in Reduced RF

    CERN Document Server

    Prior, G

    2010-01-01

    In Muon Ionisation Cooling, closely packed high-field RF cavities are interspersed with energy-absorbing material in order to reduce particle beam emittance. Transverse focussing of the muon beams is achieved by superconducting magnets. This results in the RF cavities sitting in intense magnetic fields. Recent studies have shown that this may limit the peak gradient that can be achieved in the RF cavities. In this paper, we study the effect that a reduced RF gradient may have on the cooling performance of the Neutrino Factory lattice and examine methods to mitigate the effect.

  10. Photo-ionisation mass spectrometry as detection method for gas chromatography. Optical selectivity and multidimensional comprehensive separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Welthagen, Werner; Gröger, Thomas

    2008-03-14

    Mass spectrometry (MS) with soft ionisation techniques (i.e. ionisation without fragmentation of the analyte molecules) for gaseous samples exhibits interesting analytical properties for direct analysis applications (i.e. direct inlet mass spectrometric on-line monitoring) as well as mass spectrometric detection method for gas chromatography (GC-MS). Commonly either chemical ionisation (CI) or field ionisation (FI) is applied as soft ionisation technology for GC-MS. An interesting alternative to the CI and FI technologies methods are photo-ionisation (PI) methods. PI overcomes some of the limitations of CI and FI and furthermore add some unique analytical properties. The resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) method uses intense UV-laser pulses (wavelength range approximately 350-193 nm) for highly selective, sensitive and soft ionisation of predominately aromatic compounds. The single photon ionisation (SPI) method utilises VUV light (from lamps or laser sources, wavelengths range approximately 150-110 nm) can be used for a universal soft ionisation of organic molecules. In this article the historical development as well as the current status and concepts of gas chromatography hyphenated to photo-ionisation mass spectrometry are reviewed.

  11. Evaluation of health factors in high-rise buildings. 2. Bioclimatological consequences resulting from comparative measurements of the air ionisation in a high-rise building located in a heavily contaminated suburban area and at certain altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moese, J.R.; Fischer, G.

    1981-01-01

    According to accepted scientific theories inhaled small ions deliver their charges in the pulmonary alveoli and this leads to local recharges. This process stimulates structures of the central nervous system and the activity of the endocrine is excited, resulting in an enhancement of the general well-being. These possibilities of interpretation regarding a biological ionic effect are supported, with reservations by positive medical effects during and after a stay in a well-ventilated mountain climate or also in a sea-climate. Owing to their lower mobility the large ions are inhaled as small ions to an increasing extent. The chemical and physical noxa are delivered and deposited in the respiratory tract. They stick the epithelia in the trachea and in the bronchi as well as the endothelia in the lung vesicles. The number of the ciliary movements is reduced. Similar effects are known to be caused also by nicotine abuse. This results in a decreased ability of expectoration and a lower intake of oxygen by the alveoli. These facts could furnish an explanation for the increased vulnerability of city dwellers to infections diseases and to catarrh. The changed ionisation of air in urbanised areas definitely represents only one of the many risk factors. In addition to the attempt to characterize bioclimatically local weather conditions by means of the non-conventional parameter air ionisation our study has also been intended to establish biologically oriented criteria for the living in a high-rise building in a particularly unfavourable location. Under specific microclimatic conditions the uppermost storeys were at times bioclimatically favoured over the lowermost, especially when shallow air inversion is present. In such cases, small ions exclusively were registered in the upper storeys and large ions in the lower floors.

  12. High-altitude atomic nitrogen densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, E. S.; Strobel, D. F.; Mauersberger, K.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the seasonal and diurnal variations of atomic nitrogen are compared with measurements made by the open source neutral mass spectrometer on the AE-C satellite. With the simultaneous measurements of molecular nitrogen and atomic oxygen densities as input, model calculations of odd nitrogen densities predict the same trends in atomic nitrogen as those observed. From these comparisons it is inferred that horizontal transport significantly reduces the diurnal variation of atomic nitrogen. Estimates are given of the sensitivity of atomic nitrogen densities to variations in the photoelectron flux, the neutral temperatures, and the neutral winds.

  13. Radiative effects of tropospheric ionisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Aplin

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing evidence that cosmic ray variations may influence clouds and climate, there has been little discussion of the direct radiative effects of atmospheric ionisation. Laboratory experiments show that hydrated molecular cluster-ions, formed in the atmosphere by cosmic rays, absorb in the infra-red continuum at wavelengths of 9–12 μm. The tropospheric magnitude of this effect is estimated: transmittance anomalies from clear sky ion concentrations peak at ~2% at 10 km in the mid-latitudes. A simple isothermal clear sky atmospheric model suggests the integrated effect of the absorption is ~2 Wm−2. The effect appears detectable in existing surface data sets; surface micrometeorological data shows a significant anticorrelation between downwelling infra-red radiation and atmospheric cosmic ray ionisation. This is consistent with the infra-red attenuation observed in laboratory studies of cluster-ion absorption. If atmospheric ionisation from cosmic rays has universally direct radiative effects, then reinterpretation of satellite cloud data may be necessary.

  14. High Field Seeking State Atom Laser and Properties of Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Lin; XIONG Wei; YANG Fan; YI Lin; ZHOU Xiao-Ji; CHEN Xu-Zong

    2008-01-01

    We present an experimental study on the continuous atom laser. The experiments show that a high field seeking state atom laser with stable flux can be formed by increasing the strength of outcoupling before large density fluctuations appear. It is easy to obtain a long length or high speed output with this kind of atom laser.

  15. High-dimensional atom localization via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Jinyu; Yu, Benli

    2017-02-20

    We investigate the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) atom localization behaviors via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, it is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D and 3D atom localization behaviors can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters, the phase, amplitude, and initial population distribution. Interestingly, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency atom localization, which provides some potential applications in high-dimensional atom nanolithography.

  16. High-frequency multimodal atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian P. Nievergelt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multifrequency atomic force microscopy imaging has been recently demonstrated as a powerful technique for quickly obtaining information about the mechanical properties of a sample. Combining this development with recent gains in imaging speed through small cantilevers holds the promise of a convenient, high-speed method for obtaining nanoscale topography as well as mechanical properties. Nevertheless, instrument bandwidth limitations on cantilever excitation and readout have restricted the ability of multifrequency techniques to fully benefit from small cantilevers. We present an approach for cantilever excitation and deflection readout with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, enabling multifrequency techniques extended beyond 2 MHz for obtaining materials contrast in liquid and air, as well as soft imaging of delicate biological samples.

  17. The effectiveness of photocatalytic ionisation disinfection of filter materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Katarzyna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of photocatalytic ionisation as a disinfection method for filter materials contaminated by microorganisms, and to assess how air relative humidity (RH), time and microbe type influence the effectiveness of this disinfection. In the quantitative analysis of a used car air filter, bacterial contamination equalled 1.2 x 10(5) cfu/cm2, fungal contamination was 3.8 x 10(6) cfu/cm2, and the isolated microorganisms were Aspergillus niger, Bacillus megaterium, Cladosporium herbarum, Cryptococcus laurenti, Micrococcus sp., Rhodotorula glutinis and Staphylococcus cohnii. In the model experiment, three isolates (C. herbarum, R. glutinis, S. cohnii) and 3 ATCC species (A. niger, E. coli, S. aureus) were used for photocatalytic ionisation disinfection. The conditions of effective photocatalytic ionisation disinfection (R > or = 99.9%) were established as 2-3 h at RH = 77% (bacteria) and 6-24 h at RH = 53% (fungi). RH has an influence on the effectiveness of the photocatalytic disinfection process; the highest effectiveness was obtained for bacteria at RH = 77%, with results 5% higher than for RH = 49%. The studies show that the sensitivity of microorganisms to photocatalytic ionisation disinfection is ordered as follows: Gram-positive bacteria (S. cohnii, S. aureus), Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli), yeasts (R. glutinis), and moulds (C. herbarum, A. niger). Of all the mathematical models used for the description of death dynamics after photocatalytic ionisation disinfection, the Chick-Watson model is the most useful, but for more resistant microorganisms, the delayed Chick-Watson model is highly recommended. It therefore seems, that the presented disinfection method of photocatalytic ionisation can be successfully used to clean filtration materials.

  18. Atomic processes in high-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.

    1982-12-21

    This review covers dense atomic plasmas such as that produced in inertial confinement fusion. The target implosion physics along with the associated atomic physics, i.e., free electron collision phenomena, electron states I, electron states II, and nonequilibrium plasma states are described. (MOW)

  19. High data rate atom interferometric device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; McGuinness, Hayden James Evans; Rakholia, Akash

    2015-07-21

    A light-pulse atomic interferometry (LPAI) apparatus is provided. The LPAI apparatus comprises a vessel, two sets of magnetic coils configured to magnetically confine an atomic vapor in two respective magneto-optical traps (MOTs) within the vessel when activated, and an optical system configured to irradiate the atomic vapor within the vessel with laser radiation that, when suitably tuned, can launch atoms previously confined in each of the MOTs toward the other MOT. In embodiments, the magnetic coils are configured to produce a magnetic field that is non-zero at the midpoint between the traps. In embodiments, the time-of-flight of the launched atoms from one MOT to the other is 12 ms or less. In embodiments, the MOTs are situated approximately 36 mm apart. In embodiments, the apparatus is configured to activate the magnetic coils according to a particular temporal magnetic field gradient profile.

  20. Transition from non-sequential to sequential double ionisation in many-electron systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pullen, Michael G; Wang, Xu; Tong, Xiao-Min; Sclafani, Michele; Baudisch, Matthias; Pires, Hugo; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Ullrich, Joachim; Pfeifer, Thomas; Moshammer, Robert; Eberly, J H; Biegert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a detailed understanding of strong-field double ionisation of many-electron systems (heavy atoms and molecules) remains a challenging task. By comparing experimental and theoretical results in the mid-IR regime, we have unambiguously identified the transition from non-sequential (e,2e) to sequential double ionisation in Xe and shown that it occurs at an intensity below $10^{14}$ Wcm$^{-2}$. In addition, our data demonstrate that ionisation from the Xe 5s orbital is decisive at low intensities. Moreover, using the acetylene molecule, we propose how sequential double ionisation in the mid-IR can be used to study molecular dynamics and fragmentation on unprecedented few-femtosecond timescales.

  1. Analysis of peptides and protein digests by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry using neutral pH elution conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanzhong; Boysen, Reinhard I; Chowdhury, Jamil; Alam, Asif; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-05-04

    In this study, the advantages of carrying out the analysis of peptides and tryptic digests of proteins under gradient elution conditions at pH 6.5 by reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and in-line electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) are documented. For these RP separations, a double endcapped, bidentate anchored n-octadecyl wide pore silica adsorbent was employed in a capillary column format. Compared to the corresponding analysis of the same peptides and protein tryptic digests using low pH elution conditions for their RP-HPLC separation, this alternative approach provides improved selectivity and more efficient separation of these analytes, thus allowing a more sensitive identification of proteins at different abundance levels, i.e. more tryptic peptides from the same protein could be confidently identified, enabling higher sequence coverage of the protein to be obtained. This approach was further evaluated with very complex tryptic digests derived from a human plasma protein sample using an online two-dimensional (2D) strong cation-exchange (SCX)-RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system. Again, at pH 6.5, with mobile phases of different compositions, improved chromatographic selectivities were obtained, concomitant with more sensitive on-line electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometric (ESI-MS/MS) analysis. As a consequence, more plasma proteins could be confidently identified, highlighting the potential of these RP-HPLC methods with elution at pH 6.5 to extend further the scope of proteomic investigations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. High-precision atom localization via controllable spontaneous emission in a cycle-configuration atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chunling; Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Hao, Xiangying; Wu, Ying

    2012-03-26

    A scheme for realizing two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is proposed based on controllable spontaneous emission in a coherently driven cycle-configuration atomic system. As the spatial-position-dependent atom-field interaction, the frequency of the spontaneously emitted photon carries the information about the position of the atom. Therefore, by detecting the emitted photon one could obtain the position information available, and then we demonstrate high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization induced by the quantum interference between the multiple spontaneous decay channels. Moreover, we can achieve 100% probability of finding the atom at an expected position by choosing appropriate system parameters under certain conditions.

  3. Atomic Evolutions of a Single Atom in a High-Q Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛国勤

    2001-01-01

    Atomic evolutions in a single atom laser system are studied for different preparations of the initial atomic state and cavity field. Both the analytical and the numerical results are in very good agreement with the experiment carried out by Brune et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 1800], if we choose the same parameters as the experiment. The research justified that the spontaneous emission rates are enhanced in the high-Q cavity.

  4. High-precision atom localization via controllable spontaneous emission in a cycle-configuration atomic system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ding, Chunling; Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Hao, Xiangying; Wu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    .... Therefore, by detecting the emitted photon one could obtain the position information available, and then we demonstrate high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization induced by the quantum...

  5. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence techniques were developed for the containerless study of high temperature processes, material properties, levitation, and heating techniques for containerless earth-based experimentation. Experiments were performed in which fluorescence of atomic aluminum, mercury, or tungsten were studied. These experiments include measurements of: (1) Al atom evaporation from CW CO2 laser heated and aerodynamically levitated sapphire and alumina spheres, and self-supported sapphire filaments, (2) Al atom reaction with ambient oxygen in the wake of a levitated specimen, (3) Hg atom concentrations in the wake of levitated alumina and sapphire spheres, relative to the ambient Hg atom concentration, (4) Hg atom concentrations in supersonic levitation jets, and (5) metastable, electronically excited W atom concentrations produced by evaporation of an electrically heated tungsten filament.

  6. High data-rate atom interferometers through high recapture efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; Rakholia, Akash Vrijal; McGuinness, Hayden

    2015-01-27

    An inertial sensing system includes a magneto-optical trap (MOT) that traps atoms within a specified trapping region. The system also includes a cooling laser that cools the trapped atoms so that the atoms remain within the specified region for a specified amount of time. The system further includes a light-pulse atom interferometer (LPAI) that performs an interferometric interrogation of the atoms to determine phase changes in the atoms. The system includes a controller that controls the timing of MOT and cooling laser operations, and controls the timing of interferometric operations to substantially recapture the atoms in the specified trapping region. The system includes a processor that determines the amount inertial movement of the inertial sensing system based on the determined phase changes in the atoms. Also, a method of inertial sensing using this inertial sensing system includes recapture of atoms within the MOT following interferometric interrogation by the LPAI.

  7. High spatial and time resolutions with gas ionization detectors; Hautes resolutions en position et temps avec des detecteurs gazeux a ionisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouthas, J

    2001-09-01

    This document presents the principles and the characteristics of the gaseous ionisation detectors used in position and timing measurements. The first two parts recall the main notions (electron and ion motions, gaseous amplification, signal formation) and their applications to the proportional counter and the wire chamber. The explanation of the signal formation makes use of the Ramo theorem. The third part is devoted to the different types of wire chambers: drift or cathode strip chambers, TPC (time projection chamber). Some aspects on construction and ageing are also presented. Part 4 is on the detectors in which the multiplication is performed by a 'Parallel Plate' system (PPAC, Pestov counter). Special attention is paid to the RPCs (Resistive Plate Chambers) and their timing resolutions. Part 5 concentrates on 'Micro-pattern detectors' which use different kinds of microstructure for gaseous amplification. The new detectors MICROMEGAS, CAT (compteur a trous) and GEM (gas electron multiplier) and some of their applications are presented. The last part is a bibliography including some comments on the documents. (author)

  8. Differential ionisation of natural antioxidant polyenes in electrospray and nanospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaratini, Thais; Gates, Paul J; Pinto, Ernani; Colepicolo, Pio; Lopes, Norberto P

    2007-01-01

    Carotenoids are natural products with high economic relevance for the pharmaceutical industries and are a common subject for biochemical research. Reported here is a comparative study of the ionisation of carotenoids by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and nanospray mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS). The results demonstrate that, along with solvent choice, the influence of the different ionisation processes of ESI and nanoESI are fundamental in determining how ionisation is achieved and which ions (molecular ion or protonated molecule) are observed in MS. The increased understanding afforded by this study will help in the development of unequivocal microanalytical methods for carotenoids and related antioxidant polyenes.

  9. A Compact, High-Flux Cold Atom Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James R.; Kohel, James M.; Thompson, Robert J.; Aveline, David C.; Yu, Nan; Schlippert, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The performance of cold atom experiments relying on three-dimensional magneto-optical trap techniques can be greatly enhanced by employing a highflux cold atom beam to obtain high atom loading rates while maintaining low background pressures in the UHV MOT (ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap) regions. Several techniques exist for generating slow beams of cold atoms. However, one of the technically simplest approaches is a two-dimensional (2D) MOT. Such an atom source typically employs at least two orthogonal trapping beams, plus an additional longitudinal "push" beam to yield maximum atomic flux. A 2D atom source was created with angled trapping collimators that not only traps atoms in two orthogonal directions, but also provides a longitudinal pushing component that eliminates the need for an additional push beam. This development reduces the overall package size, which in turn, makes the 2D trap simpler, and requires less total optical power. The atom source is more compact than a previously published effort, and has greater than an order of magnitude improved loading performance.

  10. High-speed cinematography of gas-metal atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, Jason [ALCOA Specialty Metals Division, 100 Technical Drive, Alcoa Center, PA 15069 (United States)]. E-mail: jason.ting@alcoa.com; Connor, Jeffery [Material Science Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Ridder, Stephen [Metallurgical Processing Group, NIST, 100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8556, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2005-01-15

    A high-speed cinematographic footage of a 304L stainless steel gas atomization, recorded at the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST), was analyzed using a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm. The analysis showed the gas atomization process possesses two prominent frequency ranges of melt oscillation (pulsation). A low-frequency oscillation in the melt flow occurring between 5.41 and 123 Hz, with a dominant frequency at 9.93 Hz, was seen in the recirculation zone adjacent to the melt orifice. A high-frequency melt oscillation range was observed above 123 Hz, and was more prominent one melt-tip-diameter downstream in the melt atomization image than upstream near the melt tip. This high-frequency range may reflect the melt atomization frequency used to produce finely atomized powder. This range also included a prominent high frequency at 1273 Hz, which dominated in the image further away downstream from the melt tip. This discrete high-frequency oscillation is most probably caused by the aeroacoustic ''screech'' phenomenon, intrasound (<20 kHz), a result of the atomizing gas jets undergoing flow resonance. It is hypothesized that this discrete intrinsic aeroacoustic tone may enhance melt breakup in the atomization process with evidence of this fact in the melt images.

  11. The Insidious Nature of 'Hard-Core' Alternative Conceptions: Implications for the constructivist research programme of patterns in high school students' and pre-service teachers' thinking about ionisation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Keith S.; Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The present study contributes to the constructivist research programme (RP) into learning science by comparing patterns in responses from two groups of learners-senior high school students and pre-service teachers-in the same educational context (Singapore), to a diagnostic instrument relating to the topic of ionisation energies. This topic is currently included in the curriculum for 16- to 19-year-old students studying chemistry in Singapore (and elsewhere). The comparison shows that: (1) although graduate pre-service teachers offered some types of incorrect responses less frequently than high school students; (2) they retained high levels of alternative conceptions commonly found among high school students; and (3) of particular note, certain alternative conceptions were found to be more common among the graduates. This suggests the intuitive appeal of certain alternative conceptions is such that they can readily be reproduced down 'generations' of learners. The findings are explored in terms of a range of conceptual resources that have been developed within the constructivist RP. The analysis suggests that the curriculum sets out inappropriate target knowledge for senior high school students, given the nature of the subject matter and the prior learning of the students. It is also suggested that it may be fruitful to consider conceptual learning in terms analogous to the RP found in science, and that from this perspective certain insidious alternative conceptions can be understood as derived from commitments that are taken for granted and protected from explicit challenge by a protective belt of refutable auxiliary conceptions.

  12. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  13. High precision spectroscopy of pionic and antiprotonic atoms; Spectroscopie de precision des atomes pioniques et antiprotoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, P

    1998-04-15

    The study of exotic atoms, in which an orbiting electron of a normal atom is replaced by a negatively charged particle ({pi}{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}, p, {kappa}{sup -}, {sigma}{sup -},...) may provide information on the orbiting particle and the atomic nucleus, as well as on their interaction. In this work, we were interested in pionic atoms ({pi}{sup -14} N) on the one hand in order to determine the pion mass with high accuracy (4 ppm), and on the other hand in antiprotonic atoms (pp-bar) in order to study the strong nucleon-antinucleon interaction at threshold. In this respect, a high-resolution crystal spectrometer was coupled to a cyclotron trap which provides a high stop density for particles in gas targets at low pressure. Using curved crystals, an extended X-ray source could be imaged onto the detector. Charge-Coupled Devices were used as position sensitive detectors in order to measure the Bragg angle of the transition to a high precision. The use of gas targets resolved the ambiguity owing to the number of K electrons for the value of the pion mass, and, for the first time, strong interaction shift and broadening of the 2p level in antiprotonic hydrogen were measured directly. (author)

  14. The high-mass component (>m/z 10 000) of coal tar pitch by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Marcos; Morgan, Trevor J; Behrouzi, Mahtab; Karaca, Fatma; Galmes, Carolina; Herod, Alan A; Kandiyoti, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    The size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) of acetone-soluble, pyridine-soluble and pyridine-insoluble fractions of a coal tar pitch indicates a bimodal distribution in each fraction. The proportion of high-mass material excluded from the SEC column porosity increases with solvent polarity. The polymer calibration of SEC shows the mass range of the small molecules to be from approximately 100 u to approximately 6000 u, with the mass range of the large excluded molecules above 200 000 u and up to several million u. In contrast, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) shows a similar low-mass range of ion abundances (< m/z 6000), but with a smaller range of high-mass ion abundances, from approximately m/z 10 000 to 100 000. The large molecules may have three-dimensional structures to allow molecules of relatively low mass to behave as if they are of large size in SEC. Laser desorption mass spectrometry of the acetone- and pyridine-soluble fractions produced molecular ions of polycyclic aromatics that can be related to the known compositions from gas chromatography (GC) mass spectrometry. The experimental conditions used to generate the bimodal distribution by MALDI-MS involve reducing the ion signal intensities to avoid overload of the detector and enable detection of the high-mass ions, by reducing the high-mass detector voltage (i.e. sensitivity) and increasing the laser power.

  15. High Performance Atomically Thin Flat Lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Han; Qiu, Chengwei; Jia, Baohua; Bao, Qiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate ultrathin flat lenses with a thickness of 7 {\\AA}, which corresponds to the fundamental physical limit of the thickness of the material, is fabricated in a large area, monolayer, CVD-prepared tungsten chalcogenides single crystals using the low-cost flexible laser writing method. The lenses apply the ultra-high refractive index to introduce abrupt amplitude modulation of the incident light to achieve three-dimensional (3D) focusing diffraction-limited resolution (0.5{\\lambda}) and a focusing efficiency as high as 31%. An analytical physical model based diffraction theory is derived to simulate the focusing process, which shows excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Evidence for Ionised Accretion Discs in Five Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ballantyne, D R; Fabian, A C

    2000-01-01

    (Abridged) We present the results of fitting ASCA spectra of six narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies with the ionised reflection models of Ross & Fabian (1993). We find that five of the galaxies (TONS 180, PKS 0558-504, Ark 564, Mrk 335 and PG 1244+026) are well fit by the ionised disc model, and these are often better fits than the alternative models considered. The sixth galaxy, NGC 4051, has additional spectral complexity that cannot be well described by a simple ionised disc model or any of the other alternative models. All six of the NLS1s we considered show evidence for a broad Fe Kalpha line, but none of the line centroids are consistent with emission from highly ionised Fe. This is most likely due to the line being redshifted because of relativistic effects. We note that sources with larger ionisation parameters tend to have larger Fe Kalpha EWs. We interpret this as evidence that ionised Fe features are making their presence felt in the spectra. Since most of our sources have steep spectra, hig...

  17. Blockade involving high- n, n ~ 300 , strontium Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Zhang, Xinyue; Dunning, F. Barry

    2016-05-01

    The blockade of high- n strontium n1F3 Rydberg states contained in a hot atomic beam is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. One difficulty in such experiments is that, once created, Rydberg atoms move out of the excitation volume reducing blockade effects. While the effects of such motion are apparent, the data provide strong evidence of blockade, consistent with theoretical predictions. Because of their relatively high angular momentum (L = 3) , a pair of n1F3 Rydberg atoms have many degenerate states whose degeneracy is removed by Rydberg-Rydberg interactions yielding a high density of states near the target energy. To evaluate the effect of blockade not only the energy shifts but also the modification of the oscillator strengths for excitation have to be taken into account. The n-scaling of the interactions and the importance of high-order multipoles will also be discussed. Research supported by the NSF and Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  18. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography. XV. Estimation of the pH variation of aqueous buffers with the change of the acetonitrile fraction of the mobile phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2004-12-03

    The most commonly used mobile phases in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) are hydro-organic mixtures of an aqueous buffer and an organic modifier. The addition of this organic solvent to buffered aqueous solutions involves a variation of the buffer properties (pH and buffer capacity). In this paper, the pH variation is studied for acetic acid-acetate, phosphoric acid-dihydrogenphosphate-hydrogenphosphate, citric acid-dihydrogencitrate-citrate, and ammonium-ammonia buffers. The proposed equations allow pH estimation of acetonitrile-water buffered mobile phases up to 60% (v/v) of organic modifier and initial aqueous buffer concentrations between 0.001 and 0.1 mol L(-1), from the initial aqueous pH. The estimated pH variation of the mobile phase and the pKa variation of the analytes allow us to predict the degree of ionisation of the analytes and from this and analyte hydrophobicities, to interpret the relative retention and separation of analyte mixtures.

  19. Characterization of cis- and trans-octadecenoic acid positional isomers in edible fat and oil using gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector equipped with highly polar ionic liquid capillary column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Asanuma, Masaharu; Mizobe, Hoyo; Kojima, Koichi; Nagai, Toshiharu; Beppu, Fumiaki; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the characterisation of all cis- and trans-octadecenoic acid (C18:1) positional isomers in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil (PHVO) and milk fat, which contain several cis- and trans-C18:1 positional isomers, was achieved by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector equipped with a highly polar ionic liquid capillary column (SLB-IL111). Prior to analysis, the cis- and trans-C18:1 fractions in PHVO and milk fat were separated using a silver-ion cartridge. The resolution of all cis-C18:1 positional isomers was successfully accomplished at the optimal isothermal column temperature of 120 °C. Similarly, the positional isomers of trans-C18:1, except for trans-6-C18:1 and trans-7-C18:1, were separated at 120 °C. The resolution of trans-6-C18:1 and trans-7-C18:1 isomers was made possible by increasing the column temperature to 160 °C. This analytical method is suitable for determining the cis- and trans-C18:1 positional isomers in edible fats and oils.

  20. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, P.

    1994-08-01

    The study of inelastic collision phenomena with highly charged projectile ions and the interpretation of spectral features resulting from these collisions remain as the major focal points in the atomic physics research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. The title of the research project, ``Atomic Physics with Highly Charged Ions,`` speaks to these points. The experimental work in the past few years has divided into collisions at high velocity using the primary beams from the tandem and LINAC accelerators and collisions at low velocity using the CRYEBIS facility. Theoretical calculations have been performed to accurately describe inelastic scattering processes of the one-electron and many-electron type, and to accurately predict atomic transition energies and intensities for x rays and Auger electrons. Brief research summaries are given for the following: (1) electron production in ion-atom collisions; (2) role of electron-electron interactions in two-electron processes; (3) multi-electron processes; (4) collisions with excited, aligned, Rydberg targets; (5) ion-ion collisions; (6) ion-molecule collisions; (7) ion-atom collision theory; and (8) ion-surface interactions.

  1. Experimental Investigation on a Highly Sensitive Atomic Magnetometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu-Guang; XU Yun-Fei; WANG Zhao-Ying; LIU Yun-Xian; LIN Qiang

    2009-01-01

    A highly sensitive all-optical atomic magnetometer based on the magnetooptical effect which uses the advanced technique of single laser beam detection is reported and demonstrated experimentally.A sensitivityof 0.5 pT/Hz1/2 is obtained by analyzing the magnetic noise spectrum,which exceeds that of most traditional magnetometers.This kind of atomic magnetometer is very compact,has a low power consumption,and has a high theoretical sensitivity limit,which make it suitable for many applications.

  2. Electronic transitions in highly charged ion-atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Ullrich, J.; Schuch, R.; Olson, R. E.; Dörner, R.

    1989-09-01

    Three different aspects of electronic transitions in fast, highly charged ion-atom collisions are discussed. First, experimental data and n-CTMC calculations for differential multiple ionization cross sections of 1.4 {MeV}/{u} U 32+on rare gas atoms are presented. It is shown that the electronic motion has a dramatic influence on the kinematics of the emitted particles (in particular the nuclei). The possibility is discussed to measure in fast ionizing processes by a recoil ion-projectile coincidence technique the internal sum momentum of "electron clusters" in atoms. This new "technique" opens a new field of atomic structure research at high-energy heavy-ion accelerators. Second, the use of the H-like heavy ions as projectiles is discussed to measure, through observable interference structures, static and dynamic properties of transiently formed superheavy quasimolecular systems. Third, the "ancient" gas target-solid target difference in the impact-parameter dependence of K-shell ionization in nearly symmetric ion-atom collisions is presented. This severe discrepancy between gas and solid still remains an unsolved fundamental problem in the field of inner-shell ionization in the MO regime.

  3. Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Geffert, Otfried; Santra, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Compton scattering is the nonresonant inelastic scattering of an x-ray photon by an electron and has been used to probe the electron momentum distribution in gas-phase and condensed-matter samples. In the low x-ray intensity regime, Compton scattering from atoms dominantly comes from bound electrons in neutral atoms, neglecting contributions from bound electrons in ions and free (ionized) electrons. In contrast, in the high x-ray intensity regime, the sample experiences severe ionization via x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics. Thus, it becomes necessary to take into account all the contributions to the Compton scattering signal when atoms are exposed to high-intensity x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). In this paper, we investigate the Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity, using an extension of the integrated x-ray atomic physics toolkit, xatom. As the x-ray fluence increases, there is a significant contribution from ionized electrons to the Compton spectra, which gives rise to strong deviations from the Compton spectra of neutral atoms. The present study provides not only understanding of the fundamental XFEL-matter interaction but also crucial information for single-particle imaging experiments, where Compton scattering is no longer negligible. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Sang-Kil Son was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  4. High-Order Dispersion Coefficients for Alkali-metal Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Shuai; DING Chi-Kun; CHEN Chang-Yong; WU Xue-Qing

    2013-01-01

    High-order dispersion coefficients C9,C11,C12,and C13 for the ground-state alkali-metals were calculated by combining the l-dependent model potential of alkali-metal atoms and linear variation method based on B-spline basis functions.The results were compared.

  5. [Burner head with high sensitivity in atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X; Yang, Y

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents a burner head with gas-sample separate entrance and double access, which is used for atomic absorption spectroscopy. According to comparison and detection, the device can improve sensitivity by a factor of 1 to 5. In the meantime it has properties of high stability and resistance to interference.

  6. Nucleation in an ultra low ionisation environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    In this work we have studied aerosol formation at ultra-low ionisation levels, using the existing deep underground science facility at Boulby mine, UK. At 1100 m depth, with a corresponding factor 106 reduction in cosmic ray muon flux, the Boulby facility is an ideal place to study the role of ions...

  7. Ionising radiation exposure in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld H; LSO

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch population is exposed to ionising radiation from various sources, both natural and man-made. This is a review of the radiation exposure for members of the public from all sources for the year 2000. The average annual effective dose per capita is estimated at 2.5 mSv, which is almost the

  8. An investigation of high fractions of metastable helium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.P.Feng(冯贤平); B.W.James

    2003-01-01

    Penning type discharge was adopted to excite helium atoms. It is suitable for generating high densitymetastables at a range from 0.1 mTorr to 0.5 Tort. The highest metastable density of 3.5 × 1010 cm-3was observed at a static gas pressure of 0.5 Torr. The highest fraction of metastables (N21s/NHe) of 10-3in a low gas pressure was obtained. The variation of the magnetic field strength on the discharge doesnot result in a significant density change of the metastable helium atoms. When no magnetic field wasapplied, no discharge took place.

  9. Catalytically highly active top gold atom on palladium nanocluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Haruta, Masatake; Toshima, Naoki

    2011-10-23

    Catalysis using gold is emerging as an important field of research in connection with 'green' chemistry. Several hypotheses have been presented to explain the markedly high activities of Au catalysts. So far, the origin of the catalytic activities of supported Au catalysts can be assigned to the perimeter interfaces between Au nanoclusters and the support. However, the genesis of the catalytic activities of colloidal Au-based bimetallic nanoclusters is unclear. Moreover, it is still a challenge to synthesize Au-based colloidal catalysts with high activity. Here we now present the 'crown-jewel' concept (Supplementary Fig. S1) for preparation of catalytically highly Au-based colloidal catalysts. Au-Pd colloidal catalysts containing an abundance of top (vertex or corner) Au atoms were synthesized according to the strategy on a large scale. Our results indicate that the genesis of the high activity of the catalysts could be ascribed to the presence of negatively charged top Au atoms.

  10. A compact, high performance atomic magnetometer for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vishal K; Wakai, Ronald T

    2013-11-21

    We present a highly sensitive room-temperature atomic magnetometer (AM), designed for use in biomedical applications. The magnetometer sensor head is only 2 × 2 × 5 cm3 and is constructed using readily available, low-cost optical components. The magnetic field resolution of the AM is magnetometers. We present side-by-side comparisons between our AM and a SQUID magnetometer, and show that equally high quality magnetoencephalography and magnetocardiography recordings can be obtained using our AM.

  11. High Fidelity Simulation of Primary Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Christopher; Bravo, Luis; Kim, Dokyun

    2014-11-01

    A high-fidelity numerical simulation of jet breakup and spray formation from a complex diesel fuel injector at ambient conditions has been performed. A full understanding of the primary atomization process in fuel injection of diesel has not been achieved for several reasons including the difficulties accessing the optically dense region. Due to the recent advances in numerical methods and computing resources, high fidelity simulations of atomizing flows are becoming available to provide new insights of the process. In the present study, an unstructured un-split Volume-of-Fluid (VoF) method coupled to a stochastic Lagrangian spray model is employed to simulate the atomization process. A common rail fuel injector is simulated by using a nozzle geometry available through the Engine Combustion Network. The working conditions correspond to a single orifice (90 μm) JP-8 fueled injector operating at an injection pressure of 90 bar, ambient condition at 29 bar, 300 K filled with 100% nitrogen with Rel = 16,071, Wel = 75,334 setting the spray in the full atomization mode. The experimental dataset from Army Research Lab is used for validation in terms of spray global parameters and local droplet distributions. The quantitative comparison will be presented and discussed. Supported by Oak Ridge Associated Universities and the Army Research Laboratory.

  12. High sensitive detection of high-order partial wave scattering in photoassociation of ultralcold atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yu-Qing; Ma Jie; Wu Ji-Zhou; Zhang Yi-Chi; Zhao Yan-Ting; Wang Li-Rong; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    We report on the observation of enhanced high-order partial wave scattering from atom-atom interaction via changing the temperature of a magneto-optical trap in the process of photoassociation. The high-order scattering partial wave is directly manifested through the large signal amplitude of the rovibrational resonance levels of trap-loss spectroscopy from photoassociation.

  13. Flash ionisation signature in coherent cyclotron emission from Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Vorgul, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Brown dwarfs form mineral clouds in their atmospheres, where charged particles can produce large-scale discharges in form of lightning resulting in a substantial sudden increase of local ionisation. Brown dwarfs are observed to emit cyclotron radio emission. We show that signatures of strong transient atmospheric ionisation events (flash ionisation) can be imprinted on a pre-existing radiation. Detection of such flash ionisation events will open investigations into the ionisation state and atmospheric dynamics. Such ionisation events can also result from explosion shock waves, bursts or eruptions. We present an analytical model that describes the modulation of a pre-existing electromagnetic radiation by a time-dependent (flash) conductivity that is characteristic for flash ionisation events like lightning. Our conductivity model reproduces the conductivity function derived from observations of Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes, and is applicable to astrophysical objects with strong temporal variations in the loca...

  14. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  15. Time dependent non-LTE calculations of ionisation in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Wehrse, R; Davé, R; Dav\\'e, Romeel

    2005-01-01

    We present a new implicit numerical algorithm for the calculation of the time dependent non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium of a gas in an external radiation field that is accurate, fast and unconditionally stable for all spatial and temporal increments. The method is presented as a backward difference scheme in 1-D but can be readily generalised to 3-D. We apply the method for calculating the evolution of ionisation domains in a hydrogen plasma with plane-parallel Gaussian density enhancements illuminated by sources of UV radiation. We calculate the speed of propagation of ionising fronts through different ambient densities and the interaction of such ionising fronts with density enhancements. We show that for a typical UV source that may be present in the early universe, the introduction of a density enhancement of a factor ~10 above an ambient density 10^{-4} atoms/cm^3 could delay the outward propagation of an ionisation front by millions of years. Our calculations show that within the lifetime of a singl...

  16. Simultaneous determination of phenolic compounds in Cynthiana grape (Vitis aestivalis) by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Lopez, L M; McGlynn, W; Goad, C L; Mireles Dewitt, C A

    2014-04-15

    Phenolic acids, flavanols, flavonols and stilbenes (PAFFS) were isolated from whole grapes, juice, or pomace and purified using enzymatic hydrolysis. Only anthocyanin mono-glucosides and a few of the oligomers from Cynthiana grape (Vitis aestivalis) were analysed. Flavonoid-anthocyanin mono-glucosides (FA) were isolated using methanol/0.1% hydrochloric acid extraction. In addition, crude extractions of phenolic compounds from Cynthiana grape using 50% methanol, 70% methanol, 50% acetone, 0.01% pectinase, or petroleum ether were also evaluated. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with photodiode array (PDA) detector was used to identify phenolic compounds. A method was developed for simultaneous separation, identification and quantification of both PAFFS and FA. Quantification was performed by the internal standard method using a five points regression graph of the UV-visible absorption data collected at the wavelength of maximum absorbance for each analyte. From whole grape samples nine phenolic compounds were tentatively identified and quantified. The individual phenolic compounds content varied from 3 to 875 mg kg⁻¹ dry weight. For juice, twelve phenolic compounds were identified and quantified. The content varied from 0.07 to 910 mg kg⁻¹ dry weight. For pomace, a total of fifteen phenolic compounds were tentatively identified and quantified. The content varied from 2 mg kg⁻¹ to 198 mg kg⁻¹ dry matter. Results from HPLC analysis of the samples showed that gallic acid and (+)-catechin hydrate were the major phenolic compounds in both whole grapes and pomace. Cyanidin and petunidin 3-O-glucoside were the major anthocyanin glucosides in the juice.

  17. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  18. Feasibility of filter atomization in high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Uwe; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Katskov, Dmitri

    2006-03-01

    A prototype spectrometer for high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS), built at ISAS Berlin, Germany, was combined with a graphite filter atomizer (GFA), earlier developed at TUT, Pretoria, South Africa. The furnace and auto-sampler units from a commercial AA spectrometer, model AAS vario 6 (Analytik Jena AG, Jena, Germany), were employed in the instrument. Instead of conventional platform tube, the GFA was used to provide low measurement susceptibility to interferences and short determination cycle. The GFA was modified according to the design of the furnace unit and optimal physical parameters of its components (filter and collector) found. Afterwards, optimal GFA was replicated and tested to outline analytical performances of the HR-CS GFA AA spectrometer in view of prospects of multi-element analysis. In particular, reproducibility of performances, repeatability of analytical signals, lifetime, temperature limit and duration of the measurement cycle were examined, and elements available for determination justified. The results show that the peak area of the atomic absorption signal is reproduced in various GFA copies within ± 4% deviation range. The GFA can stand temperatures of 2800 °C with 6 s hold time for 55 temperature cycles, and 2700 °C (8 s) for about 200 cycles. Only the external tube is prone to destruction while the filter and collector do not show any sign of erosion caused by temperature or aggressive matrix. Analytical signals are affected insignificantly by tube aging. Repeatability of the peak area remains within 1.1-1.7% RSD over more than hundred determination cycles. Peak areas are proportional to the sample volume of injected organic and inorganic liquids up to at least 50 μL. The drying stage is combined with hot sampling and cut down to 15-20 s. The list of metals available for determination with full vapor release includes Al, Co, Cr, Ni, Pt as well as more volatile metals. Characteristic masses at

  19. Production of very-high-n strontium Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S.; Zhang, X.; Killian, T. C.; Dunning, F. B.; Hiller, M.; Yoshida, S.; Nagele, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2013-10-01

    The production of very-high-n (n˜300-500) strontium Rydberg atoms is explored using a crossed-laser-atom-beam geometry. n1S0 and n1D2 states are created by two-photon excitation via the 5s5p 1P1 intermediate state using radiation with wavelengths of ˜461 and ˜413 nm. Rydberg atom densities as high as ˜3×105 cm-3 have been achieved, sufficient that Rydberg-Rydberg interactions can become important. The isotope shifts in the Rydberg series limits are determined by tuning the 461-nm light to preferentially excite the different strontium isotopes. Photoexcitation in the presence of an applied electric field is examined. The initially quadratic Stark shift of the n1P1 and n1D2 states becomes near-linear at higher fields and the possible use of n1D2 states to create strongly polarized, quasi-one-dimensional electronic states in strontium is discussed. The data are analyzed with the aid of a two-active-electron (TAE) approximation. The two-electron Hamiltonian, within which the Sr2+ core is represented by a semi-empirical potential, is numerically diagonalized allowing the calculation of the energies of high-n Rydberg states and their photoexcitation probabilities.

  20. Exploring dipole blockade using high- n strontium Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyue; Ye, Shuzhen; Dunning, F. Barry; Hiller, Moritz; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Studies of the production of strongly-polarized quasi-1D high- n, n ~ 300 , strontium `` nF'' Rydberg states in an atomic beam by three-photon excitation in a weak dc field suggest that (in the absence of blockade effects) densities of ~106 cm-3 might be achieved. At such densities the interparticle separation, ~ 100 μm , becomes comparable to that at which dipole blockade effects are expected to become important. Apparatus modifications are underway to allow the exploration of blockade at very high- n and the effects of the high energy level density. Blockade is also being examined through calculations of the energy spectrum for two interaction atoms. Access to the blockade regime promises creation of Rydberg atoms at well-defined separations whose interactions can be coherently controlled using electric field pulses thereby enabling study of the dynamics of strongly-coupled Rydberg systems. Research supported by the NSF, the Robert A. Welch Foundation, and the FWF (Austria).

  1. The ionising radiations: a daily reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gallego Díaz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduce the nature of the radioactive substances and of the ionising radiation, the effects that they cause on the matter and the available media for their detection and measure, as well as the sources of natural radiation, to which the human being are exposed. Next, in the more detailed part of this paper, it is described the wide range of ionising radiations uses in: medicine, agriculture, earth sciences, biology and in some other scientific fields, that allow to pose its impact in the perspective of facing the ones from natural sources. The article concludes that for avoiding damages it is necessary proper protection against the radioactive substances, but avoiding limitation their beneficial uses in the various ranges described. For finishing this paper, the basic principles of radiation protection are described, due to they are the its principal aim.

  2. Tools to discover anionic and nonionic polyfluorinated alkyl surfactants by liquid chromatography electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Xenia; Granby, Kit; Christensen, Jan H.

    2011-01-01

    A tiered approach is proposed for the discovery of unknown anionic and nonionic polyfluorinated alkyl surfactants (PFASs) by reversed phase ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) – negative electrospray ionisation – quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC......–ESI−–QTOF–MS). The chromatographic separation, ionisation and detection of PFASs mixtures, was achieved at high pH (pH=9.7) with NH4OH as additive. To distinguish PFASs from other chemicals we used the characteristic negative mass defects of PFASs, their specific losses of 20Da (HF) and the presence of series of chromatographic...

  3. Retention of ionisable compounds on high-performance liquid chromatography XVII. Estimation of the pH variation of aqueous buffers with the change of the methanol fraction of the mobile phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Xavier; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2007-01-05

    The use of methanol-aqueous buffer mobile phases in HPLC is a common election when performing chromatographic separations of ionisable analytes. The addition of methanol to the aqueous buffer to prepare such a mobile phase changes the buffer capacity and the pH of the solution. In the present work, the variation of these buffer properties is studied for acetic acid-acetate, phosphoric acid-dihydrogenphosphate-hydrogenphosphate, citric acid-dihydrogencitrate-hydrogencitrate-citrate, and ammonium-ammonia buffers. It is well established that the pH change of the buffers depends on the initial concentration and aqueous pH of the buffer, on the percentage of methanol added, and on the particular buffer used. The proposed equations allow the pH estimation of methanol-water buffered mobile phases up to 80% in volume of organic modifier from initial aqueous buffer pH and buffer concentration (before adding methanol) between 0.001 and 0.01 mol L(-1). From both the estimated pH values of the mobile phase and the estimated pKa of the ionisable analytes, it is possible to predict the degree of ionisation of the analytes and therefore, the interpretation of acid-base analytes behaviour in a particular methanol-water buffered mobile phase.

  4. Production of very-high-$n$ strontium Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Shuzhen; Killian, Thomas C; Dunning, F Barry; Hiller, Moritz; Yoshida, Shuhei; Nagele, Stefan; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The production of very-high-$n$, $n\\sim300$-500, strontium Rydberg atoms is explored using a crossed laser-atom beam geometry. $n$$^{1}$S$_{0}$ and $n$$^{1}$D$_{2}$ states are created by two-photon excitation via the 5s5p $^{1}$P$_{1}$ intermediate state using radiation with wavelengths of $\\sim$~461 and $\\sim$ 413 nm. Rydberg atom densities as high as $\\sim 3 \\times 10^{5}$ cm$^{-3}$ have been achieved, sufficient that Rydberg-Rydberg interactions can become important. The isotope shifts in the Rydberg series limits are determined by tuning the 461 nm light to preferentially excite the different strontium isotopes. Photoexcitation in the presence of an applied electric field is examined. The initially quadratic Stark shift of the $n$$^{1}$P$_{1}$ and $n$$^{1}$D$_{2}$ states becomes near-linear at higher fields and the possible use of $n{}^{1}$D$_{2}$ states to create strongly-polarized, quasi-one-dimensional electronic states in strontium is discussed. The data are analyzed with the aid of a two-active-elect...

  5. Characterizing high- n quasi-one-dimensional strontium Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Moritz; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Ye, Shuzhen; Zhang, Xinyue; Dunning, F. Barry

    2014-05-01

    The production of high- n, n ~ 300 , quasi-one-dimensional strontium Rydberg atoms by two-photon excitation of selected extreme Stark states in the presence of a weak dc field is examined using a crossed laser-atom beam geometry. The polarization of the product states is probed using three independent techniques which are analyzed with the aid of classical-trajectory Monte Carlo simulations that employ initial ensembles based on quantum calculations using a two-active-electron model. Comparisons between theory and experiment demonstrate that the product states have large dipole moments, ~ 1 . 0 - 1 . 2n2 a . u . and that they can be engineered using pulsed electric fields to create a wide variety of target states. Research supported by the NSF, the Robert A Welch Foundation, and the FWF (Austria).

  6. Solar Hard X-ray Source Sizes in a Beam-Heated and Ionised Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    O'Flannagain, A; Gallagher, P T

    2014-01-01

    Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are produced as bremsstrahlung when an accelerated population of electrons interacts with the dense chromospheric plasma. HXR observations presented by using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have shown that HXR source sizes are 3-6 times more extended in height than those predicted by the standard collisional thick target model (CTTM). Several possible explanations have been put forward including the multi-threaded nature of flare loops, pitch-angle scattering, and magnetic mirroring. However, the nonuniform ionisation (NUI) structure along the path of the electron beam has not been fully explored as a solution to this problem. Ionised plasma is known to be less effective at producing nonthermal bremsstrahlung HXRs when compared to neutral plasma. If the peak HXR emission was produced in a locally ionised region within the chromosphere, the intensity of emission will be preferentially reduced around this peak, resulting in a more extended source. Due to...

  7. The Physical Conditions of Atomic Gas at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeleman, Marcel

    In this thesis we provide insight into the chemical composition, physical conditions and cosmic distribution of atomic gas at high redshift. We study this gas in absorption against bright background quasars in absorption systems known as Damped Ly-alpha Systems (DLAs). These systems contain the bulk of the atomic gas at high redshift and are the likely progenitors of modern-day galaxies. In Chapter 2, we find that the atomic gas in DLAs obeys a mass-metallicity relationship that is similar to the mass-metallicity relationship seen in star-forming galaxies. The evolution of this relationship is linear with redshift, allowing for a planar equation to accurately describe this evolution, which provides a more stringent constraint on simulations modeling DLAs. Furthermore, the concomitant evolution of the mass-metallicity relationship of atomic gas and star-forming galaxies suggests an intimate link between the two. We next use a novel way to measure the physical conditions of the gas by using fine-structure line ratios of singly ionized carbon and silicon. By measuring the density of the upper and lower level states, we are able to determine the temperature, hydrogen density and electron density of the gas. We find that the conditions present in this high redshift gas are consistent with the conditions we see in the local interstellar medium (ISM). A few absorbers have higher than expected pressure, which suggests that they probe the ISM of star-forming galaxies. Finally in Chapter 4, we measure the cosmic neutral hydrogen density at redshifts below 1.6. Below this redshift, the Ly-alpha line of hydrogen is absorbed by the atmosphere, making detection difficult. Using the archive of the Hubble Space Telescope, we compile a comprehensive list of quasars for a search of DLAs at redshift below 1.6. We find that the incidence rate of DLAs and the cosmic neutral hydrogen density is smaller than previously measured, but consistent with the values both locally and at

  8. A Compact, High Performance Atomic Magnetometer for Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Vishal K

    2013-01-01

    We present a highly sensitive room-temperature atomic magnetometer (AM), designed for use in biomedical applications. The magnetometer sensor head is only 2x2x5 cm^3 and it is constructed using readily available, low-cost optical components. The magnetic field resolution of the AM is <10 fT/sqrt(Hz), which is comparable to cryogenically cooled superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. We present side-by-side comparisons between our AM and a SQUID magnetometer, and show that equally high quality magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) recordings can be obtained using our AM.

  9. Atom probe field ion microscopy of high resistivity materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibrandij, S.J.; Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-02-01

    Over the last 30 years the atom probe has proved to be a powerful tool for studying nanometer-sized compositional fluctuations in a wide range of metallic alloys but has had only limited applications to semiconductors and ceramics. One of the primary reasons for this difference is the higher resistivity of semiconducting and ceramic specimens. Because of this high resistivity, the high voltage field evaporation pulse is attenuated before it reaches the apex of the specimen thereby making the pulse ineffective for field evaporation. Experiments have demonstrated that both variants of the voltage-pulsed atom probe (i.e., those instruments in which the field evaporation pulse is applied directly to the specimen and those in which the negative pulse is applied to a counter electrode in front of the specimen) are equally affected. In this overview, the limits of applicability of the voltage-pulsed atom probe to high resistivity materials are examined. In this study, a wide range of materials have been examined to determine whether field ion microscopy and voltage-pulsed field evaporation can be achieved and the results are summarized in the report. Field ion microscopy including dc field evaporation was possible for all materials except bulk ceramic insulators and glasses. Field ion microscopy requires some conductivity both to achieve a high electric field at the apex of the specimen, and also to support the field ion current. In contrast, voltage-pulsed field evaporation requires transmission of the pulse to the apex of the specimen. All metallic alloys including high resistance alloys and metallic glasses were successfully field evaporated with a voltage pulse. Specimens that were produced from bulk material of several conducting ceramics including MoSi, TiB and TiC were also successfully field evaporated with a voltage pulse.

  10. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge.

  11. The Chocolate Shop and Atomic Orbitals: A New Atomic Model Created by High School Students to Teach Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Atomic orbital theory is a difficult subject for many high school and beginning undergraduate students, as it includes mathematical concepts not yet covered in the school curriculum. Moreover, it requires certain ability for abstraction and imagination. A new atomic orbital model "the chocolate shop" created "by" students…

  12. The Chocolate Shop and Atomic Orbitals: A New Atomic Model Created by High School Students to Teach Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Atomic orbital theory is a difficult subject for many high school and beginning undergraduate students, as it includes mathematical concepts not yet covered in the school curriculum. Moreover, it requires certain ability for abstraction and imagination. A new atomic orbital model "the chocolate shop" created "by" students…

  13. Food ionisation. Realities and perspectives; L'ionisation alimentaire. Realites et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, G

    1994-06-01

    The ionisation of food is a treatment using a certain type of energy. the radiations used in the industrial treatments are limited to three sources. The gamma radiations, the x radiations and the electrons beams emitted with accelerators. The physical treatments by ionizing radiations have for aim to cleanse and to increase the conservation time of food. Now, the applications in agriculture and food industry, are still marginal. The industrial using ionisation are these ones that did not find any alternative decontamination method. The barriers are more scientific or technical or economical than a question of regulation or behaviour. (N.C.)

  14. High-order-harmonic generation in atomic and molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Noslen; Chacón, Alexis; Pérez-Hernández, Jose A.; Biegert, Jens; Lewenstein, Maciej; Ciappina, Marcelo F.

    2017-03-01

    High-order-harmonic generation (HHG) results from the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with matter. It configures an invaluable tool to produce attosecond pulses, moreover, to extract electron structural and dynamical information of the target, i.e., atoms, molecules, and solids. In this contribution, we introduce an analytical description of atomic and molecular HHG, that extends the well-established theoretical strong-field approximation (SFA). Our approach involves two innovative aspects: (i) First, the bound-continuum and rescattering matrix elements can be analytically computed for both atomic and multicenter molecular systems, using a nonlocal short range model, but separable, potential. When compared with the standard models, these analytical derivations make possible to directly examine how the HHG spectra depend on the driven media and laser-pulse features. Furthermore, we can turn on and off contributions having distinct physical origins or corresponding to different mechanisms. This allows us to quantify their importance in the various regions of the HHG spectra. (ii) Second, as reported recently [N. Suárez et al., Phys. Rev. A 94, 043423 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.043423], the multicenter matrix elements in our theory are free from nonphysical gauge- and coordinate-system-dependent terms; this is accomplished by adapting the coordinate system to the center from which the corresponding time-dependent wave function originates. Our SFA results are contrasted, when possible, with the direct numerical integration of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in reduced and full dimensionality. Very good agreement is found for single and multielectronic atomic systems, modeled under the single active electron approximation, and for simple diatomic molecular systems. Interference features, ubiquitously present in every strong-field phenomenon involving a multicenter target, are also captured by our model.

  15. Resonant quenching of Rydberg atomic states by highly polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narits, A. A.; Mironchuk, E. S.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2016-06-01

    The results of theoretical studies of the resonant quenching and ion-pair formation processes induced by collisions of Rydberg atoms with highly polar molecules possessing small electron affinities are reported. We elaborate an approach for describing collisional dynamics of both processes and demonstrate the predominant role of resonant quenching channel of reaction for the destruction of Rydberg states by electron-attaching molecules. The approach is based on the solution of the coupled differential equations for the transition amplitudes between the ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule formed during a collision of particles. It takes into account the possibility of the dipole-bound anion decay in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core and generalizes previous models of charge-transfer processes involving Rydberg atoms to the cases, when the multistate Landau-Zener approaches become inapplicable. Our calculations for {{Rb}}({nl}) atom perturbed by {{{C}}}2{{{H}}}4{{SO}}3, {{CH}}2{CHCN}, {{CH}}3{{NO}}2, {{CH}}3{CN}, {{{C}}}3{{{H}}}2{{{O}}}3, and {{{C}}}3{{{H}}}4{{{O}}}3 molecules show that the curves representing the dependence of the resonant quenching cross sections on the principal quantum number n are bell-shaped with the positions of maxima being shifted towards lower values of n and the peak values, {σ }{max}({{q})}, several times higher than those for the ion-pair formation, {σ }{max}({{i})}. We obtain a simple power relation between the energy of electron affinity of a molecule and the position of maximum in n-dependence of the resonant quenching cross section. It can be used as an additional means for determining small binding energies of dipole-bound anions from the experimental data on resonant quenching of Rydberg states by highly polar molecules.

  16. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic strontium for ultracold atom physics, high-precision spectroscopy and quantum sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Sorrentino, F.; Ferrari, G.; Poli, N.; Drullinger, R. E.; G. M. Tino

    2006-01-01

    This review describes the production of atomic strontium samples at ultra-low temperature and at high phase-space density, and their possible use for physical studies and applications. We describe the process of loading a magneto-optical trap from an atomic beam and preparing the sample for high precision measurements. Particular emphasis is given to the applications of ultracold Sr samples, spanning from optical frequency metrology to force sensing at micrometer scale.

  17. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding.

  18. Production of high-n strontium Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S.; Zhang, X.; Killian, T. C.; Dunning, F. B.; Hiller, M.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    The photoexcitation of strontium Rydberg atoms with n ~ 300 is being examined using a crossed laser-atom beam approach to enable study of quasi-stable two-electron excited states and of strongly-coupled Rydberg systems.

  19. RF System for the MICE Demonstration of Ionisation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald, K.; et al.

    2017-04-01

    Muon accelerators offer an attractive option for a range of future particle physics experiments. They can enable high energy (TeV+) high energy lepton colliders whilst mitigating the difficulty of synchrotron losses, and can provide intense beams of neutrinos for fundamental physics experiments investigating the physics of flavor. The method of production of muon beams results in high beam emittance which must be reduced for efficient acceleration. Conventional emittance control schemes take too long, given the very short (2.2 microsecond) rest lifetime of the muon. Ionisation cooling offers a much faster approach to reducing particle emittance, and the international MICE collaboration aims to demonstrate this technique for the first time. This paper will present the MICE RF system and its role in the context of the overall experiment.

  20. The impact of atomic precision measurements in high energy physics

    OpenAIRE

    Casalbuoni, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    In this talk I discuss the relevance of atomic physics in understanding some important questions about elementary particle physics. A particular attention is devoted to atomic parity violation measurements which seem to suggest new physics beyond the Standard Model. Atomic physics might also be relevant in discovering possible violations of the CPT symmetry.

  1. Highly excited hydrogen in strong d. c. electric fields: atomic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, M.H.

    1988-03-01

    We excite atomic hydrogen from the ground state via a three-photon process to high-lying excited states in the presence of strong d.c. electric fields. The external field is used to manipulate, control, and design specific atomic structures. We can construct nearly 'one-dimensional' atoms whose electronic distributions are highly extended along the field, and which may have enormous electric dipole moments ('giant-dipole atoms').

  2. A portable laser system for high precision atom interferometry experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Malte; Giorgini, Antonio; Tino, Guglielmo M; Peters, Achim

    2010-01-01

    We present a modular rack-mounted laser system for the cooling and manipulation of neutral rubidium atoms which has been developed for the portable gravimeter GAIN, an atom interferometer that will be capable of performing high precision gravity measurements directly at sites of geophysical interest. This laser system is designed to be compact, mobile and robust, yet it still offers improvements over many conventional laboratory-based laser systems. Our system is contained in a standard 19" rack and emits light at five different wavelengths simultaneously on up to 12 fibre ports at a total output power of 800 mW. These wavelengths can be changed and switched between ports in less than a microsecond. The setup includes two phase-locked Raman lasers with a phase noise spectral density of less than 1 \\mu rad/sqrt(Hz) in the frequency range in which our gravimeter is most sensitive to noise. We characterize this laser system and evaluate the performance limits it imposes on an interferometer.

  3. Cosmic-ray ionisation in collapsing clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Marco; Galli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) play an important role in dense molecular cores, affecting their thermal and dynamical evolution and initiating the chemistry. Several studies have shown that the formation of protostellar discs in collapsing clouds is severely hampered by the braking torque exerted by the entrained magnetic field on the infalling gas, as long as the field remains frozen to the gas. We examine the possibility that the concentration and twisting of the field lines in the inner region of collapse can produce a significant reduction of the ionisation fraction. To check whether the CR ionisation rate (CRir) can fall below the critical value required to maintain good coupling, we first study the propagation of CRs in a model of a static magnetised cloud varying the relative strength of the toroidal/poloidal components and the mass-to-flux ratio. We then follow the path of CRs using realistic magnetic field configurations generated by numerical simulations of a rotating collapsing core. We find that an increment of...

  4. Measurement of the activity of beta emitting gases using an ionisation chamber; Mesure de l'activite des gaz emetteurs beta au moyen d'une chambre d'ionisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebouleux, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique. Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1962-07-01

    An ionization chamber was developed for measuring directly the activity of a {beta}-emitting gas whatever the gas may be. The following two parameters are defined and determined: p, the average specific ionization produced by a {beta} disintegration, and i, the average {beta} path in the chamber. It was shown, during the determination of i, that the {beta} particles are reflected on the walls of the ionization chamber when the latter are made of a high atomic number material. It was possible to eliminate this effect by constructing an electrode chamber made of graphite. With this chamber a direct measurement can be made of the activity of a gaseous {beta} emitter with a precision of about {+-}10%. Some applications are given of the graphite electrode chamber (calibration of the chambers built industrially and determination of the activation cross section of a gaseous emitter). It was possible to determine the activation cross section of {sup 134}Xe; a value of 0.18 {+-} 0.03 barn was found. (author) [French] Le but de l'etude est de realiser une chambre d'ionisation permettant d'effectuer une mesure directe de l'activite d'un gaz emetteur {beta} quel que soit l'emetteur considere. On definit et l'on determine les deux parametres suivants: p: ionisation specifique moyenne produite par une desintegration {beta}. La determination est effectuee par une methode graphique, i: moyenne des parcours des {beta} dans la chambre. La determination est effectuee experimentalement par introduction dans la chambre d'un gaz radioactif dont on peut calculer l'activite. On a mis en evidence, au cours de la determination de i, la reflexion des particules {beta} sur les parois des chambres d'ionisation lorsque celles-ci sont constituees d'un materiau de numero atomique eleve. La construction d'une chambre a electrodes de graphite nous a permis d'eliminer ce phenomene. Avec cette chambre, on effectue une mesure directe de

  5. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  6. Compact high-flux source of cold sodium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamporesi, G.; Donadello, S.; Serafini, S.; Ferrari, G.

    2013-06-01

    We present a compact source of cold sodium atoms suitable for the production of quantum degenerate gases and versatile for a multi-species experiment. The magnetic field produced by permanent magnets allows to simultaneously realize a Zeeman slower and a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (MOT) within an order of magnitude smaller length than standard sodium sources. We achieve an atomic flux exceeding 4 × 109 atoms/s loaded in a MOT, with a most probable longitudinal velocity of 20 m/s, and a brightness larger than 2.5 × 1012 atoms/s/sr. This atomic source allows us to produce pure Bose-Einstein condensates with more than 107 atoms and a background pressure limited lifetime of 5 min.

  7. High resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wong-Campos, J D; Neyenhuis, B; Mizrahi, J; Monroe, C

    2015-01-01

    We report the optical imaging of a single atom with nanometer resolution using an adaptive optical alignment technique that is applicable to general optical microscopy. By decomposing the image of a single laser-cooled atom, we identify and correct optical aberrations in the system and realize an atomic position sensitivity of $\\approx$ 0.5 nm/$\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ with a minimum uncertainty of 1.7 nm, allowing the direct imaging of atomic motion. This is the highest position sensitivity ever measured for an isolated atom, and opens up the possibility of performing out-of-focus 3D particle tracking, imaging of atoms in 3D optical lattices or sensing forces at the yoctonewton (10$^{-24}$ N) scale.

  8. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  9. Controlling interactions between highly-magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic $^7$S$_3$ chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on Dysprosium and Erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  10. Quantum measurements of atoms using cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Dada, Adetunmise C; Jones, Martin L; Kendon, Vivien M; Everitt, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    Generalized quantum measurements are an important extension of projective or von Neumann measurements, in that they can be used to describe any measurement that can be implemented on a quantum system. We describe how to realize two non-standard quantum measurements using cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). The first measurement optimally and unabmiguously distinguishes between two non-orthogonal quantum states. The second example is a measurement that demonstrates superadditive quantum coding gain. The experimental tools used are single-atom unitary operations effected by Ramsey pulses and two-atom Tavis-Cummings interactions. We show how the superadditive quantum coding gain is affected by errors in the field-ionisation detection of atoms, and that even with rather high levels of experimental imperfections, a reasonable amount of superadditivity can still be seen. To date, these types of measurement have only been realized on photons. It would be of great interest to have realizations using other physical ...

  11. Coating synthesis on dielectric substrates assisted by pulsed beams of high-energy gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, S. N.; Melnik, Yu A.; Metel, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    Titanium nitride and aluminum nitride coatings have been deposited on glass and aluminum oxide substrates in a flow of metal atoms accompanied by high-energy gas atoms. The metal atoms are produced due to sputtering of a flat rectangular magnetron target. The gas atoms with energy up to 25 keV are produced due to charge exchange collisions of ions extracted from the magnetron discharge plasma and accelerated by high-voltage pulses applied to a flat grid parallel to the target. The metal atoms pass through the grid and deposit on the substrate. Conjunction of their trajectories with those of gas atoms bombarding the growing coating enables the coating synthesis on complex-shape dielectric products planetary rotating inside the vacuum chamber. Mixing high-energy gas atoms of the coating and substrate atoms substantially improves the coating adhesion.

  12. QED corrections to atomic wavefunctions in highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Johan

    2015-11-18

    Bound electron states in highly charged ions are strongly influenced by the effects of relativity and quantum electrodynamics (QED). These effects induce shifts of the binding energies as well as corrections to observables related to atomic processes. In this work a numerical procedure is described and implemented in which the QED effects are treated as corrections to relativistic bound-state wavefunctions. This approach, which is based on the recently developed covariant evolution-operator formalism, allows for a merging of QED with the standard methods of many-body perturbation theory. In particular, it enables an evaluation of the combined effect of QED and electron correlation in few-electron systems. Numerical results for this effect are presented for the ground state energy of helium-like ions. A detailed analysis of the contribution from the electron self-energy is carried out in both the Feynman and Coulomb gauge. It is found that the Feynman gauge suffers from large numerical cancellations and acquires significant contributions from terms involving multiple interactions with the nuclear potential (the so-called many-potential terms), while the Coulomb gauge is well suited for an approximate treatment based on terms involving only freely propagating electrons (the zero-potential terms). With the help of QED-corrected wavefunctions it is also possible to compute corrections to observables in basic atomic processes. In this work some of the one-loop QED corrections (those derivable from perturbed wavefunctions and energies) to the differential cross section and distribution of polarization in radiative recombination of initially bare uranium nuclei are evaluated, as well as the corresponding corrections to the ratio τ{sub E1}/τ{sub M2} of the electric dipole and magnetic quadrupole transition amplitudes in the 2p{sub 3/2}→1s radiative decay of hydrogenlike uranium. The results from these calculations are all of the expected magnitude, namely on the order

  13. High Gradient Accelerator Cavities Using Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ives, Robert Lawrence [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Parsons, Gregory [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, Philip [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Oldham, Christopher [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Mundy, Zach [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Dolgashev, Valery [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-12-09

    In the Phase I program, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR), in collaboration with North Carolina State University (NCSU), fabricated copper accelerator cavities and used Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to apply thin metal coatings of tungsten and platinum. It was hypothesized that a tungsten coating would provide a robust surface more resistant to arcing and arc damage. The platinum coating was predicted to reduce processing time by inhibiting oxides that form on copper surfaces soon after machining. Two sets of cavity parts were fabricated. One was coated with 35 nm of tungsten, and the other with approximately 10 nm of platinum. Only the platinum cavity parts could be high power tested during the Phase I program due to schedule and funding constraints. The platinum coated cavity exhibit poor performance when compared with pure copper cavities. Not only did arcing occur at lower power levels, but the processing time was actually longer. There were several issues that contributed to the poor performance. First, machining of the base copper cavity parts failed to achieve the quality and cleanliness standards specified to SLAC National Accelerator Center. Secondly, the ALD facilities were not configured to provide the high levels of cleanliness required. Finally, the nanometer coating applied was likely far too thin to provide the performance required. The coating was ablated or peeled from the surface in regions of high fields. It was concluded that the current ALD process could not provide improved performance over cavities produced at national laboratories using dedicated facilities.

  14. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  15. On the Ionisation Fraction in Protoplanetary Disks I: Comparing Different Reaction Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ilgner, M; Ilgner, Martin; Richard P. Nelson

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the ionisation fraction in protostellar disk models using a number of different chemical reaction networks, including gas-phase and gas-grain reaction schemes. The disk models we consider are conventional alpha-disks, which include viscous heating and radiative cooling. The primary source of ionisation is assumed to be X-ray irradiation from the central star. We consider a number of gas-phase chemical networks. In general we find that the simple models predict higher fractional ionisation levels and more extensive active zones than the more complex models. When heavy metal atoms are included the simple models predict that the disk is magnetically active throughout. The complex models predict that extensive regions of the disk remain magnetically uncoupled even with a fractional abundance of magnesium of 10(-8). The addition of submicron sized grains with a concentration of 10(-12) causes the size of the dead zone to increase dramatically for all kinetic models considered. We find that the simple ...

  16. Time-dependent hydrogen ionisation in the solar chromosphere. I: Methods and first results

    CERN Document Server

    Wedemeyer-Boehm, J L S

    2006-01-01

    An approximate method for solving the rate equations for the hydrogen populations was extended and implemented in the three-dimensional radiation (magneto-)hydrodynamics code CO5BOLD. The method is based on a model atom with six energy levels and fixed radiative rates. It has been tested extensively in one-dimensional simulations. The extended method has been used to create a three-dimensional model that extends from the upper convection zone to the chromosphere. The ionisation degree of hydrogen in our time-dependent simulation is comparable to the corresponding equilibrium value up to 500 km above optical depth unity. Above this height, the non-equilibrium ionisation degree is fairly constant over time and space, and tends to be at a value set by hot propagating shock waves. The hydrogen level populations and electron density are much more constant than the corresponding values for statistical equilibrium, too. In contrast, the equilibrium ionisation degree varies by more than 20 orders of magnitude between...

  17. Ionisation clusters at DNA level: experimental modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pszona, S.; Kula, J

    2002-07-01

    The importance of initial clustered damage to DNA is a hypothesis, which has to be approached also from physical modelling of the initial products of single charged particle interaction with DNA. A new tool for such studies, presented here, is based on modelling of the ionisation patterns resulting from a single charged particle crossing a nitrogen cavity of nanometre size. The nanometre size sites equivalent in unit density to DNA and nucleosome, have been modelled in a device, called a Jet Counter, consisting of a pulse operated valve which inject nitrogen in the form of an expansion jet into a interaction chamber. The distributions of the number of ions in a cluster created by a single alpha particle of 4.6 MeV along 0.15 nm to 13 nm size in nitrogen have been measured. A new descriptor of radiation action at DNA level is proposed. (author)

  18. Transmission-line decelerators for atoms in high Rydberg states

    CERN Document Server

    Lancuba, P

    2014-01-01

    Beams of helium atoms in Rydberg states with principal quantum number $n=52$, and traveling with an initial speed of 1950 m/s, have been accelerated, decelerated and guided while confined in moving electric traps generated above a curved, surface-based electrical transmission line with a segmented center conductor. Experiments have been performed with atoms guided at constant speed, and with accelerations exceeding $10^7$ m/s$^2$. In each case the manipulated atoms were detected by spatially resolved, pulsed electric field ionization. The effects of tangential and centripetal accelerations on the effective trapping potentials experienced by the atoms in the decelerator have been studied, with the resulting observations highlighting contributions from the density of excited Rydberg atoms to the acceleration, deceleration and guiding efficiencies in the experiments.

  19. Transmission-line decelerators for atoms in high Rydberg states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancuba, P.; Hogan, S. D.

    2014-11-01

    Beams of helium atoms in Rydberg states with principal quantum number n =52 , and traveling with an initial speed of 1950 m/s, have been accelerated, decelerated, and guided while confined in moving electric traps generated above a curved, surface-based electrical transmission line with a segmented center conductor. Experiments have been performed with atoms guided at constant speed, and with accelerations exceeding 107 m /s 2. In each case, the manipulated atoms were detected by spatially resolved, pulsed electric field ionization. The effects of tangential and centripetal accelerations on the effective trapping potentials experienced by the atoms in the decelerator have been studied, with the resulting observations highlighting contributions from the density of excited Rydberg atoms to the acceleration, deceleration, and guiding efficiencies in the experiments.

  20. High-resolution adaptive imaging of a single atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Campos, J. D.; Johnson, K. G.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C.

    2016-09-01

    Optical imaging systems are used extensively in the life and physical sciences because of their ability to non-invasively capture details on the microscopic and nanoscopic scales. Such systems are often limited by source or detector noise, image distortions and human operator misjudgement. Here, we report a general, quantitative method to analyse and correct these errors. We use this method to identify and correct optical aberrations in an imaging system for single atoms and realize an atomic position sensitivity of ˜0.5 nm Hz-1/2 with a minimum uncertainty of 1.7 nm, allowing the direct imaging of atomic motion. This is the highest position sensitivity ever measured for an isolated atom and opens up the possibility of performing out-of-focus three-dimensional particle tracking, imaging of atoms in three-dimensional optical lattices or sensing forces at the yoctonewton (10-24 N) scale.

  1. INVESTIGATION INTO THE MECHANISMS OF TISSUE ATOMIZATION BY HIGH INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic atomization, or the emission of a fog of droplets, was recently proposed to explain tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy. However, even though liquid atomization has been studied extensively, the mechanisms of tissue atomization remain unclear. In this paper, high-speed photography and overpressure were used to evaluate the role of bubbles in tissue atomization. As the static pressure increased, the degree of fractionation decreased, and the ex vivo tissue became thermally d...

  2. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon [School Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Bo-Ram, E-mail: hbrlee@inu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-840 Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental research plasma process for thin film deposition is presented. • VHF plasma source for PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was employed to reduce plasma damage. • The use of VHF plasma improved all of the film qualities and growth characteristics. - Abstract: Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  3. Fragmentation d'agrégats de carbone (multi) chargés formés par ionisation et excitation en collision de haute vitesse

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    M L. ADOUI, Rapporteur Mme L. CHEN, Rapporteur M P.A. HERVIEUX Mme C. JOBLIN Mme L. TCHANG-BRILLET, Présidente du jury; The present work is devoted to the study of the excitation, ionisation and fragmentation of monocharged carbon clusters C^+_n (n \\leq 10) induced by high velocity (2.6au) collision on helium gas. For this velocity regime the electronic mechanisms of excitation and ionisation are dominant. The collision processes (electronic excitation, simple and (multi) ionisation, fragment...

  4. Atomic fluorescence study of high temperature aerodynamic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.; Sethi, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet laser induced atomic fluorescence has been used to characterize supersonic jet aerodynamic levitation experiments. The levitated specimen was a 0.4 cm sapphire sphere that was separately heated at temperatures up to 2327 K by an infrared laser. The supersonic jet expansion and thermal gradients in the specimen wake were studied by measuring spatial variations in the concentration of atomic Hg added to the levitating argon gas stream. Further applications of atomic fluorescence in containerless experiments, such as ideal gas fluorescence thermometry and containerless process control are discussed.

  5. The ionised X-ray outflowing torus in ESO 323-G77: low-ionisation clumps confined by homogeneous warm absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Sanfrutos, Mario; Krongold, Yair; Agís-González, Beatriz; Longinotti, Anna Lia

    2015-01-01

    We report on the long- and short-term X-ray spectral analysis of the polar-scattered Seyfert 1.2 galaxy ESO 323-G77, observed in three epochs between 2006 and 2013 with Chandra and XMM-Newton. Four high-resolution Chandra observations give us a unique opportunity to study the properties of the absorbers in detail, as well as their short time-scale (days) variability. From the rich set of absorption features seen in the Chandra data, we identify two warm absorbers with column densities and ionisations that are consistent with being constant on both short and long time-scales, suggesting that those are the signature of a rather homogeneous and extended outflow. A third absorber, ionised to a lesser degree, is also present and it replaces the strictly neutral absorber that is ubiquitously inferred from the X-ray analysis of obscured Compton-thin sources. This colder absorber appears to vary in column density on long time-scales, suggesting a non-homogeneous absorber. Moreover, its ionisation responds to the nucl...

  6. INVESTIGATION INTO THE MECHANISMS OF TISSUE ATOMIZATION BY HIGH INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic atomization, or the emission of a fog of droplets, was recently proposed to explain tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy. However, even though liquid atomization has been studied extensively, the mechanisms of tissue atomization remain unclear. In this paper, high-speed photography and overpressure were used to evaluate the role of bubbles in tissue atomization. As the static pressure increased, the degree of fractionation decreased, and the ex vivo tissue became thermally denatured. The effect of surface wetness on atomization was also evaluated in vivo and in tissue-mimicking gels where surface wetness was found to enhance atomization by forming surface instabilities that augment cavitation. In addition, experimental results indicated that wetting collagenous tissues, such as the liver capsule, allowed atomization to breach such barriers. These results highlight the importance of bubbles and surface instabilities in atomization and could be used to enhance boiling histotripsy for transition to clinical use. PMID:25662182

  7. Investigation into the mechanisms of tissue atomization by high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Julianna C; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Vera A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasonic atomization, or the emission of a fog of droplets, was recently proposed to explain tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy. However, even though liquid atomization has been studied extensively, the mechanisms underlying tissue atomization remain unclear. In the work described here, high-speed photography and overpressure were used to evaluate the role of bubbles in tissue atomization. As static pressure increased, the degree of fractionation decreased, and the ex vivo tissue became thermally denatured. The effect of surface wetness on atomization was also evaluated in vivo and in tissue-mimicking gels, where surface wetness was found to enhance atomization by forming surface instabilities that augment cavitation. In addition, experimental results indicated that wetting collagenous tissues, such as the liver capsule, allowed atomization to breach such barriers. These results highlight the importance of bubbles and surface instabilities in atomization and could be used to enhance boiling histotripsy for transition to clinical use.

  8. High-Flux Ultracold-Atom Chip Interferometers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ColdQuanta's ultimate objective is to produce a compact, turnkey, ultracold-atom system specifically designed for performing interferometry with Bose-Einstein...

  9. Spin-Orbit Larmor Clock for Ionisation Times in One-Photon and Strong-Field Regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushal, Jivesh; Torlina, Lisa; Ivanov, Misha; Smirnova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Photoionisation is a process where absorption of one or several photons liberates an electron and creates a hole in a quantum system, such as an atom or a molecule. Is it faster to remove an electron using one or many photons, and how to define this time? Here we introduce a clock that allows us to define ionisation time for both one-photon and many-photon ionisation regimes. The clock uses the interaction of the electron or hole spin with the magnetic field created by their orbital motion, known as the spin-orbit interaction. The angle of spin precession in the magnetic field records time. We use the combination of analytical theory and ab-initio calculations to show how ionisation delay depends on the number of absorbed photons, how it appears in the experiment and what electron dynamics it signifies. In particular, we apply our method to calculate the derived time delays in tunnelling regime of strong-field ionisation.

  10. Exploring the Powerful Ionised Wind in the Seyfert Galaxy PG1211+143

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounds, Ken

    2013-10-01

    Highly-ionised high-speed winds in AGN (UFOs) were first detected with XMM-Newton a decade ago, and are now established as a key factor in the study of SMBH accretion, and in the growth and metal enrichment of their host galaxies. However, information on the ionisation and dynamical structure, and the ultimate fate of UFOs remains very limited. We request a 600ks extended XMM-Newton study of the prototype UFO PG1211+143 in AO-13, to obtain high quality EPIC and RGS spectra, to map the flow structure and variability, while seeking evidence for the anticipated interaction with the ISM and possible conversion of the energetic wind to a momentum-driven flow.

  11. Highly charged ions as a basis of optical atomic clockwork of exceptional accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevianko, Andrei; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V

    2012-11-02

    We propose a novel class of atomic clocks based on highly charged ions. We consider highly forbidden laser-accessible transitions within the 4f(12) ground-state configurations of highly charged ions. Our evaluation of systematic effects demonstrates that these transitions may be used for building exceptionally accurate atomic clocks which may compete in accuracy with recently proposed nuclear clocks.

  12. Effects of atomic hydrogen and deuterium exposure on high polarization GaAs photocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Baylac; P. Adderley; J. Brittian; J. Clark; T. Day; J. Grames; J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker; M. Stutzman; A. T. Wu; A. S. Terekhov

    2005-12-01

    Strained-layer GaAs and strained-superlattice GaAs photocathodes are used at Jefferson Laboratory to create high average current beams of highly spin-polarized electrons. High electron yield, or quantum efficiency (QE), is obtained only when the photocathode surface is atomically clean. For years, exposure to atomic hydrogen or deuterium has been the photocathode cleaning technique employed at Jefferson Laboratory. This work demonstrates that atomic hydrogen cleaning is not necessary when precautions are taken to ensure that clean photocathode material from the vendor is not inadvertently dirtied while samples are prepared for installation inside photoemission guns. Moreover, this work demonstrates that QE and beam polarization can be significantly reduced when clean high-polarization photocathode material is exposed to atomic hydrogen from an rf dissociator-style atomic hydrogen source. Surface analysis provides some insight into the mechanisms that degrade QE and polarization due to atomic hydrogen cleaning.

  13. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, Jan; Grzeschik, Christoph; Sternke, Tammo; Grote, Alexander; Popp, Manuel; Becker, Dennis; Müntinga, Hauke; Ahlers, Holger; Peters, Achim; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Sengstock, Klaus; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M

    2015-01-01

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of...

  14. Positron-Lithium Atom and Electron-Lithium Atom Scattering Systems at Intermediate and High Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Ratnavelu; S. Y. Ng

    2006-01-01

    @@ The coupled-channel optical method is used to study positron scattering by atomic lithium at energies ranging from the ionization threshold to 60 eV. The present method simultaneously treats the target channels and the positronium (Ps) channels in the coupled-channel method together with the continuum effects via an ab-initio optical potential. Ionization, elastic and inelastic cross sections in target channels, and the total cross section are also reported and compared with other theoretical and experimental data. A comparative study with the corresponding electron-lithium data is also reported.

  15. The Ionising Radiations Advisory Committee Open Meeting 10 October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-01

    Full text: The Ionising Radiations Advisory Committee (IRAC) held its first open meeting on 10 October 2001 in response to a request from the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) that all its advisory committees should follow the Commission's example and hold such meetings. Some of the other advisory committees have already held open meetings and others are planning to do so shortly. The aim of the meeting was to enable members of the public to meet IRAC members and to find out more about the Committee - how it worked and the type of issues it dealt with. The first two sessions were devoted to short presentations describing IRAC's work and influences, now and in the future, on radiation protection generally. The third session was a discussion forum. The agenda for the meeting and the presentations are posted on the web at: www.hse.gov.uk/foi/iracopen.htm. Each session of presentations was followed by questions of clarification and the third session of the meeting comprised an open forum. Many of the questions raised were not directly relevant to IRAC but, nevertheless, members provided brief responses and referred questions on to others as appropriate. One question had been notified in advance, asking whether members of IRAC agreed that it is now (regrettably) reasonably foreseeable that a loss of containment of radioactive material may occur at a nuclear facility as a result of impact by an aeroplane or by other hostile acts, and that this should be made clear in published guidance on REPPIR. This question was not within IRAC's remit. The Chairman of the Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee offered to take the question to the Committee's next meeting. Issues discussed included: Concerns that exposure to ionising radiation at low levels is more dangerous than is currently reflected in risk estimates. The European Parliament has adopted a resolution calling on the main international bodies, including the International Commission on Radiological

  16. Exploring star formation in high-z galaxies using atomic and molecular emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullberg, Bitten

    2016-03-01

    The conditions under which stars are formed and the reasons for triggering and quenching of starburst events in high-z galaxies, are still not well understood. Studying the interstellar medium (ISM) and the morphology of high-z galaxies are therefore key points in order to understand galaxy evolution. The cosmic star formation rate density peaks between 1thesis presents three studies of the ISM in high-z galaxies and their morphologies by: Exploring the physical conditions of the ISM in a sample of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) using the relative observed line strength of ionised carbon ([CII]) and carbon monoxide (CO). We find that the line ratios can best be described by a medium of [CII] and CO emitting gas with a higher [CII] than CO excitation temperature, high CO optical depth tau(CO)>>1, and low to moderate [CII] optical depth tau(CII)2, pave the road for future investigations of the star-forming ISM in high-z galaxies, by illustrating the importance of multi-wavelength, fine structure- and molecular line studies.

  17. An important step forward in continuous spectroscopic imaging of ionising radiations using ASICs

    CERN Document Server

    Fessler, P; Eberle, H; Raad-Iseli, C D; Hilt, B; Huss, D; Krummenacher, F; Lutz, Jean Robert; Prevot, G; Renouprez, Albert Jean; Sigward, M H; Schwaller, B; Voltolini, C

    1999-01-01

    Characterization results are given for an original ASIC allowing continuous acquisition of ionising radiation images in spectroscopic mode. Ionising radiation imaging in general and spectroscopic imaging in particular must primarily be guided by the attempt to decrease statistical noise, which requires detection systems designed to allow very high counting rates. Any source of dead time must therefore be avoided. Thus, the use of on-line corrections of the inevitable dispersion of characteristics between the large number of electronic channels of the detection system, shall be precluded. Without claiming to achieve ultimate noise levels, the work described is focused on how to prevent good individual acquisition channel noise performance from being totally destroyed by the dispersion between channels without introducing dead times. With this goal, we developed an automatic charge amplifier output voltage offset compensation system which operates regardless of the cause of the offset (detector or electronic). ...

  18. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states; Excitation et ionisation des atomes d'hydrogene et d'helium par des impulsions laser femtosecondes: approche theorique par des etats de Coulomb-Volkov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichard, R

    2007-12-15

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when {Dirac_h}{omega} > I{sub p}: it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with {Dirac_h}{omega} < I{sub p}: new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  19. Highly stable atomic vector magnetometer based on free spin precession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afach, S; Ban, G; Bison, G; Bodek, K; Chowdhuri, Z; Grujić, Z D; Hayen, L; Hélaine, V; Kasprzak, M; Kirch, K; Knowles, P; Koch, H-C; Komposch, S; Kozela, A; Krempel, J; Lauss, B; Lefort, T; Lemière, Y; Mtchedlishvili, A; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Piegsa, F M; Prashanth, P N; Quéméner, G; Rawlik, M; Ries, D; Roccia, S; Rozpedzik, D; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Severjins, N; Weis, A; Wursten, E; Wyszynski, G; Zejma, J; Zsigmond, G

    2015-08-24

    We present a magnetometer based on optically pumped Cs atoms that measures the magnitude and direction of a 1 μT magnetic field. Multiple circularly polarized laser beams were used to probe the free spin precession of the Cs atoms. The design was optimized for long-time stability and achieves a scalar resolution better than 300 fT for integration times ranging from 80 ms to 1000 s. The best scalar resolution of less than 80 fT was reached with integration times of 1.6 to 6 s. We were able to measure the magnetic field direction with a resolution better than 10 μrad for integration times from 10 s up to 2000 s.

  20. Selective addressing of high-rank atomic polarization moments

    CERN Document Server

    Yashchuk, V V; Gawlik, W; Kimball, D F; Malakyan, Y P; Rochester, S M; Malakyan, Yu. P.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a method of selective generation and study of polarization moments of up to the highest rank $\\kappa=2F$ possible for a quantum state with total angular momentum $F$. The technique is based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light. Various polarization moments are distinguished by the periodicity of light-polarization rotation induced by the atoms during Larmor precession and exhibit distinct light-intensity and frequency dependences. We apply the method to study polarization moments of $^{87}$Rb atoms contained in a vapor cell with antirelaxation coating. Distinct ultra-narrow (1-Hz wide) resonances, corresponding to different multipoles, appear in the magnetic-field dependence of the optical rotation. The use of the highest-multipole resonances has important applications in quantum and nonlinear optics and in magnetometry.

  1. High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    sprays, volume of fluids, CFD, diesel 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 16 19a. NAME OF...Reynolds number, Re = 3000. In a related study, Desjardins con- ducted detailed numerical simulations ( DNS ) of primary atomization for several values...model development. Note that, as with most other DNS studies, no quantitative comparison to experimental data is typically provided. The need to

  2. High-resolution studies of the Majorana atomic chain platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Benjamin E.; Randeria, Mallika T.; Li, Jian; Jeon, Sangjun; Xie, Yonglong; Wang, Zhijun; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Andrei Bernevig, B.; Yazdani, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Ordered assemblies of magnetic atoms on the surface of conventional superconductors can be used to engineer topological superconducting phases and realize Majorana fermion quasiparticles (MQPs) in a condensed matter setting. Recent experiments have shown that chains of Fe atoms on Pb generically have the required electronic characteristics to form a one-dimensional topological superconductor and have revealed spatially resolved signatures of localized MQPs at the ends of such chains. Here we report higher-resolution measurements of the same atomic chain system performed using a dilution refrigerator scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). With significantly better energy resolution than previous studies, we show that the zero-bias peak (ZBP) in Fe chains has no detectable splitting from hybridization with other states. The measurements also reveal that the ZBP exhibits a distinctive `double eye’ spatial pattern on nanometre length scales. Theoretically we show that this is a general consequence of STM measurements of MQPs with substantial spectral weight in the superconducting substrate, a conclusion further supported by measurements of Pb overlayers deposited on top of the Fe chains. Finally, we report experiments performed with superconducting tips in search of the particle-hole symmetric MQP signature expected in such measurements.

  3. Interference Dynamics of Hydrogen Atoms in High-Frequency Dichromatic Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tai-Wang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Fu, Pan-Ming; Chen, Shi-Gang

    2002-08-01

    We investigate the ionization and high-order harmonic generation of a hydrogen atom in high-frequency (several atomic units) super strong (up to several tens of atomic units) dichromatic laser fields. An effective iterative method in the framework of high-frequency Floquet theory is used in the calculations. We have considered two kinds of dichromatic laser field, i.e. 1ω-2ω and 1ω-3ω. We find that, in both the cases, the ionization and high-order harmonic generation show evident dependence on the relative phase and strength of the additional harmonic field. The dynamical origin of these interference effects is also discussed.

  4. Interference Dynamics of Hydrogen Atoms in High-Frequency Dichromatic Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程太旺; 李晓峰; 傅盘铭; 陈式刚

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the ionization and high-order harmonic generation of a hydrogen atom in high-frequency (several atomic units) super strong (up to several tens of atomic units) dichromatic laser fields. An effective iterative method in the framework of high-frequency Floquet theory is used in the calculations. We have considered two kinds of dichromatic laser field, i.e. 1ω - 2ω and lω - 3ω. We find that, in both the cases, the ionization and high-order harmonic generation show evident dependence on the relative phase and strength of the additional harmonic field. The dynamical origin of these interference effects is also discussed.

  5. A cost-effective high-flux source of cold ytterbium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Zou, Yueyang; Zhang, Shanchao; Cho, Chang-woo; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2016-10-01

    We report a cost-effective way to prepare high-flux slow ytterbium atoms with extremely low-power 399-nm light suitable for the production of quantum degenerate ytterbium gases. By collimating an atomic beam through an array of micro-capillary tubes, we obtain a bright atomic beam through the Zeeman slower operating at low light power of only 15 mW for the source. We achieve the loading rate of 2 × 107 s-1 into the intercombination magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a sufficient steady-state MOT atom number of 2 × 108 for 174Yb atoms. Our apparatus highlights an efficient method to obtain slow ytterbium atoms using a simple low-power 399-nm laser system.

  6. Productions of hollow atoms from solids irradiated by high intensity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, K.; Sasaki, A.; Zhidkov, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The production of hollow atoms through the collisions of fast electrons with a solid is studied. These electrons are produced by high-intensity short-pulse laser irradiation on a solid. The inner-shell ionization and excitation processes by the fast electron impact are investigated. It is found that ionization processes give more significant contribution to the production of hollow atoms. (orig.)

  7. Production of dimeson atoms in high-energy collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyev, L.; Gevorkyan, S.; Voskresenskaya, O.

    2017-04-01

    The production of two-meson electromagnetic bound states and free meson pairs π^+π^- , K^+K^- , π^+K^{∓} in relativistic collisions has been considered. It is shown that using of exact Coulomb wave functions for dimeson atom (DMA) allows one to calculate the yield of discrete states with the desired accuracy. The relative probabilities of production of DMA and meson pairs in the free state are estimated. The amplitude of DMA transition from 1 S to 2 P state, which is essential for the pionium Lamb shift measurements, has been obtained.

  8. Production of dimeson atoms in high-energy collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasyev, L.; Gevorkyan, S.; Voskresenskaya, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    The production of two-meson electromagnetic bound states and free meson pairs π{sup +}π{sup -}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, π{sup +}K{sup -+} in relativistic collisions has been considered. It is shown that using of exact Coulomb wave functions for dimeson atom (DMA) allows one to calculate the yield of discrete states with the desired accuracy. The relative probabilities of production of DMA and meson pairs in the free state are estimated. The amplitude of DMA transition from 1S to 2P state, which is essential for the pionium Lamb shift measurements, has been obtained. (orig.)

  9. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  10. Ionisation and dissociation of water induced by swift multicharged ions; Etude de l'ionisation et de la dissociation d'H{sub 2}O induites par collision avec des ions multicharges rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, S

    2006-02-15

    Ionization and dissociation of water molecules and water clusters induced by 11.7 MeV/A Ni{sup 25+} ions were carried out by imaging techniques. Branching ratios, ionisation cross sections and Kinetic Energy Released distributions have been measured together with fragmentation dynamics studies. Multiple ionization represents approximately 30% of the ionizing events. Double ionization produces in significant way atomic oxygen, considered as a possible precursor of the large production of HO{sub 2} radical in liquid water radiolysis by ions of high Linear Energy Transfer. We evidence a strong selectivity of bond breakage in the case of ion-induced HOD fragmentation. Once the molecule doubly ionized, the breakage of the O-H bond is found 6.5 times more probable than that of the O-D bond. A semi-classical calculation simulating the fragmentation dynamics on the potential energy surface of the ground-state of di-cation H{sub 2}O{sup 2+} makes possible to as well reproduce the preferential nature of the breakage of the O-H bond as the position and the shift of the kinetic energy distributions. First results concerning interaction with water clusters are also reported. Measurements in coincidence are carried out giving access to correlation, with the distributions in energy and angle of the emitted fragments. Mass spectrum points fast intra-cluster proton transfer, leading to the emission of protonated clusters. (author)

  11. Impact of Planetary Gravitation on High Precision Neutral Atom Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharek, H.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bzowski, M.; Schwadron, N.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on physical processes inside and outside our heliosphere. For instance, recent IBEX observations provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction this can result in a significant deflection and acceleration. In this presentation we study the impact of the gravitational effects of the Earth, Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth orbit. We show that planetary gravitational effects do not significantly affect the interstellar neutral gas parameters obtained from IBEX observations. We further study the possibility whether the He focusing cone of the Sun or Jupiter could be measured by IBEX, and whether these cones could be used as an independent measure of the interstellar He temperature. These topics are of particular importance for future missions such as IMAP, which will provide ENA images for a broader energy range and with better sensitivity and resolution.

  12. Martian sub-surface ionising radiation: biosignatures and geology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Ward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars, unshielded by thick atmosphere or global magnetic field, is exposed to high levels of cosmic radiation. This ionising radiation field is deleterious to the survival of dormant cells or spores and the persistence of molecular biomarkers in the subsurface, and so its characterisation is of prime astrobiological interest. Here, we present modelling results of the absorbed radiation dose as a function of depth through the Martian subsurface, suitable for calculation of biomarker persistence. A second major implementation of this dose accumulation rate data is in application of the optically stimulated luminescence technique for dating Martian sediments.

    We present calculations of the dose-depth profile in the Martian subsurface for various scenarios: variations of surface composition (dry regolith, ice, layered permafrost, solar minimum and maximum conditions, locations of different elevation (Olympus Mons, Hellas basin, datum altitude, and increasing atmospheric thickness over geological history. We also model the changing composition of the subsurface radiation field with depth compared between Martian locations with different shielding material, determine the relative dose contributions from primaries of different energies, and discuss particle deflection by the crustal magnetic fields.

  13. Lasing and high temperature phase transitions in atomic systems with dressed state polaritons

    CERN Document Server

    Chestnov, I Yu

    2013-01-01

    We consider the fundamental problem of high temperature phase transitions in the system of high density two-level atoms off-resonantly interacting with a pump field in the presence of optical collisions (OCs) and placed in the cavity. OCs are considered in the framework of thermalization of atomic dressed state (DS) population. For the case of a strong atom-field coupling condition we analyze the problem of thermodynamically equilibrium superradiant phase transition for the order parameter representing a real amplitude of cavity mode and taking place as a result of atomic DSs thermalization process. Such transition is also connected with condensed (coherent) properties of low branch (LB) DS-polaritons occurring in the cavity. For describing non-equilibrium phase transitions we derive Maxwell-Bloch like equations which account for cavity decay rate, collisional decay rate and spontaneous emission. Various aspects of transitions to laser field formation by using atomic DS levels for both positive and negative d...

  14. Modelling of spectral lines emitted by hydrogen isotopes for ionising and recombining plasma conditions of Tokamak edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koubiti, M.; Marandet, Y.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Stamm, R.; Touati, K. [Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires, UMR 6633 CNRS/Universite de Provence, centre de Saint-Jerome, Marseille (Spain); Capes, H.; Escarguel, A.; Guirlet, R.; Michelis, C. De [Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, Association EURATOM-CEA Cadrache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    The plasma in the periphery of a magnetic fusion device plays an important role in the spread of particle and heat power. To optimise its role, it is necessary to characterize the edge plasma and understand all the interaction processes between the plasma constituents (ions, electrons and neutrals), and also their interactions with the device walls. For that purpose, high-resolution passive emission spectroscopy is well suitable since it is a non-intrusive method However, edge plasma diagnostics based on this method requires the accurate modelling of the observed spectra. A lineshape model initially developed for Stark broadening has been recently updated to include the Zeeman effect. The synthetic line profiles can be convolved with a Gaussian or a Lorentzian to account for the Doppler broadening and the instrumental function. For ionising conditions of edge plasmas such as those realized in front of the neutraliser plates (NP) of the Tore-Supra (TS) Ergodic Divertor where the electron temperature and density are usually higher than 10 eV and lower than 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, the electron excitation of deuterium atoms dominates the recombination and only the first lines of the Balmer series are measured By fitting and analysing the spectrum of the deuterium Balmer {alpha} line (D{alpha}) emitted at different radial positions, information on the edge neutral populations can be obtained. In particular the neutral pro' auction mechanism and the dominant neutral relaxation processes can be identified from Doppler profile analysis. For this purpose we have analysed the lineshape of (D{alpha}) emitted in front of an equatorial NP of the ergodic diverter by a plasma region extending up to 2 cm radially away from the NP surface. For recombining plasma conditions such as Hose obtained in axisymmetric divertors, the electron temperature and density are respectively lower than 1 eV and higher than 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}, the volume recombination dominates the excitation

  15. Radiation forces on a three-level atom in the high-order Bessel beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zheng-Ling; Yin Jian-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The general expressions of the average dissipative and dipole forces acting on a A-configuration three-level atom in an arbitrary light field are derived by means of the optical Bloch equations based on the atomic density matrix elements, and the general properties of the average dissipative and dipole forces on a three-level atom in the linearly-polarized high-order Bessel beams (HBBs) are analysed. We find a resonant property (with two resonant peaks) of the dissipative force and a non-resonant property (with two pairs of non-resonant peaks) of the dipole force on the three-level atom, which are completely different from those on the two-level atom. Meanwhile we find a saturation effect of the average dissipative force in the HBB, which comes from the saturation of the upper-level population. Our study shows that the general expressions of the average dissipative and dipole forces on the three-level atom will be simplified to those of the two-level atom under the approximation of large detuning. Finally, we study the axial and azimuthal Doppler cooling of atoms in 1D optical molasses composed of two counter-propagating HBBs and discuss the azimuthal influence of the HBB on the Doppler cooling limit. We also find that the Doppler limit of atoms in the molasses HBB is slightly below the conventional Doppler limit of hг/(2кB) due to the orbital angular momentum lh of the HBB.

  16. Charge transfer and ionisation by intermediate-energy heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toburen, L H; McLawhorn, S L; McLawhorn, R A; Evans, N L; Justiniano, E L B; Shinpaugh, J L; Schultz, D R; Reinhold, C O

    2006-01-01

    The use of heavy ion beams for microbeam studies of mammalian cell response leads to a need to better understand interaction cross sections for collisions of heavy ions with tissue constituents. For ion energies of a few MeV u(-1) or less, ions capture electrons from the media in which they travel and undergo subsequent interactions as partially 'dressed' ions. For example, 16 MeV fluorine ions have an equilibrium charge of 7(+), 32 MeV sulphur ions have an equilibrium charge of approximately 11(+), and as the ion energies decrease the equilibrium charge decreases dramatically. Data for interactions of partially dressed ions are extremely rare, making it difficult to estimate microscopic patterns of energy deposition leading to damage to cellular components. Such estimates, normally obtained by Monte Carlo track structure simulations, require a comprehensive database of differential and total ionisation cross sections as well as charge transfer cross sections. To provide information for track simulation, measurement of total ionisation cross sections have been initiated at East Carolina University using the recoil ion time-of-flight method that also yields cross sections for multiple ionisation processes and charge transfer cross sections; multiple ionisation is prevalent for heavy ion interactions. In addition, measurements of differential ionisation cross sections needed for Monte Carlo simulation of detailed event-by-event particle tracks are under way. Differential, total and multiple ionisation cross sections and electron capture and loss cross sections measured for C(+) ions with energies of 100 and 200 keV u(-1) are described.

  17. High-Throughput Atomic Force Microscopes Operating in Parallel

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeghian, H; Dekker, B; Winters, J; Bijnagte, T; Rijnbeek, R

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an essential nanoinstrument technique for several applications such as cell biology and nanoelectronics metrology and inspection. The need for statistically significant sample sizes means that data collection can be an extremely lengthy process in AFM. The use of a single AFM instrument is known for its very low speed and not being suitable for scanning large areas, resulting in very-low-throughput measurement. We address this challenge by parallelizing AFM instruments. The parallelization is achieved by miniaturizing the AFM instrument and operating many of them simultaneously. This nanoinstrument has the advantages that each miniaturized AFM can be operated independently and that the advances in the field of AFM, both in terms of speed and imaging modalities, can be implemented more easily. Moreover, a parallel AFM instrument also allows one to measure several physical parameters simultaneously; while one instrument measures nano-scale topography, another instrument can meas...

  18. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana; Coto, Borja; Rodríguez, Jorge; Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Knez, Mato

    2015-08-01

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  19. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana, E-mail: a.zuzuarregui@nanogune.eu; Gregorczyk, Keith E. [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier [IK4-Tekniker, Iñaki Goenaga 5, 20600 Eibar (Spain); Rodríguez, Jorge [Torresol Energy (SENER Group), Avda. de Zugazarte 61, 48930 Las Arenas (Spain); Knez, Mato [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-08-10

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  20. Ionisation and the Formation of Low-Mass Protostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, James; Bate, M. R.; Price, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    Molecular clouds are known to have strong magnetic fields and low ionisation rates. Numerical simulations performed with these more realistic conditions yield results closer to those observed, and furthermore, suggest additional observational signatures not yet explored. I will discuss my simulations of the formation of a single protostar starting from one solar mass of gas; the models include a self-consistent treatment of all three non-ideal MHD processes. My focus will be on how the ionisation parameters and non-ideal MHD processes affect the formation of the protostar and its environment.

  1. [Bipolar ionisation of indoor air through ion generators mountable into inflow ventilation and conditioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudarev, A A; Spichkin, G L; Denisikhina, D M; Burtsev, S I

    2010-01-01

    Experimental studies and digital modelling of artificial indoor air ionisation through bipolar ionisers mountable into inflow ventilation and conditioning proved possible creation of continuous even bipolar ion background in indoor air, similar to the natural one.

  2. High sensitivity probe absorption technique for time-of-flight measurements on cold atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mohapatra; C S Unnikrishnan

    2006-06-01

    We report on a phase-sensitive probe absorption technique with high sensitivity, capable of detecting a few hundred ultra-cold atoms in flight in an observation time of a few milliseconds. The large signal-to-noise ratio achieved is sufficient for reliable measurements on low intensity beams of cold atoms. We demonstrate the high sensitivity and figure of merit of the simple method by measuring the time-of-flight of atoms moving upwards from a magneto-optical trap released in the gravitational field.

  3. Kinematically complete study on electron impact ionisation of aligned hydrogen molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senftleben, Arne

    2009-10-28

    Within the work presented here, single ionisation of spatially aligned hydrogen molecules by 200 eV electrons was studied in a kinematically complete experiment. For the first time, a comprehensive set of fully differential cross sections (FDCS) was obtained for this process on a molecular target. The direction of the internuclear axis was derived from the fragment emission of post-collision dissociation of the residual H{sub 2}{sup +} ion. Therefore, a protonic fragment was detected in coincidence with the two final-state electrons using a dedicated reaction microscope and sophisticated data analysis. For direct ionisation into the ionic ground state, existing theoretical cross sections for aligned molecules were tested. Additionally, we observed molecular frame angular distributions of Auger electrons emitted through dissociative autoionisation of H{sub 2}. Earlier findings of kinematically incomplete experiments were reproduced, but the FDCS reveal structures so far unknown. Furthermore, for random alignment, differential cross sections at two distinct values of the mean internuclear distance were obtained, providing new arguments in the current discussion on the nature of discrepancies observed between atomic and molecular collisions. (orig.)

  4. A Simulator for Producing of High Flux Atomic Oxygen Beam by Using ECR Plasma Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuwang DUO; Meishuan LI; Yaming ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the atomic oxygen corrosion of spacecraft materials in low earth orbit environment, an atomic oxygen simulator was established. In the simulator, a 2.45 GHz microwave source with maximum power of 600 W was launched into the circular cavity to generate ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasma. The oxygen ion beam moved onto a negatively biased Mo plate under the condition of symmetry magnetic mirror field confine, then was neutralized and reflected to form oxygen atom beam. The properties of plasma density, electron temperature, plasma space potential and ion incident energy were characterized. The atomic oxygen beam flux was calibrated by measuring the mass loss rate of Kapton during the atomic 5~30 eV and a cross section of φ80 mm could be obtained under the operating pressure of 10-1~10-3 Pa. Such a high flux source can provide accelerated simulation tests of materials and coatings for space applications.

  5. Optimal experimental design for nano-particle atom-counting from high-resolution STEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; De wael, A.; Gonnissen, J.; Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be

    2015-04-15

    In the present paper, the principles of detection theory are used to quantify the probability of error for atom-counting from high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) images. Binary and multiple hypothesis testing have been investigated in order to determine the limits to the precision with which the number of atoms in a projected atomic column can be estimated. The probability of error has been calculated when using STEM images, scattering cross-sections or peak intensities as a criterion to count atoms. Based on this analysis, we conclude that scattering cross-sections perform almost equally well as images and perform better than peak intensities. Furthermore, the optimal STEM detector design can be derived for atom-counting using the expression for the probability of error. We show that for very thin objects LAADF is optimal and that for thicker objects the optimal inner detector angle increases.

  6. High-throughput atomic force microscopes operating in parallel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Hamed; Herfst, Rodolf; Dekker, Bert; Winters, Jasper; Bijnagte, Tom; Rijnbeek, Ramon

    2017-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an essential nanoinstrument technique for several applications such as cell biology and nanoelectronics metrology and inspection. The need for statistically significant sample sizes means that data collection can be an extremely lengthy process in AFM. The use of a single AFM instrument is known for its very low speed and not being suitable for scanning large areas, resulting in a very-low-throughput measurement. We address this challenge by parallelizing AFM instruments. The parallelization is achieved by miniaturizing the AFM instrument and operating many of them simultaneously. This instrument has the advantages that each miniaturized AFM can be operated independently and that the advances in the field of AFM, both in terms of speed and imaging modalities, can be implemented more easily. Moreover, a parallel AFM instrument also allows one to measure several physical parameters simultaneously; while one instrument measures nano-scale topography, another instrument can measure mechanical, electrical, or thermal properties, making it a lab-on-an-instrument. In this paper, a proof of principle of such a parallel AFM instrument has been demonstrated by analyzing the topography of large samples such as semiconductor wafers. This nanoinstrument provides new research opportunities in the nanometrology of wafers and nanolithography masks by enabling real die-to-die and wafer-level measurements and in cell biology by measuring the nano-scale properties of a large number of cells.

  7. Fast cavity-enhanced atom detection with low noise and high fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwin, J.; Trupke, M.; Kenner, J.; Ratnapala, A.; Hinds, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics describes the fundamental interactions between light and matter, and how they can be controlled by shaping the local environment. For example, optical microcavities allow high-efficiency detection and manipulation of single atoms. In this regime, fluctuations of atom number are on the order of the mean number, which can lead to signal fluctuations in excess of the noise on the incident probe field. Here we demonstrate, however, that nonlinearities and multi-atom statistics can together serve to suppress the effects of atomic fluctuations when making local density measurements on clouds of cold atoms. We measure atom densities below 1 per cavity mode volume near the photon shot-noise limit. This is in direct contrast to previous experiments where fluctuations in atom number contribute significantly to the noise. Atom detection is shown to be fast and efficient, reaching fidelities in excess of 97% after 10 μs and 99.9% after 30 μs. PMID:21829180

  8. Atom probe tomography characterizations of high nickel, low copper surveillance RPV welds irradiated to high fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Efsing, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Ringhals Units 3 and 4 reactors in Sweden are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) designed and supplied by Westinghouse Electric Company, with commercial operation in 1981 and 1983, respectively. The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) for both reactors were fabricated with ring forgings of SA 508 class 2 steel. Surveillance blocks for both units were fabricated using the same weld wire heat, welding procedures, and base metals used for the RPVs. The primary interest in these weld metals is because they have very high nickel contents, with 1.58 and 1.66 wt.% for Unit 3 and Unit 4, respectively. The nickel content in Unit 4 is the highest reported nickel content for any Westinghouse PWR. Although both welds contain less than 0.10 wt.% copper, the weld metals have exhibited high irradiation-induced Charpy 41-J transition temperature shifts in surveillance testing. The Charpy impact 41-J shifts and corresponding fluences are 192 °C at 5.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 3 and 162 °C at 6.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 4. These relatively low-copper, high-nickel, radiation-sensitive welds relate to the issue of so-called late-blooming nickel-manganese-silicon phases. Atom probe tomography measurements have revealed ˜2 nm-diameter irradiation-induced precipitates containing manganese, nickel, and silicon, with phosphorus evident in some of the precipitates. However, only a relatively few number of copper atoms are contained within the precipitates. The larger increase in the transition temperature shift in the higher copper weld metal from the Ringhals R3 Unit is associated with copper-enriched regions within the manganese-nickel-silicon-enriched precipitates rather than changes in their size or number density.

  9. Study of Atomization of a Water Jet by High-Intensity Aerial Ultrasonic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Youichi

    2001-05-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the atomization of a water jet by aerially radiating it with high-intensity ultrasonic waves. A sound source that enables the linear generation of high-intensity aerial ultrasonic waves (frequency: approximately 20 kHz) is combined with a cylindrical reflection plate in order to create a standing-wave sound field. An attempt has been made to atomize a water jet of 1 mm diameter by passing it through the above sound field at a velocity of approximately 30 m/s. It has been clarified that nodes of sound pressure in the standing-wave sound field are effective for the atomization of a water jet. In addition, the atomizing phenomenon of a water jet has been observed precisely. The relation between the intensity of sound waves required for atomization and the radiation duration has also been clarified. Even the radiation of sound waves for only 2 ms atomizes water. This suggests that a very fast water jet at 300-500 m/s might be atomized.

  10. Atom-counting in High Resolution Electron Microscopy:TEM or STEM - That's the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-10-27

    In this work, a recently developed quantitative approach based on the principles of detection theory is used in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of High Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR STEM) and HR TEM for atom-counting. So far, HR STEM has been shown to be an appropriate imaging mode to count the number of atoms in a projected atomic column. Recently, it has been demonstrated that HR TEM, when using negative spherical aberration imaging, is suitable for atom-counting as well. The capabilities of both imaging techniques are investigated and compared using the probability of error as a criterion. It is shown that for the same incoming electron dose, HR STEM outperforms HR TEM under common practice standards, i.e. when the decision is based on the probability function of the peak intensities in HR TEM and of the scattering cross-sections in HR STEM. If the atom-counting decision is based on the joint probability function of the image pixel values, the dependence of all image pixel intensities as a function of thickness should be known accurately. Under this assumption, the probability of error may decrease significantly for atom-counting in HR TEM and may, in theory, become lower as compared to HR STEM under the predicted optimal experimental settings. However, the commonly used standard for atom-counting in HR STEM leads to a high performance and has been shown to work in practice.

  11. Separate-type scanner and wideband high-voltage amplifier for atomic-resolution and high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kazuki; Usho, Satoshi; Yamada, Satoshi; Furuya, Shoji; Yoshida, Kiyonori; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2013-04-01

    We have developed a liquid-environment atomic force microscope with a wideband and low-noise scanning system for atomic-scale imaging of dynamic processes at solid/liquid interfaces. The developed scanning system consists of a separate-type scanner and a wideband high-voltage amplifier (HVA). By separating an XY-sample scanner from a Z-tip scanner, we have enabled to use a relatively large sample without compromising the high resonance frequency. We compared various cantilever- and sample-holding mechanisms by experiments and finite element analyses for optimizing the balance between the usability and frequency response characteristics. We specifically designed the HVA to drive the developed scanners, which enabled to achieve the positioning accuracy of 5.7 and 0.53 pm in the XY and Z axes, respectively. Such an excellent noise performance allowed us to perform atomic-resolution imaging of mica and calcite in liquid. Furthermore, we demonstrate in situ and atomic-resolution imaging of the calcite crystal growth process in water.

  12. Resonance fluorescence of a cold atom in a high-finesse resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Bienert, M; Torres, J M; Zippilli, S; Bienert, Marc; Morigi, Giovanna; Zippilli, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    We study the spectra of emission of a system composed by an atom, tightly confined inside a high-finesse resonator, when the atom is driven by a laser and is at steady state of the cooling dynamics induced by laser and cavity field. In general, the spectrum of resonance fluorescence and the spectrum at the cavity output contain complementary information about the dynamics undergone by the system. In certain parameter regimes, quantum interference effects between the scattering processes induced by cavity and laser field lead to the selective suppression of features of the resonance fluorescence spectrum, which are otherwise visible in the spectrum of laser-cooled atoms in free space.

  13. Atomic-Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal Oxides for High Temperature Moving Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0166 Atomic -Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal OxideS ASHLIE MARTINI UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA MERCED Final Report 06/01/2015...COVERED (From - To)      01-05-2012 to 30-04-2015 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atomic -Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal Oxides for High Temperature Moving...understand, at an atomic level, the material properties that influence the thermal, mechanical and tribological behavior of intrinsically layered binary

  14. Human MCG measurements with a high-sensitivity potassium atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, K; Ito, Y; Kobayashi, T

    2012-06-01

    Measuring biomagnetic fields, such as magnetocardiograms (MCGs), is important for investigating biological functions. To address to this need, we developed an optically pumped atomic magnetometer. In this study, human MCGs were acquired using a potassium atomic magnetometer without any modulating systems. The sensitivity of the magnetometer is comparable to that of high-T(c) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and is sufficient for acquiring human MCGs. The activity of a human heart estimated from the MCG maps agrees well with that measured with SQUID magnetometers. Thus, our magnetometer produces reliable results, which demonstrate the potential of our atomic magnetometer for biomagnetic measurements.

  15. Excitation Spectrum of Spin-1 Bosonic Atoms in an Optical Lattice with High Filling Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jing-Min

    2007-01-01

    The Green's function and the higher-order correlation functions of spin-1 cold atoms in an optical lattice are defined.Because we consider the problem of spin-1 Bose condensed atoms in an optical lattice with high filling factors,I.e.,the number density of Bose condensed atoms no is large,the fluctuation of them can be neglected and we take mean-field approximation for the higher-order terms.The excitation spectra for both the polar case and the ferromagnetic case are obtained and analyzed.

  16. High accuracy measure of atomic polarizability in an optical lattice clock

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, J. A.; Lemke, N. D.; Hinkley, N.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fox, R. W.; Ludlow, A. D.; Oates, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Despite being a canonical example of quantum mechanical perturbation theory, as well as one of the earliest observed spectroscopic shifts, the Stark effect contributes the largest source of uncertainty in a modern optical atomic clock through blackbody radiation. By employing an ultracold, trapped atomic ensemble and high stability optical clock, we characterize the quadratic Stark effect with unprecedented precision. We report the ytterbium optical clock's sensitivity to electric fields (suc...

  17. Quasi-stationary spectrum of Rydberg atoms in the field of a highly charged ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R.K.; Nedeljkovic, N.N.

    1985-05-14

    The complex energies of highly excited states of a hydrogen-like atom in the presence of a multicharged ion are determined for internuclear distances, corresponding to the position of energy levels close to the top of the potential barrier which separates the two Coulomb centres. The results obtained are used to determine the contribution of considered internuclear distances to the electron-capture cross section in Rydberg-atom-multicharged-ion slow collisions.

  18. CF3(+) and CF2H(+): new reagents for n-alkane determination in chemical ionisation reaction mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Robert S; Ouheda, Saleh A; Evans, Corey J; Monks, Paul S

    2016-11-28

    Alkanes provide a particular analytical challenge to commonly used chemical ionisation methods such as proton-transfer from water owing to their basicity. It is demonstrated that the fluorocarbon ions CF3(+) and CF2H(+), generated from CF4, as reagents provide an effective means of detecting light n-alkanes in the range C2-C6 using direct chemical ionisation mass spectrometry. The present work assesses the applicability of the reagents in Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometric (CI-TOF-MS) environments with factors such as high moisture content, operating pressures of 1-10 Torr, accelerating electric fields (E/N) and long-lived intermediate complex formation. Of the commonly used chemical ionisation reagents, H3O(+) and NO(+) only react with hexane and higher while O2(+) reacts with all the target samples, but creates significant fragmentation. By contrast, CF3(+) and CF2H(+) acting together were found to produce little or no fragmentation. In dry conditions with E/N = 100 Td or higher the relative intensity of CF2H(+) to CF3(+) was mostly less than 1% but always less than 3%, making CF3(+) the main reagent ion. Using O2(+) in a parallel series of experiments, a substantially greater degree of fragmentation was observed. The detection sensitivities of the alkanes with CF3(+) and CF2H(+), while relatively low, were found to be better than those observed with O2(+). Experiments using alkane mixtures in the ppm range have shown the ionisation technique based on CF3(+) and CF2H(+) to be particularly useful for measurements of alkane/air mixtures found in polluted environments. As a demonstration of the technique's effectiveness in complex mixtures, the detection of n-alkanes in a smoker's breath is demonstrated.

  19. Ionisation in turbulent magnetic molecular clouds. I. Effect on density and mass-to-flux ratio structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu; Caselli, Paola

    2017-05-01

    little structural difference between the SL and CR-only models, while below this threshold the ionisation structure significantly affects the formation of filaments. This holds true for both sets of models. Analysis of the mass within cores and filaments shows that the mass decreases as the degree of turbulence increases. Finally, observed filaments within the Taurus L1495/B213 complex are best reproduced by models with supercritical mass-to-flux ratios and/or at least mildly supersonic turbulence, however, our models show that the sterile fibres observed within Taurus may occur in highly ionised, subcritical environments. Conclusions: From the analysis of the simulations, we conclude that in the presence of low turbulent velocities, the ionisation structure of the medium still plays a role in shaping the structure of the cloud, however, above Mach 2, the differences between the two profiles become indistinguishable. However, differences may be present in the underlying velocity structure. Kinematics studies will be the focus of the next paper in this series. Regions with fertile fibres likely indicate a trans- or supercritical mass-to-flux ratio within the region while sterile fibres are likely subcritical and transient.

  20. Invasive oral cancer stem cells display resistance to ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemenetzidis, Emilios; Gammon, Luke; Biddle, Adrian; Emich, Helena; Mackenzie, Ian C

    2015-12-22

    There is a significant amount of evidence to suggest that human tumors are driven and maintained by a sub-population of cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSC). In the case of head and neck cancer, such cells have been characterised by high expression levels of CD44 cell surface glycoprotein, while we have previously shown the presence of two diverse oral CSC populations in vitro, with different capacities for cell migration and proliferation. Here, we examined the response of oral CSC populations to ionising radiation (IR), a front-line measure for the treatment of head and neck tumors. We show that oral CSC initially display resistance to IR-induced growth arrest as well as relative apoptotic resistance. We propose that this is a result of preferential activation of the DNA damagerepair pathway in oral CSC with increased activation of ATM and BRCA1, elevated levels of DNA repair proteins RAD52, XLF, and a significantly faster rate of DNA double-strand-breaks clearance 24 hours following IR. By visually identifying CSC sub-populations undergoing EMT, we show that EMT-CSC represent the majority of invasive cells, and are more radio-resistant than any other population in re-constructed 3D tissues. We provide evidence that IR is not sufficient to eliminate CSC in vitro, and that sensitization of CD44hi/ESAlow cells to IR, followed by secondary EMT blockade, could be critical in order to reduce primary tumor recurrence, but more importantly to be able to eradicate cells capable of invasion and distant metastasis.

  1. Electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms inside a high-finesse optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiteng; Kumar, Santosh; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Chao, Yuanxi; Fan, Haoquan; Shaffer, James

    2016-05-01

    We present experimental work on the observation of Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) inside a high-finesse optical cavity. We show that a cold atomic cloud with controllable number of atoms can be transported into the cavity by using a focus-tunable lens. Rydberg atoms are excited via a two-photon transition in a ladder-type EIT configuration. A three-peak structure in the cavity transmission can be observed when Rydberg EIT atoms are generated inside the cavity. The two side peaks are caused by ``bright state polaritons'', while the central peak corresponds to a ``dark-state polariton'' The cavity Rydberg EIT system can be useful for single photon generation using the Rydberg blockade effect, studying many-body physics, and generating novel quantum states amongst many other applications. This work is supported by AFOSR.

  2. Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Argentero, G; Kotakoski, J; Eder, F R; Meyer, J C

    2015-01-01

    We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes, only the shift in the peak positions must be detected if the beam is limited to a single atom. We conclude that the experimental case will be challenging but is not excluded by the physical principles as far as considered here. Moreover, the initial experiments demonstrate the separation of gold and carbon based on a signal that is related to their mass, rather than their atomic number.

  3. Atomic-Resolution Kinked Structure of an Alkylporphyrin on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yiing; Panduwinata, Dwi; Sintic, Maxine; Sum, Tze Jing; Hush, Noel S; Crossley, Maxwell J; Reimers, Jeffrey R

    2011-01-20

    The atomic structure of the chains of an alkyl porphyrin (5,10,15,20-tetranonadecylporphyrin) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) at the solid/liquid interface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and 1-phenyloctane is resolved using calibrated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), density functional theory (DFT) image simulations, and ONIOM-based geometry optimizations. While atomic structures are often readily determined for porphyrin SAMs, the determination of the structure of alkyl-chain connections has not previously been possible. A graphical calibration procedure is introduced, allowing accurate observation of SAM lattice parameters, and, of the many possible atomic structures modeled, only the lowest-energy structure obtained was found to predict the observed lattice parameters and image topography. Hydrogen atoms are shown to provide the conduit for the tunneling current through the alkyl chains.

  4. Realizing high magnetic moments in fcc Fe nanoparticles through atomic structure stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Thornton, S C; Binns, C

    2012-05-02

    We describe the realization of a high moment state in fcc Fe nanoparticles through a controlled change in their atomic structure. Embedding Fe nanoparticles in a Cu(1-x)Au(x) matrix causes their atomic structure to switch from bcc to fcc. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements show that the structure in both the matrix and the Fe nanoparticles expands as the amount of Au in the matrix is increased, with the data indicating a tetragonal stretch in the Fe nanoparticles. The samples were prepared directly from the gas phase by co-deposition, using a gas aggregation source and MBE-type sources respectively for the nanoparticle and matrix materials. The structure change in the Fe nanoparticles is accompanied by a sharp increase in atomic magnetic moment, ultimately to values of ~2.5 ± 0.3 μ(B)/atom .

  5. Intense deuterium nuclear fusion of pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally within highly deuterated atom clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshiaki, A; Zhang, Y C

    2002-01-01

    Embedded nano-Pd particles of 5 nm in size instantly abundant D-atoms more than 250% in the atomic ratio against Pd-atoms at room temperature when they are kept in D sub 2 gas pressurized to less than 10 atm. In such ultrahigh densities, 2-4 D-atoms can be coagulated inside each octahedral space of Pd lattice (pycnodeuterium-lump). When a stimulation energy such as latticequake causing by ultrasonic wave was supplied to those highly deuterated Pd particles, intense deuterium nuclear fusion (''solid fusion'') was generated there and both excess heat and sup 4 He gas were abundantly produced. Naturally, these facts can not be realized at all in bulk Pd. The results show that the nuclear fusion occurs without any hazardous rays in pycnodeuterium-lumps coagulated locally inside the each cell of the host metal lattice. These unit cells correspond to minimum unit of the solid fusion reactor as a ''Lattice Reactor''. (author)

  6. Dual-axis, high data-rate atom interferometer via cold ensemble exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Rakholia, Akash V; Biedermann, Grant W

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a dual-axis accelerometer and gyroscope atom interferometer, which forms the building blocks of a six-axis inertial measurement unit. By recapturing the atoms after the interferometer sequence, we maintain a large atom number at high data-rates of 50 to 100 measurements per second. Two cold ensembles are formed in trap zones located a few centimeters apart, and are launched toward one-another. During their ballistic trajectory, they are interrogated with a stimulated Raman sequence, detected, and recaptured in the opposing trap zone. We achieve sensitivities at $\\mathrm{\\mu \\mathit{g} / \\sqrt{Hz}}$ and $\\mathrm{\\mu rad / s / \\sqrt{Hz}}$ levels, making this a compelling prospect for expanding the use of atom interferometer inertial sensors beyond benign laboratory environments.

  7. Carrier-wave Rabi-flopping signatures in high-order harmonic generation for alkali atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappina, M F; Pérez-Hernández, J A; Landsman, A S; Zimmermann, T; Lewenstein, M; Roso, L; Krausz, F

    2015-04-10

    We present a theoretical investigation of carrier-wave Rabi flopping in real atoms by employing numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in alkali species. Given the short HHG cutoff, related to the low saturation intensity, we concentrate on the features of the third harmonic of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) atoms. For pulse areas of 2π and Na atoms, a characteristic unique peak appears, which, after analyzing the ground state population, we correlate with the conventional Rabi flopping. On the other hand, for larger pulse areas, carrier-wave Rabi flopping occurs, and is associated with a more complex structure in the third harmonic. These characteristics observed in K atoms indicate the breakdown of the area theorem, as was already demonstrated under similar circumstances in narrow band gap semiconductors.

  8. Carrier-wave Rabi flopping signatures in high-order harmonic generation for alkali atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Landsman, A S; Zimmermann, T; Lewenstein, M; Roso, L; Krausz, F

    2015-01-01

    We present the first theoretical investigation of carrier-wave Rabi flopping in real atoms by employing numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in alkali species. Given the short HHG cutoff, related to the low saturation intensity, we concentrate on the features of the third harmonic of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) atoms. For pulse areas of 2$\\pi$ and Na atoms, a characteristic unique peak appears, which, after analyzing the ground state population, we correlate with the conventional Rabi flopping. On the other hand, for larger pulse areas, carrier-wave Rabi flopping occurs, and is associated with a more complex structure in the third harmonic. These new characteristics observed in K atoms indicate the breakdown of the area theorem, as was already demonstrated under similar circumstances in narrow band gap semiconductors.

  9. Atomic fountain clock with very high frequency stability employing a pulse-tube-cryocooled sapphire oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Hagimoto, Ken; Hirano, Iku; Watabe, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Hartnett, John G

    2014-09-01

    The frequency stability of an atomic fountain clock was significantly improved by employing an ultra-stable local oscillator and increasing the number of atoms detected after the Ramsey interrogation, resulting in a measured Allan deviation of 8.3 × 10(-14)τ(-1/2)). A cryogenic sapphire oscillator using an ultra-low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler and cryostat, without the need for refilling with liquid helium, was applied as a local oscillator and a frequency reference. High atom number was achieved by the high power of the cooling laser beams and optical pumping to the Zeeman sublevel m(F) = 0 employed for a frequency measurement, although vapor-loaded optical molasses with the simple (001) configuration was used for the atomic fountain clock. The resulting stability is not limited by the Dick effect as it is when a BVA quartz oscillator is used as the local oscillator. The stability reached the quantum projection noise limit to within 11%. Using a combination of a cryocooled sapphire oscillator and techniques to enhance the atom number, the frequency stability of any atomic fountain clock, already established as primary frequency standard, may be improved without opening its vacuum chamber.

  10. The potential use of diamond coated tungsten tips as a field ionisation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, A.; Prawer, S.; Legge, G.J.F.; Kostidis, L.I. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Tungsten tips are convenient for use in a high brightness gaseous phase field ionisation source. However, the lifetime of these tips is not adequate for practical use. The authors are investigating whether coating tungsten tips with diamond using Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) will improve the practicality of using these tips by an improvement in longevity of the source and/or an improvement in brightness due to the effects of the property of negative electron affinity which has been observed on CVD diamond. 1 ref.

  11. KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF THERMOLUMINESCENCE DOSE RESPONSE: LONG OVERDUE CONFRONTATION WITH THE EFFECTS OF IONISATION DENSITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Y S; Eliyahu, I; Oster, L

    2016-12-01

    The reader will time-travel through almost seven decades of kinetic models and mathematical simulations of thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics based on the band-gap theory of the solid state. From post-World-War II, ideas concerning electron trapping mechanisms to the highly idealised one trap-one recombination (OTOR) model first elaborated in 1956 but still in 'high gear' today. The review caresses but purposely avoids in-depth discussion of the endless stream of papers discussing the intricacies of glow peak shapes arising from first-order, second-order, mixed-order and general-order kinetics predominantly based on non-interacting systems, and then on to the more physically realistic scenarios that have attempted to analyse complex systems involving ever greater numbers of interacting trapping centres, luminescent centres and non-luminescent centres. The review emphasises the difficulty the band-gap models have in the simulation of dose response linear/supralinear behaviour and especially the dependence of the supralinearity on ionisation density. The significance of the non-observation of filling-rate supralinearity in the absorption stage is emphasised since it removes from consideration the possibility of TL supralinearity arising from irradiation stage supralinearity. The importance of the simultaneous action of both localised and delocalised transitions has gradually penetrated the mindset of the community of kinetic researchers, but most simulations have concentrated on the shape of glow peaks and the extraction of the glow peak parameters, E (the thermal activation energy) and s (the attempt-to-escape frequency). The simulation of linear/supralinear dose response and its dependence on ionisation density have been largely avoided until recently due to the fundamental schism between the effects of ionisation density and some basic assumptions of the band-gap model. The review finishes with an in-depth presentation and discussion of the most recent

  12. IFU Spectroscopy of Southern Planetary Nebulae V: Low-Ionisation Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Dopita, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    In this fifth paper of the series, we examine the spectroscopy and morphology of four southern Galactic planetary nebulae Hen 2-141, NGC 5307, IC 2553, and PB 6 using new integral field spectroscopy data. The morphologies and ionisation structures of the sample are given as a set of emission-line maps. In addition, the physical conditions, chemical compositions, and kinematical characteristics of these objects are derived. The results show that PB 6 and Hen 2-141 are of very high excitation classes and IC 2553 and NGC 5307 are mid to high excitation objects. The elemental abundances reveal that PB 6 is of Type I, Hen 2-141 and IC 2553 are of Type IIa, and NGC 5307 is of Type IIb/III. The observations unveil the presence of well-defined low-ionisation structures or `knots' in all objects. The diagnostic diagrams reveal that the excitation mechanism of these knots is probably by photoionisation of dense material by the nebular central stars. The physical analysis of six of these knots show no significant differences with their surrounding nebular gas, except their lower electron densities. In spite of the enhancement of the low-ionisation emission lines of these knots, their chemical abundances are nearly comparable to their surrounding nebulae, with the exception of perhaps slightly higher nitrogen abundances in the NGC 5307 knots. The integrated spectrum of IC 2553 reveals that nearly all key lines that have led researchers to characterise its central star as a weak-emission line star type are in fact of nebular origin.

  13. PROBING THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF ATOMIC GAS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M. [Department of Physics and Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, UCSD, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Prochaska, J. Xavier, E-mail: mneeleman@physics.ucsd.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, 1156 High Street, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    A new method is used to measure the physical conditions of the gas in damped Lyα systems (DLAs). Using high-resolution absorption spectra of a sample of 80 DLAs, we are able to measure the ratio of the upper and lower fine-structure levels of the ground state of C{sup +} and Si{sup +}. These ratios are determined solely by the physical conditions of the gas. We explore the allowed physical parameter space using a Monte Carlo Markov chain method to constrain simultaneously the temperature, neutral hydrogen density, and electron density of each DLA. The results indicate that at least 5% of all DLAs have the bulk of their gas in a dense, cold phase with typical densities of ∼100 cm{sup –3} and temperatures below 500 K. We further find that the typical pressure of DLAs in our sample is log (P/k{sub B} ) = 3.4 (K cm{sup –3}), which is comparable to the pressure of the local interstellar medium (ISM), and that the components containing the bulk of the neutral gas can be quite small with absorption sizes as small as a few parsecs. We show that the majority of the systems are consistent with having densities significantly higher than expected for a purely canonical warm neutral medium, indicating that significant quantities of dense gas (i.e., n {sub H} > 0.1 cm{sup –3}) are required to match observations. Finally, we identify eight systems with positive detections of Si II*. These systems have pressures (P/k{sub B} ) in excess of 20,000 K cm{sup –3}, which suggest that these systems tag a highly turbulent ISM in young, star-forming galaxies.

  14. Characterization of a velocity-tunable 87Rb cold atomic source with a high-speed imaging technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Yan-Ying; Zhu Chang-Xing; Wang Xiao-Jia; Xue Hong-Bo; Ye Xiong-Ying; Zhou Zhao-Ying

    2009-01-01

    This paper has developed and characterized a method to produce a velocity-tunable 87Rb cold atomic source for atomic interferometry application.Using a high speed fluorescence imaging technology,it reports that the dynamic process of the atomic source formation is observed and the source performances including the flux and the initial velocity axe characterized.A tunable atomic source with the initial velocity of 1.4~2.6 m/s and the atomic source flux of 2×108~6×109 atoms/s has been obtained with the built experimental setup.

  15. Probing the Physical Conditions of Atomic Gas at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    A new method is used to measure the physical conditions of the gas in damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs). Using high resolution absorption spectra of a sample of 80 DLAs, we are able to measure the ratio of the upper to lower fine-structure levels of the ground state of C II and Si II. These ratios are determined solely by the physical conditions of the gas. We explore the allowed physical parameter space using a Monte Carlo Markov Chain method to constrain simultaneously the temperature, neutral hydrogen density, and electron density of each DLA. The results indicate that at least 5 % of all DLAs have the bulk of their gas in a dense, cold phase with typical densities of ~100 cm-3 and temperatures below 500 K. We further find that the typical pressure of DLAs in our sample is log(P/k) = 3.4 [K cm-3], which is comparable to the pressure of the local interstellar medium (ISM), and that the components containing the bulk of the neutral gas can be quite small with absorption sizes as small as a few parsec. We sho...

  16. Proceedings of the workshop on opportunities for atomic physics using slow, highly-charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The study of atomic physics with highly-charged ions is an area of intense activity at the present time because of a convergence of theoretical interest and advances in experimental techniques. The purpose of the Argonne ''Workshop on Opportunities for Atomic Physics Using Slow, Highly-Charged Ions'' was to bring together atomic, nuclear, and accelerator physicists in order to identify what new facilities would be most useful for the atomic physics community. The program included discussion of existing once-through machines, advanced ion sources, recoil ion techniques, ion traps, and cooler rings. One of the topics of the Workshop was to discuss possible improvement to the ANL Tandem-Linac facility (ATLAS) to enhance the capability for slowing down ions after they are stripped to a high-charge state (the Accel/Decel technique). Another topic was the opportunity for atomic physics provided by the ECR ion source which is being built for the Uranium Upgrade of ATLAS. 18 analytics were prepared for the individual papers in this volume.

  17. Magnetorotational instability in stratified, weakly ionised accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Salmeron, Roberto Aureliano; Salmeron, Raquel; Wardle, Mark

    2003-01-01

    We present a linear analysis of the vertical structure and growth of the magnetorotational instability in stratified, weakly ionised accretion discs, such as protostellar and quiescent dwarf novae systems. The method includes the effects of the magnetic coupling, the conductivity regime of the fluid and the strength of the magnetic field, which is initially vertical. The conductivity is treated as a tensor and assumed constant with height. We obtained solutions for the structure and growth rate of global unstable modes for different conductivity regimes, strengths of the initial magnetic field and coupling between ionised and neutral components of the fluid. The envelopes of short-wavelenght perturbations are determined by the action of competing local growth rates at different heights, driven by the vertical stratification of the disc. Ambipolar diffusion perturbations peak consistently higher above the midplane than modes including Hall conductivity. For weak coupling, perturbations including the Hall effec...

  18. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  19. AtomDB and PyAtomDB: Atomic Data and Modelling Tools for High Energy and Non-Maxwellian Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Adam; Smith, Randall K.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Cui, Xiaohong

    2016-04-01

    The release of AtomDB 3 included a large wealth of inner shell ionization and excitation data allowing accurate modeling of non-equilibrium plasmas. We describe the newly calculated data and compare it to published literature data. We apply the new models to existing supernova remnant data such as W49B and N132D. We further outline progress towards AtomDB 3.1, including a new energy-dependent charge exchange cross sections.We present newly developed models for the spectra of electron-electron bremsstrahlung and those due to non-Maxwellian electron distributions.Finally, we present our new atomic database access tools, released as PyAtomDB, allowing powerful use of the underlying fundamental atomic data as well as the spectral emissivities.

  20. Fully kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection in partially ionised gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Jiang, W.; Lapenta, G.; Markidis, S.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection has been explored for decades as a way to convert magnetic energy into kinetic energy and heat and to accelerate particles in environments as different as the solar surface, planetary magnetospheres, the solar wind, accretion disks, laboratory plasmas. When studying reconnection via simulations, it is usually assumed that the plasma is fully ionised, as it is indeed the case in many of the above-mentioned cases. There are, however, exceptions, the most notable being the lower solar atmosphere. Small ionisation fractions are registered also in the warm neutral interstellar medium, in dense interstellar clouds, in protostellar and protoplanetary accreditation disks, in tokamak edge plasmas and in ad-hoc laboratory experiments [1]. We study here how magnetic reconnection is modified by the presence of a neutral background, i.e. when the majority of the gas is not ionised. The ionised plasma is simulated with the fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code iPic3D [2]. Collisions with the neutral background are introduced via a Monte Carlo plug-in. The standard Monte Carlo procedure [3] is employed to account for elastic, excitation and ionization electron-neutral collisions, as well as for elastic scattering and charge exchange ion-neutral collisions. Collisions with the background introduce resistivity in an otherwise collisionless plasma and modifications of the particle distribution functions: particles (and ions at a faster rate) tend to thermalise to the background. To pinpoint the consequences of this, we compare reconnection simulations with and without background. References [1] E E Lawrence et al. Physical review letters, 110(1):015001, 2013. [2] S Markidis et al. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 80(7):1509-1519, 2010. [3] K Nanbu. IEEE Transactions on plasma science, 28(3):971-990, 2000.

  1. Medical response to effects of ionising radiation. [Nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosbie, W.A.; Gittus, J.H. (UKAEA Headquarters, London (UK))

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on 'Medical Response to Effects of Ionising Radiation' in 1989 in the form of nineteen papers published as a book. Topics discussed include radiation accidents at nuclear facilities, the medical management of radiation casualties, the responsibilities, plans and resources for coping with a nuclear accident and finally the long term effects of radiation, including leukaemia epidemiology studies. All papers were selected and indexed separately. (UK).

  2. IEC standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytchev, M; Ambrosi, P; Behrens, R; Chiaro, P

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents IEC/SC 45B 'Radiation protection instrumentation' and its standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation: IEC 61526 Ed. 3 for active personal dosemeters and IEC 62387-1 for passive integrating dosimetry systems. The transposition of these standards as CENELEC (European) standards is also discussed together with the collaboration between IEC/SC 45B and ISO/TC 85/SC 2.

  3. Electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry: principles and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C S; Lam, C W K; Chan, M H M; Cheung, R C K; Law, L K; Lit, L C W; Ng, K F; Suen, M W M; Tai, H L

    2003-01-01

    This mini-review provides a general understanding of electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) which has become an increasingly important technique in the clinical laboratory for structural study or quantitative measurement of metabolites in a complex biological sample. The first part of the review explains the electrospray ionisation process, design of mass spectrometers with separation capability, characteristics of the mass spectrum, and practical considerations in quantitative analysis. The second part then focuses on some clinical applications. The capability of ESI-tandem-MS in measuring bio-molecules sharing similar molecular structures makes it particularly useful in screening for inborn errors of amino acid, fatty acid, purine, pyrimidine metabolism and diagnosis of galactosaemia and peroxisomal disorders. Electrospray ionisation is also efficient in generating cluster ions for structural elucidation of macromolecules. This has fostered a new and improved approach (vs electrophoresis) for identification and quantification of haemoglobin variants. With the understanding of glycohaemoglobin structure, an IFCC reference method for glycohaemoglobin assay has been established using ESI-MS. It represents a significant advancement for the standardisation of HbA1c in diabetic monitoring. With its other applications such as in therapeutic drug monitoring, ESI-MS will continue to exert an important influence in the future development and organisation of the clinical laboratory service.

  4. Erich Regener and the maximum in ionisation of the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, P

    2014-01-01

    In the 1930s the German physicist Erich Regener (1881-1955) did important work on the measurement of the rate of production of ionisation deep under-water and in the atmosphere. He discovered, along with one of his students, Georg Pfotzer, the altitude at which the production of ionisation in the atmosphere reaches a maximum, often, but misleadingly, called the Pfotzer maximum. Regener was one of the first to estimate the energy density of cosmic rays, an estimate that was used by Baade and Zwicky to bolster their postulate that supernovae might be their source. Yet Regener's name is less recognised by present-day cosmic ray physicists than it should be largely because in 1937 he was forced to take early retirement by the National Socialists as his wife had Jewish ancestors. In this paper we briefly review his work on cosmic rays and recommend an alternative naming of the ionisation maximum. The influence that Regener had on the field through his son, his son-in-law, his grandsons and his students and through...

  5. Effects of discharge current and voltage on the high density of metastable helium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengXian-Ping; DAndruczyk; BWJames; KTakiyama; SNamba; TOda

    2003-01-01

    Both hollow-cathode and Penning-type discharges were adopted toexcite helium atoms to a metastable state. Experimental data indicate that Penning discharge is more suitable for generating high fractions of metastables in a low-density helium hean for laser-induced fluorescence technique in measuring electric fields at the edge of a plasma. The metastable density increases with increasing helium gas pressure in the range of 1.33×10-2-66.7Pa. The highest metastable density of 3.8×1016m-3 is observed at a static gas pressure of 66.7Pa. An approximately linear relationship between the density of metastable helium atoms and the plasma discharge current is observed. Magnetic field plays a very important role in producing a high density of metastable atoms in Penning discharge.

  6. Effects of discharge current and voltage on the high density of metastable helium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xian-Ping(冯贤平); D Andruczyk; B W James; K Takiyama; S Namba; T Oda

    2003-01-01

    Both hollow-cathode and Penning-type discharges were adopted to excite helium atoms to a metastable state.Experimental data indicate that Penning discharge is more suitable for generating high fractions of metastables in a low-density helium beam for laser-induced fluorescence technique in measuring electric fields at the edge of a plasma.The metastable density increases with increasing helium gas pressure in the range of 1.33× 10-2-66.7Pa. The highest metastable density of 3.8 × 1016m-3 is observed at a static gas pressure of 66.7Pa. An approximately linear relationship between the density of metastable helium atoms and the plasma discharge current is observed. Magnetic field plays a very important role in producing a high density of metastable atoms in Penning discharge.

  7. Ultrasonic atomization of tissue and its role in tissue fractionation by high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2012-12-01

    Atomization and fountain formation is a well-known phenomenon that occurs when a focused ultrasound wave in liquid encounters an air interface. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to fractionate a tissue into submicron-sized fragments in a process termed boiling histotripsy, wherein the focused ultrasound wave superheats the tissue at the focus, producing a millimetre-sized boiling or vapour bubble in several milliseconds. Yet the question of how this millimetre-sized boiling bubble creates submicron-sized tissue fragments remains. The hypothesis of this work is that the tissue can behave as a liquid such that it atomizes and forms a fountain within the vapour bubble produced in boiling histotripsy. We describe an experiment, in which a 2 MHz HIFU transducer (maximum in situ intensity of 24 000 W cm-2) was aligned with an air-tissue interface meant to simulate the boiling bubble. Atomization and fountain formation was observed with high-speed photography and resulted in tissue erosion. Histological examination of the atomized tissue showed whole and fragmented cells and nuclei. Air-liquid interfaces were also filmed. Our conclusion was that HIFU can fountain and atomize tissue. Although this process does not entirely mimic what was observed in liquids, it does explain many aspects of tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy.

  8. Ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by fast charged particle impact: identification of mechanisms for double K-shell vacancy production as a function of the projectile charge and velocity; Ionisation et excitation de l'atome de lithium par impact de particules chargees rapides: Identification des mecanismes de creation de deux lacunes en couche K du lithium en fonction de la charge et de la vitesse du projectile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangama, J

    2002-11-01

    Ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by fast charged particle impact: identification of mechanisms for double K-shell vacancy production as a function of projectile charge and velocity. Auger electron spectroscopy is used for an experimental investigation of ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by ions (Kr34{sup +} and Ar18{sup +}) and electrons at high impact velocities (from 6 to 60 a.u.). In particular, relative contributions of the mechanisms responsible for lithium K-shell ionization-excitation are determined for various projectile charges Zp and velocities vp. A large range of perturbation parameters |Zp|/vp is explored (|Zp|/vp = 0,05 - 0,7 a.u.). From single K-shell excitation results, it appears that the projectile-electron interaction gives mainly rise to a dipole-like transition 1s -> np Concerning K-shell ionization-excitation, the separation of the TS2 (two independent projectile-electron interactions) and TS1 (one projectile-electron interaction) mechanisms responsible for the formation of the 2snp 1,3P and 2sns 1,3S lithium states is performed. In TS1 process, the projectile-electron interaction can be followed by an electron-electron interaction (dielectronic process) or by an internal rearrangement of the residual target after a sudden potential change (shake process). From Born theory, ab initio calculations are performed. The good agreement between theoretical and experimental results confirms the mechanism identification. For the production of P states, TS1 is found to be strongly dominant for small |Zp|/vp values and TS2 is found to be most important for large |Zp|/vp values. Since P states cannot be formed significantly via a shake process, the TS1 and TS2 separation provides a direct signature of the dielectronic process. On the other hand, the TS1 process is shown to be the unique process for producing the S states. At the moment, only the shake aspect of the TS1 process can explain the fact that the 2s3s configuration is

  9. High Throughput Atomic Layer Deposition Processes: High Pressure Operations, New Reactor Designs, and Novel Metal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, MoatazBellah Mahmoud

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase nano-coating process that deposits very uniform and conformal thin film materials with sub-angstrom level thickness control on various substrates. These unique properties made ALD a platform technology for numerous products and applications. However, most of these applications are limited to the lab scale due to the low process throughput relative to the other deposition techniques, which hinders its industrial adoption. In addition to the low throughput, the process development for certain applications usually faces other obstacles, such as: a required new processing mode (e.g., batch vs continuous) or process conditions (e.g., low temperature), absence of an appropriate reactor design for a specific substrate and sometimes the lack of a suitable chemistry. This dissertation studies different aspects of ALD process development for prospect applications in the semiconductor, textiles, and battery industries, as well as novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials. The investigation of a high pressure, low temperature ALD process for metal oxides deposition using multiple process chemistry revealed the vital importance of the gas velocity over the substrate to achieve fast depositions at these challenging processing conditions. Also in this work, two unique high throughput ALD reactor designs are reported. The first is a continuous roll-to-roll ALD reactor for ultra-fast coatings on porous, flexible substrates with very high surface area. While the second reactor is an ALD delivery head that allows for in loco ALD coatings that can be executed under ambient conditions (even outdoors) on large surfaces while still maintaining very high deposition rates. As a proof of concept, part of a parked automobile window was coated using the ALD delivery head. Another process development shown herein is the improvement achieved in the selective synthesis of organic-inorganic materials using an ALD based process called sequential vapor

  10. High-order inertial phase shifts for time-domain atom interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Bongs, K; Kasevich, M A; Bongs, Kai; Launay, Romain; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    High-order inertial phase shifts are calculated for time-domain atom interferometers. We obtain closed-form analytic expressions for these shifts in accelerometer, gyroscope, optical clock and photon recoil measurement configurations. Our analysis includes Coriolis, centrifugal, gravitational, and gravity gradient-induced forces. We identify new shifts which arise at levels relevant to current and planned experiments.

  11. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report, FY 1989--91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

  12. Junior High School Students' Ideas about the Shape and Size of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the atom is one of the building blocks of science education. Although the concept is a foundation for students' subsequent learning experiences, it is difficult for students to comprehend because of common misconceptions and its abstractness. The purpose of this study is to examine junior high school students' (ages 12-13) ideas…

  13. Junior High School Students' Ideas about the Shape and Size of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the atom is one of the building blocks of science education. Although the concept is a foundation for students' subsequent learning experiences, it is difficult for students to comprehend because of common misconceptions and its abstractness. The purpose of this study is to examine junior high school students' (ages 12-13) ideas…

  14. Photodissociation and photoionisation of atoms and molecules of astrophysical interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heays, A. N.; Bosman, A. D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2017-06-01

    A new collection of photodissociation and photoionisation cross sections for 102 atoms and molecules of astrochemical interest has been assembled, along with a brief review of the basic physical processes involved. These have been used to calculate dissociation and ionisation rates, with uncertainties, in a standard ultraviolet interstellar radiation field (ISRF) and for other wavelength-dependent radiation fields, including cool stellar and solar radiation, Lyman-α dominated radiation, and a cosmic-ray induced ultraviolet flux. The new ISRF rates generally agree within 30% with our previous compilations, with a few notable exceptions. Comparison with other databases such as PHIDRATES is made. The reduction of rates in shielded regions was calculated as a function of dust, molecular and atomic hydrogen, atomic C, and self-shielding column densities. The relative importance of these shielding types depends on the atom or molecule in question and the assumed dust optical properties. All of the new data are publicly available from the Leiden photodissociation and ionisation database. Sensitivity of the calculated rates to variation of temperature and isotope, and uncertainties in measured or calculated cross sections, are tested and discussed. Tests were conducted on the new rates with an interstellar-cloud chemical model, and find general agreement (within a factor of two) in abundances obtained with the previous iteration of the Leiden database assuming an ISRF, and order-of-magnitude variations assuming various kinds of stellar radiation. The newly parameterised dust-shielding factors makes a factor-of-two difference to many atomic and molecular abundances relative to parameters currently in the UDfA and KIDA astrochemical reaction databases. The newly-calculated cosmic-ray induced photodissociation and ionisation rates differ from current standard values up to a factor of 5. Under high temperature and cosmic-ray-flux conditions the new rates alter the equilibrium

  15. Computation for High Excited Stark Levels of hydrogen Atoms in Uniform Electric Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田人和

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method for the numerical calculation of exact complex eigenvalues of Schrodinger equations for a hydrogen atom in a uniform electric field. This method allows a direct calculation for complex eigenvalues without using any auxiliary treatment, such as the Breit-Wigner parametrization and the complex scale transformation,etc. The characteristics of high excited atoms in electric field have attracted extensive interest in experimental aspect, however, the existing theoretical calculation is only up to n = 40. Here we present the computation results ranging from n = 1 to 100. The data for n(<,_ ) 40 are in agreement with the results of other researchers.

  16. Ground state atomic oxygen in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering: a quantitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britun, Nikolay; Belosludtsev, Alexandr; Silva, Tiago; Snyders, Rony

    2017-02-01

    The ground state density of oxygen atoms in reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges has been studied quantitatively. Both time-resolved and space-resolved measurements were conducted. The measurements were performed using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF), and calibrated by optical emission actinometry with multiple Ar emission lines. The results clarify the dynamics of the O ground state atoms in the discharge afterglow significantly, including their propagation and fast decay after the plasma pulse, as well as the influence of gas pressure, O2 admixture, etc.

  17. Interaction of slow and highly charged ions with surfaces: formation of hollow atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Grether, M.; Spieler, A.; Niemann, D. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany). Bereich Festkoerperphysik; Arnau, A.

    1997-03-01

    The method of Auger spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of highly charged ions with Al and C surfaces. The formation of hollow Ne atoms in the first surface layers was evaluated by means of a Density Functional theory including non-linear screening effects. The time-dependent filling of the hollow atom was determined from a cascade model yielding information about the structure of the K-Auger spectra. Variation of total intensities of the L- and K-Auger peaks were interpreted by the cascade model in terms of attenuation effects on the electrons in the solid. (author)

  18. Resonant coherent ionization in grazing ion/atom-surface collisions at high velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. (Dept. de Ciencias de la Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial, Facultad de Informatica, Univ. del Pais Vasco, San Sebastian (Spain)); Pitarke, J.M. (Materia Kondentsatuaren Fisika Saila, Zientzi Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Univ., Bilbo (Spain))

    1994-05-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of a fast ion/atom with an oriented crystal surface under grazing incidence conditions is shown to contribute significantly to ionize the probe for high enough velocities and motion along a random direction. The dependence of this process on both the distance to the surface and the velocity of the projectile is studied in detail. We focus on the case of hydrogen moving with a velocity above 2 a.u. Comparison with other mechanisms of charge transfer, such as capture from inner shells of the target atoms, permits us to draw some conclusions about the charge state of the outgoing projectiles. (orig.)

  19. Circular dichroism in free-free transitions of high energy electron-atom scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Cionga, Aurelia; Zloh, Gabriela; 10.1103/PhysRevA.62.063406

    2013-01-01

    We consider high energy electron scattering by hydrogen atoms in the presence of a laser field of moderate power and higher frequencies. If the field is a superposition of a linearly and a circularly polarized laser beam in a particular configuration, then we can show that circular dichroism in two photon transitions can be observed not only for the differential but also for the integrated cross sections, provided the laser-dressing of the atomic target is treated in second order perturbation theory and the coupling between hydrogenic bound and continuum states is involved.

  20. Ethanol enrichment from ethanol-water mixtures using high frequency ultrasonic atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpalani, D M; Suzuki, K

    2011-09-01

    The influence of high frequency ultrasound on the enrichment of ethanol from ethanol-water mixtures was investigated. Experiments performed in a continuous enrichment system showed that the generated atomized mist was at a higher ethanol concentration than the feed and the enrichment ratio was higher than the vapor liquid equilibrium curve for ethanol-water above 40 mol%. Well-controlled experiments were performed to analyze the effect of physical parameters; temperature, carrier gas flow and collection height on the enrichment. Droplet size measurements of the atomized mist and visualization of the oscillating fountain jet formed during sonication were made to understand the separation mechanism.

  1. Extremely high reflection of solar wind protons as neutral hydrogen atoms from regolith in space

    CERN Document Server

    Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Holmström, Mats; Bhardwaj, Anil; Sridharan, R; Dhanya, MB; Wurz, Peter; Schaufelberger, Audrey; Asamura, Kazushi; 10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.012

    2010-01-01

    We report on measurements of extremely high reflection rates of solar wind particles from regolith-covered lunar surfaces. Measurements by the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) instrument on the Indian Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft in orbit around the Moon show that up to 20% of the impinging solar wind protons are reflected from the lunar surface back to space as neutral hydrogen atoms. This finding, generally applicable to regolith-covered atmosphereless bodies, invalidates the widely accepted assumption that regolith almost completely absorbs the impinging solar wind.

  2. High quality anti-relaxation coating material for alkali atom vapor cells

    CERN Document Server

    Balabas, M V; Wasilewski, W; Krauter, H; Madsen, L S; Muller, J H; Fernholz, T; Polzik, E S

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of alkali atom vapor cells coated with a high quality anti-relaxation coating material based on alkenes. The prepared cells with single compound alkene based coating showed the longest spin relaxation times which have been measured up to now with room temperature vapor cells. Suggestions are made that chemical binding of a cesium atom and an alkene molecule by attack to the C=C bond plays a crucial role in such improvement of anti-relaxation coating quality.

  3. Atomic physics with highly-charged ions at the future FAIR facility: A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, Th. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany) and Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt (Germany)]. E-mail: t.stoehlker@gsi.de; Beyer, H.F. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Brandau, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Kozhuharov, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Kluge, H.J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Mann, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Noertershaeuser, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Schramm, U. [LMU, Munich (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    Key features of the future international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) offer a range of new and challenging opportunities for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions and exotic nuclei. Centred on use of FAIR, the Stored Particle Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC), organized in working groups, has been formed. A short report on the tasks and activities of the various SPARC working groups, devoted to the realization of experimental equipments and set-ups required to reach the physics goals is given.

  4. Atomic physics with highly-charged ions at the future FAIR facility. A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehlker, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Beyer, H.F.; Braeuning, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (DE)] (and others)

    2006-11-15

    The key features of the future international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) offer a range of new and challenging opportunities for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions and exotic nuclei. Centred on use of FAIR, the Stored Particle Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC), organized in working groups, has been formed. A short report on the tasks and activities of the various SPARC working groups, devoted to the realization of experimental equipments and setups required to reach the physics goals is given. (orig.)

  5. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Anders

    1999-05-01

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  6. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom); Smith, Jim T. [School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Ford, Alex T., E-mail: alex.ford@port.ac.uk [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We comprehensively review the effects of ionising radiation in crustaceans. • Current environmental radioprotection levels found to be inadequate in some cases. • Mutation is shown to be a sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure. • Lowest observed effect dose rate varies by orders of magnitude. - Abstract: Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive

  7. Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argentero, G.; Mangler, C.; Kotakoski, J.; Eder, F.R.; Meyer, J.C., E-mail: Jannik.Meyer@univie.ac.at

    2015-04-15

    We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes, only the shift in the peak positions must be detected if the beam is limited to a single atom. We conclude that the experimental case will be challenging but is not excluded by the physical principles as far as considered here. Moreover, the initial experiments demonstrate that the separation of gold and carbon based on a signal that is related to their mass, rather than their atomic number. - Highlights: • We explore how energy loss spectroscopy could be used to obtain information about the mass, rather than the charge, of atoms. • The dose and precision that would be needed to distinguish between the two isotopes of carbon, C12 and C13, is estimated. • Signal broadening due to phonons is included in the calculation. • Initial experiments show the separation between gold and carbon based on their mass rather than charge.

  8. High-efficiency atomic entanglement concentration for quantum communication network assisted by cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-Yu; Li, Tao; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-04-01

    Quantum entanglement is the key resource in quantum information processing, especially in quantum communication network. However, affected by the environment noise, the maximally entangled states usually collapse into nonmaximally entangled ones or even mixed states. Here we present two high-efficiency schemes to complete the entanglement concentration of nonlocal two-atom systems. Our first scheme is used to concentrate the nonlocal atomic systems in the partially entangled states with known parameters, and it has the optimal success probability. The second scheme is used to concentrate the entanglement of the nonlocal two-atom systems in the partially entangled states with unknown parameters. Compared with the other schemes for the entanglement concentration of atomic systems, our two protocols are more efficient and practical. They require only an ancillary single photon to judge whether they succeed or not, and they work in a heralded way with detection inefficiency and absence of sophisticated single-photon detectors in practical applications. Moreover, they are insensitive to both the cavity decay and atomic spontaneous emission.

  9. Engineering exciton interactions with Zeeman excitations of highly magnetic atoms on an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, R A Vargas

    2015-01-01

    We show that Zeeman excitations in an ensemble of highly magnetic atoms trapped in an optical lattice lead to interacting Frenkel excitons described by a tunable $t$-$V$ model. The dispersion of the excitons and the interactions between excitons can be tuned in a wide range by transferring atoms to different Zeeman states. We show that these parameters are insensitive to an external magnetic field, which leads to an interesting possibility of engineering lattice models with significant particle-non-conserving terms. We consider the coupling of the Zeeman excitations to the translational motion of atoms in the lattice and show that the resulting Hamiltonian is equivalent to a polaron Hamiltonian, where the mathematical form of the particle - phonon interaction can be tuned by transferring atoms to different Zeeman states. We calculate the model parameters for the specific system of Dy atoms on an optical lattice with the lattice site separation 266 nm and show that the exciton interaction parameters can be tun...

  10. High-order harmonic generation from Rydberg atoms driven by plasmonic-enhanced laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Tikman, Y; Ciappina, M F; Chacon, A; Altun, Z; Lewenstein, M

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in Rydberg atoms driven by spatially inhomogeneous laser fields, induced, for instance, by plasmonic enhancement. It is well known that the laser intensity should to exceed certain threshold in order to generate HHG, when noble gas atoms in their ground state are used as an active medium. One way to enhance the coherent light coming from a conventional laser oscillator is to take advantage of the amplification obtained by the so-called surface plasmon polaritons, created when a low intensity laser field is focused onto a metallic nanostructure. The main limitation of this scheme is the low damage threshold of the materials employed in the nanostructures engineering. In this work we propose to use Rydberg atoms, driven by spatially inhomogeneous, plasmonic-enhanced laser fields, for HHG. We exhaustively discuss the behaviour and efficiency of these systems in the generation of coherent harmonic emission. To this aim we numerically solve the time...

  11. A high flux pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen. [for spacecraft materials ground testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krech, Robert H.; Caledonia, George E.

    1986-01-01

    The design and demonstration of a pulsed high flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen are reported. In the present test setup, molecular oxygen under several atmospheres of pressure is introduced into an evacuated supersonic expansion nozzle through a pulsed molecular beam valve. A 10J CO2 TEA laser is focused to intensities greater than 10 to the 9th W/sq cm in the nozzle throat, generating a laser-induced breakdown with a resulting 20,000-K plasma. Plasma expansion is confined by the nozzle geometry to promote rapid electron-ion recombination. Average O-atom beam velocities from 5-13 km/s at fluxes up to 10 to the 18th atoms/pulse are measured, and a similar surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples to that obtained on the STS-8 mission is found.

  12. Serum ionised calcium and cardiovascular disease in 45-years old men and women followed for 18 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogard, Christina Gerlach; Petersen, Janne; Jørgensen, Torben

    2006-01-01

    a health survey in 1981 in Copenhagen had ionised serum calcium and different cardiovascular risk factors measured. The participants were followed until 1999 in The National Hospital Patients Registry and The National Death Registry in Denmark regarding the diagnosis ischemic heart disease (IHD...... to persons in the lower quintiles. The increased risk disappeared when gender and cardiovascular confounders were included in a Cox proportional hazards analysis (p=0.20 for IHD and p=0.50 for CVD, respectively). In a separate analysis of men and IHD the result remained insignificant (p=0.07). Conclusions......High level of total serum calcium within the normal range has been associated with increased cardiovascular risk. We wanted to evaluate whether the physiological active ionised form of calcium also was a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods: A total of 974 participants from...

  13. Determining a 'safe' high-mass limit in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectra of coal derived materials with reference to instrument noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaro; Herod; Domin; Zhuo; Islas; Kandiyoti

    1999-01-01

    Three methods for determining a 'safe' estimate for high-mass limits of MALDI spectra of coal derived liquids were explored, using a sample of coal-tar pitch and its pyridine-insoluble fraction. Co-addition of increasing numbers of single-shot spectra (10, 30, 50 and 100 pulses) showed visually observable reductions in noise levels, consistent with robust and statistically meaningful signals. Three separate types of post-acquisition calculation were used to identify high-mass limits of the spectra. (i) A literature method indicated high-mass limits similar to those observed visually-as a shift from baseline at the highest masses, nearly 350 000 u for the coal tar pitch and about 390 000 u for its pyridine insoluble fraction. (ii) Comparing instrument signal with pre-selected multiples of the standard deviation, upper mass estimates of between 40-60 000 u for the coal-tar pitch and about 95 000 u for its pyridine-insoluble fraction were found. (iii) Calculation of the slope was used to identify 'lift-off' of the spectrum from baseline. The angle between the smoothed spectrum and the baseline was matched to a pre-selected value (e.g. 0.5 degrees and 1 degrees ). However, the arbitrary specification of the key parameter did not establish this last method on a firm basis. The choice of a criterion for estimating high-mass limits of MALDI spectra remains a semi-quantitative procedure; a reasonably conservative high-mass limit may be estimated by comparison of signal with five times the standard deviation. However, evaluation of size exclusion chromatograms of the present samples using polystyrene standards suggests that molecular mass distributions of pitch samples arrived at by MALDI mass spectrometry are, at least partly, determined by the limitations of available instruments. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Coulomb time delays in high harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlina, Lisa; Smirnova, Olga

    2017-02-01

    Measuring the time it takes to remove an electron from an atom or molecule during photoionization has been the focus of a number of recent experiments using newly developed attosecond spectroscopies. The interpretation of such measurements, however, depends critically on the measurement protocol and the specific observables available in each experiment. One such protocol relies on high harmonic generation. In this paper, we derive rigorous and general expressions for ionisation and recombination times in high harmonic generation experiments. We show that these times are different from, but related to, ionisation times measured in photoelectron spectroscopy: that is, those obtained using the attosecond streak camera, RABBITT and attoclock methods. We then proceed to use the analytical R-matrix theory to calculate these times and compare them with experimental values.

  15. Note: High-speed Z tip scanner with screw cantilever holding mechanism for atomic-resolution atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy has attracted much attention due to its unique capability of visualizing nanoscale dynamic processes at a solid/liquid interface. However, its usability and resolution have yet to be improved. As one of the solutions for this issue, here we present a design of a high-speed Z-tip scanner with screw holding mechanism. We perform detailed comparison between designs with different actuator size and screw arrangement by finite element analysis. Based on the design giving the best performance, we have developed a Z tip scanner and measured its performance. The measured frequency response of the scanner shows a flat response up to ∼10 kHz. This high frequency response allows us to achieve wideband tip-sample distance regulation. We demonstrate the applicability of the scanner to high-speed atomic-resolution imaging by visualizing atomic-scale calcite crystal dissolution process in water at 2 s/frame.

  16. High Resolution Numerical Simulations of Primary Atomization in Diesel Sprays with Single Component Reference Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    NC. 14. ABSTRACT A high-resolution numerical simulation of jet breakup and spray formation from a complex diesel fuel injector at diesel engine ... diesel fuel injector at diesel engine type conditions has been performed. A full understanding of the primary atomization process in diesel fuel...the capability of a recently adopted high fidelity two phase flow solver in the context of diesel engine sprays. Previous works relating to this

  17. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks, quantum information, and search for α variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, M S; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Safronova, U I; Porsev, S G; Kozlov, M G

    2014-07-18

    We propose 10 highly charged ions as candidates for the development of next generation atomic clocks, quantum information, and search for α variation. They have long-lived metastable states with transition wavelengths to the ground state between 170-3000 nm, relatively simple electronic structure, stable isotopes, and high sensitivity to α variation (e.g., Sm(14+), Pr(10+), Sm(13+), Nd(10+)). We predict their properties crucial for the experimental exploration and highlight particularly attractive systems for these applications.

  18. The energy and momentum input of supernova explosions in structured and ionised molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Walch, S K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the early impact of single and binary supernova (SN) explosions on dense gas clouds with three-dimensional, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulations. The effect of cloud structure, radiative cooling, and ionising radiation from the progenitor stars on the net input of kinetic energy, f_kin=E_kin/E_SN, thermal energy, f_therm=E_therm/E_SN, and gas momentum f_P=P/P_SN to the interstellar medium (ISM) is tested. For clouds with n=100 cm^{-3}, the momentum generating Sedov and pressure-driven snowplough phases are terminated early (~ 0.01 Myr) and radiative cooling limits the coupling to f_therm ~ 0.01, f_kin ~ 0.05, and f_P ~ 9, significantly lower than for the case without cooling. For pre-ionised clouds these numbers are only increased by ~ 50%, independent of the cloud structure. This only suffices to accelerate ~ 5% of the cloud to radial velocities >30km/s. A second SN might further enhance the coupling efficiencies if delayed past the Sedov phase of the first explosion. Such very low coupli...

  19. An important step forward in continuous spectroscopic imaging of ionising radiations using ASICs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessler, P. [11 rue Rabelais, 92170 Vanves (France); Coffin, J. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Eberle, H. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Raad Iseli, C. de [Smart Silicon Systems SA, Ch. de la Graviere 6, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hilt, B. [Universite de Haute-Alsace, GRPHE, 61, rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Huss, D. [Universite de Haute-Alsace, GRPHE, 61, rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Krummenacher, F. [Smart Silicon Systems SA, Ch. de la Graviere 6, CH-1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Lutz, J.R. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Prevot, G. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Renouprez, A. [Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne (France); Sigward, M.H. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Schwaller, B. [Universite de Haute-Alsace, GRPHE, 61, rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Voltolini, C. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, B.P. 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    1999-01-21

    Characterization results are given for an original ASIC allowing continuous acquisition of ionising radiation images in spectroscopic mode. Ionising radiation imaging in general and spectroscopic imaging in particular must primarily be guided by the attempt to decrease statistical noise, which requires detection systems designed to allow very high counting rates. Any source of dead time must therefore be avoided. Thus, the use of on-line corrections of the inevitable dispersion of characteristics between the large number of electronic channels of the detection system, shall be precluded. Without claiming to achieve ultimate noise levels, the work described is focused on how to prevent good individual acquisition channel noise performance from being totally destroyed by the dispersion between channels without introducing dead times. With this goal, we developed an automatic charge amplifier output voltage offset compensation system which operates regardless of the cause of the offset (detector or electronic). The main performances of the system are the following: the input equivalent noise charge is 190 e rms (input non connected, peaking time 500 ns), the highest gain is 255 mV/fC, the peaking time is adjustable between 200 ns and 2 {mu}s and the power consumption is 10 mW per channel. The agreement between experimental data and theoretical simulation results is excellent.

  20. The effect of non ionising electromagnetic radiation on RAAF personnel during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, J A

    1994-05-01

    Did exposure to non ionising electromagnetic radiation during World War II in the short term have a stimulating effect on the anterior pituitary gland, and in turn on the gonads of both sexes, since the figures obtained appeared to affect the sexes equally? Is it that the long-term effect of microwave radiation on personnel is to cause adenoma and carcinoma? Is this long-term effect similar to the long-term effect of X-rays on infants, children and adolescents? According to Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 1980 (page 1710): "X-rays to the head and neck in infancy, childhood or adolescence is associated with a high incidence of thyroid disease later in life. Nodular disease is found to be particularly common on 20% of patients at risk, and may not be apparent until 30 years or more after exposure. One-third of the nodular type are found to be carcinomatous." The effect of non ionising electromagnetic and microwave radiation on those who work in these fields certainly needs much more investigation. What will be the long-term effect of using micro-ovens on the rising generation?

  1. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecchia, I; Dini, V; Ricci-Vitiani, L; Biffoni, M; Balduzzi, M; Fratini, E; Belli, M; Campa, A; Esposito, G; Cirrone, G; Romano, F; Stancampiano, C; Pelacchi, F; Pallini, R; Tabocchini, M A

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with (137)Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u(-1) in the dose range of 5-40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality.

  2. Mapping the ionised gas around the luminous QSO HE 1029-1401: Evidence for minor merger events?

    CERN Document Server

    Husemann, B; Wisotzki, L; Jahnke, K; Kupko, D; Nugroho, D; Schramm, M

    2010-01-01

    We present VIMOS integral field spectroscopy of the brightest radio-quiet QSO on the southern sky HE 1029-1401 at a redshift of z=0.086. Standard decomposition techniques for broad-band imaging are extended to integral field data in order to deblend the QSO and host emission. We perform a tentative analysis of the stellar continuum finding a young stellar population (<100Myr) or a featureless continuum embedded in an old stellar population (10Gyr) typical for a massive elliptical galaxy. The stellar velocity dispersion of sigma_*=320\\pm90 km/s and the estimated black hole mass log(M_BH/M_sun)=8.7\\pm0.3 are consistent with the local M_BH-sigma_* relation within the errors. For the first time we map the two-dimensional ionised gas distribution and the gas velocity field around HE 1029-1401. While the stellar host morphology is purely elliptical we find a highly structured distribution of ionised gas out to 16 kpc from the QSO. The gas is highly ionised solely by the QSO radiation and has a significantly lowe...

  3. Highly Adsorptive, MOF-Functionalized Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    areas and high adsorptive capacities. We find that a nanoscale coating of Al2O3 formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the surface of nonwoven ...distribution is unlimited. Highly Adsorptive, MOF-Functionalized Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition The... Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition Report Title While metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) show great

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition of High-k Dielectrics Using Supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Rajesh

    2005-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-κdielectric was performed in supercritical CO2 (SCCO2), using a two-step reaction sequence. In step one, tetraethoxy silane (TEOS) precursor was injected in SCCO2 at 80-100 C and 50 MPa pressure to obtain a chemisorbed surface monolayer, which was then oxidized into SiO2 using peroxide entrained in SCCO2. ALD process was controlled by estimating precursor solubility and its mass transport with respect to the density of SCCO2, and correlating these parameters with precursor injection volume. In the ALD process, 7 pulses of precursor were used anticipating deposition of one atomic layer in each of the pulses. The thickness of the SiO2 atomic layers deposited using SCCO2 was measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE), and the C-V measurements were also performed. The result obtained using VASE indicates that there were 7 monolayers of SiO2 with total thickness of 35 å, and the dielectric constant of the deposited layers was 4.0±0.1. Our initial findings clearly demonstrate that SCCO2 is capable of atomic layer deposition of high quality dielectric films at very low process temperatures preventing interface reaction. More research is in progress to achieve ALD of HfO2 and TiO2 in SCCO2.

  5. International Conference on The Physics of Highly Ionised Atoms, Incorporating the International Conference on Beam Foil Spectroscopy (7th), Held in England on July 2 - 5, 1984. Programme and Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-05

    on He and H2 collisions, at Montesquieu 32 10.5 qkeV Electron capture into Rydberg states in • O collisions between multiply-charged ions J...Bordenave- Montesquieu , A. 5, 32 Bottcher, C. 81 Bottrell, G. J. 81 Bozek, E. 90 Brazuk, A. 35, 71 Brouillard, F. 37 Brown, J. S. 75, 92 Bruandet, J. F...AGRIPPA FACILITY S. Bliman, J.J. Bonnet, A. Bordenave- Montesquieu , J. Desesquelles, 0 M. Druetta, D. Hitz & M. Mayo AGRIPPA GIS CEA/CNRS, Centre d’Etudes

  6. A new heating strategy in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for better absorbance-time curves at high atomization rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torsi, Giancarlo [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna, Via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: giancarlo.torsi@unibo.it; Zattoni, Andrea [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna, Via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Locatelli, Clinio [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna, Via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Valcher, Sergio [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna, Via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2005-03-31

    The results previously obtained by using fast heating in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry are considerably improved by using a new heating sequence which can be summarized as transverse-longitudinal heating mode. The absorbance vs. time curves, obtained with the new heating mode, follow almost perfectly a simple model in which only diffusion is considered as the force acting on the atomic vapor. From the fitting of the experimental absorbance vs. time data points with theoretical values, it is possible to calculate both the absorbance, when all atoms injected are assumed to be present, and their diffusion coefficient. Both values can be calculated by a simple software approach without the operator intervention. The asymptotic absorbance calculated in this way is the maximum absorbance physically obtainable and is the basis for standardless analysis.

  7. Investigation of the impact of high liquid viscosity on jet atomization in crossflow via high-fidelity simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Gao, Hui; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2017-08-01

    Atomization of extremely high viscosity liquid can be of interest for many applications in aerospace, automotive, pharmaceutical, and food industries. While detailed atomization measurements usually face grand challenges, high-fidelity numerical simulations offer the advantage to comprehensively explore the atomization details. In this work, a previously validated high-fidelity first-principle simulation code HiMIST is utilized to simulate high-viscosity liquid jet atomization in crossflow. The code is used to perform a parametric study of the atomization process in a wide range of Ohnesorge numbers (Oh = 0.004-2) and Weber numbers (We = 10-160). Direct comparisons between the present study and previously published low-viscosity jet in crossflow results are performed. The effects of viscous damping and slowing on jet penetration, liquid surface instabilities, ligament formation/breakup, and subsequent droplet formation are investigated. Complex variations in near-field and far-field jet penetrations with increasing Oh at different We are observed and linked with the underlying jet deformation and breakup physics. Transition in breakup regimes and increase in droplet size with increasing Oh are observed, mostly consistent with the literature reports. The detailed simulations elucidate a distinctive edge-ligament-breakup dominated process with long surviving ligaments for the higher Oh cases, as opposed to a two-stage edge-stripping/column-fracture process for the lower Oh counterparts. The trend of decreasing column deflection with increasing We is reversed as Oh increases. A predominantly unimodal droplet size distribution is predicted at higher Oh, in contrast to the bimodal distribution at lower Oh. It has been found that both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz linear stability theories cannot be easily applied to interpret the distinct edge breakup process and further study of the underlying physics is needed.

  8. Testing spatial α-variation with optical atomic clocks based on highly charged ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berengut J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We review recent works illustrating the potential use of highly charged ions as the basis of optical atomic clocks of exceptional accuracy and very high sensitivity to variation of the fine structure constant, α. The tendency towards large transition energies in highly charged ions can be overcome using level crossings, which allow transitions between different orbitals to be within the range of usual lasers. We present simple scaling laws that demonstrate reduced systematics that could be realised in highly charged ion clocks. Such clocks could allow us to corroborate astronomical studies that suggest a spatial gradient in values of α across the Universe.

  9. Intercomparison of ionisation chamber measurements from (125)I seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J B; Enari, K F; Baldock, C

    2007-05-01

    The reference air kerma rates of a set of individual (125)I seeds were calculated from current measurements of a calibrated re-entrant ionisation chamber. Single seeds were distributed to seven Australian brachytherapy centres for the same measurement with the user's instrumentation. Results are expressed as the ratio of the reference air kerma rate measured by the Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation (ANSTO) to the reference air kerma rate measured at the centre. The intercomparison ratios of all participants were within +/-5% of unity.

  10. Ionisation constants of inorganic acids and bases in aqueous solution

    CERN Document Server

    Perrin, D D

    2013-01-01

    Ionisation Constants of Inorganic Acids and Bases in Aqueous Solution, Second Edition provides a compilation of tables that summarize relevant data recorded in the literature up to the end of 1980 for the ionization constants of inorganic acids and bases in aqueous solution. This book includes references to acidity functions for strong acids and bases, as well as details about the formation of polynuclear species. This text then explains the details of each column of the tables, wherein column 1 gives the name of the substance and the negative logarithm of the ionization constant and column 2

  11. Photoionisation detection of single {sup 87}Rb-atoms using channel electron multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henkel, Florian Alexander

    2011-09-02

    Fast and efficient detection of single atoms is a universal requirement concerning modern experiments in atom physics, quantum optics, and precision spectroscopy. In particular for future quantum information and quantum communication technologies, the efficient readout of qubit states encoded in single atoms or ions is an elementary prerequisite. The rapid development in the field of quantum optics and atom optics in the recent years has enabled to prepare individual atoms as quantum memories or arrays of single atoms as qubit registers. With such systems, the implementation of quantum computation or quantum communication protocols seems feasible. This thesis describes a novel detection scheme which enables fast and efficient state analysis of single neutral atoms. The detection scheme is based on photoionisation and consists of two parts: the hyperfine-state selective photoionisation of single atoms and the registration of the generated photoion-electron pairs via two channel electron multipliers (CEMs). In this work, both parts were investigated in two separate experiments. For the first step, a photoionisation probability of p{sub ion}=0.991 within an ionisation time of t{sub ion}=386 ns is achieved for a single {sup 87}Rb-atom in an optical dipole trap. For the second part, a compact detection system for the ionisation fragments was developed consisting of two opposing CEM detectors. Measurements show that single neutral atoms can be detected via their ionisation fragments with a detection efficiency of {eta}{sub atom}=0.991 within a detection time of t{sub det}=415.5 ns. In a future combined setup, this will allow the state-selective readout of optically trapped, single neutral {sup 87}Rb-atoms via photoionisation detection with an estimated detection efficiency {eta}=0.982 and a detection time of t{sub tot} = 802 ns. Although initially developed for single {sup 87}Rb-atoms, the concept of photoionisation detection is in principle generally applicable to any

  12. Comparison of kinetic models for atom recombination on high-temperature reusable surface insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1993-01-01

    Five kinetic models are compared for their ability to predict recombination coefficients for oxygen and nitrogen atoms over high-temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI). Four of the models are derived using Rideal-Eley or Langmuir-Hinshelwood catalytic mechanisms to describe the reaction sequence. The fifth model is an empirical expression that offers certain features unattainable through mechanistic description. The results showed that a four-parameter model, with temperature as the only variable, works best with data currently available. The model describes recombination coefficients for oxygen and nitrogen atoms for temperatures from 300 to 1800 K. Kinetic models, with atom concentrations, demonstrate the influence of atom concentration on recombination coefficients. These models can be used for the prediction of heating rates due to catalytic recombination during re-entry or aerobraking maneuvers. The work further demonstrates a requirement for more recombination experiments in the temperature ranges of 300-1000 K, and 1500-1850 K, with deliberate concentration variation to verify model requirements.

  13. High-flux cold rubidium atomic beam for strongly-coupled cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Basudev [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata (India); University of Maryland, MD (United States); Scholten, Michael [University of Maryland, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the region of strong coupling. A 2D{sup +} magneto-optical trap (MOT), loaded with rubidium getters in a dry-film-coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate greater than 2 x 10{sup 10} atoms/s. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with a tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a cavity with a length of 280 μm, resulting in a vacuum Rabi splitting of more than ±10 MHz. The presence of a sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling region, with an atom-photon dipole coupling coefficient g of 7 MHz, a cavity mode decay rate κ of 3 MHz, and a spontaneous emission decay rate γ of 6 MHz.

  14. A high repetition rate experimental setup for quantum non-linear optics with cold Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busche, Hannes; Ball, Simon W.; Huillery, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Using electromagnetically induced transparency and photon storage, the strong dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms and the resulting dipole blockade can be mapped onto light fields to realise optical non-linearities and interactions at the single photon level. We report on the realisation of an experimental apparatus designed to study interactions between single photons stored as Rydberg excitations in optically trapped microscopic ensembles of ultracold 87Rb atoms. A pair of in-vacuum high numerical aperture lenses focus excitation and trapping beams down to 1 μm, well below the Rydberg blockade. Thanks to efficient magneto-optical trap (MOT) loading from an atomic beam generated by a 2D MOT and the ability to recycle the microscopic ensembles more than 20000 times without significant atom loss, we achieve effective repetition rates exceeding 110 kHz to obtain good photon counting statistics on reasonable time scales. To demonstrate the functionality of the setup, we present evidence of strong photon interactions including saturation of photon storage and the retrieval of non-classical light. Using in-vacuum antennae operating at up to 40 GHz, we perform microwave spectroscopy on photons stored as Rydberg excitations and observe an interaction induced change in lineshape depending on the number of stored photons.

  15. Junior High School Students' Ideas about the Shape and Size of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2012-08-01

    The concept of the atom is one of the building blocks of science education. Although the concept is a foundation for students' subsequent learning experiences, it is difficult for students to comprehend because of common misconceptions and its abstractness. The purpose of this study is to examine junior high school students' (ages 12-13) ideas about the shape and size of the atom and the evolution of these ideas over 2 years. The study's sample size was 126 students, including 76 sixth-grade and 50 seventh-grade students. The educational curriculum and relevant literature guided the development of a questionnaire that consisted of three open-ended questions intended to determine students' knowledge of the structure and physical properties of the atom. After administering the questionnaire, collected data were analysed qualitatively. The study shows that students had difficulty developing a mental image of the atom, and contrary to the conclusions of other studies, students demonstrated a preference for working with complex and abstract models.

  16. Experimental study of highly excited even-parity bound states of the Sm atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Wen-Jie; Dai Chang-Jian; Xiao Ying; Zhao Hong-Ying

    2009-01-01

    In this work,a three-step autoionization detection method and direct photoionization detection method are employed to measure the highly excited even-parity states of the Sm atom in the energy region between 36360 cm-1 and 40800 cm-1.Comparisons between the results from the two detection techniques enable us to discriminate the Rydberg states from the valence states in the same energy region with the information of level energies,possible J values and their relative intensities.Furthermore,in the experiment two different excitation schemes are designed to obtain the spectra of highly excited even-purity states of the Sm atom.With a detailed analysis of the experimental data,this work not only confirms the results about many spectral data from the literature with different excitation schemes,but also reports new spectral data on 29 Rydberg states and 23 valence states.

  17. Quasiclassical approach to high-energy QED processes in strong laser and atomic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Di Piazza, A

    2012-01-01

    An approach, based on the use of the quasiclassical Green's function, is developed for investigating high-energy quantum electrodynamical processes in combined strong laser and atomic fields. Employing an operator technique, we derive the Green's function of the Dirac equation in an arbitrary plane wave and a localized potential. Then, we calculate the total cross section of high-energy electron-positron photoproduction in an atomic field of arbitrary charge number (Bethe-Heitler process) in the presence of a strong laser field. It is shown that the laser field substantially modifies the cross section at already available incoming photon energies and laser parameters. This makes it feasible to observe the analogous effect in a laser field of the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect for the Bethe-Heitler process.

  18. K-Vacancy Production in the Collision of Highly Charged Relativistic Ions With Heavy Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Khabibullaev, P. K.

    2000-01-01

    A general expression for the cross section of the inelastic collision of relativistic highly charged ion with heavy (relativistic) atoms is obtained using the generalized eikonal approximation. In the ultrarelativistic limit, the obtained formula coincides with a known exact one. As an application of the obtained result, probability and cross section of the K-vacany production in the U92+ - U91+ collision are calculated.

  19. Determination of Trace Iron in High Purity Sodium Fluoride by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for the direct determination of iron in high purity sodium fluoride using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Interferences caused by the matrix are investigated. It is shown that the ashing temperature can be increased to 1 400°C and matrix interferences eliminated, the sensi tivity of iron increased in 1.27 fold by the addition of nickel nitrate. The method is applied to the determina tion of iron in sodium fluoride and satisfactory results are obtained.

  20. K-Vacancy Production in the Collision of Highly Charged Relativistic Ions With Heavy Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    KHABIBULLAEV, P. K.

    2000-01-01

    A general expression for the cross section of the inelastic collision of relativistic highly charged ion with heavy (relativistic) atoms is obtained using the generalized eikonal approximation. In the ultrarelativistic limit, the obtained formula coincides with a known exact one. As an application of the obtained result, probability and cross section of the K-vacany production in the U92+ - U91+ collision are calculated.

  1. Dispersion engineered high-Q silicon Nitride Ring-Resonators via Atomic Layer Deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Riemensberger, Johann; Herr, Tobias; Brasch, Victor; Holzwarth, Ronald; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate dispersion engineering of integrated silicon nitride based ring resonators through conformal coating with hafnium dioxide deposited on top of the structures via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Both, magnitude and bandwidth of anomalous dispersion can be significantly increased. All results are confirmed by high resolution frequency-comb-assisted-diode-laser spectroscopy and are in very good agreement with the simulated modification of the mode spectrum.

  2. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of bacteriochlorophylls from Chlorobiaceae: characteristic fragmentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airs, Ruth L; Keely, Brendan J

    2002-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (APCI-LC/MS/MS) has been applied to the study of bacteriochlorophylls c, d, and e of phototrophic prokaryotes. Cultures of Chlorobiaceae containing bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e were examined using a high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and APCI-LC/MS/MS employing post-column addition of formic acid. The results reveal complex distributions of bacteriochlorophyll homologues, with some closely eluting species giving isobaric protonated molecules. On-line LC/MS/MS studies reveal characteristic fragment ions for bacteriochlorophylls c, d, and e. Fragmentations involving loss of the extended alkyl substituents that are unique to bacteriochlorophylls c, d and e and their derivatives have been rationalised by studying the phaeophorbides and the results applied to the direct study of the bacteriochlorophylls.

  3. Characterisation of bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van

    2000-01-01

    Chemical analysis for the characterisation of micro-organisms is rapidly evolving, after the recent advent of new ionisation methods in mass spectrometry (MS): electrospray (ES) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI). These methods allow quick characterisation of micro-organisms, ei

  4. Controlling ionisation and fragmentation processes in CO2 via inelastic electron recollisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frasinski L. J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The angular dependence of nonsequential double ionisation and dissociation induced by laser driven inelastic electron rescattering was investigated experimentally in aligned CO2. A clear dependence on the recollision angle was found demonstrating quantum control of ionisation and dissociation processes in the strong field regime.

  5. High-resolution dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquids with different feedback architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Melcher

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent achievement of atomic resolution with dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM [Fukuma et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 2005, 87, 034101], where quality factors of the oscillating probe are inherently low, challenges some accepted beliefs concerning sensitivity and resolution in dAFM imaging modes. Through analysis and experiment we study the performance metrics for high-resolution imaging with dAFM in liquid media with amplitude modulation (AM, frequency modulation (FM and drive-amplitude modulation (DAM imaging modes. We find that while the quality factors of dAFM probes may deviate by several orders of magnitude between vacuum and liquid media, their sensitivity to tip–sample forces can be remarkable similar. Furthermore, the reduction in noncontact forces and quality factors in liquids diminishes the role of feedback control in achieving high-resolution images. The theoretical findings are supported by atomic-resolution images of mica in water acquired with AM, FM and DAM under similar operating conditions.

  6. Extracting features buried within high density atom probe point cloud data through simplicial homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Srikant; Kaluskar, Kaustubh; Broderick, Scott; Rajan, Krishna

    2015-12-01

    Feature extraction from Atom Probe Tomography (APT) data is usually performed by repeatedly delineating iso-concentration surfaces of a chemical component of the sample material at different values of concentration threshold, until the user visually determines a satisfactory result in line with prior knowledge. However, this approach allows for important features, buried within the sample, to be visually obscured by the high density and volume (~10(7) atoms) of APT data. This work provides a data driven methodology to objectively determine the appropriate concentration threshold for classifying different phases, such as precipitates, by mapping the topology of the APT data set using a concept from algebraic topology termed persistent simplicial homology. A case study of Sc precipitates in an Al-Mg-Sc alloy is presented demonstrating the power of this technique to capture features, such as precise demarcation of Sc clusters and Al segregation at the cluster boundaries, not easily available by routine visual adjustment.

  7. Generation of high-frequency combs locked to atomic resonances by quantum phase modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zuoye; Cavaletto, Stefano M; Harman, Zoltán; Keitel, Christoph H; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A general mechanism for the generation of frequency combs referenced to atomic resonances is put forward. The mechanism is based on the periodic phase control of a quantum system's dipole response. We develop an analytic description of the comb spectral structure, depending on both the atomic and the phase-control properties. We further suggest an experimental implementation of our scheme: Generating a frequency comb in the soft-x-ray spectral region, which can be realized with currently available techniques and radiation sources. The universality of this mechanism allows the generalization of frequency-comb technology to arbitrary frequencies, including the hard-x-ray regime by using reference transitions in highly charged ions.

  8. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Jorge R., E-mail: jorge.rr@cea.cu [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Canto Blanco, 28049 Madrid, España (Spain)

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  9. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Suto, Keiko [Nara Women' s Univ., Graduate School of Human Culture, Nara (Japan); Kagawa, Takashi [Nara Women' s Univ., Department of Physics, Nara (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x10{sup 11} is estimated. (author)

  10. Spectroscopy and atomic physics of highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni for tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cheng, C.-C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the spectroscopy and atomic physics for some highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni ions produced in tokamak plasmas. Forbidden and intersystem wavelengths for Cr and Ni ions are extrapolated and interpolated using the known wavelengths for Fe lines identified in solar-flare plasmas. Tables of transition probabilities for the B I, C I, N I, O I, and F I isoelectronic sequences are presented, and collision strengths and transition probabilities for Cr, Fe, and Ni ions of the Be I sequence are given. Similarities of tokamak and solar spectra are discussed, and it is shown how the atomic data presented may be used to determine ion abundances and electron densities in low-density plasmas.

  11. Transferring calibration coefficients from ionisation chambers used for diagnostic radiology to transmission chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the response of a double volume transmission ionisation chamber, developed at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, was compared to that of a commercial transmission chamber. Both ionisation chambers were tested in different X-ray beam qualities using secondary standard ionisation chambers as reference dosimeters. These standard ionisation chambers were a parallel-plate and a cylindrical ionisation chambers, used for diagnostic radiology and mammography beam qualities, respectively. The response of both transmission chambers was compared to that of the secondary standard chambers to obtain coefficients of equivalence. These coefficients allow the transmission chambers to be used as reference equipment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Detecting and locating light atoms from high-resolution STEM images: The quest for a single optimal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, the optimal detector design is investigated for both detecting and locating light atoms from high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) images. The principles of detection theory are used to quantify the probability of error for the detection of light atoms from HR STEM images. To determine the optimal experiment design for locating light atoms, use is made of the so-called Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB). It is investigated if a single optimal design can be found for both the detection and location problem of light atoms. Furthermore, the incoming electron dose is optimised for both research goals and it is shown that picometre range precision is feasible for the estimation of the atom positions when using an appropriate incoming electron dose under the optimal detector settings to detect light atoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Atomization off thin water films generated by high-frequency substrate wave vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Manor, Ofer; Winkler, Andreas; Schmidt, Hagen; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-11-01

    Generating aerosol droplets via the atomization of thin aqueous films with high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) offers several advantages over existing nebulization methods, particularly for pulmonary drug delivery, offering droplet sizes in the 1-5-μm range ideal for effective pulmonary therapy. Nevertheless, the physics underlying SAW atomization is not well understood, especially in the context of thin liquid film formation and spreading and how this affects the aerosol production. Here, we demonstrate that the film geometry, governed primarily by the applied power and frequency of the SAW, indeed plays a crucial role in the atomization process and, in particular, the size of the atomized droplets. In contrast to the continuous spreading of low surface energy liquids atop similar platforms, high surface energy liquids such as water, in the present case, are found to undergo transient spreading due to the SAW to form a quasisteady film whose height is determined by self-selection of the energy minimum state associated with the acoustic resonance in the film and whose length arises from a competition between acoustic streaming and capillary effects. This is elucidated from a fundamental model for the thin film spreading behavior under SAW excitation, from which we show good agreement between the experimentally measured and theoretically predicted droplet dimension, both of which consistently indicate a linear relationship between the droplet diameter and the mechanical power coupled into the liquid by the SAW (the latter captured by an acoustic Weber number to the two thirds power, and the reciprocal of the SAW frequency).

  14. Spin-Exchange Collisions of the Ground State of Cs Atoms in a High Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Li-Ping; LUO Jun; ZENG Xi-Zhi

    2000-01-01

    Cs atoms were optically pumped with a Ti:sapphire laser in a magnetic field of 1.516 T. Steady absorption spectra and populations of Zeeman sublevels of the ground state of Cs in N2 gas at various pressures (5, 40, and 80 Torr)were obtained. The results show that in a high magnetic field, the combined electron-nuclear spin transition(flip-flop transition), which is mainly induced by the collision modification δa( J.I)of hyperfine interaction, is an important relaxation mechanism at high buffer-gas pressures.

  15. High resolution miniature dilatometer based on an atomic force microscope piezocantilever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.-H.; Graf, D.; Murphy, T. P.; Tozer, S. W. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Schmiedeshoff, G. M. [Department of Physics, Occidental College, Los Angeles, California 90041 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Thermal expansion, or dilation, is closely related to the specific heat, and provides useful information regarding material properties. The accurate measurement of dilation in confined spaces coupled with other limiting experimental environments such as low temperatures and rapidly changing high magnetic fields requires a new sensitive millimeter size dilatometer that has little or no temperature and field dependence. We have designed an ultracompact dilatometer using an atomic force microscope piezoresistive cantilever as the sensing element and demonstrated its versatility by studying the charge density waves in alpha uranium to high magnetic fields (up to 31 T). The performance of this piezoresistive dilatometer was comparable to that of a titanium capacitive dilatometer.

  16. Ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlachter, A.S.; Berkner, K.H.; Stearns, J.W.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Kelbch, S.; Ullrich, J.; Hagmann, S.; Richard, P.; Stockli, M.P.; Graham, W.G.

    1986-11-01

    Electron capture and loss by fast highly charged ions in a gas target, and ionization of the target by passage of the fast projectile beam, are fundamental processes in atomic physics. These processes, along with excitation, can be experimentally studied separately (''singles'') or together (''coincidence''). This paper is a review of recent results on singles measurements for electron capture and loss and for target ionization, for velocities which are generally high relative to the active electron, including recent ionization measurements for a nearly relativistic projectile. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Development of nanomanipulator using a high-speed atomic force microscope coupled with a haptic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, F., E-mail: tmfiwat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Ohashi, Y.; Ishisaki, I. [Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Picco, L.M. [H Will Physics Laboratory and IRC in Nanotechnology, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Ushiki, T. [Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Asahimachidori, Niigata, 951-8122 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been widely used for surface fabrication and manipulation. However, nanomanipulation using a conventional AFM is inefficient because of the sequential nature of the scan-manipulation scan cycle, which makes it difficult for the operator to observe the region of interest and perform the manipulation simultaneously. In this paper, a nanomanipulation technique using a high-speed atomic force microscope (HS-AFM) is described. During manipulation using the AFM probe, the operation is periodically interrupted for a fraction of a second for high-speed imaging that allows the topographical image of the manipulated surface to be periodically updated. With the use of high-speed imaging, the interrupting time for imaging can be greatly reduced, and as a result, the operator almost does not notice the blink time of the interruption for imaging during the manipulation. This creates a more intuitive interface with greater feedback and finesse to the operator. Nanofabrication under real-time monitoring was performed to demonstrate the utility of this arrangement for real-time nanomanipulation of sample surfaces under ambient conditions. Furthermore, the HS-AFM is coupled with a haptic device for the human interface, enabling the operator to move the HS-AFM probe to any position on the surface while feeling the response from the surface during the manipulation. - Highlights: • A nanomanipulater based on a high-speed atomic force microscope was developped. • High-speed imaging provides a valuable feedback during the manipulation operation. • Operator can feel the response from the surface via a haptic device during manipulation. • Nanofabrications under real-time monitoring were successfully performed.

  18. Effects of dc electric fields on multiphoton ionization of rubidium atoms at low and high densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Nathan I.; Compton, Robert N.

    2001-08-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) of rubidium atoms at both low (atomic beam) and high (heat pipe) densities is studied using a tunable OPO laser. At high Rb densities ionization of the laser excited ns, np, and nd states occurs both through photoionization and collisional ionization. Excitation of the np states is found to be induced by the external electric field at both low and high densities. In addition, np signal is also seen at very low (E→0) fields in the heat pipe, providing evidence for collision mixing as well as field mixing. At low densities, signal for the high np states initially increases with applied field, but soon saturates (i.e. becomes field independent) while the signal for high nd states decreases with increasing field. At low Rb densities strong resonance features are observed in the energy region between the zero field limit (IP) and the field ionization limit. These features, as well as the field ionization threshold, are found to be dependent upon the angle between the laser polarization and the direction of the applied dc field. Evidence for tunneling through the barrier created by the -e2/r-eEr potential is also presented for ns and nd states.

  19. Note: High-speed Z tip scanner with screw cantilever holding mechanism for atomic-resolution atomic force microscopy in liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Akrami, Seyed; Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy has attracted much attention due to its unique capability of visualizing nanoscale dynamic processes at a solid/liquid interface. However, its usability and resolution have yet to be improved. As one of the solutions for this issue, here we present a design of a high-speed Z-tip scanner with screw holding mechanism. We perform detailed comparison between designs with different actuator size and screw arrangement by finite element analysis. Based on the desig...

  20. Multidisciplinary approach to assess the sensitivity of dwarf tomato plants to low-LET ionising radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Micco, Veronica; De Pascale, Stefania; Aronne, Giovanna; Paradiso, Roberta; Vitaglione, Paola; Turano, Mimmo; Arena, Carmen

    Ionising radiation, acting alone or in interaction with microgravity and other environmental constraints, may affect plant at molecular, morpho-structural and physiological level. The intensity of the plant’s response depends on the properties of radiation and on the features of the plant itself. Indeed, different species are characterised by different susceptibility to radiation which may change during the life course. The aim of this research was to study the radiosensitivity to low-LET ionising radiation of plants of dwarf tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. ‘Microtom’) at two phenological phases (vegetative and reproductive), within the purpose of analysing plants for consideration as candidates for Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS) in Space. To pursue this objective, plants of the cultivar Microtom were irradiated with different doses of X-rays either at the stage of the second true leaf (VP - vegetative phase) or when at least one flower was blossomed (RP - reproductive phase). Plant’s response to ionising radiation was assessed through a multidisciplinary approach combining genetic analyses, ecophysiological measurements, morpho-anatomical characterisation of leaves and fruits, nutritional analyses of fruits. Growth, molecular and morpho-functional traits were measured during plant development up to fruiting in both VP and RP plant groups, and compared with non-irradiated control plants. Plant growth was monitored weekly recording parameters such as plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, flowering and fruiting rate. Potential DNA alterations were explored through Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. The efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus was evaluated by determining photosynthetic pigment composition, photochemistry and leaf gas exchanges. Leaf and fruit structure were analysed through light and epi-fluorescence microscopy. Leaf anatomical traits related to photosynthetic efficiency, and to structural radioprotection

  1. Non-ionising radiation human exposure assessment near telecommunication devices in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunić, Dina

    2006-03-01

    This paper gives an overview of the regulatory acts in non-ionising radiation in the world, with a special emphasis on basic guidelines issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). ICNIRP Guidelines are implemented in many countries worldwide. Croatia has also implemented them indirectly through the European Recommendation 1999/519/EC. The Croatian regulatory acts include the Non-lonising Radiation Protection Act, Ordinance on Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) Protection, and the Ordinance on Basic Requirements for Devices which produce Optical Radiation and Measures for Optical Radiation Protection. Dosimetry and densitometry are compliant with relevant international and European standards. The paper presents an example of densitometric human exposure assessment in complex indoor exposure conditions. In spite of a high number of indoor and outdoor sources and the "worst-case exposure assessment", the results are within the limits defined by the Croatian EMF Ordinance.

  2. Heralded high-efficiency quantum repeater with atomic ensembles assisted by faithful single-photon transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-10-27

    Quantum repeater is one of the important building blocks for long distance quantum communication network. The previous quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles and linear optical elements can only be performed with a maximal success probability of 1/2 during the entanglement creation and entanglement swapping procedures. Meanwhile, the polarization noise during the entanglement distribution process is harmful to the entangled channel created. Here we introduce a general interface between a polarized photon and an atomic ensemble trapped in a single-sided optical cavity, and with which we propose a high-efficiency quantum repeater protocol in which the robust entanglement distribution is accomplished by the stable spatial-temporal entanglement and it can in principle create the deterministic entanglement between neighboring atomic ensembles in a heralded way as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Meanwhile, the simplified parity-check gate makes the entanglement swapping be completed with unity efficiency, other than 1/2 with linear optics. We detail the performance of our protocol with current experimental parameters and show its robustness to the imperfections, i.e., detuning and coupling variation, involved in the reflection process. These good features make it a useful building block in long distance quantum communication.

  3. A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, A. S.; Higgins, S. R.; Knauss, K. G.; Rosso, K. M.

    2011-01-01

    A high-pressure atomic force microscope(AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluidrefractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (101¯4) surface are presented. Finally, this new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid–fluid interfaces under pressure.

  4. Characterization of the surface charge distribution on kaolinite particles using high resolution atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Zhao, Cunlu; Klaassen, Aram; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder; Siretanu, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Most solid surfaces, in particular clay minerals and rock surfaces, acquire a surface charge upon exposure to an aqueous environment due to adsorption and/or desorption of ionic species. Macroscopic techniques such as titration and electrokinetic measurements are commonly used to determine the surface charge and ζ -potential of these surfaces. However, because of the macroscopic averaging character these techniques cannot do justice to the role of local heterogeneities on the surfaces. In this work, we use dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the distribution of surface charge on the two (gibbsite-like and silica-like) basal planes of kaolinite nanoparticles immersed in aqueous electrolyte with a lateral resolution of approximately 30 nm. The surface charge density is extracted from force-distance curves using DLVO theory in combination with surface complexation modeling. While the gibbsite-like and the silica-like facet display on average positive and negative surface charge values as expected, our measurements reveal lateral variations of more than a factor of two on seemingly atomically smooth terraces, even if high resolution AFM images clearly reveal the atomic lattice on the surface. These results suggest that simple surface complexation models of clays that attribute a unique surface chemistry and hence homogeneous surface charge densities to basal planes may miss important aspects of real clay surfaces.

  5. Production of Ceramic Balls by High Temperature Atomization of Mine Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunsik; Ha, Minchul; Yang, Dong-hyo; Sohn, Jeong-soo; Park, Joohyun

    Gold tailing, red mud and waste limestones are industrial wastes that are mostly landfilled near the process plants. These increase the environmental risks as well as the necessity of waste management. Recycling of materials has been limited due to the fine particle sizes, heavy metals and unique oxide compositions. The authors investigated the potential utilization of these industrial wastes by melting and granulation technique. As quartz, hematite, alumina and lime consist more than 90wt% of mine wastes, CaO-FetO-Al2O3-SiO2 quaternary oxide system was applied to the thermodynamic calculations. Compositions of molten oxides were designed considering the lowest melting temperature and the adequate viscosity for atomization. Samples were melted by high frequency induction furnace then the atomization was carried out by air blowing technique. Viscosities of the melts were measured to quantify the optimum melting and atomization condition. Size distribution of the produced ceramic balls was investigated to estimate potential of the product to be used as abrasive materials.

  6. Double-resonance spectroscopy in Rubidium vapour-cells for high performance and miniature atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Mileti, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report our studies on using microwave-optical double-resonance (DR) spectroscopy for a high-performance Rb vapour-cell atomic clock in view of future industrial applications. The clock physics package is very compact with a total volume of only 0.8 dm3. It contains a recently in-house developed magnetron-type cavity and a Rb vapour cell. A homed-made frequency-stabilized laser system with an integrated acousto-optical-modulator (AOM) - for switching and controlling the light output power- is used as an optical source in a laser head (LH). The LH has the overall volume of 2.5 dm3 including the laser diode, optical elements, AOM and electronics. In our Rb atomic clock two schemes of continuous-wave DR and Ramsey-DR schemes are used, where the latter one strongly reduces the light-shift effect by separation of the interaction of light and microwave. Applications of the DR clock approach to more radically miniaturized atomic clocks are discussed.

  7. An atomic and molecular fluid model for efficient edge-plasma transport simulations at high densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognlien, Thomas; Rensink, Marvin

    2016-10-01

    Transport simulations for the edge plasma of tokamaks and other magnetic fusion devices requires the coupling of plasma and recycling or injected neutral gas. There are various neutral models used for this purpose, e.g., atomic fluid model, a Monte Carlo particle models, transition/escape probability methods, and semi-analytic models. While the Monte Carlo method is generally viewed as the most accurate, it is time consuming, which becomes even more demanding for device simulations of high densities and size typical of fusion power plants because the neutral collisional mean-free path becomes very small. Here we examine the behavior of an extended fluid neutral model for hydrogen that includes both atoms and molecules, which easily includes nonlinear neutral-neutral collision effects. In addition to the strong charge-exchange between hydrogen atoms and ions, elastic scattering is included among all species. Comparisons are made with the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo code. Work performed for U.S. DoE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. An electron of helium atom under a high-intensity laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Adepoju, Adenike Grace; Liman, Muhammed S.; Oyewumi, K. J.; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2017-02-01

    We scrutinize the behavior of eigenvalues of an electron in a helium (He) atom as it interacts with electric field directed along the z-axis and is exposed to linearly polarized intense laser field radiation. To achieve this, we freeze one electron of the He atom at its ionic ground state and the motion of the second electron in the ion core is treated via a more general case of screened Coulomb potential model. Using the Kramers-Henneberger (KH) unitary transformation, which is the semiclassical counterpart of the Block-Nordsieck transformation in the quantized field formalism, the squared vector potential that appears in the equation of motion is eliminated and the resultant equation is expressed in the KH frame. Within this frame, the resulting potential and the corresponding wave function are expanded in Fourier series and using Ehlotzky’s approximation, we obtain a laser-dressed potential to simulate intense laser field. By fitting the more general case of screened Coulomb potential model into the laser-dressed potential, and then expanding it in Taylor series up to O≤ft({{r}4},α 09\\right) , we obtain the solution (eigenvalues and wave function) of an electron in a He atom under the influence of external electric field and high-intensity laser field, within the framework of perturbation theory formalism. We found that the variation in frequency of laser radiation has no effect on the eigenvalues of a He electron for a particular electric field intensity directed along z-axis. Also, for a very strong external electric field and an infinitesimal screening parameter, the system is strongly bound. This work has potential application in the areas of atomic and molecular processes in external fields including interactions with strong fields and short pulses.

  9. The Study of Active Atoms in High-Voltage Pulsed Coronal Discharge by Optical Diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Feng; Wang Wenchun; Wang Su; Ren Chunsheng; Wang Younian

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the emission spectra of active atoms O (3p5P → 3s5S20 777.4 nm),Ha (3P → 2S 656.3 nm) and N (3p4P → 3s4S0 742.3 nm, 744.2 nm, 746.8 nm) produced by thepositive high-voltage pulsed corona discharge (HVPCD) of N2 and H2O mixture in a needle-platereactor have successfully been recorded against a severe electromagnetic interference coming fromthe HVPCD at one atmosphere. The effects of the peak voltage, the repetition rate of pulseddischarge and the flow rate of oxygen on the production of those active atoms are investigated. Itis found that when the peak voltage and the repetition rate of the pulsed discharge are increased,the emission intensities of those active atoms rise correspondingly. And the emission intensities ofO (3p5P → 3s5S20 777.4 nm), Ha (3P → 2S 656.3 nm) and N (3p4P → 3s4S0 742.3 nm, 744.2 nm,746.8 nm) increase with the flow rate of oxygen (from 0 to 25 ml/min) and achieve a maximumvalue at a flow rate of 25 ml/min. When the flow rate of oxygen is increased further, the emissionintensities of those atoms visibly decrease correspondingly. The main physicochemical processesof interaction involved between electrons, neutrals and ions are also discussed.

  10. High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Evan A; Pfeiffer, Jonathan B; Anderson, Dana Z

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

  11. Fragmentation dynamics of ammonia cluster ions after single photon ionisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, E.; Vries, J. de; Steger, H.; Menzel, C.; Kamke, W.; Hertel, I.V. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Freiburger Materialforschungszentrum)

    1991-01-01

    A reflecting time of flight mass spectrometer (RETOF) is used to study unimolecular and collision induced fragmentation of ammonia cluster ions. Synchrotron radiation from the BESSY electron storage ring is used in a range of photon energies from 9.08 up to 17.7 eV for single photon ionisation of neutral clusters in a supersonic beam. The threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence technique (TPEPICO) is used to define the energy initially deposited into the cluster ions. Metastable unimolecular decay ({mu}s range) is studied using the RETOF's capacity for energy analysis. Under collision free conditions the by far most prominent metastable process is the evaporation of one neutral NH{sub 3} monomer from protonated clusters (NH{sub 3}){sub x}NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Abundance of homogeneous vs. protonated cluster ions and of metastable fragments are reported as a function of photon energy and cluster size up to n=10. (orig.).

  12. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleg V Belyakov; Heli Mononen; Marjo Peraelae [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  13. High sensitive formaldehyde graphene gas sensor modified by atomic layer deposition zinc oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Haichuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Keke; Xie, Haifen, E-mail: hfxie@ecust.edu.cn [Department of Physics, School of Science, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhao, Xiaojing; Liu, Feng [Department of Physics, Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2014-07-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films with various thicknesses were fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition on Chemical Vapor Deposition grown graphene films and their response to formaldehyde has been investigated. It was found that 0.5 nm ZnO films modified graphene sensors showed high response to formaldehyde with the resistance change up to 52% at the concentration of 9 parts-per-million (ppm) at room temperature. Meanwhile, the detection limit could reach 180 parts-per-billion (ppb) and fast response of 36 s was also obtained. The high sensitivity could be attributed to the combining effect from the highly reactive, top mounted ZnO thin films, and high conductive graphene base network. The dependence of ZnO films surface morphology and its sensitivity on the ZnO films thickness was also investigated.

  14. Thermally and optically stimulated luminescence of AlN-Y2O3 ceramics after ionising irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Bos, A.J.J.; Winkelman, A.J.M.;

    1999-01-01

    Thermally (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) were studied in AlN-Y2O3 ceramics after irradiation with ionising radiation. The extremely high TL sensitivity (approximately 60 times the sensitivity of LiF:Mg,Tl (TLD-100)) makes AlN-Y2O3 ceramics attractive as a TLD material. However......, an essential drawback of AlN-Y2O3 is its high fading rate. Special attention has been focused on understanding and improving the fading properties. In particular, the influence of the ceramics production conditions and the additive concentration on the fading rate have been studied. Experimental results...

  15. Headspace analysis of new psychoactive substances using a Selective Reagent Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion in the number and use of new psychoactive substances presents a significant analytical challenge because highly sensitive instrumentation capable of detecting a broad range of chemical compounds in real-time with a low rate of false positives is required. A Selective Reagent Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (SRI-ToF-MS) instrument is capable of meeting all of these requirements. With its high mass resolution (up to m/Δm of 8000), the application of variations in...

  16. Monte Carlo configuration interaction applied to multipole moments, ionisation energies and electron affinities

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, J P; Paterson, M J

    2013-01-01

    The method of Monte Carlo configuration interaction (MCCI) [1,2] is applied to the calculation of multipole moments. We look at the ground and excited state dipole moments in carbon monoxide. We then consider the dipole of NO, the quadrupole of the nitrogen molecule and of BH. An octupole of methane is also calculated. We consider experimental geometries and also stretched bonds. We show that these non-variational quantities may be found to relatively good accuracy when compared with FCI results, yet using only a small fraction of the full configuration interaction space. MCCI results in the aug-cc-pVDZ basis are seen to generally have reasonably good agreement with experiment. We also investigate the performance of MCCI when applied to ionisation energies and electron affinities of atoms in an aug-cc-pVQZ basis. We compare the MCCI results with full configuration-interaction quantum Monte Carlo [3,4] and `exact' non-relativistic results [3,4]. We show that MCCI could be a useful alternative for the calculati...

  17. Light storage in a cold atomic ensemble with a high optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Chough, Young-Tak; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2017-06-01

    A quantum memory with a high storage efficiency and a long coherence time is an essential element in quantum information applications. Here, we report our recent development of an optical quantum memory with a rubidium-87 cold atom ensemble. By increasing the optical depth of the medium, we have achieved a storage efficiency of 65% and a coherence time of 51 μs for a weak laser pulse. The result of a numerical analysis based on the Maxwell-Bloch equations agrees well with the experimental results. Our result paves the way toward an efficient optical quantum memory and may find applications in photonic quantum information processing.

  18. Amplified light storage with high fidelity based on electromagnetically induced transparency in rubidium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Gang; Tang, Guoyu; Xue, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using slow and stored light based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we theoretically realize the storage of optical pulses with enhanced efficiency and high fidelity in ensembles of warm atoms in 85Rb vapor cells. The enhancement of storage efficiency is achieved by introducing a pump field beyond three-level configuration to form a N-type scheme, which simultaneously inhibits the undesirable four-wave mixing effect while preserves its fidelity. It is shown that the typical storage efficiency can be improved from 29% to 53% with the application of pump field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this efficiency decreases with storage time and increases over unity with optical depth.

  19. High sensitivity, low-systematics atom interferometers using Bragg diffraction and Bloch oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Estey, Brian; Müller, Holger; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new scheme for atom interferometry based on both large-momentum transfer Bragg beam splitters and Bloch oscillations. Combining the advantages of previous approaches to recoil-sensitive interferometers, we increase the signal and suppress a systematic phase shift caused by Bragg diffraction at least 60-fold, matching experiment to theory; the systematic shift can be eliminated from Mach-Zehnder interferometers. We demonstrate high contrast, interference with up to 4.4 million radians of phase difference between freely evolving matter waves, and a resolution of $\\delta \\alpha/\\alpha=0.33\\,$ppb$\\sqrt{\\rm 6h}$ available to measurements of the fine structure constant.

  20. Wide-area scanner for high-speed atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Hiroki; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Kobashi, Toshihide; Shibata, Mikihiro; Nishiyama, Jun; Yasuda, Ryohei; Ando, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) has recently been established. The dynamic processes and structural dynamics of protein molecules in action have been successfully visualized using HS-AFM. However, its maximum scan ranges in the X- and Y-directions have been limited to ∼1 μm and ∼4 μm, respectively, making it infeasible to observe the dynamics of much larger samples, including live cells. Here, we develop a wide-area scanner with a maximum XY scan range of ∼46 × 46 μm2 by magnifyin...

  1. Self-Channeling of High-Power Long-Wave Infrared Pulses in Atomic Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, K.; Kolesik, M.; Wright, E. M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2017-02-01

    We simulate and elucidate the self-channeling of high-power 10 μ m infrared pulses in atomic gases. The major new result is that the peak intensity can remain remarkably stable over many Rayleigh ranges. This arises from the balance between the self-focusing, diffraction, and defocusing caused by the excitation induced dephasing due to many-body Coulomb effects that enhance the low-intensity plasma densities. This new paradigm removes the Rayleigh range limit for sources in the 8 - 12 μ m atmospheric transmission window and enables transport of individual multi-TW pulses over multiple kilometer ranges.

  2. Zeeman Effect of Sm Atoms by High-Resolution Diode-Laser Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Guo Jin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution atomic-beam diode-laser spectroscopy in Sm I has been performed. Zeeman spectra have been measured for the three optical transitions at different external magnetic fields and well resolved at the magnetic fields of stronger than 6.0 mT. Using the known precise Landé -factors of the ground multiplet, the Landé -factors of the upper 4f66s6p   and levels have been determined, and their precision has been improved compared with the reference values.

  3. Laser frequency offset locking scheme for high-field imaging of cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Puentes, Graciana

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple and flexible frequency offset locking scheme developed for high-field imaging of ultra-cold atoms which relies on commercially available RF electronics only. The main new ingredient is the use of the sharp amplitude response of a home-made RF filter to provide an error signal for locking the lasers. We were able to offset lock two independent diode lasers within a capture range of 200 MHz, and with a tuning range of up to 1.4GHz. The beat-note residual fluctuations for offset locked lasers are bellow 2MHz for integration times of several hundreds of seconds.

  4. Correlated double electron capture in slow, highly charged ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Havener, C.C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Swenson, J.K.; Shafroth, S.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent measurements of autoionization electrons produced in slow, highly charged ion-atom collisions are reviewed. Mechanisms for double electron capture into equivalent and nonequivalent configurations are analyzed by comparing the probabilities for the creation of L/sub 1/L/sub 23/X Coster Kronig electrons and L-Auger electrons. It is shown that the production of the Coster-Kronig electrons is due to electron correlation effects whose analysis leads beyond the independent-particle model. The importance of correlation effects on different capture mechanisms is discussed. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Dark matter scattering on electrons: Accurate calculations of atomic excitations and implications for the DAMA and XENON experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Dzuba, Vladimir; Flambaum, Victor; Gribakin, Gleb; Pospelov, Maxim; Stadnik, Yevgeny

    2017-01-01

    Atoms can become ionised during the scattering of a slow, heavy particle off a bound electron. Such an interaction involving leptophilic WIMP dark matter is a potential explanation for the anomalous 9 sigma annual modulation in the DAMA direct detection experiment. We show that due to non-analytic, cusp-like behavior of Coulomb functions close to the nucleus leads to an effective atomic structure enhancement. Crucially, we also show that electron relativistic effects are important. With this in mind, we perform high-accuracy relativistic calculations of atomic ionisation. We scan the parameter space: the DM mass, the mediator mass, and the effective coupling strength, to determine if there is any region that could potentially explain the DAMA signal. While we find that the modulation fraction of all events with energy deposition above 2 keV in NaI can be quite significant, reaching 50%, the relevant parts of the parameter space are excluded by the XENON10 and XENON100 experiments.

  6. A high-performance Raman-Ramsey Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Coget, Grégoire; Yun, Peter; Guérandel, Stéphane; de Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a high-performance coherent-population-trapping (CPT) Cs vapor cell atomic clock using the push-pull optical pumping technique in the pulsed regime, allowing the detection of high-contrast and narrow Ramsey-CPT fringes. The impact of several experimental parameters onto the clock resonance and short-term fractional frequency stability, including the laser power, the cell temperature, and the Ramsey sequence parameters, has been investigated. We observe and explain the existence of a slight dependence on laser power of the central Ramsey-CPT fringe line-width in the pulsed regime. We report also that the central fringe line-width is commonly narrower than the expected Ramsey line-width given by 1 / ( 2 T R ) , with TR the free-evolution time, for short values of TR. The clock demonstrates a short-term fractional frequency stability at the level of 2.3 × 10 - 13 τ - 1 / 2 up to 100 s averaging time, mainly limited by the laser amplitude modulation noise. Comparable performances are obtained in the conventional continuous wave regime, with the use of an additional laser power stabilization setup. The pulsed interaction allows to reduce significantly the clock frequency sensitivity to laser power variations, especially for high values of TR. This pulsed CPT clock, ranking among the best microwave vapor cell atomic frequency standards, could find applications in telecommunication, instrumentation, defense or satellite-based navigation systems.

  7. Measurements of atomic parameters of highly charged ions for interpreting astrophysical spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Utter, S.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Boyce, K.R.; Gendreau, K.C.; Kelley, R.; Porter, F.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Gu, M.F.; Kahn, S.M.; Savin, D.W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Gygax, J. [Swales and Associates, Beltsville, MD (United States)

    2001-07-01

    High-resolution X-ray spectra obtained by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission put new demands on atomic data including line positions, excitation cross sections, and radiative rates of cosmically-abundant highly-charged ions. To address this need, we are performing measurements of the line emission from ions of cosmically abundant elements. The data are obtained at the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap and focus on cross sections for electron-impact excitation, dielectronic recombination, and resonance excitation as well as atomic structure measurements. We find that ratios of the electron-impact excitation cross sections of singlet and triplet levels are systematically different from the calculated values in the case of many highly charged ions. This, for example, has a profound impact on inferring optical depths from solar and stellar atmospheres. Moreover, new line identifications are presented that resolve some long-standing puzzles in the interpretation of solar data, and the importance of resonance contributions to the spectral emission is assessed. (orig.)

  8. Effects of electric fields and collisions on highly excited rubidium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, N.I.; Compton, R.N. [Tennessee Univ., Dept. of Chemistry and Physics, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2003-10-01

    The effects of static and pulsed electric fields on the multiphoton ionization (MPI) of rubidium atoms at both low (atomic beam) and high (heat pipe) densities are studied using tunable OPO lasers. Two-photon excitation of np states is induced by the external electric field at both low and high densities. In addition, np signal is also seen at very low electric fields in the heat pipe, providing evidence for collision mixing as well as field mixing. At low Rb densities strong resonance features are observed in the energy region between the zero field limit (IP) and the field ionization limit. In addition, collisional detachment and charge transfer between excited ns and nd Rb Rydberg states and nozzle-jet cooled polar molecules (acetonitrile and acetone) are studied under crossed-beam conditions. The formation of dipole bound anions for acetone is only seen under nozzle jet expansion conditions and the maximum in the Rydberg electron transfer (RET) rate versus n depends upon the expansion gas (n{sub max} increases in the order H{sub 2}, He, Ne, Ar, Xe). For acetone (low dipole moment and large n{sub max}), collisional detachment dominates the charge transfer, whereas for acetonitrile (high dipole moment and low n{sub max}), charge transfer is seen to dominate the creation of Rb{sup +}. (authors)

  9. Effects of electric fields and collisions on highly excited rubidium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, N. I.; Compton, R. N.

    2003-10-01

    The effects of static and pulsed electric fields on the multiphoton ionization (MPI) of rubidium atoms at both low (atomic beam) and high (heat pipe) densities are studied using tunable OPO lasers. Two-photon excitation of np states is induced by the external electric field at both low and high densities. In addition, np signal is also seen at very low electric fields in the heat pipe, providing evidence for collision mixing as well as field mixing. At low Rb densities strong resonance features are observed in the energy region between the zero field limit (IP) and the field ionization limit. In addition, collisional detachment and charge transfer between excited ns and nd Rb Rydberg states and nozzle-jet cooled polar molecules (acetonitrile and acetone) are studied under crossed-beam conditions. The formation of dipole bound anions for acetone is only seen under nozzle jet expansion conditions and the maximum in the Rydberg electron transfer (RET) rate versus n depends upon the expansion gas (n_max increases in the order H{2}, He, Ne, Ar, Xe). For acetone (low dipole moment and large n_max), collisional detachment dominates the charge transfer, whereas for acetonitrile (high dipole moment and low n_max), charge transfer is seen to dominate the creation of Rb+.

  10. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditmire, Todd [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for High Energy Density Science

    2016-10-12

    We propose to expand our recent studies on the interactions of intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) femtosecond pulses with atomic and molecular clusters. The work described follows directly from work performed under BES support for the past grant period. During this period we upgraded the THOR laser at UT Austin by replacing the regenerative amplifier with optical parametric amplification (OPA) using BBO crystals. This increased the contrast of the laser, the total laser energy to ~1.2 J , and decreased the pulse width to below 30 fs. We built a new all reflective XUV harmonic beam line into expanded lab space. This enabled an increase influence by a factor of 25 and an increase in the intensity by a factor of 50. The goal of the program proposed in this renewal is to extend this class of experiments to available higher XUV intensity and a greater range of wavelengths. In particular we plan to perform experiments to confirm our hypothesis about the origin of the high charge states in these exploding clusters, an effect which we ascribe to plasma continuum lowering (ionization potential depression) in a cluster nano-­plasma. To do this we will perform experiments in which XUV pulses of carefully chosen wavelength irradiate clusters composed of only low-Z atoms and clusters with a mixture of this low-­Z atom with higher Z atoms. The latter clusters will exhibit higher electron densities and will serve to lower the ionization potential further than in the clusters composed only of low Z atoms. This should have a significant effect on the charge states produced in the exploding cluster. We will also explore the transition of explosions in these XUV irradiated clusters from hydrodynamic expansion to Coulomb explosion. The work proposed here will explore clusters of a wider range of constituents, including clusters from solids. Experiments on clusters from solids will be enabled by development we performed during the past grant period in which we constructed and

  11. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  12. Predictive value of derived calcium figures based on the measurement of ionised calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, M D; Dryburgh, F J; Fyffe, J A; Jenkins, A S

    1981-03-01

    The algorithms used in this hospital to assess calcium status are calculated ionised serum calcium and the serum calcium concentration adjusted for albumin. In order to establish their clinical usefulness, they were compared with the ionised calcium concentration measured on the Nova 2 instrument in patients with various calcium and protein abnormalities. Good correlation was found between the measured and calculated values. The predictive values for the calculated results and for total serum calcium concentrations are presented. In this series, the derived values were useful in predicting the serum ionised calcium concentration of the patients studied.

  13. Double Ionisation in R-Matrix Theory Using a 2-electron Outer Region

    CERN Document Server

    Wragg, Jack; van der Hart, H W

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a two-electron outer region for use within R-matrix theory to describe double ionisation processes. The capability of this method is demonstrated for single-photon double ionisation of He in the photon energy region between 80 eV to 180 eV. The cross sections are in agreement with established data. The extended RMT method also provides information on higher-order processes, as demonstrated by the identification of signatures for sequential double ionisation processes involving an intermediate He$^{+}$ state with $n=2$.

  14. New Atomic Methods for Dark Matter Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Stadnik, Yevgeny; Dzuba, Vladimir; Flambaum, Victor; Leefer, Nathan; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    We propose to exploit P and T violating effects in atoms, nuclei, and molecules to search for dark matter (eg axions) and various other cosmic fields. We perform calculations of electric dipole moments (EDMs) that a dark matter field would induce in atoms. Crucially, the effects we consider here are linear in the small parameter that quantifies the dark matter interaction strength; most current searches rely on effects that are at least quadratic in this parameter. The induced oscillating EDMs have the potential to be measured with very high accuracy, and experimental techniques in this field are evolving fast. Pairs of closely spaced opposite parity levels that are found in diatomic molecules will also lead to a significant enhancement in these effects. We are also interested in a possible explanation for the anomalous DAMA dark matter detection results based on DM-electron scattering. Our calculations may provide a possible mechanism for dark matter induced ionisation modulations that are not ruled out by other experiments. Alternatively, they could further reduce the available parameter space for certain dark matter models.

  15. High-speed atomic force microscope based on an astigmatic detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, H.-S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Hwu, E.-T.; Chang, C.-S.; Hwang, I.-S., E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Ding, R.-F.; Huang, H.-F.; Wang, W.-M. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Huang, K.-Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-15

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) enables visualizing dynamic behaviors of biological molecules under physiological conditions at a temporal resolution of 1s or shorter. A small cantilever with a high resonance frequency is crucial in increasing the scan speed. However, detecting mechanical resonances of small cantilevers is technically challenging. In this study, we constructed an atomic force microscope using a digital versatile disc (DVD) pickup head to detect cantilever deflections. In addition, a flexure-guided scanner and a sinusoidal scan method were implemented. In this work, we imaged a grating sample in air by using a regular cantilever and a small cantilever with a resonance frequency of 5.5 MHz. Poor tracking was seen at the scan rate of 50 line/s when a cantilever for regular AFM imaging was used. Using a small cantilever at the scan rate of 100 line/s revealed no significant degradation in the topographic images. The results indicate that a smaller cantilever can achieve a higher scan rate and superior force sensitivity. This work shows the potential for using a DVD pickup head in future HS-AFM technology.

  16. High-speed atomic force microscopy for large scan sizes using small cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2010-06-01

    We present a high-speed atomic force microscope that exhibits a number of practical advantages over previous designs. Its central component is a high-speed scanner with a maximum scan size of 23 µm × 23 µm and a conveniently large sample stage area (6.5 mm × 6.5 mm). In combination with small cantilevers, image rates of up to 46 images s - 1 in air and 13 images s - 1 in liquid are reached under z-feedback control. By large scan size imaging of collagen fibrils in air, sample velocities of 8.8 mm s - 1 in the xy-direction and 11 mm s - 1 in the z-direction are reached. To provide optimized imaging conditions for both large and small scan sizes, a modular scanner design allows easily exchanging the x- and y-piezos. The scanner is therefore also suited for investigations on the molecular and atomic scale, which is demonstrated by imaging the step dynamics of a calcite surface during dissolution and the hexagonal lattice of a mica surface in liquid.

  17. High-throughput all-atom molecular dynamics simulations using distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, I; Harvey, M J; Giorgino, T; Anderson, D P; De Fabritiis, G

    2010-03-22

    Although molecular dynamics simulation methods are useful in the modeling of macromolecular systems, they remain computationally expensive, with production work requiring costly high-performance computing (HPC) resources. We review recent innovations in accelerating molecular dynamics on graphics processing units (GPUs), and we describe GPUGRID, a volunteer computing project that uses the GPU resources of nondedicated desktop and workstation computers. In particular, we demonstrate the capability of simulating thousands of all-atom molecular trajectories generated at an average of 20 ns/day each (for systems of approximately 30 000-80 000 atoms). In conjunction with a potential of mean force (PMF) protocol for computing binding free energies, we demonstrate the use of GPUGRID in the computation of accurate binding affinities of the Src SH2 domain/pYEEI ligand complex by reconstructing the PMF over 373 umbrella sampling windows of 55 ns each (20.5 mus of total data). We obtain a standard free energy of binding of -8.7 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol within 0.7 kcal/mol from experimental results. This infrastructure will provide the basis for a robust system for high-throughput accurate binding affinity prediction.

  18. A highly miniaturized vacuum package for a trapped ion atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwindt, Peter D. D., E-mail: pschwin@sandia.gov; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Partner, Heather; Casias, Adrian; Wagner, Adrian R.; Moorman, Matthew; Manginell, Ronald P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kellogg, James R.; Prestage, John D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a highly miniaturized vacuum package for use in an atomic clock utilizing trapped ytterbium-171 ions. The vacuum package is approximately 1 cm{sup 3} in size and contains a linear quadrupole RF Paul ion trap, miniature neutral Yb sources, and a non-evaporable getter pump. We describe the fabrication process for making the Yb sources and assembling the vacuum package. To prepare the vacuum package for ion trapping, it was evacuated, baked at a high temperature, and then back filled with a helium buffer gas. Once appropriate vacuum conditions were achieved in the package, it was sealed with a copper pinch-off and was subsequently pumped only by the non-evaporable getter. We demonstrated ion trapping in this vacuum package and the operation of an atomic clock, stabilizing a local oscillator to the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of {sup 171}Y b{sup +}. The fractional frequency stability of the clock was measured to be 2 × 10{sup −11}/τ{sup 1/2}.

  19. On curriculum of 'Atom and Radiation' in high school physics 1B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Nobuo [Tachibana Gakuen Senior High School, Matsuda, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    The 30% of electric power consumed in general home of Japan is supplied by nuclear power plants nowadays. High school students should have a right knowledge of nuclear energy. A curriculum of 'Atom and Radiation' is carried on about 10 school hours. The curriculum contains 10 items as follows: (1) history of discovery and development of nuclear energy, (2) radiation and radiation generation mechanism, (3) radiation measurement 1; natural radiation and familiar radiation source, (4) radiation measurement 2; relations of a distance and intensity (or dose), (5) radiation measurement 3; shielding effect experiment of radiation, (6) radiation observation by cloud chamber; assembling cloud chamber, (7) nuclear fission; chain reaction and atomic bomb, (8) principle of nuclear energy; principle and structure of nuclear reactor, (9) nuclear fuel and radioactive waste, (10) nuclear power as a energy source; discussion. Video-tapes fitted for these items are used in teaching. High school students after teaching have been able to consider nuclear energy and environmental issues by themselves. (M. Suetake)

  20. Highly spin-polarized deuterium atoms from the UV dissociation of Deuterium Iodide

    CERN Document Server

    Sofikitis, D; Koumarianou, G; Jiang, H; Bougas, L; Samartzis, P C; Andreev, A; Rakitzis, T P

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarisation of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) nuclear spins increases the D-T fusion reaction rate by ~50%, thus lowering the breakeven limit for the achievement of self-sustained fusion, and controls the emission direction of the reaction products for improved reactor efficiency. However, the important D-D polarization-dependent fusion reaction has not yet been measured, due to the low density of conventional polarized deuterium beams of ~10$^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$, limited by collisions on the ms-timescale of production. Here we demonstrate that hyperpolarised D atoms are produced by the 270 nm photodissociation of deuterium iodide (DI), yielding ~60% nuclear D polarization after ~1.6 ns, ~10$^6$ times faster than conventional methods, allowing collision-limited densities of ~10$^{18}$ cm$^{-3}$. Such ultrahigh densities of polarized D atoms open the way for the study of high-signal polarized D-D reactions. We discuss the possibility of the production of high-density pulsed polarized beams, and of polarized D...

  1. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible.

  2. Observing Planets and Small Bodies in Sputtered High Energy Atom (SHEA) Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, A.; Orsini, S.; Hsieh, K. C.; Baragiola, R.; Fama, M.; Johnson, R.; Mura, A.; Plainaki, Ch.; Sarantos, M.; Cassidy, T. A.; DeAngelis, E; Desai, M.; Goldstein, R.; Lp, W.-H.; Killen, R.; Livi, S.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the surfaces of bodies unprotected by either strong magnetic fields or thick atmospheres in the Solar System is caused by various processes, induced by photons, energetic ions and micrometeoroids. Among these processes, the continuous bombardment of the solar wind or energetic magnetospheric ions onto the bodies may significantly affect their surfaces, with implications for their evolution. Ion precipitation produces neutral atom releases into the exosphere through ion sputtering, with velocity distribution extending well above the particle escape limits. We refer to this component of the surface ejecta as sputtered high-energy atoms (SHEA). The use of ion sputtering emission for studying the interaction of exposed bodies (EB) with ion environments is described here. Remote sensing in SHEA in the vicinity of EB can provide mapping of the bodies exposed to ion sputtering action with temporal and mass resolution. This paper speculates on the possibility of performing remote sensing of exposed bodies using SHEA The evolution of the surfaces of bodies unprotected by either strong magnetic fields or thick atmospheres in the Solar System is caused by various processes, induced by photons, energetic ions and micrometeoroids. Among these processes, the continuous bombardment of the solar wind or energetic magnetospheric ions onto the bodies may significantly affect their surfaces, with implications for their evolution. Ion precipitation produces neutral atom releases into the exosphere through ion sputtering, with velocity distribution extending well above the particle escape limits. We refer to this component of the surface ejecta as sputtered high-energy atoms (SHEA). The use of ion sputtering emission for studying the interaction of exposed bodies (EB) with ion environments is described here. Remote sensing in SHEA in the vicinity of EB can provide mapping of the bodies exposed to ion sputtering action with temporal and mass resolution. This paper

  3. High-Performance Ru1 /CeO2 Single-Atom Catalyst for CO Oxidation: A Computational Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengyu; Li, Lei; Liu, Xinying; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Chen, Zhongfang

    2016-10-18

    By means of density functional theory computations, we examine the stability and CO oxidation activity of single Ru on CeO2 (111), TiO2 (110) and Al2 O3 (001) surfaces. The heterogeneous system Ru1 /CeO2 has very high stability, as indicated by the strong binding energies and high diffusion barriers of a single Ru atom on the ceria support, while the Ru atom is rather mobile on TiO2 (110) and Al2 O3 (001) surfaces and tends to form clusters, excluding these systems from having a high efficiency per Ru atom. The Ru1 /CeO2 exhibits good catalytic activity for CO oxidation via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, thus is a promising single-atom catalyst.

  4. Interpretation of ionospheric F-region structures in the vicinity of ionisation troughs observed by satellite radio tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Aladjev

    Full Text Available Tomographic images of the spatial distribution of electron density in the ionospheric F-region are presented from the Russian-American Tomography Experiment (RATE in November 1993 as well as from campaigns carried out in northern Scandinavia in November 1995 and in Russia in April 1990. The reconstructions selected display the ionisation troughs above the tomographic chains of receivers during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed periods. Two mathematical models of the high-latitude ionosphere developed in the Polar Geophysical Institute have been applied for interpretation of the observed tomographic images.

    Key words. Ionosphere (electric fields and currents; ion chemistry and composition; plasma convection

  5. Observation of $\\pi^- K^+$ and $\\pi^+ K^-$ atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; The PS212 collaboration; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Anania, A.; Aogaki, S.; Benelli, A.; Brekhovskikh, V.; Cechak, T.; Chiba, M.; Chliapnikov, P.; Doskarova, P.; Drijard, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dumitriu, D.; Fluerasu, D.; Gorin, A.; Gorchakov, O.; Gritsay, K.; Guaraldo, C.; Gugiu, M.; Hansroul, M.; Hons, Z.; Horikawa, S.; Iwashita, Y.; Karpukhin, V.; Kluson, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Kruglov, V.; Kruglova, L.; Kulikov, A.; Kulish, E.; Kuptsov, A.; Lamberto, A.; Lanaro, A.; Lednicky, R.; Marinas, C.; Martincik, J.; Nikitin, M.; Okada, K.; Olchevskii, V.; Pentia, M.; Penzo, A.; Plo, M.; Prusa, P.; Rappazzo, G.; Vidal, A.Romero; Ryazantsev, A.; Rykalin, V.; Saborido, J.; Sidorov, A.; Smolik, J.; Takeutchi, F.; Tauscher, L.; Trojek, T.; Trusov, S.; Urban, T.; Vrba, T.; Yazkov, V.; Yoshimura, Y.; Zhabitsky, M.; Zrelov, P.

    2016-01-01

    The observation of hydrogen-like $\\pi K$ atoms, consisting of $\\pi^- K^+$ or $\\pi^+ K^-$ mesons, is presented. The atoms have been produced by 24 GeV/$c$ protons from the CERN PS accelerator, interacting with platinum or nickel foil targets. The breakup (ionisation) of $\\pi K$ atoms in the same targets yields characteristic $\\pi K$ pairs, called ``atomic pairs'', with small relative momenta in the pair centre-of-mass system. The upgraded DIRAC experiment has observed $349\\pm62$ such atomic $\\pi K$ pairs, corresponding to a signal of 5.6 standard deviations.

  6. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A. P.; Grussie, F.; Bruhns, H.; de Ruette, N.; Koenning, T. P.; Miller, K. A.; Savin, D. W.; Stützel, J.; Urbain, X.; Kreckel, H.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of ˜7.4% for H- at a beam energy of 10 keV and ˜3.7% for C- at 28 keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975 nm and 808 nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2 kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table.

  7. Highly conformal atomic layer deposition of tantalum oxide using alkylamide precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausmann, Dennis M.; Rouffignac, Philippe de; Smith, Amethyst; Gordon, Roy; Monsma, Douwe

    2003-10-22

    Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal films of tantalum oxide were studied using tantalum alkylamide precursors and water as the oxygen source. These films also exhibited a very high degree of conformality: 100% step coverage on vias with aspect ratios greater than 35. As deposited, the films were free of detectable impurities with the expected (2.5-1) oxygen to metal ratio and were smooth and amorphous. The films were completely uniform in thickness and composition over the length of the reactor used for depositions. Films were deposited at substrate temperatures from 50 to 350 deg. C from precursors that were vaporized at temperatures from 50 to 120 deg. C. As deposited, the films showed a dielectric constant of 28 and breakdown field consistently greater than 4.5 MV/cm.

  8. High Current Density and Low Thermal Conductivity of Atomically Thin Semimetallic WTe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mleczko, Michal J; Xu, Runjie Lily; Okabe, Kye; Kuo, Hsueh-Hui; Fisher, Ian R; Wong, H-S Philip; Nishi, Yoshio; Pop, Eric

    2016-08-23

    Two-dimensional (2D) semimetals beyond graphene have been relatively unexplored in the atomically thin limit. Here, we introduce a facile growth mechanism for semimetallic WTe2 crystals and then fabricate few-layer test structures while carefully avoiding degradation from exposure to air. Low-field electrical measurements of 80 nm to 2 μm long devices allow us to separate intrinsic and contact resistance, revealing metallic response in the thinnest encapsulated and stable WTe2 devices studied to date (3-20 layers thick). High-field electrical measurements and electrothermal modeling demonstrate that ultrathin WTe2 can carry remarkably high current density (approaching 50 MA/cm(2), higher than most common interconnect metals) despite a very low thermal conductivity (of the order ∼3 Wm(-1) K(-1)). These results suggest several pathways for air-stable technological viability of this layered semimetal.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy and atomic models of highly charged heavy ions in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, C.; Murakami, I.; Koike, F.; Tamura, N.; Sakaue, H. A.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Kato, D.; Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Sudo, S.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2017-01-01

    We report recent results of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy of highly charged heavy ions in plasmas produced in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The LHD is an ideal source of experimental databases of EUV spectra because of high brightness and low opacity, combined with the availability of pellet injection systems and reliable diagnostic tools. The measured heavy elements include tungsten, tin, lanthanides and bismuth, which are motivated by ITER as well as a variety of plasma applications such as EUV lithography and biological microscopy. The observed spectral features drastically change between quasicontinuum and discrete depending on the plasma temperature, which leads to some new experimental identifications of spectral lines. We have developed collisional-radiative models for some of these ions based on the measurements. The atomic number dependence of the spectral feature is also discussed.

  10. Generation of neutral atomic beams utilizing photodetachment by high power diode laser stacks

    CERN Document Server

    O'Connor, A P; Grussie, F; Koenning, T P; Miller, K A; de Ruette, N; Stützel, J; Savin, D W; Urbain, X; Kreckel, H

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of high power diode laser stacks to photodetach fast hydrogen and carbon anions and produce ground term neutral atomic beams. We achieve photodetachment efficiencies of $\\sim$7.4\\% for H$^-$ at a beam energy of 10\\,keV and $\\sim$3.7\\% for C$^-$ at 28\\,keV. The diode laser systems used here operate at 975\\,nm and 808\\,nm, respectively, and provide high continuous power levels of up to 2\\,kW, without the need of additional enhancements like optical cavities. The alignment of the beams is straightforward and operation at constant power levels is very stable, while maintenance is minimal. We present a dedicated photodetachment setup that is suitable to efficiently neutralize the majority of stable negative ions in the periodic table.

  11. Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Toshiyuki; Miranda, Martin; Inoue, Ryotaro; Kozuma, Mikio

    2015-07-01

    We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399 nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40 mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220 mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling and can be made compact, which will be useful for providing light sources for laser cooling experiments including transportable optical lattice clocks.

  12. Strategy for designing stable and powerful nitrogen-rich high-energy materials by introducing boron atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Chi, Wei-Jie; Li, Quan-Song; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2017-06-01

    One of the most important aims in the development of high-energy materials is to improve their stability and thus ensure that they are safe to manufacture and transport. In this work, we theoretically investigated open-chain N4B2 isomers using density functional theory in order to find the best way of stabilizing nitrogen-rich molecules. The results show that the boron atoms in these isomers are aligned linearly with their neighboring atoms, which facilitates close packing in the crystals of these materials. Upon comparing the energies of nine N4B2 isomers, we found that the structure with alternating N and B atoms had the lowest energy. Structures with more than one nitrogen atom between two boron atoms had higher energies. The energy of N4B2 increases by about 50 kcal/mol each time it is rearranged to include an extra nitrogen atom between the two boron atoms. More importantly, our results also show that boron atoms stabilize nitrogen-rich molecules more efficiently than carbon atoms do. Also, the combustion of any isomer of N4B2 releases more heat than the corresponding isomer of N4C2 does under well-oxygenated conditions. Our study suggests that the three most stable N4B2 isomers (BN13, BN24, and BN34) are good candidates for high-energy molecules, and it outlines a new strategy for designing stable boron-containing high-energy materials. Graphical abstract The structural characteristics, thermodynamic stabilities, and exothermic properties of nitrogen-rich N4B2 isomers were investigated by means of density functional theory.

  13. Thermoluminescent properties of CVD diamond: applications to ionising radiation dosimetry; Proprietes thermoluminescentes du diamant CVD: applications a la dosimetrie des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitfils, A

    2007-09-15

    Remarkable properties of synthetic diamond (human soft tissue equivalence, chemical stability, non-toxicity) make this material suitable for medical application as thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). This work highlights the interest of this material as radiotherapy TLD. In the first stage of this work, we looked after thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of polycrystalline diamond made by Chemically Vapor Deposited (CVD) synthesis. Dosimetric characteristics are satisfactory as TLD for medical application. Luminescence thermal quenching on diamond has been investigated. This phenomenon leads to a decrease of dosimetric TL peak sensitivity when the heating rate increases. The second part of this work analyses the use of synthetic diamond as TLD in radiotherapy. Dose profiles, depth dose distributions and the cartography of an electron beam obtained with our samples are in very good agreement with results from an ionisation chamber. It is clearly shown that CVD) diamond is of interest to check beams of treatment accelerators. The use of these samples in a control of treatment with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy underlines good response of synthetic diamond in high dose gradient areas. These results indicate that CVD diamond is a promising material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  14. High purity polyimide analysis by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rafael F.; Carvalho, Gabriel S.; Duarte, Fabio A.; Bolzan, Rodrigo C.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni were determined in high purity polyimides (99.5%) by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GFAAS) using Zeeman effect background correction system with variable magnetic field, making possible the simultaneous measurement at high or low sensitivity. The following analytical parameters were evaluated: pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, feasibility of calibration with aqueous solution, linear calibration range, sample mass range and the use of chemical modifier. Calibration with aqueous standard solutions was feasible for all analytes. No under or overestimated results were observed and up to 10 mg sample could be introduced on the platform for the determination of Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni. The relative standard deviation ranged from 3 to 20%. The limits of detection (LODs) achieved using the high sensitivity mode were as low as 7.0, 2.5, 1.7, 17 and 0.12 ng g- 1 for Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni, respectively. No addition of chemical modifier was necessary, except for Mn determination where Pd was required. The accuracy was evaluated by analyte spike and by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion in a single reaction chamber system and also by neutron activation analysis. No difference among the results obtained by SS-GFAAS and those obtained by alternative analytical methods using independent techniques. SS-GFAAS method showed some advantages, such as the determination of metallic contaminants in high purity polyimides with practically no sample preparation, very low LODs, calibration with aqueous standards and determination in a wide range of concentration.

  15. Development of spherical fine powders by high-pressure water atomization using swirl water jet; Senkaisui jet wo mochiita koatsusui atomize ni yoru kyujo bifun no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikukawa, M.; Matsumoto, S.; Inaba, T.; Iwatsu, O.; Takeda, T. [Fukuda Metal Foil and Powder Co. Ltd., Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-05-15

    In order to obtain spherical fine powders, a new high-pressure water atomization method using swirl water jet was developed. In this paper the effects of jet swirl angle ({omega}) upon the properties of powders were investigated. Cu-10 mass%Sn alloy was atomized by this method at the constant water pressure of 83.3 MPa and constant metal orifice diameter of 4mm, while {omega} was varied from 0 to 0.18 rad. Median diameter of the powder by the laser diffraction method (D{sub 50}) decreased from 12.5 {mu}m to 7.5{mu}m with increasing {omega}, and this corresponded to Fisher average diameter (D{sub FS}) at about w=0.18 rad. The apparent and tap density of the powder increased about 1 and 1.5 Mg/m{sup 3} respectively, and the particle shape observed by SEM became spherical with increasing {omega}. (author)

  16. In situ studies of the atomic layer deposition of thin HfO{sub 2} dielectrics by ultra high vacuum atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolanek, Krzysztof, E-mail: kolanek@tu-cottbus.d [Brandenburg University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Sensors, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 17, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Tallarida, Massimo; Karavaev, Konstantin; Schmeisser, Dieter [Brandenburg University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Sensors, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 17, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2010-06-01

    We studied in situ the initial stages of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO{sub 2} by an ultra high vacuum atomic force microscope working in frequency-modulation mode. The ALD cycles, made by using tetrakis-di-methyl-amido-Hf and water as precursors, were performed on the Si(001)/SiO{sub 2} substrate maintained at 230 {sup o}C. After each ALD cycle we studied the influence of the HfO{sub 2} growth on the surface height histogram, the root mean square roughness, the surface fractal dimension and the autocorrelation function. This detailed analysis of the surface topography allowed us to confirm the completion of the first HfO{sub 2} layer after four ALD cycles.

  17. High-speed imaging optical techniques for shockwave and droplets atomization analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slangen, Pierre R.; Lauret, Pierre; Heymes, Frederic; Aprin, Laurent; Lecysyn, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Droplets atomization by shockwave can act as a consequence in domino effects on an industrial facility: aggression of a storage tank (projectile from previous event, for example) can cause leakage of hazardous material (toxic and flammable). As the accident goes on, a secondary event can cause blast generation, impacting the droplets and resulting in their atomization. Therefore, exchange surface increase impacts the evaporation rate. This can be an issue in case of dispersion of such a cloud. The experiments conducted in the lab generate a shockwave with an open-ended shock tube to break up liquid droplets. As the expected shockwave speed is about 400 m/s (˜Mach 1.2), the interaction with falling drops is very short. High-speed imaging is performed at about 20,000 fps. The shockwave is measured using both overpressure sensors: particle image velocimetry and pure in line shadowgraphy. The size of fragmented droplets is optically measured by direct shadowgraphy simultaneously in different directions. In these experiments, secondary breakups of a droplet into an important number of smaller droplets from the shockwave-induced flow are shown. The results of the optical characterizations are discussed in terms of shape, velocity, and size.

  18. A review of atomic layer deposition providing high performance lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Xifei; Bai, Zhimin; Song, Xiaosheng; Xiong, Dongbin; Zhao, Mengli; Li, Dejun; Lu, Shigang

    2017-01-01

    With the significant obstacles that have been conquered in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, it is urgent to impel accelerating development of room-temperature Li-S batteries with high energy density and long-term stability. In view of the unique solid-liquid-solid conversion processes of Li-S batteries, however, designing effective strategies to address the insulativity and volume effect of cathode, shuttle of soluble polysulfides, and/or safety hazard of Li metal anode has been challenging. An atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a representative thin film technology with exceptional capabilities in developing atomic-precisely conformal films. It has been demonstrated to be a promise strategy of solving emerging issues in advanced electrical energy storage (EES) devices via the surface modification and/or the fabrication of complex nanostructured materials. In this review, the recent developments and significances on how ALD improves the performance of Li-S batteries were discussed in detail. Significant attention mainly focused on the various strategies with the use of ALD to refine the electrochemical interfaces and cell configurations. Furthermore, the novel opportunities and perspective associated with ALD for future research directions were summarized. This review may boost the development and application of advanced Li-S batteries using ALD.

  19. High-Throughput Fabrication of Resonant Metamaterials with Ultrasmall Coaxial Apertures via Atomic Layer Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Daehan; Nguyen, Ngoc-Cuong; Martin-Moreno, Luis; Mohr, Daniel A; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Shaver, Jonah; Peraire, Jaime; Ebbesen, Thomas W; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2016-03-09

    We combine atomic layer lithography and glancing-angle ion polishing to create wafer-scale metamaterials composed of dense arrays of ultrasmall coaxial nanocavities in gold films. This new fabrication scheme makes it possible to shrink the diameter and increase the packing density of 2 nm-gap coaxial resonators, an extreme subwavelength structure first manufactured via atomic layer lithography, both by a factor of 100 with respect to previous studies. We demonstrate that the nonpropagating zeroth-order Fabry-Pérot mode, which possesses slow light-like properties at the cutoff resonance, traps infrared light inside 2 nm gaps (gap volume ∼ λ(3)/10(6)). Notably, the annular gaps cover only 3% or less of the metal surface, while open-area normalized transmission is as high as 1700% at the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) condition. The resulting energy accumulation alongside extraordinary optical transmission can benefit applications in nonlinear optics, optical trapping, and surface-enhanced spectroscopies. Furthermore, because the resonance wavelength is independent of the cavity length and dramatically red shifts as the gap size is reduced, large-area arrays can be constructed with λresonance ≫ period, making this fabrication method ideal for manufacturing resonant metamaterials.

  20. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, Denis A.; Tyurnina, Anastasia V.; Yu, Geliang L.; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V.; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V.; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R.; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D.; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S.; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V.; Fal'Ko, Vladimir I.; Geim, Andre K.; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 103 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and 104 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  1. Intracavity Rydberg-atom electromagnetically induced transparency using a high-finesse optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiteng; Chao, Yuanxi; Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Shaffer, James P.

    2017-09-01

    We present an experimental study of cavity-assisted Rydberg-atom electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using a high-finesse optical cavity (F ˜28 000 ). Rydberg atoms are excited via a two-photon transition in a ladder-type EIT configuration. A three-peak structure of the cavity transmission spectrum is observed when Rydberg EIT is generated inside the cavity. The two symmetrically spaced side peaks are caused by bright-state polaritons, while the central peak corresponds to a dark-state polariton. Anticrossing phenomena and the effects of mirror adsorbate electric fields are studied under different experimental conditions. We determine a lower bound on the coherence time for the system of 7.26 ±0.06 μ s , most likely limited by laser dephasing. The cavity-Rydberg EIT system can be useful for single-photon generation using the Rydberg blockade effect, studying many-body physics, and generating novel quantum states among many other applications.

  2. High-speed atomic force microscopy shows that annexin V stabilizes membranes on the second timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Atsushi; Chipot, Christophe; Rangl, Martina; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Annexins are abundant cytoplasmic proteins that can bind to negatively charged phospholipids in a Ca2+-dependent manner, and are known to play a role in the storage of Ca2+ and membrane healing. Little is known, however, about the dynamic processes of protein-Ca2+-membrane assembly and disassembly. Here we show that high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) can be used to repeatedly induce and disrupt annexin assemblies and study their structure, dynamics and interactions. Our HS-AFM set-up is adapted for such biological applications through the integration of a pumping system for buffer exchange and a pulsed laser system for uncaging caged compounds. We find that biochemically identical annexins (annexin V) display different effective Ca2+ and membrane affinities depending on the assembly location, providing a wide Ca2+ buffering regime while maintaining membrane stabilization. We also show that annexin is membrane-recruited and forms stable supramolecular assemblies within ˜5 s in conditions that are comparable to a membrane lesion in a cell. Molecular dynamics simulations provide atomic detail of the role played by Ca2+ in the reversible binding of annexin to the membrane surface.

  3. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, Denis A; Tyurnina, Anastasia V; Yu, Geliang L; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Geim, Andre K; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-21

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  4. Atomic ordering in cubic bismuth telluride alloy phases at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loa, I.; Bos, J.-W. G.; Downie, R. A.; Syassen, K.

    2016-06-01

    Pressure-induced transitions from ordered intermetallic phases to substitutional alloys to semi-ordered phases were studied in a series of bismuth tellurides. By using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction, the compounds Bi4Te5 , BiTe, and Bi2Te were observed to form alloys with the disordered body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure upon compression to above 14-19 GPa at room temperature. The BiTe and Bi2Te alloys and the previously discovered high-pressure alloys of Bi2Te3 and Bi4Te3 were all found to show atomic ordering after gentle annealing at very moderate temperatures of ˜100 ∘C . Upon annealing, BiTe transforms from bcc to the B2 (CsCl) crystal-structure type, and the other phases adopt semi-disordered variants thereof, featuring substitutional disorder on one of the two crystallographic sites. The transition pressures and atomic volumes of the alloy phases show systematic variations across the BimTen series including the end members Bi and Te. First-principles calculations were performed to characterize the electronic structure and chemical bonding properties of B2-type BiTe and to identify the driving forces of the ordering transition. The calculated Fermi surface of B2-type BiTe has an intricate structure and is predicted to undergo three topological changes between 20 and 60 GPa.

  5. Microstructure simulation of rapidly solidified ASP30 high-speed steel particles by gas atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Bo; Yang, Zhi-liang; Wu, Guang-xin; Zhang, Jie-yu; Zhao, Shun-li

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the microstructure evolution of rapidly solidified ASP30 high-speed steel particles was predicted using a simulation method based on the cellular automaton-finite element (CAFE) model. The dendritic growth kinetics, in view of the characteristics of ASP30 steel, were calculated and combined with macro heat transfer calculations by user-defined functions (UDFs) to simulate the microstructure of gas-atomized particles. The relationship among particle diameter, undercooling, and the convection heat transfer coefficient was also investigated to provide cooling conditions for simulations. The simulated results indicated that a columnar grain microstructure was observed in small particles, whereas an equiaxed microstructure was observed in large particles. In addition, the morphologies and microstructures of gas-atomized ASP30 steel particles were also investigated experimentally using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The experimental results showed that four major types of microstructures were formed: dendritic, equiaxed, mixed, and multi-droplet microstructures. The simulated results and the available experimental data are in good agreement.

  6. Extracting features buried within high density atom probe point cloud data through simplicial homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Srikant; Kaluskar, Kaustubh; Broderick, Scott; Rajan, Krishna, E-mail: krajan@iastate.edu

    2015-12-15

    Feature extraction from Atom Probe Tomography (APT) data is usually performed by repeatedly delineating iso-concentration surfaces of a chemical component of the sample material at different values of concentration threshold, until the user visually determines a satisfactory result in line with prior knowledge. However, this approach allows for important features, buried within the sample, to be visually obscured by the high density and volume (~10{sup 7} atoms) of APT data. This work provides a data driven methodology to objectively determine the appropriate concentration threshold for classifying different phases, such as precipitates, by mapping the topology of the APT data set using a concept from algebraic topology termed persistent simplicial homology. A case study of Sc precipitates in an Al–Mg–Sc alloy is presented demonstrating the power of this technique to capture features, such as precise demarcation of Sc clusters and Al segregation at the cluster boundaries, not easily available by routine visual adjustment. - Highlights: • Provides a data driven methodology to select appropriate concentration threshold. • Maps topology of APT data using persistent simplicial homology. • The application to Sc precipitates in an Al–Mg–Sc alloy is provided. • Capture features not easily available by routine visual adjustment.

  7. Robust generation of high-fidelity entangled states for multiple atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li-Hua

    2009-01-01

    A scheme is presented for generating entangled states of multiple atoms in a cavity. In the scheme the atoms simultaneously interact with a cavity mode, with the first atom driven by two classical fields and the other atoms driven by a classical field. Our scheme is valid even if the cavity decay rate is larger than the effective coupling strength, which is important for experiment. The generation of entangled states is conditional on the detection of a photon decaying from the cavity and thus the fidelity of the entangled state is insensitive to the detection inefficiency. Furthermore, the scheme can be applied to the case with any number of atoms in principle.

  8. Medical exposure to ionising radiation and the risk of brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blettner, Maria; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Samkange-Zeeb, Florence

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of exposure to low doses of ionising radiation in the aetiology of brain tumours has yet to be clarified. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between medically or occupationally related exposure to ionising radiation and brain tumours. METHODS: We...... used self-reported medical and occupational data collected during the German part of a multinational case-control study on mobile phone use and the risk of brain tumours (Interphone study) for the analyses. RESULTS: For any exposure to medical ionising radiation we found odds ratios (ORs) of 0.63 (95...... regions. CONCLUSION: We did not find any significant increased risk of brain tumours for exposure to medical ionising radiation....

  9. Lifetime measurement of excited atomic and ionic states of some noble gases using the high-frequency deflection technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M B Das; S Karmakar

    2005-12-01

    High-frequency deflection (HFD) technique with a delayed coincidence single photon counting arrangement is an efficient technique for radiative lifetime measurement. An apparatus for measurement of the radiative lifetime of atoms and molecules has been developed in our laboratory and measurements have been performed with great success in a large number of atoms and ions. The present version of the apparatus is described in this paper together with a brief description of the basic features and performance.

  10. Valence one-electron and shake-up ionisation bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. IV. The dibenzanthracene species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleuze, Michael S. [Theoretische Chemie, Departement SBG, Universiteit Hasselt, Agoralaan, Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)], E-mail: michael.deleuze@uhasselt.be

    2006-10-26

    A comprehensive study of the He (I) ultra-violet photoelectron spectra of the 1.2,3.4; 1.2,5.6 and 1.2,7.8 isomers of dibenzanthracene up to the double ionisation threshold at {approx}18 eV is presented with the aid of one-particle Green's Function calculations performed using the outer-valence Green's Function (OVGF) approach and the third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction [ADC(3)] scheme, along with basis sets of improving quality. Suited extrapolations of the ADC(3) results for the one-electron energies characterising the {pi}-band system ({epsilon} {sub b} < 10 eV) to Dunning's correlation consistent basis set of triple zeta quality (cc-pVTZ) enable theoretical insights into HeI measurements which approach chemical accuracy (1 kcal/mol or 43.4 meV). In contrast, a confrontation of simulated spectral envelopes with high-resolution He I photoelectron spectra indicates that polycyclic aromatic molecules with sterically overcrowded bay regions are more susceptible to undergo vibronic coupling complications at the {sigma}-ionisation onset. OVGF/cc-pVDZ or OVGF/cc-pVTZ pole strengths smaller than 0.85 systematically corroborate a breakdown of the orbital (or one-electron) picture of ionisation at the ADC(3)/6-31G levels. The extent of shake-up bands is correspondingly related to topological, structural and magnetic criteria of aromaticity. Comparison is made with calculations of the lowest doublet-doublet excitation energies of the related radical cations, by means of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT)

  11. Simulating the 21-cm signal from reionisation including non-linear ionisations and inhomogeneous recombinations

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Sultan; Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian; Santos, Mario G.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the impact of incorporating physically motivated ionisation and recombination rates on the history and topology of cosmic reionisation, by incorporating inputs from small-volume hydrodynamic simulations into a semi-numerical code, SimFast21, that evolves reionisation on large scales. We employ radiative hydrodynamic simulations to parameterize the ionisation rate Rion and recombination rate Rrec as functions of halo mass, overdensity and redshift. We find that Rion is super-linearl...

  12. The high resolution vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectra of the group VI dihydrides and deuterides Rydberg series

    CERN Document Server

    Mayhew, C A

    1984-01-01

    The high resolution absorption spectra of the important group VI dihydrides and deuterides in the vacuum ultraviolet below, and up to, their first ionisation potentials are presented. These spectra were recorded using synchrotron radiation as the background light source in conjunction with a 3m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph, equipped with holographic gratings. Due to the nature of the originating orbital for the majority of optical transitions in the VUV well developed Rydberg series are observed. One particular series can be followed up to fairly high n, so that accurate values of the first ionisation potential are determined. The identifications of the Rydberg series are made from arguments relating to their oscillator strengths, quantum defects, symmetries and from comparisons with the spectra of the corresponding united atoms i.e. the inert gases. Examples of the symmetry assignments for Rydberg series from rotational band contour analyses of the lower Rydberg members for the H sub 2 S, H sub 2 Se ...

  13. A fully relativistic approach for calculating atomic data for highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, Douglas H. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang Honglin [Applied Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: zhang@lanl.gov; Fontes, Christopher J. [Applied Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)], E-mail: cjf@lanl.gov

    2009-07-15

    We present a review of our fully relativistic approach to calculating atomic data for highly charged ions, highlighting a research effort that spans twenty years. Detailed discussions of both theoretical and numerical techniques are provided. Our basic approach is expected to provide accurate results for ions that range from approximately half ionized to fully stripped. Options for improving the accuracy and range of validity of this approach are also discussed. In developing numerical methods for calculating data within this framework, considerable emphasis is placed on techniques that are robust and efficient. A variety of fundamental processes are considered including: photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation, electron-impact ionization, autoionization, electron capture, photoionization and photorecombination. Resonance contributions to a variety of these processes are also considered, including discussions of autoionization, electron capture and dielectronic recombination. Ample numerical examples are provided in order to illustrate the approach and to demonstrate its usefulness in providing data for large-scale plasma modeling.

  14. A replacement of high-k process for CMOS transistor by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Choi, Byung Joon; Yang, J. Joshua; Moon, Dong-Il; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Williams, R. Stanley; Meyyappan, M.

    2013-08-01

    A replacement of high-k process was implemented on an independent double gate FinFET, following the ordinary gate-first process with minor modifications. The present scheme involves neither exotic materials nor unprecedented processing. After the source/drain process, the sacrificial gate oxide was selectively substituted with amorphous Ta2O5 via conformal plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. The present gate-first gate-dielectric-last scheme combines the advantages of the process and design simplicity of the gate-first approach and the control of the effective gate workfunction and the interfacial oxide of the gate-dielectric-last approach. Electrical characterization data and cross-sectional images are provided as evidence of the concept.

  15. High-speed atomic force microscopy reveals rotary catalysis of rotorless F₁-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, Takayuki; Iino, Ryota; Ando, Toshio; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2011-08-05

    F(1) is an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-driven motor in which three torque-generating β subunits in the α(3)β(3) stator ring sequentially undergo conformational changes upon ATP hydrolysis to rotate the central shaft γ unidirectionally. Although extensive experimental and theoretical work has been done, the structural basis of cooperative torque generation to realize the unidirectional rotation remains elusive. We used high-speed atomic force microscopy to show that the rotorless F(1) still "rotates"; in the isolated α(3)β(3) stator ring, the three β subunits cyclically propagate conformational states in the counterclockwise direction, similar to the rotary shaft rotation in F(1). The structural basis of unidirectionality is programmed in the stator ring. These findings have implications for cooperative interplay between subunits in other hexameric ATPases.

  16. Atomic force microscopy study of anion intercalation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliata, D.; Haering, P.; Haas, O.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegenthaler, H. [University of Berne (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, we studied highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in perchloric acid, as a model to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation in graphite. Aim of the work is the local and time dependent investigation of dimensional changes of the host material during electrochemical intercalation processes on the nanometer scale. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, as in-situ tool of analysis during intercalation and expulsion of perchloric anions into the HOPG electrodes. According to the AFM measurements, the HOPG interlayer spacing increases by 32% when perchloric anions intercalate, in agreement with the formation of stage IV of graphite intercalation compounds. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  17. Fast, high-precision optical polarization synthesizer for ultracold-atom experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Robens, Carsten; Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Zopes, Jonathan; Alberti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to precisely synthesize arbitrary polarization states of light with a high modulation bandwidth. Our approach consists in superposing two laser light fields with the same wavelength, but with opposite circular polarizations, where the phase and amplitude of each light field are individually controlled. To assess the precision of the synthesized polarization states, we characterize static spatial variations of the polarization over the wavefront, as well as the noise spectral density of temporal fluctuations. We find that static polarization distortions limit the extinction ratio to $2\\times 10^{-5}$, corresponding to a 0.01% reduction of the degree of polarization (DOP). We also obtain that temporal fluctuations give rise to a $0.2^\\circ$ uncertainty in the state of polarization (SOP). We recently demonstrated an application of the polarization synthesizer (Robens et al., arXiv:1608.02410) to create two fully independent, controllable optical lattices, which trap atoms depending on...

  18. A fully relativistic approach for calculating atomic data for highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fontes, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sampson, Douglas H [PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIV

    2009-01-01

    We present a review of our fully relativistic approach to calculating atomic data for highly charged ions, highlighting a research effort that spans twenty years. Detailed discussions of both theoretical and numerical techniques are provided. Our basic approach is expected to provide accurate results for ions that range from approximately half ionized to fully stripped. Options for improving the accuracy and range of validity of this approach are also discussed. In developing numerical methods for calculating data within this framework, considerable emphasis is placed on techniques that are robust and efficient. A variety of fundamental processes are considered including: photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation, electron-impact ionization, autoionization, electron capture, photoionization and photorecombination. Resonance contributions to a variety of these processes are also considered, including discussions of autoionization, electron capture and dielectronic recombination. Ample numerical examples are provided in order to illustrate the approach and to demonstrate its usefulness in providing data for large-scale plasma modeling.

  19. Double-electron capture by highly-ionized atoms isolated at very low energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogwell Hoogerheide, Shannon; Dreiling, Joan M.; Sahiner, Arda; Tan, Joseph N.

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange with background gases, also known as electron capture processes, is important in the study of comets, controlled fusion energy, anti-matter atoms, and proposed one-electron ions in Rydberg states. However, there are few experiments in the very low energy regime that could be useful for further theoretical development. At NIST, highly-charged ions extracted from an electron-beam ion trap can be isolated with energy state. Analysis using a system of rate equations yields information about the ion cloud expansion and single-electron capture rates. A substantial amount of double-electron capture is also observed. We present the relative rates and discuss the error budget. SFH and JMD were funded by National Research Council Research Associateship Awards during some of this work.

  20. Serum induced degradation of 3D DNA box origami observed by high speed atomic force microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Zaixing; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Chuanxu;

    2015-01-01

    3D DNA origami holds tremendous potential to encapsulate and selectively release therapeutic drugs. Observations of real-time performance of 3D DNA origami structures in physiological environment will contribute much to its further applications. Here, we investigate the degradation kinetics of 3D...... DNA box origami in serum using high-speed atomic force microscope optimized for imaging 3D DNA origami in real time. The time resolution allows characterizing the stages of serum effects on individual 3D DNA box origami with nanometer resolution. Our results indicate that the whole digest process...... is a combination of a rapid collapse phase and a slow degradation phase. The damages of box origami mainly happen in the collapse phase. Thus, the structure stability of 3D DNA box origami should be further improved, especially in the collapse phase, before clinical applications...

  1. Hydrogen atom in strong magnetic field: a high accurate calculation in spheroidal coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiang; KANG Shuai; ZHANG Xian-zhou; SHI Ting-yun

    2006-01-01

    A B-spline-type basis set method for the calculation of hydrogen atom in strong magnetic fields in the frame of spheroidal coordinates has been introduced.High accurate energy levels of hydrogen in the magnetic field,with strength ranging from 0 to 1000 a.u.,have been obtained.For the ground state,ls0,energies with at least 11 significant digits have been obtained.For the low-lying excited state,2p-1,energies with at least 9 significant digits are obtained.The method has also been applied to the calculation of hydrogen Rydberg states in laboratory magnetic fields.Energy spectra with at least 10 significant digits are presented.A comparison with other results in the literatures has been performed.Our results are comparable to the most accurate one up to date.A possible extension to the cases of parallel and crossed electric and magnetic fields have been discussed.

  2. A serial-kinematic nanopositioner for high-speed atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadikhaye, Sachin P., E-mail: sachin.wadikhaye@uon.edu.au; Yong, Yuen Kuan; Reza Moheimani, S. O. [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    A flexure-guided serial-kinematic XYZ nanopositioner for high-speed Atomic Force Microscopy is presented in this paper. Two aspects influencing the performance of serial-kinematic nanopositioners are studied in this work. First, mass reduction by using tapered flexures is proposed to increased the natural frequency of the nanopositioner. 25% increase in the natural frequency is achieved due to reduced mass with tapered flexures. Second, a study of possible sensor positioning in a serial-kinematic nanopositioner is presented. An arrangement of sensors for exact estimation of cross-coupling is incorporated in the proposed design. A feedforward control strategy based on phaser approach is presented to mitigate the dynamics and nonlinearity in the system. Limitations in design approach and control strategy are discussed in the Conclusion.

  3. Large-area thermoelectric high-aspect-ratio nanostructures by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoho, Mikko; Juntunen, Taneli; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2016-09-01

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of large-area high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. We fabricate the structures by atomic layer deposition of conformal ZnO thin films on track-etched polycarbonate substrate. The resulting structure consists of ZnO tubules which continue through the full thickness of the substrate. The electrical and thermal properties of the structures are studied both in-plane and out-of-plane. They exhibit very low out-of-plane thermal conductivity down to 0.15 W m-1 K-1 while the in-plane sheet resistance of the films was found to be half that of the same film on glass substrate, allowing material-independent doubling of output power of any planar thin-film thermoelectric generator. The wall thickness of the fabricated nanotubes was varied within a range of up to 100 nm. The samples show polycrystalline nature with (002) preferred crystal orientation.

  4. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, A.

    This research follows a multifaceted approach, from theory to practice, to the investigation and development of novel helium plasmas, sample introduction systems, and diagnostic techniques for atomic and mass spectrometries. During the period January 1994 - December 1994, four major sets of challenging research programs were addressed that each included a number of discrete but complementary projects: (1) The first program is concerned with fundamental and analytical investigations of novel atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPS) that are suitable for the atomization-excitation-ionization of elements, especially those possessing high excitation and ionization energies, for the purpose of enhancing sensitivity and selectivity of analytical measurements. (2) The second program includes simulation and computer modeling of He ICPS. The aim is to ease the hunt for new helium plasmas by predicting their structure and fundamental and analytical properties, without incurring the enormous cost for extensive experimental studies. (3) The third program involves spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of plasma discharges to instantly visualize their prevailing structures, to quantify key fundamental properties, and to verify predictions by mathematical models. (4) The fourth program entails investigation of new, low-cost sample introduction systems that consume micro- to nanoliter quantity of sample solution in plasma spectrometries. A portion of this research involves development and applications of novel diagnostic techniques suitable for probing key fundamental properties of aerosol prior to and after injection into high-temperature plasmas. These efforts, still in progress, collectively offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, material science, biomedicine and nutrition.

  5. ER stress induced by ionising radiation in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yan; Pang, Xueli; Su, Yongping; Ai, Guoping; Wang, Tao

    2010-06-01

    Ionising radiation (IR) can evoke a series of biochemical events inside the cell. However, whether IR can directly induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is not clear. In our previous study, we found that there might be a causative link between IR and ER stress. In this study, we further characterised the type of ER stress induced by IR. Rat intestinal epithelial cells IEC-6 were irradiated at a dose of 10 Gy, and total RNA and proteins were harvested at indicated time points. The mRNA and protein expression of immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) and glucose regulated protein 94 (GRP94) was detected along with proteins associated with ER stress signal pathways. Our results indicated that IR induced up-regulation of ER stress marker including BiP and GRP94 at protein and mRNA levels in IEC-6 cells. Increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha) and induced mRNA splicing of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) suggested that PERK (interferon-induced double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PRKR) -like endoplasmic reticulum kinase) and IRE1 (inositol requirement 1) signal transduction pathways were involved in this kind of ER stress. However, the active form of activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) did not change significantly in irradiated cells, which suggested that the ATF6 pathway was not involved. Thus, we concluded that IR could induce moderate ER stress directly in IEC-6 cells.

  6. Dosimetry of ionising radiation in modern radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Lehmann, Joerg; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-07-01

    Dosimetry of ionising radiation is a well-established and mature branch of physical sciences with many applications in medicine and biology. In particular radiotherapy relies on dosimetry for optimisation of cancer treatment and avoidance of severe toxicity for patients. Several novel developments in radiotherapy have introduced new challenges for dosimetry with small and dynamically changing radiation fields being central to many of these applications such as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy. There is also an increasing awareness of low doses given to structures not in the target region and the associated risk of secondary cancer induction. Here accurate dosimetry is important not only for treatment optimisation but also for the generation of data that can inform radiation protection approaches in the future. The article introduces some of the challenges and highlights the interdependence of dosimetric calculations and measurements. Dosimetric concepts are explored in the context of six application fields: reference dosimetry, small fields, low dose out of field, in vivo dosimetry, brachytherapy and auditing of radiotherapy practice. Recent developments of dosimeters that can be used for these purposes are discussed using spatial resolution and number of dimensions for measurement as sorting criteria. While dosimetry is ever evolving to address the needs of advancing applications of radiation in medicine two fundamental issues remain: the accuracy of the measurement from a scientific perspective and the importance to link the measurement to a clinically relevant question. This review aims to provide an update on both of these.

  7. Set-up of a High-Resolution 300 mK Atomic Force Microscope in an Ultra-High Vacuum Compatible 3He/10T Cryostat

    CERN Document Server

    von Allwörden, Henning; Köhler, Arne; Eelbo, Thomas; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The design of an atomic force microscope with an all-fiber interferometric detection scheme capable of atomic resolution at about 500 mK is presented. The microscope body is connected to a small pumped 3He reservoir with a base temperature of about 300 mK. The bakeable insert with the cooling stage can be moved from its measurement position inside the bore of a superconducting 10 T magnet into an ultra-high vacuum chamber, where tip and sample can be exchanged in-situ. Moreover, single atoms or molecules can be evaporated onto a cold substrate located inside the microscope. Two side chambers are equipped with standard surface preparation and surface analysis tools. The performance of the microscope at low temperatures is demonstrated by resolving single Co atoms on Mn/W(110) and by showing atomic resolution on NaCl(001).

  8. Set-up of a high-resolution 300 mK atomic force microscope in an ultra-high vacuum compatible 3He/10 T cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Allwörden, H.; Ruschmeier, K.; Köhler, A.; Eelbo, T.; Schwarz, A.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-07-01

    The design of an atomic force microscope with an all-fiber interferometric detection scheme capable of atomic resolution at about 500 mK is presented. The microscope body is connected to a small pumped 3He reservoir with a base temperature of about 300 mK. The bakeable insert with the cooling stage can be moved from its measurement position inside the bore of a superconducting 10 T magnet into an ultra-high vacuum chamber, where the tip and sample can be exchanged in situ. Moreover, single atoms or molecules can be evaporated onto a cold substrate located inside the microscope. Two side chambers are equipped with standard surface preparation and surface analysis tools. The performance of the microscope at low temperatures is demonstrated by resolving single Co atoms on Mn/W(110) and by showing atomic resolution on NaCl(001).

  9. Set-up of a high-resolution 300 mK atomic force microscope in an ultra-high vacuum compatible (3)He/10 T cryostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Allwörden, H; Ruschmeier, K; Köhler, A; Eelbo, T; Schwarz, A; Wiesendanger, R

    2016-07-01

    The design of an atomic force microscope with an all-fiber interferometric detection scheme capable of atomic resolution at about 500 mK is presented. The microscope body is connected to a small pumped (3)He reservoir with a base temperature of about 300 mK. The bakeable insert with the cooling stage can be moved from its measurement position inside the bore of a superconducting 10 T magnet into an ultra-high vacuum chamber, where the tip and sample can be exchanged in situ. Moreover, single atoms or molecules can be evaporated onto a cold substrate located inside the microscope. Two side chambers are equipped with standard surface preparation and surface analysis tools. The performance of the microscope at low temperatures is demonstrated by resolving single Co atoms on Mn/W(110) and by showing atomic resolution on NaCl(001).

  10. Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of conformal Pt films in high aspect ratio trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkens, I. J. M.; Verheijen, M. A.; Knoops, H. C. M.; Keuning, W.; Roozeboom, F.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2017-02-01

    To date, conventional thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been the method of choice to deposit high-quality Pt thin films grown typically from (MeCp)PtMe3 vapor and O2 gas at 300 °C. Plasma-assisted ALD of Pt using O2 plasma can offer several advantages over thermal ALD, such as faster nucleation and deposition at lower temperatures. In this work, it is demonstrated that plasma-assisted ALD at 300 °C also allows for the deposition of highly conformal Pt films in trenches with high aspect ratio ranging from 3 to 34. Scanning electron microscopy inspection revealed that the conformality of the deposited Pt films was 100% in trenches with aspect ratio (AR) up to 34. These results were corroborated by high-precision layer thickness measurements by transmission electron microscopy for trenches with an aspect ratio of 22. The role of the surface recombination of O-radicals and the contribution of thermal ALD reactions is discussed.

  11. Low temperature platinum atomic layer deposition on nylon-6 for highly conductive and catalytic fiber mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundy, J. Zachary; Shafiefarhood, Arya; Li, Fanxing; Khan, Saad A.; Parsons, Gregory N., E-mail: gnp@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Engineering Building I, 911 Partners Way, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature platinum atomic layer deposition (Pt-ALD) via (methylcyclopentadienyl)trimethyl platinum and ozone (O{sub 3}) is used to produce highly conductive nonwoven nylon-6 (polyamide-6, PA-6) fiber mats, having effective conductivities as high as ∼5500–6000 S/cm with only a 6% fractional increase in mass. The authors show that an alumina ALD nucleation layer deposited at high temperature is required to promote Pt film nucleation and growth on the polymeric substrate. Fractional mass gain scales linearly with Pt-ALD cycle number while effective conductivity exhibits a nonlinear trend with cycle number, corresponding to film coalescence. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy reveals island growth mode of the Pt film at low cycle number with a coalesced film observed after 200 cycles. The metallic coating also exhibits exceptional resistance to mechanical flexing, maintaining up to 93% of unstressed conductivity after bending around cylinders with radii as small as 0.3 cm. Catalytic activity of the as-deposited Pt film is demonstrated via carbon monoxide oxidation to carbon dioxide. This novel low temperature processing allows for the inclusion of highly conductive catalytic material on a number of temperature-sensitive substrates with minimal mass gain for use in such areas as smart textiles and flexible electronics.

  12. Experimental study of conversion from atomic high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骐; 陈建新; 夏元钦; 陈德应

    2003-01-01

    There are two physical phenomena in a strong laser intensity. One is the high-order harmonic emission; the other is x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. The experiment of conversion from high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions was given with a 105fs Ti:sapphire laser by adjusting laser intensities. The ingredient in plasma was investigated by the numerical simulations. Our experimental results suggested that the free electrons have detrimental effects on harmonic generation but are favourable for x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. If we want to obtain more intense harmonic signals as a coherent light source in the soft x-ray region, we must avoid the production of free electrons in plasmas. At the same time, if we want to observe x-rays for the development of high-repetition-rate table-top soft x-ray lasers, we should strip all atoms in the plasmas to a necessary ionized stage by the optical-fieldionization in the field of a high-intensity laser pulse.

  13. Atomic structure of high-coercivity cobalt-carbide nanoparticles ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, D. A.; Sterbinsky, G.; Stephens, P. W.; Carroll, K. J.; Yoon, H.; Meng, S.; Huba, Z.; Carpenter, E. E.

    2013-03-01

    Permanent magnets are increasingly important in numerous applications, including the quickly expanding area of green technologies (e . g . high efficiency electric car motors and wind turbine power systems). We present studies of novel permanent magnet materials based on cobalt carbide nanoparticles (NPs), where the energy product (BHmax) exceeds 20 kJ / m3. The NPs are synthesized via a polyol process, which offers a flexible approach to modify the Co-carbide phase (Co2C and Co3C), and NP morphology, size and size dispersion. The Co2C and Co3C phases have unique magnetic properties, and the combination exhibits the high BHmax . We present a detailed assessment of the structure of mixtures of Co2C and Co3 NPs, measured by high-resolution, synchrotron based powder x-ray diffraction (p-XRD). Both the Co2C and Co3 phases exhibit an orthorhombic structure (Pnnm and Pnma space groups, respectively). The high-resolution p-XRD facilitates identification of mixed phase samples, enabling detailed comparisons of the atomic structure with the magnetic properties, measured by both lab-based magnetometry and x-ray spectroscopy (soft x-ray XAS & XMCD).

  14. Atomic physics with highly-charged heavy ions at the GSI future facility: The scientific program of the SPARC collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumberidze, A. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: a.gumberidze@gsi.de; Bosch, F. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Braeuning-Demian, A. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hagmann, S. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kuehl, Th. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Liesen, D. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Stoehlker, Th. [GSI, Plankstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    The proposed new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will open up exciting and far-reaching perspectives for atomic physics research in the realm of highly-charged heavy ions: it will provide the highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei. In combination with the strongest possible electromagnetic fields produced by the nuclear charge of the heaviest nuclei, this will allow to extend atomic spectroscopy up to the virtual limits of atomic matter. Based on the experience and results already achieved at the experimental storage ring (ESR), a substantial progress in atomic physics research has to be expected in this domain, due to a tremendous improvement of intensity, energy and production yield of both stable and unstable nuclei.

  15. Spectroscopic Investigations of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions - Atomic Spectroscopy and Fusion Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clementson, Joel [Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    The spectra of highly charged tungsten ions have been investigated using x-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy. These heavy ions are of interest in relativistic atomic structure theory, where high-precision wavelength measurements benchmark theoretical approaches, and in magnetic fusion research, where the ions may serve to diagnose high-temperature plasmas. The work details spectroscopic investigations of highly charged tungsten ions measured at the Livermore electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility. Here, the EBIT-I and SuperEBIT electron beam ion traps have been employed to create, trap, and excite tungsten ions of M- and L-shell charge states. The emitted spectra have been studied in high resolution using crystal, grating, and x-ray calorimeter spectrometers. In particular, wavelengths of n = 0 M-shell transitions in K-like W55+ through Ne-like W64+, and intershell transitions in Zn-like W44+ through Co-like W47+ have been measured. Special attention is given to the Ni-like W46+ ion, which has two strong electric-dipole forbidden transitions that are of interest for plasma diagnostics. The EBIT measurements are complemented by spectral modeling using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC), and predictions for tokamak spectra are presented. The L-shell tungsten ions have been studied at electron-beam energies of up to 122 keV and transition energies measured in Ne-like W64+ through Li-like W71+. These spectra constitute the physics basis in the design of the ion-temperature crystal spectrometer for the ITER tokamak. Tungsten particles have furthermore been introduced into the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) spheromak in Livermore in order to investigate diagnostic possibilities of extreme ultraviolet tungsten spectra for the ITER divertor. The spheromak measurement and spectral modeling using FAC suggest that tungsten ions in charge states around Er-like W6+ could be useful for

  16. Electron localizability indicators ELI and ELIA: the case of highly correlated wavefunctions for the argon atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezugly, Viktor; Wielgus, Pawel; Wagner, Frank R; Kohout, Miroslav; Grin, Yuri

    2008-06-01

    Electron localizability indicators based on the same-spin electron pair density and the opposite-spin electron pair density are studied for correlated wavefunctions of the argon atom. Different basis sets and reference spaces are used for the multireference configuration interaction method following the complete active space calculations aiming at the understanding of the effect of local electron correlation when approaching the exact wavefunction. The populations of the three atomic shells of Ar atom in real space are calculated for each case.

  17. Rapid analysis of formic acid, acetic acid, and furfural in pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and ethanol in a bioethanol fermentation using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smart Katherine A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (APCI-MS offers advantages as a rapid analytical technique for the quantification of three biomass degradation products (acetic acid, formic acid and furfural within pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and the analysis of ethanol during fermentation. The data we obtained using APCI-MS correlated significantly with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis whilst offering the analyst minimal sample preparation and faster sample throughput.

  18. The fabrication of a double-layer atom chip with through silicon vias for an ultra-high-vacuum cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Lin, Yun-Siang; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Huang, Chi-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    This study presents a double-layer atom chip that provides users with increased diversity in the design of the wire patterns and flexibility in the design of the magnetic field. It is more convenient for use in atomic physics experiments. A negative photoresist, SU-8, was used as the insulating layer between the upper and bottom copper wires. The electrical measurement results show that the upper and bottom wires with a width of 100 µm can sustain a 6 A current without burnout. Another focus of this study is the double-layer atom chips integrated with the through silicon via (TSV) technique, and anodically bonded to a Pyrex glass cell, which makes it a desired vacuum chamber for atomic physics experiments. Thus, the bonded glass cell not only significantly reduces the overall size of the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) chamber but also conducts the high current from the backside to the front side of the atom chip via the TSV under UHV (9.5 × 10-10 Torr). The TSVs with a diameter of 70 µm were etched through by the inductively coupled plasma ion etching and filled by the bottom-up copper electroplating method. During the anodic bonding process, the electroplated copper wires and TSVs on atom chips also need to pass the examination of the required bonding temperature of 250 °C, under an applied voltage of 1000 V. Finally, the UHV test of the double-layer atom chips with TSVs at room temperature can be reached at 9.5 × 10-10 Torr, thus satisfying the requirements of atomic physics experiments under an UHV environment.

  19. Highly conductive and flexible nylon-6 nonwoven fiber mats formed using tungsten atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanyan, Berç; Oldham, Christopher J; Sweet, William J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2013-06-12

    Low-temperature vapor-phase tungsten atomic layer deposition (ALD) using WF6 and dilute silane (SiH4, 2% in Ar) can yield highly conductive coatings on nylon-6 microfiber mats, producing flexible and supple nonwovens with conductivity of ∼1000 S/cm. We find that an alumina nucleation layer, reactant exposure, and deposition temperature all influence the rate of W mass uptake on 3D fibers, and film growth rate is calibrated using high surface area anodic aluminum oxide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals highly conformal tungsten coatings on nylon fibers with complex "winged" cross-section. Using reactant gas "hold" sequences during the ALD process, we conclude that reactant species can transport readily to reactive sites throughout the fiber mat, consistent with conformal uniform coverage observed by TEM. The conductivity of 1000 S/cm for the W-coated nylon is much larger than found in other conductive nonwovens. We also find that the nylon mats maintain 90% of their conductivity after being flexed around cylinders with radii as small as 0.3 cm. Metal ALD coatings on nonwovens make possible the solvent-free functionalization of textiles for electronic applications.

  20. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  1. Metabolite signal identification in accurate mass metabolomics data with MZedDB, an interactive m/z annotation tool utilising predicted ionisation behaviour 'rules'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snowdon Stuart

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolomics experiments using Mass Spectrometry (MS technology measure the mass to charge ratio (m/z and intensity of ionised molecules in crude extracts of complex biological samples to generate high dimensional metabolite 'fingerprint' or metabolite 'profile' data. High resolution MS instruments perform routinely with a mass accuracy of Results Metabolite 'structures' harvested from publicly accessible databases were converted into a common format to generate a comprehensive archive in MZedDB. 'Rules' were derived from chemical information that allowed MZedDB to generate a list of adducts and neutral loss fragments putatively able to form for each structure and calculate, on the fly, the exact molecular weight of every potential ionisation product to provide targets for annotation searches based on accurate mass. We demonstrate that data matrices representing populations of ionisation products generated from different biological matrices contain a large proportion (sometimes > 50% of molecular isotopes, salt adducts and neutral loss fragments. Correlation analysis of ESI-MS data features confirmed the predicted relationships of m/z signals. An integrated isotope enumerator in MZedDB allowed verification of exact isotopic pattern distributions to corroborate experimental data. Conclusion We conclude that although ultra-high accurate mass instruments provide major insight into the chemical diversity of biological extracts, the facile annotation of a large proportion of signals is not possible by simple, automated query of current databases using computed molecular formulae. Parameterising MZedDB to take into account predicted ionisation behaviour and the biological source of any sample improves greatly both the frequency and accuracy of potential annotation 'hits' in ESI-MS data.

  2. Atomically monodisperse nickel nanoclusters as highly active electrocatalysts for water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joya, Khurram S.; Sinatra, Lutfan; Abdulhalim, Lina G.; Joshi, Chakra P.; Hedhili, M. N.; Bakr, Osman M.; Hussain, Irshad

    2016-05-01

    Achieving water splitting at low overpotential with high oxygen evolution efficiency and stability is important for realizing solar to chemical energy conversion devices. Herein we report the synthesis, characterization and electrochemical evaluation of highly active nickel nanoclusters (Ni NCs) for water oxidation at low overpotential. These atomically precise and monodisperse Ni NCs are characterized by using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction and mass spectrometry. The molecular formulae of these Ni NCs are found to be Ni4(PET)8 and Ni6(PET)12 and are highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution without any pre-conditioning. Ni4(PET)8 are slightly better catalysts than Ni6(PET)12 which initiate oxygen evolution at an amazingly low overpotential of ~1.51 V (vs. RHE; η ~ 280 mV). The peak oxygen evolution current density (J) of ~150 mA cm-2 at 2.0 V (vs. RHE) with a Tafel slope of 38 mV dec-1 is observed using Ni4(PET)8. These results are comparable to the state-of-the-art RuO2 electrocatalyst, which is highly expensive and rare compared to Ni-based materials. Sustained oxygen generation for several hours with an applied current density of 20 mA cm-2 demonstrates the long-term stability and activity of these Ni NCs towards electrocatalytic water oxidation. This unique approach provides a facile method to prepare cost-effective, nanoscale and highly efficient electrocatalysts for water oxidation.Achieving water splitting at low overpotential with high oxygen evolution efficiency and stability is important for realizing solar to chemical energy conversion devices. Herein we report the synthesis, characterization and electrochemical evaluation of highly active nickel nanoclusters (Ni NCs) for water oxidation at low overpotential. These atomically precise and monodisperse Ni NCs are characterized by using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction and mass spectrometry. The molecular formulae of these

  3. Large scale opacity fluctuations in the Lyman alpha forest: evidence for QSOs dominating the ionising UV background at z ~ 5.5-6 ?

    CERN Document Server

    Chardin, Jonathan; Haehnelt, Martin G

    2016-01-01

    Lyman-alpha forest data probing the post-reionization Universe shows surprisingly large opacity fluctuations over rather large ($\\ge$50 comoving Mpc/h) spatial scales. We model these fluctuations using a hybrid approach utilizing the large volume Millennium simulation to predict the spatial distribution of QSOs combined with smaller scale full hydrodynamical simulation performed with RAMSES and post-processed with the radiative transfer code ATON. We produce realictic mock absorption spectra that account for the contribution of galaxies and QSOs to the ionising UV background. This improved models confirm our earlier findings that a significant ($\\ge$50%) contribution of ionising photons from QSOs can explain the large reported opacity fluctuations on large scales. The inferred QSO luminosity function is thereby consistent with recent estimates of the space density of QSOs at this redshift. Our simulations still somewhat struggle, however, to reproduce the very long (110 comoving Mpc/h) high opacity absorption...

  4. Atomically Monodisperse Nickel Nanoclusters as Highly Active Electrocatalysts for Water Oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Joya, Khurram

    2016-04-08

    Achieving water splitting at low overpotential with high oxygen evolution efficiency and stability is important for realizing solar to chemical energy conversion devices. Herein we report the synthesis, characterization and electrochemical evaluation of highly active nickel nanoclusters (Ni NCs) for water oxidation at low overpotential. These atomically precise and monodisperse Ni NCs are characterized by using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction and mass spectrometry. The molecular formulae of these Ni NCs are found to be Ni4(PET)8 and Ni6(PET)12 and are highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution without any pre-conditioning. Ni4(PET)8 are slightly better catalysts than Ni6(PET)12 and initiate the oxygen evolution at an amazingly low overpotential of ~1.51 V (vs RHE; η ≈ 280 mV). The peak oxygen evolution current density (J) of ~150 mA cm–2 at 2.0 V (vs. RHE) with a Tafel slope of 38 mV dec–1 is observed using Ni4(PET)8. These results are comparable to the state-of-the art RuO2 electrocatalyst, which is highly expensive and rare compared to Ni-based materials. Sustained oxygen generation for several hours with an applied current density of 20 mA cm–2 demonstrates the long-term stability and activity of these Ni NCs towards electrocatalytic water oxidation. This unique approach provides a facile method to prepare cost-effective, nanoscale and highly efficient electrocatalysts for water oxidation.

  5. High-Speed Generation of Entangled States for Two Three-Level Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2007-01-01

    A scheme is presented for generating entangled states for two three-level atoms in a cavity. In the scheme two atoms simultaneously interact with a cavity mode with a small detuning. Thus, the operation time is very short,which is important in view of decoherence.

  6. An atomic beam source for fast loading of a magneto-optical trap under high vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, P.D.; Hilliard, Andrew; Grünzweig, T.

    2012-01-01

    is capable of loading 90 of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) in less than 7 s while maintaining a low vacuum pressure of 10 -11 Torr. The transverse velocity components of the atomic beam are measured to be within typical capture velocities of a rubidium MOT. Finally, we show that the atomic beam can be turned...

  7. High-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical-trap source for cold lithium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiecke, T.G.; Gensemer, S.D.; Ludewig, A.; Walraven, J.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D MOT) as a beam source for cold Li-6 atoms. The source is side loaded from an oven operated at temperatures in the range 600 less than or similar to T less than or similar to 700 K. The performance is analyzed by loading the atoms into a

  8. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  9. The development of an atom chip with through silicon vias for an ultra-high-vacuum cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Li, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Yun-Siang; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Huang, Chi-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the development, fabrication and examination of an atom chip through silicon vias (TSV), which is anodically bonded with a Pyrex glass cell to form an ultra-high-vacuum system for the application of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) experiments. The silicon via is etched by the inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etch and filled by copper plating technology. The metal wires on both sides of the atom chips are patterned by the lithography process. Three different sizes of TSV are made and tested by continuously applying a maximum current of 17 A under the vacuum (70 Torr) and in air. In addition, after the thermal cycling of an anodic bonding process (requested at 350 °C) and a high electric field of 1000 V m-1, the TSV on atom chips can still hold the ultra-high vacuum (UHV). The conductive and vacuum yields of the TSV improved from 50% to 100% and from 75% to 81.25%, respectively after the modification of the fabrication process. Finally, the UHV test of TSV on atom chips at room temperature can be reached at 8 × 10-10 Torr, thus satisfying the requirements of atomic physics experiments under the UHV environment.

  10. Atomic carbon as a tracer of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies: perspectives for ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, Matteo; Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Ludlow, Aaron D; Papadopoulos, Padelis P

    2014-01-01

    We use a high-resolution simulation that tracks the non-equilibrium abundance of molecular hydrogen, H2, within a massive high-redshift galaxy to produce mock ALMA maps of the fine-structure lines of atomic carbon CI 1-0 and CI 2-1. Inspired by recent observational and theoretical work, we assume that CI is thoroughly mixed in giant molecular clouds and demonstrate that its emission is an excellent proxy for H2. The entire H2 mass of a galaxy at redshift z<4 can be detected using a compact interferometric configuration with a large synthesized beam (that does not resolve the target galaxy) in less than 1 hour of integration time. Low-resolution imaging of the CI lines (in which the target galaxy is resolved into 3-4 beams) will detect nearly 50-60 per cent of the molecular hydrogen in less than 12 hours. In this case, the data cube also provides valuable information regarding the dynamical state of the galaxy. We conclude that ALMA observations of the CI 1-0 and 2-1 emission will widely extend the interval...

  11. High-speed atomic force microscopy reveals structural dynamics of amyloid β1-42 aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Itami, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Teplow, David B; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-05-24

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins into insoluble amyloid fibrils is implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. This process involves protein assembly into oligomeric intermediates and fibrils with highly polymorphic molecular structures. These structural differences may be responsible for different disease presentations. For this reason, elucidation of the structural features and assembly kinetics of amyloidogenic proteins has been an area of intense study. We report here the results of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) studies of fibril formation and elongation by the 42-residue form of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ1-42), a key pathogenetic agent of Alzheimer's disease. Our data demonstrate two different growth modes of Aβ1-42, one producing straight fibrils and the other producing spiral fibrils. Each mode depends on initial fibril nucleus structure, but switching from one growth mode to another was occasionally observed, suggesting that fibril end structure fluctuated between the two growth modes. This switching phenomenon was affected by buffer salt composition. Our findings indicate that polymorphism in fibril structure can occur after fibril nucleation and is affected by relatively modest changes in environmental conditions.

  12. Simple-Cubic Carbon Frameworks with Atomically Dispersed Iron Dopants toward High-Efficiency Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Biwei; Wang, Xinxia; Zou, Jinxiang; Yan, Yancui; Xie, Songhai; Hu, Guangzhi; Li, Yanguang; Dong, Angang

    2017-03-08

    Iron and nitrogen codoped carbons (Fe-N-C) have attracted increasingly greater attention as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Although challenging, the synthesis of Fe-N-C catalysts with highly dispersed and fully exposed active sites is of critical importance for improving the ORR activity. Here, we report a new type of graphitic Fe-N-C catalysts featuring numerous Fe single atoms anchored on a three-dimensional simple-cubic carbon framework. The Fe-N-C catalyst, derived from self-assembled Fe3O4 nanocube superlattices, was prepared by in situ ligand carbonization followed by acid etching and ammonia activation. Benefiting from its homogeneously dispersed and fully accessible active sites, highly graphitic nature, and enhanced mass transport, our Fe-N-C catalyst outperformed Pt/C and many previously reported Fe-N-C catalysts for ORR. Furthermore, when used for constructing the cathode for zinc-air batteries, our Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited current and power densities comparable to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst.

  13. Ru nanostructure fabrication using an anodic aluminum oxide nanotemplate and highly conformal Ru atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo-Hee; Park, Sang-Joon; Son, Jong-Yeog; Kim, Hyungjun

    2008-01-30

    We fabricated metallic nanostructures directly on Si substrates through a hybrid nanoprocess combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) and a self-assembled anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanotemplate. ALD Ru films with Ru(DMPD)(EtCp) as a precursor and O(2) as a reactant exhibited high purity and low resistivity with negligible nucleation delay and low roughness. These good growth characteristics resulted in the excellent conformality for nanometer-scale vias and trenches. Additionally, AAO nanotemplates were fabricated directly on Si and Ti/Si substrates through a multiple anodization process. AAO nanotemplates with various hole sizes (30-100 nm) and aspect ratios (2:1-20:1) were fabricated by controlling the anodizing process parameters. The barrier layers between AAO nanotemplates and Si substrates were completely removed by reactive ion etching (RIE) using BCl(3) plasma. By combining the ALD Ru and the AAO nanotemplate, Ru nanostructures with controllable sizes and shapes were prepared on Si and Ti/Si substrates. The Ru nanowire array devices as a platform for sensor devices exhibited befitting properties of good ohmic contact and high surface/volume ratio.

  14. Cantilevered bimorph-based scanner for high speed atomic force microscopy with large scanning range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yusheng; Shang, Guangyi; Cai, Wei; Yao, Jun-en

    2010-05-01

    A cantilevered bimorph-based resonance-mode scanner for high speed atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging is presented. The free end of the bimorph is used for mounting a sample stage and the other one of that is fixed on the top of a conventional single tube scanner. High speed scanning is realized with the bimorph-based scanner vibrating at resonant frequency driven by a sine wave voltage applied to one piezolayer of the bimorph, while slow scanning is performed by the tube scanner. The other piezolayer provides information on vibration amplitude and phase of the bimorph itself simultaneously, which is used for real-time data processing and image calibration. By adjusting the free length of the bimorph, the line scan rate can be preset ranging from several hundred hertz to several kilohertz, which would be beneficial for the observation of samples with different properties. Combined with a home-made AFM system and a commercially available data acquisition card, AFM images of various samples have been obtained, and as an example, images of the silicon grating taken at a line rate of 1.5 kHz with the scan size of 20 microm are given. By manually moving the sample of polished Al foil surface while scanning, the capability of dynamic imaging is demonstrated.

  15. High-speed Lissajous-scan atomic force microscopy: scan pattern planning and control design issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaei, A; Yong, Yuen K; Moheimani, S O Reza

    2012-06-01

    Tracking of triangular or sawtooth waveforms is a major difficulty for achieving high-speed operation in many scanning applications such as scanning probe microscopy. Such non-smooth waveforms contain high order harmonics of the scan frequency that can excite mechanical resonant modes of the positioning system, limiting the scan range and bandwidth. Hence, fast raster scanning often leads to image distortion. This paper proposes analysis and design methodologies for a nonlinear and smooth closed curve, known as Lissajous pattern, which allows much faster operations compared to the ordinary scan patterns. A simple closed-form measure is formulated for the image resolution of the Lissajous pattern. This enables us to systematically determine the scan parameters. Using internal model controllers (IMC), this non-raster scan method is implemented on a commercial atomic force microscope driven by a low resonance frequency positioning stage. To reduce the tracking errors due to actuator nonlinearities, higher order harmonic oscillators are included in the IMC controllers. This results in significant improvement compared to the traditional IMC method. It is shown that the proposed IMC controller achieves much better tracking performances compared to integral controllers when the noise rejection performances is a concern.

  16. Atomic layer deposition encapsulated activated carbon electrodes for high voltage stable supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kijoo; Cho, Moonkyu; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-01-28

    Operating voltage enhancement is an effective route for high energy density supercapacitors. Unfortunately, widely used activated carbon electrode generally suffers from poor electrochemical stability over 2.5 V. Here we present atomic layer deposition (ALD) encapsulation of activated carbons for high voltage stable supercapacitors. Two-nanometer-thick Al2O3 dielectric layers are conformally coated at activated carbon surface by ALD, well-maintaining microporous morphology. Resultant electrodes exhibit excellent stability at 3 V operation with 39% energy density enhancement from 2.5 V operation. Because of the protection of surface functional groups and reduction of electrolyte degradation, 74% of initial voltage was maintained 50 h after full charge, and 88% of capacitance was retained after 5000 cycles at 70 °C accelerated test, which correspond to 31 and 17% improvements from bare activated carbon, respectively. This ALD-based surface modification offers a general method to enhance electrochemical stability of carbon materials for diverse energy and environmental applications.

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition for Coating of High Aspect Ratio TiO2 Nanotube Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We present an optimized approach for the deposition of Al2O3 (as a model secondary material) coating into high aspect ratio (≈180) anodic TiO2 nanotube layers using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. In order to study the influence of the diffusion of the Al2O3 precursors on the resulting coating thickness, ALD processes with different exposure times (i.e., 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 s) of the trimethylaluminum (TMA) precursor were performed. Uniform coating of the nanotube interiors was achieved with longer exposure times (5 and 10 s), as verified by detailed scanning electron microscopy analysis. Quartz crystal microbalance measurements were used to monitor the deposition process and its particular features due to the tube diameter gradient. Finally, theoretical calculations were performed to calculate the minimum precursor exposure time to attain uniform coating. Theoretical values on the diffusion regime matched with the experimental results and helped to obtain valuable information for further optimization of ALD coating processes. The presented approach provides a straightforward solution toward the development of many novel devices, based on a high surface area interface between TiO2 nanotubes and a secondary material (such as Al2O3). PMID:27643411

  18. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation.

  19. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  20. A miniaturized, high frequency mechanical scanner for high speed atomic force microscope using suspension on dynamically determined points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herfst, Rodolf; Dekker, Bert; Witvoet, Gert; Crowcombe, Will; Lange, Dorus de [Department of Optomechatronics, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Sadeghian, Hamed, E-mail: hamed.sadeghianmarnani@tno.nl, E-mail: h.sadeghianmarnani@tudelft.nl [Department of Optomechatronics, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    One of the major limitations in the speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) is the bandwidth of the mechanical scanning stage, especially in the vertical (z) direction. According to the design principles of “light and stiff” and “static determinacy,” the bandwidth of the mechanical scanner is limited by the first eigenfrequency of the AFM head in case of tip scanning and by the sample stage in terms of sample scanning. Due to stringent requirements of the system, simply pushing the first eigenfrequency to an ever higher value has reached its limitation. We have developed a miniaturized, high speed AFM scanner in which the dynamics of the z-scanning stage are made insensitive to its surrounding dynamics via suspension of it on specific dynamically determined points. This resulted in a mechanical bandwidth as high as that of the z-actuator (50 kHz) while remaining insensitive to the dynamics of its base and surroundings. The scanner allows a practical z scan range of 2.1 μm. We have demonstrated the applicability of the scanner to the high speed scanning of nanostructures.

  1. A miniaturized, high frequency mechanical scanner for high speed atomic force microscope using suspension on dynamically determined points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfst, Rodolf; Dekker, Bert; Witvoet, Gert; Crowcombe, Will; de Lange, Dorus; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2015-11-01

    One of the major limitations in the speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) is the bandwidth of the mechanical scanning stage, especially in the vertical (z) direction. According to the design principles of "light and stiff" and "static determinacy," the bandwidth of the mechanical scanner is limited by the first eigenfrequency of the AFM head in case of tip scanning and by the sample stage in terms of sample scanning. Due to stringent requirements of the system, simply pushing the first eigenfrequency to an ever higher value has reached its limitation. We have developed a miniaturized, high speed AFM scanner in which the dynamics of the z-scanning stage are made insensitive to its surrounding dynamics via suspension of it on specific dynamically determined points. This resulted in a mechanical bandwidth as high as that of the z-actuator (50 kHz) while remaining insensitive to the dynamics of its base and surroundings. The scanner allows a practical z scan range of 2.1 μm. We have demonstrated the applicability of the scanner to the high speed scanning of nanostructures.

  2. Cataract and ionizing radiation; Cataracte et rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassilieff, S. [Ecole des Applications Militaires de l' Energie Atomique, 50 - Cherbourg Octeville (France)

    2009-10-15

    The radiation-induced cataract has been up to now considered as a quite rare pathology, needing high-dose radiations (beyond a dose threshold roughly estimated at 2 Grays to the lens) consisting mainly in head tumour radiotherapy complications. Several new studies on different exposed populations such as astronauts, japanese atomic bomb survivors, people undergoing X-ray examinations, Chernobyl accident 'liquidators' as well as data from animal experiments, suggest that dose threshold for detectable opacities as well as for clinical posterior sub-capsular cataract occurring, might be far lower than those previously assumed. Even the existence of a dose threshold is no longer an absolute certitude insofar as radiation-induced cataract pathogenesis might consist not really in a deterministic effect (direct tissue harmful effect, killing or seriously injuring a critical population of cells) as believed until now, but rather in a stochastic effect (genomic damage in target-cells, altered cell division, abnormal lens fiber cell differentiation). More practically, these new data may lead us to reconsider radioprotection of specifically exposed populations: mainly patients and workers. Regarding workers, labour legislation (lens equivalent dose limit of 150 mSv during 12 consecutive months) might be, in the medium term, reassessed downwards. (author)

  3. Rapid screening method for determination of Ecstasy and amphetamines in urine samples using gas chromatography-chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, M; Rosati, F; Pacifici, R; Zuccaro, R; Romolo, F S; Lopez, A

    2002-04-05

    The need for analytical screening tests more reliable and valid to detect amphetamine and related "designer drugs" in biological samples is becoming critical, due to the increasing diffusion of these drugs on the European illegal market. The most common screening procedures based on immunoassays suffer a number of limitations, including low sensitivity, lack of specificity and limited number of detectable substances. This paper describes a screening method based on gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC/MS) using positive chemical ionisation (PCI) detection. Methanol was used as reactant gas in the ionisation chamber. Molecular ions of different compounds were monitored, allowing a sensitivity of 5-10 ng/ml with high selectivity. The sensitivity of the method gives positive results in samples taken 48-72 h after intake of one dose of 50-100 mg. The method is simple and rapid. Sample preparation was limited to one liquid-liquid extraction, without any hydrolysis and derivatisation. Hydrolysis is critical to identify metabolites excreted as conjugates. Blank urine samples spiked with known amounts of amphetamine (AM), methylamphetamine (MA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA), methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) and methylenedioxyphenyl-N-methyl-2-butanamine (MBDB) were analysed. The method was successfully tested on real samples of urine from people, whose use of amphetamine was suspected, and results were compared with results obtained with immunoassays.

  4. Airborne hydrogen cyanide measurements using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer for the plume identification of biomass burning forest fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Le Breton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN from biomass burning events in Canada using I− reagent ions on board the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the BORTAS campaign in 2011. The ionisation scheme enabled highly sensitive measurements at 1 Hz frequency through biomass burning plumes in the troposphere. A strong correlation between the HCN, carbon monoxide (CO and acetonitrile (CH3CN was observed, indicating the potential of HCN as a biomass burning (BB marker. A plume was defined as being 6 standard deviations above background for the flights. This method was compared with a number of alternative plume-defining techniques employing CO and CH3CN measurements. The 6-sigma technique produced the highest R2 values for correlations with CO. A normalised excess mixing ratio (NEMR of 3.68 ± 0.149 pptv ppbv−1 was calculated, which is within the range quoted in previous research (Hornbrook et al., 2011. The global tropospheric model STOCHEM-CRI incorporated both the observed ratio and extreme ratios derived from other studies to generate global emission totals of HCN via biomass burning. Using the ratio derived from this work, the emission total for HCN from BB was 0.92 Tg (N yr−1.

  5. Airborne hydrogen cyanide measurements using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer for the plume identification of biomass burning forest fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Le Breton

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN from biomass burning events in Canada using I reagent ions on board the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the BORTAS campaign in 2011. The ionisation scheme enabled highly sensitive measurements at 1 Hz frequency through biomass burning plumes in the troposphere.

    A strong correlation between the HCN, carbon monoxide (CO and acetonitrile (CH3CN was observed, indicating the potential of HCN as a biomass burning (BB marker. A plume was defined as being 6 standard deviations above background for the flights. This method was compared with a number of alternative plume defining techniques employing CO and CH3CN measurements. The 6 sigma technique produced the highest R2 values for correlations with CO. A Normalised Excess Mixing Ratio (NEMR of 3.76 ± 0.022 pptv ppbv−1 was calculated which is within the range quoted in previous research (Hornbrook et al., 2011. The global tropospheric model STOCHEM-CRI incorporated both the observed ratio and extreme ratios derived from other studies to generate global emission totals of HCN via biomass burning. Using the ratio derived from this work the emission total for HCN from BB was 0.92 Tg (N yr−1.

  6. Investigation of polymer derived ceramics cantilevers for application of high speed atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yun

    High speed Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a wide variety of applications ranging from nanomanufacturing to biophysics. In order to have higher scanning speed of certain AFM modes, high resonant frequency cantilevers are needed; therefore, the goal of this research is to investigate using polymer derived ceramics for possible applications in making high resonant frequency AFM cantilevers using complex cross sections. The polymer derived ceramic that will be studied, is silicon carbide. Polymer derived ceramics offer a potentially more economic fabrication approach for MEMS due to their relatively low processing temperatures and ease of complex shape design. Photolithography was used to make the desired cantilever shapes with micron scale size followed by a wet etching process to release the cantilevers from the substrates. The whole manufacturing process we use borrow well-developed techniques from the semiconducting industry, and as such this project also could offer the opportunity to reduce the fabrication cost of AFM cantilevers and MEMS in general. The characteristics of silicon carbide made from the precursor polymer, SMP-10 (Starfire Systems), were studied. In order to produce high qualities of silicon carbide cantilevers, where the major concern is defects, proper process parameters needed to be determined. Films of polymer derived ceramics often have defects due to shrinkage during the conversion process. Thus control of defects was a central issue in this study. A second, related concern was preventing oxidation; the polymer derived ceramics we chose is easily oxidized during processing. Establishing an environment without oxygen in the whole process was a significant challenge in the project. The optimization of the parameters for using photolithography and wet etching process was the final and central goal of the project; well established techniques used in microfabrication were modified for use in making the cantilever in the project. The techniques

  7. Determination of a high spatial resolution geopotential model using atomic clock comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, G.; Panet, I.; Wolf, P.; Guerlin, C.; Bize, S.; Delva, P.

    2017-01-01

    Recent technological advances in optical atomic clocks are opening new perspectives for the direct determination of geopotential differences between any two points at a centimeter-level accuracy in geoid height. However, so far detailed quantitative estimates of the possible improvement in geoid determination when adding such clock measurements to existing data are lacking. We present a first step in that direction with the aim and hope of triggering further work and efforts in this emerging field of chronometric geodesy and geophysics. We specifically focus on evaluating the contribution of this new kind of direct measurements in determining the geopotential at high spatial resolution (≈ 10 km). We studied two test areas, both located in France and corresponding to a middle (Massif Central) and high (Alps) mountainous terrain. These regions are interesting because the gravitational field strength varies greatly from place to place at high spatial resolution due to the complex topography. Our method consists in first generating a synthetic high-resolution geopotential map, then drawing synthetic measurement data (gravimetry and clock data) from it, and finally reconstructing the geopotential map from that data using least squares collocation. The quality of the reconstructed map is then assessed by comparing it to the original one used to generate the data. We show that adding only a few clock data points (less than 1% of the gravimetry data) reduces the bias significantly and improves the standard deviation by a factor 3. The effect of the data coverage and data quality on the results is investigated, and the trade-off between the measurement noise level and the number of data points is discussed.

  8. Determination of a high spatial resolution geopotential model using atomic clock comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, G.; Panet, I.; Wolf, P.; Guerlin, C.; Bize, S.; Delva, P.

    2017-06-01

    Recent technological advances in optical atomic clocks are opening new perspectives for the direct determination of geopotential differences between any two points at a centimeter-level accuracy in geoid height. However, so far detailed quantitative estimates of the possible improvement in geoid determination when adding such clock measurements to existing data are lacking. We present a first step in that direction with the aim and hope of triggering further work and efforts in this emerging field of chronometric geodesy and geophysics. We specifically focus on evaluating the contribution of this new kind of direct measurements in determining the geopotential at high spatial resolution (≈ 10 km). We studied two test areas, both located in France and corresponding to a middle (Massif Central) and high (Alps) mountainous terrain. These regions are interesting because the gravitational field strength varies greatly from place to place at high spatial resolution due to the complex topography. Our method consists in first generating a synthetic high-resolution geopotential map, then drawing synthetic measurement data (gravimetry and clock data) from it, and finally reconstructing the geopotential map from that data using least squares collocation. The quality of the reconstructed map is then assessed by comparing it to the original one used to generate the data. We show that adding only a few clock data points (less than 1% of the gravimetry data) reduces the bias significantly and improves the standard deviation by a factor 3. The effect of the data coverage and data quality on the results is investigated, and the trade-off between the measurement noise level and the number of data points is discussed.

  9. A Time-Dependent Approach to High-Resolution Photoabsorption Spectrum of Rydberg Atoms in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Xue-Bin; LIU Hong-Ping; SHI Ting-Yun

    2008-01-01

    A robust time-dependent approach to the high-resolution photoabsorption spectrum of Rydberg atoms in magnetic fields is presented. Traditionally we have to numerically diagonalize a huge matrix to solve the eigen-problem and then to obtain the spectral information. This matrix operation requires high-speed computers with large memories. Alternatively we present a unitary but very easily parallelized time-evolution method in an inexpensive way, which is very accurate and stable even in long-time scale evolution. With this method, we perform the spectral calculation of hydrogen atom in magnetic field, which agrees well with the experimental observation. It can be extended to study the dynamics of Rydberg atoms in more complicated cases such as in combined electric and magnetic fields.

  10. Evidence for an ionised disc in the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Ark 564

    CERN Document Server

    Vaughan, S; Reeves, J; Warwick, R; Edelson, R

    1999-01-01

    We present simultaneous ASCA and RXTE observations of Ark 564, the brightest known ``narrow-line'' Seyfert 1 in the 2-10 keV band. The measured X-ray spectrum is dominated by a steep (Gamma~2.7) power-law continuum extending to at least 20 keV, with imprinted Fe K-line and -edge features and an additional ``soft excess'' below ~1.5 keV. The energy of the iron K-edge indicates the presence of highly ionised material, which we identify in terms of reflection from a strongly irradiated accretion disc. The high reflectivity of this putative disc, together with its strong intrinsic O VIII Ly-alpha and O VIII recombination emission, can also explain much of the observed soft excess flux. Furthermore, the same spectral model also provides a reasonable match to the very steep 0.1-2 keV spectrum deduced from ROSAT data. The source is much more rapidly variable than ``normal'' Seyfert 1s of comparable luminosity, increasing by a factor of ~50% in 1.6 hours, with no measurable lag between the 0.5-2 keV and 3-12 keV band...

  11. On the Coulomb corrections to the total cross section of the interaction of the $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ atom with ordinary atoms at high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, D Yu

    1999-01-01

    The size of $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atom in the low lying states is considerably smaller than the radius of atomic screening. Due to that we can neglect this screening calculating the contribution of multi-photon exchanges. We obtain the analytic formula for Coulomb corrections which works with a very good accuracy for the ground state of $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ atom.

  12. Atomization of High-Viscosity Fluids for Aromatherapy Using Micro-heaters for Heterogeneous Bubble Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Junhui; Kong, Ka Wai; Chan, Ho-Yin; Sun, Winston; Li, Wen Jung; Chau, Eric Boa Fung; Chan, George Kak Man

    2017-01-01

    The development of a novel lead-free microelectromechanical-system (MEMS)-based atomizer using the principle of thermal bubble actuation is presented. It is a low-cost, lead-free design that is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans. It has been tested to be applicable over a wide range of fluid viscosities, ranging from 1 cP (e.g., water) to 200 cP (e.g., oil-like fluid) at room temperature, a range that is difficult to achieve using ordinary atomizers. The results demonstrate that the average power consumption of the atomizer is approximately 1 W with an atomization rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mg of deionized (DI) water per cycle. The relationships between the micro-heater track width and the track gap, the size of the micro-cavities and the nucleation energy were studied to obtain an optimal atomizer design. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) results indicate that the diameter of the ejected droplets ranges from 30 to 90 μm with a speed of 20 to 340 mm/s. In addition, different modes of spraying are reported for the first time. It is envisioned that the successful development of this MEMS-based atomizing technology will revolutionize the existing market for atomizers and could also benefit different industries, particularly in applications involving viscous fluids. PMID:28074925

  13. Atomization of High-Viscosity Fluids for Aromatherapy Using Micro-heaters for Heterogeneous Bubble Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Junhui; Kong, Ka Wai; Chan, Ho-Yin; Sun, Winston; Li, Wen Jung; Chau, Eric Boa Fung; Chan, George Kak Man

    2017-01-11

    The development of a novel lead-free microelectromechanical-system (MEMS)-based atomizer using the principle of thermal bubble actuation is presented. It is a low-cost, lead-free design that is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans. It has been tested to be applicable over a wide range of fluid viscosities, ranging from 1 cP (e.g., water) to 200 cP (e.g., oil-like fluid) at room temperature, a range that is difficult to achieve using ordinary atomizers. The results demonstrate that the average power consumption of the atomizer is approximately 1 W with an atomization rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mg of deionized (DI) water per cycle. The relationships between the micro-heater track width and the track gap, the size of the micro-cavities and the nucleation energy were studied to obtain an optimal atomizer design. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) results indicate that the diameter of the ejected droplets ranges from 30 to 90 μm with a speed of 20 to 340 mm/s. In addition, different modes of spraying are reported for the first time. It is envisioned that the successful development of this MEMS-based atomizing technology will revolutionize the existing market for atomizers and could also benefit different industries, particularly in applications involving viscous fluids.

  14. Atomization of High-Viscosity Fluids for Aromatherapy Using Micro-heaters for Heterogeneous Bubble Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Junhui; Kong, Ka Wai; Chan, Ho-Yin; Sun, Winston; Li, Wen Jung; Chau, Eric Boa Fung; Chan, George Kak Man

    2017-01-01

    The development of a novel lead-free microelectromechanical-system (MEMS)-based atomizer using the principle of thermal bubble actuation is presented. It is a low-cost, lead-free design that is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans. It has been tested to be applicable over a wide range of fluid viscosities, ranging from 1 cP (e.g., water) to 200 cP (e.g., oil-like fluid) at room temperature, a range that is difficult to achieve using ordinary atomizers. The results demonstrate that the average power consumption of the atomizer is approximately 1 W with an atomization rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mg of deionized (DI) water per cycle. The relationships between the micro-heater track width and the track gap, the size of the micro-cavities and the nucleation energy were studied to obtain an optimal atomizer design. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) results indicate that the diameter of the ejected droplets ranges from 30 to 90 μm with a speed of 20 to 340 mm/s. In addition, different modes of spraying are reported for the first time. It is envisioned that the successful development of this MEMS-based atomizing technology will revolutionize the existing market for atomizers and could also benefit different industries, particularly in applications involving viscous fluids.

  15. High-temperature atomic superfluidity in lattice Bose-Fermi mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Fabrizio; Albus, Alexander

    2004-08-27

    We consider atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices and study the superfluidity of fermionic atoms due to s-wave pairing induced by boson-fermion interactions. We prove that the induced fermion-fermion coupling is always attractive if the boson-boson on-site interaction is repulsive, and predict the existence of an enhanced BEC-BCS crossover as the strength of the lattice potential is varied. We show that for direct on-site fermion-fermion repulsion, the induced attraction can give rise to superfluidity via s-wave pairing at striking variance with the case of pure systems of fermionic atoms with direct repulsive interactions.

  16. LDRD Project 52523 final report :Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal tribological coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungk, John Michael (University of Minnesota); Dugger, Michael Thomas; George, Steve M. (University of Colorado); Prasad, Somuri V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mayer, Thomas Michael; Scharf, Thomas W.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Gerberich, William W. (University of Minnesota)

    2005-10-01

    Friction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of micromechanical (MEMS) devices. While a variety of lubricant and wear resistant coatings are known which we might consider for application to MEMS devices, the severe geometric constraints of many micromechanical systems (high aspect ratios, shadowed surfaces) make most deposition methods for friction and wear-resistance coatings impossible. In this program we have produced and evaluate highly conformal, tribological coatings, deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), for use on surface micromachined (SMM) and LIGA structures. ALD is a chemical vapor deposition process using sequential exposure of reagents and self-limiting surface chemistry, saturating at a maximum of one monolayer per exposure cycle. The self-limiting chemistry results in conformal coating of high aspect ratio structures, with monolayer precision. ALD of a wide variety of materials is possible, but there have been no studies of structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of these films. We have developed processes for depositing thin (<100 nm) conformal coatings of selected hard and lubricious films (Al2O3, ZnO, WS2, W, and W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminates), and measured their chemical, physical, mechanical and tribological properties. A significant challenge in this program was to develop instrumentation and quantitative test procedures, which did not exist, for friction, wear, film/substrate adhesion, elastic properties, stress, etc., of extremely thin films and nanolaminates. New scanning probe and nanoindentation techniques have been employed along with detailed mechanics-based models to evaluate these properties at small loads characteristic of microsystem operation. We emphasize deposition processes and fundamental properties of ALD materials, however we have also evaluated applications and film performance for model SMM and LIGA devices.

  17. Kinematics of Ionised Gas in the Barred Seyfert Galaxy NGC 4151

    CERN Document Server

    Asif, M W; Pedlar, A

    2005-01-01

    We have determined the structure and kinematics of ionised gas in the weak oval bar of the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy, NGC 4151, using the TAURUS Fabry-Perot interferometer to simultaneously map the distribution and kinematics of Hbeta emission. We also present broad-band ultraviolet imaging of the host galaxy, obtained with XMM-Newton, that shows the detailed distribution of star formation in the bar and in the optically-faint outer spiral arms. We compare the distribution and kinematics of ionised gas with that previously determined in neutral hydrogen by Mundell & Shone; we suggest that the distribution of bright, patchy UV emission close to the HI shocks is consistent with ionisation by star clusters that have formed in compressed pre-shock gas. These clusters then travel ballistically through the gaseous shock to ionise gas downstream along the leading edge of the bar. In addition, we detect, for the first time, ionised gas within the shock itself which is streaming to smaller radii in the same mann...

  18. Student and intern awareness of ionising radiation exposure from common diagnostic imaging procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G Z; Wong, D D; Nguyen, L K; Mendelson, R M

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate medical student and intern awareness of ionising radiation exposure from common diagnostic imaging procedures and to suggest how education could be improved. Fourth to sixth year medical students enrolled at a Western Australian university and interns from three teaching hospitals in Perth were recruited. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of 26 questions on their background, knowledge of ionising radiation doses and learning preferences for future teaching on this subject. A total of 331 completed questionnaires were received (95.9%). Of the 17 questions assessing knowledge of ionising radiation, a mean score of 6.0 was obtained by respondents (95% CI 5.8-6.2). Up to 54.8% of respondents underestimated the radiation dose from commonly requested radiological procedures. Respondents (11.3 and 25.5%) incorrectly believed that ultrasound and MRI emit ionising radiation, respectively. Of the four subgroups of respondents, the intern doctor subgroup performed significantly better (mean score 6.9, P medical student subgroups. When asked for the preferred method of teaching for future radiation awareness, a combination of lectures, tutorials and workshops was preferred. This study has clearly shown that awareness of ionising radiation from diagnostic imaging is lacking among senior medical students and interns. The results highlight the need for improved education to minimise unnecessary exposure of patients and the community to radiation. Further studies are required to determine the most effective form of education.

  19. Atomic Layer Deposited Coatings on Nanowires for High Temperature Water Corrosion Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersak, Alexander S; Lewis, Ryan J; Liew, Li-Anne; Wen, Rongfu; Yang, Ronggui; Lee, Yung-Cheng

    2016-11-30

    Two-phase liquid-cooling technologies incorporating micro/nanostructured copper or silicon surfaces have been established as a promising thermal management solution to keep up with the increasing power demands of high power electronics. However, the reliability of nanometer-scale features of copper and silicon in these devices has not been well investigated. In this work, accelerated corrosion testing reveals that copper nanowires are not immune to corrosion in deaerated pure hot water. To solve this problem, we investigate atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO2 coatings grown at 150 and 175 °C. We measured no difference in coating thickness for a duration of 12 days. Using a core/shell approach, we grow ALD TiO2/Al2O3 protective coatings on copper nanowires and demonstrate a preservation of nanoengineered copper features. These studies have identified a critical reliability problem of nanoscale copper and silicon surfaces in deaerated, pure, hot water and have successfully demonstrated a reliable solution using ALD TiO2/Al2O3 protective coatings.

  20. Generation of single photons with highly tunable wave shape from a cold atomic quantum memory

    CERN Document Server

    Farrera, Pau; Albrecht, Boris; Ho, Melvyn; Chávez, Matías; Teo, Colin; Sangouard, Nicolas; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    We report on a single photon source with highly tunable photon shape based on a cold ensemble of Rubidium atoms. We follow the DLCZ scheme to implement an emissive quantum memory, which can be operated as a photon pair source with controllable delay. We find that the temporal wave shape of the emitted read photon can be precisely controlled by changing the shape of the driving read pulse. We generate photons with temporal durations varying over three orders of magnitude up to 10 {\\mu}s without a significant change of the read-out efficiency. We prove the non-classicality of the emitted photons by measuring their antibunching, showing near single photon behavior at low excitation probabilities. We also show that the photons are emitted in a pure state by measuring unconditional autocorrelation functions. Finally, to demonstrate the usability of the source for realistic applications, we create ultra-long single photons with a rising exponential or doubly peaked wave shape which are important for several quantum...

  1. Strong coupling and high contrast all optical modulation in atomic cladding waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Liron; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-01-01

    In recent years we are witnessing a flourish in research aimed to facilitate alkali vapors in guided wave configurations. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, the increase in density of states, the interaction with surfaces and primarily the high intensities carried along the structure, a rich world of light vapor interactions can be studied, and new functionalities, e.g. low power nonlinear light-matter interactions can be achieved. One immense remaining challenge is to study the effects of quantum coherence and shifts in such nano-scale waveguides, characterized by ultra-small mode areas and fast dynamics. Here, we construct a serpentine silicon-nitride wave guide, having atomic vapor as its cladding. The unprecedented mode volume of 5e-13 m^3 supported over a length of 17 mm is used to demonstrate efficient linear and non-linear spectroscopy. Fascinating and important phenomena such as van der Waals shifts, dynamical stark shifts, and coherent effects such as strong coupling (in the for...

  2. Direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the analysis of high-purity niobium pentaoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M D; Krivan, V

    2000-01-01

    A direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SoS-ETAAS) method for ultratrace analysis of powdered niobium pentaoxide for Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn has been developed. The elements K, Mg, Na and Zn could be determined without any chemical modification. However, in the determination of the elements Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni, serious matrix-caused non-spectral interferences and background occurred which made their determination impossible. This problem was remedied by conversion of the niobium pentaoxide matrix into the thermally stable niobium carbide by using methane atmosphere during the pyrolysis stage. The development resulted in establishing an extraordinary powerful method for the analysis of niobium pentaoxide in term of limits of detection, accuracy, simplicity and analysis time. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions. The accuracy was checked by comparing the results with those obtained by ETAAS in analysis of slurries and digests of the sample. Due to almost complete freedom of blank and high applicable sample amounts (up to 15 mg), extremely low limits of detection (0.5-2 ng/g) were achieved.

  3. Imaging stability in force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung I., E-mail: ByungKim@boisestate.edu [Department of Physics, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive Boise, ID 83725-1570, United States of America (United States); Boehm, Ryan D. [Department of Physics, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive Boise, ID 83725-1570, United States of America (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We studied the stability of force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy (HSAFM) by imaging soft, hard, and biological sample surfaces at various applied forces. The HSAFM images showed sudden topographic variations of streaky fringes with a negative applied force when collected on a soft hydrocarbon film grown on a grating sample, whereas they showed stable topographic features with positive applied forces. The instability of HSAFM images with the negative applied force was explained by the transition between contact and noncontact regimes in the force–distance curve. When the grating surface was cleaned, and thus hydrophilic by removing the hydrocarbon film, enhanced imaging stability was observed at both positive and negative applied forces. The higher adhesive interaction between the tip and the surface explains the improved imaging stability. The effects of imaging rate on the imaging stability were tested on an even softer adhesive Escherichia coli biofilm deposited onto the grating structure. The biofilm and planktonic cell structures in HSAFM images were reproducible within the force deviation less than ∼0.5 nN at the imaging rate up to 0.2 s per frame, suggesting that the force-feedback HSAFM was stable for various imaging speeds in imaging softer adhesive biological samples. - Highlights: ► We investigated the imaging stability of force-feedback HSAFM. ► Stable–unstable imaging transitions rely on applied force and sample hydrophilicity. ► The stable–unstable transitions are found to be independent of imaging rate.

  4. Atomic Hydrogen Gas in Dark-Matter Minihalos and the Compact High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, A; Wolfire, M G

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the coupled hydrostatic and ionization structures of pressure-supported gas clouds that are confined by gravitationally dominant dark-matter (DM) mini-halos and by an external bounding pressure provided by a hot medium. We focus on clouds that are photoionized and heated by the present-day background metagalactic field and determine the conditions for the formation of warm (WNM), and multi-phased (CNM/WNM) neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) cores in the DM-dominated clouds. We consider LCDM dark-matter halos, and we compute models for a wide range of halo masses, total cloud gas masses, and external bounding pressures. We present models for the pressure-supported HI structures observed in the Local Group dwarf galaxies Leo A and Sag DIG. We then construct minihalo models for the multi-phased (and low-metallicity) compact high-velocity HI clouds (CHVCs). If the CHVCs are drawn from the same family of halos that successfully reproduce the dwarf galaxy observations, then the CHVCs must be "circumgalactic ...

  5. Near-Atomic Resolution Structure of a Highly Neutralizing Fab Bound to Canine Parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organtini, Lindsey J; Lee, Hyunwook; Iketani, Sho; Huang, Kai; Ashley, Robert E; Makhov, Alexander M; Conway, James F; Parrish, Colin R; Hafenstein, Susan

    2016-11-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious pathogen that causes severe disease in dogs and wildlife. Previously, a panel of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAb) raised against CPV was characterized. An antibody fragment (Fab) of MAb E was found to neutralize the virus at low molar ratios. Using recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we determined the structure of CPV in complex with Fab E to 4.1 Å resolution, which allowed de novo building of the Fab structure. The footprint identified was significantly different from the footprint obtained previously from models fitted into lower-resolution maps. Using single-chain variable fragments, we tested antibody residues that control capsid binding. The near-atomic structure also revealed that Fab binding had caused capsid destabilization in regions containing key residues conferring receptor binding and tropism, which suggests a mechanism for efficient virus neutralization by antibody. Furthermore, a general technical approach to solving the structures of small molecules is demonstrated, as binding the Fab to the capsid allowed us to determine the 50-kDa Fab structure by cryo-EM.

  6. Nanoscale Stoichiometric Analysis of a High-Temperature Superconductor by Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzini, Stella; London, Andrew J; Gault, Baptiste; Saxey, David; Speller, Susannah; Grovenor, Chris R M; Danaie, Mohsen; Moody, Michael P; Edmondson, Philip D; Bagot, Paul A J

    2017-01-31

    The functional properties of the high-temperature superconductor Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ (Y-123) are closely correlated to the exact stoichiometry and oxygen content. Exceeding the critical value of 1 oxygen vacancy for every five unit cells (δ>0.2, which translates to a 1.5 at% deviation from the nominal oxygen stoichiometry of Y7.7Ba15.3Cu23O54-δ ) is sufficient to alter the superconducting properties. Stoichiometry at the nanometer scale, particularly of oxygen and other lighter elements, is extremely difficult to quantify in complex functional ceramics by most currently available analytical techniques. The present study is an analysis and optimization of the experimental conditions required to quantify the local nanoscale stoichiometry of single crystal yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) samples in three dimensions by atom probe tomography (APT). APT analysis required systematic exploration of a wide range of data acquisition and processing conditions to calibrate the measurements. Laser pulse energy, ion identification, and the choice of range widths were all found to influence composition measurements. The final composition obtained from melt-grown crystals with optimized superconducting properties was Y7.9Ba10.4Cu24.4O57.2.

  7. Wide-area scanner for high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroki; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Kobashi, Toshihide; Shibata, Mikihiro; Nishiyama, Jun; Yasuda, Ryohei; Ando, Toshio

    2013-05-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) has recently been established. The dynamic processes and structural dynamics of protein molecules in action have been successfully visualized using HS-AFM. However, its maximum scan ranges in the X- and Y-directions have been limited to ~1 μm and ~4 μm, respectively, making it infeasible to observe the dynamics of much larger samples, including live cells. Here, we develop a wide-area scanner with a maximum XY scan range of ~46 × 46 μm(2) by magnifying the displacements of stack piezoelectric actuators using a leverage mechanism. Mechanical vibrations produced by fast displacement of the X-scanner are suppressed by a combination of feed-forward inverse compensation and the use of triangular scan signals with rounded vertices. As a result, the scan speed in the X-direction reaches 6.3 mm/s even for a scan size as large as ~40 μm. The nonlinearity of the X- and Y-piezoelectric actuators' displacements that arises from their hysteresis is eliminated by polynomial-approximation-based open-loop control. The interference between the X- and Y-scanners is also eliminated by the same technique. The usefulness of this wide-area scanner is demonstrated by video imaging of dynamic processes in live bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  8. Atomic force microscopy with nanoelectrode tips for high resolution electrochemical, nanoadhesion and nanoelectrical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellist, Michael R.; Chen, Yikai; Mark, Andreas; Gödrich, Sebastian; Stelling, Christian; Jiang, Jingjing; Poddar, Rakesh; Li, Chunzeng; Kumar, Ravi; Papastavrou, Georg; Retsch, Markus; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Huang, Zhuangqun; Xiang, Chengxiang; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2017-03-01

    Multimodal nano-imaging in electrochemical environments is important across many areas of science and technology. Here, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) using an atomic force microscope (AFM) platform with a nanoelectrode probe is reported. In combination with PeakForce tapping AFM mode, the simultaneous characterization of surface topography, quantitative nanomechanics, nanoelectronic properties, and electrochemical activity is demonstrated. The nanoelectrode probe is coated with dielectric materials and has an exposed conical Pt tip apex of ∼200 nm in height and of ∼25 nm in end-tip radius. These characteristic dimensions permit sub-100 nm spatial resolution for electrochemical imaging. With this nanoelectrode probe we have extended AFM-based nanoelectrical measurements to liquid environments. Experimental data and numerical simulations are used to understand the response of the nanoelectrode probe. With PeakForce SECM, we successfully characterized a surface defect on a highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite electrode showing correlated topographical, electrochemical and nanomechanical information at the highest AFM-SECM resolution. The SECM nanoelectrode also enabled the measurement of heterogeneous electrical conductivity of electrode surfaces in liquid. These studies extend the basic understanding of heterogeneity on graphite/graphene surfaces for electrochemical applications.

  9. Influence of easily ionised elements on the delayed responses of the emission intensities of an analyte in a power modulated U-shaped argon stabilised DC arc plasma with an aerosol supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIROSLAV KUZMANOVIC

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The current of a U-shaped argon stabilised DC arc was square modulated with a 40 Hz repetition frequency between 6 and 3 A. The delayed line intensity responses to the modulation of the arc current were investigated using calcium as a representative analyte. The intensities of both the atomic and ionic lines were monitored at different distances from the arc axis in the presence of various concentrations of the easily ionised element. Temporal evolutions were monitored on a millisecond time scale. It was found that the responses of the line intesity to the arc current change strongly depended on the observed radial position, especially in the vicinity of the arc axis. The obtained results showed a significant influence of even small amounts of the easily ionised element on the excitation and transport of the analyte and indicated a way of possibly improving the analytical capabilities of the excitation source.

  10. Magnetoencephalography with a Cs-based high-sensitivity compact atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jingwei; Wan, Shuangai; Sun, Yifan; Dou, Rongshe; Guo, Yuhao; Wei, Kequan; He, Kaiyan; Qin, Jie; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, substantial progress has been made in developing a new generation of magnetoencephalography (MEG) with a spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF)-based atomic magnetometer (AM). An AM employs alkali atoms to detect weak magnetic fields. A compact AM array with high sensitivity is crucial to the design; however, most proposed compact AMs are potassium (K)- or rubidium (Rb)-based with single beam configurations. In the present study, a pump-probe two beam configuration with a Cesium (Cs)-based AM (Cs-AM) is introduced to detect human neuronal magnetic fields. The length of the vapor cell is 4 mm, which can fully satisfy the need of designing a compact sensor array. Compared with state-of-the-art compact AMs, our new Cs-AM has two advantages. First, it can be operated in a SERF regime, requiring much lower heating temperature, which benefits the sensor with a closer distance to scalp due to ease of thermal insulation and less electric heating noise interference. Second, the two-beam configuration in the design can achieve higher sensitivity. It is free of magnetic modulation, which is necessary in one-beam AMs; however, such modulation may cause other interference in multi-channel circumstances. In the frequency band between 10 Hz and 30 Hz, the noise level of the proposed Cs-AM is approximately 10 f T/Hz1/2, which is comparable with state-of-the-art K- or Rb-based compact AMs. The performance of the Cs-AM was verified by measuring human auditory evoked fields (AEFs) in reference to commercial superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) channels. By using a Cs-AM, we observed a clear peak in AEFs around 100 ms (M100) with a much larger amplitude compared with that of a SQUID, and the temporal profiles of the two devices were in good agreement. The results indicate the possibility of using the compact Cs-AM for MEG recordings, and the current Cs-AM has the potential to be designed for multi-sensor arrays and gradiometers for future neuroscience

  11. Automatic generation of reaction energy databases from highly accurate atomization energy benchmark sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margraf, Johannes T; Ranasinghe, Duminda S; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2017-03-31

    In this contribution, we discuss how reaction energy benchmark sets can automatically be created from arbitrary atomization energy databases. As an example, over 11 000 reaction energies derived from the W4-11 database, as well as some relevant subsets are reported. Importantly, there is only very modest computational overhead involved in computing >11 000 reaction energies compared to 140 atomization energies, since the rate-determining step for either benchmark is performing the same 140 quantum chemical calculations. The performance of commonly used electronic structure methods for the new database is analyzed. This allows investigating the relationship between the performances for atomization and reaction energy benchmarks based on an identical set of molecules. The atomization energy is found to be a weak predictor for the overall usefulness of a method. The performance of density functional approximations in light of the number of empirically optimized parameters used in their design is also discussed.

  12. A dark-line two-dimensional magneto-optical trap of 85Rb atoms with high optical depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanchao; Chen, J F; Liu, Chang; Zhou, Shuyu; Loy, M M T; Wong, G K L; Du, Shengwang

    2012-07-01

    We describe the apparatus of a dark-line two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical trap (MOT) of (85)Rb cold atoms with high optical depth (OD). Different from the conventional configuration, two (of three) pairs of trapping laser beams in our 2D MOT setup do not follow the symmetry axes of the quadrupole magnetic field: they are aligned with 45° angles to the longitudinal axis. Two orthogonal repumping laser beams have a dark-line volume in the longitudinal axis at their cross over. With a total trapping laser power of 40 mW and repumping laser power of 18 mW, we obtain an atomic OD up to 160 in an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) scheme, which corresponds to an atomic-density-length product NL = 2.05 × 10(15) m(-2). In a closed two-state system, the OD can become as large as more than 600. Our 2D MOT configuration allows full optical access of the atoms in its longitudinal direction without interfering with the trapping and repumping laser beams spatially. Moreover, the zero magnetic field along the longitudinal axis allows the cold atoms maintain a long ground-state coherence time without switching off the MOT magnetic field, which makes it possible to operate the MOT at a high repetition rate and a high duty cycle. Our 2D MOT is ideal for atomic-ensemble-based quantum optics applications, such as EIT, entangled photon pair generation, optical quantum memory, and quantum information processing.

  13. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what exten

  14. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what

  15. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what exten

  16. Optical cooling and trapping of highly magnetic atoms: the benefits of a spontaneous spin polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreon, Davide; Sidorenkov, Leonid A.; Bouazza, Chayma; Maineult, Wilfried; Dalibard, Jean; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    From the study of long-range-interacting systems to the simulation of gauge fields, open-shell lanthanide atoms with their large magnetic moment and narrow optical transitions open novel directions in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As for other atomic species, the magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the working horse of experiments but its operation is challenging, due to the large electronic spin of the atoms. Here we present an experimental study of narrow-line dysprosium MOTs. We show that the combination of radiation pressure and gravitational forces leads to a spontaneous polarization of the electronic spin. The spin composition is measured using a Stern–Gerlach separation of spin levels, revealing that the gas becomes almost fully spin-polarized for large laser frequency detunings. In this regime, we reach the optimal operation of the MOT, with samples of typically 3× {10}8 atoms at a temperature of 15 μK. The spin polarization reduces the complexity of the radiative cooling description, which allows for a simple model accounting for our measurements. We also measure the rate of density-dependent atom losses, finding good agreement with a model based on light-induced Van der Waals forces. A minimal two-body loss rate β ∼ 2× {10}-11 cm3 s–1 is reached in the spin-polarized regime. Our results constitute a benchmark for the experimental study of ultracold gases of magnetic lanthanide atoms.

  17. An atomic beam of 6Li — 7Li for high resolution spectroscopy from matrix isolation sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, A. N.; Sacramento, R. L.; Silva, B. A.; Uhlmann, F. O.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the Matrix Isolation Sublimation (MlSu) technique for generating cold lithium atoms for the measurement of the 6Li - 7Li isotope shift in D1 and D2 transitions. The technique is capable of generating cold 6Li and 7Li beams at 4 K with forward velocity of 125 m/s. Using this beam we offer a distinguished source of lithium atoms for transitions measurements, adding a new possibility to make high resolution spectroscopy towards improving the experimental checks of the theory.

  18. High-Frequency Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Entanglement via Atomic Memory Effects in Four-Wave Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-Hua; HU Xiang-Ming; KONG Ling-Feng; ZHANG Xiu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Atomic memory effects occur when the atomic relaxation times are comparable to or much longer than the cavity relaxation times.We show that by using the memory effects,it is possible to obtain high-frequency Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement between a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes fields in a four-wave mixing system.The physical origin is traced to the dynamical Stark splittings of dressed states due to the parametrically amplified fields.This mechanism provides an alternative and efficient way for sideband entanglement.

  19. Sputtering of copper atoms by keV atomic and molecular ions A comparison of experiment with analytical and computer based models

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, D R; Goelich,

    2002-01-01

    Non-resonant multiphoton ionisation combined with quadrupole and time-of-flight analysis has been used to measure energy distributions of sputtered copper atoms. The sputtering of a polycrystalline copper target by 3.6 keV Ar sup + , N sup + and CF sub 2 sup + and 1.8 keV N sup + and CF sub 2 sup + ion bombardment at 45 deg. has been investigated. The linear collision model in the isotropic limit fails to describe the high energy tail of the energy distributions. However the TRIM.SP computer simulation has been shown to provide a good description. The results indicate that an accurate description of sputtering by low energy, molecular ions requires the use of computer simulation rather than analytical approaches. This is particularly important when considering plasma-surface interactions in plasma etching and deposition systems.

  20. Performance characteristics of a Bioassay method for plutonium using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linauskas, S.H.; Elliot, N.L.; Paterson, L.M.; Totland, M.M

    2003-01-01

    Plutonium-in-urine analysis by radiochemical isolation of Pu followed by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) is capable of high sensitivity and precision measurements {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu. Bias and precision estimates for the TIMS bioassay program at Chalk River Laboratories easily met the ANSI N13.30 performance criteria standards with {sup 239}Pu results of 1.5% and 3.0%, respectively. Analytical blanks derived from water, artificial urine and true urine samples did not produce any statistically different results. During a four-year period of development and implementation of {sup 239}Pu measurements by TIMS, average sample blank values were reduced from 3.9 fg (9.0 {mu}Bq) to 0.57 fg (1.3 {mu}Bq). This reduction was achieved through rigorous application of clean-room handling techniques throughout sample processing. Blank data were found to follow a Iognormal distribution, and current detection limit parameters for L{sub c} and L{sub d} at the 95% significance levels are 0.85 fg {sup 239}Pu (2.0 {mu}Bq) and 1.3 fg {sup 239}Pu (3.0 {mu}Bq), respectively. Detection limits in this range are expected to be sufficient to identify intakes of Pu/Am mixtures at levels that are around one-twentieth of an ALl or better under routine monitoring situations for ICRP Type S and Type M inhalation solubility classes. (author)

  1. Chemical analyses of micrometre-sized solids by a miniature laser ablation/ionisation mass spectrometer (LMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulej, Marek; Wiesendanger, Reto; Neuland, Maike; Meyer, Stefan; Wurz, Peter; Neubeck, Anna; Ivarsson, Magnus; Riedo, Valentine; Moreno-Garcia, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Knopp, Gregor

    2017-04-01

    Investigation of elemental and isotope compositions of planetary solids with high spatial resolution are of considerable interest to current space research. Planetary materials are typically highly heterogenous and such studies can deliver detailed chemical information of individual sample components with the sizes down to a few micrometres. The results of such investigations can yield mineralogical surface context including mineralogy of individual grains or the elemental composition of of other objects embedded in the sample surface such as micro-sized fossils. The identification of bio-relevant material can follow by the detection of bio-relevant elements and their isotope fractionation effects [1, 2]. For chemical analysis of heterogenous solid surfaces we have combined a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer (LMS) (mass resolution (m/Dm) 400-600; dynamic range 105-108) with in situ microscope-camera system (spatial resolution ˜2um, depth 10 um). The microscope helps to find the micrometre-sized solids across the surface sample for the direct mass spectrometric analysis by the LMS instrument. The LMS instrument combines an fs-laser ion source and a miniature reflectron-type time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometric analysis of the selected on the sample surface objects followed after ablation, atomisation and ionisation of the sample by a focussed laser radiation (775 nm, 180 fs, 1 kHz; the spot size of ˜20 um) [4, 5, 6]. Mass spectra of almost all elements (isotopes) present in the investigated location are measured instantaneously. A number of heterogenous rock samples containing micrometre-sized fossils and mineralogical grains were investigated with high selectivity and sensitivity. Chemical analyses of filamentous structures observed in carbonate veins (in harzburgite) and amygdales in pillow basalt lava can be well characterised chemically yielding elemental and isotope composition of these objects [7, 8]. The investigation can be

  2. Measurement of total angular momentum values of high-lying even-parity atomic states of samarium by spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Pulhani; M L Shah; G P Gupta; B M Suri

    2010-12-01

    Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique was used to uniquely assign total angular momentum () values to high-lying even-parity energy levels of atomic samarium. Unique value assignment was done for seven energy levels in the energy region 34,800–36,200 cm-1 , recently observed and reported in the literature.

  3. Voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed atom probe tomography of a multiphase high-strength low-carbon steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Michael D; Seidman, David N

    2011-12-01

    The differences in artifacts associated with voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed (wavelength = 532 or 355 nm) atom-probe tomographic (APT) analyses of nanoscale precipitation in a high-strength low-carbon steel are assessed using a local-electrode atom-probe tomograph. It is found that the interfacial width of nanoscale Cu precipitates increases with increasing specimen apex temperatures induced by higher laser pulse energies (0.6-2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm). This effect is probably due to surface diffusion of Cu atoms. Increasing the specimen apex temperature by using pulse energies up to 2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm is also found to increase the severity of the local magnification effect for nanoscale M2C metal carbide precipitates, which is indicated by a decrease of the local atomic density inside the carbides from 68 ± 6 nm(-3) (voltage pulsing) to as small as 3.5 ± 0.8 nm(-3). Methods are proposed to solve these problems based on comparisons with the results obtained from voltage-pulsed APT experiments. Essentially, application of the Cu precipitate compositions and local atomic density of M2C metal carbide precipitates measured by voltage-pulsed APT to 532 or 355 nm wavelength laser-pulsed data permits correct quantification of precipitation.

  4. Comparative analysis of deuterium ions implanted and deuterium atoms saturated at high pressure in pure pd and Pd diluted alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Kulikauskas, V. S.; Wiśniewski, R.; Wilczynska, T.; Kitowski, K.

    2012-01-01

    Pd and its diluted alloys (Pd-Ag, Pd-Pt, Pd-Ru, Pd-Rh) were implanted by 25 keV deuterium ions at a fluence interval of (1.2-2.3) × 1022 m-2. The same property alloys were saturated by deuterium atoms using high pressure chamber during long period with temperature stabilization and electrical resistance measurement of standard Pd wire. The post-treatment depth distributions of deuterium and accompanied hydrogen atoms were measured immediately after implantation (ten days) and after definite time period (three months) after saturation with the usage of elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). After two months, the measurements were repeated. The comparison of obtained results in both series of studies allowed one to make an important observation of a relative stability of deuterium and hydrogen atoms in pure Pd and its diluted alloys.

  5. One- and two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of alkali-metal atoms on helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifrader, Alexandra; Allard, Olivier; Auböck, Gerald; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E; Huber, Robert; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2010-10-28

    Alkali-metal atoms captured on the surface of superfluid helium droplets are excited to high energies (≈3 eV) by means of pulsed lasers, and their laser-induced-fluorescence spectra are recorded. We report on the one-photon excitation of the (n+1)p←ns transition of K, Rb, and Cs (n=4, 5, and 6, respectively) and on the two-photon one-color excitation of the 5d←5s transition of Rb. Gated-photon-counting measurements are consistent with the relaxation rates of the bare atoms, hence consistent with the reasonable expectation that atoms quickly desorb from the droplet and droplet-induced relaxation need not be invoked.

  6. The spatial damping of magnetohydrodynamic waves in a flowing partially ionised prominence plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Carbonell, M; Oliver, R; Ballester, J L

    2010-01-01

    Solar prominences are partially ionised plasmas displaying flows and oscillations. These oscillations show time and spatial damping and, commonly, have been explained in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. We study the spatial damping of linear non-adiabatic MHD waves in a flowing partially ionised plasma, having prominence-like physical properties. We consider single fluid equations for a partially ionised hydrogen plasma including in the energy equation optically thin radiation, thermal conduction by electrons and neutrals, and heating. Keeping the frequency real and fixed, we have solved the obtained dispersion relations for the complex wavenumber, k, and have analysed the behaviour of the damping length, wavelength and the ratio of the damping length to the wavelength, versus period, for Alfven, fast, slow and thermal waves.

  7. High Current Density Effect on In-situ Atomic Migration Characteristics of a BiTe Thin Film System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seunghyun; Park, Yong-Jin; Joo, Young-Chang; Park, Young-Bae

    2013-10-01

    Understanding fundamental atomic migration characteristics of multicomponent chalcogenide materials such as GeSbTe (GST) and BiTe are important in order to investigate the failure mechanism related to the electrical reliability of thermoelectric materials under high current density. In this work, high current density effect on the in-situ atomic migration characteristics of the BiTe thermoelectric thin films was conducted by real-time observation inside an scanning electron microscope chamber. Under the high current density conditions ranging from 0.83×106 to 1.0×106 A/cm2 at 100 °C, Te migrated toward the cathode, and Bi migrated toward the anode because the electrostatic force was dominant by very high Joule heating effect.

  8. The ionisation energy of cyclopentadienone: a photoelectron-photoion coincidence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, Thomas K.; Hemberger, Patrick; Troy, Tyler P.; Ahmed, Musahid; Stanton, John F.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2015-08-01

    Imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence (iPEPICO) spectra of cyclopentadienone (C5H4=O and C5D4=O) have been measured at the Swiss Light Source Synchrotron (Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland) at the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Beamline. Complementary to the photoelectron spectra, photoionisation efficiency curves were measured with tunable VUV radiation at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline at the Advanced Light Source Synchrotron (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA). For both experiments, molecular beams diluted in argon and helium were generated from the vacuum flash pyrolysis of o-phenylene sulphite in a resistively heated microtubular SiC flow reactor. The Franck-Condon profiles and ionisation energies were calculated at the CCSD(T) level of theory, and are in excellent agreement with the observed iPEPICO spectra. The ionisation energies of both cyclopentadienone-d0, IE(C5H4=O), and cyclopentadienone-d4, IE(C5D4=O), were observed to be the same: 9.41 ± 0.01 eV. The mass-selected threshold photoelectron spectrum (ms-TPES) of cyclopentadienone reveals that the C=C stretch in the ground state of the cation is excited upon ionisation, supporting computational evidence that the ground state of the cation is ? 2A2, and is in agreement with previous studies. However, the previously reported ionisation potential has been improved considerably in this work. In addition, since o-benzoquinone (o-O=C6H4=O and o-O=C6D4=O) is also produced in this process, its ms-TPES has been recorded. From the iPEPICO and photoionisation efficiency spectra, we infer an adiabatic ionisation energy of IE(o-O=C6H4=O) = 9.3 ± 0.1 eV, but the rather structureless spectrum indicates a strong change in geometry upon ionisation making this value less reliable.

  9. High performance liquid chromatography--atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of arsenic species in beer samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo Coelho, N.M.; Parrilla, Carmen; Cervera, M.L.; Pastor, A.; Guardia, M. de la

    2003-04-10

    A method has been developed for the direct determination of As(III), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and As(V) in beers by hydride generation--atomic fluorescence spectrometry after separation of arsenic species by high performance liquid chromatography. Compounds were separated by anion-exchange chromatography with isocratic elution using KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}/K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} as mobile phase with elution times of 1.67, 2.08, 6.52 and 10.72 min for As(III), DMA, MMA and As(V), respectively. Parameters affecting the hydride generation of all arsenic species were studied and the best conditions were established as a reaction coil of 150 cm, for a sample injected volume of 100 {mu}l, a 4.0% (m/v) solution of sodium tetrahydroborate and 2.0 mol l{sup -1} hydrochloric acid with flow rates of 2.7 and 1.7 ml min{sup -1}, respectively and a flow rate of 500 ml min{sup -1} for the argon carrier gas. Under the best experimental conditions, the detection limit was found to be 0.12, 0.20, 0.27 and 0.39 {mu}g l{sup -1} for As(III), DMA, MMA and As(V), respectively. The relative standard deviation for eight independent determinations varied from 3.9 till 8.9% for species considered at a concentration level of 10.0 {mu}g l{sup -1}. Recovery and comparative studies evidenced that the method is suitable for the accurate determination of arsenic species in water and beer samples.

  10. Coupled-channel calculations of K-shell ionisation in asymmetric collision systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehler, G.; Greiner, W.; Soff, G.

    1987-06-28

    Theoretical results on K-shell ionisation for a variety of asymmetric collision systems are reported. The calculated ionisation rates are compared with experimental data. The coupled-channel formalism underlying these calculations is presented. It is based on a set of relativistic target centred states, taking a screened potential of Dirac-Fock-Slater type into account. The effects of different matrix elements are discussed, e.g. continuum-continuum couplings. The binding effect is inherently contained in the present approach and described in a dynamical way.

  11. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Terence T W; Ho, Kenneth K Y; Tang, Matthew Y H; Robles, Joseph D F; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C S; Tang, Anson H L; Lam, Edmund Y; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Chan, Godfrey C F; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K

    2013-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity- a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry- permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individu...

  12. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terence T. W.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Tang, Matthew Y. H.; Robles, Joseph D. F.; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity – a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry – permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individual cells simultaneously with a multitude of parameters obtained in the standard assay. PMID:24413677

  13. Non-dissociative and dissociative ionisation of H sub 2 by 50-2000 keV antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, L.H.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moeller, S.P.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Tang-Petersen, S.; Uggerhoej, E. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Physics); Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Morenzoni, E. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland))

    1990-08-14

    A beam of antiprotons with energies between 50 keV and 2 MeV has been used for measurements of non-dissociative ionisation and dissociative ionisation cross sections of H{sub 2}. The results are compared with cross sections for equivelocity protons and electrons, and the role of interference effects in two-electron processes is discussed. (author).

  14. High-Multipole Excitations of Hydrogen-Like Atoms by Twisted Photons near Phase Singularity

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasev, Andrei; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-01-01

    We calculate transition amplitudes and cross sections for excitation of hydrogen-like atoms by the twisted photon states, or photon states with angular momentum projection on the direction of propagation exceeding $\\hbar$. If the target atom is located at distances of the order of atomic size near the phase singularity in the vortex center, the transitions rates into the states with orbital angular momentum $l_f>1$ become comparable with the rates for electric dipole transitions. It is shown that when the transition rates are normalized to the local photon flux, the resulting cross sections for $l_f>1$ are singular near the optical vortex center. Relation to the "quantum core" concept introduced by Berry and Dennis is discussed.

  15. Variations of Positive and Negative Dispersions in Both Highly and Weakly Absorptive Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Salloum, Tony; Snell, Scott; Davis, Jon; Narducci, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Positive and negative dispersive media are essential in subluminal, superluminal and negative group velocity pulse propagation applications. Three-level atomic media at resonance, especially the Lambda configuration, are positively dispersive and transparent. In contrast, two-level atomic systems are negatively dispersive and opaque. In this work we study higher level atomic systems comprised of three fields coupled to three levels (double lambda) or four levels (N-Scheme). We explore the systems of interest for critical features such as negative dispersion and transparency, a combination that is needed in numerous applications, e.g. optical gyroscopes. We solve the time dependent equations perturbatively and compare them to well established behavior in three-level systems. Some of the results are analyzed in terms of resonances which control the different features of the observed dispersive and absorptive behaviors.

  16. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in high-power gap breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FILUK,A.B.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; NASH,THOMAS J.; NOACK,DONALD D.; MARON,Y.

    2000-03-20

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently-discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. The authors describe a newly-developed diagnostic tool that provides the first direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1 mm spatial resolution in the 10 mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO{sub 2} gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50--100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption is seen, setting upper limits of 0.12--1.5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} for ground state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of 0.16--1.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization throughout the gap as a breakdown mechanism. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  17. Measurement of the electronic density of ionised media by hyper frequency methods; Mesure de la densite electronique des milieux ionises par des methodes hyperfrequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consoli, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    Within the limits of the I.N.S.T.N. courses on plasmas, this analytical study summarizes the articles quoted in the references on hyper-frequency techniques for the measurement of electronic density of an ionised gas. It is neither exhaustive nor complete and further details may be obtained by referring to the works mentioned. The first part, devoted to the theoretical side, concert the propagation of electromagnetic waves ionised media and the excitation of stationary raves in electromagnetic cavities. The second part deals with the measurement techniques themselves. It includes those techniques which hare become classic, and also more recent ones being developed in various laboratories and in the Service of Applied Physics at Saclay. (author) [French] Dans le cadre des cours sur les plasmas a l'l.N.S.T. cette etude d'analyse resume les articles cites en bibliographie sur les techniques hyperfrequences pour la mesure de la densite electronique d'un gas ionise. Elle n'est ni exhaustive, ni complete. Pour plus de details on voudra bien se rapporter aux travaux mentionnes. La premiere partie consacree a des rappels theoriques, concerne la propagation des ondes electromagnetiques dans les milieux ionises et sur l'excitation d'ondes stationnaires dans les cavites electromagnetiques. La seconde se rapporte aux techniques de mesures proprement dites. On a fait figurer dans cette partie des techniques devenues classiques et celles plus recentes en cours d'etudes dans divers laboratoires et au Service de Physique Appliquee a SACLAY. (auteur)

  18. Feasibility guidelines for kaonic atom experiments with ultra-high-resolution X-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Okada, S.

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies of strong-interaction effects in kaonic atoms suggest that analysing so-called 'lower' and 'upper' levels in the same atom could separate one-nucleon absorption from multinucleon processes. The present work examines the feasibility of direct measurements of upper level widths in addition to lower level widths in future experiments, using superconducting microcalorimeter detectors. About ten elements are identified as possible candidates for such experiments, all of medium-weight and heavy nuclei. New experiments focused on achieving good accuracy for widths of such pairs of levels could contribute significantly to our knowledge of the K--nucleon interaction in the nuclear medium.

  19. Mass spectrometry for high-throughput metabolomics analysis of urine

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelrazig, Salah M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Direct electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (direct ESI-MS), by omitting the chromatographic step, has great potential for application as a high-throughput approach for untargeted urine metabolomics analysis compared to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The rapid development and technical innovations revealed in the field of ambient ionisation MS such as nanoelectrospray ionisation (nanoESI) chip-based infusion and liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA...

  20. High-magnetic-field-assisted scattering of electrons with atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Ajoy [Laban Hrad Vidyapith, AD-369, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2007-04-28

    We have investigated quantum mechanically the scattering of electrons off atomic hydrogen in a strong magnetic field. Elastic, inelastic, backward and total scattering cross sections are reported. Near-resonance behaviour of the system is analysed. Results are presented after evaluating and summing all-order Born series under suitable physical conditions.

  1. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  2. ELECTRON-CAPTURE IN HIGHLY-CHARGED ION-ATOM COLLISIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORGENSTERN, R

    1993-01-01

    An attempt is made to identify the most important mechanisms responsible for the rearrangement of electrons during collisions between multiply charged ions and atoms at keV energies. It is discussed to which extent the influence of binding energy, angular momentum of heavy particles and electrons, a

  3. High atomic diffusivity during pulsed laser irradiation of TiON quasi-amorphous films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodorescu, V.S., E-mail: teoval@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Maraloiu, A.V.; Negrea, R.F.; Ghica, D. [National Institute of Materials Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Scarisoreanu, N.D.; Dinescu, M. [National Institute of Lasers, Plasma and Radiation, 409 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Gartner, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, I.G. Murgulescu, Romanian Academy, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Blanchin, M.-G. [ILM – Université Claude Bernard Lyon1, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • The evidence of the structure of the TiON quasi-amorphous structure by HRTEM. • The evidence of the laser induced phase transition in this film structure. • Fast atomic diffusion in the amorphous film during the laser pulse action. - Abstract: Quasi-amorphous titanium oxynitride (TiON) films were obtained by annealing sol–gel anatase TiO{sub 2} films in NH{sub 3} atmosphere at 600 °C. These films were irradiated with 50 laser pulses using the fourth harmonic (266 nm) radiation of the Nd-YAG laser, with an average fluence of 20 mJ/cm{sup 2}. HRTEM observations of the pulsed laser irradiated films evidenced the rutile TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites formation. The rutile structure was not present either in the TiON films before the laser irradiation, or in the initial sol–gel anatase TiO{sub 2} films. During the laser irradiation, the film structure remains in the solid state phase, as it results from the temperature estimation and microscopic observations. For the rutile nanocrystals formation, the atomic diffusion length of the oxygen and titanium atoms should be in the nanometric range during the laser pulse action, which implies a diffusivity close to the values observed in the liquid phase. We consider that the rutile phase formation is a proof of the fast atomic diffusion in the solid amorphous matrix, during the laser irradiation.

  4. ELECTRON-CAPTURE IN HIGHLY-CHARGED ION-ATOM COLLISIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORGENSTERN, R

    1993-01-01

    An attempt is made to identify the most important mechanisms responsible for the rearrangement of electrons during collisions between multiply charged ions and atoms at keV energies. It is discussed to which extent the influence of binding energy, angular momentum of heavy particles and electrons,

  5. Characterization and modeling of atomic layer deposited high-density trench capacitors in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matters-Kammerer, M.K.; Jinesh, K.B.; Rijks, T.G.S.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Klootwijk, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed electrical analysis of multiple layer trench capacitors fabricated in silicon with atomic-layer-deposited Al 2O 3 and TiN is presented. It is shown that in situ ozone annealing of the Al 2O 3 layers prior to the TiN electrode deposition significantly improves the electric properties of th

  6. Optical cooling and trapping highly magnetic atoms: The benefits of a spontaneous spin polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Dreon, Davide; Bouazza, Chayma; Maineult, Wilfried; Dalibard, Jean; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    From the study of long-range-interacting systems to the simulation of gauge fields, open-shell Lanthanide atoms with their large magnetic moment and narrow optical transitions open novel directions in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As for other atomic species, the magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the working horse of experiments but its operation is challenging, due to the large electronic spin of the atoms. Here we present an experimental study of narrow-line Dysprosium MOTs. We show that the combination of radiation pressure and gravitational forces leads to a spontaneous polarization of the electronic spin. The spin composition is measured using a Stern-Gerlach separation of spin levels, revealing that the gas becomes almost fully spin-polarized for large laser frequency detunings. In this regime, we reach the optimal operation of the MOT, with samples of typically $3\\times 10^8$ atoms at a temperature of 20$\\,\\mu$K. The spin polarization reduces the complexity of the radiative cooling description, whi...

  7. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Linearization of the calibration curves within a broad concentration range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katskov, Dmitri, E-mail: katskovda@tut.ac.za [Tshwane University of Technology, Chemistry Department, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Hlongwane, Miranda [Tshwane University of Technology, Chemistry Department, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Heitmann, Uwe [German Aerospace Center, Rose-Luxemburg Str. 2, 10178 Berlin (Germany); Florek, Stefan [ISAS-Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9,12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The calculation algorithm suggested provides linearization of the calibration curves in high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The algorithm is based on the modification of the function wavelength-integrated absorbance vs. concentration of analyte vapor in the absorption volume. According to the suggested approach, the absorption line is represented by a triangle for low and trapezium for high analyte vapor concentration in the absorption volume. The respective semi-empirical formulas include two linearization parameters, which depend on properties of the absorption line and characteristics of the atomizer and spectrometer. The parameters can be approximately evaluated from the theory and determined in practice from the original broad-range calibration curve. The parameters were found and the proposed calculation algorithm verified in the experiments on direct determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb in the solutions within a concentration ranges from 0.15 to 625 {mu}g{center_dot}L{sup -1} using tube, platform tube and filter furnace atomizers. The use of various atomizers, lines, elements and atomization temperatures made possible the simulation of various practical analytical conditions. It was found that the algorithm and optimal linearization parameters made it possible to obtain for each line and atomizer linear approximations of the calibration curves within 3-4 orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients close to 0.999. The algorithm makes possible to employ a single line for the direct element determination over a broad concentration range. The sources of errors and the possibility of a priori theoretical evaluation of the linearization parameters are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New calculation algorithm for HR-CS ET AAS measurements was proposed and applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The suggested formulas include two parameters to be determined experimentally. Black

  8. Thermodynamics and kinetic behaviors of thickness-dependent crystallization in high-k thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Xianglong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan, E-mail: madayan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Xu, Kewei [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049, People' s Republic of China and Department of Physics and Opt-electronic Engineering, Xi' an University of Arts and Science, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition is adopted to prepare HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} high-k thin films. The HfO{sub 2} thin films are amorphous at the initial growth stage, but become crystallized when the film thickness (h) exceeds a critical value (h{sub critical}{sup *}). This phase transition from amorphous to crystalline is enhanced at higher temperatures and is discussed, taking into account the effect of kinetic energy. At lower temperatures, the amorphous state can be maintained even when h>h{sub critical}{sup *} owing to the small number of activated atoms. However, the number of activated atoms increases with the temperature, allowing crystallization to occur even in films with smaller thickness. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films, on the other hand, maintain their amorphous state independent of the film thickness and temperature owing to the limited number of activated atoms. A thermodynamic model is proposed to describe the thickness-dependent phase transition.

  9. Adsorption and Vibration of O Atoms on Fe Low-index and Fe (211) High-index Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The 5-parameter Morse potential(5-MP) of the interaction between oxygen atoms and iron surfaces was constructed. The adsorption and diffusion of O atoms on Fe low-index and Fe(211 ) high-index surfaces were investigated by using 5-MP. All the critical characteristics of the system, such as adsorption site, adsorption geometry, binding energy, and eigenvalues for vibration, were calculated. The calculation results show that O atoms are located at the fourfold hollow site of the Fe(100) surface with an eigenvibration at 437 cm-1. These results are in good agreement with the experimental and theoretical results obtained previously. With regard to the adsorption site of O-Fe(110) system, the authors of this study assume that the preferential adsorption state is the H3 site and not the LB site, which is not in agreement with the experimental inferences obtained earlier. However, on the Fe( 111 ) and Fe(211 ) surfaces,O atoms predominantly occupy the quasi-3-fold site.

  10. A High-resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser Photoionization and Photoelectron Study of the Co Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang; Wang, Hailing; Luo, Zhihong; Shi, Xiaoyu; Chang, Yih-Chung; Ng, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the vacuum ultraviolet-photoionization efficiency (VUV-PIE) spectrum of Co in the energy range of 63,500-67,000 cm-1, which covers the photoionization transitions of Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F4), Co(3d74s2 4F7/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F3), Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F3), Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d8 3F2), and Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) \\to Co+(3d74s1 5F5). We have also recorded the pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectrum of Co in the same energy range, allowing accurate determinations of ionization energies (IEs) for the photoionization transitions from the Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) ground neutral state to the Co+(3F J ) (J = 4 and 3) and Co+(5F5) ionic states, as well as from the Co(3d74s2 4F7/2) excited neural state to the Co+(3d8 3F3) ionic state. The high-resolution nature of the VUV laser used has allowed the observation of many well-resolved autoionizing resonances in the VUV-PIE spectrum, among which an autoionizing Rydberg series, 3d74s1(5F5)np (n = 19-38), converging to the Co+(3d74s1 5F5) ionic state from the Co(3d74s2 4F9/2) ground neutral state is identified. The fact that no discernible step-like structures are present at these ionization thresholds in the VUV-PIE spectrum indicates that direct photoionization of Co is minor compared to autoionization in this energy range. The IE values, the autoionizing Rydberg series, and the photoionization cross sections obtained in this experiment are valuable for understanding the VUV opacity and abundance measurement of the Co atom in stars and solar atmospheres, as well as for benchmarking the theoretical results calculated in the Opacity Project and the IRON Project, and thus are of relevance to astrophysics.

  11. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si

  12. For discussion: obtaining consent for ionising radiation: has the time come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Richard M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to promote debate on the issues surrounding the provision of information to, and the obtaining of valid consent from patients exposed to ionising radiation (IR) from diagnostic and interventional imaging procedures. This is especially pertinent in view of recent interest in the risks of IR expressed in the medical and lay press.

  13. Calculated ionisation potentials to determine the oxidation of vanillin precursors by lignin peroxidase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Hartmans, S.; Swarts, H.J.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the biocatalytic production of vanillin, this research focused on the lignin peroxidase (LiP) catalysed oxidation of naturally occurring phenolic derivatives: O-methyl ethers, O-acetyl esters, and O-glucosyl ethers. The ionisation potential (IP) of a series of model compounds was

  14. Calculated ionisation potentials to determine the oxidation of vanillin precursors by lignin peroxidase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Have, R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Hartmans, S.; Swarts, H.J.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the biocatalytic production of vanillin, this research focused on the lignin peroxidase (LiP) catalysed oxidation of naturally occurring phenolic derivatives: O-methyl ethers, O-acetyl esters, and O-glucosyl ethers. The ionisation potential (IP) of a series of model compounds was calculat

  15. Bioaerosol detection by aerosol TOF-mass spectrometry: Application of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuijckhuijse, A.L. van; Stowers, M.A.; Kientz, Ch.E.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.

    2000-01-01

    In previous publications the use of an aerosol time of flight mass spectrometer was reported for the on-line measurements of aerosols (Weiss 1997, Kievit 1995). The apparatus is capable of measuring the size as well as the chemical composition, by the use of Laser Desorption/Ionisation (LDI), of an

  16. No evidence for large-scale outflows in the extended ionised halo of ULIRG Mrk273

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, R A W; Tadhunter, C N; Rose, M; Cabrera-Lavers, A; Spoon, H; Munoz-Tunon, C

    2016-01-01

    We present deep new GTC/OSIRIS narrow-band images and optical WHT/ISIS long-slit spectroscopy of the merging system Mrk273 that show a spectacular extended halo of warm ionised gas out to a radius of $\\sim45$ kpc from the system nucleus. Outside of the immediate nuclear regions (r > 6 kpc), there is no evidence for kinematic disturbance in the ionised gas: in the extended regions covered by our spectroscopic slits the emission lines are relatively narrow (FWHM $\\lesssim$ 350 km$\\rm s^{-1}$) and velocity shifts small (|$\\Delta$V| $\\lesssim{} $250 km$\\rm s^{-1}$). This is despite the presence of powerful near-nuclear outflows (FWHM > 1000 km$\\rm s^{-1}$; |$\\Delta$V| > 400 km$\\rm s^{-1}$; r < 6 kpc). Diagnostic ratio plots are fully consistent with Seyfert 2 photo-ionisation to the NE of the nuclear region, however to the SW the plots are more consistent with low-velocity radiative shock models. The kinematics of the ionised gas, combined with the fact that the main structures are aligned with low-surface-bri...

  17. A miniaturized, high frequency mechanical scanner for high speed atomic force microscope using suspension on dynamically determined points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfst, R.W.; Dekker, A.; Witvoet, G.; Crowcombe, W.E.; Lange, T.J. de; Sadeghian Marnani, H.

    2015-01-01

    One of the major limitations in the speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) is the bandwidth of the mechanical scanning stage, especially in the vertical (z) direction. According to the design principles of “light and stiff” and “static determinacy,” the bandwidth of the mechanical scanner is

  18. A miniaturized, high frequency mechanical scanner for high speed atomic force microscope using suspension on dynamically determined points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfst, R.W.; Dekker, A.; Witvoet, G.; Crowcombe, W.E.; Lange, T.J. de; Sadeghian Marnani, H.

    2015-01-01

    One of the major limitations in the speed of the atomic force microscope (AFM) is the bandwidth of the mechanical scanning stage, especially in the vertical (z) direction. According to the design principles of “light and stiff” and “static determinacy,” the bandwidth of the mechanical scanner is lim

  19. High-Fidelity Simulations of Electrically-Charged Atomizing Diesel-Type Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Benoit; Owkes, Mark; van Poppel, Bret

    2015-11-01

    Combustion of liquid fuels accounts for over a third of the energy usage today. Improving efficiency of combustion systems is critical to meet the energy needs while limiting environmental impacts. Additionally, a shift away from traditional fossil fuels to bio-derived alternatives requires fuel injection systems that can atomize fuels with a wide range of properties. In this work, the potential benefits of electrically-charged atomization is investigated using numerical simulations. Particularly, the electrostatic forces on the hydrodynamic jet are quantified and the impact of the forces is analyzed by comparing simulations of Diesel-type jets at realistic flow conditions. The simulations are performed using a state-of-the-art numerical framework that globally conserves mass, momentum, and the electric charge density even at the gas-liquid interface where discontinuities exist.

  20. A highly stable atomic vector magnetometer based on free spin precession

    CERN Document Server

    Afach, S; Bison, G; Bodek, K; Chowdhuri, Z; Grujic, Z D; Hayen, L; Helaine, V; Kasprzak, M; Kirch, K; Knowles, P; Koch, H -C; Komposch, S; Kozela, A; Krempel, J; Lauss, B; Lefort, T; Lemiere, Y; Mtchedlishvili, A; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Piegsa, F M; Prashanth, P N; Quemener, G; Rawlik, M; Ries, D; Roccia, S; Rozpedzik, D; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Severjins, N; Weis, A; Wursten, E; Wyszynski, G; Zejma, J; Zsigmond, G

    2015-01-01

    We present a magnetometer based on optically pumped Cs atoms that measures the magnitude and direction of a 1 $\\mu$T magnetic field. Multiple circularly polarized laser beams were used to probe the free spin precession of the Cs atoms. The design was optimized for long-time stability and achieves a scalar resolution better than 300 fT for integration times ranging from 80 ms to 1000 s. The best scalar resolution of less than 80 fT was reached with integration times of 1.6 to 6 s. We were able to measure the magnetic field direction with a resolution better than 10 $\\mu$rad for integration times from 10 s up to 2000 s.