WorldWideScience

Sample records for higher compressive moduli

  1. Higher-Derivative Supergravity and Moduli Stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciupke, David; Westphal, Alexander; Louis, Jan; Hamburg Univ.

    2015-05-01

    We review the ghost-free four-derivative terms for chiral superfields in N=1 supersymmetry and supergravity. These terms induce cubic polynomial equations of motion for the chiral auxiliary fields and correct the scalar potential. We discuss the different solutions and argue that only one of them is consistent with the principles of effective field theory. Special attention is paid to the corrections along flat directions which can be stabilized or destabilized by the higher-derivative terms. We then compute these higher-derivative terms explicitly for the type IIB string compactified on a Calabi-Yau orientifold with fluxes via Kaluza-Klein reducing the (α') 3 R 4 corrections in ten dimensions for the respective N=1 Kaehler moduli sector. We prove that together with flux and the known (α') 3 -corrections the higher-derivative term stabilizes all Calabi-Yau manifolds with positive Euler number, provided the sign of the new correction is negative.

  2. Moduli stabilization in higher dimensional brane models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flachi, Antonino; Pujolas, Oriol; Garriga, Jaume; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2003-01-01

    We consider a class of warped higher dimensional brane models with topology M x Σ x S 1 /Z 2 , where Σ is a D2 dimensional manifold. Two branes of co-dimension one are embedded in such a bulk space-time and sit at the orbifold fixed points. We concentrate on the case where an exponential warp factor (depending on the distance along the orbifold) accompanies the Minkowski M and the internal space Σ line elements. We evaluate the moduli effective potential induced by bulk scalar fields in these models, and we show that generically this can stabilize the size of the extra dimensions. As an application, we consider a scenario where supersymmetry is broken not far below the cutoff scale, and the hierarchy between the electroweak and the effective Planck scales is generated by a combination of redshift and large volume effects. The latter is efficient due to the shrinking of Σ at the negative tension brane, where matter is placed. In this case, we find that the effective potential can stabilize the size of the extra dimensions (and the hierarchy) without fine tuning, provided that the internal space Σ is flat. (author)

  3. Moduli stabilization in higher dimensional brane models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flachi, Antonino; Pujolas, Oriol [IFAE, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: pujolas@ifae.es; Garriga, Jaume [IFAE, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Fisica Fonamental and C.E.R. en Astrofisica, Fisica de Particules i Cosmologia Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Tanaka, Takahiro [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford MA 02155 (United States); Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2003-08-01

    We consider a class of warped higher dimensional brane models with topology M x {sigma} x S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2}, where {sigma} is a D2 dimensional manifold. Two branes of co-dimension one are embedded in such a bulk space-time and sit at the orbifold fixed points. We concentrate on the case where an exponential warp factor (depending on the distance along the orbifold) accompanies the Minkowski M and the internal space {sigma} line elements. We evaluate the moduli effective potential induced by bulk scalar fields in these models, and we show that generically this can stabilize the size of the extra dimensions. As an application, we consider a scenario where supersymmetry is broken not far below the cutoff scale, and the hierarchy between the electroweak and the effective Planck scales is generated by a combination of redshift and large volume effects. The latter is efficient due to the shrinking of {sigma} at the negative tension brane, where matter is placed. In this case, we find that the effective potential can stabilize the size of the extra dimensions (and the hierarchy) without fine tuning, provided that the internal space {sigma} is flat. (author)

  4. Research on differences and correlation between tensile, compression and flexural moduli of cement stabilized macadam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to reveal the differences and conversion relations between the tensile, compressive and flexural moduli of cement stabilized macadam, in this paper, we develop a new test method for measuring three moduli simultaneously. By using the materials testing system, we test three moduli of the cement stabilized macadam under different loading rates, propose a flexural modulus calculation formula which considers the shearing effect, reveal the change rules of the tensile, compression and flexural moduli with the loading rate and establish the conversion relationships between the three moduli. The results indicate that: three moduli become larger with the increase of the loading rate, showing a power function pattern; with the shear effect considered, the flexural modulus is increased by 47% approximately over that in the current test method; the tensile and compression moduli of cement stabilized macadam are significantly different. Therefore, if only the compression modulus is used as the structural design parameter of asphalt pavement, there will be a great deviation in the analysis of the load response. In order to achieve scientific design and calculation, the appropriate design parameters should be chosen based on the actual stress state at each point inside the pavement structure.

  5. A novel method for fabrication of biodegradable scaffolds with high compression moduli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeGroot, JH; Kuijper, HW; Pennings, AJ

    1997-01-01

    It has been previously shown that, when used for meniscal reconstruction, porous copoly(L-lactide/epsilon-caprolactone) implants enhanced healing of meniscal lesions owing to their excellent adhesive properties. However, it appeared that the materials had an insufficient compression modulus to

  6. Dynamic elastic moduli of rocks under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, R N [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-01

    Elastic moduli are determined as a function of confining pressure to 10 kb on rocks in which Plowshare shots are to be fired. Numerical simulation codes require accurate information on the mechanical response of the rock medium to various stress levels in order to predict cavity dimensions. The theoretical treatment of small strains in an elastic medium relates the propagation velocity of compressional and shear waves to the elastic moduli. Velocity measurements can provide, as unique code input data, the rigidity modulus, Poisson' ratio and the shear wave velocity, as well as providing checks on independent determinations of the other moduli. Velocities are determined using pulsed electro-mechanical transducers and measuring the time-of-flight in the rock specimen. A resonant frequency of 1 MHz is used to insure that the wavelength exceeds the average grain dimension and is subject to bulk rock properties. Data obtained on a variety of rock types are presented and analyzed. These data are discussed in terms of their relationship to moduli measured by static methods as well as the effect of anisotropy, porosity, and fractures. In general, fractured rocks with incipient cracks show large increases in velocity and moduli in the first 1 to 2 kb of compression as a result of the closing of these voids. After this, the velocities increase much more slowly. Dynamic moduli for these rocks are often 10% higher than corresponding static moduli at low pressure, but this difference decreases as the voids are closed until the moduli agree within experimental error. The discrepancy at low pressure is a result of the elastic energy in the wave pulse being propagated around cracks, with little effect on propagation velocity averaged over the entire specimen. (author)

  7. Dynamic elastic moduli of rocks under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schock, R.N.

    1970-01-01

    Elastic moduli are determined as a function of confining pressure to 10 kb on rocks in which Plowshare shots are to be fired. Numerical simulation codes require accurate information on the mechanical response of the rock medium to various stress levels in order to predict cavity dimensions. The theoretical treatment of small strains in an elastic medium relates the propagation velocity of compressional and shear waves to the elastic moduli. Velocity measurements can provide, as unique code input data, the rigidity modulus, Poisson' ratio and the shear wave velocity, as well as providing checks on independent determinations of the other moduli. Velocities are determined using pulsed electro-mechanical transducers and measuring the time-of-flight in the rock specimen. A resonant frequency of 1 MHz is used to insure that the wavelength exceeds the average grain dimension and is subject to bulk rock properties. Data obtained on a variety of rock types are presented and analyzed. These data are discussed in terms of their relationship to moduli measured by static methods as well as the effect of anisotropy, porosity, and fractures. In general, fractured rocks with incipient cracks show large increases in velocity and moduli in the first 1 to 2 kb of compression as a result of the closing of these voids. After this, the velocities increase much more slowly. Dynamic moduli for these rocks are often 10% higher than corresponding static moduli at low pressure, but this difference decreases as the voids are closed until the moduli agree within experimental error. The discrepancy at low pressure is a result of the elastic energy in the wave pulse being propagated around cracks, with little effect on propagation velocity averaged over the entire specimen. (author)

  8. α{sup '} inflation. Moduli stabilisation and observable tensors from higher derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicoli, Michele [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica ed Astronomia; INFN, Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Ciupke, David [DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; De Alwis, Senarath [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Muia, Francesco [INFN, Sezione di Bologna (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    The leading order dynamics of the type IIB Large Volume Scenario is characterised by the interplay between α{sup '} and non-perturbative effects which fix the overall volume and all local blow-up modes leaving (in general) several flat directions. In this paper we show that, in an arbitrary Calabi-Yau with at least one blow-up mode resolving a point-like singularity, any remaining flat directions can be lifted at subleading order by the inclusions of higher derivative α{sup '} corrections. We then focus on simple fibred cases with one remaining flat direction which can behave as an inflaton if its potential is generated by both higher derivative α{sup '} and winding loop corrections. Natural values of the underlying parameters give a spectral index in agreement with observational data and a tensor-to-scalar ratio of order r=0.01 which could be observed by forthcoming CMB experiments. Dangerous corrections from higher dimensional operators are suppressed due to the presence of an approximate non-compact shift symmetry.

  9. Determination of hoop direction effective elastic moduli of non-circular profile, fiber reinforced polymer composite sewer liner pipes from lateral ring compression tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czél, Gergely; Takács, Dénes

    2015-01-01

    A new material property determination method is presented for the calculation of effective elastic moduli of non-circular ring specimens cut from filament wound oval profile polymer composite sewer liner pipes. The hoop direction elastic moduli was determined using the test results obtained from ring compression tests, which is a very basic setup, and requires no special equipment. Calculations were executed for many different oval profiles, and diagrams were constructed, from which the cross section dependent C_e_f_f constants can be taken. The new method was validated by the comparison of tests and finite element analysis results. The calculation method and the diagrams are essential design tools for engineers, and a big step forward in sizing non-circular profile liner pipes. - Highlights: • A simple modulus measurement method is presented for non-circular ring specimens. • The evaluation method is validated against a finite element model. • Profile shape dependent constants are presented for a wide range of cross-sections. • A set of charts with the constants are provided to aid design engineers.

  10. Moduli spaces of convex projective structures on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fock, V. V.; Goncharov, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce explicit parametrisations of the moduli space of convex projective structures on surfaces, and show that the latter moduli space is identified with the higher Teichmüller space for defined in [V.V. Fock, A.B. Goncharov, Moduli spaces of local systems and higher Teichmüller theory, math.......AG/0311149]. We investigate the cluster structure of this moduli space, and define its quantum version....

  11. Heterotic moduli stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicoli, M.; De Alwis, S.; Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO; Westphal, A.

    2013-04-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of moduli stabilization for weakly coupled heterotic string theory compactified on smooth Calabi-Yau three-folds. We focus on both supersymmetric and supersymmetry breaking vacua of generic (0,2) compactifications obtained by minimising the total (F+D)-term scalar potential. After reviewing how to stabilise all the geometric moduli in a supersymmetric way by including fractional fluxes, non-perturbative and threshold effects, we show that the inclusion of α' corrections leads to new de Sitter or nearly Minkowski vacua which break supersymmetry spontaneously. The minimum lies at moderately large volumes of all the geometric moduli, at perturbative values of the string coupling and at the right phenomenological value of the GUT gauge coupling. However the structure of the heterotic 3-form flux used for complex structure moduli stabilization does not contain enough freedom to tune the superpotential. This results in the generic prediction of high-scale supersymmetry breaking around the GUT scale. We finally provide a dynamical derivation of anisotropic compactifications with stabilized moduli which allow for perturbative gauge coupling unification around 10 16 GeV.

  12. Heterotic moduli stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicoli, M. [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dipt. Fisica ed Astronomia; INFN, Bologna (Italy); Adbus Salam ICTP, Trieste (Italy); De Alwis, S. [Adbus Salam ICTP, Trieste (Italy); Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). UCB 390 Physics Dept.; Westphal, A. [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2013-04-15

    We perform a systematic analysis of moduli stabilization for weakly coupled heterotic string theory compactified on smooth Calabi-Yau three-folds. We focus on both supersymmetric and supersymmetry breaking vacua of generic (0,2) compactifications obtained by minimising the total (F+D)-term scalar potential. After reviewing how to stabilise all the geometric moduli in a supersymmetric way by including fractional fluxes, non-perturbative and threshold effects, we show that the inclusion of {alpha}' corrections leads to new de Sitter or nearly Minkowski vacua which break supersymmetry spontaneously. The minimum lies at moderately large volumes of all the geometric moduli, at perturbative values of the string coupling and at the right phenomenological value of the GUT gauge coupling. However the structure of the heterotic 3-form flux used for complex structure moduli stabilization does not contain enough freedom to tune the superpotential. This results in the generic prediction of high-scale supersymmetry breaking around the GUT scale. We finally provide a dynamical derivation of anisotropic compactifications with stabilized moduli which allow for perturbative gauge coupling unification around 10{sup 16} GeV.

  13. Moduli-induced baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Koji; Jeong, Kwang Sik [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Takahashi, Fuminobu [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tokyo Univ., Kashiwa (Japan). Kavli IPMU, TODIAS

    2013-12-15

    We study a scenario for baryogenesis in modular cosmology and discuss its implications for the moduli stabilization mechanism and the supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking scale. If moduli fields dominate the Universe and decay into the standard model particles through diatonic couplings, the right amount of baryon asymmetry can be generated through CP violating decay of gluino into quark and squark followed by baryon-number violating squark decay. We find that, in the KKLT-type moduli stabilization, at least two non-perturbative terms are required to obtain a sizable CP phase, and that the successful baryogenesis is possible for the soft SUSY breaking mass heavier than O(1) TeV. A part of the parameter space for successful baryogenesis can be probed at the collider experiments, dinucleon decay search experiment, and the measurements of electric dipole moments of neutron and electron. It is also shown that similar baryogenesis works in the case of the gravitino- or the saxion-dominated Universe.

  14. A higher chest compression rate may be necessary for metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; You, Je Sung; Cho, Young Soon; Chung, Sung Phil; Park, Incheol

    2012-01-01

    Metronome guidance is a simple and economical feedback system for guiding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, a recent study showed that metronome guidance reduced the depth of chest compression. The results of previous studies suggest that a higher chest compression rate is associated with a better CPR outcome as compared with a lower chest compression rate, irrespective of metronome use. Based on this finding, we hypothesized that a lower chest compression rate promotes a reduction in chest compression depth in the recent study rather than metronome use itself. One minute of chest compression-only CPR was performed following the metronome sound played at 1 of 4 different rates: 80, 100, 120, and 140 ticks/min. Average compression depths (ACDs) and duty cycles were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance, and the values in the absence and presence of metronome guidance were compared. Both the ACD and duty cycle increased when the metronome rate increased (P = .017, metronome rates of 80 and 100 ticks/min were significantly lower than those for the procedures without metronome guidance. The ACD and duty cyle for chest compression increase as the metronome rate increases during metronome-guided CPR. A higher rate of chest compression is necessary for metronome-guided CPR to prevent suboptimal quality of chest compression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Plutonium Elastic Moduli, Electron Localization, and Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliori, Albert; Mihut-Stroe, Izabella; Betts, Jon B.

    2008-01-01

    In almost all materials, compression is accompanied naturally by stiffening. Even in materials with zero or negative thermal expansion, where warming is accompanied by volume contraction it is the volume change that primarily controls elastic stiffness. Not so in the metal plutonium. In plutonium, alloying with gallium can change the sign of thermal expansion, but for the positive thermal- expansion monoclinic phase as well as the face-centered-cubic phase with either sign of thermal expansion, and the orthorhombic phase, recent measurements of elastic moduli show soften on warming by an order of magnitude more than expected, the shear and compressional moduli track, and volume seems irrelevant. These effects point toward a novel mechanism for electron localization, and have important implication for the pressure dependence of the bulk compressibility. (authors)

  16. Moduli of weighted hyperplane arrangements

    CERN Document Server

    Lahoz, Martí; Macrí, Emanuele; Stellari, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on a large class of geometric objects in moduli theory and provides explicit computations to investigate their families. Concrete examples are developed that take advantage of the intricate interplay between Algebraic Geometry and Combinatorics. Compactifications of moduli spaces play a crucial role in Number Theory, String Theory, and Quantum Field Theory – to mention just a few. In particular, the notion of compactification of moduli spaces has been crucial for solving various open problems and long-standing conjectures. Further, the book reports on compactification techniques for moduli spaces in a large class where computations are possible, namely that of weighted stable hyperplane arrangements.

  17. Moduli spaces in algebraic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goettsche, L.

    2000-01-01

    This volume of the new series of lecture notes of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics contains the lecture notes of the School on Algebraic Geometry which took place at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics from 26 July to 13 August 1999. The school consisted of 2 weeks of lecture courses and one week of conference. The topic of the school was moduli spaces. More specifically the lectures were divided into three subtopics: principal bundles on Riemann surfaces, moduli spaces of vector bundles and sheaves on projective varieties, and moduli spaces of curves

  18. After microvascular decompression to treat trigeminal neuralgia, both immediate pain relief and recurrence rates are higher in patients with arterial compression than with venous compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Gu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Guan; Guo, Jun; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Shuguang; Qian, Chunfa

    2017-07-04

    We explored differences in postoperative pain relief achieved through decompression of the trigeminal nerve compressed by arteries and veins. Clinical characteristics, intraoperative findings, and postoperative curative effects were analyzed in 72 patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by microvascular decompression. The patients were divided into arterial and venous compression groups based on intraoperative findings. Surgical curative effects included immediate relief, delayed relief, obvious reduction, and invalid result. Among the 40 patients in the arterial compression group, 32 had immediate pain relief of pain (80.0%), 5 cases had delayed relief (12.5%), and 3 cases had an obvious reduction (7.5%). In the venous compression group, 12 patients had immediate relief of pain (37.5%), 13 cases had delayed relief (40.6%), and 7 cases had an obvious reduction (21.9%). During 2-year follow-up period, 6 patients in the arterial compression group experienced recurrence of trigeminal neuralgia, but there were no recurrences in the venous compression group. Simple artery compression was followed by early relief of trigeminal neuralgia more often than simple venous compression. However, the trigeminal neuralgia recurrence rate was higher in the artery compression group than in the venous compression group.

  19. Elastic Moduli of Permanently Densified Silica Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, T.; Margueritat, J.; Martinet, C.; Mermet, A.; Champagnon, B.

    2014-01-01

    Modelling the mechanical response of silica glass is still challenging, due to the lack of knowledge concerning the elastic properties of intermediate states of densification. An extensive Brillouin Light Scattering study on permanently densified silica glasses after cold compression in diamond anvil cell has been carried out, in order to deduce the elastic properties of such glasses and to provide new insights concerning the densification process. From sound velocity measurements, we derive phenomenological laws linking the elastic moduli of silica glass as a function of its densification ratio. The found elastic moduli are in excellent agreement with the sparse data extracted from literature, and we show that they do not depend on the thermodynamic path taken during densification (room temperature or heating). We also demonstrate that the longitudinal sound velocity exhibits an anomalous behavior, displaying a minimum for a densification ratio of 5%, and highlight the fact that this anomaly has to be distinguished from the compressibility anomaly of a-SiO2 in the elastic domain. PMID:25431218

  20. Moduli space of torsional manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Melanie; Tseng, L.-S.; Yau, S.-T.

    2007-01-01

    We characterize the geometric moduli of non-Kaehler manifolds with torsion. Heterotic supersymmetric flux compactifications require that the six-dimensional internal manifold be balanced, the gauge bundle be Hermitian Yang-Mills, and also the anomaly cancellation be satisfied. We perform the linearized variation of these constraints to derive the defining equations for the local moduli. We explicitly determine the metric deformations of the smooth flux solution corresponding to a torus bundle over K3

  1. Moduli mediation without moduli-induced gravitino problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akita, Kensuke [Department of Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo, 169-8555 (Japan); Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University,Sapporo, 060-0810 (Japan); Oikawa, Akane; Otsuka, Hajime [Department of Physics, Waseda University, Tokyo, 169-8555 (Japan)

    2016-05-30

    We study the moduli-induced gravitino problem within the framework of the phenomenologically attractive mirage mediations. The huge amount of gravitino generated by the moduli decay can be successfully diluted by introducing an extra light modulus field which does not induce the supersymmetry breaking. Since the lifetime of extra modulus field becomes longer than usually considered modulus field, our proposed mechanism is applied to both the low- and high-scale supersymmetry breaking scenarios. We also point out that such an extra modulus field appears in the flux compactification of type II string theory.

  2. String moduli inflation. An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicoli, Michele [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Quevedo, Fernando [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). DAMTP/CMS; Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    We present an overview of inflationary models derived from string theory focusing mostly on closed string moduli as inflatons. After a detailed discussion of the {eta}-problem and different approaches to address it, we describe possible ways to obtain a de Sitter vacuum with all closed string moduli stabilised. We then look for inflationary directions and present some of the most promising scenarios where the inflatons are either the real or the imaginary part of Kaehler moduli. We pay particular attention on extracting potential observable implications, showing how most of the scenarios predict negligible gravitational waves and could therefore be ruled out by the Planck satellite. We conclude by briefly mentioning some open challenges in string cosmology beyond deriving just inflation. (orig.)

  3. String moduli inflation. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Quevedo, Fernando

    2011-06-01

    We present an overview of inflationary models derived from string theory focusing mostly on closed string moduli as inflatons. After a detailed discussion of the η-problem and different approaches to address it, we describe possible ways to obtain a de Sitter vacuum with all closed string moduli stabilised. We then look for inflationary directions and present some of the most promising scenarios where the inflatons are either the real or the imaginary part of Kaehler moduli. We pay particular attention on extracting potential observable implications, showing how most of the scenarios predict negligible gravitational waves and could therefore be ruled out by the Planck satellite. We conclude by briefly mentioning some open challenges in string cosmology beyond deriving just inflation. (orig.)

  4. Elastic Moduli of Carbon Nanohorns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube is a special case of carbon nanohorns or carbon nanocones with zero apex angle. Research into carbon nanohorns started almost at the same time as the discovery of nanotubes in 1991. Most researchers focused on the investigation of nanotubes, and the exploration of nanohorns attracted little attention. To model the carbon nanohorns, we make use of a more reliable second-generation reactive empirical bond-order potential by Brenner and coworkers. We investigate the elastic moduli and conclude that these nanohorns are equally strong and require in-depth investigation. The values of Young's and Shear moduli decrease with apex angle.

  5. Singular moduli and Arakelov intersection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Lin.

    1994-05-01

    The value of the modular function j(τ) at imaginary quadratic arguments τ in the upper half plane is usually called singular moduli. In this paper, we use Arakelov intersection to give the prime factorizations of a certain combination of singular moduli, coming from the Hecke correspondence. Such a result may be considered as the degenerate one of Gross and Zagier on Heegner points and derivatives of L-series in their paper [GZ1], and is parallel to the result in [GZ2]. (author). 2 refs

  6. On the Moduli of Convexity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guirao, A. J.; Hájek, Petr Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 135, č. 10 (2007), s. 3233-3240 ISSN 0002-9939 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Banach spaces * moduli of convexity * uniformly rotund norms Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.520, year: 2007

  7. Moduli fields as quintessence and the chameleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Martin, Jerome

    2007-01-01

    We consider models where moduli fields are not stabilized and play the role of quintessence. In order to evade gravitational tests, we investigate the possibility that moduli behave as chameleon fields. We find that, for realistic moduli superpotentials, the chameleon effect is not strong enough, implying that moduli quintessence models are gravitationally ruled out. More generally, we state a no-go theorem for quintessence in supergravity whereby models either behave like a pure cosmological constant or violate gravitational tests

  8. Moduli backreaction on inflationary attractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roest, Diederik; Werkman, Pelle

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the interplay between moduli dynamics and inflation, focusing on the KKLT- scenario and cosmological α-attractors. General couplings between these sectors can induce a significant backreaction and potentially destroy the inflationary regime; however, we demonstrate that this generically does not happen for α-attractors. Depending on the details of the superpotential, the volume modulus can either be stable during the entire inflationary trajectory, or become tachyonic at some point and act as a waterfall field, resulting in a sudden end of inflation. In the latter case there is a universal supersymmetric minimum where the scalars end up, preventing the decompactification scenario. The gravitino mass is independent from the inflationary scale with no fine-tuning of the parameters. The observational predictions conform to the universal value of attractors, fully compatible with the Planck data, with possibly a capped number of e-folds due to the interplay with moduli.

  9. Moduli Backreaction on Inflationary Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Roest, Diederik; Werkman, Pelle

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the interplay between moduli dynamics and inflation, focusing on the KKLT-scenario and cosmological $\\alpha$-attractors. General couplings between these sectors can induce a significant backreaction and potentially destroy the inflationary regime; however, we demonstrate that this generically does not happen for $\\alpha$-attractors. Depending on the details of the superpotential, the volume modulus can either be stable during the entire inflationary trajectory, or become tachyonic at some point and act as a waterfall field, resulting in a sudden end of inflation. In the latter case there is a universal supersymmetric minimum where the scalars end up, preventing the decompactification scenario. The observational predictions conform to the universal value of attractors, fully compatible with the Planck data, with possibly a capped number of e-folds due to the interplay with moduli.

  10. Applicability of higher-order TVD method to low mach number compressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamatsu, Mikio

    1995-01-01

    Steep gradients of fluid density are the influential factor of spurious oscillation in numerical solutions of low Mach number (M<<1) compressible flows. The total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme is a promising remedy to overcome this problem and obtain accurate solutions. TVD schemes for high-speed flows are, however, not compatible with commonly used methods in low Mach number flows using pressure-based formulation. In the present study a higher-order TVD scheme is constructed on a modified form of each individual scalar equation of primitive variables. It is thus clarified that the concept of TVD is applicable to low Mach number flows within the framework of the existing numerical method. Results of test problems of the moving interface of two-component gases with the density ratio ≥ 4, demonstrate the accurate and robust (wiggle-free) profile of the scheme. (author)

  11. Moduli destabilization via gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dong-il [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Center for Quantum Spacetime; Pedro, Francisco G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Yeom, Dong-han [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Center for Quantum Spacetime; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-06-15

    We examine the interplay between gravitational collapse and moduli stability in the context of black hole formation. We perform numerical simulations of the collapse using the double null formalism and show that the very dense regions one expects to find in the process of black hole formation are able to destabilize the volume modulus. We establish that the effects of the destabilization will be visible to an observer at infinity, opening up a window to a region in spacetime where standard model's couplings and masses can differ significantly from their background values.

  12. The moduli problem for plane branches

    CERN Document Server

    Zariski, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Moduli problems in algebraic geometry date back to Riemann's famous count of the 3g-3 parameters needed to determine a curve of genus g. In this book, Zariski studies the moduli space of curves of the same equisingularity class. After setting up and reviewing the basic material, Zariski devotes one chapter to the topology of the moduli space, including an explicit determination of the rare cases when the space is compact. Chapter V looks at specific examples where the dimension of the generic component can be determined through rather concrete methods. Zariski's last chapter concerns the application of deformation theory to the moduli problem, including the determination of the dimension of the generic component for a particular family of curves. An appendix by Bernard Teissier reconsiders the moduli problem from the point of view of deformation theory. He gives new proofs of some of Zariski's results, as well as a natural construction of a compactification of the moduli space.

  13. A Metric for Heterotic Moduli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelas, Philip; de la Ossa, Xenia; McOrist, Jock

    2017-12-01

    Heterotic vacua of string theory are realised, at large radius, by a compact threefold with vanishing first Chern class together with a choice of stable holomorphic vector bundle. These form a wide class of potentially realistic four-dimensional vacua of string theory. Despite all their phenomenological promise, there is little understanding of the metric on the moduli space of these. What is sought is the analogue of special geometry for these vacua. The metric on the moduli space is important in phenomenology as it normalises D-terms and Yukawa couplings. It is also of interest in mathematics, since it generalises the metric, first found by Kobayashi, on the space of gauge field connections, to a more general context. Here we construct this metric, correct to first order in {α^{\\backprime}}, in two ways: first by postulating a metric that is invariant under background gauge transformations of the gauge field, and also by dimensionally reducing heterotic supergravity. These methods agree and the resulting metric is Kähler, as is required by supersymmetry. Checking the metric is Kähler is intricate and the anomaly cancellation equation for the H field plays an essential role. The Kähler potential nevertheless takes a remarkably simple form: it is the Kähler potential of special geometry with the Kähler form replaced by the {α^{\\backprime}}-corrected hermitian form.

  14. Moduli stabilization in non-geometric backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie; Vafa, Cumrun; Walcher, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Type II orientifolds based on Landau-Ginzburg models are used to describe moduli stabilization for flux compactifications of type II theories from the world-sheet CFT point of view. We show that for certain types of type IIB orientifolds which have no Kaehler moduli and are therefore intrinsically non-geometric, all moduli can be explicitly stabilized in terms of fluxes. The resulting four-dimensional theories can describe Minkowski as well as anti-de Sitter vacua. This construction provides the first string vacuum with all moduli frozen and leading to a 4D Minkowski background

  15. The moduli and gravitino (non)-problems in models with strongly stabilized moduli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Jason L.; Olive, Keith A.; Garcia, Marcos A.G.

    2014-01-01

    In gravity mediated models and in particular in models with strongly stabilized moduli, there is a natural hierarchy between gaugino masses, the gravitino mass and moduli masses: m 1/2 << m 3/2 << m φ . Given this hierarchy, we show that 1) moduli problems associated with excess entropy production from moduli decay and 2) problems associated with moduli/gravitino decays to neutralinos are non-existent. Placed in an inflationary context, we show that the amplitude of moduli oscillations are severely limited by strong stabilization. Moduli oscillations may then never come to dominate the energy density of the Universe. As a consequence, moduli decay to gravitinos and their subsequent decay to neutralinos need not overpopulate the cold dark matter density

  16. Correlation between temperature dependence of elastic moduli and Debye temperature of paramagnetic metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodryakov, V.Yu.; Povzner, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The correlation between the temperature dependence of elastic moduli and the Debye temperature of paramagnetic metal is analyzed in neglect of the temperature dependence of the Poison coefficient σ within the frames of the Debye-Grueneisen presentations. It is shown, that namely the temperature dependence of the elastic moduli determines primarily the temperature dependence of the Debye temperature Θ(T). On the other hand, the temperature dependence Θ(T) very weakly effects the temperature dependence of the elastic moduli. The later made it possible to formulate the self-consistent approach to calculation of the elastic moduli temperature dependence. The numerical estimates of this dependence parameters are conducted by the example of the all around compression modulus of the paramagnetic lutetium [ru

  17. On Scientific Data and Image Compression Based on Adaptive Higher-Order FEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolín, Pavel; Andrš, David

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2009), s. 56-68 ISSN 2070-0733 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/07/0496; GA AV ČR IAA100760702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : data compress ion * image compress ion * adaptive hp-FEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering http://www.global-sci.org/aamm

  18. Strong moduli stabilization and phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian; Mambrini, Yann; Mustafayev, Azar; Olive, Keith A

    2013-01-01

    We describe the resulting phenomenology of string theory/supergravity models with strong moduli stabilization. The KL model with F-term uplifting, is one such example. Models of this type predict universal scalar masses equal to the gravitino mass. In contrast, A-terms receive highly suppressed gravity mediated contributions. Under certain conditions, the same conclusion is valid for gaugino masses, which like A-terms, are then determined by anomalies. In such models, we are forced to relatively large gravitino masses (30-1000 TeV). We compute the low energy spectrum as a function of m_{3/2}. We see that the Higgs masses naturally takes values between 125-130 GeV. The lower limit is obtained from the requirement of chargino masses greater than 104 GeV, while the upper limit is determined by the relic density of dark matter (wino-like).

  19. Moduli space of Chern-Simons gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Jiro; Yamanaka, Yuki

    1990-09-01

    Conformally invariant (2+1)-dimensional gravity, Chern-Shimons gravity, is studied. Its solution space, moduli space, is investigated using the linearization method. The dimension of moduli space is determined as 18g - 18 for g > 1,6 for g = 1 and 0 for g = 0. We discuss the geometrical meaning of our investigation. (author)

  20. String moduli stabilization at the conifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Herschmann, Daniela; Wolf, Florian [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany)

    2016-08-18

    We study moduli stabilization for type IIB orientifolds compactified on Calabi-Yau threefolds in the region close to conifold singularities in the complex structure moduli space. The form of the periods implies new phenomena like exponential mass hierarchies even in the regime of negligible warping. Integrating out the heavy conic complex structure modulus leads to an effective flux induced potential for the axio-dilaton and the remaining complex structure moduli containing exponentially suppressed terms that imitate non-perturbative effects. It is shown that this scenario can be naturally combined with the large volume scenario so that all moduli are dynamically stabilized in the dilute flux regime. As an application of this moduli stabilization scheme, a string inspired model of aligned inflation is designed that features a parametrically controlled hierarchy of mass scales.

  1. Gravitational Particle Production and the Moduli Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G; Linde, Andrei D; Felder, Gary; Kofman, Lev; Linde, Andrei

    2000-01-01

    A theory of gravitational production of light scalar particles during and after inflation is investigated. We show that in the most interesting cases where long-wavelength fluctuations of light scalar fields can be generated during inflation, these fluctuations rather than quantum fluctuations produced after inflation give the dominant contribution to particle production. In such cases a simple analytical theory of particle production can be developed. Application of our results to the theory of quantum creation of moduli fields demonstrates that if the moduli mass is smaller than the Hubble constant then these fields are copiously produced during inflation. This gives rise to the cosmological moduli problem even if there is no homogeneous component of the classical moduli field in the universe. To avoid this version of the moduli problem it is necessary for the Hubble constant H during the last stages of inflation and/or the reheating temperature T_R after inflation to be extremely small.

  2. Moduli of double EPW-sextics

    CERN Document Server

    O'Grady, Kieran G

    2016-01-01

    The author studies the GIT quotient of the symplectic grassmannian parametrizing lagrangian subspaces of \\bigwedge^3{\\mathbb C}^6 modulo the natural action of \\mathrm{SL}_6, call it \\mathfrak{M}. This is a compactification of the moduli space of smooth double EPW-sextics and hence birational to the moduli space of HK 4-folds of Type K3^{[2]} polarized by a divisor of square 2 for the Beauville-Bogomolov quadratic form. The author will determine the stable points. His work bears a strong analogy with the work of Voisin, Laza and Looijenga on moduli and periods of cubic 4-folds.

  3. Experimentally-based multiscale model of the elastic moduli of bovine trabecular bone and its constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamed, Elham [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Novitskaya, Ekaterina, E-mail: eevdokim@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Li, Jun; Jasiuk, Iwona [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); McKittrick, Joanna [University of California, San Diego, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The elastic moduli of trabecular bone were modeled using an analytical multiscale approach. Trabecular bone was represented as a porous nanocomposite material with a hierarchical structure spanning from the collagen–mineral level to the trabecular architecture level. In parallel, compression testing was done on bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in two anatomical directions, parallel to the femoral neck axis and perpendicular to it, and the measured elastic moduli were compared with the corresponding theoretical results. To gain insights on the interaction of collagen and minerals at the nanoscale, bone samples were deproteinized or demineralized. After such processing, the treated samples remained as self-standing structures and were tested in compression. Micro-computed tomography was used to characterize the hierarchical structure of these three bone types and to quantify the amount of bone porosity. The obtained experimental data served as inputs to the multiscale model and guided us to represent bone as an interpenetrating composite material. Good agreement was found between the theory and experiments for the elastic moduli of the untreated, deproteinized, and demineralized trabecular bone. - Highlights: • A multiscale model was used to predict the elastic moduli of trabecular bone. • Samples included demineralized, deproteinized and untreated bone. • The model portrays bone as a porous, interpenetrating two phase composite. • The experimental elastic moduli for trabecular bone fell between theoretical bounds.

  4. Experimentally-based multiscale model of the elastic moduli of bovine trabecular bone and its constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamed, Elham; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Li, Jun; Jasiuk, Iwona; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The elastic moduli of trabecular bone were modeled using an analytical multiscale approach. Trabecular bone was represented as a porous nanocomposite material with a hierarchical structure spanning from the collagen–mineral level to the trabecular architecture level. In parallel, compression testing was done on bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in two anatomical directions, parallel to the femoral neck axis and perpendicular to it, and the measured elastic moduli were compared with the corresponding theoretical results. To gain insights on the interaction of collagen and minerals at the nanoscale, bone samples were deproteinized or demineralized. After such processing, the treated samples remained as self-standing structures and were tested in compression. Micro-computed tomography was used to characterize the hierarchical structure of these three bone types and to quantify the amount of bone porosity. The obtained experimental data served as inputs to the multiscale model and guided us to represent bone as an interpenetrating composite material. Good agreement was found between the theory and experiments for the elastic moduli of the untreated, deproteinized, and demineralized trabecular bone. - Highlights: • A multiscale model was used to predict the elastic moduli of trabecular bone. • Samples included demineralized, deproteinized and untreated bone. • The model portrays bone as a porous, interpenetrating two phase composite. • The experimental elastic moduli for trabecular bone fell between theoretical bounds

  5. K3 surfaces and their moduli

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, Gavril; Geer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the latest developments concerning the moduli of K3 surfaces. It is aimed at algebraic geometers, but is also of interest to number theorists and theoretical physicists, and continues the tradition of related volumes like “The Moduli Space of Curves” and “Moduli of Abelian Varieties,” which originated from conferences on the islands Texel and Schiermonnikoog and which have become classics. K3 surfaces and their moduli form a central topic in algebraic geometry and arithmetic geometry, and have recently attracted a lot of attention from both mathematicians and theoretical physicists. Advances in this field often result from mixing sophisticated techniques from algebraic geometry, lattice theory, number theory, and dynamical systems. The topic has received significant impetus due to recent breakthroughs on the Tate conjecture, the study of stability conditions and derived categories, and links with mirror symmetry and string theory. At the same time, the theory of irred...

  6. Geometry and quantization of moduli spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Jørgen; Riera, Ignasi

    2016-01-01

    This volume is based on four advanced courses held at the Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM), Barcelona. It presents both background information and recent developments on selected topics that are experiencing extraordinary growth within the broad research area of geometry and quantization of moduli spaces. The lectures focus on the geometry of moduli spaces which are mostly associated to compact Riemann surfaces, and are presented from both classical and quantum perspectives.

  7. Moduli of Riemann surfaces, transcendental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hain, R.

    2000-01-01

    These notes are an informal introduction to moduli spaces of compact Riemann surfaces via complex analysis, topology and Hodge Theory. The prerequisites for the first lecture are just basic complex variables, basic Riemann surface theory up to at least the Riemann-Roch formula, and some algebraic topology, especially covering space theory. The first lecture covers moduli in genus 0 and genus 1 as these can be understood using relatively elementary methods, but illustrate many of the points which arise in higher genus. The notes cover more material than was covered in the lectures, and sometimes the order of topics in the notes differs from that in the lectures. We have seen in genus 1 case that M 1 is the quotient Γ 1 /X 1 of a contractible complex manifold X 1 = H by a discrete group Γ 1 = SL 2 (Z). The action of Γ 1 on X 1 is said to be virtually free - that is, Γ 1 has a finite index subgroup which acts (fixed point) freely on X 1 . In this section we will generalize this to all g >= 1 - we will sketch a proof that there is a contractible complex manifold Xg, called Teichmueller space, and a group Γ g , called the mapping class group, which acts virtually freely on X g . The moduli space of genus g compact Riemann surfaces is the quotient: M g = Γ g /X g . This will imply that M g has the structure of a complex analytic variety with finite quotient singularities. Teichmueller theory is a difficult and technical subject. Because of this, it is only possible to give an overview. In this lecture, we compute the orbifold Picard group of M g for all g >= 1. Recall that an orbifold line bundle over M g is a holomorphic line bundle L over Teichmueller space X g together with an action of the mapping class group Γ g on it such that the projection L → X g is Γ g -equivariant. An orbifold section of this line bundle is a holomorphic Γ g -equivariant section X g → L of L. This is easily seen to be equivalent to fixing a level l>= 3 and considering holomorphic

  8. Probing the moduli dependence of refined topological amplitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Antoniadis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of providing a worldsheet description of the refined topological string, we continue the study of a particular class of higher derivative couplings Fg,n in the type II string effective action compactified on a Calabi–Yau threefold. We analyse first order differential equations in the anti-holomorphic moduli of the theory, which relate the Fg,n to other component couplings. From the point of view of the topological theory, these equations describe the contribution of non-physical states to twisted correlation functions and encode an obstruction for interpreting the Fg,n as the free energy of the refined topological string theory. We investigate possibilities of lifting this obstruction by formulating conditions on the moduli dependence under which the differential equations simplify and take the form of generalised holomorphic anomaly equations. We further test this approach against explicit calculations in the dual heterotic theory.

  9. Higher resolution cine imaging with compressed sensing for accelerated clinical left ventricular evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aaron C W; Strugnell, Wendy; Riley, Robyn; Schmitt, Benjamin; Zenge, Michael; Schmidt, Michaela; Morris, Norman R; Hamilton-Craig, Christian

    2017-06-01

    To assess the clinical feasibility of a compressed sensing cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence of both high temporal and spatial resolution (CS_bSSFP) in comparison to a balanced steady-state free precession cine (bSSFP) sequence for reliable quantification of left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass. Segmented MRI cine images were acquired on a 1.5T scanner in 50 patients in the LV short-axis stack orientation using a retrospectively gated conventional bSSFP sequence (generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition [GRAPPA] acceleration factor 2), followed by a prospectively triggered CS_bSSFP sequence with net acceleration factor of 8. Image quality was assessed by published criteria. Comparison of sequences was made in LV volumes and mass, image quality score, quantitative regional myocardial wall motion, and imaging time using Pearson's correlation, Bland-Altman and paired 2-tailed Student's t-test. Differences (bSSFP minus CS_bSSFP, mean ± SD) and Pearson's correlations were 14.8 ± 16.3 (P = 0.31) and r = 0.98 (P cine CS_bSSFP accurately and reliably quantitates LV volumes and mass, shortens acquisition times, and is clinically feasible. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1693-1699. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Moduli stabilization in type IIB orientifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulgin, W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with the stabilization of the moduli fields in the compactifications of the type IIB string theory on orientifolds. A concrete procedure for the construction of solutions, in which all moduli fields are fixed, yields the KKLT scenario. We study, on which models the scenario can be applied, if approximations of the original KKLT work are abandoned. We find that in a series of models, namely such without complex-structure moduli the construction of the consistent solutions in the framework of the KKLT scenario is not possible. The nonperturbative effects, like D3 instantons and gaugino condensates are a further component of the KKLT scenario. They lead to the stabilization of the Kaehler moduli. We present criteria for the generation of the superpotential due to the D3 instantons at a Calaby-Yau manifold in presence of fluxes. Furthermore we show that although the presence of the nonperturbative superpotential in the equations of motions is correlated with the switching on of all ISD and IASD fluxes, the deciding criterium for the generation of the nonperturbative superpotential depends only on the fluxes of the type (2,1). Thereafter we discuss two models, in which we stabilize all moduli fields. Thereby it deals with Calabi-Yau orientifolds which have been obtained by a blow-up procedure from the Z 6-II and Z 2 x Z 4 orientifolds

  11. Thermodynamics and elastic moduli of fluids with steeply repulsive potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, D. M.

    1997-08-01

    Analytic expressions for the thermodynamic properties and elastic moduli of molecular fluids interacting with steeply repulsive potentials are derived using Rowlinson's hard-sphere perturbation treatment which employs a softness parameter, λ specifying the deviation from the hard-sphere potential. Generic potentials of this form might be used to represent the interactions between near-hard-sphere stabilized colloids. Analytic expressions for the equivalent hard-sphere diameter of inverse power [ɛ(σ/r)n where ɛ sets the energy scale and σ the distance scale] exponential and logarithmic potential forms are derived using the Barker-Henderson formula. The internal energies in the hard-sphere limit are predicted essentially exactly by the perturbation approach when compared against molecular dynamics simulation data using the same potentials. The elastic moduli are similarly accurately predicted in the hard-sphere limit, as they are trivially related to the internal energy. The compressibility factors from the perturbation expansion do not compare as favorably with simulation data, and in this case the Carnahan-Starling equation of state prediction using the analytic effective hard-sphere diameter would appear to be a preferable route for this thermodynamic property. A more refined state point dependent definition for the effective hard-sphere diameter is probably required for this property.

  12. Accidental Kähler moduli inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maharana, Anshuman; Rummel, Markus; Sumitomo, Yoske

    2015-01-01

    We study a model of accidental inflation in type IIB string theory where inflation occurs near the inflection point of a small Kähler modulus. A racetrack structure helps to alleviate the known concern that string-loop corrections may spoil Kähler Moduli Inflation unless having a significant suppression via the string coupling or a special brane setup. Also, the hierarchy of gauge group ranks required for the separation between moduli stabilization and inflationary dynamics is relaxed. The relaxation becomes more significant when we use the recently proposed D-term generated racetrack model

  13. Moduli determination of continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, P.K.; Hsu, D.K.; Miriyala, N.; Snead, L.L.; McHargue, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    Nicalon TM /silicon carbide composites were fabricated by the Forced Chemical Vapor Infiltration (FCVI) method. Both through-thickness and in-plane (fiber fabric plane) moduli were determined using ultrasonic techniques. The through-thickness elastic constants (moduli) were found to be much less than the in-plane moduli. Increased porosity significantly decreased both in-plane and through-thickness moduli. A periodic model using a homogenization method was formulated to predict the effect of porosity on the moduli of woven fabric composites. The predicted moduli were found to be in reasonably good agreement with the experimental results. ((orig.))

  14. Moduli spaces of unitary conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendland, K.

    2000-08-01

    We investigate various features of moduli spaces of unitary conformal field theories. A geometric characterization of rational toroidal conformal field theories in arbitrary dimensions is presented and discussed in relation to singular tori and those with complex multiplication. We study the moduli space M 2 of unitary two-dimensional conformal field theories with central charge c = 2. All the 26 non-exceptional non-isolated irreducible components of M 2 are constructed that may be obtained by an orbifold procedure from toroidal theories. The parameter spaces and partition functions are calculated explicitly. All multicritical points and lines are determined, such that all but three of these 26 components are directly or indirectly connected to the space of toroidal theories in M 2 . Relating our results to those by Dixon, Ginsparg, Harvey on the classification of c = 3/2 superconformal field theories, we give geometric interpretations to all non-isolated orbifolds discussed by them and correct their statements on multicritical points within the moduli space of c = 3/2 superconformal field theories. In the main part of this work, we investigate the moduli space M of N = (4, 4) superconformal field theories with central charge c = 6. After a slight emendation of its global description we give generic partition functions for models contained in M. We explicitly determine the locations of various known models in the component of M associated to K3 surfaces

  15. A minicourse on moduli of curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looijenga, E.

    2000-01-01

    These are notes that accompany a short course given at the School on Algebraic Geometry 1999 at the ICTP, Trieste. A major goal is to outline various approaches to moduli spaces of curves. In the last part I discuss the algebraic classes that naturally live on these spaces; these can be thought of as the characteristic classes for bundles of curves. (author)

  16. Quantum scattering in two black hole moduli space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kenji; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the quantum scattering process in a moduli space consisting of two maximally charged dilaton black holes. The black hole moduli space geometry has different structures for arbitrary dimensions and various values of the dilaton coupling. We study the quantum effects of the different moduli space geometries with scattering process. Then, it is found that there is a resonance state on certain moduli spaces

  17. Fixing All Moduli in a Simple F-Theory Compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denef, F.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss a simple example of an F-theory compactification on a Calabi-Yau fourfold where background fluxes, together with nonperturbative effects from Euclidean D3 instantons and gauge dynamics on D7 branes, allow us to fix all closed and open string moduli. We explicitly check that the known higher order corrections to the potential, which we neglect in our leading approximation, only shift the results by a small amount. In our exploration of the model, we encounter interesting new phenomena, including examples of transitions where D7 branes absorb O3 planes, while changing topology to preserve the net D3 charge

  18. Dimensional reduction for D3-brane moduli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cownden, Brad; Frey, Andrew R.; Marsh, M.C. David; Underwood, Bret

    2016-01-01

    Warped string compactifications are central to many attempts to stabilize moduli and connect string theory with cosmology and particle phenomenology. We present a first-principles derivation of the low-energy 4D effective theory from dimensional reduction of a D3-brane in a warped Calabi-Yau compactification of type IIB string theory with imaginary self-dual 3-form flux, including effects of D3-brane motion beyond the probe approximation, and find the metric on the moduli space of brane positions, the universal volume modulus, and axions descending from the 4-form potential. As D3-branes may be considered as carrying either electric or magnetic charges for the self-dual 5-form field strength, we present calculations in both duality frames. Our results are consistent with, but extend significantly, earlier results on the low-energy effective theory arising from D3-branes in string compactifications.

  19. Special geometry on the moduli space for the two-moduli non-Fermat Calabi–Yau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Aleshkin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We clarify the recently proposed method for computing a special Kähler metric on a Calabi–Yau complex structure moduli space using the fact that the moduli space is a subspace of a particular Frobenius manifold. We use this method to compute a previously unknown special Kähler metric in a two-moduli non-Fermat model.

  20. Special geometry on the moduli space for the two-moduli non-Fermat Calabi-Yau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshkin, Konstantin; Belavin, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We clarify the recently proposed method for computing a special Kähler metric on a Calabi-Yau complex structure moduli space using the fact that the moduli space is a subspace of a particular Frobenius manifold. We use this method to compute a previously unknown special Kähler metric in a two-moduli non-Fermat model.

  1. BCFT moduli space in level truncation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudrna, Matěj; Maccaferri, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 4 (2016), 1-33, č. článku 057. ISSN 1029-8479 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31689S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : deformation: marginal * field theory: string * tachyon: potential * string: open * moduli space * effective potential * nonperturbative * toy model Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 6.063, year: 2016

  2. Supersymmetric SU(5) GUT with Stabilized Moduli

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Panda, Binata

    2008-01-01

    We construct a minimal example of a supersymmetric grand unified model in a toroidal compactification of type I string theory with magnetized D9-branes. All geometric moduli are stabilized in terms of the background internal magnetic fluxes which are of "oblique" type (mutually non-commuting). The gauge symmetry is just SU(5) and the gauge non-singlet chiral spectrum contains only three families of quarks and leptons transforming in the $10+{\\bar 5}$ representations.

  3. Supersymmetric moduli stabilization and high-scale inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, Wilfried; Wieck, Clemens; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    We study the back-reaction of moduli fields on the inflaton potential in generic models of F-term inflation. We derive the moduli corrections as a power series in the ratio of Hubble scale and modulus mass. The general result is illustrated with two examples, hybrid inflation and chaotic inflation. We find that in both cases the decoupling of moduli dynamics and inflation requires moduli masses close to the scale of grand unification. For smaller moduli masses the CMB observables are strongly affected.

  4. Braneworld gravity: Influence of the moduli fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelo, Carlos; Visser, Matt

    2000-01-01

    We consider the case of a generic braneworld geometry in the presence of one or more moduli fields (e.g., the dilaton) that vary throughout the bulk spacetime. Working in an arbitrary conformal frame, using the generalized junction conditions of gr-qc/0008008 and the Gauss-Codazzi equations, we derive the effective ''induced'' on-brane gravitational equations. As usual in braneworld scenarios, these equations do not form a closed system in that the bulk can exchange both information and stress-energy with the braneworld. We work with an arbitrary number of moduli fields described by an arbitrary sigma model, with arbitrary curvature couplings, arbitrary self interactions, and arbitrary dimension for the bulk. (The braneworld is always codimension one.) Among the novelties we encounter are modifications of the on-brane stress-energy conservation law, anomalous couplings between on-brane gravity and the trace of the on-brane stress-energy tensor, and additional possibilities for modifying the on-brane effective cosmological constant. After obtaining the general stress-energy ''conservation'' law and the ''induced Einstein equations'' we particularize the discussion to two particularly attractive cases: for a (n-2)-brane in ([n-1]+1) dimensions we discuss both the effect of (1) generic variable moduli fields in the Einstein frame, and (2) the effect of a varying dilaton in the string frame. (author)

  5. Gauge and moduli hierarchy in a multiply warped braneworld scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Ashmita; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of Higgs-like boson near the mass scale ∼126 Gev generates renewed interest to the gauge hierarchy problem in the standard model related to the stabilisation of the Higgs mass within Tev scale without any unnatural fine tuning. One of the successful attempts to resolve this problem has been the Randall–Sundrum warped geometry model. Subsequently this 5-dimensional model was extended to a doubly warped 6-dimensional (or higher) model which can offer a geometric explanation of the fermion mass hierarchy in the standard model of elementary particles (D. Choudhury and S. SenGupta, 2007 [1]). In an attempt to address the dark energy issue, we in this work extend such 6-dimensional warped braneworld model to include non-flat 3-branes at the orbifold fixed points such that a small but non-vanishing brane cosmological constant is induced in our observable brane. We show that the requirements of a Planck to Tev scale warping along with a vanishingly small but non-zero cosmological constant on the visible brane with non-hierarchical moduli, each with scale close to Planck length, lead to a scenario where the 3-branes can have energy scales either close to Tev or close to Planck scale. Such a scenario can address both the gauge hierarchy as well as fermion mass hierarchy problem in standard model without introducing hierarchical scales between the two moduli. Thus simultaneous resolutions to the gauge hierarchy problem, fermion mass hierarchy problem and non-hierarchical moduli problem are closely linked with the near flatness condition of our universe.

  6. Note on moduli stabilization, supersymmetry breaking and axiverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2011-06-15

    We study properties of moduli stabilization in the four dimensional N=1 supergravity theory with heavy moduli and would-be saxion-axion multiplets including light string-theoretic axions. We give general formulation for the scenario that heavy moduli and saxions are stabilized while axions remain light, assuming that moduli are stabilized near the supersymmetric solution. One can find stable vacuum, i.e. nontachyonic saxions, in the non-supersymmetric Minkowski vacua. We also discuss the cases, where the moduli are coupled to the supersymmetry breaking sector and/or moduli have contributions to supersymmetry breaking. Furthermore we study the models with axions originating from matter-like fields. Our analysis on moduli stabilization is applicable even if there are not light axion multiplets. (orig.)

  7. Pressure derivatives of elastic moduli of fused quartz to 10 kb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselnick, L.; Meister, R.; Wilson, W.H.

    1967-01-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal and shear moduli were made on fused quartz to 10 kb at 24??5??C. The anomalous behavior of the bulk modulus K at low pressure, ???K ???P 0, at higher pressures. The pressure derivative of the rigidity modulus ???G ???P remains constant and negative for the pressure range covered. A 15-kb hydrostatic pressure vessel is described for use with ultrasonic pulse instrumentation for precise measurements of elastic moduli and density changes with pressure. The placing of the transducer outside the pressure medium, and the use of C-ring pressure seals result in ease of operation and simplicity of design. ?? 1967.

  8. Arithmetic fundamental groups and moduli of curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makoto Matsumoto

    2000-01-01

    This is a short note on the algebraic (or sometimes called arithmetic) fundamental groups of an algebraic variety, which connects classical fundamental groups with Galois groups of fields. A large part of this note describes the algebraic fundamental groups in a concrete manner. This note gives only a sketch of the fundamental groups of the algebraic stack of moduli of curves. Some application to a purely topological statement, i.e., an obstruction to the subjectivity of Johnson homomorphisms in the mapping class groups, which comes from Galois group of Q, is explained. (author)

  9. Elastic Moduli of Nanoparticle-Polymer Composite Thin Films via Buckling on Elastomeric Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongyi; Karim, Alamgir; University of Akron Team

    2011-03-01

    Polymeric thin films find applications in diverse areas such as coatings, barriers and packaging. The dispersion of nanoparticles into the films was proven to be an effective method to generate tunable properties, particularly mechanical strength. However, there are very few methods for mechanical characterization of the composite thin films with high accuracy. In this study, nanometric polystyrene and polyvinyl alcohol films with uniformly dispersed cobalt and Cloisite nanoparticles at varying concentrations were synthesized via flow-coating and then transferred to crosslinked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) flexible substrates. The technique of Strain-Induced Elastic Buckling Instability for Mechanical Measurements (SIEBIMM) was employed to determine the elastic moduli of the films, which were calculated from the buckling patterns generated by applying compressive stresses. Results on moduli of films as a function of the concentrations of nanoparticles and the thicknesses of the composite films will be presented. *Corresponding author: alamgir@uakron.edu

  10. On moduli spaces in AdS{sub 4} supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwis, Senarath de [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Louis, Jan [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich 12 - Physik; Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Mathematische Physik; McAllister, Liam [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Triendl, Hagen [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Division, Physics Dept.; Westphal, Alexander [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Gruppe Theorie

    2013-12-15

    We study the structure of the supersymmetric moduli spaces of N=1 and N=2 supergravity theories in AdS{sub 4} backgrounds. In the N=1 case, the moduli space cannot be a complex submanifold of the Kaehler field space, but is instead real with respect to the inherited complex structure. In N=2 supergravity the same result holds for the vector multiplet moduli space, while the hypermultiplet moduli space is a Kaehler submanifold of the quaternionic-Kaehler field space. These findings are in agreement with AdS/CFT considerations.

  11. The topology of moduli space and quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montano, D.; Sonnenschein, J.

    1989-01-01

    We show how an SO(2,1) gauge theory with a fermionic symmetry may be used to describe the topology of the moduli space of curves. The observables of the theory correspond to the generators of the cohomology of moduli space. This is an extension of the topological quantum field theory introduced by Witten to investigate the cohomology of Yang-Mills instanton moduli space. We explore the basic structure of topological quantum field theories, examine a toy U(1) model, and then realize a full theory of moduli space topology. We also discuss why a pure gravity theory, as attempted in previous work, could not succeed. (orig.)

  12. Singular points in moduli spaces of Yang-Mills fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ticciati, R.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis investigates the metric dependence of the moduli spaces of Yang-Mills fields of an SU(2) principal bundle P with chern number -1 over a four-dimensional, simply-connected, oriented, compact smooth manifold M with positive definite intersection form. The purpose of this investigation is to suggest that the surgery class of the moduli space of irreducible connections is, for a generic metric, a Z 2 topological invariant of the smooth structure on M. There are three main parts. The first two parts are local analysis of singular points in the moduli spaces. The last part is global. The first part shows that the set of metrics for which the moduli space of irreducible connections has only non-degenerate singularities has codimension at least one in the space of all metrics. The second part shows that, for a one-parameter family of moduli spaces in a direction transverse to the set of metrics for which the moduli spaces have singularities, passing through a non-degenerate singularity of the simplest type changes the moduli space by a cobordism. The third part shows that generic one-parameter families of metrics give rise to six-dimensional manifolds, the corresponding family of moduli spaces of irreducible connections. It is shown that when M is homeomorphic to S 4 the six-dimensional manifold is a proper cobordism, thus establishing the independence of the surgery class of the moduli space on the metric on M

  13. Moduli stabilization and the pattern of sparticle spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kiwoon

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the pattern of low energy sparticle spectra which appears in some class of moduli stabilization scenario. In case that light moduli are stabilized by non-perturbative effects encoded in the superpotential and a phenomenologically viable de Sitter vacuum is obtained by a sequestered supersymmetry breaking sector, the anomaly-mediated soft terms become comparable to the moduli-mediated ones, leading to a quite distinctive pattern of low energy spacticle masses dubbed the mirage mediation pattern. We also discuss low energy sparticle masses in more general mixed-mediation scenario which includes a comparable size of gauge mediation in addition to the moduli and anomaly mediations.

  14. Extrapolation of bulk rock elastic moduli of different rock types to high pressure conditions and comparison with texture-derived elastic moduli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullemeyer, Klaus; Lokajíček, Tomás; Vasin, Roman N.; Keppler, Ruth; Behrmann, Jan H.

    2018-02-01

    In this study elastic moduli of three different rock types of simple (calcite marble) and more complex (amphibolite, micaschist) mineralogical compositions were determined by modeling of elastic moduli using texture (crystallographic preferred orientation; CPO) data, experimental investigation and extrapolation. 3D models were calculated using single crystal elastic moduli, and CPO measured using time-of-flight neutron diffraction at the SKAT diffractometer in Dubna (Russia) and subsequently analyzed using Rietveld Texture Analysis. To define extrinsic factors influencing elastic behaviour, P-wave and S-wave velocity anisotropies were experimentally determined at 200, 400 and 600 MPa confining pressure. Functions describing variations of the elastic moduli with confining pressure were then used to predict elastic properties at 1000 MPa, revealing anisotropies in a supposedly crack-free medium. In the calcite marble elastic anisotropy is dominated by the CPO. Velocities continuously increase, while anisotropies decrease from measured, over extrapolated to CPO derived data. Differences in velocity patterns with sample orientation suggest that the foliation forms an important mechanical anisotropy. The amphibolite sample shows similar magnitudes of extrapolated and CPO derived velocities, however the pattern of CPO derived velocity is closer to that measured at 200 MPa. Anisotropy decreases from the extrapolated to the CPO derived data. In the micaschist, velocities are higher and anisotropies are lower in the extrapolated data, in comparison to the data from measurements at lower pressures. Generally our results show that predictions for the elastic behavior of rocks at great depths are possible based on experimental data and those computed from CPO. The elastic properties of the lower crust can, thus, be characterized with an improved degree of confidence using extrapolations. Anisotropically distributed spherical micro-pores are likely to be preserved, affecting

  15. Moduli stabilisation for chiral global models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Mayrhofer, Christoph; Valandro, Roberto

    2011-10-01

    We combine moduli stabilisation and (chiral) model building in a fully consistent global set-up in Type IIB/F-theory. We consider compactifications on Calabi-Yau orientifolds which admit an explicit description in terms of toric geometry. We build globally consistent compactifications with tadpole and Freed-Witten anomaly cancellation by choosing appropriate brane set-ups and world-volume fluxes which also give rise to SU(5)- or MSSM-like chiral models. We fix all the Kaehler moduli within the Kaehler cone and the regime of validity of the 4D effective field theory. This is achieved in a way compatible with the local presence of chirality. The hidden sector generating the non-perturbative effects is placed on a del Pezzo divisor that does not have any chiral intersections with any other brane. In general, the vanishing D-term condition implies the shrinking of the rigid divisor supporting the visible sector. However, we avoid this problem by generating r< n D-term conditions on a set of n intersecting divisors. The remaining (n-r) flat directions are fixed by perturbative corrections to the Kaehler potential. We illustrate our general claims in an explicit example. We consider a K3-fibred Calabi-Yau with four Kaehler moduli, that is an hypersurface in a toric ambient space and admits a simple F-theory up-lift. We present explicit choices of brane set-ups and fluxes which lead to three different phenomenological scenarios: the first with GUT-scale strings and TeV-scale SUSY by fine-tuning the background fluxes; the second with an exponentially large value of the volume and TeV-scale SUSY without fine-tuning the background fluxes; and the third with a very anisotropic configuration that leads to TeV-scale strings and two micron-sized extra dimensions. The K3 fibration structure of the Calabi-Yau three-fold is also particularly suitable for cosmological purposes. (orig.)

  16. Moduli stabilisation for chiral global models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicoli, Michele [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Mayrhofer, Christoph [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Valandro, Roberto [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2011-10-15

    We combine moduli stabilisation and (chiral) model building in a fully consistent global set-up in Type IIB/F-theory. We consider compactifications on Calabi-Yau orientifolds which admit an explicit description in terms of toric geometry. We build globally consistent compactifications with tadpole and Freed-Witten anomaly cancellation by choosing appropriate brane set-ups and world-volume fluxes which also give rise to SU(5)- or MSSM-like chiral models. We fix all the Kaehler moduli within the Kaehler cone and the regime of validity of the 4D effective field theory. This is achieved in a way compatible with the local presence of chirality. The hidden sector generating the non-perturbative effects is placed on a del Pezzo divisor that does not have any chiral intersections with any other brane. In general, the vanishing D-term condition implies the shrinking of the rigid divisor supporting the visible sector. However, we avoid this problem by generating rmoduli, that is an hypersurface in a toric ambient space and admits a simple F-theory up-lift. We present explicit choices of brane set-ups and fluxes which lead to three different phenomenological scenarios: the first with GUT-scale strings and TeV-scale SUSY by fine-tuning the background fluxes; the second with an exponentially large value of the volume and TeV-scale SUSY without fine-tuning the background fluxes; and the third with a very anisotropic configuration that leads to TeV-scale strings and two micron-sized extra dimensions. The K3 fibration structure of the Calabi-Yau three-fold is also particularly suitable for cosmological purposes. (orig.)

  17. The Grenoble station for producing strong transient magnetic fields higher than 100 teslas by an explosive driven flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot, M.

    1976-01-01

    Reproducible transient magnetic fields up to 400 teslas (4 megaoersted) are achieved by a simple explosive driven flux compression. The results are described simply from the point of view of energy conversion. The problems of field measurements are studied: the precision is +-2% with a field cavity of 5 mm diameter [fr

  18. Moduli of Parabolic Higgs Bundles and Atiyah Algebroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logares, Marina; Martens, Johan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study the geometry of the moduli space of (non-strongly) parabolic Higgs bundles over a Riemann surface with marked points. We show that this space possesses a Poisson structure, extending the one on the dual of an Atiyah algebroid over the moduli space of parabolic vector bundle...

  19. The universal connection and metrics on moduli spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massamba, Fortune; Thompson, George

    2003-11-01

    We introduce a class of metrics on gauge theoretic moduli spaces. These metrics are made out of the universal matrix that appears in the universal connection construction of M. S. Narasimhan and S. Ramanan. As an example we construct metrics on the c 2 = 1 SU(2) moduli space of instantons on R 4 for various universal matrices. (author)

  20. Metastable SUSY breaking, de Sitter moduli stabilisation and Kaehler moduli inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krippendorf, Sven; Quevedo, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    We study the influence of anomalous U(1) symmetries and their associated D-terms on the vacuum structure of global field theories once they are coupled to N = 1 supergravity and in the context of string compactifications with moduli stabilisation. In particular, we focus on a IIB string motivated construction of the ISS scenario and examine the influence of one additional U(1) symmetry on the vacuum structure. We point out that in the simplest one-Kaehler modulus compactification, the original ISS vacuum gets generically destabilised by a runaway behaviour of the potential in the modulus direction. In more general compactifications with several Kaehler moduli, we find a novel realisation of the LARGE volume scenario with D-term uplifting to de Sitter space and both D-term and F-term supersymmetry breaking. The structure of soft supersymmetry breaking terms is determined in the preferred scenario where the standard model cycle is not stabilised non-perturbatively and found to be flavour universal. Our scenario also provides a purely supersymmetric realisation of Kaehler moduli (blow-up and fibre) inflation, with similar observational properties as the original proposals but without the need to include an extra (non-SUSY) uplifting term.

  1. Explicitly broken supersymmetry with exactly massless moduli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Xi [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Freedman, Daniel Z. [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of Mathematics,Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhao, Yue [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-06-16

    The AdS/CFT correspondence is applied to an analogue of the little hierarchy problem in three-dimensional supersymmetric theories. The bulk is governed by a supergravity theory in which a U(1) × U(1) R-symmetry is gauged by Chern-Simons fields. The bulk theory is deformed by a boundary term quadratic in the gauge fields. It breaks SUSY completely and sources an exactly marginal operator in the dual CFT. SUSY breaking is communicated by gauge interactions to bulk scalar fields and their spinor superpartners. The bulk-to-boundary propagator of the Chern-Simons fields is a total derivative with respect to the bulk coordinates. Integration by parts and the Ward identity permit evaluation of SUSY breaking effects to all orders in the strength of the deformation. The R-charges of scalars and spinors differ so large SUSY breaking mass shifts are generated. Masses of R-neutral particles such as scalar moduli are not shifted to any order in the deformation strength, despite the fact that they may couple to R-charged fields running in loops. We also obtain a universal deformation formula for correlation functions under an exactly marginal deformation by a product of holomorphic and anti-holomorphic U(1) currents.

  2. Young's moduli of cables for high field superconductive dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shunji; Shintomi, Takakazu.

    1983-01-01

    Superconductive dipole magnets for big accelerators are subjected to enormous electro-magnetic force, when they are operated with high field such as 10 Tesla. They should be constructed by means of superconductive cables, which have high Young's modulus, to obtain good performance. To develop such cables we measured the Young's moduli of cables for practical use of accelerator magnets. They are monolithic and compacted strand cables. We measured also Young's moduli of monolithic copper and brass cables for comparison. The obtained data showed the Young's moduli of 35 and 15 GPa for the monolithic and compacted strand cables, respectively. (author)

  3. Higgs, moduli problem, baryogenesis and large volume compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2012-07-01

    We consider the cosmological moduli problem in the context of high-scale supersymmetry breaking suggested by the recent discovery of the standard-model like Higgs boson. In order to solve the notorious moduli-induced gravitino problem, we focus on the LARGE volume scenario, in which the modulus decay into gravitinos can be kinematically forbidden. We then consider the Affleck-Dine mechanism with or without an enhanced coupling with the inflaton, taking account of possible Q-ball formation. We show that the baryon asymmetry of the present Universe can be generated by the Affleck-Dine mechanism in LARGE volume scenario, solving the moduli and gravitino problems.

  4. Higgs, moduli problem, baryogenesis and large volume compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan). Mathematical Physics Lab.; Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Takahashi, Fuminobu [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2012-07-15

    We consider the cosmological moduli problem in the context of high-scale supersymmetry breaking suggested by the recent discovery of the standard-model like Higgs boson. In order to solve the notorious moduli-induced gravitino problem, we focus on the LARGE volume scenario, in which the modulus decay into gravitinos can be kinematically forbidden. We then consider the Affleck-Dine mechanism with or without an enhanced coupling with the inflaton, taking account of possible Q-ball formation. We show that the baryon asymmetry of the present Universe can be generated by the Affleck-Dine mechanism in LARGE volume scenario, solving the moduli and gravitino problems.

  5. In vitro behaviors of rat mesenchymal stem cells on bacterial celluloses with different moduli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taokaew, Siriporn; Phisalaphong, Muenduen; Zhang Newby, Bi-min

    2014-01-01

    Compressive moduli of bacteria-synthesized cellulose (BC) were altered by two drying techniques: ambient-air drying and freeze drying. While no significant differences in dry weight were found, their cross-sectional structures and thickness varied greatly. Freeze dried BCs had loose cross-sectional structures and a thickness of ∼ 4.7 mm, whereas air dried BCs had more compacted cross-sectional structures and a thickness of ∼ 0.1 mm. The compressive moduli of the rehydrated freeze dried and rehydrated air dried BCs were measured to be 21.06 ± 0.22 kPa and 90.09 ± 21.07 kPa, respectively. When rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were seeded on these BCs, they maintained a round morphology in the first 3 days of cultivation. More spread-out morphology and considerable proliferation on freeze dried BCs were observed in 7 days, but not on air-dried BCs. The cells were further grown for 3 weeks in the absence and presence of differentiation agents. Without using any differentiation agents, no detectable differentiation was noticed for rMSCs further cultivated on both types of BC. With differentiation inducing agents, chondrogenic differentiation, visualized by histological staining, was observed in some area of the rehydrated freeze dried BCs; while osteogenic differentiation was noticed on the stiffer rehydrated air dried BCs. - Graphical abstract: In the presence of induction agents, rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) preferentially differentiated into osteocytes on stiffer air dried BC films. - Highlights: • Bacterial cellulose (BC) sheets with different moduli generated by drying differently • Air-dried BC exhibited a modulus similar to that of bone. • Freeze-dried BC showed a modulus in the range of that of muscle. • Air-dried BC promoted the differentiation of rMSCs into osteocytes. • Freeze-dried BC promoted the differentiation of rMSCs into chondrocytes

  6. In vitro behaviors of rat mesenchymal stem cells on bacterial celluloses with different moduli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taokaew, Siriporn [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3906 (United States); Phisalaphong, Muenduen [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Zhang Newby, Bi-min, E-mail: bimin@uakron.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3906 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Compressive moduli of bacteria-synthesized cellulose (BC) were altered by two drying techniques: ambient-air drying and freeze drying. While no significant differences in dry weight were found, their cross-sectional structures and thickness varied greatly. Freeze dried BCs had loose cross-sectional structures and a thickness of ∼ 4.7 mm, whereas air dried BCs had more compacted cross-sectional structures and a thickness of ∼ 0.1 mm. The compressive moduli of the rehydrated freeze dried and rehydrated air dried BCs were measured to be 21.06 ± 0.22 kPa and 90.09 ± 21.07 kPa, respectively. When rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were seeded on these BCs, they maintained a round morphology in the first 3 days of cultivation. More spread-out morphology and considerable proliferation on freeze dried BCs were observed in 7 days, but not on air-dried BCs. The cells were further grown for 3 weeks in the absence and presence of differentiation agents. Without using any differentiation agents, no detectable differentiation was noticed for rMSCs further cultivated on both types of BC. With differentiation inducing agents, chondrogenic differentiation, visualized by histological staining, was observed in some area of the rehydrated freeze dried BCs; while osteogenic differentiation was noticed on the stiffer rehydrated air dried BCs. - Graphical abstract: In the presence of induction agents, rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) preferentially differentiated into osteocytes on stiffer air dried BC films. - Highlights: • Bacterial cellulose (BC) sheets with different moduli generated by drying differently • Air-dried BC exhibited a modulus similar to that of bone. • Freeze-dried BC showed a modulus in the range of that of muscle. • Air-dried BC promoted the differentiation of rMSCs into osteocytes. • Freeze-dried BC promoted the differentiation of rMSCs into chondrocytes.

  7. Successfully combining SUGRA hybrid inflation and moduli stabilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Inflation and moduli stabilisation mechanisms work well independently, and many string-motivated supergravitymodels have been proposed for them. However a complete theory will contain both, and there will be (gravitational) interactions between the two sectors. These give corrections to the inflaton potential, which generically ruin inflation. This holds true even for fine-tuned moduli stabilisation schemes. We show that a viable combined model can be obtained if it is the Kaehler functions (G=K+ln vertical stroke W vertical stroke 2 ) of the two sectors that are added, rather than the superpotentials (as is usually done). Interaction between the two sectors does still impose some restrictions on the moduli stabilisation mechanism, which are derived. Significantly, we find that the (post-inflation) moduli stabilisation scale no longer needs to be above the inflationary energy scale. (orig.)

  8. Successfully combining SUGRA hybrid inflation and moduli stabilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique; Postma, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica (NIKHEF), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-01-15

    Inflation and moduli stabilisation mechanisms work well independently, and many string-motivated supergravitymodels have been proposed for them. However a complete theory will contain both, and there will be (gravitational) interactions between the two sectors. These give corrections to the inflaton potential, which generically ruin inflation. This holds true even for fine-tuned moduli stabilisation schemes. We show that a viable combined model can be obtained if it is the Kaehler functions (G=K+ln vertical stroke W vertical stroke {sup 2}) of the two sectors that are added, rather than the superpotentials (as is usually done). Interaction between the two sectors does still impose some restrictions on the moduli stabilisation mechanism, which are derived. Significantly, we find that the (post-inflation) moduli stabilisation scale no longer needs to be above the inflationary energy scale. (orig.)

  9. Aspects of Moduli Stabilization in Type IIB String Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaaban Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review moduli stabilization in type IIB string theory compactification with fluxes. We focus on KKLT and Large Volume Scenario (LVS. We show that the predicted soft SUSY breaking terms in KKLT model are not phenomenological viable. In LVS, the following result for scalar mass, gaugino mass, and trilinear term is obtained: m0=m1/2=-A0=m3/2, which may account for Higgs mass limit if m3/2~O(1.5 TeV. However, in this case, the relic abundance of the lightest neutralino cannot be consistent with the measured limits. We also study the cosmological consequences of moduli stabilization in both models. In particular, the associated inflation models such as racetrack inflation and Kähler inflation are analyzed. Finally, the problem of moduli destabilization and the effect of string moduli backreaction on the inflation models are discussed.

  10. Metastable SUSY Breaking, de Sitter Moduli Stabilisation and Kähler Moduli Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Krippendorf, Sven

    2009-01-01

    We study the influence of anomalous U(1) symmetries and their associated D-terms on the vacuum structure of global field theories once they are coupled to N=1 supergravity and in the context of string compactifications with moduli stabilisation. In particular, we focus on a IIB string motivated construction of the ISS scenario and examine the influence of one additional U(1) symmetry on the vacuum structure. We point out that in the simplest one-Kahler modulus compactification, the original ISS vacuum gets generically destabilised by a runaway behaviour of the potential in the modulus direction. In more general compactifications with several Kahler moduli, we find a novel realisation of the LARGE volume scenario with D-term uplifting to de Sitter space and both D-term and F-term supersymmetry breaking. The structure of soft supersymmetry breaking terms is determined in the preferred scenario where the standard model cycle is not stabilised non-perturbatively and found to be flavour universal. Our scenario als...

  11. Evaluation of Procedures for Backcalculation of Airfield Pavement Moduli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R -1 5 -3 1 Evaluation of Procedures for Backcalculation of Airfield Pavement Moduli G eo te ch n ic al a n d S tr u...August 2015 Evaluation of Procedures for Backcalculation of Airfield Pavement Moduli Lucy P. Priddy and Carlos R. Gonzalez Geotechnical and...USAF’s) airfield pavement structural evaluation procedures. Determining the structural integrity of airfield pavement relies on the analysis of

  12. Chest compression with a higher level of pressure support ventilation: effects on secretion removal, hemodynamics, and respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner da Silva Naue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of chest compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation, in comparison with that of aspiration alone, in removing secretions, normalizing hemodynamics, and improving respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation. METHODS: This was a randomized crossover clinical trial involving patients on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h in the ICU of the Porto Alegre Hospital de Clínicas, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Patients were randomized to receive aspiration alone (control group or compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation (intervention group. We measured hemodynamic parameters, respiratory mechanics parameters, and the amount of secretions collected. RESULTS: We included 34 patients. The mean age was 64.2 ± 14.6 years. In comparison with the control group, the intervention group showed a higher median amount of secretions collected (1.9 g vs. 2.3 g; p = 0.004, a greater increase in mean expiratory tidal volume (16 ± 69 mL vs. 56 ± 69 mL; p = 0.018, and a greater increase in mean dynamic compliance (0.1 ± 4.9 cmH2O vs. 2.8 ± 4.5 cmH2O; p = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, chest compression accompanied by an increase in pressure support significantly increased the amount of secretions removed, the expiratory tidal volume, and dynamic compliance. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:NCT01155648 [http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/

  13. On D-brane dynamics and moduli stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Noriaki

    2017-09-01

    We discuss the effect of the dynamics of D-branes on moduli stabilization in type IIB string theory compactifications, with reference to a concrete toy model of T6/Z 3 orientifold compactification with fractional D3-branes and anti-D3-branes at orbifold fixed points. The resulting attractive forces between anti-D3-branes and D3-branes, together with the repulsive forces between anti-D3-branes and O3-planes, can affect the stability of the compact space. There are no complex structure moduli in T6/Z 3 orientifold, which should thus capture some generic features of more general settings where all complex structure moduli are stabilized by three-form fluxes. The simultaneous presence of branes and anti-branes brings along the breaking of supersymmetry. Non-BPS combinations of this type are typical of “brane supersymmetry breaking” and are a necessary ingredient in the KKLT scenario for stabilizing the remaining Kähler moduli. The conclusion of our analysis is that, while mutual D-brane interactions sometimes help Kähler moduli stabilization, this is not always the case.

  14. Moduli vacuum misalignment and precise predictions in string inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Koushik; Maharana, Anshuman; Quevedo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The predictions for all the cosmological observables of any inflationary model depend on the number of e-foldings which is sensitive to the post-inflationary history of the universe. In string models the generic presence of light moduli leads to a late-time period of matter domination which lowers the required number of e-foldings and, in turn, modifies the exact predictions of any inflationary model. In this paper we compute exactly the shift of the number of e-foldings in Kähler moduli inflation which is determined by the magnitude of the moduli initial displacement caused by vacuum misalignment and the moduli decay rates. We find that the preferred number of e-foldings gets reduced from 50 to 45, causing a modification of the spectral index at the percent level. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding the full post-inflationary evolution of the universe in order to derive precise predictions in string inflation. To perform this task it is crucial to work in a setting where there is good control over moduli stabilisation.

  15. Moduli vacuum misalignment and precise predictions in string inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicoli, Michele [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN sezione di Bologna,viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Abdus Salam ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Dutta, Koushik [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics,1/AF Salt Lake, Kolkata 700064 (India); Maharana, Anshuman [Harish Chandra Research Intitute,Chattnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Quevedo, Fernando [Abdus Salam ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); DAMTP, University of Cambridge,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-03

    The predictions for all the cosmological observables of any inflationary model depend on the number of e-foldings which is sensitive to the post-inflationary history of the universe. In string models the generic presence of light moduli leads to a late-time period of matter domination which lowers the required number of e-foldings and, in turn, modifies the exact predictions of any inflationary model. In this paper we compute exactly the shift of the number of e-foldings in Kähler moduli inflation which is determined by the magnitude of the moduli initial displacement caused by vacuum misalignment and the moduli decay rates. We find that the preferred number of e-foldings gets reduced from 50 to 45, causing a modification of the spectral index at the percent level. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding the full post-inflationary evolution of the universe in order to derive precise predictions in string inflation. To perform this task it is crucial to work in a setting where there is good control over moduli stabilisation.

  16. Natural inflation and moduli stabilization in heterotic orbifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehle, Fabian; Wieck, Clemens

    2015-03-01

    We study moduli stabilization in combination with inflation in heterotic orbifold compactifications in the light of a large Hubble scale and the favored tensor-to-scalar ratio r∼0.05. To account for a trans-Planckian field range we implement aligned natural inflation. Although there is only one universal axion in heterotic constructions, further axions from the geometric moduli can be used for alignment and inflation. We argue that such an alignment is rather generic on orbifolds, since all non-perturbative terms are determined by modular weights of the involved fields and the Dedekind η function. We present two setups inspired by the mini-landscape models of the Z 6-II orbifold which realize aligned inflation and stabilization of the relevant moduli. One has a supersymmetric vacuum after inflation, while the other includes a gaugino condensate which breaks supersymmetry at a high scale.

  17. Effect of TeO2 on the elastic moduli of sodium borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saddeek, Y.B.; Abd El Latif, Lamia

    2004-01-01

    Sodium borate glass containing tellurite as Te x Na 2-2x B 4-4x O 7-5x with x=0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.25 and 0.35 have been prepared by rapid quenching. Ultrasonic velocity (both longitudinal and shear) measurements have been made using a transducer operated at the fundamental frequency of 4 MHz at room temperature. The density was measured by the conventional Archimedes method. The elastic moduli, the Debye temperature, Poisson's ratio, and the parameters derived from the Makishima-Mackenzie model and the bond compression model have been obtained as a function of TeO 2 content. The monotonic decrease in the velocities and the elastic moduli, and the increase in the ring diameter and the ratio K bc /K e as a function of TeO 2 modifier content reveals the loose packing structure, which is attributed to the increase in the molar volume and the reduction in the vibrations of the borate lattice. The observed results confirm that the addition of TeO 2 changes the rigid character of Na 2 B 4 O 7 to a matrix of ionic behaviour bonds (NBOs). This is due to the creation of more and more discontinuities and defects in the glasses, thus breaking down the borax structure

  18. Third-order elastic moduli for alkali-halide crystals possessing the sodium chloride structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, U.

    2010-01-01

    The values of third-order elastic moduli for alkali halides, having NaCl-type crystal structure are calculated according to the Born-Mayer potential model, considering the repulsive interactions up to the second nearest neighbours and calculating the values of the potential parameters for each crystal, independently, from the compressibility data. This work presents the first published account of the calculation of the third-order elastic moduli taking the actual value of the potential parameter unlike the earlier works. Third-order elastic constants have been computed for alkali halides at 0 and 300 K. The results of the third-order elastic constants are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. Very good agreement between experimental and theoretical third-order elastic constant data (except C 123 ) is found. We have also computed the values of the pressure derivatives of second-order elastic constants and Anderson-Grueneisen parameter for alkali halides, which agree reasonably well with the experimental values, indicating the satisfactory nature of our computed data for third-order elastic constants.

  19. Noncommutative solitons: moduli spaces, quantization, finite θ effects and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadasz, Leszek; Rocek, Martin; Lindström, Ulf; von Unge, Rikard

    2001-06-01

    We find the N-soliton solution at infinite θ, as well as the metric on the moduli space corresponding to spatial displacements of the solitons. We use a perturbative expansion to incorporate the leading θ-1 corrections, and find an effective short range attraction between solitons. We study the stability of various solutions. We discuss the finite θ corrections to scattering, and find metastable orbits. Upon quantization of the two-soliton moduli space, for any finite θ, we find an s-wave bound state.

  20. CP violation and moduli stabilization in heterotic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giedt, Joel

    2002-01-01

    The role of moduli stabilization in predictions for CP violation is examined in the context of four-dimensional effective supergravity models obtained from the weakly coupled heterotic string. They point out that while stabilization of compactification moduli has been studied extensively, the determination of background values for other scalar by dynamical means has not been subjected to the same degree of scrutiny. These other complex scalars are important potential sources of CP violation and they show in a simple model how their background values (including complex phases) may be determined from the minimization of the supergravity scalar potential, subject to the constraint of vanishing cosmological constant

  1. On elastic moduli and elastic anisotropy in polycrystalline martensitic NiTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, S.; Clausen, B.; Padula, S.A.; Noebe, R.D.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2011-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational effort was undertaken to provide insight into the elastic response of B19' martensitic NiTi variants as they exist in bulk, polycrystalline aggregate form during monotonic tensile and compressive loading. The experimental effort centered on using in situ neutron diffraction during loading to measure elastic moduli in several directions along with an average Young's modulus and a Poisson's ratio. The measurements were compared with predictions from a 30,000 variant, self-consistent polycrystalline deformation model that accounted for the elastic intergranular constraint, and also with predictions of single crystal behavior from previously published ab initio studies. Variant conversion and detwinning processes that influenced the intergranular constraint occurred even at stresses where the macroscopic stress-strain response appeared linear. Direct evidence of these processes was revealed in changes in texture, which were captured in inverse pole figures constructed from the neutron diffraction measurements.

  2. On elastic moduli and elastic anisotropy in polycrystalline martensitic NiTi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, S. [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC), Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Clausen, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Padula, S.A.; Noebe, R.D. [NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States); Vaidyanathan, R., E-mail: raj@mail.ucf.edu [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC), Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    A combined experimental and computational effort was undertaken to provide insight into the elastic response of B19' martensitic NiTi variants as they exist in bulk, polycrystalline aggregate form during monotonic tensile and compressive loading. The experimental effort centered on using in situ neutron diffraction during loading to measure elastic moduli in several directions along with an average Young's modulus and a Poisson's ratio. The measurements were compared with predictions from a 30,000 variant, self-consistent polycrystalline deformation model that accounted for the elastic intergranular constraint, and also with predictions of single crystal behavior from previously published ab initio studies. Variant conversion and detwinning processes that influenced the intergranular constraint occurred even at stresses where the macroscopic stress-strain response appeared linear. Direct evidence of these processes was revealed in changes in texture, which were captured in inverse pole figures constructed from the neutron diffraction measurements.

  3. Infinite Grassmannian and moduli space of G-bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.; Ramanathan, A.

    1993-03-01

    Let C be a smooth irreducible projective curve and G a simply connected simple affine algebraic group of C. We study in this paper the relationship between the space of vacua defined in Conformal Field Theory and the space of sections of a line bundle on the moduli space of G-bundles over C. (author). 33 refs

  4. Moduli space for endomorphisms of finite dimension vector spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanarek, H.

    1990-12-01

    Consider the set (End n ) of endomorphisms of vector spaces of dimension n n ). What we present here is a decomposition of (End n ) in which each element has a fine moduli space and one of them is composed by the semisimple endomorphisms as D. Mumford shows. (author). 2 refs

  5. On the L2-metric of vortex moduli spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baptista, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    We derive general expressions for the Kähler form of the L2-metric in terms of standard 2-forms on vortex moduli spaces. In the case of abelian vortices in gauged linear sigma-models, this allows us to compute explicitly the Kähler class of the L2-metric. As an application we compute the total

  6. Moduli for decorated tuples of sheaves and representation spaces ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    We extend the scope of a former paper to vector bundle problems involving ... the machinery of algebraic geometry to the gauge theoretic moduli space for the pairs ... A nice example of a classification problem which can be formulated in our ... Numerous famous special cases of this construction have been studied in the ...

  7. Stability of Picard Bundle Over Moduli Space of Stable Vector ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Answering a question of [BV] it is proved that the Picard bundle on the moduli space of stable vector bundles of rank two, on a Riemann surface of genus at least three, with fixed determinant of odd degree is stable.

  8. Moduli and (un)attractor black hole thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astefanesei, D.; Goldstein, K.D.; Mahapatra, S.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate four-dimensional spherically symmetric black hole solutions in gravity theories with massless, neutral scalars non-minimally coupled to gauge fields. In the non-extremal case, we explicitly show that, under the variation of the moduli, the scalar charges appear in the first law of

  9. On the possibility of large axion moduli spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudelius, Tom [Jefferson Physical Laboratory, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    We study the diameters of axion moduli spaces, focusing primarily on type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau three-folds. In this case, we derive a stringent bound on the diameter in the large volume region of parameter space for Calabi-Yaus with simplicial Kähler cone. This bound can be violated by Calabi-Yaus with non-simplicial Kähler cones, but additional contributions are introduced to the effective action which can restrict the field range accessible to the axions. We perform a statistical analysis of simulated moduli spaces, finding in all cases that these additional contributions restrict the diameter so that these moduli spaces are no more likely to yield successful inflation than those with simplicial Kähler cone or with far fewer axions. Further heuristic arguments for axions in other corners of the duality web suggest that the difficulty observed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2003/06/001 of finding an axion decay constant parametrically larger than M{sub p} applies not only to individual axions, but to the diagonals of axion moduli space as well. This observation is shown to follow from the weak gravity conjecture of http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2007/06/060, so it likely applies not only to axions in string theory, but also to axions in any consistent theory of quantum gravity.

  10. String loop moduli stabilisation and cosmology in IIB flux compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicoli, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed review of the moduli stabilisation mechanism and possible cosmological implications of the LARGE Volume Scenario (LVS) that emerges naturally in the context of type IIB Calabi-Yau flux compactifications. After a quick overview of physics beyond the Standard Model, we present string theory as the most promising candidate for a consistent theory of quantum gravity. We then give a pedagogical introduction to type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau orientifolds where most of the moduli are stabilised by turning on background fluxes. However in order to fix the Kaehler moduli one needs to consider several corrections beyond the leading order approximations. After presenting a survey of all the existing solutions to this problem, we derive the topological conditions on an arbitrary Calabi-Yau to obtain the LVS since it requires no fine-tuning of the fluxes and provides a natural solution of the hierarchy problem. After performing a systematic study of the behaviour of string loop corrections for general type IIB compactifications, we show how they play a crucial role to achieve full Kaehler moduli stabilisation in the LVS. Before examining the possible cosmological implication of these scenarios, we present a broad overview of string cosmology. We then notice how, in the case of K3-fibrations, string loop corrections give rise naturally to an inflationary model which yields observable gravity waves. We finally study the finite-temperature behaviour of the LVS and discuss prospects for future work. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Wellhead compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Joe [Sertco Industries, Inc., Okemah, OK (United States); Vazquez, Daniel [Hoerbiger Service Latin America Inc., Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Jacobs, Denis Richard [Hoerbiger do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, all wells experience a natural decline in oil and gas production. In gas wells, the major problems are liquid loading and low downhole differential pressures which negatively impact total gas production. As a form of artificial lift, wellhead compressors help reduce the tubing pressure resulting in gas velocities above the critical velocity needed to surface water, oil and condensate regaining lost production and increasing recoverable reserves. Best results come from reservoirs with high porosity, high permeability, high initial flow rates, low decline rates and high total cumulative production. In oil wells, excessive annulus gas pressure tends to inhibit both oil and gas production. Wellhead compression packages can provide a cost effective solution to these problems by reducing the system pressure in the tubing or annulus, allowing for an immediate increase in production rates. Wells furthest from the gathering compressor typically benefit the most from wellhead compression due to system pressure drops. Downstream compressors also benefit from higher suction pressures reducing overall compression horsepower requirements. Special care must be taken in selecting the best equipment for these applications. The successful implementation of wellhead compression from an economical standpoint hinges on the testing, installation and operation of the equipment. Key challenges and suggested equipment features designed to combat those challenges and successful case histories throughout Latin America are discussed below.(author)

  12. Moduli effective action in warped brane-world compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garriga, Jaume; Pujolas, Oriol; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2003-01-01

    We consider a class of 5D brane-world solutions with a power-law warp factor a(y)∝y q , and bulk dilaton with profile phi∝lny, where y is the proper distance in the extra dimension. This class includes the heterotic M-theory brane-world of [Phys. Rev. D 59 (1999) 086001, and] and the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model as a limiting case. In general, there are two moduli fields y ± , corresponding to the 'positions' of two branes (which live at the fixed points of an orbifold compactification). Classically, the moduli are massless, due to a scaling symmetry of the action. However, in the absence of supersymmetry, they develop an effective potential at one loop. Local terms proportional to K ± 4 , where K ± =q/y ± is the local curvature scale at the location of the corresponding brane, are needed in order to remove the divergences in the effective potential. Such terms break the scaling symmetry and hence they may act as stabilizers for the moduli. When the branes are very close to each other, the effective potential induced by massless bulk fields behaves like V∼d -4 , where d is the separation between branes. When the branes are widely separated, the potentials for each one of the moduli generically develop a 'Coleman-Weinberg'-type behaviour of the form a 4 (y ± )K ± 4 ln(K ± /μ ± ), where μ ± are renormalization scales. In the RS case, the bulk geometry is AdS and K ± are equal to a constant, independent of the position of the branes, so these terms do not contribute to the mass of the moduli. However, for generic warp factor, they provide a simple stabilization mechanism. For q > or approx. 10, the observed hierarchy can be naturally generated by this potential, giving the lightest modulus a mass of order m - < or approx. TeV

  13. The relationship between 3D bone architectural parameters and elastic moduli of three orthogonal directions predicted from finite elements analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwan Soo; Lee, Sam Sun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Wan Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between 3D bone architectural parameters and direction-related elastic moduli of cancellous bone of mandibular condyle. Two micro-pigs (Micro-pigR, PWG Genetics Korea) were used. Each pig was about 12 months old and weighing around 44 kg. 31 cylindrical bone specimen were obtained from cancellous bone of condyles for 3D analysis and measured by micro-computed tomography. Six parameters were trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), bone specific surface (BS/BV), percent bone volume (BV/TV), structure model index (SMI), degree of anisotropy (DA) and 3-dimensional fractal dimension (3DFD). Elastic moduli of three orthogonal directions (superiorinferior (SI), medial-lateral (ML), andterior-posterior (AP) direction) were calculated through finite element analysis. Elastic modulus of superior-inferior direction was higher than those of other directions. Elastic moduli of 3 orthogonal directions showed different correlation with 3D architectural parameters. Elastic moduli of SI and ML directions showed significant strong to moderate correlation with BV/TV, SMI and 3DFD. Elastic modulus of cancellous bone of pig mandibular condyle was highest in the SI direction and it was supposed that the change into plate-like structure of trabeculae was mainly affected by increase of trabeculae of SI and ML directions.

  14. Combined effects of cooled EGR and a higher geometric compression ratio on thermal efficiency improvement of a downsized boosted spark-ignition direct-injection engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Jianye; Xu, Min; Li, Tie; Gao, Yi; Wang, Jiasheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Experiments for the effects of cooled EGR and two compression ratios (CR) on fuel efficiency were conducted. • The mechanism for the observed fuel efficiency behaviors by cooled EGR and high CR was clarified. • Cooled EGR offers more fuel efficiency improvement than elevating CR from 9.3 to 10.9. • Combining 18–25% cooled EGR with 10.9 CR lead to 2.1–3.5% brake thermal efficiency improvements. - Abstract: The downsized boosted spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engine has proven to be one of the most promising concepts to improve vehicle fuel economy. However, the boosted engine is typically designed at a lower geometric compression ratio (CR) due to the increased knock tendency in comparison to naturally aspirated engines, limiting the potential of improving fuel economy. On the other hand, cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) has drawn attention due to the potential to suppress knock and improve fuel economy. Combing the effects of boosting, increased CR and cooled EGR to further improve fuel economy within acceptable knock tolerance has been investigated using a 2.0 L downsized boosted SIDI engine over a wide range of engine operating conditions from 1000 rpm to 3000 rpm at low to high loads. To clarify the mechanism of this complicated effects, the first law of thermodynamics analysis was conducted with the inputs from GT-Power® engine simulation. Experiment results indicate that cooled EGR provides more brake thermal efficiency improvement than increasing geometric CR from 9.3 to 10.9. The benefit of brake thermal efficiency from the higher CR is limited to low load conditions. The attributes for improving brake thermal efficiency by cooled EGR include reduced heat transfer loss, reduced pumping work and increased ratio of specific heats for all the engine operating conditions, as well as higher degree of constant volume heat release only for the knock-limited high load conditions. The combined effects of 18–25% cooled EGR

  15. Explicit Gromov-Hausdorff compactifications of moduli spaces of Kähler-Einstein Fano manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spotti, Cristiano; Sun, Song

    We exhibit the first non-trivial concrete examples of Gromov-Hausdorff compactifications of moduli spaces of Kähler-Einstein Fano manifolds in all complex dimensions bigger than two (Fano K-moduli spaces). We also discuss potential applications to explicit study of moduli spaces of K-stable Fano...

  16. On rationality of moduli spaces of vector bundles on real Hirzebruch ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Moduli spaces of semistable vector bundles on a smooth projective variety are studied from various points of view. One of the questions that is often addressed is the birational type of the moduli space, more precisely, the question of rationality. It is known that the moduli space of semistable vector bundles of ...

  17. No-scale D-term inflation with stabilized moduli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, Wilfried; Domcke, Valerie; Wieck, Clemens

    2013-09-15

    We study the consistency of hybrid inflation and moduli stabilization, using the Kallosh- Linde model as an example for the latter. We find that F-term hybrid inflation is not viable since inflationary trajectories are destabilized by tachyonic modes. On the other hand, D-term hybrid inflation is naturally compatible with moduli stabilization due to the absence of a large superpotential term during the inflationary phase. Our model turns out to be equivalent to superconformal D-term inflation and it therefore successfully accounts for the CMB data in the large-field regime. Supersymmetry breaking can be incorporated via an O'Raifeartaigh model. For GUT-scale inflation one obtains a stringent bound on the gravitino mass. A rough estimate yields m{sub 3/2}>or similar 10{sup 5} GeV, contrary to naive expectation.

  18. Structures and Elastic Moduli of Polymer Nanocomposite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongyi; Karim, Alamgir; University of Akron Team

    2014-03-01

    Polymeric thin films generally possess unique mechanical and thermal properties due to confinement. In this study we investigated structures and elastic moduli of polymer nanocomposite thin films, which can potentially find wide applications in diverse areas such as in coating, permeation and separation. Conventional thermoplastics (PS, PMMA) and biopolymers (PLA, PCL) were chosen as polymer matrices. Various types of nanoparticles were used including nanoclay, fullerene and functionalized inorganic particles. Samples were prepared by solvent-mixing followed by spin-coating or flow-coating. Film structures were characterized using X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Elastic moduli were measured by strain-induced elastic buckling instability for mechanical measurements (SIEBIMM), and a strengthening effect was found in certain systems due to strong interaction between polymers and nanoparticles. The effects of polymer structure, nanoparticle addition and film thickness on elastic modulus will be discussed and compared with bulk materials.

  19. The Hilbert Series of the One Instanton Moduli Space

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Sergio; Mekareeya, Noppadol; 10.1007

    2010-01-01

    The moduli space of k G-instantons on R^4 for a classical gauge group G is known to be given by the Higgs branch of a supersymmetric gauge theory that lives on Dp branes probing D(p + 4) branes in Type II theories. For p = 3, these (3 + 1) dimensional gauge theories have N = 2 supersymmetry and can be represented by quiver diagrams. The F and D term equations coincide with the ADHM construction. The Hilbert series of the moduli spaces of one instanton for classical gauge groups is easy to compute and turns out to take a particularly simple form which is previously unknown. This allows for a G invariant character expansion and hence easily generalisable for exceptional gauge groups, where an ADHM construction is not known. The conjectures for exceptional groups are further checked using some new techniques like sewing relations in Hilbert Series. This is applied to Argyres-Seiberg dualities.

  20. Moduli evolution in the presence of flux compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, Tiago; Carlos, Beatriz de; Copeland, Ed; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2005-01-01

    We study the cosmological evolution of the volume moduli in a class of recently proposed inflationary universe models of Kachru et al. arising out of Type IIB string theory, where a number of the moduli fields have been stabilized through flux compactifications. Developing an approach introduced by some of us earlier, we show, in agreement with Brustein et al., how the presence of extra sources of matter act so as to provide additional friction, slowing the modulus field as it evolves down its potential, thereby vastly increasing the region of parameter space which leads to the eventual stabilization of these fields. Extending the case to include both the real and imaginary parts of the volume modulus, we show how the parameter space of initial conditions is modified and comment on the impact for these inflationary models arising out of flux type compactifications

  1. IMPA-ICTP School on Moduli of Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Ciliberto, Ciro; Esteves, Eduardo; Melo, Margarida; Voisin, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Providing a timely description of the present state of the art of moduli spaces of curves and their geometry, this volume is written in a way which will make it extremely useful both for young people who want to approach this important field, and also for established researchers, who will find references, problems, original expositions, new viewpoints, etc. The book collects the lecture notes of a number of leading algebraic geometers and in particular specialists in the field of moduli spaces of curves and their geometry. This is an important subject in algebraic geometry and complex analysis which has seen spectacular developments in recent decades, with important applications to other parts of mathematics such as birational geometry and enumerative geometry, and to other sciences, including physics.  The themes treated are classical but with a constant look to modern developments (see Cascini, Debarre, Farkas, and Sernesi's contributions), and include very new material, such as Bridgeland stability (see M...

  2. No-scale D-term inflation with stabilized moduli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, Wilfried; Domcke, Valerie; Wieck, Clemens

    2013-09-01

    We study the consistency of hybrid inflation and moduli stabilization, using the Kallosh- Linde model as an example for the latter. We find that F-term hybrid inflation is not viable since inflationary trajectories are destabilized by tachyonic modes. On the other hand, D-term hybrid inflation is naturally compatible with moduli stabilization due to the absence of a large superpotential term during the inflationary phase. Our model turns out to be equivalent to superconformal D-term inflation and it therefore successfully accounts for the CMB data in the large-field regime. Supersymmetry breaking can be incorporated via an O'Raifeartaigh model. For GUT-scale inflation one obtains a stringent bound on the gravitino mass. A rough estimate yields m 3/2 >or similar 10 5 GeV, contrary to naive expectation.

  3. The Coulomb Branch Formula for Quiver Moduli Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Manschot, Jan; Sen, Ashoke

    2014-01-01

    In recent series of works, by translating properties of multi-centered supersymmetric black holes into the language of quiver representations, we proposed a formula that expresses the Hodge numbers of the moduli space of semi-stable representations of quivers with generic superpotential in terms of a set of invariants associated to `single-centered' or `pure-Higgs' states. The distinguishing feature of these invariants is that they are independent of the choice of stability condition. Furthermore they are uniquely determined by the $\\chi_y$-genus of the moduli space. Here, we provide a self-contained summary of the Coulomb branch formula, spelling out mathematical details but leaving out proofs and physical motivations.

  4. In Silico Measurement of Elastic Moduli of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidky, Hythem; de Pablo, Juan J.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments on confined droplets of the nematic liquid crystal 5CB have questioned long-established bounds imposed on the elastic free energy of nematic systems. This elasticity, which derives from molecular alignment within nematic systems, is quantified through a set of moduli which can be difficult to measure experimentally and, in some cases, can only be probed indirectly. This is particularly true of the surfacelike saddle-splay elastic term, for which the available experimental data indicate values on the cusp of stability, often with large uncertainties. Here, we demonstrate that all nematic elastic moduli, including the saddle-splay elastic constant k24, may be calculated directly from atomistic molecular simulations. Importantly, results obtained through in silico measurements of the 5CB elastic properties demonstrate unambiguously that saddle-splay elasticity alone is unable to describe the observed confined morphologies.

  5. Moduli evolution in the presence of thermal corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, Tiago; Carlos, Beatriz de; Copeland, Edmund J.; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the effect of thermal corrections on the evolution of moduli in effective supergravity models. This is motivated by previous results in the literature suggesting that these corrections could alter and even erase the presence of a minimum in the zero temperature potential, something that would have disastrous consequences in these particular models. We show that, in a representative sample of flux compactification constructions, this need not be the case, although we find that the inclusion of thermal corrections can dramatically decrease the region of initial conditions for which the moduli are stabilized. Moreover, the bounds on the reheating temperature coming from demanding that the full, finite temperature potential, has a minimum can be considerably relaxed given the slow pace at which the evolution proceeds.

  6. Quantum moduli spaces of N=1 string theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, T.; Dine, M.

    1996-01-01

    Generically, string models with N=1 supersymmetry are not expected to have moduli beyond perturbation theory; stringy nonperturbative effects as well as low energy field-theoretic phenomena such as gluino condensation will lift any flat directions. In this work, we describe models where some subspace of the moduli space survives nonperturbatively. Discrete R symmetries forbid any inherently stringy effects, and dynamical considerations control the field-theoretic effects. The surviving subspace is a space of high symmetry; the system is attracted to this subspace by a potential which we compute. Models of this type may be useful for considerations of duality and raise troubling cosmological questions about string theory. Our considerations also suggest a mechanism for fixing the expectation value of the dilaton. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  7. Instantons from geodesics in AdS moduli spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Daniele; Trigiante, Mario; Van Riet, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    We investigate supergravity instantons in Euclidean AdS5 × S5/ℤk. These solutions are expected to be dual to instantons of N = 2 quiver gauge theories. On the supergravity side the (extremal) instanton solutions are neatly described by the (lightlike) geodesics on the AdS moduli space for which we find the explicit expression and compute the on-shell actions in terms of the quantised charges. The lightlike geodesics fall into two categories depending on the degree of nilpotency of the Noether charge matrix carried by the geodesic: for degree 2 the instantons preserve 8 supercharges and for degree 3 they are non-SUSY. We expect that these findings should apply to more general situations in the sense that there is a map between geodesics on moduli-spaces of Euclidean AdS vacua and instantons with holographic counterparts.

  8. Bohr--Sommerfeld Lagrangians of moduli spaces of Higgs bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biswas, Indranil; Gammelgaard, Niels Leth; Logares, Marina

    Let $X$ be a compact connected Riemann surface of genus at least two. Let $M_H(r,d)$ denote the moduli space of semistable Higgs bundles on $X$ of rank $r$ and degree $d$. We prove that the compact complex Bohr-Sommerfeld Lagrangians of $M_H(r,d)$ are precisely the irreducible components of the n......Let $X$ be a compact connected Riemann surface of genus at least two. Let $M_H(r,d)$ denote the moduli space of semistable Higgs bundles on $X$ of rank $r$ and degree $d$. We prove that the compact complex Bohr-Sommerfeld Lagrangians of $M_H(r,d)$ are precisely the irreducible components...

  9. On Rationality of Moduli Spaces of Vector Bundles on Real ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let be a real form of a Hirzebruch surface. Let M H ( r , c 1 , c 2 ) be the moduli space of vector bundles on . Under some numerical conditions on r , c 1 and c 2 , we identify those M H ( r , c 1 , c 2 ) that are rational. Author Affiliations. Indranil Biswas1 Ronnie Sebastian2. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of ...

  10. On natural inflation and moduli stabilisation in string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palti, Eran [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, Philosophenweg 19, Heidelberg, 69120 (Germany)

    2015-10-28

    Natural inflation relies on the existence of an axion decay constant which is super-Planckian. In string theory only sub-Planckian axion decay constants have been found in any controlled regime. However in field theory it is possible to generate an enhanced super-Planckian decay constant by an appropriate aligned mixing between axions with individual sub-Planckian decay constants. We study the possibility of such a mechanism in string theory. In particular we construct a new realisation of an alignment scenario in type IIA string theory compactifications on a Calabi-Yau where the alignment is induced through fluxes. Within field theory the original decay constants are taken to be independent of the parameters which induce the alignment. In string theory however they are moduli dependent quantities and so interact gravitationally with the physics responsible for the mixing. We show that this gravitational effect of the fluxes on the moduli can precisely cancel any enhancement of the effective decay constant. This censorship of an effective super-Planckian decay constant depends on detailed properties of Calabi-Yau moduli spaces and occurs for all the examples and classes that we study. We expand these results to a general superpotential assuming only that the axion superpartners are fixed supersymmetrically and are able to show for a large class of Calabi-Yau manifolds, but not all, that the cancellation effect occurs and is independent of the superpotential. We also study simple models where the moduli are fixed non-supersymmetrically and find that similar cancellation behaviour can emerge. Finally we make some comments on a possible generalisation to axion monodromy inflation models.

  11. Von Neuman representations on self-dual Hilbert W* moduli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.

    1987-01-01

    Von Neumann algebras M of bounded operators on self-dual Hilbert W* moduli H possessing a cyclic-separating element x-bar in H are considered. The close relation of them to certain real subspaces of H is established. Under the supposition that the underlying W*-algebra is commutative, a Tomita-Takesaki type theorem is stated. The natural cone in H arising from the pair (M, x-bar) is investigated and its properties are obtained

  12. Monte Carlo calculations of the elastic moduli and pressure-volume-temperature equation of state for hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, Thomas D.; Bennett, Carl M.

    2000-01-01

    Isothermal-isobaric Monte Carlo calculations were used to obtain predictions of the elastic coefficients and derived engineering moduli and Poisson ratios for crystalline hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The elastic coefficients were computed using the strain fluctuation formula due to Rahman and Parrinello [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 2662 (1982)]. Calculations were performed as a function of temperature (218 K≤T≤333 K) and hydrostatic pressure (0 GPa≤p≤4 GPa). The predicted values of the moduli and Poisson ratios under ambient conditions are in accord with general expectations for molecular crystals and with a very recent, unpublished determination for RDX. The moduli exhibit a sensitive pressure dependence whereas the Poisson ratios are relatively independent of pressure. The temperature dependence of the moduli is comparable to the precision of the results. However, the crystal does exhibit thermal softening for most pressures. An additional product of the calculations is information about the pressure-volume-temperature (pVT) equation of state. We obtain near-quantitative agreement with experiment for the case of hydrostatic compression and reasonable, but not quantitative, correspondence for thermal expansion. The results indicate a significant dependence of the thermal expansion coefficients on hydrostatic pressure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  13. Moduli effective action in warped brane-world compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garriga, Jaume E-mail: garriga@ifae.es; Pujolas, Oriol; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2003-04-07

    We consider a class of 5D brane-world solutions with a power-law warp factor a(y){proportional_to}y{sup q}, and bulk dilaton with profile phi{proportional_to}lny, where y is the proper distance in the extra dimension. This class includes the heterotic M-theory brane-world of [Phys. Rev. D 59 (1999) 086001, and] and the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model as a limiting case. In general, there are two moduli fields y{sub {+-}}, corresponding to the 'positions' of two branes (which live at the fixed points of an orbifold compactification). Classically, the moduli are massless, due to a scaling symmetry of the action. However, in the absence of supersymmetry, they develop an effective potential at one loop. Local terms proportional to K{sub {+-}}{sup 4}, where K{sub {+-}}=q/y{sub {+-}} is the local curvature scale at the location of the corresponding brane, are needed in order to remove the divergences in the effective potential. Such terms break the scaling symmetry and hence they may act as stabilizers for the moduli. When the branes are very close to each other, the effective potential induced by massless bulk fields behaves like V{approx}d{sup -4}, where d is the separation between branes. When the branes are widely separated, the potentials for each one of the moduli generically develop a 'Coleman-Weinberg'-type behaviour of the form a{sup 4}(y{sub {+-}})K{sub {+-}}{sup 4}ln(K{sub {+-}}/{mu}{sub {+-}}), where {mu}{sub {+-}} are renormalization scales. In the RS case, the bulk geometry is AdS and K{sub {+-}} are equal to a constant, independent of the position of the branes, so these terms do not contribute to the mass of the moduli. However, for generic warp factor, they provide a simple stabilization mechanism. For q > or approx. 10, the observed hierarchy can be naturally generated by this potential, giving the lightest modulus a mass of order m{sub -} < or approx. TeV.

  14. Uniaxial compression test series on Bullfrog Tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Jones, A.K.; Nimick, K.G.

    1982-04-01

    Nineteen uniaxial compressive experiments were performed on samples of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff, obtained from drillhole USW-G1 at Yucca Mountain on the Nevada Test Site. The water saturated samples were deformed at a nominal strain rate of 10 -5 sec -1 , atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Resultant unconfined compressive strengths, axial strains to failure, Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios ranged from 4.63 to 153. MPa, .0028 to .0058, 2.03 to 28.9 GPa and .08 to .16, respectively

  15. Radiological Image Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shih-Chung Benedict

    The movement toward digital images in radiology presents the problem of how to conveniently and economically store, retrieve, and transmit the volume of digital images. Basic research into image data compression is necessary in order to move from a film-based department to an efficient digital -based department. Digital data compression technology consists of two types of compression technique: error-free and irreversible. Error -free image compression is desired; however, present techniques can only achieve compression ratio of from 1.5:1 to 3:1, depending upon the image characteristics. Irreversible image compression can achieve a much higher compression ratio; however, the image reconstructed from the compressed data shows some difference from the original image. This dissertation studies both error-free and irreversible image compression techniques. In particular, some modified error-free techniques have been tested and the recommended strategies for various radiological images are discussed. A full-frame bit-allocation irreversible compression technique has been derived. A total of 76 images which include CT head and body, and radiographs digitized to 2048 x 2048, 1024 x 1024, and 512 x 512 have been used to test this algorithm. The normalized mean -square-error (NMSE) on the difference image, defined as the difference between the original and the reconstructed image from a given compression ratio, is used as a global measurement on the quality of the reconstructed image. The NMSE's of total of 380 reconstructed and 380 difference images are measured and the results tabulated. Three complex compression methods are also suggested to compress images with special characteristics. Finally, various parameters which would effect the quality of the reconstructed images are discussed. A proposed hardware compression module is given in the last chapter.

  16. Moduli stabilization and uplifting with dynamically generated F-terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudas, Emilian; Papineau, Chloe; Pokorski, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    We use the F-term dynamical supersymmetry breaking models with metastable vacua in order to uplift the vacuum energy in the KKLT moduli stabilization scenario. The main advantage compared to earlier proposals is the manifest supersymmetric treatment and the natural coexistence of a TeV gravitino mass with a zero cosmological constant. We argue that it is generically difficult to avoid anti de-Sitter supersymmetric minima, however the tunneling rate from the metastable vacuum with zero vacuum energy towards them can be very suppressed. We briefly comment on the properties of the induced soft terms in the observable sector

  17. Moduli stabilization and uplifting with dynamically generated F-terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudas, Emilian [CERN Theory Division, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Papineau, Chloe [CPhT, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Pokorski, Stefan [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Univ. of Warsaw, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-02-15

    We use the F-term dynamical supersymmetry breaking models with metastable vacua in order to uplift the vacuum energy in the KKLT moduli stabilization scenario. The main advantage compared to earlier proposals is the manifest supersymmetric treatment and the natural coexistence of a TeV gravitino mass with a zero cosmological constant. We argue that it is generically difficult to avoid anti de-Sitter supersymmetric minima, however the tunneling rate from the metastable vacuum with zero vacuum energy towards them can be very suppressed. We briefly comment on the properties of the induced soft terms in the observable sector.

  18. Using Ultrasonic Lamb Waves To Measure Moduli Of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of broad-band ultrasonic Lamb waves in plate specimens of ceramic-matrix/fiber and metal-matrix/fiber composite materials used to determine moduli of elasticity of materials. In one class of potential applications of concept, Lamb-wave responses of specimens measured and analyzed at various stages of thermal and/or mechanical processing to determine effects of processing, without having to dissect specimens. In another class, structural components having shapes supporting propagation of Lamb waves monitored ultrasonically to identify signs of deterioration and impending failure.

  19. Non-minimal gauge mediation and moduli stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinski, T.; Lalak, Z.; Pawelczyk, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter we consider U(1) A -gauged Polonyi model with two spurions coupled to a twisted closed string modulus. This offers a consistent setup for metastable SUSY breakdown which allows for moduli stabilization and naturally leads to gauge or hybrid gauge/gravitational mediation mechanism. Due to the presence of the second spurion one can arrange for a solution of the μ and B μ problems in a version of modified Giudice-Masiero mechanism, which works both in the limit of pure gauge mediation and in the mixed regime of hybrid mediation.

  20. Moduli/inflaton mixing with supersymmetry breaking field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Hamaguchi, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2006-05-15

    A heavy scalar field such as moduli or an inflaton generally mixes with a field responsible for the supersymmetry breaking. We study the scalar decay into the standard model particles and their superpartners, gravitinos, and the supersymmetry breaking sector, particularly paying attention to decay modes that proceed via the mixing between the scalar and the supersymmetry breaking field. The impacts of the new decay processes on cosmological scenarios are also discussed; the modulus field generically produces too much gravitinos, and most of the inflation models tend to result in too high reheating temperature and/or gravitino overproduction. (Orig.)

  1. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  2. Compression stockings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call your health insurance or prescription plan: Find out if they pay for compression stockings. Ask if your durable medical equipment benefit pays for compression stockings. Get a prescription from your doctor. Find a medical equipment store where they can ...

  3. The output least-squares approach to estimating Lamé moduli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gockenbach, Mark S.

    2007-12-01

    The Lamé moduli of a heterogeneous, isotropic, planar membrane can be estimated by observing the displacement of the membrane under a known edge traction, and choosing estimates of the moduli that best predict the observed displacement under a finite-element simulation. This algorithm converges to the exact moduli given pointwise measurements of the displacement on an increasingly fine mesh. The error estimates that prove this convergence also show the instability of the inverse problem.

  4. Correlations between elastic moduli and properties in bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weihua

    2006-01-01

    A survey of the elastic, mechanical, fragility, and thermodynamic properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and glass-forming liquids is presented. It is found that the elastic moduli of BMGs have correlations with the glass transition temperature, melting temperature, mechanical properties, and even liquid fragility. On the other hand, the elastic constants of available BMGs show a rough correlation with a weighted average of the elastic constants for the constituent elements. Although the theoretical and physical reasons for the correlations are to be clarified, these correlations could assist in understanding the long-standing issues of glass formation and the nature of glass and simulate the work of theorists. Based on the correlation, we show that the elastic moduli can assist in selecting alloying components for controlling the elastic properties and glass-forming ability of the BMGs and thus can guide BMG design. As case study, we report the formation of the families of rare-earth-based BMGs with controllable properties

  5. On a new compactification of the moduli of vector bundles on a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeeva, N V

    2008-01-01

    A new compactification of the moduli scheme of Gieseker-stable vector bundles with prescribed Hilbert polynomial on a smooth projective polarized surface (S,H) defined over a field k=k-bar of characteristic zero is constructed. The families of locally free sheaves on the surface S are completed by locally free sheaves on surfaces that are certain modifications of S. The new moduli space has a birational morphism onto the Gieseker-Maruyama moduli space. The case when the Gieseker-Maruyama space is a fine moduli space is considered. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  6. On a new compactification of moduli of vector bundles on a surface. III: Functorial approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeeva, Nadezhda V

    2011-01-01

    A new compactification for the scheme of moduli for Gieseker-stable vector bundles with prescribed Hilbert polynomial on the smooth projective polarized surface (S,L) is constructed. We work over the field k=k-bar of characteristic zero. Families of locally free sheaves on the surface S are completed with locally free sheaves on schemes which are modifications of S. The Gieseker-Maruyama moduli space has a birational morphism onto the new moduli space. We propose the functor for families of pairs 'polarized scheme-vector bundle' with moduli space of such type. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  7. Exact moduli space metrics for hyperbolic vortex polygons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusch, S.; Speight, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Exact metrics on some totally geodesic submanifolds of the moduli space of static hyperbolic N-vortices are derived. These submanifolds, denoted as Σ n,m , are spaces of C n -invariant vortex configurations with n single vortices at the vertices of a regular polygon and m=N-n coincident vortices at the polygon's center. The geometric properties of Σ n,m are investigated, and it is found that Σ n,n-1 is isometric to the hyperbolic plane of curvature -(3πn) -1 . The geodesic flow on Σ n,m and a geometrically natural variant of geodesic flow recently proposed by Collie and Tong ['The dynamics of Chern-Simons vortices', Phys. Rev. D Part. Fields Gravit. Cosmol. 78, 065013 (2008);e-print arXiv:hep-th/0805.0602] are analyzed in detail.

  8. Dynamics of moduli and gaugino condensates in an expanding universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papineau, C.; Ramos-Sanchez, S.; Postma, M.

    2009-08-01

    We study dynamical moduli stabilization driven by gaugino condensation in supergravity. In the presence of background radiation, there exists a region of initial conditions leading to successful stabilization. We point out that most of the allowed region corresponds to initial Hubble rate H close to the scale of condensation Λ, which is the natural cutoff of the effective theory. We first show that including the condensate dynamics sets a strong bound on the initial conditions. We then find that (complete) decoupling of the condensate happens at H about two orders of magnitude below Λ. This bound implies that in the usual scenario with the condensate integrated out, only the vicinity of the minimum leads to stabilization. Finally, we discuss the effects of thermal corrections. (orig.)

  9. Yukawa unification in moduli-dominant SUSY breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, S.; Tatsuo Kobayashi

    1997-07-01

    We study Yukawa in string models with moduli-dominant SUSY breaking. This type of SUSY breaking in general leads to non-universal soft masses, i.e. soft scalar masses and gaugino masses. Such non-universality is important for phenomenological aspects of Yukawa unification, i.e., successful electroweak breaking, SUSY corrections to the bottom mass and the branching ratio of b → sγ. We show three regions in the whole parameter space which lead to successful electroweak breaking and allow small SUSY corrections to the bottom mass. For these three regions we investigated the b → sγ decay and mass spectra. (author). 26 refs, 6 figs

  10. Instanton transition in thermal and moduli deformed de Sitter cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kounnas, Costas; Partouche, Herve

    2008-01-01

    We consider the de Sitter cosmology deformed by the presence of a thermal bath of radiation and/or time-dependent moduli fields. Depending on the parameters, either a first or second-order phase transition can occur. In the first case, an instanton allows a double analytic continuation. It induces a probability to enter the inflationary evolution by tunnel effect from another cosmological solution. The latter starts with a big bang and, in the case the transition does not occur, ends with a big crunch. A temperature duality exchanges the two cosmological branches. In the limit where the pure de Sitter universe is recovered, the tunnel effect reduces to a 'creation from nothing', due to the vanishing of the big bang branch. However, the latter may be viable in some range of the deformation parameter. In the second case, there is a smooth evolution from a big bang to the inflationary phase

  11. Elastic moduli of a Brownian colloidal glass former

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschi, S.; Fuchs, M.

    2018-01-01

    The static, dynamic and flow-dependent shear moduli of a binary mixture of Brownian hard disks are studied by an event-driven molecular dynamics simulation. Thereby, the emergence of rigidity close to the glass transition encoded in the static shear modulus G_∞ is accessed by three methods. Results from shear stress auto-correlation functions, elastic dispersion relations, and the elastic response to strain deformations upon the start-up of shear flow are compared. This enables one to sample the time-dependent shear modulus G(t) consistently over several decades in time. By that a very precise specification of the glass transition point and of G_∞ is feasible. Predictions by mode coupling theory of a finite shear modulus at the glass transition, of α-scaling in fluid states close to the transition, and of shear induced decay in yielding glass states are tested and broadly verified.

  12. Morphology and linear-elastic moduli of random network solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtrab, Susan; Kapfer, Sebastian C; Arns, Christoph H; Madadi, Mahyar; Mecke, Klaus; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E

    2011-06-17

    The effective linear-elastic moduli of disordered network solids are analyzed by voxel-based finite element calculations. We analyze network solids given by Poisson-Voronoi processes and by the structure of collagen fiber networks imaged by confocal microscopy. The solid volume fraction ϕ is varied by adjusting the fiber radius, while keeping the structural mesh or pore size of the underlying network fixed. For intermediate ϕ, the bulk and shear modulus are approximated by empirical power-laws K(phi)proptophin and G(phi)proptophim with n≈1.4 and m≈1.7. The exponents for the collagen and the Poisson-Voronoi network solids are similar, and are close to the values n=1.22 and m=2.11 found in a previous voxel-based finite element study of Poisson-Voronoi systems with different boundary conditions. However, the exponents of these empirical power-laws are at odds with the analytic values of n=1 and m=2, valid for low-density cellular structures in the limit of thin beams. We propose a functional form for K(ϕ) that models the cross-over from a power-law at low densities to a porous solid at high densities; a fit of the data to this functional form yields the asymptotic exponent n≈1.00, as expected. Further, both the intensity of the Poisson-Voronoi process and the collagen concentration in the samples, both of which alter the typical pore or mesh size, affect the effective moduli only by the resulting change of the solid volume fraction. These findings suggest that a network solid with the structure of the collagen networks can be modeled in quantitative agreement by a Poisson-Voronoi process. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Rock Physical Interpretation of the Relationship between Dynamic and Static Young's Moduli of Sedimentary Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T.

    2017-12-01

    The static Young's modulus (deformability) of a rock is indispensable for designing and constructing tunnels, dams and underground caverns in civil engineering. Static Young's modulus which is an elastic modulus at large strain level is usually obtained with the laboratory tests of rock cores sampled in boreholes drilled in a rock mass. A deformability model of the entire rock mass is then built by extrapolating the measurements based on a rock mass classification obtained in geological site characterization. However, model-building using data obtained from a limited number of boreholes in the rock mass, especially a complex rock mass, may cause problems in the accuracy and reliability of the model. On the other hand, dynamic Young's modulus which is the modulus at small strain level can be obtained from seismic velocity. If dynamic Young's modulus can be rationally converted to static one, a seismic velocity model by the seismic method can be effectively used to build a deformability model of the rock mass. In this study, we have, therefore, developed a rock physics model (Mavko et al., 2009) to estimate static Young's modulus from dynamic one for sedimentary rocks. The rock physics model has been generally applied to seismic properties at small strain level. In the proposed model, however, the sandy shale model, one of rock physics models, is extended for modeling the static Young's modulus at large strain level by incorporating the mixture of frictional and frictionless grain contacts into the Hertz-Mindlin model. The proposed model is verified through its application to the dynamic Young's moduli derived from well log velocities and static Young's moduli measured in the tri-axial compression tests of rock cores sampled in the same borehole as the logs were acquired. This application proves that the proposed rock physics model can be possibly used to estimate static Young's modulus (deformability) which is required in many types of civil engineering applications

  14. Moduli Spaces for Linear Differential Equations and the Painlevé Equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Put, Marius van der; Saito, Masa-Hiko

    2009-01-01

    A systematic construction of isomonodromic families of connections of rank two on the Riemarm sphere is obtained by considering the analytic Riemann-Hilbert map RH : M -> R, where M is a moduli space of connections and 72, the monodromy space, is a moduli space for analytic data (i.e., ordinary

  15. WSNs Microseismic Signal Subsection Compression Algorithm Based on Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouzhou Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For wireless network microseismic monitoring and the problems of low compression ratio and high energy consumption of communication, this paper proposes a segmentation compression algorithm according to the characteristics of the microseismic signals and the compression perception theory (CS used in the transmission process. The algorithm will be collected as a number of nonzero elements of data segmented basis, by reducing the number of combinations of nonzero elements within the segment to improve the accuracy of signal reconstruction, while taking advantage of the characteristics of compressive sensing theory to achieve a high compression ratio of the signal. Experimental results show that, in the quantum chaos immune clone refactoring (Q-CSDR algorithm for reconstruction algorithm, under the condition of signal sparse degree higher than 40, to be more than 0.4 of the compression ratio to compress the signal, the mean square error is less than 0.01, prolonging the network life by 2 times.

  16. The Infinitesimal Moduli Space of Heterotic G 2 Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Ossa, Xenia; Larfors, Magdalena; Svanes, Eirik E.

    2018-06-01

    Heterotic string compactifications on integrable G 2 structure manifolds Y with instanton bundles {(V,A), (TY,\\tilde{θ})} yield supersymmetric three-dimensional vacua that are of interest in physics. In this paper, we define a covariant exterior derivative D and show that it is equivalent to a heterotic G 2 system encoding the geometry of the heterotic string compactifications. This operator D acts on a bundle Q}=T^*Y \\oplus End(V) \\oplus End(TY)} and satisfies a nilpotency condition \\check{{D^2=0} , for an appropriate projection of D. Furthermore, we determine the infinitesimal moduli space of these systems and show that it corresponds to the finite-dimensional cohomology group H^1_{D}(Q). We comment on the similarities and differences of our result with Atiyah's well-known analysis of deformations of holomorphic vector bundles over complex manifolds. Our analysis leads to results that are of relevance to all orders in the {α'} expansion.

  17. Interface effects on effective elastic moduli of nanocrystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gangfeng; Feng Xiqiao; Yu Shouwen; Nan Cewen

    2003-01-01

    Interfaces often play a significant role in many physical properties and phenomena of nanocrystalline materials (NcMs). In the present paper, the interface effects on the effective elastic property of NcMs are investigated. First, an atomic potential method is suggested for estimating the effective elastic modulus of an interface phase. Then, the Mori-Tanaka effective field method is employed to determine the overall effective elastic moduli of a nanocrystalline material, which is regarded as a binary composite consisting of a crystal or inclusion phase with regular lattice connected by an amorphous-like interface or matrix phase. Finally, the stiffening effects of strain gradients are examined on the effective elastic property by using the strain gradient theory to analyze a representative unit cell. Our analysis shows two physical mechanisms of interfaces that influence the effective stiffness and other mechanical properties of materials. One is the softening effect due to the distorted atomic structures and the increased atomic spacings in interface regions, and another is the baffling effect due to the existence of boundary layers between the interface phase and the crystalline phase

  18. Quantum triangulations. Moduli spaces, strings, and quantum computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carfora, Mauro; Marzouli, Annalisa [Univ. degli Studi di Pavia (Italy). Dipt. Fisica Nucleare e Teorica; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Pavia (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Research on polyhedral manifolds often points to unexpected connections between very distinct aspects of Mathematics and Physics. In particular triangulated manifolds play quite a distinguished role in such settings as Riemann moduli space theory, strings and quantum gravity, topological quantum field theory, condensed matter physics, and critical phenomena. Not only do they provide a natural discrete analogue to the smooth manifolds on which physical theories are typically formulated, but their appearance is rather often a consequence of an underlying structure which naturally calls into play non-trivial aspects of representation theory, of complex analysis and topology in a way which makes manifest the basic geometric structures of the physical interactions involved. Yet, in most of the existing literature, triangulated manifolds are still merely viewed as a convenient discretization of a given physical theory to make it more amenable for numerical treatment. The motivation for these lectures notes is thus to provide an approachable introduction to this topic, emphasizing the conceptual aspects, and probing, through a set of cases studies, the connection between triangulated manifolds and quantum physics to the deepest. This volume addresses applied mathematicians and theoretical physicists working in the field of quantum geometry and its applications. (orig.)

  19. Effective moduli of high volume fraction particulate composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, P.; Dharan, C.K.H.

    1995-01-01

    Predictions using current micromechanics theories for the effective moduli of particulate-reinforced composites tend to break down at high volume fractions of the reinforcing phase. The predictions are usually well below experimentally measured values of the Young's modulus for volume fractions exceeding about 0.6. In this paper, the concept of contiguity, which is a measure of phase continuity, is applied to Mori-Tanaka micromechanics theory. It is shown that contiguity of the second phase increases with volume fraction, leading eventually to a reversal in the roles of the inclusion and matrix. In powder metallurgy practice, it is well known that at high volume fractions, sintering and consolidation of the reinforcement make it increasingly continuous and more like the matrix phase, while the former matrix tends to become more like the inclusion phase. The concept of contiguity applied to micromechanics theory results in very good agreement between the predicted Young's modulus and experimental data on tungsten carbide particulate-reinforced cobalt

  20. Explaining the electroweak scale and stabilizing moduli in M theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, Bobby S.; Bobkov, Konstantin; Kane, Gordon L.; Kumar, Piyush; Shao Jing

    2007-01-01

    In a recent paper [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).] it was shown that in fluxless M theory vacua with at least two hidden sectors undergoing strong gauge dynamics and a particular form of the Kaehler potential, all moduli are stabilized by the effective potential and a stable hierarchy is generated, consistent with standard gauge unification. This paper explains the results of [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).] in more detail and generalizes them, finding an essentially unique de Sitter vacuum under reasonable conditions. One of the main phenomenological consequences is a prediction which emerges from this entire class of vacua: namely, gaugino masses are significantly suppressed relative to the gravitino mass. We also present evidence that, for those vacua in which the vacuum energy is small, the gravitino mass, which sets all the superpartner masses, is automatically in the TeV-100 TeV range

  1. Explaining the electroweak scale and stabilizing moduli in M theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bobby S.; Bobkov, Konstantin; Kane, Gordon L.; Kumar, Piyush; Shao, Jing

    2007-12-01

    In a recent paper [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.97.191601] it was shown that in fluxless M theory vacua with at least two hidden sectors undergoing strong gauge dynamics and a particular form of the Kähler potential, all moduli are stabilized by the effective potential and a stable hierarchy is generated, consistent with standard gauge unification. This paper explains the results of [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.97.191601] in more detail and generalizes them, finding an essentially unique de Sitter vacuum under reasonable conditions. One of the main phenomenological consequences is a prediction which emerges from this entire class of vacua: namely, gaugino masses are significantly suppressed relative to the gravitino mass. We also present evidence that, for those vacua in which the vacuum energy is small, the gravitino mass, which sets all the superpartner masses, is automatically in the TeV 100 TeV range.

  2. Moduli Potentials in Type IIA Compactifications with RR and NS Flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachru, S.

    2004-12-01

    We describe a simple class of type IIA string compactifications on Calabi-Yau manifolds where background fluxes generate a potential for the complex structure moduli, the dilaton, and the Kaehler moduli. This class of models corresponds to gauged {Nu} = 2 supergravities, and the potential is completely determined by a choice of gauging and by data of the {Nu} = 2 Calabi-Yau model--the prepotential for vector multiplets and the quaternionic metric on the hypermultiplet moduli space. Using mirror symmetry, one can determine many (though not all) of the quantum corrections which are relevant in these models.

  3. Degenerate conformal theories on higher-genus surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional degenerate field theories on higher-genus surfaces are investigated. Objects are built on the space of moduli, whose linear combinations are hypothetically conformal blocks in degenerate theories

  4. Size-dependent elastic moduli and vibrational properties of fivefold twinned copper nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y. G.; Zhao, Y. T.; Ye, H. F.; Zhang, H. W.

    2014-08-01

    Based on atomistic simulations, the elastic moduli and vibration behaviors of fivefold twinned copper nanowires are investigated in this paper. Simulation results show that the elastic (i.e., Young’s and shear) moduli exhibit size dependence due to the surface effect. The effective Young’s modulus is found to decrease slightly whereas the effective shear modulus increases slightly with the increase in the wire radius. Both moduli tend to approach certain values at a larger radius and can be suitably described by core-shell composite structure models. Furthermore, we show by comparing simulation results and continuum predictions that, provided the effective Young’s and shear moduli are used, classic elastic theory can be applied to describe the small-amplitude vibration of fivefold twinned copper nanowires. Moreover, for the transverse vibration, the Timoshenko beam model is more suitable because shear deformation becomes apparent.

  5. Size-dependent elastic moduli and vibrational properties of fivefold twinned copper nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y G; Zhao, Y T; Ye, H F; Zhang, H W

    2014-01-01

    Based on atomistic simulations, the elastic moduli and vibration behaviors of fivefold twinned copper nanowires are investigated in this paper. Simulation results show that the elastic (i.e., Young’s and shear) moduli exhibit size dependence due to the surface effect. The effective Young’s modulus is found to decrease slightly whereas the effective shear modulus increases slightly with the increase in the wire radius. Both moduli tend to approach certain values at a larger radius and can be suitably described by core-shell composite structure models. Furthermore, we show by comparing simulation results and continuum predictions that, provided the effective Young’s and shear moduli are used, classic elastic theory can be applied to describe the small-amplitude vibration of fivefold twinned copper nanowires. Moreover, for the transverse vibration, the Timoshenko beam model is more suitable because shear deformation becomes apparent. (paper)

  6. Compositional dependence of Young's moduli for amorphous FeCo-SiO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Xie, J. L.; Deng, L. J.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, Z. W.; Bi, L.

    2011-01-01

    Systematic force-deflection measurements with microcantilevers and a combinatorial-deposition method have been used to investigate the Young's moduli of amorphous composite FeCo-SiO 2 thin films as a function of film composition, with high compositional resolution. It is found that the modulus decreases monotonically with increasing FeCo content. Such a trend can be explained in terms of the metalloid atoms having a significant effect on the Young's moduli of metal-metalloid composites, which is associated with the strong chemical interaction between the metalloid and themetallic atoms rather than that between the metallic components themselves. This work provides an efficient and effective method to study the moduli of magnetic thin films over a largecomposition coverage, and to compare the relative magnitudes of moduli for differentcompositions at high compositional resolution.

  7. Moduli of mathematical instanton vector bundles with odd c2 on projective space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhomirov, Aleksandr S

    2012-01-01

    We study the moduli space I n of mathematical instanton vector bundles of rank 2 with second Chern class n≥1 on the projective space P 3 , and prove the irreducibility of I n for arbitrary odd n≥1.

  8. An Efficient and Accurate Genetic Algorithm for Backcalculation of Flexible Pavement Layer Moduli : Executive Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Backcalculation of pavement moduli has been an intensively researched subject for more than four decades. Despite the existence of many backcalculation programs employing different backcalculation procedures and algorithms, accurate inverse of the la...

  9. A flux-scaling scenario for high-scale moduli stabilization in string theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Blumenhagen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tree-level moduli stabilization via geometric and non-geometric fluxes in type IIB orientifolds on Calabi–Yau manifolds is investigated. The focus is on stable non-supersymmetric minima, where all moduli are fixed except for some massless axions. The scenario includes the purely axionic orientifold-odd moduli. A set of vacua allowing for parametric control over the moduli vacuum expectation values and their masses is presented, featuring a specific scaling with the fluxes. Uplift mechanisms and supersymmetry breaking soft masses on MSSM-like D7-branes are discussed as well. This scenario provides a complete effective framework for realizing the idea of F-term axion monodromy inflation in string theory. It is argued that, with all masses close to the Planck and GUT scales, one is confronted with working at the threshold of controlling all mass hierarchies.

  10. A flux-scaling scenario for high-scale moduli stabilization in string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Font, Anamaría [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, LMU, Theresienstr. 37, 80333 München (Germany); Fuchs, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Herschmann, Daniela, E-mail: herschma@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Plauschinn, Erik [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Sekiguchi, Yuta; Wolf, Florian [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, LMU, Theresienstr. 37, 80333 München (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Tree-level moduli stabilization via geometric and non-geometric fluxes in type IIB orientifolds on Calabi–Yau manifolds is investigated. The focus is on stable non-supersymmetric minima, where all moduli are fixed except for some massless axions. The scenario includes the purely axionic orientifold-odd moduli. A set of vacua allowing for parametric control over the moduli vacuum expectation values and their masses is presented, featuring a specific scaling with the fluxes. Uplift mechanisms and supersymmetry breaking soft masses on MSSM-like D7-branes are discussed as well. This scenario provides a complete effective framework for realizing the idea of F-term axion monodromy inflation in string theory. It is argued that, with all masses close to the Planck and GUT scales, one is confronted with working at the threshold of controlling all mass hierarchies.

  11. In search of invariants for viscous liquids in the density scaling regime: investigations of dynamic and thermodynamic moduli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzejowska, Agnieszka; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Paluch, Marian

    2017-07-19

    In this paper, we report the nontrivial results of our investigations of dynamic and thermodynamic moduli in search of invariants for viscous liquids in the density scaling regime by using selected supercooled van der Waals liquids as representative materials. Previously, the dynamic modulus M p-T (defined in the pressure-temperature representation by the ratio of isobaric activation energy and activation volume) as well as the ratio B T /M p-T (where B T is the thermodynamic modulus defined as the inverse isothermal compressibility) have been suggested as some kinds of material constants. We have established that they are not valid in the explored wide range of temperatures T over a dozen decades of structural relaxation times τ. The temperature dependences of M p-T and B T /M p-T have been elucidated by comparison with the well-known measure of the relative contribution of temperature and density fluctuations to molecular dynamics near the glass transition, i.e., the ratio of isochoric and isobaric activation energies. Then, we have implemented an idea to transform the definition of the dynamic modulus M p-T from the p-T representation to the V-T one. This idea relied on the disentanglement of combined temperature and density fluctuations involved in isobaric parameters and has resulted in finding an invariant for viscous liquids in the density scaling regime, which is the ratio of thermodynamic and dynamic moduli, B T /M V-T . In this way, we have constituted a characteristic of thermodynamics and molecular dynamics, which remains unchanged in the supercooled liquid state for a given material, the molecular dynamics of which obeys the power density scaling law.

  12. Deformations, moduli stabilisation and gauge couplings at one-loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honecker, Gabriele; Koltermann, Isabel [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, MITP & Institut für Physik (WA THEP),Johannes Gutenberg-Universität,Staudingerweg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Staessens, Wieland [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM-CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Cantoblanco,Calle de Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Cantoblanco,Calle de Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-04-05

    We investigate deformations of ℤ{sub 2} orbifold singularities on the toroidal orbifold T{sup 6}/(ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 6}) with discrete torsion in the framework of Type IIA orientifold model building with intersecting D6-branes wrapping special Lagrangian cycles. To this aim, we employ the hypersurface formalism developed previously for the orbifold T{sup 6}/(ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 2}) with discrete torsion and adapt it to the (ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 6}×ΩR) point group by modding out the remaining ℤ{sub 3} subsymmetry and the orientifold projection ΩR. We first study the local behaviour of the ℤ{sub 3}×ΩR invariant deformation orbits under non-zero deformation and then develop methods to assess the deformation effects on the fractional three-cycle volumes globally. We confirm that D6-branes supporting USp(2N) or SO(2N) gauge groups do not constrain any deformation, while deformation parameters associated to cycles wrapped by D6-branes with U(N) gauge groups are constrained by D-term supersymmetry breaking. These features are exposed in global prototype MSSM, Left-Right symmetric and Pati-Salam models first constructed in (DOI: 10.1016/j.nuclphysb.2015.10.009; 10.1002/prop.201400066), for which we here count the number of stabilised moduli and study flat directions changing the values of some gauge couplings. Finally, we confront the behaviour of tree-level gauge couplings under non-vanishing deformations along flat directions with the one-loop gauge threshold corrections at the orbifold point and discuss phenomenological implications, in particular on possible LARGE volume scenarios and the corresponding value of the string scale M{sub string}, for the same global D6-brane models.

  13. Picard-Fuchs equations and the moduli space of superconformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadavid, A.C.; Ferrara, S.

    1991-01-01

    We derive simple techniques which allow us to relate Picard-Fuchs differential equations for the periods of holomorphic p-forms on certain complex manifolds, to their moduli space and its modular group (target space duality). For Calabi-Yau manifolds the special geometry of moduli space gives the Zamolodchikov metric and the Yukawa couplings in terms of the periods. For general N=2 superconformal theories these equations exactly determine perturbed correlation functions of the chiral rings of primary fields. (orig.)

  14. On the reconstruction of a unitary matrix from its moduli. Existence of continuous ambiguities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auberson, G.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that, for an n x n unitary matrix with n ≥ 4, the knowledge of the moduli of its elements is not always sufficient to determine this matrix up to 'trivial' or 'discrete' ambiguities. Using a parametrization a la Kobayashi-Maskawa in the case n=4, we exhibit various configurations of the moduli for which a continuous ambiguity appears (i.e., some non-trivial phase remains free). (orig.)

  15. Symplectic geometry on moduli spaces of holomorphic bundles over complex surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Khesin, Boris; Rosly, Alexei

    2000-01-01

    We give a comparative description of the Poisson structures on the moduli spaces of flat connections on real surfaces and holomorphic Poisson structures on the moduli spaces of holomorphic bundles on complex surfaces. The symplectic leaves of the latter are classified by restrictions of the bundles to certain divisors. This can be regarded as fixing a "complex analogue of the holonomy" of a connection along a "complex analogue of the boundary" in analogy with the real case.

  16. How to define the storage and loss moduli for a rheologically nonlinear material?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argatov, Ivan; Iantchenko, Alexei; Kocherbitov, Vitaly

    2017-11-01

    A large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) is considered in the strain-controlled regime, and the interrelation between the Fourier transform and the stress decomposition approaches is established. Several definitions of the generalized storage and loss moduli are examined in a unified conceptual scheme based on the Lissajous-Bowditch plots. An illustrative example of evaluating the generalized moduli from a LAOS flow is given.

  17. Development of superhigh-strength mortars with compressive strength of 3000kgf/cm sup 2 or higher. 3000kgf/cm sup 2 ijo no asshuku kyodo wo motsu mortar no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohama, Y; Izumura, K [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). Collete of Engineering; Hayashi, S [Onoda Cement Co. Ltd., Yamaguchi (Japan)

    1991-08-01

    This paper discusses the preparation factors and curing conditions of superhigh-strength mortar, and explains a method of manufacturing superhigh-strength mortar having still higher strength and its superhigh strength generating mechanism. A recommended cement material for the superhigh-strength mortar is a Portland cement mixed with a high-purity silica at 20% and silica fume at 20%. This was made to a water-cement material ratio of 15% and fine aggregate cement material ratio of 1.06, cured in an autoclave, and further heat-cured at 200{degree}C for one day to obtain a superhigh-strength mortar. The compression and bending strengths reach 2,200 kgf/cm{sup 2} and 180 kgf/cm{sup 2} respectively when used with silica sand, and 3000 kgf/cm{sup 2} and 220 kgf/cm{sup 2} or more when used with stainless steel grits. The heat curing at 200{degree}C for a day increases remarkably the compression strength of the superhigh-strength mortar regardless of the curing conditions before the heat curing. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Temperature- and thickness-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Zhimin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mechanical properties of polymer ultrathin films are usually different from those of their counterparts in bulk. Understanding the effect of thickness on the mechanical properties of these films is crucial for their applications. However, it is a great challenge to measure their elastic modulus experimentally with in situ heating. In this study, a thermodynamic model for temperature- (T and thickness (h-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films Ef(T,h is developed with verification by the reported experimental data on polystyrene (PS thin films. For the PS thin films on a passivated substrate, Ef(T,h decreases with the decreasing film thickness, when h is less than 60 nm at ambient temperature. However, the onset thickness (h*, at which thickness Ef(T,h deviates from the bulk value, can be modulated by T. h* becomes larger at higher T because of the depression of the quenching depth, which determines the thickness of the surface layer δ.

  19. Dislocations and point defects in hydrostatically compressed crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosevich, A.M.; Tokij, V.V.; Strel'tsov, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    Within the framework of the theory of finite deformations, the elastic fields are considered, which are induced by the sources of internal stresses in a crystal compressed under a high pressure. In the case of a hydrostatically compressed crystal with defects, the use of a variation principle is discussed. Using the smallness of distorsions, the linear theory of elastic fields of defects in the crystal compressed under a high pressure, is developed. An analysis of the main relationships of the theory results in the following conclusion: in a course of the linear approximation the taking into account of the hydrostatic pressure brings to the renorming of the elasticity moduli and to the replacing of the hydrostatic parameters of defects by their values in the compressed crystal. That conclusion allows the results of the elasticity linear theory of the crystal with defects to be used to the full extent

  20. Experimental Investigation on the Fatigue Mechanical Properties of Intermittently Jointed Rock Models Under Cyclic Uniaxial Compression with Different Loading Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Dong, Lu; Xu, Nuwen; Feng, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Intermittently jointed rocks, widely existing in many mining and civil engineering structures, are quite susceptible to cyclic loading. Understanding the fatigue mechanism of jointed rocks is vital to the rational design and the long-term stability analysis of rock structures. In this study, the fatigue mechanical properties of synthetic jointed rock models under different cyclic conditions are systematically investigated in the laboratory, including four loading frequencies, four maximum stresses, and four amplitudes. Our experimental results reveal the influence of the three cyclic loading parameters on the mechanical properties of jointed rock models, regarding the fatigue deformation characteristics, the fatigue energy and damage evolution, and the fatigue failure and progressive failure behavior. Under lower loading frequency or higher maximum stress and amplitude, the jointed specimen is characterized by higher fatigue deformation moduli and higher dissipated hysteresis energy, resulting in higher cumulative damage and lower fatigue life. However, the fatigue failure modes of jointed specimens are independent of cyclic loading parameters; all tested jointed specimens exhibit a prominent tensile splitting failure mode. Three different crack coalescence patterns are classified between two adjacent joints. Furthermore, different from the progressive failure under static monotonic loading, the jointed rock specimens under cyclic compression fail more abruptly without evident preceding signs. The tensile cracks on the front surface of jointed specimens always initiate from the joint tips and then propagate at a certain angle with the joints toward the direction of maximum compression.

  1. Correlations between quality indexes of chest compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Ling; Yan, Li; Huang, Su-Fang; Bai, Xiang-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a kind of emergency treatment for cardiopulmonary arrest, and chest compression is the most important and necessary part of CPR. The American Heart Association published the new Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care in 2010 and demanded for better performance of chest compression practice, especially in compression depth and rate. The current study was to explore the relationship of quality indexes of chest compression and to identify the key points in chest compression training and practice. Totally 219 healthcare workers accepted chest compression training by using Laerdal ACLS advanced life support resuscitation model. The quality indexes of chest compression, including compression hands placement, compression rate, compression depth, and chest wall recoil as well as self-reported fatigue time were monitored by the Laerdal Computer Skills and Reporting System. The quality of chest compression was related to the gender of the compressor. The indexes in males, including self-reported fatigue time, the accuracy of compression depth and the compression rate, the accuracy of compression rate, were higher than those in females. However, the accuracy of chest recoil was higher in females than in males. The quality indexes of chest compression were correlated with each other. The self-reported fatigue time was related to all the indexes except the compression rate. It is necessary to offer CPR training courses regularly. In clinical practice, it might be better to change the practitioner before fatigue, especially for females or weak practitioners. In training projects, more attention should be paid to the control of compression rate, in order to delay the fatigue, guarantee enough compression depth and improve the quality of chest compression.

  2. Lectures on moduli of principal G-bundles over algebraic curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorger, C.

    2000-01-01

    These notes are supposed to be an introduction to the moduli of G-bundles on curves. Therefore I will lay stress on ideas in order to make these notes more readable. In the last years the moduli spaces of G-bundles over algebraic curves have attracted some attention from various subjects like from conformal field theory or Beilinson and Drinfeld's geometric Langlands program. In both subjects it turned out that the 'stacky' point of view is more convenient and as the basic motivation of these notes is to introduce to the latter subject our moduli spaces will be moduli stacks (and not coarse moduli spaces). As people may feel uncomfortable with stacks I have included a small introduction to them. Actually there is a forthcoming book of Laumon and Moret-Bailly based on their preprint and my introduction merely does the step -1, i.e. explains why we are forced to use them here and recalls the basic results I need later. So here is the plan of the lectures: after some generalities on G-bundles, I will classify them topologically. Actually the proof is more interesting than the result as it will give a flavor of the basic theorem on G-bundles which describes the moduli stack as a double quotient of loop-groups. This 'uniformization theorem', which goes back to A. Weil as a bijection on sets, will be proved in the section following the topological classification. Then I will introduce two line bundles on the moduli stack: the determinant and the paffian bundle. The first one can be used to describe the canonical bundle on the moduli stack and the second to define a square-root of it. Unless G is simply connected the square root depends on the choice of a theta-characteristic. This square root plays an important role in the geometric Langlands program. Actually, in order to get global differential operators on the moduli stack one has to consider twisted differential operators with values in these square-roots. The rest of the lectures will be dedicated to describe the

  3. Moduli Dark Matter and the Search for Its Decay Line using Suzaku X-Ray Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusenko, Alexander; Loewenstein, Michael; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2013-01-01

    Light scalar fields called moduli arise from a variety of different models involving supersymmetry and/or string theory; thus their existence is a generic prediction of leading theories for physics beyond the standard model. They also present a formidable, long-standing problem for cosmology. We argue that an anthropic solution to the moduli problem exists in the case of small moduli masses and that it automatically leads to dark matter in the form of moduli. The recent discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson implies a lower bound on the moduli mass of about a keV. This form of dark matter is consistent with the observed properties of structure formation, and it is amenable to detection with the help of x-ray telescopes. We present the results of a search for such dark matter particles using spectra extracted from the first deep x-ray observations of the Draco and Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxies, which are darkmatter- dominated systems with extreme mass-to-light ratios and low intrinsic backgrounds. No emission line is positively detected, and we set new constraints on the relevant new physics.

  4. Measurements of Young's and shear moduli of rail steel at elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuanye; Zhang, Haifeng; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Karim, Md Afzalul; Felix Wu, H

    2014-03-01

    The design and modelling of the buckling effect of Continuous Welded Rail (CWR) requires accurate material constants, especially at elevated temperatures. However, such material constants have rarely been found in literature. In this article, the Young's moduli and shear moduli of rail steel at elevated temperatures are determined by a new sonic resonance method developed in our group. A network analyser is used to excite a sample hanged inside a furnace through a simple tweeter type speaker. The vibration signal is picked up by a Polytec OFV-5000 Laser Vibrometer and then transferred back to the network analyser. Resonance frequencies in both the flexural and torsional modes are measured, and the Young's moduli and shear moduli are determined through the measured resonant frequencies. To validate the measured elastic constants, the measurements have been repeated by using the classic sonic resonance method. The comparisons of obtained moduli from the two methods show an excellent consistency of the results. In addition, the material elastic constants measured are validated by an ultrasound test based on a pulse-echo method and compared with previous published results at room temperature. The measured material data provides an invaluable reference for the design of CWR to avoid detrimental buckling failure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. On the compactification of the moduli space of branched minimal immersions of S2 into S4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loo, B.

    1992-01-01

    We study the natural compactification of the moduli space of branched minimal immersions of S 2 into S 4 . We prove that the (compactified) moduli space M d is a connected projective variety of dimension 2d+4. It is irreducible when d=1,2, and it has two irreducible components when d ≥ 3. We discuss the bubbling phenomenon at the boundary of the moduli space. (author). 26 refs, 3 figs

  6. Effect of compressibility on the hypervelocity penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W. J.; Chen, X. W.; Chen, P.

    2018-02-01

    We further consider the effect of rod strength by employing the compressible penetration model to study the effect of compressibility on hypervelocity penetration. Meanwhile, we define different instances of penetration efficiency in various modified models and compare these penetration efficiencies to identify the effects of different factors in the compressible model. To systematically discuss the effect of compressibility in different metallic rod-target combinations, we construct three cases, i.e., the penetrations by the more compressible rod into the less compressible target, rod into the analogously compressible target, and the less compressible rod into the more compressible target. The effects of volumetric strain, internal energy, and strength on the penetration efficiency are analyzed simultaneously. It indicates that the compressibility of the rod and target increases the pressure at the rod/target interface. The more compressible rod/target has larger volumetric strain and higher internal energy. Both the larger volumetric strain and higher strength enhance the penetration or anti-penetration ability. On the other hand, the higher internal energy weakens the penetration or anti-penetration ability. The two trends conflict, but the volumetric strain dominates in the variation of the penetration efficiency, which would not approach the hydrodynamic limit if the rod and target are not analogously compressible. However, if the compressibility of the rod and target is analogous, it has little effect on the penetration efficiency.

  7. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  8. High Pressure Compression-Molding of α-Cellulose and Effects of Operating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Rouilly

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Commercial α-cellulose was compression-molded to produce 1A dog-bone specimens under various operating conditions without any additive. The resulting agromaterials exhibited a smooth, plastic-like surface, and constituted a suitable target as replacement for plastic materials. Tensile and three-points bending tests were conducted according to ISO standards related to the evaluation of plastic materials. The specimens had strengths comparable to classical petroleum-based thermoplastics. They also exhibited high moduli, which is characteristic of brittle materials. A higher temperature and higher pressure rate produced specimens with higher mechanical properties while low moisture content produced weaker specimens. Generally, the strong specimen had higher specific gravity and lower moisture content. However, some parameters did not follow the general trend e.g., thinner specimen showed much higher Young’s Modulus, although their specific gravity and moisture content remained similar to control, revealing a marked skin-effect which was confirmed by SEM observations.

  9. H.264/AVC Video Compression on Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabayko, M. P.; Markov, N. G.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the usage of H.264/AVC video compression tools by the flagship smartphones. The results show that only a subset of tools is used, meaning that there is still a potential to achieve higher compression efficiency within the H.264/AVC standard, but the most advanced smartphones are already reaching the compression efficiency limit of H.264/AVC.

  10. Moduli, Scalar Charges, and the First Law of Black Hole Thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, G.; Kallosh, R.; Kol, B.

    1996-01-01

    We show that under variation of moduli fields φ the first law of black hole thermodynamics becomes dM=κdA/8π +ΩdJ+ψdq+χdp-Σdφ, where Σ are the scalar charges. Also the ADM mass is extremized at fixed A, J, (p,q) when the moduli fields take the fixed value φ fix (p,q) which depend only on electric and magnetic charges. Thus the double-extreme black hole minimizes the mass for fixed conserved charges. We can now explain the fact that extreme black holes fix the moduli fields at the horizon φ=φ fix (p,q): φ fix is such that the scalar charges vanish: Σ(φ fix ,(p,q))=0. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  11. QUANTITATIVE NON-DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION (QNDE) OF THE ELASTIC MODULI OF POROUS TIAL ALLOYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeheskel, O.

    2008-01-01

    The elastic moduli of γ-TiA1 were studied in porous samples consolidated by various techniques e.g. cold isostatic pressing (CIP), pressure-less sintering, or hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Porosity linearly affects the dynamic elastic moduli of samples. The results indicate that the sound wave velocities and the elastic moduli affected by the processing route and depend not only on the attained density but also on the consolidation temperature. In this paper we show that there is linear correlation between the shear and the longitudinal sound velocities in porous TiA1. This opens the way to use a single sound velocity as a tool for quantitative non-destructive evaluation (QNDE) of porous TiA1 alloys. Here we demonstrate the applicability of an equation derived from the elastic theory and used previously for porous cubic metals

  12. On moduli stabilisation and de Sitter vacua in MSSM heterotic orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parameswaran, Susha L. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Zavala, Ivonne [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Inst.

    2010-09-15

    We study the problem of moduli stabilisation in explicit heterotic orbifold compactifications, whose spectra contain the MSSM plus some vector-like exotics that can be decoupled. Considering all the bulk moduli, we obtain the 4D low energy effective action for the compactification, which has contributions from various, computable, perturbative and non-perturbative effects. Hidden sector gaugino condensation and string worldsheet instantons result in a combination of racetrack, KKLT and cusp-form contributions to the superpotential, which lift all the bulk moduli directions. We point out the properties observed in our concrete models, which tend to be missed when only ''generic'' features of a model are assumed. We search for interesting vacua and find several de Sitter solutions, but so far, they all turn out to be unstable. (orig.)

  13. On the Young's moduli of Ti-6Al-4V alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Zhongyun

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the authors will present an iterative approach to Young's modulus of multi-phase composites developed by Fan et al. The iterative approach will then be applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloys to predict their effective Young's moduli. It is hoped that the theoretical predictions will offer a quantitative explanation to the peculiar shape of the E c -f β curve and will shed some light on controlling the Young's moduli of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by choosing the proper heat treatment procedure

  14. The information metric on the moduli space of instantons with global symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Malek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this note we revisit Hitchin's prescription [1] of the Fisher metric as a natural measure on the moduli space of instantons that encodes the space–time symmetries of a classical field theory. Motivated by the idea of the moduli space of supersymmetric instantons as an emergent space in the sense of the gauge/gravity duality, we extend the prescription to encode also global symmetries of the underlying theory. We exemplify our construction with the instanton solution of the CPN sigma model on R2.

  15. The Picard group of the moduli space of r-Spin Riemann surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    An r-Spin Riemann surface is a Riemann surface equipped with a choice of rth root of the (co)tangent bundle. We give a careful construction of the moduli space (orbifold) of r-Spin Riemann surfaces, and explain how to establish a Madsen–Weiss theorem for it. This allows us to prove the “Mumford...... conjecture” for these moduli spaces, but more interestingly allows us to compute their algebraic Picard groups (for g≥10, or g≥9 in the 2-Spin case). We give a complete description of these Picard groups, in terms of explicitly constructed line bundles....

  16. The homology groups of moduli spaces on non-classical Klein surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaw, Myint

    2001-08-01

    We describe the moduli space M-vector±(g,c) of non-classical directed Klein surfaces of genus g=h-c-1 with c≥0 distinguished points as a configuration space B ± (h,c) of classes h-slit pairs in C. Based on this model, we prove that M-vector ± (g,c) is non-orientable for any g and c and we compute the homology groups of the moduli spaces M-vector ± (g,c) for g≤2. (author)

  17. Canonical generators of the cohomology of moduli of parabolic bundles on curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, I.; Raghavendra, N.

    1994-11-01

    We determine generators of the rational cohomology algebras of moduli spaces of parabolic vector bundles on a curve, under some 'primality' conditions on the parabolic datum. These generators are canonical in a precise sense. Our results are new even for usual vector bundles (i.e., vector bundles without parabolic structure) whose rank is greater than 2 and is coprime to the degree; in this case, they are generalizations of a theorem of Newstead on the moduli of vector bundles of rank 2 and odd degree. (author). 11 refs

  18. Application specific compression : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.

  19. The effect of compressive stress on the Young's modulus of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, T.; Usui, T.; Ero, M.; Fukuda, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The Young's moduli of unirradiated and high temperature (800 to 1000 0 C) irradiated graphites for HTGR were measured by the ultrasonic method in the direction of applied compressive stress during and after stressing. The Young's moduli of all the tested graphites decreased with increasing compressive stress both during and after stressing. In order to investigate the reason for the decrease in Young's modulus by applying compressive stress, the mercury pore diameter distributions of a part of the unirradiated and irradiated specimens were measured. The change in pore distribution is believed to be associated with structural changes produced by irradiation and compressive stressing. The residual strain, after removing the compressive stress, showed a good correlation with the decrease in Young's modulus caused by the compressive stress. The decrease in Young's modulus by applying compressive stress was considered to be due to the increase in the mobile dislocation density and the growth or formation of cracks. The results suggest, however, that the mechanism giving the larger contribution depends on the brand of graphite, and in anisotropic graphite it depends on the direction of applied stress and the irradiation conditions. (author)

  20. Moduli spaces for linear differential equations and the Painlev'e equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Put, Marius van der; Saito, Masa-Hiko

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we give a systematic construction of ten isomonodromic families of connections of rank two on P1 inducing Painlev´e equations. The classification of ten families is given by considering the Riemann-Hilbert morphism from a moduli space of connections with certain type of regular and

  1. Digitally controlled measurement of sonic elastic moduli and internal friction by phase analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.H.; Hunter, O. Jr.; Rasmussen, M.D.; Skank, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    An automated system is described for measuring internal friction and elastic moduli using sonic resonance techniques. This mirocomputer-controlled device does phase angle analysis in addition to traditional decay and peak-width internal friction measurement. The apparatus may be programmed to make measurements at any sequence of temperatures between room temperature and 1600 0 C

  2. Determination of static moduli in fractured rocks by T-matrix model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chalupa, F.; Vilhelm, J.; Petružálek, Matěj; Bukovská, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2017), s. 22-31 ISSN 1335-1788 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : fractured rocks * dynamic and static moduli * T-matrix model * elastic wave velocity * well logging Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 0.769, year: 2016 http://actamont.tuke.sk/pdf/2017/n1/3chalupa.pdf

  3. The fine structure of the moduli space of abelian differentials in genus 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijenga, Eduard; Gabriele, Mondello

    2014-01-01

    The moduli space of curves endowed with a nonzero abelian differential admits a natural stratification according to the configuration of its zeroes. We give a description of these strata for genus 3 in terms of root system data. For each non-open stratum we obtain a presentation of its orbifold

  4. Hurwitz numbers, moduli of curves, topological recursion, Givental's theory and their relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitz, L.

    2014-01-01

    The study of curves is an important area of research in algebraic geometry and mathematical physics. In my thesis I study so-called moduli spaces of curves; these are spaces that parametrize all curves with some specified properties. In particular, I study maps from curves to other spaces, recursive

  5. Bohr-Sommerfeld orbits in the moduli space of flat connections and the Verlinde dimension formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, L.C.; Weitsman, J.

    1992-01-01

    We show how the moduli space of flat SU(2) connections on a two-manifold can be quantized. The dimension of the quantization, given by the number of integral fibres of the polarization, matches the Verlinde formula, which is known to give the dimension of the quantization of this space in a Kaehler polarization. (orig./HSI)

  6. Influence of seed layer moduli on FEM based modulus backcalculation results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matsui, K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents recentupdates of DBALM (Dynamic Back Analysis for Layer Moduli) software whose solver is based on exi-symmetric FEM and was first developed in 1993. Examples of airfield pavement application are also presented. The results...

  7. Quantum mechanics on the moduli space from the quantum geometrodynamics of the open topological membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogan, I.I.

    1991-01-01

    The quantum geometrodynamics of the open topological membrane is described in terms of 2+1 topologically massive gravity (TMG) where the inverse graviton mass is proportional to the 2D central charge and thus is the measure of the off-criticality. The hamiltonian quantization of TMG on Riemann surfaces is considered and the moduli space appears as the subspace of the quantum-mechanical configuration space containing, besides the moduli, the first-order time derivatives of half of the moduli. The appearance of the first-order time derivatives as coordinates, not momenta, is due to the third-order derivative in the TMG lagrangian. The hamiltonian for the latter leads us to the discrete levels picture which looks like the topologically massive gauge theory (TMGT) case, where we also get the Landau levels picture and the lowest Landau level corresponds to the Hilbert space of the Chern-Simons theory (CST). The connection between the positivity of the energy and the complex structure on the moduli space is discussed. (orig.)

  8. REDUCED ISOTROPIC CRYSTAL MODEL WITH RESPECT TO THE FOURTH-ORDER ELASTIC MODULI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Burlayenko

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Using a reduced isotropic crystal model the relationship between the fourth-order elastic moduli of an isotropic medium and the independent components of the fourth-order elastic moduli tensor of real crystals of various crystal systems is found. To calculate the coefficients of these relations, computer algebra systems Redberry and Mathematica for working with high order tensors in the symbolic and explicit form were used, in light of the overly complex computation. In an isotropic medium, there are four independent fourth order elastic moduli. This is due to the presence of four invariants for an eighth-rank tensor in the three-dimensional space, that has symmetries over the pairs of indices. As an example, the moduli of elasticity of an isotropic medium corresponding to certain crystals of cubic system are given (LiF, NaCl, MgO, CaF2. From the obtained results it can be seen that the reduced isotropic crystal model can be most effectively applied to high-symmetry crystal systems.

  9. A family of metrics on the moduli space of CP2 instantons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habermann, L.

    1992-01-01

    A family of Riemannian metrics on the moduli space of irreducible self-dual connections of instanton number k=1 over CP 2 is considered. We find explicit formulas for these metrics and deduce conclusions concerning the geometry of the instant space. (orig.)

  10. Mirror symmetry and the moduli space for generic hypersurfaces in toric varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Berglund, P; Klemm, A D

    1995-01-01

    The moduli dependence of (2,2) superstring compactifications based on Calabi--Yau hypersurfaces in weighted projective space has so far only been investigated for Fermat-type polynomial constraints. These correspond to Landau-Ginzburg orbifolds with c=9 whose potential is a sum of A-type singularities. Here we consider the generalization to arbitrary quasi-homogeneous singularities at c=9. We use mirror symmetry to derive the dependence of the models on the complexified K\\"ahler moduli and check the expansions of some topological correlation functions against explicit genus zero and genus one instanton calculations. As an important application we give examples of how non-algebraic (``twisted'') deformations can be mapped to algebraic ones, hence allowing us to study the full moduli space. We also study how moduli spaces can be nested in each other, thus enabling a (singular) transition from one theory to another. Following the recent work of Greene, Morrison and Strominger we show that this corresponds to bla...

  11. Chaotic inflation in no-scale supergravity with string inspired moduli stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tianjun; Li, Zhijin; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2015-01-01

    The simple chaotic inflation is highly consistent with the BICEP2 experiment, and no-scale supergravity can be realized naturally in various string compactifications. Thus, we construct a chaotic inflation model in no-scale supergravity inspired from Type IIB string compactification with an anomalous U(1) X gauged symmetry. We introduce two moduli T 1 and T 2 which transform non-trivially under U(1) X , and some pairs of fundamental quarks charged under the SU(N) x U(1) X gauge group. The non-trivial transformations of moduli under U(1) X lead to a moduli-dependent Fayet-Iliopoulos (FI) term. The modulus T 2 and the real component of T 1 are stabilized by the non-perturbative effect from quark condensation and the U(1) X D-term. In particular, the stabilization from the anomalous U(1) X D-term with moduli-dependent FI term is crucial for inflation since it gives heavy mass to the real component of the modulus T 1 while keeping its axionic part light. Choosing the proper parameters, we obtain a global Minkowski vacuum where the imaginary part of T 1 has a quadratic potential for chaotic inflation. (orig.)

  12. Moduli space of Parabolic vector bundles over hyperelliptic curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    27

    This has been generalized for higher dimensional varieties by Maruyama ... Key words and phrases. Parabolic structure .... Let E be a vector bundle of rank r on X. Recall that a parabolic ..... Let us understand this picture geometrically. Let ω1 ...

  13. Compressive buckling of a rectangular nanoplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, A. O.

    2018-05-01

    This paper considers the constitutive relations of the nanoplate theory with surface stresses taken into account according to the original or complete Gurtin-Murdoch (GM) model and according to the simplified strain-consistent GM model (which does not include any non-strain terms in the surface stress-strain relation). It is shown that the potential energy of a deformed nanoplate according to both GM models preserves the classical structure using the redefined elastic moduli (effective tangential and flexural elastic properties, which contain the characteristics of bulk phase and a surface). This allows to apply the known solutions and methods from macroplates to nanoplates. As example, it is shown that the critical load of the compressive buckling of a nanoplate according to the complete and strain-consistent GM models has the difference between two solutions no more than 1.5%.

  14. Nonlinear viscoelasticity of pre-compressed layered polymeric composite under oscillatory compression

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yangguang

    2018-05-03

    Describing nonlinear viscoelastic properties of polymeric composites when subjected to dynamic loading is essential for development of practical applications of such materials. An efficient and easy method to analyze nonlinear viscoelasticity remains elusive because the dynamic moduli (storage modulus and loss modulus) are not very convenient when the material falls into nonlinear viscoelastic range. In this study, we utilize two methods, Fourier transform and geometrical nonlinear analysis, to quantitatively characterize the nonlinear viscoelasticity of a pre-compressed layered polymeric composite under oscillatory compression. We discuss the influences of pre-compression, dynamic loading, and the inner structure of polymeric composite on the nonlinear viscoelasticity. Furthermore, we reveal the nonlinear viscoelastic mechanism by combining with other experimental results from quasi-static compressive tests and microstructural analysis. From a methodology standpoint, it is proved that both Fourier transform and geometrical nonlinear analysis are efficient tools for analyzing the nonlinear viscoelasticity of a layered polymeric composite. From a material standpoint, we consequently posit that the dynamic nonlinear viscoelasticity of polymeric composites with complicated inner structures can also be well characterized using these methods.

  15. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our ...

  16. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware.

  17. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that “DNABIT Compress” algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases. PMID:21383923

  18. Evaluation of mammogram compression efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przelaskowski, A.; Surowski, P.; Kukula, A.

    2005-01-01

    quality of 0.6 bpp and 0.1 bpp reconstructions was decreased. The compression performance of the most effective reversible coders is rather unsatisfactory. The subjective rating with the diagnostic criteria of image quality was more sensitive to distortions caused by lossy compression compared with the pathology detection test. The observers constituted 14:1 as the accepted ratio of lossy wavelet compression for test mammograms. This is significantly higher than the mean ratio of 2:1 achieved with lossless methods. (author)

  19. Effect of pore geometry on the compressibility of a confined simple fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzanski, Christopher D.; Maximov, Max A.; Gor, Gennady Y.

    2018-02-01

    Fluids confined in nanopores exhibit properties different from the properties of the same fluids in bulk; among these properties is the isothermal compressibility or elastic modulus. The modulus of a fluid in nanopores can be extracted from ultrasonic experiments or calculated from molecular simulations. Using Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble, we calculated the modulus for liquid argon at its normal boiling point (87.3 K) adsorbed in model silica pores of two different morphologies and various sizes. For spherical pores, for all the pore sizes (diameters) exceeding 2 nm, we obtained a logarithmic dependence of fluid modulus on the vapor pressure. Calculation of the modulus at saturation showed that the modulus of the fluid in spherical pores is a linear function of the reciprocal pore size. The calculation of the modulus of the fluid in cylindrical pores appeared too scattered to make quantitative conclusions. We performed additional simulations at higher temperature (119.6 K), at which Monte Carlo insertions and removals become more efficient. The results of the simulations at higher temperature confirmed both regularities for cylindrical pores and showed quantitative difference between the fluid moduli in pores of different geometries. Both of the observed regularities for the modulus stem from the Tait-Murnaghan equation applied to the confined fluid. Our results, along with the development of the effective medium theories for nanoporous media, set the groundwork for analysis of the experimentally measured elastic properties of fluid-saturated nanoporous materials.

  20. Brauer groups and obstruction problems moduli spaces and arithmetic

    CERN Document Server

    Hassett, Brendan; Várilly-Alvarado, Anthony; Viray, Bianca

    2017-01-01

    The contributions in this book explore various contexts in which the derived category of coherent sheaves on a variety determines some of its arithmetic. This setting provides new geometric tools for interpreting elements of the Brauer group. With a view towards future arithmetic applications, the book extends a number of powerful tools for analyzing rational points on elliptic curves, e.g., isogenies among curves, torsion points, modular curves, and the resulting descent techniques, as well as higher-dimensional varieties like K3 surfaces. Inspired by the rapid recent advances in our understanding of K3 surfaces, the book is intended to foster cross-pollination between the fields of complex algebraic geometry and number theory. Contributors: · Nicolas Addington · Benjamin Antieau · Kenneth Ascher · Asher Auel · Fedor Bogomolov · Jean-Louis Colliot-Thélène · Krishna Dasaratha · Brendan Hassett · Colin Ingalls · Martí Lahoz · Emanuele Macrì · Kelly McKinnie · Andrew Obus · Ekin Ozman · Raman...

  1. Quantum triangulations moduli space, quantum computing, non-linear sigma models and Ricci flow

    CERN Document Server

    Carfora, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses key conceptual aspects and explores the connection between triangulated manifolds and quantum physics, using a set of case studies ranging from moduli space theory to quantum computing to provide an accessible introduction to this topic. Research on polyhedral manifolds often reveals unexpected connections between very distinct aspects of mathematics and physics. In particular, triangulated manifolds play an important role in settings such as Riemann moduli space theory, strings and quantum gravity, topological quantum field theory, condensed matter physics, critical phenomena and complex systems. Not only do they provide a natural discrete analogue to the smooth manifolds on which physical theories are typically formulated, but their appearance is also often a consequence of an underlying structure that naturally calls into play non-trivial aspects of representation theory, complex analysis and topology in a way that makes the basic geometric structures of the physical interactions involv...

  2. Anti-D3 branes and moduli in non-linear supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia del Moral, Maria P.; Parameswaran, Susha; Quiroz, Norma; Zavala, Ivonne

    2017-10-01

    Anti-D3 branes and non-perturbative effects in flux compactifications spontaneously break supersymmetry and stabilise moduli in a metastable de Sitter vacua. The low energy 4D effective field theory description for such models would be a supergravity theory with non-linearly realised supersymmetry. Guided by string theory modular symmetry, we compute this non-linear supergravity theory, including dependence on all bulk moduli. Using either a constrained chiral superfield or a constrained vector field, the uplifting contribution to the scalar potential from the anti-D3 brane can be parameterised either as an F-term or Fayet-Iliopoulos D-term. Using again the modular symmetry, we show that 4D non-linear supergravities that descend from string theory have an enhanced protection from quantum corrections by non-renormalisation theorems. The superpotential giving rise to metastable de Sitter vacua is robust against perturbative string-loop and α' corrections.

  3. Instanton counting, Macdonald function and the moduli space of D-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awata, Hidetoshi; Kanno, Hiroaki

    2005-01-01

    We argue the connection of Nekrasov's partition function in the Ω background and the moduli space of D-branes, suggested by the idea of geometric engineering and Gopakumar-Vafa invariants. In the instanton expansion of N = 2 SU(2) Yang-Mills theory the Nakrasov's partition function with equivariant parameters ε 1 ,ε 2 of toric action on C 2 factorizes correctly as the character of SU(2) L x SU(2) R spin representation. We show that up to two instantons the spin contents are consistent with the Lefschetz action on the moduli space of D2-branes on (local) F 0 . We also present an attempt at constructing a refined topological vertex in terms of the Macdonald function. The refined topological vertex with two parameters of T 2 action allows us to obtain the generating functions of equivariant χ y and elliptic genera of the Hilbert scheme of n points on C 2 by the method of topological vertex

  4. Charge-density-shear-moduli relationships in aluminum-lithium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, M

    2001-11-12

    Using the first principles full-potential linear-augmented-Slater-type orbital technique, the energies and charge densities of aluminum and aluminum-lithium supercells have been computed. The experimentally observed increase in aluminum's shear moduli upon alloying with lithium is argued to be the result of predictable changes to aluminum's total charge density, suggesting that simple rules may allow the alloy designer to predict the effects of dilute substitutional elements on alloy elastic response.

  5. Global D-brane models with stabilised moduli and light axions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicoli, Michele

    2014-03-01

    We review recent attempts to try to combine global issues of string compactifications, like moduli stabilisation, with local issues, like semi-realistic D-brane constructions. We list the main problems encountered, and outline a possible solution which allows globally consistent embeddings of chiral models. We also argue that this stabilisation mechanism leads to an axiverse. We finally illustrate our general claims in a concrete example where the Calabi-Yau manifold is explicitly described by toric geometry.

  6. Distribution of flux vacua around singular points in Calabi-Yau moduli space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Tohru; Tachikawa, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    We study the distribution of type-IIB flux vacua in the moduli space near various singular loci, e.g. conifolds, ADE singularities on P 1 , Argyres-Douglas point etc, using the Ashok-Douglas density det (R+ω). We find that the vacuum density is integrable around each of them, irrespective of the type of the singularities. We study in detail an explicit example of an Argyres-Douglas point embedded in a compact Calabi-Yau manifold

  7. Simultaneous measurements of bulk moduli and particle dynamics in a sheared colloidal glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Michael V.; Eisenmann, Christoph; Kim, Chanjoong; Weitz, David A.

    2007-03-01

    We present a novel study of glassy colloidal systems, using a stress-controlled rheometer in conjunction with a confocal microscope. This experimental setup combines the measurement of bulk moduli, using conventional rheology, with the ability to track the motion of individual particles, through confocal microscopy techniques. We explore the response of the system to applied shear, by simultaneously monitoring the macroscopic relaxation and microscopic particle dynamics, under conditions from the quiescent glass to a shear-melted liquid.

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the elastic moduli of silicate glasses and crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipps, Katharina; Stoffel, Ralf Peter; Dronskowski, Richard; Conradt, Reinhard

    2017-02-01

    A combined quantum-mechanical and thermodynamic approach to the mechanical properties of multicomponent silicate glasses is presented. Quantum chemical calculations based on density-functional theory (DFT) on various silicate systems were performed to explore the crystalline polymorphs existing for a given chemical composition. These calculations reproduced the properties of known polymorphs even in systems with extensive polymorphism, like MgSiO3. Properties resting on the atomic and electronic structure, i.e., molar volumes (densities) and bulk moduli were predicted correctly. The theoretical data (molar equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli) were then used to complement the available experimental data. In a phenomenological evaluation, experimental data of bulk moduli, a macroscopic property resting on phononic structure, were found to linearly scale with the ratios of atomic space demand to actual molar volume in a universal way. Silicates ranging from high-pressure polymorphs to glasses were represented by a single master line. This suggests that above the Debye limit (in practice: above room temperature), the elastic waves probe the short range order coordination polyhedra and their next-neighbor linkage only, while the presence or absence of an extended translational symmetry is irrelevant. As a result, glasses can be treated - with respect to the properties investigated - as commensurable members of polymorphic series. Binary glasses fit the very same line as their one-component end-members, again both in the crystalline and glassy state. Finally, it is shown that the macroscopic properties of multicomponent glasses also are linear superpositions of the properties of their constitutional phases (as determined from phase diagrams or by thermochemical calculations) taken in their respective glassy states. This is verified experimentally for heat capacities and Young’s moduli of industrial glass compositions. It can be concluded, that the combined quantum

  9. Anomaly matching conditions and the moduli space of supersymmetric gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotti, G.; Manohar, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The structure of the moduli space of N=1 supersymmetric gauge theories is analyzed from an algebraic geometric viewpoint. The connection between the fundamental fields of the ultraviolet theory, and the gauge-invariant composite fields of the infrared theory is explained in detail. The results are then used to prove an anomaly matching theorem. The theorem is used to study anomaly matching for supersymmetric QCD, and can explain all the known anomaly matching results for this case. (orig.)

  10. Tangent moduli of the Hencky material model derived from the stored energy function at finite strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poživilová, Alena; Plešek, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 482, č. 482 (2005), s. 327-330 ISSN 0255-5476 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/03/0331; GA ČR(CZ) GP106/03/D038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustoelasticity * large strains * third order elastic moduli Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2005

  11. Functional Apparent Moduli (FAMs) as Predictors of Oral Implant Osseointegration Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Po-Chun; Seol, Yang-Jo; Kikuchi, Noboru; Goldstein, Steven A.; Giannobile, William V.

    2010-01-01

    At present, limited functional data exists regarding the application and use of biomechanical and imaging technologies for oral implant osseointegration assessment. The objective of this investigation was to determine the functional apparent moduli (FAMs) that could predict the dynamics of oral implant osseointegration. Using an in vivo dental implant osseous healing model, two FAMs, functional bone apparent modulus (FBAM) and composite tissue apparent modulus (FCAM), of the selected peri-imp...

  12. Realistic D-brane models on warped throats: Fluxes, hierarchies and moduli stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascales, J.F.G.; Garcia del Moral, M.P.; Quevedo, F.; Uranga, A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the construction of string theory models with semirealistic spectrum in a sector of (anti) D3-branes located at an orbifold singularity at the bottom of a highly warped throat geometry, which is a generalisation of the Klebanov-Strassler deformed conifold. These models realise the Randall-Sundrum proposal to naturally generate the Planck/electroweak hierarchy in a concrete string theory embedding, and yielding interesting chiral open string spectra. We describe examples with Standard Model gauge group (or left-right symmetric extensions) and three families of SM fermions, with correct quantum numbers including hypercharge. The dilaton and complex structure moduli of the geometry are stabilised by the 3-form fluxes required to build the throat. We describe diverse issues concerning the stabilisation of geometric Kahler moduli, like blow-up modes of the orbifold singularities, via D term potentials and gauge theory non-perturbative effects, like gaugino condensation. This local geometry, once embedded in a full compactification, could give rise to models with all moduli stabilised, and with the potential to lead to de Sitter vacua. Issues of gauge unification, proton stability, supersymmetry breaking and Yukawa couplings are also discussed. (author)

  13. N=2 topological gauge theory, the Euler characteristic of moduli spaces, and the Casson invariant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blau, M.; Thompson, G.

    1991-11-01

    Gauge theory with a topological N=2 symmetry is discussed. This theory captures the de Rahm complex and Riemannian geometry of some underlying moduli space M and the partition function equals the Euler number χ (M) of M. Moduli spaces of instantons and of flat connections in 2 and 3 dimensions are explicitly dealt with. To motivate the constructions the relation between the Mathai-Quillen formalism and supersymmetric quantum mechanics are explained and a new kind of supersymmetric quantum mechanics is introduced, based on the Gauss-Codazzi equations. The gauge theory actions are interpreted from the Atiyah-Jeffrey point of view and related to super-symmetric quantum mechanics on spaces of connections. As a consequence of these considerations the Euler number χ (M) of the moduli space of flat connections as a generalization to arbitrary three-manifolds of the Casson invariant. The possibility of constructing a topological version of the Penner matrix model is also commented. (author). 63 refs

  14. Comparison of mechanical compressive properties of commercial and autologous fibrin glues for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, Matthew G; Behn, Anthony W; Dragoo, Jason L

    2017-11-01

    Fibrin glues are widely used in orthopedic surgery as adhesives and hemostatic agents. We evaluated the compressive properties of selected fibrin glues in order to identify which are appropriate for tissue regeneration applications subject to compression. Uniaxial unconfined compression tests were performed on fibrin gels prepared from commercial and autologous products: (1) Evicel (Ethicon), (2) Tisseel (Baxter), (3) Angel (Arthrex), and (4) ProPlaz (Biorich). Cyclic loads were applied from 0 to 30% strain for 100cycles at 0.5Hz. Following cyclic testing, specimens were subjected to ramp displacement of 1% strain per second to 80% strain. Throughout cyclic loading, Evicel and Tisseel deformed (shortened) less than Angel at all but one time point, and deformed less than ProPlaz at cycles 10 and 20. The dynamic moduli, peak stress, and strain energy were significantly greater in Tisseel than all other groups. Evicel displayed significantly greater dynamic moduli, peak stress, and strain energy than Angel and ProPlaz. Following cyclic testing, Tisseel and Evicel were significantly less deformed than Angel. No specimens exhibited gross failure during ramp loading to 80% strain. Ramp loading trends mirrored those of cyclic loading. The tested commercial glues were significantly more resistant to compression than the autologous products. The compressive properties of Tisseel were approximately twice those of Evicel. All preparations displayed moduli multiple orders of magnitude less than that of native articular cartilage. We conclude that in knee surgeries requiring fibrin glue to undergo compression of daily activity, commercial products are preferable to autologous preparations from platelet-poor plasma, though both will deform significantly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F; Calle, Paul A

    2012-11-01

    BACKGROUND AND GOAL OF STUDY: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with decreased depth. In patients undergoing prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation by health care professionals, chest compression rate and depth were recorded using an accelerometer (E-series monitor-defibrillator, Zoll, U.S.A.). Compression depth was compared for rates 120/min. A difference in compression depth ≥0.5 cm was considered clinically significant. Mixed models with repeated measurements of chest compression depth and rate (level 1) nested within patients (level 2) were used with compression rate as a continuous and as a categorical predictor of depth. Results are reported as means and standard error (SE). One hundred and thirty-three consecutive patients were analysed (213,409 compressions). Of all compressions 2% were 120/min, 36% were 5 cm. In 77 out of 133 (58%) patients a statistically significant lower depth was observed for rates >120/min compared to rates 80-120/min, in 40 out of 133 (30%) this difference was also clinically significant. The mixed models predicted that the deepest compression (4.5 cm) occurred at a rate of 86/min, with progressively lower compression depths at higher rates. Rates >145/min would result in a depth compression depth for rates 80-120/min was on average 4.5 cm (SE 0.06) compared to 4.1 cm (SE 0.06) for compressions >120/min (mean difference 0.4 cm, Pcompression rates and lower compression depths. Avoiding excessive compression rates may lead to more compressions of sufficient depth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Poroelastic Mechanical Effects of Hemicelluloses on Cellulosic Hydrogels under Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia; Cersosimo, Julie; Wang, Dongjie; Flanagan, Bernadine; Stokes, Jason R.; Gidley, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Hemicelluloses exhibit a range of interactions with cellulose, the mechanical consequences of which in plant cell walls are incompletely understood. We report the mechanical properties of cell wall analogues based on cellulose hydrogels to elucidate the contribution of xyloglucan or arabinoxylan as examples of two hemicelluloses displaying different interactions with cellulose. We subjected the hydrogels to mechanical pressures to emulate the compressive stresses experienced by cell walls in planta. Our results revealed that the presence of either hemicellulose increased the resistance to compression at fast strain rates. However, at slow strain rates, only xyloglucan increased composite strength. This behaviour could be explained considering the microstructure and the flow of water through the composites confirming their poroelastic nature. In contrast, small deformation oscillatory rheology showed that only xyloglucan decreased the elastic moduli. These results provide evidence for contrasting roles of different hemicelluloses in plant cell wall mechanics and man-made cellulose-based composite materials. PMID:25794048

  17. Complete volumetric decomposition of individual trabecular plates and rods and its morphological correlations with anisotropic elastic moduli in human trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X Sherry; Sajda, Paul; Saha, Punam K; Wehrli, Felix W; Bevill, Grant; Keaveny, Tony M; Guo, X Edward

    2008-02-01

    Trabecular plates and rods are important microarchitectural features in determining mechanical properties of trabecular bone. A complete volumetric decomposition of individual trabecular plates and rods was used to assess the orientation and morphology of 71 human trabecular bone samples. The ITS-based morphological analyses better characterize microarchitecture and help predict anisotropic mechanical properties of trabecular bone. Standard morphological analyses of trabecular architecture lack explicit segmentations of individual trabecular plates and rods. In this study, a complete volumetric decomposition technique was developed to segment trabecular bone microstructure into individual plates and rods. Contributions of trabecular type-associated morphological parameters to the anisotropic elastic moduli of trabecular bone were studied. Seventy-one human trabecular bone samples from the femoral neck (FN), tibia, and vertebral body (VB) were imaged using muCT or serial milling. Complete volumetric decomposition was applied to segment trabecular bone microstructure into individual plates and rods. The orientation of each individual trabecula was determined, and the axial bone volume fractions (aBV/TV), axially aligned bone volume fraction along each orthotropic axis, were correlated with the elastic moduli. The microstructural type-associated morphological parameters were derived and compared with standard morphological parameters. Their contributions to the anisotropic elastic moduli, calculated by finite element analysis (FEA), were evaluated and compared. The distribution of trabecular orientation suggested that longitudinal plates and transverse rods dominate at all three anatomic sites. aBV/TV along each axis, in general, showed a better correlation with the axial elastic modulus (r(2) = 0.95 approximately 0.99) compared with BV/TV (r(2) = 0.93 approximately 0.94). The plate-associated morphological parameters generally showed higher correlations with the

  18. Compressibility of Ir-Os alloys under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusenko, Kirill V.; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Gromilov, Sergey A.; Kurnosov, Alexander V.; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Hanfland, Michael; Smaalen, Sander van; Margadonna, Serena; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • fcc- and hcp-Ir-Os alloys were prepared from single-source precursors. • Their atomic volumes measured at ambient conditions using powder X-ray diffraction follow nearly linear dependence. • Compressibility of alloys have been studied up to 30 GPa at room temperature in diamond anvil cells. • Their bulk moduli increase with increasing osmium content. - Abstract: Several fcc- and hcp-structured Ir-Os alloys were prepared from single-source precursors in hydrogen atmosphere at 873 K. Their atomic volumes measured at ambient conditions using powder X-ray diffraction follow nearly linear dependence as a function of composition. Alloys have been studied up to 30 GPa at room temperature by means of synchrotron-based X-ray powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells. Their bulk moduli increase with increasing osmium content and show a deviation from linearity. Bulk modulus of hcp-Ir 0.20 Os 0.80 is identical to that of pure Os (411 GPa) within experimental errors. Peculiarities on fcc-Ir 0.80 Os 0.20 compressibility curve indicate possible changes of its electronic properties at ∼20 GPa

  19. Shock compression and quasielastic release in tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.N.; Hixson, R.S.; Tonks, D.L.; Gray, G.T. III

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of quasielastic release in shock-loaded FCC metals have shown a strong influence of the defect state on the leading edge, or first observable arrival, of the release wave. This is due to the large density of pinned dislocation segments behind the shock front, their relatively large pinning separation, and a very short response time as determined by the drag coefficient in the shock-compressed state. This effect is entirely equivalent to problems associated with elastic moduli determination using ultrasonic methods. This is particularly true for FCC metals, which have an especially low Peierls stress, or inherent lattice resistance, that has little influence in pinning dislocation segments and inhibiting anelastic deformation. BCC metals, on the other hand, have a large Peierls stress that essentially holds dislocation segments in place at low net applied shear stresses and thus allows fully elastic deformation to occur in the complete absence of anelastic behavior. Shock-compression and release experiments have been performed on tantalum (BCC), with the observation that the leading release disturbance is indeed elastic. This conclusion is established by examination of experimental VISAR records taken at the tantalum/sapphire (window) interface in a symmetric-impact experiment which subjects the sample to a peak longitudinal stress of approximately 7.3 GPa, in comparison with characteristic code calculations. copyright 1994 American Institute of Physics

  20. Line operators in theories of class S, quantized moduli space of flat connections, and Toda field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coman, Ioana; Teschner, Joerg

    2015-05-01

    Non-perturbative aspects of N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories of class S are deeply encoded in the algebra of functions on the moduli space M flat of at SL(N)-connections on Riemann surfaces. Expectation values of Wilson and 't Hooft line operators are related to holonomies of flat connections, and expectation values of line operators in the low-energy effective theory are related to Fock-Goncharov coordinates on M flat . Via the decomposition of UV line operators into IR line operators, we determine their noncommutative algebra from the quantization of Fock-Goncharov Laurent polynomials, and find that it coincides with the skein algebra studied in the context of Chern-Simons theory. Another realization of the skein algebra is generated by Verlinde network operators in Toda field theory. Comparing the spectra of these two realizations provides non-trivial support for their equivalence. Our results can be viewed as evidence for the generalization of the AGT correspondence to higher-rank class S theories.

  1. Quantitative determination of optical trapping strength and viscoelastic moduli inside living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas, Josep; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Richardson, Andrew C; Reihani, S Nader S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2013-01-01

    With the success of in vitro single-molecule force measurements obtained in recent years, the next step is to perform quantitative force measurements inside a living cell. Optical traps have proven excellent tools for manipulation, also in vivo, where they can be essentially non-invasive under correct wavelength and exposure conditions. It is a pre-requisite for in vivo quantitative force measurements that a precise and reliable force calibration of the tweezers is performed. There are well-established calibration protocols in purely viscous environments; however, as the cellular cytoplasm is viscoelastic, it would be incorrect to use a calibration procedure relying on a viscous environment. Here we demonstrate a method to perform a correct force calibration inside a living cell. This method (theoretically proposed in Fischer and Berg-Sørensen (2007 J. Opt. A: Pure Appl. Opt. 9 S239)) takes into account the viscoelastic properties of the cytoplasm and relies on a combination of active and passive recordings of the motion of the cytoplasmic object of interest. The calibration procedure allows us to extract absolute values for the viscoelastic moduli of the living cell cytoplasm as well as the force constant describing the optical trap, thus paving the way for quantitative force measurements inside the living cell. Here, we determine both the spring constant of the optical trap and the elastic contribution from the cytoplasm, influencing the motion of naturally occurring tracer particles. The viscoelastic moduli that we find are of the same order of magnitude as moduli found in other cell types by alternative methods. (paper)

  2. GUT scale extra dimensions and light moduli in supergravity and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Jan

    2010-05-15

    We study the dynamical properties of geometric moduli in five- and six-dimensional supergravity compactified on flat orbifolds, focusing on the impact of the Kaehler potential. In both cases, the Kaehler potential exhibits no-scale structure at tree level. In five dimensions, the volume modulus (radion) can be stabilized by means of perturbative Kaehler corrections. In six dimensions, the same holds for size and shape of the extra dimensions, only if the dilaton can be stabilized in a Minkowski vacuum by nonperturbative effects. We develop a systematic description of almost no-scale models and derive a model independent formula for the radion mass. The radion mass is suppressed compared to the gravitino mass. The supression factor reflects the hierarchy between the Planck and the compactification scale. We analyze a specific example, where the compactification scale is determined by Fayet-Iliopoulos terms of a locally anomalous Abelian gauge group, which are O(M{sub GUT}). In a scenario with gravitino dark matter, this leads to a radion mass of 1-10 MeV. In this mass range, the radion is cosmologically stable and contributes to the dark matter density. Based on galactic gamma ray data, we derive a tight bound on the initial displacement of the field value from its low energy vacuum. We also investigate implications of typical moduli Kaehler potentials on the cosmological evolution of the scalar fields. In particular, we discuss a class of models with steep exponential potentials and non-canonical kinetic terms, motivated by our radion example. We consider the overshooting problem of cosmological moduli dynamics, and the possibility of slow-roll solutions despite the steepness of the scalar potential. (orig.)

  3. GUT scale extra dimensions and light moduli in supergravity and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, Jan

    2010-05-01

    We study the dynamical properties of geometric moduli in five- and six-dimensional supergravity compactified on flat orbifolds, focusing on the impact of the Kaehler potential. In both cases, the Kaehler potential exhibits no-scale structure at tree level. In five dimensions, the volume modulus (radion) can be stabilized by means of perturbative Kaehler corrections. In six dimensions, the same holds for size and shape of the extra dimensions, only if the dilaton can be stabilized in a Minkowski vacuum by nonperturbative effects. We develop a systematic description of almost no-scale models and derive a model independent formula for the radion mass. The radion mass is suppressed compared to the gravitino mass. The supression factor reflects the hierarchy between the Planck and the compactification scale. We analyze a specific example, where the compactification scale is determined by Fayet-Iliopoulos terms of a locally anomalous Abelian gauge group, which are O(M GUT ). In a scenario with gravitino dark matter, this leads to a radion mass of 1-10 MeV. In this mass range, the radion is cosmologically stable and contributes to the dark matter density. Based on galactic gamma ray data, we derive a tight bound on the initial displacement of the field value from its low energy vacuum. We also investigate implications of typical moduli Kaehler potentials on the cosmological evolution of the scalar fields. In particular, we discuss a class of models with steep exponential potentials and non-canonical kinetic terms, motivated by our radion example. We consider the overshooting problem of cosmological moduli dynamics, and the possibility of slow-roll solutions despite the steepness of the scalar potential. (orig.)

  4. Feeding strategies as revealed by the section moduli of the humerus bones in bipedal theropod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott; Richards, Zachary

    2015-03-01

    The section modulus of a bone is a measure of its ability to resist bending torques. Carnivorous dinosaurs presumably had strong arm bones to hold struggling prey during hunting. Some theropods are believed to have become herbivorous and such animals would not have needed such strong arms. In this work, the section moduli of the humerus bones of bipedal theropod dinosaurs (from Microvenator celer to Tyrannosaurus rex) are studied to determine the maximum bending loads their arms could withstand. The results show that bending strength is not of uniform importance to these magnificent animals. The predatory theropods had strong arms for use in hunting. In contrast, the herbivorous dinosaurs had weaker arms.

  5. Topological recursion for chord diagrams, RNA complexes, and cells in moduli spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Chekhov, Leonid O.; Penner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    and free energies are convergent for small t and all s as a perturbation of the Gaussian potential, which arises for st=0. This perturbation is computed using the formalism of the topological recursion. The corresponding enumeration of chord diagrams gives at once the number of RNA complexes of a given...... topology as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces. The free energies are computed here in principle for all genera and explicitly for genera less than four....

  6. Equivalent elastic moduli of a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube given by uniform radial deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Qiu Xinming; Yin Yajun; Yang Fan; Fan Qinshan

    2009-01-01

    Under hydrostatic pressure, the equivalent elastic moduli of a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) are analytically determined by energy conservation, with the consideration of the covalent bond deformation. The theoretical predictions on the transverse mechanical properties of a zigzag SWNT agree reasonably well with those given by the molecular structures mechanics simulations and also the ab initio calculations. From the simple geometry calculation, the circumferential strain is about 2-3 times of the axial strain of a zigzag SWNT under hydrostatic pressure. The bulk modulus of a zigzag SWNT is found to be 3/7 times of its radial Young's modulus.

  7. A proof that Witten's open string theory gives a single cover of moduli space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwiebach, B.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1991-01-01

    We show that Witten's open string diagrams are surfaces with metrics of minimal area under the condition that all nontrivial open Jordan curves be longer or equal to π. The minimal area property is used together with a mini-max problem to establish a new existence and uniqueness theorem for quadratic differentials in open Riemann surfaces with or without punctures on the boundaries. This theorem implies that the Feynman rules of open string theory give a single cover of the moduli of open Riemann surfaces. (orig.)

  8. Stability of Picard bundle over moduli space of stable vector bundles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    Since the morphism ϕ is given by the universal property of the moduli space, the pullback of the universal bundle E on X × M to X × P by the map idX × ϕ is isomorphic (up to a twist by a line bundle coming from P) to ˜E. In other words, there is an integer k such that. 0 −→ (idX × ϕ)∗E −→ W ⊠ OP (k) −→ Ox×P (k + 1) −→ 0.

  9. Numerical solution of the ekpyrotic scenario in the moduli space approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, Torquil MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    A numerical solution to the equations of motion for the ekpyrotic bulk brane scenario in the moduli space approximation is presented. The visible universe brane has positive tension, and we use a potential that goes to zero exponentially at large distance, and also goes to zero at small distance. In the case considered, no bulk brane, visible brane collision occurs in the solution. This property and the general behavior of the solution is qualitatively the same when the visible brane tension is negative, and for many different parameter choices

  10. Simultaneous measurement of field dependence of elastic moduli by laser interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bayon, A; Salazar, F

    2000-01-01

    A methodology is applied which allows the simultaneous determination of Young's modulus and the shear modulus to evaluate elastic moduli variations with the magnetic field (DELTA E and DELTA G). The method employed is based on the simultaneous detection of the transverse and torsional natural frequencies of a slender magnetic bar located within a solenoid. The resultant vibration is detected via a heterodyne interferometric optical system with a broad bandwidth. The vibration detection and excitation systems do not interact with the sample. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by characterizing 10-mm-diameter nickel bars. The results are compared with those obtained from longitudinal vibrations.

  11. On butterfly effect in higher derivative gravities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alishahiha, Mohsen [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM),P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davody, Ali; Naseh, Ali; Taghavi, Seyed Farid [School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM),P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-07

    We study butterfly effect in D-dimensional gravitational theories containing terms quadratic in Ricci scalar and Ricci tensor. One observes that due to higher order derivatives in the corresponding equations of motion there are two butterfly velocities. The velocities are determined by the dimension of operators whose sources are provided by the metric. The three dimensional TMG model is also studied where we get two butterfly velocities at generic point of the moduli space of parameters. At critical point two velocities coincide.

  12. On butterfly effect in higher derivative gravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Davody, Ali; Naseh, Ali; Taghavi, Seyed Farid

    2016-01-01

    We study butterfly effect in D-dimensional gravitational theories containing terms quadratic in Ricci scalar and Ricci tensor. One observes that due to higher order derivatives in the corresponding equations of motion there are two butterfly velocities. The velocities are determined by the dimension of operators whose sources are provided by the metric. The three dimensional TMG model is also studied where we get two butterfly velocities at generic point of the moduli space of parameters. At critical point two velocities coincide.

  13. High-precision measurements of the compressibility of chalcogenide glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 9 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru [Vereshchagin Institute of High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation); Bychkov, E. [Universite du Littoral, LPCA, UMR 8101 CNRS (France); Tsiok, O. B. [Vereshchagin Institute of High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The volumes of glassy germanium chalcogenides GeSe{sub 2}, GeS{sub 2}, Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83}, and Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} are precisely measured at a hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa. The stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} and GeS{sub 2} glasses exhibit elastic behavior in the pressure range up to 3 GPa, and their bulk modulus decreases at pressures higher than 2–2.5 GPa. At higher pressures, inelastic relaxation processes begin and their intensity is proportional to the logarithm of time. The relaxation rate for the GeSe{sub 2} glasses has a pronounced maximum at 3.5–4.5 GPa, which indicates the existence of several parallel structural transformation mechanisms. The nonstoichiometric glasses exhibit a diffuse transformation and inelastic behavior at pressures above 1–2 GPa. The maximum relaxation rate in these glasses is significantly lower than that in the stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} glasses. All glasses are characterized by the “loss of memory” of history: after relaxation at a fixed pressure, the further increase in the pressure returns the volume to the compression curve obtained without a stop for relaxation. After pressure release, the residual densification in the stoichiometric glasses is about 7% and that in the Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83} glasses is 1.5%. The volume of the Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} glass returns to its initial value within the limits of experimental error. As the pressure decreases, the effective bulk moduli of the Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83} and Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} glasses coincide with the moduli after isobaric relaxation at the stage of increasing pressure, and the bulk modulus of the stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} glass upon decreasing pressure noticeably exceeds the bulk modulus after isobaric relaxation at the stage of increasing pressure. Along with the reported data, our results can be used to draw conclusions regarding the diffuse transformations in glassy germanium chalcogenides during compression.

  14. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Gregson, James; Wetzstein, Gordon; Raskar, Ramesh; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  15. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  16. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  17. Mining compressing sequential problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang, T.L.; Mörchen, F.; Fradkin, D.; Calders, T.G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Compression based pattern mining has been successfully applied to many data mining tasks. We propose an approach based on the minimum description length principle to extract sequential patterns that compress a database of sequences well. We show that mining compressing patterns is NP-Hard and

  18. The Polyakov relation for the sphere and higher genus surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menotti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The Polyakov relation, which in the sphere topology gives the changes of the Liouville action under the variation of the position of the sources, is also related in the case of higher genus to the dependence of the action on the moduli of the surface. We write and prove such a relation for genus 1 and for all hyperelliptic surfaces. (paper)

  19. N=2→0 super no-scale models and moduli quantum stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Kounnas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a class of heterotic N=2→0 super no-scale Z2-orbifold models. An appropriate stringy Scherk–Schwarz supersymmetry breaking induces tree level masses to all massless bosons of the twisted hypermultiplets and therefore stabilizes all twisted moduli. At high supersymmetry breaking scale, the tachyons that occur in the N=4→0 parent theories are projected out, and no Hagedorn-like instability takes place in the N=2→0 models (for small enough marginal deformations. At low supersymmetry breaking scale, the stability of the untwisted moduli is studied at the quantum level by taking into account both untwisted and twisted contributions to the 1-loop effective potential. The latter depends on the specific branch of the gauge theory along which the background can be deformed. We derive its expression in terms of all classical marginal deformations in the pure Coulomb phase, and in some mixed Coulomb/Higgs phases. In this class of models, the super no-scale condition requires having at the massless level equal numbers of untwisted bosonic and twisted fermionic degrees of freedom. Finally, we show that N=1→0 super no-scale models are obtained by implementing a second Z2 orbifold twist on N=2→0 super no-scale Z2-orbifold models.

  20. Young's moduli of carbon materials investigated by various classical molecular dynamics schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayk, Florian; Ehrens, Julian; Heitmann, Tjark; Vorndamme, Patrick; Mrugalla, Andreas; Schnack, Jürgen

    2018-05-01

    For many applications classical carbon potentials together with classical molecular dynamics are employed to calculate structures and physical properties of such carbon-based materials where quantum mechanical methods fail either due to the excessive size, irregular structure or long-time dynamics. Although such potentials, as for instance implemented in LAMMPS, yield reasonably accurate bond lengths and angles for several carbon materials such as graphene, it is not clear how accurate they are in terms of mechanical properties such as for instance Young's moduli. We performed large-scale classical molecular dynamics investigations of three carbon-based materials using the various potentials implemented in LAMMPS as well as the EDIP potential of Marks. We show how the Young's moduli vary with classical potentials and compare to experimental results. Since classical descriptions of carbon are bound to be approximations it is not astonishing that different realizations yield differing results. One should therefore carefully check for which observables a certain potential is suited. Our aim is to contribute to such a clarification.

  1. Moduli dynamics as a predictive tool for thermal maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills at large N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Takeshi [Department of Physics, Shizuoka University,836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky,Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Shiba, Shotaro [Maskawa Institute for Science and Culture, Kyoto Sangyo University,Kamigamo-Motoyama, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Wiseman, Toby [Theoretical Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College,Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Withers, Benjamin [Mathematical Sciences and STAG Research Centre, University of Southampton,Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-09

    Maximally supersymmetric (p+1)-dimensional Yang-Mills theory at large N and finite temperature, with possibly compact spatial directions, has a rich phase structure. Strongly coupled phases may have holographic descriptions as black branes in various string duality frames, or there may be no gravity dual. In this paper we provide tools in the gauge theory which give a simple and unified picture of the various strongly coupled phases, and transitions between them. Building on our previous work we consider the effective theory describing the moduli of the gauge theory, which can be computed precisely when it is weakly coupled far out on the Coulomb branch. Whilst for perturbation theory naive extrapolation from weak coupling to strong gives little information, for this moduli theory naive extrapolation from its weakly to its strongly coupled regime appears to encode a surprising amount of information about the various strongly coupled phases. We argue it encodes not only the parametric form of thermodynamic quantities for these strongly coupled phases, but also certain transcendental factors with a geometric origin, and allows one to deduce transitions between the phases. We emphasise it also gives predictions for the behaviour of other observables in these phases.

  2. Effect of rotation on the elastic moduli of solid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuiki, T.; Takahashi, D.; Murakawa, S.; Okuda, Y.; Kono, K.; Shirahama, K.

    2018-02-01

    We report measurements of elastic moduli of hcp solid 4He down to 15 mK when the samples are rotated unidirectionally. Recent investigations have revealed that the elastic behavior of solid 4He is dominated by gliding of dislocations and pinning of them by 3He impurities, which move in the solidlike Bloch waves (impuritons). Motivated by the recent controversy of torsional oscillator studies, we have performed direct measurements of shear and Young's moduli of annular solid 4He using pairs of quarter-circle-shape piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) while the whole apparatus is rotated with angular velocity Ω up to 4 rad/s. We have found that shear modulus μ is suppressed by rotation below 80 mK, when shear strain applied by PZT exceeds a critical value, above which μ decreases because the shear strain unbinds dislocations from 3He impurities. The rotation-induced decrement of μ at Ω =4 rad/s is about 14.7(12.3)% of the total change of temperature dependent μ for solid samples of pressure 3.6(5.4) MPa. The decrements indicate that the probability of pinning of 3He on dislocation segment G decreases by several orders of magnitude. We propose that the motion of 3He impuritons under rotation becomes strongly anisotropic by the Coriolis force, resulting a decrease in G for dislocation lines aligning parallel to the rotation axis.

  3. Ridge regression for predicting elastic moduli and hardness of calcium aluminosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yifan; Zeng, Huidan; Jiang, Yejia; Chen, Guorong; Chen, Jianding; Sun, Luyi

    2018-03-01

    It is of great significance to design glasses with satisfactory mechanical properties predictively through modeling. Among various modeling methods, data-driven modeling is such a reliable approach that can dramatically shorten research duration, cut research cost and accelerate the development of glass materials. In this work, the ridge regression (RR) analysis was used to construct regression models for predicting the compositional dependence of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 glass elastic moduli (Shear, Bulk, and Young’s moduli) and hardness based on the ternary diagram of the compositions. The property prediction over a large glass composition space was accomplished with known experimental data of various compositions in the literature, and the simulated results are in good agreement with the measured ones. This regression model can serve as a facile and effective tool for studying the relationship between the compositions and the property, enabling high-efficient design of glasses to meet the requirements for specific elasticity and hardness.

  4. Moduli dynamics as a predictive tool for thermal maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills at large N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Takeshi; Shiba, Shotaro; Wiseman, Toby; Withers, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Maximally supersymmetric (p+1)-dimensional Yang-Mills theory at large N and finite temperature, with possibly compact spatial directions, has a rich phase structure. Strongly coupled phases may have holographic descriptions as black branes in various string duality frames, or there may be no gravity dual. In this paper we provide tools in the gauge theory which give a simple and unified picture of the various strongly coupled phases, and transitions between them. Building on our previous work we consider the effective theory describing the moduli of the gauge theory, which can be computed precisely when it is weakly coupled far out on the Coulomb branch. Whilst for perturbation theory naive extrapolation from weak coupling to strong gives little information, for this moduli theory naive extrapolation from its weakly to its strongly coupled regime appears to encode a surprising amount of information about the various strongly coupled phases. We argue it encodes not only the parametric form of thermodynamic quantities for these strongly coupled phases, but also certain transcendental factors with a geometric origin, and allows one to deduce transitions between the phases. We emphasise it also gives predictions for the behaviour of other observables in these phases.

  5. Compression of surface myoelectric signals using MP3 encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Adrian D C

    2011-01-01

    The potential of MP3 compression of surface myoelectric signals is explored in this paper. MP3 compression is a perceptual-based encoder scheme, used traditionally to compress audio signals. The ubiquity of MP3 compression (e.g., portable consumer electronics and internet applications) makes it an attractive option for remote monitoring and telemedicine applications. The effects of muscle site and contraction type are examined at different MP3 encoding bitrates. Results demonstrate that MP3 compression is sensitive to the myoelectric signal bandwidth, with larger signal distortion associated with myoelectric signals that have higher bandwidths. Compared to other myoelectric signal compression techniques reported previously (embedded zero-tree wavelet compression and adaptive differential pulse code modulation), MP3 compression demonstrates superior performance (i.e., lower percent residual differences for the same compression ratios).

  6. Compressibility of the protein-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2018-06-01

    The compressibility of a protein relates to its stability, flexibility, and hydrophobic interactions, but the measurement, interpretation, and computation of this important thermodynamic parameter present technical and conceptual challenges. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of protein compressibility and apply it to molecular dynamics simulations of four globular proteins. Using additively weighted Voronoi tessellation, we decompose the solution compressibility into contributions from the protein and its hydration shells. We find that positively cross-correlated protein-water volume fluctuations account for more than half of the protein compressibility that governs the protein's pressure response, while the self correlations correspond to small (˜0.7%) fluctuations of the protein volume. The self compressibility is nearly the same as for ice, whereas the total protein compressibility, including cross correlations, is ˜45% of the bulk-water value. Taking the inhomogeneous solvent density into account, we decompose the experimentally accessible protein partial compressibility into intrinsic, hydration, and molecular exchange contributions and show how they can be computed with good statistical accuracy despite the dominant bulk-water contribution. The exchange contribution describes how the protein solution responds to an applied pressure by redistributing water molecules from lower to higher density; it is negligibly small for native proteins, but potentially important for non-native states. Because the hydration shell is an open system, the conventional closed-system compressibility definitions yield a pseudo-compressibility. We define an intrinsic shell compressibility, unaffected by occupation number fluctuations, and show that it approaches the bulk-water value exponentially with a decay "length" of one shell, less than the bulk-water compressibility correlation length. In the first hydration shell, the intrinsic compressibility is 25%-30% lower than in

  7. Compressibility of the protein-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2018-06-07

    The compressibility of a protein relates to its stability, flexibility, and hydrophobic interactions, but the measurement, interpretation, and computation of this important thermodynamic parameter present technical and conceptual challenges. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of protein compressibility and apply it to molecular dynamics simulations of four globular proteins. Using additively weighted Voronoi tessellation, we decompose the solution compressibility into contributions from the protein and its hydration shells. We find that positively cross-correlated protein-water volume fluctuations account for more than half of the protein compressibility that governs the protein's pressure response, while the self correlations correspond to small (∼0.7%) fluctuations of the protein volume. The self compressibility is nearly the same as for ice, whereas the total protein compressibility, including cross correlations, is ∼45% of the bulk-water value. Taking the inhomogeneous solvent density into account, we decompose the experimentally accessible protein partial compressibility into intrinsic, hydration, and molecular exchange contributions and show how they can be computed with good statistical accuracy despite the dominant bulk-water contribution. The exchange contribution describes how the protein solution responds to an applied pressure by redistributing water molecules from lower to higher density; it is negligibly small for native proteins, but potentially important for non-native states. Because the hydration shell is an open system, the conventional closed-system compressibility definitions yield a pseudo-compressibility. We define an intrinsic shell compressibility, unaffected by occupation number fluctuations, and show that it approaches the bulk-water value exponentially with a decay "length" of one shell, less than the bulk-water compressibility correlation length. In the first hydration shell, the intrinsic compressibility is 25%-30% lower than

  8. Compression for radiological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis L.

    1992-07-01

    The viewing of radiological images has peculiarities that must be taken into account in the design of a compression technique. The images may be manipulated on a workstation to change the contrast, to change the center of the brightness levels that are viewed, and even to invert the images. Because of the possible consequences of losing information in a medical application, bit preserving compression is used for the images used for diagnosis. However, for archiving the images may be compressed to 10 of their original size. A compression technique based on the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) takes the viewing factors into account by compressing the changes in the local brightness levels. The compression technique is a variation of the CCITT JPEG compression that suppresses the blocking of the DCT except in areas of very high contrast.

  9. Effects of cyclic compression on the mechanical properties and calcification process of immature chick bone tissue in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Eijiro; Nakagaki, Masashi; Ichikawa, Katsuhisa; Nagayama, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2017-06-01

    Contribution of mechanical loading to tissue growth during both the development and post-natal maturation is of a particular interest, as its understanding would be important to strategies in bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The present study has been performed to investigate how immature bone responds to mechanical loading using an ex vivo culture system. A slice of the tibia, with the thickness of 3 mm, was obtained from 0-day-old chick. For the ex vivo culture experiment in conjunction with cyclic compressive loading, we developed a custom-made, bioreactor system where both the load and the deformation applied to the specimen was recorded. Cyclic compression, with an amplitude of 0.3 N corresponding to 1 to 2% compressive strain, was applied to immature bone specimen during a 3-day culture period at an overall loading rate 3-4 cycles/min, in the presence of β-glycerol phosphate and dexamethasone in culture medium. The stress-strain relationship was obtained at the beginning and the end of the culture experiment. In addition, analyses for alkaline phosphate release, cell viability and tissue calcification were also performed. It was exhibited that elastic moduli of bone slices were significantly elevated at the end of the 3-day culture in the presence of cyclic compression, which was a similar phenomenon to significant elevation of the elastic moduli of bone tissue by the maturation from 0-day old to 3-day old. By contrast, no significant changes in the moduli were observed in the absence of cyclic compression or in deactivated, cell-free samples. The increases in the moduli were coincided with the increase in calcified area in the bone samples. It was confirmed that immature bone can respond to compressive loading in vitro and demonstrate the growth of bone matrix, similar to natural, in vivo maturation. The elevation of the elastic moduli was attributable to the increased calcified area and the realignment of collagen fibers parallel to

  10. Effects of cyclic compression on the mechanical properties and calcification process of immature chick bone tissue in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijiro Maeda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Contribution of mechanical loading to tissue growth during both the development and post-natal maturation is of a particular interest, as its understanding would be important to strategies in bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The present study has been performed to investigate how immature bone responds to mechanical loading using an ex vivo culture system. A slice of the tibia, with the thickness of 3 mm, was obtained from 0-day-old chick. For the ex vivo culture experiment in conjunction with cyclic compressive loading, we developed a custom-made, bioreactor system where both the load and the deformation applied to the specimen was recorded. Cyclic compression, with an amplitude of 0.3 N corresponding to 1 to 2% compressive strain, was applied to immature bone specimen during a 3-day culture period at an overall loading rate 3–4 cycles/min, in the presence of β-glycerol phosphate and dexamethasone in culture medium. The stress-strain relationship was obtained at the beginning and the end of the culture experiment. In addition, analyses for alkaline phosphate release, cell viability and tissue calcification were also performed. It was exhibited that elastic moduli of bone slices were significantly elevated at the end of the 3-day culture in the presence of cyclic compression, which was a similar phenomenon to significant elevation of the elastic moduli of bone tissue by the maturation from 0-day old to 3-day old. By contrast, no significant changes in the moduli were observed in the absence of cyclic compression or in deactivated, cell-free samples. The increases in the moduli were coincided with the increase in calcified area in the bone samples. It was confirmed that immature bone can respond to compressive loading in vitro and demonstrate the growth of bone matrix, similar to natural, in vivo maturation. The elevation of the elastic moduli was attributable to the increased calcified area and the realignment of collagen

  11. Effect of Hand Mixing on the Compressive Strength of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Isiwu AGUWA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of hand mixing on the compressive strength of concrete. Before designing the concrete mix, sieve analysis of sharp sand and chippings was carried out and their fineness moduli were determined. Also the dry weight of chippings and the specific gravities of both sand and chippings were determined. A designed concrete mix of 1:2:4 was used and the number of turnings of the mixture over from one end to another by hand mixing was varying from one time up to and including seven times. The strengths were measured at the curing ages of 7, 14, 21 and 28 days respectively using 150mm concrete cubes cast, cured and crushed. The results revealed that the compressive strengths of concrete cubes appreciably increased with increase in number of turnings from one to four times but remained almost constant beyond four times of turning for all the ages tested. For example, at 1, 2, and 3 times turning; the compressive strengths at 28 days were 4.67, 13.37 and 20.28N/mm2 respectively while at 4, 5 and 6 times turning; the compressive strengths at 28 days were 21.15, 21.34 and 21.69N/mm2. From the data, adequate strengths were not developed at turnings below three times of hand mixing, concluding that a minimum of three times turning is required to produce concrete with satisfactory strength.

  12. The moduli space of two U(1) instantons on noncommutative $R^4$ and $R^3\\times S^1$

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kimyeong; Tong, David; Yi, Sangheon

    2000-01-01

    We employ the ADHM method to derive the moduli space of two instantons in U(1) gauge theory on a noncommutative space. We show by an explicit hyperK\\"ahler quotient construction that the relative metric of the moduli space of two instantons on $R^4$ is the Eguchi-Hanson metric and find a unique threshold bound state. For two instantons on $R^3\\times S^1$, otherwise known as calorons, we give the asymptotic metric and conjecture a completion. We further discuss the relationship of caloron modu...

  13. Mechanics of the Compression Wood Response: II. On the Location, Action, and Distribution of Compression Wood Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, R R; Wilson, B F

    1973-04-01

    A new method for simulation of cross-sectional growth provided detailed information on the location of normal wood and compression wood increments in two tilted white pine (Pinus strobus L.) leaders. These data were combined with data on stiffness, slope, and curvature changes over a 16-week period to make the mechanical analysis. The location of compression wood changed from the under side to a flank side and then to the upper side of the leader as the geotropic stimulus decreased, owing to compression wood action. Its location shifted back to a flank side when the direction of movement of the leader reversed. A model for this action, based on elongation strains, was developed and predicted the observed curvature changes with elongation strains of 0.3 to 0.5%, or a maximal compressive stress of 60 to 300 kilograms per square centimeter. After tilting, new wood formation was distributed so as to maintain consistent strain levels along the leaders in bending under gravitational loads. The computed effective elastic moduli were about the same for the two leaders throughout the season.

  14. Influence of Young's moduli in 3D fluid-structure coupled models of the human cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhnke, Frank; Semmelbauer, Sebastian; Marquardt, Torsten

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic wave propagation in the human cochlea was studied using a tapered box-model with linear assumptions respective to all mechanical parameters. The discretisation and evaluation is conducted by a commercial finite element package (ANSYS). The main difference to former models of the cochlea was the representation of the basilar membrane by a 3D elastic solid. The Young's moduli of this solid were modified to study their influence on the travelling wave. The lymph in the scala vestibuli and scala tympani was represented by a viscous and nearly incompressible fluid finite element approach. Our results show the maximum displacement for f = 2kHz at half of the length of the cochlea in accordance with former experiments. For low frequencies f <200 Hz nearly zero phase shifts were found, whereas for f =1 kHz it reaches values up to -12 cycles depending on the degree of orthotropy.

  15. On Type IIB moduli stabilization and N=4,8 supergravities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldazabal, Gerardo [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNC) and CONICET, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Marques, Diego [Institut de Physique Theorique, CEA/ Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Nunez, Carmen, E-mail: carmen@iafe.uba.a [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (CONICET-UBA) and Departamento de Fisica, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, C.C. 67 - Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rosabal, Jose A. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNC) and CONICET, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-08-01

    We analyze D=4 compactifications of Type IIB theory with generic, geometric and non-geometric, dual fluxes turned on. In particular, we study N=1 toroidal orbifold compactifications that admit an embedding of the untwisted sector into gauged N=4,8 supergravities. Truncations, spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry and the inclusion of sources are discussed. The algebraic identities satisfied by the supergravity gaugings are used to implement the full set of consistency constraints on the background fluxes. This allows to perform a generic study of N=1 vacua and identify large regions of the parameter space that do not admit complete moduli stabilization. Illustrative examples of AdS and Minkowski vacua are presented.

  16. Exploring Lovelock theory moduli space for Schrödinger solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep P. Jatkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We look for Schrödinger solutions in Lovelock gravity in D>4. We span the entire parameter space and determine parametric relations under which the Schrödinger solution exists. We find that in arbitrary dimensions pure Lovelock theories have Schrödinger solutions of arbitrary radius, on a co-dimension one locus in the Lovelock parameter space. This co-dimension one locus contains the subspace over which the Lovelock gravity can be written in the Chern–Simons form. Schrödinger solutions do not exist outside this locus and on this locus they exist for arbitrary dynamical exponent z. This freedom in z is due to the degeneracy in the configuration space. We show that this degeneracy survives certain deformation away from the Lovelock moduli space.

  17. Exploring Lovelock theory moduli space for Schrödinger solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatkar, Dileep P.; Kundu, Nilay

    2016-09-01

    We look for Schrödinger solutions in Lovelock gravity in D > 4. We span the entire parameter space and determine parametric relations under which the Schrödinger solution exists. We find that in arbitrary dimensions pure Lovelock theories have Schrödinger solutions of arbitrary radius, on a co-dimension one locus in the Lovelock parameter space. This co-dimension one locus contains the subspace over which the Lovelock gravity can be written in the Chern-Simons form. Schrödinger solutions do not exist outside this locus and on this locus they exist for arbitrary dynamical exponent z. This freedom in z is due to the degeneracy in the configuration space. We show that this degeneracy survives certain deformation away from the Lovelock moduli space.

  18. MP3 compression of Doppler ultrasound signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poepping, Tamie L; Gill, Jeremy; Fenster, Aaron; Holdsworth, David W

    2003-01-01

    The effect of lossy, MP3 compression on spectral parameters derived from Doppler ultrasound (US) signals was investigated. Compression was tested on signals acquired from two sources: 1. phase quadrature and 2. stereo audio directional output. A total of 11, 10-s acquisitions of Doppler US signal were collected from each source at three sites in a flow phantom. Doppler signals were digitized at 44.1 kHz and compressed using four grades of MP3 compression (in kilobits per second, kbps; compression ratios in brackets): 1400 kbps (uncompressed), 128 kbps (11:1), 64 kbps (22:1) and 32 kbps (44:1). Doppler spectra were characterized by peak velocity, mean velocity, spectral width, integrated power and ratio of spectral power between negative and positive velocities. The results suggest that MP3 compression on digital Doppler US signals is feasible at 128 kbps, with a resulting 11:1 compression ratio, without compromising clinically relevant information. Higher compression ratios led to significant differences for both signal sources when compared with the uncompressed signals. Copyright 2003 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology

  19. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  20. Quantum-induced interactions in the moduli space of degenerate BPS domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A.; Guilarte, J. Mateos

    2014-01-01

    In this paper quantum effects are investigated in a very special two-scalar field model having a moduli space of BPS topological defects. In a (1+1)-dimensional space-time the defects are classically degenerate in mass kinks, but in (3+1) dimensions the kinks become BPS domain walls, all of them sharing the same surface tension at the classical level. The heat kernel/zeta function regularization method will be used to control the divergences induced by the quantum kink and domain wall fluctuations. A generalization of the Gilkey-DeWitt-Avramidi heat kernel expansion will be developed in order to accommodate the infrared divergences due to zero modes in the spectra of the second-order kink and domain wall fluctuation operators, which are respectively N=2×N=2 matrix ordinary or partial differential operators. Use of these tools in the spectral zeta function associated with the Hessian operators paves the way to obtain general formulas for the one-loop kink mass and domain wall tension shifts in any (1+1)- or (3+1)-dimensional N-component scalar field theory model. Application of these formulae to the BPS kinks or domain walls of the N=2 model mentioned above reveals the breaking of the classical mass or surface tension degeneracy at the quantum level. Because the main parameter distinguishing each member in the BPS kink or domain wall moduli space is essentially the distance between the centers of two basic kinks or walls, the breaking of the degeneracy amounts to the surge in quantum-induced forces between the two constituent topological defects. The differences in surface tension induced by one-loop fluctuations of BPS walls give rise mainly to attractive forces between the constituent walls except if the two basic walls are very far apart. Repulsive forces between two close walls only arise if the coupling approaches the critical value from below

  1. How compressible is recombinant battery separator mat?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendry, C. [Hollingsworth and Vose, Postlip Mills Winchcombe (United Kingdom)

    1999-03-01

    In the past few years, the recombinant battery separator mat (RBSM) for valve-regulated lead/acid (VRLA) batteries has become the focus of much attention. Compression, and the ability of microglass separators to maintain a level of `springiness` have helped reduce premature capacity loss. As higher compressions are reached, we need to determine what, if any, damage can be caused during the assembly process. This paper reviews the findings when RBSM materials, with different surface areas, are compressed under forces up to 500 kPa in the dry state. (orig.)

  2. Recognizable or Not: Towards Image Semantic Quality Assessment for Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Dandan; Li, Houqiang

    2017-12-01

    Traditionally, image compression was optimized for the pixel-wise fidelity or the perceptual quality of the compressed images given a bit-rate budget. But recently, compressed images are more and more utilized for automatic semantic analysis tasks such as recognition and retrieval. For these tasks, we argue that the optimization target of compression is no longer perceptual quality, but the utility of the compressed images in the given automatic semantic analysis task. Accordingly, we propose to evaluate the quality of the compressed images neither at pixel level nor at perceptual level, but at semantic level. In this paper, we make preliminary efforts towards image semantic quality assessment (ISQA), focusing on the task of optical character recognition (OCR) from compressed images. We propose a full-reference ISQA measure by comparing the features extracted from text regions of original and compressed images. We then propose to integrate the ISQA measure into an image compression scheme. Experimental results show that our proposed ISQA measure is much better than PSNR and SSIM in evaluating the semantic quality of compressed images; accordingly, adopting our ISQA measure to optimize compression for OCR leads to significant bit-rate saving compared to using PSNR or SSIM. Moreover, we perform subjective test about text recognition from compressed images, and observe that our ISQA measure has high consistency with subjective recognizability. Our work explores new dimensions in image quality assessment, and demonstrates promising direction to achieve higher compression ratio for specific semantic analysis tasks.

  3. A Mechanics Model for Sensors Imperfectly Bonded to the Skin for Determination of the Young's Moduli of Epidermis and Dermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J. H.; Shi, Y.; Pharr, M.; Feng, X.; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    A mechanics model is developed for the encapsulated piezoelectric thin-film actuators/sensors system imperfectly bonded to the human skin to simultaneously determine the Young's moduli of the epidermis and dermis as well as the thickness of epidermis. PMID:27330219

  4. The moduli space of instantons on an ALE space from 3d $\\mathcal{N}=4$ field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Mekareeya, Noppadol

    2015-01-01

    The moduli space of instantons on an ALE space is studied using the moduli space of $\\mathcal{N}=4$ field theories in three dimensions. For instantons in a simple gauge group $G$ on $\\mathbb{C}^2/\\mathbb{Z}_n$, the Hilbert series of such an instanton moduli space is computed from the Coulomb branch of the quiver given by the affine Dynkin diagram of $G$ with flavour nodes of unitary groups attached to various nodes of the Dynkin diagram. We provide a simple prescription to determine the ranks and the positions of these flavour nodes from the order of the orbifold $n$ and from the residual subgroup of $G$ that is left unbroken by the monodromy of the gauge field at infinity. For $G$ a simply laced group of type $A$, $D$ or $E$, the Higgs branch of such a quiver describes the moduli space of instantons in projective unitary group $PU(n) \\cong U(n)/U(1)$ on orbifold $\\mathbb{C}^2/\\hat{G}$, where $\\hat{G}$ is the discrete group that is in McKay correspondence to $G$. Moreover, we present the quiver whose Coulomb ...

  5. The Determination of ’In Situ’ Anisotropic Elastic Moduli from Laboratory Ultrasonic and Field Seismic Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    feet of the uppermost Kayenta sandstone unit at the Mixed Company site, for which the in situ elastic moduli are determined to be as follows: C11...and plastic anisotropic properties of Kayenta sandstone from the Mixed Company site are in poor agreement with newly generated data. (Author)

  6. Thermofluidic compression effects to achieve combustion in a low-compression scramjet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, A. F.; Wheatley, V.; Jahn, I.

    2017-12-01

    The compression provided by a scramjet inlet is an important parameter in its design. It must be low enough to limit thermal and structural loads and stagnation pressure losses, but high enough to provide the conditions favourable for combustion. Inlets are typically designed to achieve sufficient compression without accounting for the fluidic, and subsequently thermal, compression provided by the fuel injection, which can enable robust combustion in a low-compression engine. This is investigated using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes numerical simulations of a simplified scramjet engine designed to have insufficient compression to auto-ignite fuel in the absence of thermofluidic compression. The engine was designed with a wide rectangular combustor and a single centrally located injector, in order to reduce three-dimensional effects of the walls on the fuel plume. By varying the injected mass flow rate of hydrogen fuel (equivalence ratios of 0.22, 0.17, and 0.13), it is demonstrated that higher equivalence ratios lead to earlier ignition and more rapid combustion, even though mean conditions in the combustor change by no more than 5% for pressure and 3% for temperature with higher equivalence ratio. By supplementing the lower equivalence ratio with helium to achieve a higher mass flow rate, it is confirmed that these benefits are primarily due to the local compression provided by the extra injected mass. Investigation of the conditions around the fuel plume indicated two connected mechanisms. The higher mass flow rate for higher equivalence ratios generated a stronger injector bow shock that compresses the free-stream gas, increasing OH radical production and promoting ignition. This was observed both in the higher equivalence ratio case and in the case with helium. This earlier ignition led to increased temperature and pressure downstream and, consequently, stronger combustion. The heat release from combustion provided thermal compression in the combustor, further

  7. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  8. Experiments with automata compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daciuk, J.; Yu, S; Daley, M; Eramian, M G

    2001-01-01

    Several compression methods of finite-state automata are presented and evaluated. Most compression methods used here are already described in the literature. However, their impact on the size of automata has not been described yet. We fill that gap, presenting results of experiments carried out on

  9. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  10. Confounding compression: the effects of posture, sizing and garment type on measured interface pressure in sports compression clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy-Williams, Ned; Driller, Matthew William; Shing, Cecilia Mary; Fell, James William; Halson, Shona Leigh; Halson, Shona Louise

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to measure the interface pressure exerted by lower body sports compression garments, in order to assess the effect of garment type, size and posture in athletes. Twelve national-level boxers were fitted with sports compression garments (tights and leggings), each in three different sizes (undersized, recommended size and oversized). Interface pressure was assessed across six landmarks on the lower limb (ranging from medial malleolus to upper thigh) as athletes assumed sitting, standing and supine postures. Sports compression leggings exerted a significantly higher mean pressure than sports compression tights (P sports compression garments is significantly affected by garment type, size and posture assumed by the wearer.

  11. Highly Efficient Compression Algorithms for Multichannel EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Laxmi; Rahman, Daleef; Routray, Aurobinda

    2018-05-01

    The difficulty associated with processing and understanding the high dimensionality of electroencephalogram (EEG) data requires developing efficient and robust compression algorithms. In this paper, different lossless compression techniques of single and multichannel EEG data, including Huffman coding, arithmetic coding, Markov predictor, linear predictor, context-based error modeling, multivariate autoregression (MVAR), and a low complexity bivariate model have been examined and their performances have been compared. Furthermore, a high compression algorithm named general MVAR and a modified context-based error modeling for multichannel EEG have been proposed. The resulting compression algorithm produces a higher relative compression ratio of 70.64% on average compared with the existing methods, and in some cases, it goes up to 83.06%. The proposed methods are designed to compress a large amount of multichannel EEG data efficiently so that the data storage and transmission bandwidth can be effectively used. These methods have been validated using several experimental multichannel EEG recordings of different subjects and publicly available standard databases. The satisfactory parametric measures of these methods, namely percent-root-mean square distortion, peak signal-to-noise ratio, root-mean-square error, and cross correlation, show their superiority over the state-of-the-art compression methods.

  12. Two divergent paths: compression vs. non-compression in deep venous thrombosis and post thrombotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Simões Da Matta

    Full Text Available Abstract Use of compression therapy to reduce the incidence of postthrombotic syndrome among patients with deep venous thrombosis is a controversial subject and there is no consensus on use of elastic versus inelastic compression, or on the levels and duration of compression. Inelastic devices with a higher static stiffness index, combine relatively small and comfortable pressure at rest with pressure while standing strong enough to restore the “valve mechanism” generated by plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the foot. Since the static stiffness index is dependent on the rigidity of the compression system and the muscle strength within the bandaged area, improvement of muscle mass with muscle-strengthening programs and endurance training should be encouraged. Therefore, in the acute phase of deep venous thrombosis events, anticoagulation combined with inelastic compression therapy can reduce the extension of the thrombus. Notwithstanding, prospective studies evaluating the effectiveness of inelastic therapy in deep venous thrombosis and post-thrombotic syndrome are needed.

  13. Adiabatic Liquid Piston Compressed Air Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tage; Elmegaard, Brian; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    the system. The compression leads to a significant increase in temperature, and the heat generated is dumped into the ambient. This energy loss results in a low efficiency of the system, and when expanding the air, the expansion leads to a temperature drop reducing the mechanical output of the expansion......), but no such units are in operation at present. The CAES system investigated in this project uses a different approach to avoid compression heat loss. The system uses a pre-compressed pressure vessel full of air. A liquid is pumped into the bottom of the vessel when charging and the same liquid is withdrawn through......-CAES system is significantly higher than existing CAES systems due to a low or nearly absent compression heat loss. Furthermore, pumps/turbines, which use a liquid as a medium, are more efficient than air/gas compressors/turbines. In addition, the demand for fuel during expansion does not occur. •The energy...

  14. Compressive laser ranging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Wm Randall; Barber, Zeb W; Renner, Christoffer

    2011-12-15

    Compressive sampling has been previously proposed as a technique for sampling radar returns and determining sparse range profiles with a reduced number of measurements compared to conventional techniques. By employing modulation on both transmission and reception, compressive sensing in ranging is extended to the direct measurement of range profiles without intermediate measurement of the return waveform. This compressive ranging approach enables the use of pseudorandom binary transmit waveforms and return modulation, along with low-bandwidth optical detectors to yield high-resolution ranging information. A proof-of-concept experiment is presented. With currently available compact, off-the-shelf electronics and photonics, such as high data rate binary pattern generators and high-bandwidth digital optical modulators, compressive laser ranging can readily achieve subcentimeter resolution in a compact, lightweight package.

  15. Compressibility effects on turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickacheril John, John; Donzis, Diego

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of compressibility on passive scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence with a focus on the fundamental mechanisms that are responsible for such effects using a large Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database. The database includes simulations with Taylor Reynolds number (Rλ) up to 100, turbulent Mach number (Mt) between 0.1 and 0.6 and Schmidt number (Sc) from 0.5 to 1.0. We present several measures of mixing efficiency on different canonical flows to robustly identify compressibility effects. We found that, like shear layers, mixing is reduced as Mach number increases. However, data also reveal a non-monotonic trend with Mt. To assess directly the effect of dilatational motions we also present results with both dilatational and soleniodal forcing. Analysis suggests that a small fraction of dilatational forcing decreases mixing time at higher Mt. Scalar spectra collapse when normalized by Batchelor variables which suggests that a compressive mechanism similar to Batchelor mixing in incompressible flows might be responsible for better mixing at high Mt and with dilatational forcing compared to pure solenoidal mixing. We also present results on scalar budgets, in particular on production and dissipation. Support from NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Structural control of elastic moduli in ferrogels and the importance of non-affine deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessot, Giorgio; Cremer, Peet; Borin, Dmitry Y.; Odenbach, Stefan; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2014-09-01

    One of the central appealing properties of magnetic gels and elastomers is that their elastic moduli can reversibly be adjusted from outside by applying magnetic fields. The impact of the internal magnetic particle distribution on this effect has been outlined and analyzed theoretically. In most cases, however, affine sample deformations are studied and often regular particle arrangements are considered. Here we challenge these two major simplifications by a systematic approach using a minimal dipole-spring model. Starting from different regular lattices, we take into account increasingly randomized structures, until we finally investigate an irregular texture taken from a real experimental sample. On the one hand, we find that the elastic tunability qualitatively depends on the structural properties, here in two spatial dimensions. On the other hand, we demonstrate that the assumption of affine deformations leads to increasingly erroneous results the more realistic the particle distribution becomes. Understanding the consequences of the assumptions made in the modeling process is important on our way to support an improved design of these fascinating materials.

  17. An in situ estimation of anisotropic elastic moduli for a submarine shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Douglas E.; Leaney, Scott; Borland, William H.

    1994-11-01

    Direct arrival times and slownesses from wide-aperture walkaway vertical seismic profile data acquired in a layered anisotropic medium can be processed to give direct estimate of the phase slowness surface associated with the medium at the depth of the receivers. This slowness surface can, in turn, be fit by an estimated transversely isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (a 'TIV' medium). While the method requires that the medium between the receivers and the surface be horizontally stratified, no further measurement or knowledge of that medium is required. When applied to data acquired in a compacting shale sequence (here termed the 'Petronas shale') encountered by a well in the South China Sea, the method yields an estimated TIV medium that fits the data extremely well over 180 deg of propagation angles sampled by 201 source positions. The medium is strongly anisotropic. The anisotropy is significantly anelliptic and implies that the quasi-shear mode should be triplicated for off-axis propagation. Estimated density-normalized moduli (in units of sq km/sq s) for the Petronas shale are A(sub 11) = 6.99 +/- 0.21, A(sub 33) = 5.53 +/- 0.17, A(sub 55) = 0.91 +/- 0.05, and A(sub 13) = 2.64 +/- 0.26. Densities in the logged zone just below the survey lie in the range between 2200 and 2400 kg/cu m with an average value close to 2300 kg/cu m.

  18. Preparation and Elastic Moduli of Germanate Glass Containing Lead and Bismuth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan M. M. Yunus

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the rapid melt quenching technique preparation for the new family of bismuth-lead germanate glass (BPG systems in the form of (GeO260–(PbO40−x–(½Bi2O3x where x = 0 to 40 mol%. Their densities with respect of Bi2O3 concentration were determined using Archimedes’ method with acetone as a floatation medium. The current experimental data are compared with those of bismuth lead borate (B2O320–(PbO80−x–(Bi2O3x. The elastic properties of BPG were studied using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique where both longitudinal and transverse sound wave velocities have been measured in each glass samples at a frequency of 15 MHz and at room temperature. Experimental data shows that all the physical parameters of BPG including density and molar volume, both longitudinal and transverse velocities increase linearly with increasing of Bi2O3 content in the germanate glass network. Their elastic moduli such as longitudinal, shear and Young’s also increase linearly with addition of Bi2O3 but the bulk modulus did not. The Poisson’s ratio and fractal dimensionality are also found to vary linearly with the Bi2O3 concentration.

  19. Preparation and elastic moduli of germanate glass containing lead and bismuth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidek, Hj A A; Bahari, Hamid R; Halimah, Mohamed K; Yunus, Wan M M

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the rapid melt quenching technique preparation for the new family of bismuth-lead germanate glass (BPG) systems in the form of (GeO(2))(60)-(PbO)(40-) (x)-(½Bi(2)O(3))(x) where x = 0 to 40 mol%. Their densities with respect of Bi(2)O(3) concentration were determined using Archimedes' method with acetone as a floatation medium. The current experimental data are compared with those of bismuth lead borate (B(2)O(3))(20)-(PbO)(80-) (x)-(Bi(2)O(3))(x). The elastic properties of BPG were studied using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique where both longitudinal and transverse sound wave velocities have been measured in each glass samples at a frequency of 15 MHz and at room temperature. Experimental data shows that all the physical parameters of BPG including density and molar volume, both longitudinal and transverse velocities increase linearly with increasing of Bi(2)O(3) content in the germanate glass network. Their elastic moduli such as longitudinal, shear and Young's also increase linearly with addition of Bi(2)O(3) but the bulk modulus did not. The Poisson's ratio and fractal dimensionality are also found to vary linearly with the Bi(2)O(3) concentration.

  20. Analytical modeling of effect of interlayer on effective moduli of layered graphene-polymer nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.C.Roach; Y.C.Lu

    2017-01-01

    Nanocomposites enhanced with two-dimensional,layered graphene fillers are a new class of engineering materials that exhibit superior properties and characteristics to composites with conventional fillers.However,the roles of "interlayers" in layered graphene fillers have yet to be fully explored.This paper examines the effect of interlayers on mechanical properties of layered graphene polymer composites.As an effective filler,the fundamental properties (in-plane Young's modulus EL1,out-of-plane Young's modulus EL2;shear modulus GL12,major Poisson's ratio 1L12) of the layered graphene were computed by using the Arridge's lamellar model.The effects of interlayers on effective moduli of layered graphene epoxy composites were examined through the Tandon-Weng model.The properties of the interlayer show noticeable impact on elastic properties of the composites,particular the out-of-plane properties (Young's modulus E2 and shear modulus G12).The interlayer spacing is seen to have much great influence on properties of the composites.As the interlayer spacing increases from 0.34 nm to 2 nm,all elastic properties of the composites have been greatly decreased.

  1. Effects of porosity on seismic velocities, elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios of solid materials and rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbo Yu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The generalized mixture rule (GMR is used to provide a unified framework for describing Young's (E, shear (G and bulk (K moduli, Lame parameter (λ, and P- and S-wave velocities (Vp and Vs as a function of porosity in various isotropic materials such as metals, ceramics and rocks. The characteristic J values of the GMR for E, G, K and λ of each material are systematically different and display consistent correlations with the Poisson's ratio of the nonporous material (ν0. For the materials dominated by corner-shaped pores, the fixed point at which the effective Poisson's ratio (ν remains constant is at ν0 = 0.2, and J(G > J(E > J(K > J(λ and J(G  0.2 and ν0  J(Vp and J(Vs  0.2 and ν0  0.2 and ν0 = 0.2, respectively. For natural rocks containing thin-disk-shaped pores parallel to mineral cleavages, grain boundaries and foliation, however, the ν fixed point decreases nonlinearly with decreasing pore aspect ratio (α: width/length. With increasing depth or pressure, cracks with smaller α values are progressively closed, making the ν fixed point rise and finally reach to the point at ν0 = 0.2.

  2. Multi-Regge kinematics and the moduli space of Riemann spheres with marked points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duca, Vittorio Del [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich,Hönggerberg, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Druc, Stefan; Drummond, James [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Southampton,Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Duhr, Claude [Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,Route de Meyrin, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Center for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3),Université catholique de Louvain,Chemin du Cyclotron 2, 1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Dulat, Falko [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Marzucca, Robin [Center for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3),Université catholique de Louvain,Chemin du Cyclotron 2, 1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Papathanasiou, Georgios [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Verbeek, Bram [Center for Cosmology, Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3),Université catholique de Louvain,Chemin du Cyclotron 2, 1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-08-25

    We show that scattering amplitudes in planar N=4 Super Yang-Mills in multi-Regge kinematics can naturally be expressed in terms of single-valued iterated integrals on the moduli space of Riemann spheres with marked points. As a consequence, scattering amplitudes in this limit can be expressed as convolutions that can easily be computed using Stokes’ theorem. We apply this framework to MHV amplitudes to leading-logarithmic accuracy (LLA), and we prove that at L loops all MHV amplitudes are determined by amplitudes with up to L+4 external legs. We also investigate non-MHV amplitudes, and we show that they can be obtained by convoluting the MHV results with a certain helicity flip kernel. We classify all leading singularities that appear at LLA in the Regge limit for arbitrary helicity configurations and any number of external legs. Finally, we use our new framework to obtain explicit analytic results at LLA for all MHV amplitudes up to five loops and all non-MHV amplitudes with up to eight external legs and four loops.

  3. A Statistical Learning Framework for Materials Science: Application to Elastic Moduli of k-nary Inorganic Polycrystalline Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maarten; Chen, Wei; Notestine, Randy; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand; Jain, Anubhav; Asta, Mark; Gamst, Anthony

    2016-10-03

    Materials scientists increasingly employ machine or statistical learning (SL) techniques to accelerate materials discovery and design. Such pursuits benefit from pooling training data across, and thus being able to generalize predictions over, k-nary compounds of diverse chemistries and structures. This work presents a SL framework that addresses challenges in materials science applications, where datasets are diverse but of modest size, and extreme values are often of interest. Our advances include the application of power or Hölder means to construct descriptors that generalize over chemistry and crystal structure, and the incorporation of multivariate local regression within a gradient boosting framework. The approach is demonstrated by developing SL models to predict bulk and shear moduli (K and G, respectively) for polycrystalline inorganic compounds, using 1,940 compounds from a growing database of calculated elastic moduli for metals, semiconductors and insulators. The usefulness of the models is illustrated by screening for superhard materials.

  4. Comparison of slowness profiles of lamb wave with elastic moduli and crystal structure in single crystalline silicon wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Young Jae; Yun, Gyeong Won; Kim, Kyung Min; Roh, Yuji; Kim, Young H. [Applied Acoustics Lab, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Single crystalline silicon wafers having (100), (110), and (111) directions are employed as specimens for obtaining slowness profiles. Leaky Lamb waves (LLW) from immersed wafers were detected by varying the incident angles of the specimens and rotating the specimens. From an analysis of LLW signals for different propagation directions and phase velocities of each specimen, slowness profiles were obtained, which showed a unique symmetry with different symmetric axes. Slowness profiles were compared with elastic moduli of each wafer. They showed the same symmetries as crystal structures. In addition, slowness profiles showed expected patterns and values that can be inferred from elastic moduli. This implies that slowness profiles can be used to examine crystal structures of anisotropic solids.

  5. Development and assessment of compression technique for medical images using neural network. I. Assessment of lossless compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukatsu, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes assessment of the lossless compression of a new efficient compression technique (JIS system) using neural network that the author and co-workers have recently developed. At first, theory is explained for encoding and decoding the data. Assessment is done on 55 images each of chest digital roentgenography, digital mammography, 64-row multi-slice CT, 1.5 Tesla MRI, positron emission tomography (PET) and digital subtraction angiography, which are lossless-compressed by the present JIS system to see the compression rate and loss. For comparison, those data are also JPEG lossless-compressed. Personal computer (PC) is an Apple MacBook Pro with configuration of Boot Camp for Windows environment. The present JIS system is found to have a more than 4 times higher efficiency than the usual compressions which compressing the file volume to only 1/11 in average, and thus to be importantly responsible to the increasing medical imaging data. (R.T.)

  6. MPL-A program for computations with iterated integrals on moduli spaces of curves of genus zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the Maple program MPL for computations with multiple polylogarithms. The program is based on homotopy invariant iterated integrals on moduli spaces M0,n of curves of genus 0 with n ordered marked points. It includes the symbol map and procedures for the analytic computation of period integrals on M0,n. It supports the automated computation of a certain class of Feynman integrals.

  7. Elastic moduli of biological fibers in a coarse-grained model: crystalline cellulose and β-amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Adolfo B; Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2017-10-25

    We study the mechanical response of cellulose and β-amyloid microfibrils to three types of deformation: tensile, indentational, and shear. The cellulose microfibrils correspond to the allomorphs Iα or Iβ whereas the β-amyloid microfibrils correspond to the polymorphs of either two- or three-fold symmetry. This response can be characterized by three elastic moduli, namely, Y L , Y T , and S. We use a structure-based coarse-grained model to analyze the deformations in a unified manner. We find that each of the moduli is almost the same for the two allomorphs of cellulose but Y L is about 20 times larger than Y T (140 GPa vs. 7 GPa), indicating the existence of significant anisotropy. For cellulose we note that the anisotropy results from the involvement of covalent bonds in stretching. For β-amyloid, the sense of anisotropy is opposite to that of cellulose. In the three-fold symmetry case, Y L is about half of Y T (3 vs. 7) whereas for two-fold symmetry the anisotropy is much larger (1.6 vs. 21 GPa). The S modulus is derived to be 1.2 GPa for three-fold symmetry and one half of it for the other symmetry and 3.0 GPa for cellulose. The values of the moduli reflect deformations in the hydrogen-bond network. Unlike in our theoretical approach, no experiment can measure all three elastic moduli with the same apparatus. However, our theoretical results are consistent with various measured values: typical Y L for cellulose Iβ ranges from 133 to 155 GPa, Y T from 2 to 25 GPa, and S from 1.8 to 3.8 GPa. For β-amyloid, the experimental values of S and Y T are about 0.3 GPa and 3.3 GPa respectively, while the value of Y L has not been reported.

  8. Compression of the digitized X-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terae, Satoshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Takamura, Akio; Irie, Goro; Inamura, Kiyonari.

    1987-01-01

    Medical images are using an increased amount of space in the hospitals, while they are not accessed easily. Thus, suitable data filing system and precise data compression will be necessitated. Image quality was evaluated before and after image data compression, using local filing system (MediFile 1000, NEC Co.) and forty-seven modes of compression parameter. For this study X-ray images of 10 plain radiographs and 7 contrast examinations were digitized using a film reader of CCD sensor in MediFile 1000. Those images were compressed into forty-seven kinds of image data to save in an optical disc and then the compressed images were reconstructed. Each reconstructed image was compared with non-compressed images in respect to several regions of our interest by four radiologists. Compression and extension of radiological images were promptly made by employing the local filing system. Image quality was much more affected by the ratio of data compression than by the mode of parameter itself. In another word, the higher compression ratio became, the worse the image quality were. However, image quality was not significantly degraded until the compression ratio was about 15: 1 on plain radiographs and about 8: 1 on contrast studies. Image compression by this technique will be admitted by diagnostic radiology. (author)

  9. Optical pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The interest in using large lasers to achieve a very short and intense pulse for generating fusion plasma has provided a strong impetus to reexamine the possibilities of optical pulse compression at high energy. Pulse compression allows one to generate pulses of long duration (minimizing damage problems) and subsequently compress optical pulses to achieve the short pulse duration required for specific applications. The ideal device for carrying out this program has not been developed. Of the two approaches considered, the Gires--Tournois approach is limited by the fact that the bandwidth and compression are intimately related, so that the group delay dispersion times the square of the bandwidth is about unity for all simple Gires--Tournois interferometers. The Treacy grating pair does not suffer from this limitation, but is inefficient because diffraction generally occurs in several orders and is limited by the problem of optical damage to the grating surfaces themselves. Nonlinear and parametric processes were explored. Some pulse compression was achieved by these techniques; however, they are generally difficult to control and are not very efficient. (U.S.)

  10. Revisiting the two formulations of Bianchi identities and their implications on moduli stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Pramod [ICTP - International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy)

    2016-08-24

    In the context of non-geometric type II orientifold compactifications, there have been two formulations for representing the various NS-NS Bianchi-identities. In the first formulation, the standard three-form flux (H{sub 3}), the geometric flux (ω) and the non-geometric fluxes (Q and R) are expressed by using the real six-dimensional indices (e.g. H{sub ijk},ω{sub ij}{sup k},Q{sub i}{sup jk} and R{sup ijk}), and this formulation has been heavily utilized for simplifying the scalar potentials in toroidal-orientifolds. On the other hand, relevant for the studies beyond toroidal backgrounds, a second formulation is utilized in which all flux components are written in terms of various involutively even/odd (2,1)- and (1,1)-cohomologies of the complex threefold. In the lights of recent model building interests and some observations made in http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2007/08/043, http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2007/12/058, in this article, we revisit two most commonly studied toroidal examples in detail to illustrate that the present forms of these two formulations are not completely equivalent. To demonstrate the same, we translate all the identities of the first formulation into cohomology ingredients, and after a tedious reshuffling of the subsequent constraints, interestingly we find that all the identities of the second formulation are embedded into the first formulation which has some additional constraints. In addition, we look for the possible solutions of these Bianchi identities in a detailed analysis, and we find that some solutions can reduce the size of scalar potential very significantly, and in some cases are too strong to break the no-scale structure completely. Finally, we also comment on the influence of imposing some of the solutions of Bianchi identities in studying moduli stabilization.

  11. Ceramic strengthening by tuning the elastic moduli of resin-based luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spazzin, Aloísio O; Bacchi, Ataís; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Santos, Mateus B; Basso, Gabriela R; Griggs, Jason; Moraes, Rafael R

    2017-03-01

    Resin-based luting agents (RBLAs) with tuned elastic moduli (E) were prepared and their influence on the strengthening, reliability, and mode of failure of luted feldspar ceramic was investigated. RBLAs with low E (2.6GPa), intermediate E (6.6GPa), and high E (13.3GPa) were prepared and used to coat acid-etched ceramic disks. Positive (untreated ceramic) and negative (acid-etched ceramic) control groups were tested. The response variables (n=30) were biaxial flexural strength (σ bf , MPa), characteristic strength (σ 0 , MPa), and Weibull modulus at the ceramic surface (z=0) and luting agent surface (z=-t 2 ). A 3D finite element analysis simulated the biaxial flexural test. Fractographic analysis and morphology of the bonded interfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The RBLAs improved σ bf and σ 0 at z=0, particularly those with intermediate and high E, whereas the mechanical reliability was only affected in the negative control. At z=-t 2 , differences between all RBLAs were observed but the structural reliability was independent of the RBLA tested. Increasing E of the RBLA was associated with increased stress concentration at the RBLA and reduced stresses reaching the ceramic. Failures originated on the ceramic surface at the ceramic-cement interface. In the high E group, failure sometimes originated from the RBLA free surface. All RBLAs completely filled the ceramic irregularities. Increased E of the RBLA reduced the variability of strength, the stress reaching the ceramic structure, and sometimes altered the origin of failure. The use of high E RBLAs seems beneficial for luting feldspar ceramics. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. On the c-theorem in higher genus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espriu, D.; Mavromatos, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    We study the extension of the c-therorem to arbitrary genus Riemann surfaces. We analyze the breakdown of conformal invariance caused by the need of cutting off regions of moduli space to regulate divergences and argue how these can be absorbed in the bare couplings on the sphere. An extension of the c-theorem then follows. We also discuss the relationship between the c-theorem and the effective action when corrections from higher genera are accounted for. (orig.)

  13. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Rodriquez, P.J.; Younger, S.M.; Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal

  14. Pulsed Compression Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roestenberg, T. [University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-06-07

    The advantages of the Pulsed Compression Reactor (PCR) over the internal combustion engine-type chemical reactors are briefly discussed. Over the last four years a project concerning the fundamentals of the PCR technology has been performed by the University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands. In order to assess the feasibility of the application of the PCR principle for the conversion methane to syngas, several fundamental questions needed to be answered. Two important questions that relate to the applicability of the PCR for any process are: how large is the heat transfer rate from a rapidly compressed and expanded volume of gas, and how does this heat transfer rate compare to energy contained in the compressed gas? And: can stable operation with a completely free piston as it is intended with the PCR be achieved?.

  15. Medullary compression syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga T, L.; Echegaray, A.; Zaharia, M.; Pinillos A, L.; Moscol, A.; Barriga T, O.; Heredia Z, A.

    1994-01-01

    The authors made a retrospective study in 105 patients treated in the Radiotherapy Department of the National Institute of Neoplasmic Diseases from 1973 to 1992. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the influence of radiotherapy in patients with medullary compression syndrome in aspects concerning pain palliation and improvement of functional impairment. Treatment sheets of patients with medullary compression were revised: 32 out of 39 of patients (82%) came to hospital by their own means and continued walking after treatment, 8 out of 66 patients (12%) who came in a wheelchair or were bedridden, could mobilize by their own after treatment, 41 patients (64%) had partial alleviation of pain after treatment. In those who came by their own means and did not change their characteristics, functional improvement was observed. It is concluded that radiotherapy offers palliative benefit in patients with medullary compression syndrome. (authors). 20 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Mendler

    2011-03-15

    Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low

  17. Graph Compression by BFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Apostolico

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Web Graph is a large-scale graph that does not fit in main memory, so that lossless compression methods have been proposed for it. This paper introduces a compression scheme that combines efficient storage with fast retrieval for the information in a node. The scheme exploits the properties of the Web Graph without assuming an ordering of the URLs, so that it may be applied to more general graphs. Tests on some datasets of use achieve space savings of about 10% over existing methods.

  18. Environmental effects on the compressive properties - Thermosetting vs. thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, A.; Jeelani, S.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of moisture and temperature on the compressive properties of graphite/epoxy and APC-2 materials systems was investigated to assess the viability of using APC-2 instead of graphite/epoxy. Data obtained indicate that the moisture absorption rate of T-300/epoxy is higher than that of APC-2. Thick plate with smaller surface area absorbs less moisture than thin plate with larger surface area. The compressive strength and modulus of APC-2 are higher than those of T-300/epoxy composite, and APC-2 sustains higher compressive strength in the presence of moisture. The compressive strength and modulus decrease with the increase of temperature in the range of 23-100 C. The compression failure was in the form of delamination, interlaminar shear, and end brooming.

  19. Structure and Properties of Silica Glass Densified in Cold Compression and Hot Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerette, Michael; Ackerson, Michael R.; Thomas, Jay; Yuan, Fenglin; Bruce Watson, E.; Walker, David; Huang, Liping

    2015-10-01

    Silica glass has been shown in numerous studies to possess significant capacity for permanent densification under pressure at different temperatures to form high density amorphous (HDA) silica. However, it is unknown to what extent the processes leading to irreversible densification of silica glass in cold-compression at room temperature and in hot-compression (e.g., near glass transition temperature) are common in nature. In this work, a hot-compression technique was used to quench silica glass from high temperature (1100 °C) and high pressure (up to 8 GPa) conditions, which leads to density increase of ~25% and Young’s modulus increase of ~71% relative to that of pristine silica glass at ambient conditions. Our experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide solid evidences that the intermediate-range order of the hot-compressed HDA silica is distinct from that of the counterpart cold-compressed at room temperature. This explains the much higher thermal and mechanical stability of the former than the latter upon heating and compression as revealed in our in-situ Brillouin light scattering (BLS) experiments. Our studies demonstrate the limitation of the resulting density as a structural indicator of polyamorphism, and point out the importance of temperature during compression in order to fundamentally understand HDA silica.

  20. Lattice strains in gold and rhenium under nonhydrostatic compression to 37 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, Thomas S.; Shen, Guoyin; Heinz, Dion L.; Shu, Jinfu; Ma, Yanzhang; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J.; Singh, Anil K.

    1999-01-01

    Using energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction techniques together with the theory describing lattice strains under nonhydrostatic compression, the behavior of a layered sample of gold and rhenium has been studied at pressures of 14-37 GPa. For gold, the uniaxial stress component t is consistent with earlier studies and can be described by t=0.06+0.015P where P is the pressure in GPa. The estimated single-crystal elastic moduli are in reasonable agreement with trends based on extrapolated low-pressure data. The degree of elastic anisotropy increases as α, the parameter which characterizes stress-strain continuity across grain boundaries, is reduced from 1.0 to 0.5. For rhenium, the apparent equation of state has been shown to be strongly influenced by nonhydrostatic compression, as evidenced by its dependence on the angle ψ between the diffracting plane normal and the stress axis. The bulk modulus obtained by inversion of nonhydrostatic compression data can differ by nearly a factor of 2 at angles of 0 degree sign and 90 degree sign . On the other hand, by a proper choice of ψ, d spacings corresponding to quasihydrostatic compression can be obtained from data obtained under highly nonhydrostatic conditions. The uniaxial stress in rhenium over the pressure range from 14-37 GPa can be described by t=2.5+0.09P. The large discrepancy between x-ray elastic moduli and ultrasonic data and theoretical calculations indicates that additional factors such as texturing or orientation dependence of t need to be incorporated to more fully describe the strain distribution in hexagonal-close-packed metals. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  1. Compression, Mechanical and Release Properties of Chloroquine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Tablet formulations containing trifoliate yam starch exhibited faster onset and higher amount of plastic deformation during compression than those containing corn starch. The crushing strength, disintegration and dissolution times of the tablets increased with binder concentration while friability values decreased.

  2. Compressible generalized Newtonian fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Málek, Josef; Rajagopal, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2010), s. 1097-1110 ISSN 0044-2275 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : power law fluid * uniform temperature * compressible fluid Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.290, year: 2010

  3. Temporal compressive sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2017-12-12

    Methods and systems for temporal compressive sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.

  4. Compression of Infrared images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    best for bits-per-pixel rates below 1.4 bpp, while HEVC obtains best performance in the range 1.4 to 6.5 bpp. The compression performance is also evaluated based on maximum errors. These results also show that HEVC can achieve a precision of 1°C with an average of 1.3 bpp....

  5. Gas compression infrared generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, W.F.

    1980-01-01

    A molecular gas is compressed in a quasi-adiabatic manner to produce pulsed radiation during each compressor cycle when the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, and part of the energy is recovered during the expansion phase, as defined in U.S. Pat. No. 3,751,666; characterized by use of a cylinder with a reciprocating piston as a compressor

  6. Microbiological contamination of compressed air used in dentistry: an investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, M; Lynch, R M; Robson, M G

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this preliminary investigation was twofold: 1) to examine the possibility of cross-contamination between a dental-evacuation system and the compressed air used in dental operatories and 2) to capture and identify the most common microflora in the compressed-air supply. The investigation used swab, water, and air sampling that was designed to track microorganisms from the evacuation system, through the air of the mechanical room, into the compressed-air system, and back to the patient. Samples taken in the vacuum system, the air space in the mechanical room, and the compressed-air storage tank had significantly higher total concentrations of bacteria than the outside air sampled. Samples of the compressed air returning to the operatory were found to match the outside air sample in total bacteria. It was concluded that the air dryer may have played a significant role in the elimination of microorganisms from the dental compressed-air supply.

  7. Using Costal Chondrocytes to Engineer Articular Cartilage with Applications of Passive Axial Compression and Bioactive Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwe, Le W; Sullan, Gurdeep K; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2018-03-01

    Generating neocartilage with suitable mechanical integrity from a cell source that can circumvent chondrocyte scarcity is indispensable for articular cartilage regeneration strategies. Costal chondrocytes of the rib eliminate donor site morbidity in the articular joint, but it remains unclear how neocartilage formed from these cells responds to mechanical loading, especially if the intent is to use it in a load-bearing joint. In a series of three experiments, this study sought to determine efficacious parameters of passive axial compressive stimulation that would enable costal chondrocytes to synthesize mechanically robust cartilage. Experiment 1 determined a suitable time window for stimulation by its application during either the matrix synthesis phase, the maturation phase, or during both phases of the self-assembling process. The results showed that compressive stimulation at either time was effective in increasing instantaneous moduli by 92% and 87% in the synthesis and maturation phases, respectively. Compressive stimulation during both phases did not further improve properties beyond a one-time stimulation. The magnitude of passive axial compression was examined in Experiment 2 by applying 0, 3.3, 5.0, or 6.7 kPa stresses to the neocartilage. Unlike 6.7 kPa, both 3.3 and 5.0 kPa significantly increased neocartilage compressive properties by 42% and 48% over untreated controls, respectively. Experiment 3 examined how the passive axial compression regimen developed from the previous phases interacted with a bioactive regimen (transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1, chondroitinase ABC, and lysyl oxidase-like 2). Passive axial compression significantly improved the relaxation modulus compared with bioactive treatment alone. Furthermore, a combined treatment of compressive and bioactive stimulation improved the tensile properties of neocartilage 2.6-fold compared with untreated control. The ability to create robust articular cartilage from passaged costal

  8. Integer Set Compression and Statistical Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, N. Jesper

    2014-01-01

    enumeration of elements may be arbitrary or random, but where statistics is kept in order to estimate probabilities of elements. We present a recursive subset-size encoding method that is able to benefit from statistics, explore the effects of permuting the enumeration order based on element probabilities......Compression of integer sets and sequences has been extensively studied for settings where elements follow a uniform probability distribution. In addition, methods exist that exploit clustering of elements in order to achieve higher compression performance. In this work, we address the case where...

  9. Bunch Compression Stability Dependence on RF Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Limberg, T

    2005-01-01

    In present designs for FEL's with high electron peak currents and short bunch lengths, higher harmonic RF systems are often used to optimize the final longitudinal charge distributions. This opens degrees of freedom for the choice of RF phases and amplitudes to achieve the necessary peak current with a reasonable longitudinal bunch shape. It had been found empirically that different working points result in different tolerances for phases and amplitudes. We give an analytical expression for the sensitivity of the compression factor on phase and amplitude jitter for a bunch compression scheme involving two RF systems and two magnetic chicanes as well numerical results for the case of the European XFEL.

  10. NASA/University JOint VEnture (JOVE) Program: Transverse Shear Moduli Using the Torsional Responses of Rectangular Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Sam

    2001-01-01

    The first year included a study of the non-visible damage of composite overwrapped pressure vessels with B. Poe of the Materials Branch of Nasa-Langley. Early determinations showed a clear reduction in non-visible damage for thin COPVs when partially pressurized rather than unpressurized. Literature searches on Thicker-wall COPVs revealed surface damage but clearly visible. Analysis of current Analytic modeling indicated that that current COPV models lacked sufficient thickness corrections to predict impact damage. After a comprehensive study of available published data and numerous numerical studies based on observed data from Langley, the analytic framework for modeling the behavior was determined lacking and both Poe and Bogan suggested any short term (3yr) result for Jove would be overly ambitious and emphasis should be placed on transverse shear moduli studies. Transverse shear moduli determination is relevant to the study of fatigue, fracture and aging effects in composite structures. Based on the techniques developed by Daniel & Tsai, Bogan and Gates determined to verify the results for K3B and 8320. A detailed analytic and experimental plan was established and carried out that included variations in layup, width, thickness, and length. As well as loading rate variations to determine effects and relaxation moduli. The additional axial loads during the torsion testing were studied as was the placement of gages along the composite specimen. Of the proposed tasks, all of tasks I and 2 were completed with presentations given at Langley, SEM conferences and ASME/AIAA conferences. Sensitivity issues with the technique associated with the use of servohydraulic test systems for applying the torsional load to the composite specimen limited the torsion range for predictable and repeatable transverse shear properties. Bogan and Gates determined to diverge on research efforts with Gates continuing the experimental testing at Langley and Bogan modeling the apparent non

  11. Compressible Fluid Suspension Performance Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoogterp, Francis

    2003-01-01

    ... compressible fluid suspension system that was designed and installed on the vehicle by DTI. The purpose of the tests was to evaluate the possible performance benefits of the compressible fluid suspension system...

  12. Results of subscale MTF compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen; Mossman, A.; Donaldson, M.; Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    In magnetized target fusion (MTF) a magnetized plasma torus is compressed in a time shorter than its own energy confinement time, thereby heating to fusion conditions. Understanding plasma behavior and scaling laws is needed to advance toward a reactor-scale demonstration. General Fusion is conducting a sequence of subscale experiments of compact toroid (CT) plasmas being compressed by chemically driven implosion of an aluminum liner, providing data on several key questions. CT plasmas are formed by a coaxial Marshall gun, with magnetic fields supported by internal plasma currents and eddy currents in the wall. Configurations that have been compressed so far include decaying and sustained spheromaks and an ST that is formed into a pre-existing toroidal field. Diagnostics measure B, ne, visible and x-ray emission, Ti and Te. Before compression the CT has an energy of 10kJ magnetic, 1 kJ thermal, with Te of 100 - 200 eV, ne 5x1020 m-3. Plasma was stable during a compression factor R0/R >3 on best shots. A reactor scale demonstration would require 10x higher initial B and ne but similar Te. Liner improvements have minimized ripple, tearing and ejection of micro-debris. Plasma facing surfaces have included plasma-sprayed tungsten, bare Cu and Al, and gettering with Ti and Li.

  13. Experimental study on compressive strength of sediment brick masonry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woen, Ean Lee; Malek, Marlinda Abdul; Mohammed, Bashar S.; Chao-Wei, Tang; Tamunif, Muhammad Thaqif

    2018-02-01

    The effects of pre-wetted unit bricks, mortar type and slenderness ratio of prisms on the compressive strength and failure mode of newly developed sediment brick have been evaluated and compared to clay brick and cement-sand bricks. The results show that pre-wetted sediment brick masonry exhibits higher compressive strength of up to 20% compared to the dry sediment masonry. Using cement-lime mortar leads to lower compressive strength compared to cement mortar. However, the sediment brick masonry with the cement lime mortar exhibit higher compressive strength in comparison with cement mortar masonry. More of diagonal shear cracks have been observed in the failure mode of the sediment bricks masonry compared to clay and cement-sand bricks masonry that show mostly vertical cracks and crushing. The sediment unit bricks display compressive strength in between clay and cement-sand bricks.

  14. LZ-Compressed String Dictionaries

    OpenAIRE

    Arz, Julian; Fischer, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    We show how to compress string dictionaries using the Lempel-Ziv (LZ78) data compression algorithm. Our approach is validated experimentally on dictionaries of up to 1.5 GB of uncompressed text. We achieve compression ratios often outperforming the existing alternatives, especially on dictionaries containing many repeated substrings. Our query times remain competitive.

  15. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  16. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  17. Digital cinema video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husak, Walter

    2003-05-01

    The Motion Picture Industry began a transition from film based distribution and projection to digital distribution and projection several years ago. Digital delivery and presentation offers the prospect to increase the quality of the theatrical experience for the audience, reduce distribution costs to the distributors, and create new business opportunities for the theater owners and the studios. Digital Cinema also presents an opportunity to provide increased flexibility and security of the movies for the content owners and the theater operators. Distribution of content via electronic means to theaters is unlike any of the traditional applications for video compression. The transition from film-based media to electronic media represents a paradigm shift in video compression techniques and applications that will be discussed in this paper.

  18. Fingerprints in compressed strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed into a context-free grammar of size n that supports efficient Karp–Rabin fingerprint queries to any substring of S. That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S......[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(log⁡N) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(log⁡log⁡N) query time...

  19. Speeds of sound and isothermal compressibility of ternary liquid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thermo-acoustics Research Lab, Department of Chemistry, University of Allahabad,. Allahabad 211 002, India ... compressibility data of these industrially important organic compounds of ternary and higher liquid ... distillation. Densities and ...

  20. Adiabatic liquid piston compressed air energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Tage [Danish Technological Institute, Aarhus (Denmark); Elmegaard, B. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Mechanical Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Schroeder Pedersen, A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2013-01-15

    ;'Adiabatic Liquid Piston Compressed Air Energy Storage'' (ALP-CAES). The compression ratio of the gas in the vessel (ratio between maximum and minimum pressure) is relatively low; typical values would be < 1,5, whereas the compression ratio in existing CAES systems can be higher than 100, because the air is compressed from atmospheric pressure to the storage pressure. This investigation leads to the conclusion that: 1) The mechanical/electrical efficiency of the ALP-CAES system is significantly higher than existing CAES systems due to a low or nearly absent compression heat loss. Furthermore, pumps/turbines, which use a liquid as a medium, are more efficient than air/gas compressors/turbines. In addition, the demand for fuel during expansion does not occur. 2) The energy density of the ALP-CAES system is much lower than that of existing CAES systems (by a factor of 15-30) leading to a similar increase in investment in pressure vessel volume per stored MWh. Since the pressure vessel constitutes a relatively large fraction of the overall cost of a CAES system, an increase of 15-30 times renders the system economically unfeasible unless the operating conditions and the system design are very carefully selected to compensate the low energy density. Future electricity prices may increase to the extent that the efficiency benefit of ALP-CAES partly compensates the added investment. 3) When comparing ALP-CAES to an adiabatic CAES system, where compression heat is stored in thermal oil, the ALP-CAES system is found only to be competitive under a very specific set of operating/design conditions, including very high operation pressure and the use of very large caverns. 4) New systems are under development, which show an interesting trend in that they use near-isothermal compression and expansion of air (compression/expansion at almost constant temperature), eliminate compression heat loss and still maintain nearly the same level of energy density as existing CAES systems. This

  1. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%).

  2. Compressed sensing electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leary, Rowan; Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A.; Holland, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The recent mathematical concept of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that a small number of well-chosen measurements can suffice to reconstruct signals that are amenable to sparse or compressible representation. In addition to powerful theoretical results, the principles of CS are being exploited increasingly across a range of experiments to yield substantial performance gains relative to conventional approaches. In this work we describe the application of CS to electron tomography (ET) reconstruction and demonstrate the efficacy of CS–ET with several example studies. Artefacts present in conventional ET reconstructions such as streaking, blurring of object boundaries and elongation are markedly reduced, and robust reconstruction is shown to be possible from far fewer projections than are normally used. The CS–ET approach enables more reliable quantitative analysis of the reconstructions as well as novel 3D studies from extremely limited data. - Highlights: • Compressed sensing (CS) theory and its application to electron tomography (ET) is described. • The practical implementation of CS–ET is outlined and its efficacy demonstrated with examples. • High fidelity tomographic reconstruction is possible from a small number of images. • The CS–ET reconstructions can be more reliably segmented and analysed quantitatively. • CS–ET is applicable to different image content by choice of an appropriate sparsifying transform

  3. A checkpoint compression study for high-performance computing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibtesham, Dewan [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Ferreira, Kurt B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Scalable System Software Dept.; Arnold, Dorian [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    2015-02-17

    As high-performance computing systems continue to increase in size and complexity, higher failure rates and increased overheads for checkpoint/restart (CR) protocols have raised concerns about the practical viability of CR protocols for future systems. Previously, compression has proven to be a viable approach for reducing checkpoint data volumes and, thereby, reducing CR protocol overhead leading to improved application performance. In this article, we further explore compression-based CR optimization by exploring its baseline performance and scaling properties, evaluating whether improved compression algorithms might lead to even better application performance and comparing checkpoint compression against and alongside other software- and hardware-based optimizations. Our results highlights are: (1) compression is a very viable CR optimization; (2) generic, text-based compression algorithms appear to perform near optimally for checkpoint data compression and faster compression algorithms will not lead to better application performance; (3) compression-based optimizations fare well against and alongside other software-based optimizations; and (4) while hardware-based optimizations outperform software-based ones, they are not as cost effective.

  4. CoGI: Towards Compressing Genomes as an Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaojing; Zhou, Shuigeng; Guan, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Genomic science is now facing an explosive increase of data thanks to the fast development of sequencing technology. This situation poses serious challenges to genomic data storage and transferring. It is desirable to compress data to reduce storage and transferring cost, and thus to boost data distribution and utilization efficiency. Up to now, a number of algorithms / tools have been developed for compressing genomic sequences. Unlike the existing algorithms, most of which treat genomes as one-dimensional text strings and compress them based on dictionaries or probability models, this paper proposes a novel approach called CoGI (the abbreviation of Compressing Genomes as an Image) for genome compression, which transforms the genomic sequences to a two-dimensional binary image (or bitmap), then applies a rectangular partition coding algorithm to compress the binary image. CoGI can be used as either a reference-based compressor or a reference-free compressor. For the former, we develop two entropy-based algorithms to select a proper reference genome. Performance evaluation is conducted on various genomes. Experimental results show that the reference-based CoGI significantly outperforms two state-of-the-art reference-based genome compressors GReEn and RLZ-opt in both compression ratio and compression efficiency. It also achieves comparable compression ratio but two orders of magnitude higher compression efficiency in comparison with XM--one state-of-the-art reference-free genome compressor. Furthermore, our approach performs much better than Gzip--a general-purpose and widely-used compressor, in both compression speed and compression ratio. So, CoGI can serve as an effective and practical genome compressor. The source code and other related documents of CoGI are available at: http://admis.fudan.edu.cn/projects/cogi.htm.

  5. U(N) instantons on N=(1/2) superspace: Exact solution and geometry of moduli space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britto, Ruth; Feng Bo; Lunin, Oleg; Rey, Soo-Jong

    2004-01-01

    We construct the exact solution of one (anti-)instanton in N=(1/2) super Yang-Mills theory defined on non(anti-)commutative superspace. We first identify N=(1/2) superconformal invariance as maximal spacetime symmetry. For the gauge group U(2), the SU(2) part of the solution is given by the standard (anti-)instanton, but the U(1) field strength also turns out to be nonzero. The solution is SO(4) rotationally symmetric. For the gauge group U(N), in contrast with the U(2) case, we show that the entire U(N) part of the solution is deformed by non(anti-)commutativity and fermion zero modes. The solution is no longer rotationally symmetric; it is polarized into an axially symmetric configuration because of the underlying non(anti-)commutativity. We compute the 'information metric' of one (anti-)instanton. We find that the moduli space geometry is deformed from the hyperbolic space H 5 (Euclidean anti-de Sitter space) in a way anticipated from reduced spacetime symmetry. Remarkably, the volume measure of the moduli space turns out to be independent of the non(anti-)commutativity. Implications for D branes in the Ramond-Ramond flux background and the gauge-gravity correspondence are discussed

  6. Modal Damping Ratio and Optimal Elastic Moduli of Human Body Segments for Anthropometric Vibratory Model of Standing Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manoj; Gupta, T C

    2017-10-01

    The present study aims to accurately estimate inertial, physical, and dynamic parameters of human body vibratory model consistent with physical structure of the human body that also replicates its dynamic response. A 13 degree-of-freedom (DOF) lumped parameter model for standing person subjected to support excitation is established. Model parameters are determined from anthropometric measurements, uniform mass density, elastic modulus of individual body segments, and modal damping ratios. Elastic moduli of ellipsoidal body segments are initially estimated by comparing stiffness of spring elements, calculated from a detailed scheme, and values available in literature for same. These values are further optimized by minimizing difference between theoretically calculated platform-to-head transmissibility ratio (TR) and experimental measurements. Modal damping ratios are estimated from experimental transmissibility response using two dominant peaks in the frequency range of 0-25 Hz. From comparison between dynamic response determined form modal analysis and experimental results, a set of elastic moduli for different segments of human body and a novel scheme to determine modal damping ratios from TR plots, are established. Acceptable match between transmissibility values calculated from the vibratory model and experimental measurements for 50th percentile U.S. male, except at very low frequencies, establishes the human body model developed. Also, reasonable agreement obtained between theoretical response curve and experimental response envelop for average Indian male, affirms the technique used for constructing vibratory model of a standing person. Present work attempts to develop effective technique for constructing subject specific damped vibratory model based on its physical measurements.

  7. Normal and Fibrotic Rat Livers Demonstrate Shear Strain Softening and Compression Stiffening: A Model for Soft Tissue Mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryna Perepelyuk

    Full Text Available Tissues including liver stiffen and acquire more extracellular matrix with fibrosis. The relationship between matrix content and stiffness, however, is non-linear, and stiffness is only one component of tissue mechanics. The mechanical response of tissues such as liver to physiological stresses is not well described, and models of tissue mechanics are limited. To better understand the mechanics of the normal and fibrotic rat liver, we carried out a series of studies using parallel plate rheometry, measuring the response to compressive, extensional, and shear strains. We found that the shear storage and loss moduli G' and G" and the apparent Young's moduli measured by uniaxial strain orthogonal to the shear direction increased markedly with both progressive fibrosis and increasing compression, that livers shear strain softened, and that significant increases in shear modulus with compressional stress occurred within a range consistent with increased sinusoidal pressures in liver disease. Proteoglycan content and integrin-matrix interactions were significant determinants of liver mechanics, particularly in compression. We propose a new non-linear constitutive model of the liver. A key feature of this model is that, while it assumes overall liver incompressibility, it takes into account water flow and solid phase compressibility. In sum, we report a detailed study of non-linear liver mechanics under physiological strains in the normal state, early fibrosis, and late fibrosis. We propose a constitutive model that captures compression stiffening, tension softening, and shear softening, and can be understood in terms of the cellular and matrix components of the liver.

  8. HVS-based medical image compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai Xie [Institute of Image Processing and Pattern Recognition, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200030 Shanghai (China)]. E-mail: xie_kai2001@sjtu.edu.cn; Jie Yang [Institute of Image Processing and Pattern Recognition, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200030 Shanghai (China); Min Zhuyue [CREATIS-CNRS Research Unit 5515 and INSERM Unit 630, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Liang Lixiao [Institute of Image Processing and Pattern Recognition, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200030 Shanghai (China)

    2005-07-01

    Introduction: With the promotion and application of digital imaging technology in the medical domain, the amount of medical images has grown rapidly. However, the commonly used compression methods cannot acquire satisfying results. Methods: In this paper, according to the existed and stated experiments and conclusions, the lifting step approach is used for wavelet decomposition. The physical and anatomic structure of human vision is combined and the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is introduced as the main research issue in human vision system (HVS), and then the main designing points of HVS model are presented. On the basis of multi-resolution analyses of wavelet transform, the paper applies HVS including the CSF characteristics to the inner correlation-removed transform and quantization in image and proposes a new HVS-based medical image compression model. Results: The experiments are done on the medical images including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At the same bit rate, the performance of SPIHT, with respect to the PSNR metric, is significantly higher than that of our algorithm. But the visual quality of the SPIHT-compressed image is roughly the same as that of the image compressed with our approach. Our algorithm obtains the same visual quality at lower bit rates and the coding/decoding time is less than that of SPIHT. Conclusions: The results show that under common objective conditions, our compression algorithm can achieve better subjective visual quality, and performs better than that of SPIHT in the aspects of compression ratios and coding/decoding time.

  9. HVS-based medical image compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai Xie; Jie Yang; Min Zhuyue; Liang Lixiao

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: With the promotion and application of digital imaging technology in the medical domain, the amount of medical images has grown rapidly. However, the commonly used compression methods cannot acquire satisfying results. Methods: In this paper, according to the existed and stated experiments and conclusions, the lifting step approach is used for wavelet decomposition. The physical and anatomic structure of human vision is combined and the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is introduced as the main research issue in human vision system (HVS), and then the main designing points of HVS model are presented. On the basis of multi-resolution analyses of wavelet transform, the paper applies HVS including the CSF characteristics to the inner correlation-removed transform and quantization in image and proposes a new HVS-based medical image compression model. Results: The experiments are done on the medical images including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At the same bit rate, the performance of SPIHT, with respect to the PSNR metric, is significantly higher than that of our algorithm. But the visual quality of the SPIHT-compressed image is roughly the same as that of the image compressed with our approach. Our algorithm obtains the same visual quality at lower bit rates and the coding/decoding time is less than that of SPIHT. Conclusions: The results show that under common objective conditions, our compression algorithm can achieve better subjective visual quality, and performs better than that of SPIHT in the aspects of compression ratios and coding/decoding time

  10. Compressive Transient Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Qilin

    2017-04-01

    High resolution transient/3D imaging technology is of high interest in both scientific research and commercial application. Nowadays, all of the transient imaging methods suffer from low resolution or time consuming mechanical scanning. We proposed a new method based on TCSPC and Compressive Sensing to achieve a high resolution transient imaging with a several seconds capturing process. Picosecond laser sends a serious of equal interval pulse while synchronized SPAD camera\\'s detecting gate window has a precise phase delay at each cycle. After capturing enough points, we are able to make up a whole signal. By inserting a DMD device into the system, we are able to modulate all the frames of data using binary random patterns to reconstruct a super resolution transient/3D image later. Because the low fill factor of SPAD sensor will make a compressive sensing scenario ill-conditioned, We designed and fabricated a diffractive microlens array. We proposed a new CS reconstruction algorithm which is able to denoise at the same time for the measurements suffering from Poisson noise. Instead of a single SPAD senor, we chose a SPAD array because it can drastically reduce the requirement for the number of measurements and its reconstruction time. Further more, it not easy to reconstruct a high resolution image with only one single sensor while for an array, it just needs to reconstruct small patches and a few measurements. In this thesis, we evaluated the reconstruction methods using both clean measurements and the version corrupted by Poisson noise. The results show how the integration over the layers influence the image quality and our algorithm works well while the measurements suffer from non-trival Poisson noise. It\\'s a breakthrough in the areas of both transient imaging and compressive sensing.

  11. Fast Compressive Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2014-10-01

    It is a challenging task to develop effective and efficient appearance models for robust object tracking due to factors such as pose variation, illumination change, occlusion, and motion blur. Existing online tracking algorithms often update models with samples from observations in recent frames. Despite much success has been demonstrated, numerous issues remain to be addressed. First, while these adaptive appearance models are data-dependent, there does not exist sufficient amount of data for online algorithms to learn at the outset. Second, online tracking algorithms often encounter the drift problems. As a result of self-taught learning, misaligned samples are likely to be added and degrade the appearance models. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective and efficient tracking algorithm with an appearance model based on features extracted from a multiscale image feature space with data-independent basis. The proposed appearance model employs non-adaptive random projections that preserve the structure of the image feature space of objects. A very sparse measurement matrix is constructed to efficiently extract the features for the appearance model. We compress sample images of the foreground target and the background using the same sparse measurement matrix. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via a naive Bayes classifier with online update in the compressed domain. A coarse-to-fine search strategy is adopted to further reduce the computational complexity in the detection procedure. The proposed compressive tracking algorithm runs in real-time and performs favorably against state-of-the-art methods on challenging sequences in terms of efficiency, accuracy and robustness.

  12. SeqCompress: an algorithm for biological sequence compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-10-01

    The growth of Next Generation Sequencing technologies presents significant research challenges, specifically to design bioinformatics tools that handle massive amount of data efficiently. Biological sequence data storage cost has become a noticeable proportion of total cost in the generation and analysis. Particularly increase in DNA sequencing rate is significantly outstripping the rate of increase in disk storage capacity, which may go beyond the limit of storage capacity. It is essential to develop algorithms that handle large data sets via better memory management. This article presents a DNA sequence compression algorithm SeqCompress that copes with the space complexity of biological sequences. The algorithm is based on lossless data compression and uses statistical model as well as arithmetic coding to compress DNA sequences. The proposed algorithm is compared with recent specialized compression tools for biological sequences. Experimental results show that proposed algorithm has better compression gain as compared to other existing algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative data compression techniques and multi-compression results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M R; Ibrahimy, M I; Motakabber, S M A; Ferdaus, M M; Khan, M N H

    2013-01-01

    Data compression is very necessary in business data processing, because of the cost savings that it offers and the large volume of data manipulated in many business applications. It is a method or system for transmitting a digital image (i.e., an array of pixels) from a digital data source to a digital data receiver. More the size of the data be smaller, it provides better transmission speed and saves time. In this communication, we always want to transmit data efficiently and noise freely. This paper will provide some compression techniques for lossless text type data compression and comparative result of multiple and single compression, that will help to find out better compression output and to develop compression algorithms

  14. Compression instrument for tissue experiments (cite) at the meso-scale: device validation - biomed 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Douglas W; Rajagopalan, Padma; Devita, Raffaella; Sparks, Jessica L

    2011-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are the primary site of numerous transport and exchange processes essential for liver function. LSECs rest on a sparse extracellular matrix layer housed in the space of Disse, a 0.5-1LSECs from hepatocytes. To develop bioengineered liver tissue constructs, it is important to understand the mechanical interactions among LSECs, hepatocytes, and the extracellular matrix in the space of Disse. Currently the mechanical properties of space of Disse matrix are not well understood. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a device for performing mechanical tests at the meso-scale (100nm-100m), to enable novel matrix characterization within the space of Disse. The device utilizes a glass micro-spherical indentor attached to a cantilever made from a fiber optic cable. The 3-axis translation table used to bring the specimen in contact with the indentor and deform the cantilever. A position detector monitors the location of a laser passing through the cantilever and allows for the calculation of subsequent tissue deformation. The design allows micro-newton and nano-newton stress-strain tissue behavior to be quantified. To validate the device accuracy, 11 samples of silicon rubber in two formulations were tested to experimentally confirm their Young's moduli. Prior macroscopic unconfined compression tests determined the formulations of EcoFlex030 (n-6) and EcoFlex010 (n-5) to posses Young's moduli of 92.67+-6.22 and 43.10+-3.29 kPa respectively. Optical measurements taken utilizing CITE's position control and fiber optic cantilever found the moduli to be 106.4 kPa and 47.82 kPa.

  15. Analysis by compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meredith, David

    MEL is a geometric music encoding language designed to allow for musical objects to be encoded parsimoniously as sets of points in pitch-time space, generated by performing geometric transformations on component patterns. MEL has been implemented in Java and coupled with the SIATEC pattern...... discovery algorithm to allow for compact encodings to be generated automatically from in extenso note lists. The MEL-SIATEC system is founded on the belief that music analysis and music perception can be modelled as the compression of in extenso descriptions of musical objects....

  16. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  17. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  18. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  19. Investigation of chemical bond characteristics, thermal expansion coefficients and bulk moduli of alpha-R2MoO6 and R2Mo2O7 (R = rare earths) by using a dielectric chemical bond method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huaiyong; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhou, Shihong; Cao, Xueqiang

    2009-09-01

    Theoretical researches are performed on the alpha-R2MoO6 (R = Y, Gd, Tb Dy, Ho, Er, Tm and Yb) and pyrochlore-type R2Mo2O7 (R = Y, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb and Dy) rare earth molybdates by using chemical bond theory of dielectric description. The chemical bonding characteristics and their relationship with thermal expansion property and compressibility are explored. The calculated values of linear thermal expansion coefficient (LTEC) and bulk modulus agree well with the available experimental values. The calculations reveal that the LTECs and the bulk moduli do have linear relationship with the ionic radii of the lanthanides: the LTEC decreases from 6.80 to 6.62 10(-6)/K and the bulk modulus increases from 141 to 154 GPa when R goes in the order Gd, Tb Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb in the alpha-R2MoO6 series; while in the R2Mo2O7 series, the LTEC ranges from 6.80 to 6.61 10(-6)/K and the bulk modulus ranges from 147 to 163 GPa when R varies in the order Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb and Dy. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Data compression considerations for detectors with local intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sciveres, M; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    This note summarizes the outcome of discussions about how data compression considerations apply to tracking detectors with local intelligence. The method for analyzing data compression efficiency is taken from a previous publication and applied to module characteristics from the WIT2014 workshop. We explore local intelligence and coupled layer structures in the language of data compression. In this context the original intelligent tracker concept of correlating hits to find matches of interest and discard others is just a form of lossy data compression. We now explore how these features (intelligence and coupled layers) can be exploited for lossless compression, which could enable full readout at higher trigger rates than previously envisioned, or even triggerless

  1. Working characteristics of variable intake valve in compressed air engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qihui; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine.

  2. Working Characteristics of Variable Intake Valve in Compressed Air Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qihui; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine. PMID:25379536

  3. Working Characteristics of Variable Intake Valve in Compressed Air Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihui Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine.

  4. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion of Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr

    This thesis is based on experimental and numerical studies on the use of dimethyl ether (DME) in the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process. The first paper in this thesis was published in 2007 and describes HCCI combustion of pure DME in a small diesel engine. The tests...... were designed to investigate the effect of engine speed, compression ratio and equivalence ratio on the combustion timing and the engine performance. It was found that the required compression ratio depended on the equivalence ratio used. A lower equivalence ratio requires a higher compression ratio...... before the fuel is burned completely, due to lower in-cylinder temperatures and lower reaction rates. The study provided some insight in the importance of operating at the correct compression ratio, as well as the operational limitations and emission characteristics of HCCI combustion. HCCI combustion...

  5. Pulse compression by Raman induced cavity dumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rougemont, F.; Xian, D.K.; Frey, R.; Pradere, F.

    1985-01-01

    High efficiency pulse compression using Raman induced cavity dumping has been studied theoretically and experimentally. Through stimulated Raman scattering the electromagnetic energy at a primary frequency is down-converted and extracted from a storage cavity containing the Raman medium. Energy storage may be achieved either at the laser frequency by using a laser medium inside the storage cavity, or performed at a new frequency obtained through an intracavity nonlinear process. The storage cavity may be dumped passively through stimulated Raman scattering either in an oscillator or in an amplifier. All these cases have been studied by using a ruby laser as the pump source and compressed hydrogen as the Raman scatter. Results differ slightly accordingly to the technique used, but pulse shortenings higher than 10 and quantum efficiencies higher than 80% were obtained. This method could also be used with large power lasers of any wavelength from the ultraviolet to the farinfrared spectral region

  6. Free compression tube. Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Ioan

    2012-11-01

    During the flight of vehicles, their propulsion energy must overcome gravity, to ensure the displacement of air masses on vehicle trajectory, to cover both energy losses from the friction between a solid surface and the air and also the kinetic energy of reflected air masses due to the impact with the flying vehicle. The flight optimization by increasing speed and reducing fuel consumption has directed research in the aerodynamics field. The flying vehicles shapes obtained through studies in the wind tunnel provide the optimization of the impact with the air masses and the airflow along the vehicle. By energy balance studies for vehicles in flight, the author Ioan Rusu directed his research in reducing the energy lost at vehicle impact with air masses. In this respect as compared to classical solutions for building flight vehicles aerodynamic surfaces which reduce the impact and friction with air masses, Ioan Rusu has invented a device which he named free compression tube for rockets, registered with the State Office for Inventions and Trademarks of Romania, OSIM, deposit f 2011 0352. Mounted in front of flight vehicles it eliminates significantly the impact and friction of air masses with the vehicle solid. The air masses come into contact with the air inside the free compression tube and the air-solid friction is eliminated and replaced by air to air friction.

  7. Photon compression in cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensley, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown theoretically that intense microwave radiation is absorbed non-classically by a newly enunciated mechanism when interacting with hydrogen plasma. Fields > 1 Mg, lambda > 1 mm are within this regime. The predicted absorption, approximately P/sub rf/v/sub theta/sup e/, has not yet been experimentally confirmed. The applications of such a coupling are many. If microwave bursts approximately > 5 x 10 14 watts, 5 ns can be generated, the net generation of power from pellet fusion as well as various military applications becomes feasible. The purpose, then, for considering gas-gun photon compression is to obtain the above experimental capability by converting the gas kinetic energy directly into microwave form. Energies of >10 5 joules cm -2 and powers of >10 13 watts cm -2 are potentially available for photon interaction experiments using presently available technology. The following topics are discussed: microwave modes in a finite cylinder, injection, compression, switchout operation, and system performance parameter scaling

  8. Fingerprints in Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2013-01-01

    The Karp-Rabin fingerprint of a string is a type of hash value that due to its strong properties has been used in many string algorithms. In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed by a context-free grammar of size n that answers fingerprint queries...... derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(loglogN) query time. Hence, our data structures has the same time and space complexity as for random access in SLPs. We utilize the fingerprint data structures to solve the longest common extension problem in query time O(logNlogℓ) and O....... That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(logN) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP...

  9. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  10. Generalized massive optimal data compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsing, Justin; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we provide a general procedure for optimally compressing N data down to n summary statistics, where n is equal to the number of parameters of interest. We show that compression to the score function - the gradient of the log-likelihood with respect to the parameters - yields n compressed statistics that are optimal in the sense that they preserve the Fisher information content of the data. Our method generalizes earlier work on linear Karhunen-Loéve compression for Gaussian data whilst recovering both lossless linear compression and quadratic estimation as special cases when they are optimal. We give a unified treatment that also includes the general non-Gaussian case as long as mild regularity conditions are satisfied, producing optimal non-linear summary statistics when appropriate. As a worked example, we derive explicitly the n optimal compressed statistics for Gaussian data in the general case where both the mean and covariance depend on the parameters.

  11. Nonlinear viscoelasticity of pre-compressed layered polymeric composite under oscillatory compression

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yangguang; Tao, Ran; Lubineau, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    remains elusive because the dynamic moduli (storage modulus and loss modulus) are not very convenient when the material falls into nonlinear viscoelastic range. In this study, we utilize two methods, Fourier transform and geometrical nonlinear analysis

  12. Higher Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kunle Amuwo: Higher Education Transformation: A Paradigm Shilt in South Africa? ... ty of such skills, especially at the middle management levels within the higher ... istics and virtues of differentiation and diversity. .... may be forced to close shop for lack of capacity to attract ..... necessarily lead to racial and gender equity,.

  13. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  14. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pAsian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  15. Lossless medical image compression with a hybrid coder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Jing-Dar; Cheng, Po-Yuen

    1998-10-01

    The volume of medical image data is expected to increase dramatically in the next decade due to the large use of radiological image for medical diagnosis. The economics of distributing the medical image dictate that data compression is essential. While there is lossy image compression, the medical image must be recorded and transmitted lossless before it reaches the users to avoid wrong diagnosis due to the image data lost. Therefore, a low complexity, high performance lossless compression schematic that can approach the theoretic bound and operate in near real-time is needed. In this paper, we propose a hybrid image coder to compress the digitized medical image without any data loss. The hybrid coder is constituted of two key components: an embedded wavelet coder and a lossless run-length coder. In this system, the medical image is compressed with the lossy wavelet coder first, and the residual image between the original and the compressed ones is further compressed with the run-length coder. Several optimization schemes have been used in these coders to increase the coding performance. It is shown that the proposed algorithm is with higher compression ratio than run-length entropy coders such as arithmetic, Huffman and Lempel-Ziv coders.

  16. The JHKs Magnitudes of the Red Giant Branch Tip and the Distance Moduli of Nearby Dwarf Galaxy NGC 205

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Jung

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have used the near-infrared JHKS photometric data of resolved stars in a nearby dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 205 to determine the magnitudes of the red giant branch tip (TRGB. By applying Savitzky-Golay filter to the observed luminosity functions (LFs in each band, we derived the second derivatives of the LFs so as to determine the magnitudes of the TRGB. Absolute magnitudes of the TRGB in JHKs bands were measured from the Yonsei-Yale isochrones. By comparing the determined apparent magnitudes and the theoretical absolute magnitudes of the TRGB, we estimated the distance moduli of NGC 205 to be (m-M = 24.10±0:08, 24.08±0.12 and 24.14±0.14 in J, H, and Ks bands, respectively.

  17. Quantization vial real polarization of the moduli space of flat connections and Chern-Simons gauge theory in genus one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitsman, J.; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA

    1991-01-01

    We study the quantization of the moduli space of flat connections on a surface of genus one, using the real polarization of this space. The quantum wave functions in this formalism are exponential functions supported along the integral fibres of the polarization. The space of wave functions obtained in this way is isomorphic to a space of theta functions. We use our construction to cunstruct part of what may be a topological field theory in genus one, and to compute the associated invariants of some three manifolds. These computations agree with those of Witten, but the invariants are expressed as sums of quantities computed at a discrete set of connections with curvature concentrated on a link in the three manifold. A similar prescription is used to produce knot invariants. (orig.)

  18. Adiabatic compression and radiative compression of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Flux is conserved during mechanical compression of magnetic fields for both nonrelativistic and relativistic compressors. However, the relativistic compressor generates radiation, which can carry up to twice the energy content of the magnetic field compressed adiabatically. The radiation may be either confined or allowed to escape

  19. Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    & Development (LDRD) National Security Education Center (NSEC) Office of Science Programs Richard P Databases National Security Education Center (NSEC) Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Scholarships STEM Education Programs Teachers (K-12) Students (K-12) Higher Education Regional Education

  20. Usefulness of injecting local anesthetic before compression in stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Akiko; Urashima, Masaki; Nishihara, Reisuke

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy is a useful method of breast biopsy. However, some patients feel unbearable breast pain due to compression. Breast pain due to compression caused the fact that the breast cannot be compressed sufficiently. Sufficient compression is important to fix the breast in this method. Breast pain during this procedure is problematic from the perspectives of both stress and fixing the breast. We performed biopsy in the original manner by injecting local anesthetic before compression, in order to relieve breast pain due to compression. This was only slightly different in order from the standard method, and there was no need for any special technique or device. This way allowed for even higher breast compression, and all of the most recent 30 cases were compressed at levels greater than 120N. This approach is useful not only for relieving pain, but also for fixing the breast. (author)

  1. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  2. Synthetic lead bromapatite: X-ray structure at ambient pressure and compressibility up to about 20 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Fleet, Michael E.; Shieh, Sean R.; He, Qiang

    2011-05-01

    Lead bromapatite [Pb10(PO4)6Br2] has been synthesized via solid-state reaction at pressures up to 1.0 GPa, and its structure determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at ambient temperature and pressure. The large bromide anion is accommodated in the c-axis channel by lateral displacements of structural elements, particularly of Pb2 cations and PO4 tetrahedra. The compressibility of bromapatite was also investigated up to about 20.7 GPa at ambient temperature, using a diamond-anvil cell and synchrotron X-ray radiation. The compressibility of lead bromapatite is significantly different from that of lead fluorapatite. The pressure-volume data of lead bromapatite ( P < 10 GPa) fitted to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation yield an isothermal bulk modulus ( K T ) of 49.8(16) GPa and first pressure derivative ( KT^' } ) of 10.1(10). If KT^' } is fixed at 4, the derived K T is 60.8(11) GPa. The relative difference of the bulk moduli of these two lead apatites is thus about 12%, which is about two times the relative difference of the bulk moduli (~5%) of the calcium apatites fluorapatite [Ca10(PO4)6F2], chlorapatite [Ca10(PO4)6Cl2] and hydroxylapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2]. Another interesting feature apparently related to the replacement of F by Br in lead apatite is the switch in the principle axes of the strain ellipsoid: the c-axis is less compressible than the a-axis in lead bromapatite but more compressible in lead fluorapatite.

  3. Data compression of digital X-ray images from a clinical viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    For the PACS (picture archiving and communication system), large storage capacity recording media and a fast data transfer network are necessary. When the PACS are working, these technology requirements become an large problem. So we need image data compression having a higher recording efficiency media and an improved transmission ratio. There are two kinds of data compression methods, one is reversible compression and other is the irreversible one. By these reversible compression methods, a compressed-expanded image is exactly equal to the original image. The ratio of data compression is about between 1/2 an d1/3. On the other hand, for irreversible data compression, the compressed-expanded image is a distorted image, and we can achieve a high compression ratio by using this method. In the medical field, the discrete cosine transform (DCT) method is popular because of the low distortion and fast performance. The ratio of data compression is actually from 1/10 to 1/20. It is important for us to decide the compression ratio according to the purposes and modality of the image. We must carefully select the ratio of the data compression because the suitable compression ratio alters in the usage of image for education, clinical diagnosis and reference. (author)

  4. Fuel Class Higher Alcohols

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2016-08-17

    This chapter focuses on the production and combustion of alcohol fuels with four or more carbon atoms, which we classify as higher alcohols. It assesses the feasibility of utilizing various C4-C8 alcohols as fuels for internal combustion engines. Utilizing higher-molecular-weight alcohols as fuels requires careful analysis of their fuel properties. ASTM standards provide fuel property requirements for spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines such as the stability, lubricity, viscosity, and cold filter plugging point (CFPP) properties of blends of higher alcohols. Important combustion properties that are studied include laminar and turbulent flame speeds, flame blowout/extinction limits, ignition delay under various mixing conditions, and gas-phase and particulate emissions. The chapter focuses on the combustion of higher alcohols in reciprocating SI and CI engines and discusses higher alcohol performance in SI and CI engines. Finally, the chapter identifies the sources, production pathways, and technologies currently being pursued for production of some fuels, including n-butanol, iso-butanol, and n-octanol.

  5. MR Elastography Can Be Used to Measure Brain Stiffness Changes as a Result of Altered Cranial Venous Drainage During Jugular Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, A; Cheng, S; Tan, K; Sinkus, R; Bilston, L E

    2015-10-01

    Compressing the internal jugular veins can reverse ventriculomegaly in the syndrome of inappropriately low pressure acute hydrocephalus, and it has been suggested that this works by "stiffening" the brain tissue. Jugular compression may also alter blood and CSF flow in other conditions. We aimed to understand the effect of jugular compression on brain tissue stiffness and CSF flow. The head and neck of 9 healthy volunteers were studied with and without jugular compression. Brain stiffness (shear modulus) was measured by using MR elastography. Phase-contrast MR imaging was used to measure CSF flow in the cerebral aqueduct and blood flow in the neck. The shear moduli of the brain tissue increased with the percentage of blood draining through the internal jugular veins during venous compression. Peak velocity of caudally directed CSF in the aqueduct increased significantly with jugular compression (P drainage through the internal jugular veins during jugular compression have stiffer brains than those who divert venous blood through alternative pathways. These methods may be useful for studying this phenomenon in patients with the syndrome of inappropriately low-pressure acute hydrocephalus and other conditions. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  6. Biļešu tirdzniecības risinājuma zāles plāna modulis

    OpenAIRE

    Bušs, Jēkabs

    2015-01-01

    Biļešu tirdzniecības risinājuma zāles plāna modulis, ir daļa no biļešu tirdzniecības programmprodukta. Modulis sniedz iespēju iestādes klientiem ērti aplūkot zāles plānojumu, kā arī iestādes darbiniekiem izmantot to kā zāles plānojuma administrēšanas un tirdzniecības galveno rīku. Modulis sniedz iespēju apskatīt konkrētos datus par attiecīgām izrādēm, sniedz iespēju apskatīt un uzstādīt attiecīgo izrāžu bloķētās vietas, bet pats galvenais, modulis sniedz iespēju iestādes darbiniekiem ar g...

  7. Measurement of high temperature elastic moduli of an 18Cr-9Ni-2.95 Cu-0.58 Nb-0.1C (Wt %) austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Sudha, C.; Raju, S.; Saibaba, Saroja

    2018-04-01

    The Young's modulus (E) and Shear modulus (G) of an indigenously developed 18Cr-9Ni-0.1C-2.95 Cu-0.58Nb (wt %) austenitic stainless steel has been evaluated in the temperature range 298 K to 1273 K (25 °C to 1000 °C), using Impulse excitation technique (IET). The Bulk modulus (K) and the poison's ratio have been estimated from the measured values of E and G. It is observed that the elastic constants (E, G and K) are found to decrease in a nonlinear fashion with increase in temperature. The Cu precipitation is found to influence the elastic moduli of the steel in the cooling cycle. The observed elastic moduli are fitted to 3rd order polynomial equations in order to describe the temperature dependence of E, G, K moduli in the temperature range 298-1273 K (25 °C to 1000 °C). The room temperature values of E,G and K moduli is found to be 207, 82 and 145 GPa respectively for the present steel.

  8. Commissioning Results of the Upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidia, S.M.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Gilson, E.P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent changes to the NDCX beamline offer the promise of higher charge compressed bunches (>15nC), with correspondingly large intensities (>500kW/cm 2 ), delivered to the target plane for ion-beam driven warm dense matter experiments. We report on commissioning results of the upgraded NDCX beamline that includes a new induction bunching module with approximately twice the volt-seconds and greater tuning flexibility, combined with a longer neutralized drift compression channel.

  9. Compressed Baryonic Matter of Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Baryonic matter in the core of a massive and evolved star is compressed significantly to form a supra-nuclear object, and compressed baryonic matter (CBM) is then produced after supernova. The state of cold matter at a few nuclear density is pedagogically reviewed, with significant attention paid to a possible quark-cluster state conjectured from an astrophysical point of view.

  10. Streaming Compression of Hexahedral Meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isenburg, M; Courbet, C

    2010-02-03

    We describe a method for streaming compression of hexahedral meshes. Given an interleaved stream of vertices and hexahedral our coder incrementally compresses the mesh in the presented order. Our coder is extremely memory efficient when the input stream documents when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. when it contains topological finalization tags). Our coder then continuously releases and reuses data structures that no longer contribute to compressing the remainder of the stream. This means in practice that our coder has only a small fraction of the whole mesh in memory at any time. We can therefore compress very large meshes - even meshes that do not file in memory. Compared to traditional, non-streaming approaches that load the entire mesh and globally reorder it during compression, our algorithm trades a less compact compressed representation for significant gains in speed, memory, and I/O efficiency. For example, on the 456k hexahedra 'blade' mesh, our coder is twice as fast and uses 88 times less memory (only 3.1 MB) with the compressed file increasing about 3% in size. We also present the first scheme for predictive compression of properties associated with hexahedral cells.

  11. Data Compression with Linear Algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Etler, David

    2015-01-01

    A presentation on the applications of linear algebra to image compression. Covers entropy, the discrete cosine transform, thresholding, quantization, and examples of images compressed with DCT. Given in Spring 2015 at Ocean County College as part of the honors program.

  12. Images compression in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, M.S.; Furuie, S.S.; Moura, L.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of two methods for images compression in nuclear medicine was evaluated. The LZW precise, and Cosine Transformed, approximate, methods were analyzed. The results were obtained, showing that the utilization of approximated method produced images with an agreeable quality for visual analysis and compression rates, considerably high than precise method. (C.G.C.)

  13. Compressive Sensing in Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    . The need for cheaper, smarter and more energy efficient wireless devices is greater now than ever. This thesis addresses this problem and concerns the application of the recently developed sampling theory of compressive sensing in communication systems. Compressive sensing is the merging of signal...... acquisition and compression. It allows for sampling a signal with a rate below the bound dictated by the celebrated Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem. In some communication systems this necessary minimum sample rate, dictated by the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem, is so high it is at the limit of what...... with using compressive sensing in communication systems. The main contribution of this thesis is two-fold: 1) a new compressive sensing hardware structure for spread spectrum signals, which is simpler than the current state-of-the-art, and 2) a range of algorithms for parameter estimation for the class...

  14. Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    This chapter reports 1982 cases involving aspects of higher education. Interesting cases noted dealt with the federal government's authority to regulate state employees' retirement and raised the questions of whether Title IX covers employment, whether financial aid makes a college a program under Title IX, and whether sex segregated mortality…

  15. The Basic Principles and Methods of the System Approach to Compression of Telemetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenets, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The task of data compressing of measurement data is still urgent for information-measurement systems. In paper the basic principles necessary for designing of highly effective systems of compression of telemetric information are offered. A basis of the offered principles is representation of a telemetric frame as whole information space where we can find of existing correlation. The methods of data transformation and compressing algorithms realizing the offered principles are described. The compression ratio for offered compression algorithm is about 1.8 times higher, than for a classic algorithm. Thus, results of a research of methods and algorithms showing their good perspectives.

  16. Extreme compression behaviour of equations of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanker, J.; Dulari, P.; Singh, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    The extreme compression (P→∞) behaviour of various equations of state with K' ∞ >0 yields (P/K) ∞ =1/K' ∞ , an algebraic identity found by Stacey. Here P is the pressure, K the bulk modulus, K ' =dK/dP, and K' ∞ , the value of K ' at P→∞. We use this result to demonstrate further that there exists an algebraic identity also between the higher pressure derivatives of bulk modulus which is satisfied at extreme compression by different types of equations of state such as the Birch-Murnaghan equation, Poirier-Tarantola logarithmic equation, generalized Rydberg equation, Keane's equation and the Stacey reciprocal K-primed equation. The identity has been used to find a relationship between λ ∞ , the third-order Grueneisen parameter at P→∞, and pressure derivatives of bulk modulus with the help of the free-volume formulation without assuming any specific form of equation of state.

  17. Torelli groups, extended Johnson homomorphisms, and new cycles on the moduli space of curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morita, Shigeyuki; Penner, Robert

    modulo N are derived for all N. Furthermore, the first Johnson homomorphism, which is defined from the classical Torelli group to the third exterior power of the homology of the surface, is shown to lift to an explicit canonical 1-cocycle of the Teichmueller space. The main tool for these results...... cocycle lifts of the higher Johnson homomorphisms....

  18. An ab initio study on compressibility of Al-containing MAX-phase carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Yuelei; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Rongguo; Zhu, Chuncheng

    2013-01-01

    The compressibility of Al-containing MAX carbides was investigated in details using first-principle calculations based on density functional theory. The bond stiffness and bond angle as a function of pressure were examined. The M-Al bond stiffness is about 1/3–1/2 of M-C bond stiffness. The M-C bond close to Al atoms has the highest bond stiffness in M 3 AlC 2 and M 4 AlC 3 phases, with the similar bond stiffness of the other two bonds in the latter. Generally, the bond stiffness of the strongest M-C bond increases with increasing VEC (Valence Electron Concentration), which also affects the bond stiffness of other bonds. Of most importance, the bulk moduli are 0.256 of the mean bond stiffness for three series. With increasing pressure, M-Al bond angle increases, but M-C bond angles decreases, which indicates that M-Al and M-C bonds shift towards basal plane and along c-axis, respectively. As a result, the compressibility becomes more difficult along c-axis than a-axis. Some abnormal phenomena in the compressibility of Al-containing M n+1 AlX n phases with VEC = 6 are attributed to the thermodynamical instability of these compounds

  19. Parametric study of the deformation of transversely isotropic discs under diametral compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos F. Markides

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The displacement field in a circular disc made of a transversely isotropic material is explored in a parametric manner. The disc is assumed to be loaded by a parabolic distribution of compressive radial stresses along two finite arcs of its periphery in the absence of any tangential (frictional stresses. Advantage is here taken of a recently introduced closed-form analytic solution for the displacement field developed in an orthotropic disc under diametral compression which was achieved adopting the complex potentials technique for rectilinear anisotropic materials as it was formulated in the pioneering work of S.G. Lekhnitskii. The analytic nature of this solution permits thorough, indepth exploration of the influence of some crucial parameters on the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the deformation of transversely isotropic circular discs compressed between the jaws of the devise suggested by the International Society for Rock Mechanics for the standardized implementation of the Brazilian-disc test. The parameters considered include the anisotropy ratio (i.e., the ratio of the two elastic moduli characterizing the disc material, the angle between the loading axis and the planes of transverse isotropy and the length of the loaded arcs. Strongly non-linear relationships between these parameters and the components of the displacement field are revealed.

  20. Dynamic Response and Failure Mechanism of Brittle Rocks Under Combined Compression-Shear Loading Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Dai, Feng

    2018-03-01

    A novel method is developed for characterizing the mechanical response and failure mechanism of brittle rocks under dynamic compression-shear loading: an inclined cylinder specimen using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. With the specimen axis inclining to the loading direction of SHPB, a shear component can be introduced into the specimen. Both static and dynamic experiments are conducted on sandstone specimens. Given carefully pulse shaping, the dynamic equilibrium of the inclined specimens can be satisfied, and thus the quasi-static data reduction is employed. The normal and shear stress-strain relationships of specimens are subsequently established. The progressive failure process of the specimen illustrated via high-speed photographs manifests a mixed failure mode accommodating both the shear-dominated failure and the localized tensile damage. The elastic and shear moduli exhibit certain loading-path dependence under quasi-static loading but loading-path insensitivity under high loading rates. Loading rate dependence is evidently demonstrated through the failure characteristics involving fragmentation, compression and shear strength and failure surfaces based on Drucker-Prager criterion. Our proposed method is convenient and reliable to study the dynamic response and failure mechanism of rocks under combined compression-shear loading.

  1. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT). FINAL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  2. Compression etiology in tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almekinders, Louis C; Weinhold, Paul S; Maffulli, Nicola

    2003-10-01

    Recent studies have emphasized that the etiology of tendinopathy is not as simple as was once thought. The etiology is likely to be multifactorial. Etiologic factors may include some of the traditional factors such as overuse, inflexibility, and equipment problems; however, other factors need to be considered as well, such as age-related tendon degeneration and biomechanical considerations as outlined in this article. More research is needed to determine the significance of stress-shielding and compression in tendinopathy. If they are confirmed to play a role, this finding may significantly alter our approach in both prevention and in treatment through exercise therapy. The current biomechanical studies indicate that certain joint positions are more likely to place tensile stress on the area of the tendon commonly affected by tendinopathy. These joint positions seem to be different than the traditional positions for stretching exercises used for prevention and rehabilitation of tendinopathic conditions. Incorporation of different joint positions during stretching exercises may exert more uniform, controlled tensile stress on these affected areas of the tendon and avoid stresshielding. These exercises may be able to better maintain the mechanical strength of that region of the tendon and thereby avoid injury. Alternatively, they could more uniformly stress a healing area of the tendon in a controlled manner, and thereby stimulate healing once an injury has occurred. Additional work will have to prove if a change in rehabilitation exercises is more efficacious that current techniques.

  3. Compressible Vortex Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavarasan, Ramasamy; Arakeri, Jayawant; Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of a high-speed vortex ring with a shock wave is one of the fundamental issues as it is a source of sound in supersonic jets. The complex flow field induced by the vortex alters the propagation of the shock wave greatly. In order to understand the process, a compressible vortex ring is studied in detail using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and shadowgraphic techniques. The high-speed vortex ring is generated from a shock tube and the shock wave, which precedes the vortex, is reflected back by a plate and made to interact with the vortex. The shadowgraph images indicate that the reflected shock front is influenced by the non-uniform flow induced by the vortex and is decelerated while passing through the vortex. It appears that after the interaction the shock is "split" into two. The PIV measurements provided clear picture about the evolution of the vortex at different time interval. The centerline velocity traces show the maximum velocity to be around 350 m/s. The velocity field, unlike in incompressible rings, contains contributions from both the shock and the vortex ring. The velocity distribution across the vortex core, core diameter and circulation are also calculated from the PIV data.

  4. Relationship between medical compression and intramuscular pressure as an explanation of a compression paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, J-F; Benigni, J-P; Cornu-Thenard, A; Fournier, J; Blin, E

    2015-06-01

    Using standing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we recently showed that medical compression, providing an interface pressure (IP) of 22 mmHg, significantly compressed the deep veins of the leg but not, paradoxically, superficial varicose veins. To provide an explanation for this compression paradox by studying the correlation between the IP exerted by medical compression and intramuscular pressure (IMP). In 10 legs of five healthy subjects, we studied the effects of different IPs on the IMP of the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The IP produced by a cuff manometer was verified by a Picopress® device. The IMP was measured with a 21G needle connected to a manometer. Pressure data were recorded in the prone and standing positions with cuff manometer pressures from 0 to 50 mmHg. In the prone position, an IP of less than 20 did not significantly change the IMP. On the contrary, a perfect linear correlation with the IMP (r = 0.99) was observed with an IP from 20 to 50 mmHg. We found the same correlation in the standing position. We found that an IP of 22 mmHg produced a significant IMP increase from 32 to 54 mmHg, in the standing position. At the same time, the subcutaneous pressure is only provided by the compression device, on healthy subjects. In other words, the subcutaneous pressure plus the IP is only a little higher than 22 mmHg-a pressure which is too low to reduce the caliber of the superficial veins. This is in accordance with our standing MRI 3D anatomical study which showed that, paradoxically, when applying low pressures (IP), the deep veins are compressed while the superficial veins are not. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Determination of Optimum Compression Ratio: A Tribological Aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yüksek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Internal combustion engines are the primary energy conversion machines both in industry and transportation. Modern technologies are being implemented to engines to fulfill today's low fuel consumption demand. Friction energy consumed by the rubbing parts of the engines are becoming an important parameter for higher fuel efficiency. Rate of friction loss is primarily affected by sliding speed and the load acting upon rubbing surfaces. Compression ratio is the main parameter that increases the peak cylinder pressure and hence normal load on components. Aim of this study is to investigate the effect of compression ratio on total friction loss of a diesel engine. A variable compression ratio diesel engine was operated at four different compression ratios which were "12.96", "15:59", "18:03", "20:17". Brake power and speed was kept constant at predefined value while measuring the in- cylinder pressure. Friction mean effective pressure ( FMEP data were obtained from the in cylinder pressure curves for each compression ratio. Ratio of friction power to indicated power of the engine was increased from 22.83% to 37.06% with varying compression ratio from 12.96 to 20:17. Considering the thermal efficiency , FMEP and maximum in- cylinder pressure optimum compression ratio interval of the test engine was determined as 18.8 ÷ 19.6.

  6. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately

  7. Mammography image compression using Wavelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuhar Ripin; Md Saion Salikin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Md Isa

    2004-01-01

    Image compression plays an important role in many applications like medical imaging, televideo conferencing, remote sensing, document and facsimile transmission, which depend on the efficient manipulation, storage, and transmission of binary, gray scale, or color images. In Medical imaging application such Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACs), the image size or image stream size is too large and requires a large amount of storage space or high bandwidth for communication. Image compression techniques are divided into two categories namely lossy and lossless data compression. Wavelet method used in this project is a lossless compression method. In this method, the exact original mammography image data can be recovered. In this project, mammography images are digitized by using Vider Sierra Plus digitizer. The digitized images are compressed by using this wavelet image compression technique. Interactive Data Language (IDLs) numerical and visualization software is used to perform all of the calculations, to generate and display all of the compressed images. Results of this project are presented in this paper. (Author)

  8. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  9. Does team lifting increase the variability in peak lumbar compression in ironworkers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Gert; Visser, Steven; van der Molen, Henk F.; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Hoozemans, Marco J. M.; van Dieën, Jaap H.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2012-01-01

    Ironworkers frequently perform heavy lifting tasks in teams of two or four workers. Team lifting could potentially lead to a higher variation in peak lumbar compression forces than lifts performed by one worker, resulting in higher maximal peak lumbar compression forces. This study compared

  10. Context-Aware Image Compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky C K Chan

    Full Text Available We describe a physics-based data compression method inspired by the photonic time stretch wherein information-rich portions of the data are dilated in a process that emulates the effect of group velocity dispersion on temporal signals. With this coding operation, the data can be downsampled at a lower rate than without it. In contrast to previous implementation of the warped stretch compression, here the decoding can be performed without the need of phase recovery. We present rate-distortion analysis and show improvement in PSNR compared to compression via uniform downsampling.

  11. Compressive sensing for urban radar

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of compressive sensing and sparse signal reconstruction, approaches to urban radar have shifted toward relaxed constraints on signal sampling schemes in time and space, and to effectively address logistic difficulties in data acquisition. Traditionally, these challenges have hindered high resolution imaging by restricting both bandwidth and aperture, and by imposing uniformity and bounds on sampling rates.Compressive Sensing for Urban Radar is the first book to focus on a hybrid of two key areas: compressive sensing and urban sensing. It explains how reliable imaging, tracki

  12. Starting up a programme of atomic piles using compressed gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, J.; Yvon, J.

    1959-01-01

    1) An examination of the intellectual and material resources which have directed the French programme towards: a) the natural uranium and plutonium system, b) the use of compressed gas as heat transfer fluid (primary fluid). 2) The parts played in exploring the field by the pile EL2 and G1, EL2 a natural uranium, heavy water and compressed gas pile, G1 a natural uranium, graphite and atmospheric air pile. 3) Development of the neutronics of graphite piles: physical study of G1. 4) The examination of certain problem posed by centres equipped with natural uranium, graphite and compressed carbon dioxide piles: structure, special materials, fluid circuits, maximum efficiency. Economic aspects. 5) Aids to progress: a) piles for testing materials and for tests on canned fuel elements, b) laboratory and calculation facilities. 6) Possible new orientations of compressed gas piles: a) raising of the pressure, b) enriched fuel, c) higher temperatures, d) use of heavy water. (author) [fr

  13. Investigating low-frequency compression using the Grid method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Dau, Torsten; MacDonald, Ewen

    2016-01-01

    in literature. Moreover, slopes of the low-level portions of the BM I/O functions estimated at 500 Hz were examined, to determine whether the 500-Hz off-frequency forward masking curves were affected by compression. Overall, the collected data showed a trend confirming the compressive behaviour. However......There is an ongoing discussion about whether the amount of cochlear compression in humans at low frequencies (below 1 kHz) is as high as that at higher frequencies. It is controversial whether the compression affects the slope of the off-frequency forward masking curves at those frequencies. Here......, the Grid method with a 2-interval 1-up 3-down tracking rule was applied to estimate forward masking curves at two characteristic frequencies: 500 Hz and 4000 Hz. The resulting curves and the corresponding basilar membrane input-output (BM I/O) functions were found to be comparable to those reported...

  14. Quantum autoencoders for efficient compression of quantum data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jonathan; Olson, Jonathan P.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2017-12-01

    Classical autoencoders are neural networks that can learn efficient low-dimensional representations of data in higher-dimensional space. The task of an autoencoder is, given an input x, to map x to a lower dimensional point y such that x can likely be recovered from y. The structure of the underlying autoencoder network can be chosen to represent the data on a smaller dimension, effectively compressing the input. Inspired by this idea, we introduce the model of a quantum autoencoder to perform similar tasks on quantum data. The quantum autoencoder is trained to compress a particular data set of quantum states, where a classical compression algorithm cannot be employed. The parameters of the quantum autoencoder are trained using classical optimization algorithms. We show an example of a simple programmable circuit that can be trained as an efficient autoencoder. We apply our model in the context of quantum simulation to compress ground states of the Hubbard model and molecular Hamiltonians.

  15. New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark J. Bergander

    2005-08-29

    The main objective of this project is to confirm on a well-instrumented prototype the theoretically derived claims of higher efficiency and coefficient of performance for geothermal heat pumps based on a new regenerative thermodynamic cycle as comparing to existing technology. In order to demonstrate the improved performance of the prototype, it will be compared to published parameters of commercially available geothermal heat pumps manufactured by US and foreign companies. Other objectives are to optimize the design parameters and to determine the economic viability of the new technology. Background (as stated in the proposal): The proposed technology closely relates to EERE mission by improving energy efficiency, bringing clean, reliable and affordable heating and cooling to the residential and commercial buildings and reducing greenhouse gases emission. It can provide the same amount of heating and cooling with considerably less use of electrical energy and consequently has a potential of reducing our nations dependence on foreign oil. The theoretical basis for the proposed thermodynamic cycle was previously developed and was originally called a dynamic equilibrium method. This theory considers the dynamic equations of state of the working fluid and proposes the methods for modification of T-S trajectories of adiabatic transformation by changing dynamic properties of gas, such as flow rate, speed and acceleration. The substance of this proposal is a thermodynamic cycle characterized by the regenerative use of the potential energy of two-phase flow expansion, which in traditional systems is lost in expansion valves. The essential new features of the process are: (1) The application of two-step throttling of the working fluid and two-step compression of its vapor phase. (2) Use of a compressor as the initial step compression and a jet device as a second step, where throttling and compression are combined. (3) Controlled ratio of a working fluid at the first and

  16. Reconfigurable Hardware for Compressing Hyperspectral Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranki, Nazeeh; Namkung, Jeffrey; Villapando, Carlos; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, Matthew; Xie, Hua

    2010-01-01

    High-speed, low-power, reconfigurable electronic hardware has been developed to implement ICER-3D, an algorithm for compressing hyperspectral-image data. The algorithm and parts thereof have been the topics of several NASA Tech Briefs articles, including Context Modeler for Wavelet Compression of Hyperspectral Images (NPO-43239) and ICER-3D Hyperspectral Image Compression Software (NPO-43238), which appear elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. As described in more detail in those articles, the algorithm includes three main subalgorithms: one for computing wavelet transforms, one for context modeling, and one for entropy encoding. For the purpose of designing the hardware, these subalgorithms are treated as modules to be implemented efficiently in field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The design takes advantage of industry- standard, commercially available FPGAs. The implementation targets the Xilinx Virtex II pro architecture, which has embedded PowerPC processor cores with flexible on-chip bus architecture. It incorporates an efficient parallel and pipelined architecture to compress the three-dimensional image data. The design provides for internal buffering to minimize intensive input/output operations while making efficient use of offchip memory. The design is scalable in that the subalgorithms are implemented as independent hardware modules that can be combined in parallel to increase throughput. The on-chip processor manages the overall operation of the compression system, including execution of the top-level control functions as well as scheduling, initiating, and monitoring processes. The design prototype has been demonstrated to be capable of compressing hyperspectral data at a rate of 4.5 megasamples per second at a conservative clock frequency of 50 MHz, with a potential for substantially greater throughput at a higher clock frequency. The power consumption of the prototype is less than 6.5 W. The reconfigurability (by means of reprogramming) of

  17. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  18. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  19. Compressed sensing for distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Coluccia, Giulio; Magli, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the state-of-the art in the exciting and timely topic of compressed sensing for distributed systems. It has to be noted that, while compressed sensing has been studied for some time now, its distributed applications are relatively new. Remarkably, such applications are ideally suited to exploit all the benefits that compressed sensing can provide. The objective of this book is to provide the reader with a comprehensive survey of this topic, from the basic concepts to different classes of centralized and distributed reconstruction algorithms, as well as a comparison of these techniques. This book collects different contributions on these aspects. It presents the underlying theory in a complete and unified way for the first time, presenting various signal models and their use cases. It contains a theoretical part collecting latest results in rate-distortion analysis of distributed compressed sensing, as well as practical implementations of algorithms obtaining performance close to...

  20. Nonlinear compression of optical solitons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    linear pulse propagation is the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation [1]. There are ... Optical pulse compression finds important applications in optical fibres. The pulse com ..... to thank CSIR, New Delhi for financial support in the form of SRF.

  1. Compression and expansion in central collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielewicz, P.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of central collisions of heavy nuclei in the energy range from few tens of MeV/nucleon to a couple of GeV/nucleon is discussed. As the beam energy increases and/or the impact parameter decreases, the maximum compression increases. It is argued that the hydrodynamic behaviour of matter sets in the vicinity of balance energy. At higher energies shock fronts are observed to form within head-on reaction simulations, perpendicular to beam axis and separating hot compressed matter from cold. In the semi-central reactions a weak tangential discontinuity develops in-between these fronts. The hot compressed matter exposed to the vacuum in directions parallel to the shock front begin to expand collectively into these directions. The expansion affects particle angular distributions and mean energy components and further shapes of spectra and mean energies of particles emitted into any one direction. The variation of slopes and the relative yields measured within the FOPI collaboration are in a general agreement with the results of simulations. As to the FOPI data on stopping, they are consistent with the preference for transverse over the longitudinal motion in the head-on Au + Au collisions. Unfortunately, though, the data can not be used to decide directly on that preference due to acceptance cuts. Tied to the spatial and temporal changes in the reactions are changes in the entropy per nucleon. (authors)

  2. Mechanisms of anomalous compressibility of vitreous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alisha N.; Lesher, Charles E.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2014-11-01

    The anomalous compressibility of vitreous silica has been known for nearly a century, but the mechanisms responsible for it remain poorly understood. Using GHz-ultrasonic interferometry, we measured longitudinal and transverse acoustic wave travel times at pressures up to 5 GPa in vitreous silica with fictive temperatures (Tf) ranging between 985 °C and 1500 °C. The maximum in ultrasonic wave travel times-corresponding to a minimum in acoustic velocities-shifts to higher pressure with increasing Tf for both acoustic waves, with complete reversibility below 5 GPa. These relationships reflect polyamorphism in the supercooled liquid, which results in a glassy state possessing different proportions of domains of high- and low-density amorphous phases (HDA and LDA, respectively). The relative proportion of HDA and LDA is set at Tf and remains fixed on compression below the permanent densification pressure. The bulk material exhibits compression behavior systematically dependent on synthesis conditions that arise from the presence of floppy modes in a mixture of HDA and LDA domains.

  3. Dynamic compressive properties and failure mechanism of glass fiber reinforced silica hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jie; Li Shukui; Yan Lili; Huo Dongmei; Wang Fuchi

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic compressive properties of glass fiber reinforced silica (GFRS) hydrogel were investigated using a spilt Hopkinson pressure bar. Failure mechanism of GFRS hydrogel was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Result showed that dynamic compressive stresses were much higher than the quasi-static compressive stresses at the same strain. The dynamic compressive strength was directly proportional to the strain rate with same sample dimensions. The dynamic compressive strength was directly proportional to the sample basal area at same strain rate. Dynamic compressive failure strain was small. At high strain rates, glass fibers broke down and separated from the matrix, pores shrank rapidly. Failure resulted from the increase of lateral tensile stress in hydrogel under dynamic compression.

  4. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Cantrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The KN calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67 ×1017 N m−3. The average ratio KN/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043 × 1010 m−1 for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of KN via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  5. Fiber/collagen composites for ligament tissue engineering: influence of elastic moduli of sparse aligned fibers on mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Patrick S; Verbridge, Scott S; Dahlgren, Linda A; Kakar, Sanjeev; Guelcher, Scott A; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun microfibers are attractive for the engineering of oriented tissues because they present instructive topographic and mechanical cues to cells. However, high-density microfiber networks are too cell-impermeable for most tissue applications. Alternatively, the distribution of sparse microfibers within a three-dimensional hydrogel could present instructive cues to guide cell organization while not inhibiting cell behavior. In this study, thin (∼5 fibers thick) layers of aligned microfibers (0.7 μm) were embedded within collagen hydrogels containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cultured for up to 14 days, and assayed for expression of ligament markers and imaged for cell organization. These microfibers were generated through the electrospinning of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(ester-urethane) (PEUR), or a 75/25 PEUR/PCL blend to produce microfiber networks with elastic moduli of 31, 15, and 5.6 MPa, respectively. MSCs in composites containing 5.6 MPa fibers exhibited increased expression of the ligament marker scleraxis and the contractile phenotype marker α-smooth muscle actin versus the stiffer fiber composites. Additionally, cells within the 5.6 MPa microfiber composites were more oriented compared to cells within the 15 and 31 MPa microfiber composites. Together, these data indicate that the mechanical properties of microfiber/collagen composites can be tuned for the engineering of ligament and other target tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1894-1901, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Elastic wave speeds and moduli in polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2009-01-01

    We used ultrasonic pulse transmission to measure compressional, P, and shear, S, wave speeds in laboratory-formed polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate. From the wave speed's linear dependence on temperature and pressure and from the sample's calculated density, we derived expressions for bulk, shear, and compressional wave moduli and Poisson's ratio from -20 to 15??C and 22.4 to 32.8 MPa for ice Ih, -20 to 15??C and 30.5 to 97.7 MPa for si methane hydrate, and -20 to 10??C and 30.5 to 91.6 MPa for sll methane-ethane hydrate. All three materials had comparable P and S wave speeds and decreasing shear wave speeds with increasing applied pressure. Each material also showed evidence of rapid intergranular bonding, with a corresponding increase in wave speed, in response to pauses in sample deformation. There were also key differences. Resistance to uniaxial compaction, indicated by the pressure required to compact initially porous samples, was significantly lower for ice Ih than for either hydrate. The ice Ih shear modulus decreased with increasing pressure, in contrast to the increase measured in both hydrates ?? 2009.

  7. Effect of Kollidon VA®64 particle size and morphology as directly compressible excipient on tablet compression properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, R S; Patel, C; Sevak, V; Chan, M

    2018-01-01

    The study evaluates use of Kollidon VA ® 64 and a combination of Kollidon VA ® 64 with Kollidon VA ® 64 Fine as excipient in direct compression process of tablets. The combination of the two grades of material is evaluated for capping, lamination and excessive friability. Inter particulate void space is higher for such excipient due to the hollow structure of the Kollidon VA ® 64 particles. During tablet compression air remains trapped in the blend exhibiting poor compression with compromised physical properties of the tablets. Composition of Kollidon VA ® 64 and Kollidon VA ® 64 Fine is evaluated by design of experiment (DoE). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of two grades of Kollidon VA ® 64 exhibits morphological differences between coarse and fine grade. The tablet compression process is evaluated with a mix consisting of entirely Kollidon VA ® 64 and two mixes containing Kollidon VA ® 64 and Kollidon VA ® 64 Fine in ratio of 77:23 and 65:35. A statistical modeling on the results from the DoE trials resulted in the optimum composition for direct tablet compression as combination of Kollidon VA ® 64 and Kollidon VA ® 64 Fine in ratio of 77:23. This combination compressed with the predicted parameters based on the statistical modeling and applying main compression force between 5 and 15 kN, pre-compression force between 2 and 3 kN, feeder speed fixed at 25 rpm and compression range of 45-49 rpm produced tablets with hardness ranging between 19 and 21 kp, with no friability, capping, or lamination issue.

  8. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  9. Quantifying Young's moduli of protein fibrils and particles with bimodal force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jay; Charnley, Mirren; Cheng, Christopher; Reynolds, Nicholas P; Jones, Owen G

    2017-10-19

    Force spectroscopy is a means of obtaining mechanical information of individual nanometer-scale structures in composite materials, such as protein assemblies for use in consumer films or gels. As a recently developed force spectroscopy technique, bimodal force spectroscopy relates frequency shifts in cantilevers simultaneously excited at multiple frequencies to the elastic properties of the contacted material, yet its utility for quantitative characterization of biopolymer assemblies has been limited. In this study, a linear correlation between experimental frequency shift and Young's modulus of polymer films was used to calibrate bimodal force spectroscopy and quantify Young's modulus of two protein nanostructures: β-lactoglobulin fibrils and zein nanoparticles. Cross-sectional Young's modulus of protein fibrils was determined to be 1.6 GPa while the modulus of zein nanoparticles was determined as 854 MPa. Parallel measurement of β-lactoglobulin fibril by a competing pulsed-force technique found a higher cross-sectional Young's modulus, highlighting the importance of comparative calibration against known standards in both pulsed and bimodal force spectroscopies. These findings demonstrate a successful procedure for measuring mechanical properties of individual protein assemblies with potential use in biological or packaging applications using bimodal force spectroscopy.

  10. A model for the parabolic slices Per1(e2πip/q) in moduli space of quadratic rational maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhre, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The notion of relatedness loci in the parabolic slices Per1(e2πip/q) in moduli space of quadratic rational maps is introduced. They are counterparts of the disconnectedness or escape locus in the slice of quadratic polynomials. A model for these loci is presented, and a strategy of proof of the f......The notion of relatedness loci in the parabolic slices Per1(e2πip/q) in moduli space of quadratic rational maps is introduced. They are counterparts of the disconnectedness or escape locus in the slice of quadratic polynomials. A model for these loci is presented, and a strategy of proof...... of the faithfulness of the model is given....

  11. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed a...

  12. Double-compression method for biomedical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Yevhenii A.; Mustetsov, Timofey N.; Hamdi, Rami R.; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa; Orshubekov, Nurbek; DzierŻak, RóŻa; Uvaysova, Svetlana

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a double compression method (DCM) of biomedical images. A comparison of image compression factors in size JPEG, PNG and developed DCM was carried out. The main purpose of the DCM - compression of medical images while maintaining the key points that carry diagnostic information. To estimate the minimum compression factor an analysis of the coding of random noise image is presented.

  13. Optimal chest compression rate in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a prospective, randomized crossover study using a manikin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Hwa; Ryu, Ji Ho; Min, Mun Ki; Kim, Yong In; Park, Maeng Real; Yeom, Seok Ran; Han, Sang Kyoon; Park, Seong Wook

    2016-08-01

    When performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the 2010 American Heart Association guidelines recommend a chest compression rate of at least 100 min, whereas the 2010 European Resuscitation Council guidelines recommend a rate of between 100 and 120 min. The aim of this study was to examine the rate of chest compression that fulfilled various quality indicators, thereby determining the optimal rate of compression. Thirty-two trainee emergency medical technicians and six paramedics were enrolled in this study. All participants had been trained in basic life support. Each participant performed 2 min of continuous compressions on a skill reporter manikin, while listening to a metronome sound at rates of 100, 120, 140, and 160 beats/min, in a random order. Mean compression depth, incomplete chest recoil, and the proportion of correctly performed chest compressions during the 2 min were measured and recorded. The rate of incomplete chest recoil was lower at compression rates of 100 and 120 min compared with that at 160 min (P=0.001). The numbers of compressions that fulfilled the criteria for high-quality CPR at a rate of 120 min were significantly higher than those at 100 min (P=0.016). The number of high-quality CPR compressions was the highest at a compression rate of 120 min, and increased incomplete recoil occurred with increasing compression rate. However, further studies are needed to confirm the results.

  14. New patient-controlled abdominal compression method in radiography: radiation dose and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piippo-Huotari, Oili; Norrman, Eva; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta; Geijer, Håkan

    2018-05-01

    The radiation dose for patients can be reduced with many methods and one way is to use abdominal compression. In this study, the radiation dose and image quality for a new patient-controlled compression device were compared with conventional compression and compression in the prone position . To compare radiation dose and image quality of patient-controlled compression compared with conventional and prone compression in general radiography. An experimental design with quantitative approach. After obtaining the approval of the ethics committee, a consecutive sample of 48 patients was examined with the standard clinical urography protocol. The radiation doses were measured as dose-area product and analyzed with a paired t-test. The image quality was evaluated by visual grading analysis. Four radiologists evaluated each image individually by scoring nine criteria modified from the European quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images. There was no significant difference in radiation dose or image quality between conventional and patient-controlled compression. Prone position resulted in both higher dose and inferior image quality. Patient-controlled compression gave similar dose levels as conventional compression and lower than prone compression. Image quality was similar with both patient-controlled and conventional compression and was judged to be better than in the prone position.

  15. Muscle Shear Moduli Changes and Frequency of Alternate Muscle Activity of Plantar Flexor Synergists Induced by Prolonged Low-Level Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Akagi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During prolonged low-level contractions, synergist muscles are activated in an alternating pattern of activity and silence called as alternate muscle activity. Resting muscle stiffness is considered to increase due to muscle fatigue. Thus, we investigated whether the difference in the extent of fatigue of each plantar flexor synergist corresponded to the difference in the frequency of alternate muscle activity between the synergists using muscle shear modulus as an index of muscle stiffness. Nineteen young men voluntarily participated in this study. The shear moduli of the resting medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles (MG and LG and soleus muscle (SOL were measured using shear wave ultrasound elastography before and after a 1-h sustained contraction at 10% peak torque during maximal voluntary contraction of isometric plantar flexion. One subject did not accomplish the task and the alternate muscle activity for MG was not found in 2 subjects; therefore, data for 16 subjects were used for further analyses. The magnitude of muscle activation during the fatiguing task was similar in MG and SOL. The percent change in shear modulus before and after the fatiguing task (MG: 16.7 ± 12.0%, SOL: −4.1 ± 13.9%; mean ± standard deviation and the alternate muscle activity during the fatiguing task (MG: 33 [20–51] times, SOL: 30 [17–36] times; median [25th–75th percentile] were significantly higher in MG than in SOL. The contraction-induced change in shear modulus (7.4 ± 20.3% and the alternate muscle activity (37 [20–45] times of LG with the lowest magnitude of muscle activation during the fatiguing task among the plantar flexors were not significantly different from those of the other muscles. These results suggest that the degree of increase in muscle shear modulus induced by prolonged contraction corresponds to the frequency of alternate muscle activity between MG and SOL during prolonged contraction. Thus, it is likely that, compared with

  16. Perceptual Image Compression in Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Eckstein, Miguel; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The next era of space exploration, especially the "Mission to Planet Earth" will generate immense quantities of image data. For example, the Earth Observing System (EOS) is expected to generate in excess of one terabyte/day. NASA confronts a major technical challenge in managing this great flow of imagery: in collection, pre-processing, transmission to earth, archiving, and distribution to scientists at remote locations. Expected requirements in most of these areas clearly exceed current technology. Part of the solution to this problem lies in efficient image compression techniques. For much of this imagery, the ultimate consumer is the human eye. In this case image compression should be designed to match the visual capacities of the human observer. We have developed three techniques for optimizing image compression for the human viewer. The first consists of a formula, developed jointly with IBM and based on psychophysical measurements, that computes a DCT quantization matrix for any specified combination of viewing distance, display resolution, and display brightness. This DCT quantization matrix is used in most recent standards for digital image compression (JPEG, MPEG, CCITT H.261). The second technique optimizes the DCT quantization matrix for each individual image, based on the contents of the image. This is accomplished by means of a model of visual sensitivity to compression artifacts. The third technique extends the first two techniques to the realm of wavelet compression. Together these two techniques will allow systematic perceptual optimization of image compression in NASA imaging systems. Many of the image management challenges faced by NASA are mirrored in the field of telemedicine. Here too there are severe demands for transmission and archiving of large image databases, and the imagery is ultimately used primarily by human observers, such as radiologists. In this presentation I will describe some of our preliminary explorations of the applications

  17. Evaluation of a new image compression technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algra, P.R.; Kroon, H.M.; Noordveld, R.B.; DeValk, J.P.J.; Seeley, G.W.; Westerink, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of a new image compression technique, subband coding using vector quantization, on 44 CT examinations of the upper abdomen. Three independent radiologists reviewed the original images and compressed versions. The compression ratios used were 16:1 and 20:1. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed no difference in the diagnostic contents between originals and their compressed versions. Subjective visibility of anatomic structures was equal. Except for a few 20:1 compressed images, the observers could not distinguish compressed versions from original images. They conclude that subband coding using vector quantization is a valuable method for data compression in CT scans of the abdomen

  18. Compressive Sampling of EEG Signals with Finite Rate of Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poh Kok-Kiong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of electroencephalographic signals and subsequent diagnoses can only be done effectively on long term recordings that preserve the signals' morphologies. Currently, electroencephalographic signals are obtained at Nyquist rate or higher, thus introducing redundancies. Existing compression methods remove these redundancies, thereby achieving compression. We propose an alternative compression scheme based on a sampling theory developed for signals with a finite rate of innovation (FRI which compresses electroencephalographic signals during acquisition. We model the signals as FRI signals and then sample them at their rate of innovation. The signals are thus effectively represented by a small set of Fourier coefficients corresponding to the signals' rate of innovation. Using the FRI theory, original signals can be reconstructed using this set of coefficients. Seventy-two hours of electroencephalographic recording are tested and results based on metrices used in compression literature and morphological similarities of electroencephalographic signals are presented. The proposed method achieves results comparable to that of wavelet compression methods, achieving low reconstruction errors while preserving the morphologiies of the signals. More importantly, it introduces a new framework to acquire electroencephalographic signals at their rate of innovation, thus entailing a less costly low-rate sampling device that does not waste precious computational resources.

  19. Statistical conditional sampling for variable-resolution video compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wong

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate a variable-resolution approach to video compression based on Conditional Random Field and statistical conditional sampling in order to further improve compression rate while maintaining high-quality video. In the proposed approach, representative key-frames within a video shot are identified and stored at full resolution. The remaining frames within the video shot are stored and compressed at a reduced resolution. At the decompression stage, a region-based dictionary is constructed from the key-frames and used to restore the reduced resolution frames to the original resolution via statistical conditional sampling. The sampling approach is based on the conditional probability of the CRF modeling by use of the constructed dictionary. Experimental results show that the proposed variable-resolution approach via statistical conditional sampling has potential for improving compression rates when compared to compressing the video at full resolution, while achieving higher video quality when compared to compressing the video at reduced resolution.

  20. Building indifferentiable compression functions from the PGV compression functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauravaram, P.; Bagheri, Nasour; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde

    2016-01-01

    Preneel, Govaerts and Vandewalle (PGV) analysed the security of single-block-length block cipher based compression functions assuming that the underlying block cipher has no weaknesses. They showed that 12 out of 64 possible compression functions are collision and (second) preimage resistant. Black......, Rogaway and Shrimpton formally proved this result in the ideal cipher model. However, in the indifferentiability security framework introduced by Maurer, Renner and Holenstein, all these 12 schemes are easily differentiable from a fixed input-length random oracle (FIL-RO) even when their underlying block...

  1. Compression of Probabilistic XML Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldman, Irma; de Keijzer, Ander; van Keulen, Maurice

    Database techniques to store, query and manipulate data that contains uncertainty receives increasing research interest. Such UDBMSs can be classified according to their underlying data model: relational, XML, or RDF. We focus on uncertain XML DBMS with as representative example the Probabilistic XML model (PXML) of [10,9]. The size of a PXML document is obviously a factor in performance. There are PXML-specific techniques to reduce the size, such as a push down mechanism, that produces equivalent but more compact PXML documents. It can only be applied, however, where possibilities are dependent. For normal XML documents there also exist several techniques for compressing a document. Since Probabilistic XML is (a special form of) normal XML, it might benefit from these methods even more. In this paper, we show that existing compression mechanisms can be combined with PXML-specific compression techniques. We also show that best compression rates are obtained with a combination of PXML-specific technique with a rather simple generic DAG-compression technique.

  2. Plasma heating by adiabatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.A. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    These two lectures will cover the following three topics: (i) The application of adiabatic compression to toroidal devices is reviewed. The special case of adiabatic compression in tokamaks is considered in more detail, including a discussion of the equilibrium, scaling laws, and heating effects. (ii) The ATC (Adiabatic Toroidal Compressor) device which was completed in May 1972, is described in detail. Compression of a tokamak plasma across a static toroidal field is studied in this device. The device is designed to produce a pre-compression plasma with a major radius of 17 cm, toroidal field of 20 kG, and current of 90 kA. The compression leads to a plasma with major radius of 38 cm and minor radius of 10 cm. Scaling laws imply a density increase of a factor 6, temperature increase of a factor 3, and current increase of a factor 2.4. An additional feature of ATC is that it is a large tokamak which operates without a copper shell. (iii) Data which show that the expected MHD behavior is largely observed is presented and discussed. (U.S.)

  3. Concurrent data compression and protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.

    2009-01-01

    Data compression techniques involve transforming data of a given format, called source message, to data of a smaller sized format, called codeword. The primary objective of data encryption is to ensure security of data if it is intercepted by an eavesdropper. It transforms data of a given format, called plaintext, to another format, called ciphertext, using an encryption key or keys. Thus, combining the processes of compression and encryption together must be done in this order, that is, compression followed by encryption because all compression techniques heavily rely on the redundancies which are inherently a part of a regular text or speech. The aim of this research is to combine two processes of compression (using an existing scheme) with a new encryption scheme which should be compatible with encoding scheme embedded in encoder. The novel technique proposed by the authors is new, unique and is highly secured. The deployment of sentinel marker' enhances the security of the proposed TR-One algorithm from 2/sup 44/ ciphertexts to 2/sup 44/ +2/sub 20/ ciphertexts thus imposing extra challenges to the intruders. (author)

  4. Radiologic image compression -- A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.; Huang, H.K.; Zaremba, L.; Gooden, D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of radiologic image compression is to reduce the data volume of and to achieve a lot bit rate in the digital representation of radiologic images without perceived loss of image quality. However, the demand for transmission bandwidth and storage space in the digital radiology environment, especially picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and teleradiology, and the proliferating use of various imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine, computed radiography, and digital subtraction angiography, continue to outstrip the capabilities of existing technologies. The availability of lossy coding techniques for clinical diagnoses further implicates many complex legal and regulatory issues. This paper reviews the recent progress of lossless and lossy radiologic image compression and presents the legal challenges of using lossy compression of medical records. To do so, the authors first describe the fundamental concepts of radiologic imaging and digitization. Then, the authors examine current compression technology in the field of medical imaging and discuss important regulatory policies and legal questions facing the use of compression in this field. The authors conclude with a summary of future challenges and research directions. 170 refs

  5. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped with...

  6. Limits to compression with cascaded quadratic soliton compressors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    We study cascaded quadratic soliton compressors and address the physical mechanisms that limit the compression. A nonlocal model is derived, and the nonlocal response is shown to have an additional oscillatory component in the nonstationary regime when the group-velocity mismatch (GVM) is strong....... This inhibits efficient compression. Raman-like perturbations from the cascaded nonlinearity, competing cubic nonlinearities, higher-order dispersion, and soliton energy may also limit compression, and through realistic numerical simulations we point out when each factor becomes important. We find......, the simulations show that reaching single-cycle duration is ultimately inhibited by competing cubic nonlinearities as well as dispersive waves, that only show up when taking higher-order dispersion into account....

  7. MRI analysis of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ling; Chai Weimin; Song Qi; Ling Huawei; Miao Fei; Chen Kemin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the offending vessels of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia by magnetic resonance tomographic angiography (MRTA). Methods: MRTA images of 235 asymptomatic trigeminal nerves and 147 symptomatic trigeminal nerves were analyzed by two radiologists who were blinded to the clinical findings. Judgment was made on if there were some vessels close to the trigeminal nerve. The diameter of the offending vessel, the distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons and the direction of the vessel toward the nerve were also recorded at the same time. Group t-test and Chi-Square test were used for statistics. Results: Two hundred and forty-two trigeminal nerves of all 382 nerves can be detected offending vessels on MRTA images, 111 of 242 trigeminal nerves were asymptomatic, the rest 131 were symptomatic. Statistical analysis indicated that the distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons in symptomatic group (the median is 2 mm) was shorter than that in the asymptomatic group (the median is 4 mm) (P<0.01). In 89.3% cases (117/131) of the symptomatic group the angle between the vessel and the nerve is larger than 45 degree, but only in 67.6% cases (75/111) in the asymptomatic group the angle is larger than 45 degree. That means significant difference is between the two groups (P<0.01). Vessel-nerve compression can be seen in 1 case of asymptomatic group (0.4%, 1/235) and 45 eases in symptomatic group (30.6%, 45/147). The vessel-nerve compression rate of the symptomatic group was much higher than that of the asymptomatic group (P<0.01). Conclusion: MR is a useful tool to evaluate the offending vessels of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia. The distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons and the direction of the vessel toward the nerve are related to the onset of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia. (authors)

  8. Elastic moduli, thermal expansion, and inferred permeability of Climax quartz monzonite and Sudbury gabbro to 5000C and 55 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, L.; Heard, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    Young's modulus (E), bulk modulus (K), and the coefficient of thermal linear expansion (α) have been determined for Climax quartz monzonite to 500 0 C and pressures (P) to 55 MPa and for Sudbury gabbro to 300 0 C and 55 MPa. For each rock, both E and K decreased with T and increased with P in a nonlinear manner. In the monzonite, E and K decreased by up to 60% as P decreased from 55.2 to 6.9 MPa isothermally, while the gabbro indicated a decrease up to 70% over the same pressure range. As T increased isobarically, E and K for the monzonite decreased by up to a factor of approx. 80% from 19 to 500 0 C. The moduli of the gabbro decreased by as much as 70% from 19 to 300 0 C. α for the monzonite increased with T and decreased with P in a nonmonotonic fashion, with most measured values for α greater than values calculated for the crack-free aggregate. Depending on P, α in the monzonite increased from 8 to 11.10 -6 0 C -1 at 40 0 C to 22 to 25.10 -6 C -1 at 475 0 C. For the gabbro, α also generally decreased with increasing P. Values ranged from 6 to 11.10 -6 0 C -1 , showing a nonlinear trend and very little net increas over the T range from 19 to 300 0 C. Calculated permeability of these rocks based on the α determinations indicated that permeabilities may increase by up to a factor of 3 over the temperature interval 19 to 300 0 C, and the permeability of the monzonite is inferred to increase by up to a factor of 8 by 500 0 C. In both rocks, most measurements are consistent with microcracks controlling the thermoelastic response by opening with T and closing with sigma and P

  9. Rectal perforation by compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Jin

    2017-07-01

    As the use of compressed air in industrial work has increased, so has the risk of associated pneumatic injury from its improper use. However, damage of large intestine caused by compressed air is uncommon. Herein a case of pneumatic rupture of the rectum is described. The patient was admitted to the Emergency Room complaining of abdominal pain and distension. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle over his buttock. On arrival, vital signs were stable but physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and marked distension of the abdomen. Computed tomography showed a large volume of air in the peritoneal cavity and subcutaneous emphysema at the perineum. A rectal perforation was found at laparotomy and the Hartmann procedure was performed.

  10. Compact torus compression of microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, D.W.; Langdon, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility that a compact torus (CT) might be accelerated to large velocities has been suggested by Hartman and Hammer. If this is feasible one application of these moving CTs might be to compress microwaves. The proposed mechanism is that a coaxial vacuum region in front of a CT is prefilled with a number of normal electromagnetic modes on which the CT impinges. A crucial assumption of this proposal is that the CT excludes the microwaves and therefore compresses them. Should the microwaves penetrate the CT, compression efficiency is diminished and significant CT heating results. MFE applications in the same parameters regime have found electromagnetic radiation capable of penetrating, heating, and driving currents. We report here a cursory investigation of rf penetration using a 1-D version of a direct implicit PIC code

  11. Premixed autoignition in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Krisman, Alexander; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Prediction of chemical ignition delay in an autoignition process is critical in combustion systems like compression ignition engines and gas turbines. Often, ignition delay times measured in simple homogeneous experiments or homogeneous calculations are not representative of actual autoignition processes in complex turbulent flows. This is due the presence of turbulent mixing which results in fluctuations in thermodynamic properties as well as chemical composition. In the present study the effect of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables on the ignition delay is quantified with direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence. A premixed syngas-air mixture is used to remove the effects of inhomogeneity in the chemical composition. Preliminary results show a significant spatial variation in the ignition delay time. We analyze the topology of autoignition kernels and identify the influence of extreme events resulting from compressibility and intermittency. The dependence of ignition delay time on Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers is also quantified. Supported by Basic Energy Sciences, Dept of Energy, United States.

  12. Lossless Compression of Broadcast Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Bo; Eriksen, N.; Faber, E.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate several techniques for lossless and near-lossless compression of broadcast video.The emphasis is placed on the emerging international standard for compression of continous-tone still images, JPEG-LS, due to its excellent compression performance and moderatecomplexity. Except for one...... cannot be expected to code losslessly at a rate of 125 Mbit/s. We investigate the rate and quality effects of quantization using standard JPEG-LS quantization and two new techniques: visual quantization and trellis quantization. Visual quantization is not part of baseline JPEG-LS, but is applicable...... in the framework of JPEG-LS. Visual tests show that this quantization technique gives much better quality than standard JPEG-LS quantization. Trellis quantization is a process by which the original image is altered in such a way as to make lossless JPEG-LS encoding more effective. For JPEG-LS and visual...

  13. Efficient access of compressed data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggers, S.J.; Shoshani, A.

    1980-06-01

    A compression technique is presented that allows a high degree of compression but requires only logarithmic access time. The technique is a constant suppression scheme, and is most applicable to stable databases whose distribution of constants is fairly clustered. Furthermore, the repeated use of the technique permits the suppression of a multiple number of different constants. Of particular interest is the application of the constant suppression technique to databases the composite key of which is made up of an incomplete cross product of several attribute domains. The scheme for compressing the full cross product composite key is well known. This paper, however, also handles the general, incomplete case by applying the constant suppression technique in conjunction with a composite key suppression scheme

  14. Compressibility of rotating black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Interpreting the cosmological constant as a pressure, whose thermodynamically conjugate variable is a volume, modifies the first law of black hole thermodynamics. Properties of the resulting thermodynamic volume are investigated: the compressibility and the speed of sound of the black hole are derived in the case of nonpositive cosmological constant. The adiabatic compressibility vanishes for a nonrotating black hole and is maximal in the extremal case--comparable with, but still less than, that of a cold neutron star. A speed of sound v s is associated with the adiabatic compressibility, which is equal to c for a nonrotating black hole and decreases as the angular momentum is increased. An extremal black hole has v s 2 =0.9 c 2 when the cosmological constant vanishes, and more generally v s is bounded below by c/√(2).

  15. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  16. Wavelet compression algorithm applied to abdominal ultrasound images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cheng-Hsun; Pan, Su-Feng; LU, Chin-Yuan; Lee, Ming-Che

    2006-01-01

    We sought to investigate acceptable compression ratios of lossy wavelet compression on 640 x 480 x 8 abdominal ultrasound (US) images. We acquired 100 abdominal US images with normal and abnormal findings from the view station of a 932-bed teaching hospital. The US images were then compressed at quality factors (QFs) of 3, 10, 30, and 50 followed outcomes of a pilot study. This was equal to the average compression ratios of 4.3:1, 8.5:1, 20:1 and 36.6:1, respectively. Four objective measurements were carried out to examine and compare the image degradation between original and compressed images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was also introduced for subjective assessment. Five experienced and qualified radiologists as reviewers blinded to corresponding pathological findings, analysed paired 400 randomly ordered images with two 17-inch thin film transistor/liquid crystal display (TFT/LCD) monitors. At ROC analysis, the average area under curve (Az) for US abdominal image was 0.874 at the ratio of 36.6:1. The compressed image size was only 2.7% for US original at this ratio. The objective parameters showed the higher the mean squared error (MSE) or root mean squared error (RMSE) values, the poorer the image quality. The higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) values indicated better image quality. The average RMSE, PSNR at 36.6:1 for US were 4.84 ± 0.14, 35.45 dB, respectively. This finding suggests that, on the basis of the patient sample, wavelet compression of abdominal US to a ratio of 36.6:1 did not adversely affect diagnostic performance or evaluation error for radiologists' interpretation so as to risk affecting diagnosis

  17. Medical image compression by using three-dimensional wavelet transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Huang, H.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional (3-D) medical image compression method for computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) that uses a separable nonuniform 3-D wavelet transform. The separable wavelet transform employs one filter bank within two-dimensional (2-D) slices and then a second filter bank on the slice direction. CT and MR image sets normally have different resolutions within a slice and between slices. The pixel distances within a slice are normally less than 1 mm and the distance between slices can vary from 1 mm to 10 mm. To find the best filter bank in the slice direction, the authors use the various filter banks in the slice direction and compare the compression results. The results from the 12 selected MR and CT image sets at various slice thickness show that the Haar transform in the slice direction gives the optimum performance for most image sets, except for a CT image set which has 1 mm slice distance. Compared with 2-D wavelet compression, compression ratios of the 3-D method are about 70% higher for CT and 35% higher for MR image sets at a peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) of 50 dB. In general, the smaller the slice distance, the better the 3-D compression performance

  18. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  19. Cladding creepdown under compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, D.O.

    1977-01-01

    Light-water power reactors use Zircaloy tubing as cladding to contain the UO 2 fuel pellets. In-service operating conditions impose an external hydrostatic force on the cladding, causing it to creep down into eventual contact with the fuel. Knowledge of the rate of such creepdown is of great importance to modelers of fuel element performance. An experimental system was devised for studying creepdown that meets several severe requirements by providing (1) correct stress state, (2) multiple positions for measuring radial displacement of the cladding surface, (3) high-precision data, and (4) an experimental configuration compact enough to fit in-reactor. A microcomputer-controlled, eddy-current monitoring system was developed for this study and has proven highly successful in measuring cladding deformation with time at temperatures of 371 0 C (700 0 F) and higher, and at pressures as high as 21 MPa

  20. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F.; Calle, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and goal of study: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with

  1. Compression measurement in laser driven implosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, D.T.; Cambell, E.M.; Ceglio, N.M.; Lane, S.L.; Larsen, J.T.; Matthews, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the measurement of compression in the context of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Programs' transition from thin-walled exploding pusher targets, to thicker walled targets which are designed to lead the way towards ablative type implosions which will result in higher fuel density and pR at burn time. These experiments promote desirable reactor conditions but pose diagnostic problems because of reduced multi-kilovolt x-ray and reaction product emissions, as well as increasingly more difficult transport problems for these emissions as they pass through the thicker pR pusher conditions. Solutions to these problems, pointing the way toward higher energy twodimensional x-ray images, new reaction product imaging ideas and the use of seed gases for both x-ray spectroscopic and nuclear activation techniques are identified

  2. The impact of chest compression rates on quality of chest compressions : a manikin study

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Richard A.; Soar, Jasmeet; Davies, Robin P.; Akhtar, Naheed; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose\\ud Chest compressions are often performed at a variable rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The effect of compression rate on other chest compression quality variables (compression depth, duty-cycle, leaning, performance decay over time) is unknown. This randomised controlled cross-over manikin study examined the effect of different compression rates on the other chest compression quality variables.\\ud Methods\\ud Twenty healthcare professionals performed two minutes of co...

  3. moduli of toyoura sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Builes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una serie de ensayos triaxiales en arena de Toyoura con distintas densidades secas. Se aplicaron ciclos muy pequeños de carga y descarga para obtener el modulo de Young “estático”. Además, como medidas “dinámicas”, se emplearon dos tipos de técnicas de propagación de ondas; una utilizando elementos Bender, y la otra utilizando actuadores piezoeléctricos para provocar ondas primarias y secundarias. Basados en estas medidas estáticas y dinámicas, se discute: 1 la diferencia entre los tres tipos de medidas dinámicas empleadas, 2 la relación entre los resultados de las medidas estáticas y dinámicas y 3 el efecto del estado de esfuerzos en la anisotropía inducida y la densidad seca del material.

  4. Compression force-depth relationship during out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, A E; Nysaether, J; Kramer-Johansen, J; Steen, P A; Dorph, E

    2007-03-01

    Recent clinical studies reporting the high frequency of inadequate chest compression depth (compression depth in certain patients. Using a specially designed monitor/defibrillator equipped with a sternal pad fitted with an accelerometer and a pressure sensor, compression force and depth was measured during CPR in 91 adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. There was a strong non-linear relationship between the force of compression and depth achieved. Mean applied force for all patients was 30.3+/-8.2 kg and mean absolute compression depth 42+/-8 mm. For 87 of 91 patients 38 mm compression depth was obtained with less than 50 kg. Stiffer chests were compressed more forcefully than softer chests (pcompressed more deeply than stiffer chests (p=0.001). The force needed to reach 38 mm compression depth (F38) and mean compression force were higher for males than for females: 29.8+/-14.5 kg versus 22.5+/-10.2 kg (pcompression depth with age, but a significant 1.5 kg mean decrease in applied force for each 10 years increase in age (pcompressions performed. Average residual force during decompression was 1.7+/-1.0 kg, corresponding to an average residual depth of 3+/-2 mm. In most out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims adequate chest compression depth can be achieved by a force<50 kg, indicating that an average sized and fit rescuer should be able to perform effective CPR in most adult patients.

  5. Relationship between weight of rescuer and quality of chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Daikoku, Rie; Saito, Shin; Saito, Yayoi

    2014-06-24

    According to the guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the rotation time for chest compression should be about 2 min. The quality of chest compressions is related to the physical fitness of the rescuer, but this was not considered when determining rotation time. The present study aimed to clarify associations between body weight and the quality of chest compression and physical fatigue during CPR performed by 18 registered nurses (10 male and 8 female) assigned to light and heavy groups according to the average weight for each sex in Japan. Five-minute chest compressions were then performed on a manikin that was placed on the floor. Measurement parameters were compression depth, heart rate, oxygen uptake, integrated electromyography signals, and rating of perceived exertion. Compression depth was evaluated according to the ratio (%) of adequate compressions (at least 5 cm deep). The ratio of adequate compressions decreased significantly over time in the light group. Values for heart rate, oxygen uptake, muscle activity defined as integrated electromyography signals, and rating of perceived exertion were significantly higher for the light group than for the heavy group. Chest compression caused increased fatigue among the light group, which consequently resulted in a gradual fall in the quality of chest compression. These results suggested that individuals with a lower body weight should rotate at 1-min intervals to maintain high quality CPR and thus improve the survival rates and neurological outcomes of victims of cardiac arrest.

  6. Compressing Data Cube in Parallel OLAP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Dehne

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an efficient algorithm to compress the cubes in the progress of the parallel data cube generation. This low overhead compression mechanism provides block-by-block and record-by-record compression by using tuple difference coding techniques, thereby maximizing the compression ratio and minimizing the decompression penalty at run-time. The experimental results demonstrate that the typical compression ratio is about 30:1 without sacrificing running time. This paper also demonstrates that the compression method is suitable for Hilbert Space Filling Curve, a mechanism widely used in multi-dimensional indexing.

  7. CEPRAM: Compression for Endurance in PCM RAM

    OpenAIRE

    González Alberquilla, Rodrigo; Castro Rodríguez, Fernando; Piñuel Moreno, Luis; Tirado Fernández, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    We deal with the endurance problem of Phase Change Memories (PCM) by proposing Compression for Endurance in PCM RAM (CEPRAM), a technique to elongate the lifespan of PCM-based main memory through compression. We introduce a total of three compression schemes based on already existent schemes, but targeting compression for PCM-based systems. We do a two-level evaluation. First, we quantify the performance of the compression, in terms of compressed size, bit-flips and how they are affected by e...

  8. Entropy, Coding and Data Compression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 9. Entropy, Coding and Data Compression. S Natarajan. General Article Volume 6 Issue 9 September 2001 pp 35-45. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/09/0035-0045 ...

  9. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H; Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E; Katayama, S; Koyano, M

    2010-01-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO 4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO 2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  10. Range Compressed Holographic Aperture Ladar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    entropy saturation behavior of the estimator is analytically described. Simultaneous range-compression and aperture synthesis is experimentally...4 2.1 Circular and Inverse -Circular HAL...2.3 Single Aperture, Multi-λ Imaging ...................................................................................... 14 2.4 Simultaneous Range

  11. Compression of Probabilistic XML documents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, Irma

    2009-01-01

    Probabilistic XML (PXML) files resulting from data integration can become extremely large, which is undesired. For XML there are several techniques available to compress the document and since probabilistic XML is in fact (a special form of) XML, it might benefit from these methods even more. In

  12. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, A.; Okuno, M.; Okudera, H.; Mashimo, T.; Omurzak, E.; Katayama, S.; Koyano, M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  13. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H [Department of Earth Sciences, Kanazawa University Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Katayama, S; Koyano, M, E-mail: okuno@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.j [JAIST, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1297 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO{sub 4} tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO{sub 2} glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  14. Image Quality Assessment for Different Wavelet Compression Techniques in a Visual Communication Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha A. S. Alwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Images with subband coding and threshold wavelet compression are transmitted over a Rayleigh communication channel with additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN, after quantization and 16-QAM modulation. A comparison is made between these two types of compression using both mean square error (MSE and structural similarity (SSIM image quality assessment (IQA criteria applied to the reconstructed image at the receiver. The two methods yielded comparable SSIM but different MSE measures. In this work, we justify our results which support previous findings in the literature that the MSE between two images is not indicative of structural similarity or the visibility of errors. It is found that it is difficult to reduce the pointwise errors in subband-compressed images (higher MSE. However, the compressed images provide comparable SSIM or perceived quality for both types of compression provided that the retained energy after compression is the same.

  15. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branderhorst, W.; Groot, J. E. de; Lier, M. G. J. T. B. van; Grimbergen, C. A.; Neeter, L. M. F. H.; Heeten, G. J. den; Neeleman, C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body during compression. This leads to unnecessary stretching of the skin and other tissues around the breast, which can make the imaging procedure more painful for the patient. The goal of this study was to implement a method to measure and minimize the force imbalance, and to assess its feasibility as an objective and reproducible method of setting the image receptor height. Methods: A trial was conducted consisting of 13 craniocaudal mammographic compressions on a silicone breast phantom, each with the image receptor positioned at a different height. The image receptor height was varied over a range of 12 cm. In each compression, the force exerted by the compression paddle was increased up to 140 N in steps of 10 N. In addition to the paddle force, the authors measured the force exerted by the image receptor and the reaction force exerted on the patient body by the ground. The trial was repeated 8 times, with the phantom remounted at a slightly different orientation and position between the trials. Results: For a given paddle force, the obtained results showed that there is always exactly one image receptor height that leads to a balance of the forces on the breast. For the breast phantom, deviating from this specific height increased the force imbalance by 9.4 ± 1.9 N/cm (6.7%) for 140 N paddle force, and by 7.1 ± 1.6 N/cm (17.8%) for 40 N paddle force. The results also show that in situations where the force exerted by the image receptor is not measured, the craniocaudal force imbalance can still be determined by positioning the patient on a weighing scale and observing the changes in displayed weight during the procedure. Conclusions: In mammographic breast

  16. Adiabatic compression of ion rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrabee, D.A.; Lovelace, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been made of the compression of collisionless ion rings in an increasing external magnetic field, B/sub e/ = zB/sub e/(t), by numerically implementing a previously developed kinetic theory of ring compression. The theory is general in that there is no limitation on the ring geometry or the compression ratio, lambdaequivalentB/sub e/ (final)/B/sub e/ (initial)> or =1. However, the motion of a single particle in an equilibrium is assumed to be completely characterized by its energy H and canonical angular momentum P/sub theta/ with the absence of a third constant of the motion. The present computational work assumes that plasma currents are negligible, as is appropriate for a low-temperature collisional plasma. For a variety of initial ring geometries and initial distribution functions (having a single value of P/sub theta/), it is found that the parameters for ''fat'', small aspect ratio rings follow general scaling laws over a large range of compression ratios, 1 3 : The ring radius varies as lambda/sup -1/2/; the average single particle energy as lambda/sup 0.72/; the root mean square energy spread as lambda/sup 1.1/; and the total current as lambda/sup 0.79/. The field reversal parameter is found to saturate at values typically between 2 and 3. For large compression ratios the current density is found to ''hollow out''. This hollowing tends to improve the interchange stability of an embedded low β plasma. The implications of these scaling laws for fusion reactor systems are discussed

  17. A review of lossless audio compression standards and algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muin, Fathiah Abdul; Gunawan, Teddy Surya; Kartiwi, Mira; Elsheikh, Elsheikh M. A.

    2017-09-01

    Over the years, lossless audio compression has gained popularity as researchers and businesses has become more aware of the need for better quality and higher storage demand. This paper will analyse various lossless audio coding algorithm and standards that are used and available in the market focusing on Linear Predictive Coding (LPC) specifically due to its popularity and robustness in audio compression, nevertheless other prediction methods are compared to verify this. Advanced representation of LPC such as LSP decomposition techniques are also discussed within this paper.

  18. SCALCE: boosting sequence compression algorithms using locally consistent encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hach, Faraz; Numanagic, Ibrahim; Alkan, Can; Sahinalp, S Cenk

    2012-12-01

    The high throughput sequencing (HTS) platforms generate unprecedented amounts of data that introduce challenges for the computational infrastructure. Data management, storage and analysis have become major logistical obstacles for those adopting the new platforms. The requirement for large investment for this purpose almost signalled the end of the Sequence Read Archive hosted at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), which holds most of the sequence data generated world wide. Currently, most HTS data are compressed through general purpose algorithms such as gzip. These algorithms are not designed for compressing data generated by the HTS platforms; for example, they do not take advantage of the specific nature of genomic sequence data, that is, limited alphabet size and high similarity among reads. Fast and efficient compression algorithms designed specifically for HTS data should be able to address some of the issues in data management, storage and communication. Such algorithms would also help with analysis provided they offer additional capabilities such as random access to any read and indexing for efficient sequence similarity search. Here we present SCALCE, a 'boosting' scheme based on Locally Consistent Parsing technique, which reorganizes the reads in a way that results in a higher compression speed and compression rate, independent of the compression algorithm in use and without using a reference genome. Our tests indicate that SCALCE can improve the compression rate achieved through gzip by a factor of 4.19-when the goal is to compress the reads alone. In fact, on SCALCE reordered reads, gzip running time can improve by a factor of 15.06 on a standard PC with a single core and 6 GB memory. Interestingly even the running time of SCALCE + gzip improves that of gzip alone by a factor of 2.09. When compared with the recently published BEETL, which aims to sort the (inverted) reads in lexicographic order for improving bzip2, SCALCE + gzip

  19. Mammographic compression – A need for mechanical standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branderhorst, Woutjan, E-mail: w.branderhorst@amc.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA Amsterdam (Netherlands); Groot, Jerry E. de, E-mail: jerry.degroot@sigmascreening.com [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Highnam, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.highnam@volparasolutions.com [Volpara Solutions Limited, P.O. Box 24404, Manners St Central, Wellington 6142 (New Zealand); Chan, Ariane, E-mail: ariane.chan@volparasolutions.com [Volpara Solutions Limited, P.O. Box 24404, Manners St Central, Wellington 6142 (New Zealand); Böhm-Vélez, Marcela, E-mail: marcelabvelez@gmail.com [Weinstein Imaging Associates, 5850 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (United States); Broeders, Mireille J.M., E-mail: mireille.broeders@radboudumc.nl [Radboud University Medical Center, Department for Health Evidence, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); LRCB Dutch Reference Center for Screening, P.O. Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Heeten, Gerard J. den, E-mail: g.denheeten@lrcb.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); LRCB Dutch Reference Center for Screening, P.O. Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Grimbergen, Cornelis A., E-mail: c.a.grimbergen@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •We studied mechanical breast compression practice in two different clinical sites. •We visualized the distributions of not only the applied force but also the pressure. •The applied pressure was highly variable, both within and between the data sets. •The average applied pressure and the variation were higher for smaller breasts. •A proposal for improved individualization, by standardizing pressure, is discussed. -- Abstract: Background: A lack of consistent guidelines regarding mammographic compression has led to wide variation in its technical execution. Breast compression is accomplished by means of a compression paddle, resulting in a certain contact area between the paddle and the breast. This procedure is associated with varying levels of discomfort or pain. On current mammography systems, the only mechanical parameter available in estimating the degree of compression is the physical entity of force (daN). Recently, researchers have suggested that pressure (kPa), resulting from a specific force divided by contact area on a breast, might be a more appropriate parameter for standardization. Software has now become available which enables device-independent cross-comparisons of key mammographic metrics, such as applied compression pressure (force divided by contact area), breast density and radiation dose, between patient populations. Purpose: To compare the current compression practice in mammography between different imaging sites in the Netherlands and the United States from a mechanical point of view, and to investigate whether the compression protocols in these countries can be improved by standardization of pressure (kPa) as an objective mechanical parameter. Materials and methods: We retrospectively studied the available parameters of a set of 37,518 mammographic compressions (9188 women) from the Dutch national breast cancer screening programme (NL data set) and of another set of 7171 compressions (1851 women) from a breast imaging

  20. Full-frame compression of discrete wavelet and cosine transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Li, Huai; Krasner, Brian; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1995-04-01

    At the foreground of computerized radiology and the filmless hospital are the possibilities for easy image retrieval, efficient storage, and rapid image communication. This paper represents the authors' continuous efforts in compression research on full-frame discrete wavelet (FFDWT) and full-frame discrete cosine transforms (FFDCT) for medical image compression. Prior to the coding, it is important to evaluate the global entropy in the decomposed space. It is because of the minimum entropy, that a maximum compression efficiency can be achieved. In this study, each image was split into the top three most significant bit (MSB) and the remaining remapped least significant bit (RLSB) images. The 3MSB image was compressed by an error-free contour coding and received an average of 0.1 bit/pixel. The RLSB image was either transformed to a multi-channel wavelet or the cosine transform domain for entropy evaluation. Ten x-ray chest radiographs and ten mammograms were randomly selected from our clinical database and were used for the study. Our results indicated that the coding scheme in the FFDCT domain performed better than in FFDWT domain for high-resolution digital chest radiographs and mammograms. From this study, we found that decomposition efficiency in the DCT domain for relatively smooth images is higher than that in the DWT. However, both schemes worked just as well for low resolution digital images. We also found that the image characteristics of the `Lena' image commonly used in the compression literature are very different from those of radiological images. The compression outcome of the radiological images can not be extrapolated from the compression result based on the `Lena.'

  1. Degree of Left Renal Vein Compression Predicts Nutcracker Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. Hangge

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutcracker syndrome (NS refers to symptomatic compression of the left renal vein (LRV between the abdominal aorta and superior mesenteric artery with potential symptoms including hematuria, proteinuria, left flank pain, and renal venous hypertension. No consensus diagnostic criteria exist to guide endovascular treatment. We aimed to evaluate the specificity of LRV compression to NS symptoms through a retrospective study including 33 NS and 103 control patients. The size of the patent lumen at point of compression and normal portions of the LRV were measured for all patients. Multiple logistic regression analyses (MLR assessing impact of compression, body mass index (BMI, age, and gender on the likelihood of each symptom with NS were obtained. NS patients presented most commonly with abdominal pain (72.7%, followed by hematuria (57.6%, proteinuria (39.4%, and left flank pain (30.3%. These symptoms were more commonly seen than in the control group at 10.6, 11.7, 6.8, and 1.9%, respectively. The degree of LRV compression for NS was 74.5% and 25.2% for controls (p < 0.0001. Higher compression led to more hematuria (p < 0.0013, abdominal pain (p < 0.006, and more proteinuria (p < 0.002. Furthermore, the average BMI of NS patients was 21.4 and 27.2 for controls (p < 0.001 and a low BMI led to more abdominal pain (p < 0.005. These results demonstrate a strong correlation between the degree of LRV compression on imaging in diagnosing NS.

  2. Flux compression generators as plasma compression power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Freeman, B.L.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    A survey is made of applications where explosive-driven magnetic flux compression generators have been or can be used to directly power devices that produce dense plasmas. Representative examples are discussed that are specific to the theta pinch, the plasma gun, the dense plasma focus and the Z pinch. These examples are used to illustrate the high energy and power capabilities of explosive generators. An application employing a rocket-borne, generator-powered plasma gun emphasizes the size and weight potential of flux compression power supplies. Recent results from a local effort to drive a dense plasma focus are provided. Imploding liners ae discussed in the context of both the theta and Z pinches

  3. The influence of channel anion identity on the high-pressure crystal structure, compressibility, and stability of apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Richard; Walker, Andrew M.

    2018-03-01

    The material properties of the common phosphate mineral apatite are influenced by the identity of the channel anion, which is usually F-, Cl-, or (OH)-. Density functional theory calculations have been used to determine the effect of channel anion identity on the compressibility and structure of apatite. Hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are found to have similar zero pressure bulk moduli, of 79.2 and 82.1 GPa, respectively, while chlorapatite is considerably more compressible, with K 0 = 55.0 GPa. While the space groups of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite do not change between 0 and 25 GPa, symmetrization of the Cl- site in chlorapatite at 7.5 GPa causes the space group to change from P2 1 /b to P6 3 /m. Examination of the valence electron density distribution in chlorapatite reveals that this symmetry change is associated with a change in the coordination of the Cl- anion from threefold to sixfold coordinated by Ca. We also calculate the pressure at which apatite decomposes to form tuite, a calcium orthophosphate mineral, and find that the transition pressure is sensitive to the identity of the channel anion, being lowest for fluorapatite (13.8 GPa) and highest for chlorapatite (26.9 GPa). Calculations are also performed within the DFT-D2 framework to investigate the influence of dispersion forces on the compressibility of apatite minerals.

  4. A Study on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Gasoline Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Makoto; Morikawa, Koji; Itoh, Jin; Saishu, Youhei

    A new engine concept consisting of HCCI combustion for low and midrange loads and spark ignition combustion for high loads was introduced. The timing of the intake valve closing was adjusted to alter the negative valve overlap and effective compression ratio to provide suitable HCCI conditions. The effect of mixture formation on auto-ignition was also investigated using a direct injection engine. As a result, HCCI combustion was achieved with a relatively low compression ratio when the intake air was heated by internal EGR. The resulting combustion was at a high thermal efficiency, comparable to that of modern diesel engines, and produced almost no NOx emissions or smoke. The mixture stratification increased the local A/F concentration, resulting in higher reactivity. A wide range of combustible A/F ratios was used to control the compression ignition timing. Photographs showed that the flame filled the entire chamber during combustion, reducing both emissions and fuel consumption.

  5. The task of control digital image compression

    OpenAIRE

    TASHMANOV E.B.; МАМАTOV М.S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider the relationship of control tasks and image compression losses. The main idea of this approach is to allocate structural lines simplified image and further compress the selected data

  6. Discrete Wigner Function Reconstruction and Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jia-Ning; Fang, Lei; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2011-01-01

    A new reconstruction method for Wigner function is reported for quantum tomography based on compressed sensing. By analogy with computed tomography, Wigner functions for some quantum states can be reconstructed with less measurements utilizing this compressed sensing based method.

  7. Compressibility Analysis of the Tongue During Speech

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Unay, Devrim

    2001-01-01

    .... In this paper, 3D compression and expansion analysis of the tongue will be presented. Patterns of expansion and compression have been compared for different syllables and various repetitions of each syllable...

  8. Compressed normalized block difference for object tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yun; Zhang, Dengzhuo; Cai, Donglan; Zhou, Hao; Lan, Ge

    2018-04-01

    Feature extraction is very important for robust and real-time tracking. Compressive sensing provided a technical support for real-time feature extraction. However, all existing compressive tracking were based on compressed Haar-like feature, and how to compress many more excellent high-dimensional features is worth researching. In this paper, a novel compressed normalized block difference feature (CNBD) was proposed. For resisting noise effectively in a highdimensional normalized pixel difference feature (NPD), a normalized block difference feature extends two pixels in the original formula of NPD to two blocks. A CNBD feature can be obtained by compressing a normalized block difference feature based on compressive sensing theory, with the sparse random Gaussian matrix as the measurement matrix. The comparative experiments of 7 trackers on 20 challenging sequences showed that the tracker based on CNBD feature can perform better than other trackers, especially than FCT tracker based on compressed Haar-like feature, in terms of AUC, SR and Precision.

  9. Compact toroid formation, compression, and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degnan, J.H.; Bell, D.E.; Baca, G.P.; Dearborn, M.E.; Douglas, M.R.; Englert, S.E.; Englert, T.J.; Holmes, J.H.; Hussey, T.W.; Kiuttu, G.F.; Lehr, F.M.; Marklin, G.J.; Mullins, B.W.; Peterkin, R.E.; Price, D.W.; Roderick, N.F.; Ruden, E.L.; Turchi, P.J.; Coffey, S.K.; Seiler, S.W.; Bird, G.

    1992-01-01

    Research on the formation, compression, and acceleration of milligram Compact Toroids (CTs) will be discussed. This includes experiments with 2-stage coaxial gun discharges and calculations including 2D- MHD. The CTs are formed by 110 μf, 70 KV, 2 MA, 3 μs rise time discharges into 2 mg gas puffs in a 90 cm inner diameter, 7.6 cm gap coaxial gun with approximately 0.15 Tesla of radial-axial initial magnetic field. Reconnection at the neck of the toroidal magnetized plasma bubble extracted from the first stage gun forms the CT. Trapping, relaxation to a minimum energy Taylor state is observed with magnetic probe arrays. Low energy (few hundred KJ, 2 MA) acceleration in straight coaxial geometry, and high energy acceleration using a conical compression stage are discussed. The Phillips Laboratory 1,300 μf, 120 KV, 9.4 MJ SHIVA STAR capacitor bank is used for the acceleration discharge. The charging and triggering of the 36-module bank has been modified to permit use of any multiple of three modules. Highlights of fast photography, current, voltage, magnetic probe array, optical spectroscopy, interferometry, VUV, and higher energy radiation data and 2D-MHD calculations will be presented. Considerably more detail is presented in companion papers

  10. Schwarz-based algorithms for compressible flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidriri, M.D. [ICASE, Hampton, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    To compute steady compressible flows one often uses an implicit discretization approach which leads to a large sparse linear system that must be solved at each time step. In the derivation of this system one often uses a defect-correction procedure, in which the left-hand side of the system is discretized with a lower order approximation than that used for the right-hand side. This is due to storage considerations and computational complexity, and also to the fact that the resulting lower order matrix is better conditioned than the higher order matrix. The resulting schemes are only moderately implicit. In the case of structured, body-fitted grids, the linear system can easily be solved using approximate factorization (AF), which is among the most widely used methods for such grids. However, for unstructured grids, such techniques are no longer valid, and the system is solved using direct or iterative techniques. Because of the prohibitive computational costs and large memory requirements for the solution of compressible flows, iterative methods are preferred. In these defect-correction methods, which are implemented in most CFD computer codes, the mismatch in the right and left hand side operators, together with explicit treatment of the boundary conditions, lead to a severely limited CFL number, which results in a slow convergence to steady state aerodynamic solutions. Many authors have tried to replace explicit boundary conditions with implicit ones. Although they clearly demonstrate that high CFL numbers are possible, the reduction in CPU time is not clear cut.

  11. Coding Strategies and Implementations of Compressive Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han

    This dissertation studies the coding strategies of computational imaging to overcome the limitation of conventional sensing techniques. The information capacity of conventional sensing is limited by the physical properties of optics, such as aperture size, detector pixels, quantum efficiency, and sampling rate. These parameters determine the spatial, depth, spectral, temporal, and polarization sensitivity of each imager. To increase sensitivity in any dimension can significantly compromise the others. This research implements various coding strategies subject to optical multidimensional imaging and acoustic sensing in order to extend their sensing abilities. The proposed coding strategies combine hardware modification and signal processing to exploiting bandwidth and sensitivity from conventional sensors. We discuss the hardware architecture, compression strategies, sensing process modeling, and reconstruction algorithm of each sensing system. Optical multidimensional imaging measures three or more dimensional information of the optical signal. Traditional multidimensional imagers acquire extra dimensional information at the cost of degrading temporal or spatial resolution. Compressive multidimensional imaging multiplexes the transverse spatial, spectral, temporal, and polarization information on a two-dimensional (2D) detector. The corresponding spectral, temporal and polarization coding strategies adapt optics, electronic devices, and designed modulation techniques for multiplex measurement. This computational imaging technique provides multispectral, temporal super-resolution, and polarization imaging abilities with minimal loss in spatial resolution and noise level while maintaining or gaining higher temporal resolution. The experimental results prove that the appropriate coding strategies may improve hundreds times more sensing capacity. Human auditory system has the astonishing ability in localizing, tracking, and filtering the selected sound sources or

  12. Elastic behavior of MFI-type zeolites: 3 – Compressibility of silicalite and mutinaite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quartieri, Simona; Arletti, Rossella; Vezzalini, Giovanna; Di Renzo, Francesco; Dmitriev, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study – performed using silicone oil as “non-penetrating” pressure transmitting medium – of the elastic behavior of three zeolites with MFI-type framework: the natural zeolite mutinaite and two silicalites (labeled A and B) synthesized under different conditions. While in mutinaite no symmetry change is observed as a function of pressure, a phase transition from monoclinic (P2 1 /n) to orthorhombic (Pnma) symmetry occurs at about 1.0 GPa in the silicalite samples. This phase transition is irreversible upon decompression. The second order bulk moduli of silicalite A and silicalite B, calculated after the fulfillment of the phase transition, are: K 0 =18.2(2) and K 0 =14.3 (2) GPa, respectively. These values makes silicalite the most compressible zeolite among those up to now studied in silicone oil. The structural deformations induced by HP in silicalite A were investigated by means of complete Rietveld structural refinements, before and after the phase transition, at P amb and 0.9 GPa, respectively. The elastic behaviors of the three MFI-type zeolites here investigated were compared with those of Na-ZSM-5 and H-ZSM-5, studied in similar experimental conditions: the two silicalites – which are the phases with the highest Si/Al ratios and hence the lowest extraframework contents – show the highest compressibility. On the contrary, the most rigid material is mutinaite, which has a very complex extraframework composition characterized by a high number of cations and water molecules. - Graphical abstract: High-pressure behavior of silicalite compressed in silicone oil: projection of the structure along the [0 1 0] direction at Pamb(a), 0.9 GPa (b). (c) Comparison of the unit-cell volume variations as a function of pressure for mutinaite, H-ZSM5, Na-ZSM5, silicalite A, and silicalite B compressed in silicone oil. Highlights: ► X-ray powder diffraction study of silicalite and mutinaite

  13. Elastic behavior of MFI-type zeolites: 3 - Compressibility of silicalite and mutinaite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quartieri, Simona, E-mail: squartieri@unime.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Messina, Viale Ferdinando Stagno d' Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina S. Agata (Italy); Arletti, Rossella [Dipartimento di Scienze Mineralogiche e Petrologiche, Via Valperga Caluso 35, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vezzalini, Giovanna [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via S. Eufemia 19, 41100 Modena (Italy); Di Renzo, Francesco [Institut Charles Gerhardt de Montpellier, UMR 5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, 8 rue Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier (France); Dmitriev, Vladimir [Swiss-Norwegian Beam Line at ESRF, BP220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2012-07-15

    We report the results of an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study - performed using silicone oil as 'non-penetrating' pressure transmitting medium - of the elastic behavior of three zeolites with MFI-type framework: the natural zeolite mutinaite and two silicalites (labeled A and B) synthesized under different conditions. While in mutinaite no symmetry change is observed as a function of pressure, a phase transition from monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) to orthorhombic (Pnma) symmetry occurs at about 1.0 GPa in the silicalite samples. This phase transition is irreversible upon decompression. The second order bulk moduli of silicalite A and silicalite B, calculated after the fulfillment of the phase transition, are: K{sub 0}=18.2(2) and K{sub 0}=14.3 (2) GPa, respectively. These values makes silicalite the most compressible zeolite among those up to now studied in silicone oil. The structural deformations induced by HP in silicalite A were investigated by means of complete Rietveld structural refinements, before and after the phase transition, at P{sub amb} and 0.9 GPa, respectively. The elastic behaviors of the three MFI-type zeolites here investigated were compared with those of Na-ZSM-5 and H-ZSM-5, studied in similar experimental conditions: the two silicalites - which are the phases with the highest Si/Al ratios and hence the lowest extraframework contents - show the highest compressibility. On the contrary, the most rigid material is mutinaite, which has a very complex extraframework composition characterized by a high number of cations and water molecules. - Graphical abstract: High-pressure behavior of silicalite compressed in silicone oil: projection of the structure along the [0 1 0] direction at Pamb(a), 0.9 GPa (b). (c) Comparison of the unit-cell volume variations as a function of pressure for mutinaite, H-ZSM5, Na-ZSM5, silicalite A, and silicalite B compressed in silicone oil. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray powder

  14. Measurement of the through thickness compression of a battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shutian; Huang, Xiaosong; Xiao, Xinran

    2018-04-01

    The mechanical integrity of the separator is critical to the reliable operation of a battery. Due to its minimal thickness, compression experiments with a single/a few layers of separator are difficult to perform. In this work, a capacitance based displacement set-up has been developed for the measurement of the through thickness direction (TTD) compression stress-strain behavior of the separator and the investigation of its interaction with the electrode. The experiments were performed for a stack of two layers of Celgard 2400 separator, NMC cathode, and separator/NMC cathode/separator stack in both dry and wet (i.e. submersed in dimethyl carbonate DMC) conditions. The experimental results reveal that the separator compression modulus can be significantly affected by the presence of DMC. The iso-stress based rule of mixtures was used to compute the compressive stress-strain curve for the stack from that of the separator and NMC layer. The computed curve agreed with the experimental curve reasonably well up to about 0.16 strain but deviated significantly to a softer response at higher strains. The results suggest that, in the stack, the TTD compressive deformation of the separator is influenced by the NMC cathode.

  15. Free-beam soliton self-compression in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. A.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Pugžlys, A.; Panchenko, V. Ya; Shumakova, V.; Ališauskas, S.; Baltuška, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2018-02-01

    We identify a physical scenario whereby soliton transients generated in freely propagating laser beams within the regions of anomalous dispersion in air can be compressed as a part of their free-beam spatiotemporal evolution to yield few-cycle mid- and long-wavelength-infrared field waveforms, whose peak power is substantially higher than the peak power of the input pulses. We show that this free-beam soliton self-compression scenario does not require ionization or laser-induced filamentation, enabling high-throughput self-compression of mid- and long-wavelength-infrared laser pulses within a broad range of peak powers from tens of gigawatts up to the terawatt level. We also demonstrate that this method of pulse compression can be extended to long-range propagation, providing self-compression of high-peak-power laser pulses in atmospheric air within propagation ranges as long as hundreds of meters, suggesting new ways towards longer-range standoff detection and remote sensing.

  16. On Normalized Compression Distance and Large Malware

    OpenAIRE

    Borbely, Rebecca Schuller

    2015-01-01

    Normalized Compression Distance (NCD) is a popular tool that uses compression algorithms to cluster and classify data in a wide range of applications. Existing discussions of NCD's theoretical merit rely on certain theoretical properties of compression algorithms. However, we demonstrate that many popular compression algorithms don't seem to satisfy these theoretical properties. We explore the relationship between some of these properties and file size, demonstrating that this theoretical pro...

  17. Image quality (IQ) guided multispectral image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Chen, Genshe; Wang, Zhonghai; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Image compression is necessary for data transportation, which saves both transferring time and storage space. In this paper, we focus on our discussion on lossy compression. There are many standard image formats and corresponding compression algorithms, for examples, JPEG (DCT -- discrete cosine transform), JPEG 2000 (DWT -- discrete wavelet transform), BPG (better portable graphics) and TIFF (LZW -- Lempel-Ziv-Welch). The image quality (IQ) of decompressed image will be measured by numerical metrics such as root mean square error (RMSE), peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and structural Similarity (SSIM) Index. Given an image and a specified IQ, we will investigate how to select a compression method and its parameters to achieve an expected compression. Our scenario consists of 3 steps. The first step is to compress a set of interested images by varying parameters and compute their IQs for each compression method. The second step is to create several regression models per compression method after analyzing the IQ-measurement versus compression-parameter from a number of compressed images. The third step is to compress the given image with the specified IQ using the selected compression method (JPEG, JPEG2000, BPG, or TIFF) according to the regressed models. The IQ may be specified by a compression ratio (e.g., 100), then we will select the compression method of the highest IQ (SSIM, or PSNR). Or the IQ may be specified by a IQ metric (e.g., SSIM = 0.8, or PSNR = 50), then we will select the compression method of the highest compression ratio. Our experiments tested on thermal (long-wave infrared) images (in gray scales) showed very promising results.

  18. Speech Data Compression using Vector Quantization

    OpenAIRE

    H. B. Kekre; Tanuja K. Sarode

    2008-01-01

    Mostly transforms are used for speech data compressions which are lossy algorithms. Such algorithms are tolerable for speech data compression since the loss in quality is not perceived by the human ear. However the vector quantization (VQ) has a potential to give more data compression maintaining the same quality. In this paper we propose speech data compression algorithm using vector quantization technique. We have used VQ algorithms LBG, KPE and FCG. The results table s...

  19. Considerations and Algorithms for Compression of Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Jesper

    We consider compression of unordered sets of distinct elements. After a discus- sion of the general problem, we focus on compressing sets of fixed-length bitstrings in the presence of statistical information. We survey techniques from previous work, suggesting some adjustments, and propose a novel...... compression algorithm that allows transparent incorporation of various estimates for probability distribution. Our experimental results allow the conclusion that set compression can benefit from incorporat- ing statistics, using our method or variants of previously known techniques....

  20. A biological compression model and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Minh Duc; Dix, Trevor I; Allison, Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    A biological compression model, expert model, is presented which is superior to existing compression algorithms in both compression performance and speed. The model is able to compress whole eukaryotic genomes. Most importantly, the model provides a framework for knowledge discovery from biological data. It can be used for repeat element discovery, sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis. We demonstrate that the model can handle statistically biased sequences and distantly related sequences where conventional knowledge discovery tools often fail.