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Sample records for higher catalase activity

  1. Characterization of Catalase from Psychrotolerant Psychrobacter piscatorii T-3 Exhibiting High Catalase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kimoto, Hideyuki; Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Matsuyma, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2012-01-01

    A psychrotolerant bacterium, strain T-3 (identified as Psychrobacter piscatorii), that exhibited an extraordinarily high catalase activity was isolated from the drain pool of a plant that uses H2O2 as a bleaching agent. Its cell extract exhibited a catalase activity (19,700 U·mg protein−1) that was higher than that of Micrococcus luteus used for industrial catalase production. Catalase was approximately 10% of the total proteins in the cell extract of the strain. The catalase (PktA) was purif...

  2. Characterization of Catalase from Psychrotolerant Psychrobacter piscatorii T-3 Exhibiting High Catalase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Hideyuki; Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Matsuyma, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2012-01-01

    A psychrotolerant bacterium, strain T-3 (identified as Psychrobacter piscatorii), that exhibited an extraordinarily high catalase activity was isolated from the drain pool of a plant that uses H2O2 as a bleaching agent. Its cell extract exhibited a catalase activity (19,700 U·mg protein−1) that was higher than that of Micrococcus luteus used for industrial catalase production. Catalase was approximately 10% of the total proteins in the cell extract of the strain. The catalase (PktA) was purified homogeneously by only two purification steps, anion exchange and hydrophobic chromatographies. The purified catalase exhibited higher catalytic efficiency and higher sensitivity of activity at high temperatures than M. luteus catalase. The deduced amino acid sequence showed the highest homology with catalase of Psycrobacter cryohalolentis, a psychrotolelant bacterium obtained from Siberian permafrost. These findings suggest that the characteristics of the PktA molecule reflected the taxonomic relationship of the isolate as well as the environmental conditions (low temperatures and high concentrations of H2O2) under which the bacterium survives. Strain T-3 efficiently produces a catalase (PktA) at a higher rate than Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans, which produces a very strong activity of catalase (EktA) at a moderate rate, in order to adapt to high concentration of H2O2. PMID:22408420

  3. catalase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof.Dr. Saleh

    2012-05-17

    May 17, 2012 ... For the establishment of the enzyme, the rate of catalase activity was linearly increased with increase of the ... toxic by itself, but in a Fenton-type reaction that can ... used to decompose the hydrogen peroxide before the.

  4. Growth-dependent catalase localization in Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T reflected by catalase activity of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Yoshiko; Takebe, Fumihiko; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Hara, Isao; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A psychrotolerant and H2O2-resistant bacterium, Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2(T), exhibits extraordinary H2O2 resistance and produces catalase not only intracellularly but also extracellularly. The intracellular and extracellular catalases exhibited the same enzymatic characteristics, that is, they exhibited the temperature-dependent activity characteristic of a cold-adapted enzyme, their heat stabilities were similar to those of mesophilic enzymes and very high catalytic intensity. In addition, catalase gene analysis indicated that the bacterium possessed the sole clade 1 catalase gene corresponding to intracellular catalase. Hence, intracellular catalase is secreted into the extracellular space. In addition to intracellular and extracellular catalases, the inner circumference of the cells showed the localization of catalase in the mid-stationary growth phase, which was observed by immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody against the intracellular catalase of the strain. The cells demonstrated higher catalase activity in the mid-stationary growth phase than in the exponential growth phase. The catalase localized in the inner circumference can be dissociated by treatment with Tween 60. Thus, the localized catalase is not tightly bound to the inner circumference of the cells and may play a role in the oxidative defense of the cells under low metabolic state.

  5. Growth-Dependent Catalase Localization in Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T Reflected by Catalase Activity of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Yoshiko; Takebe, Fumihiko; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Hara, Isao; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A psychrotolerant and H2O2-resistant bacterium, Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T, exhibits extraordinary H2O2 resistance and produces catalase not only intracellularly but also extracellularly. The intracellular and extracellular catalases exhibited the same enzymatic characteristics, that is, they exhibited the temperature-dependent activity characteristic of a cold-adapted enzyme, their heat stabilities were similar to those of mesophilic enzymes and very high catalytic intensity. In addition, catalase gene analysis indicated that the bacterium possessed the sole clade 1 catalase gene corresponding to intracellular catalase. Hence, intracellular catalase is secreted into the extracellular space. In addition to intracellular and extracellular catalases, the inner circumference of the cells showed the localization of catalase in the mid-stationary growth phase, which was observed by immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody against the intracellular catalase of the strain. The cells demonstrated higher catalase activity in the mid-stationary growth phase than in the exponential growth phase. The catalase localized in the inner circumference can be dissociated by treatment with Tween 60. Thus, the localized catalase is not tightly bound to the inner circumference of the cells and may play a role in the oxidative defense of the cells under low metabolic state. PMID:24204687

  6. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-15

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H2O2 treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H2O2 resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H2O2, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H2O2 stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Promote Autophagy-Dependent Cell Death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Juul, Trine Maxel; Auzina, Aija

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify...... an Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxyurea-resistant autophagy mutant, atg2, which also shows reduced sensitivity to cell death triggered by the bacterial effector avrRpm1. To test if catalase deficiency likewise affected both hydroxyurea and avrRpm1 sensitivity, we selected mutants with extremely low catalase...... activities and showed that they carried mutations in a gene that we named NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 (NCA1). nca1 mutants showed severely reduced activities of all three catalase isoforms in Arabidopsis, and loss of NCA1 function led to strong suppression of RPM1-triggered cell death. Basal and starvation...

  8. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H_2O_2) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H_2O_2 treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H_2O_2 resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H_2O_2, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H_2O_2 stress. - Highlights: • The dr1998 mutant strain lost 90% of its total catalase activity. • Increased ROS levels and decreased H_2O_2 resistance were observed in dr1998 mutants. • Lack of drA0146 did not affect any oxidative stress-related phenotypes. • The purified DRA0146 did not show catalase activity.

  9. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sun-Wook [Research Division for Biotechnology, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong [Research Division for Biotechnology, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Heon-Man [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sangyong, E-mail: saylim@kaeri.re.kr [Research Division for Biotechnology, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress. - Highlights: • The dr1998 mutant strain lost 90% of its total catalase activity. • Increased ROS levels and decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resistance were observed in dr1998 mutants. • Lack of drA0146 did not affect any oxidative stress-related phenotypes. • The purified DRA0146 did not show catalase activity.

  10. Growth of catalase A and catalase T deficient mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ethanol and oleic acid : Growth profiles and catalase activities in relation to microbody proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Rytka, Joanna; Kunau, Wolf H.; Veenhuis, Marten

    The parental strain (A+T+) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mutants, deficient in catalase T (A+T-), catalase A (A-T+) or both catalases (A-T-), grew on ethanol and oleic acid with comparable doubling times. Specific activities of catalase were low in glucose- and ethanol-grown cells. In the two

  11. Growth of catalase A and catalase T deficient mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ethanol and oleic acid: Growth profiles and catalase activities in relation to microbody proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Rytka, Joanna; Kunau, Wolf H.; Veenhuis, Marten

    1990-01-01

    The parental strain (A+T+) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mutants, deficient in catalase T (A+T-), catalase A (A-T+) or both catalases (A-T-), grew on ethanol and oleic acid with comparable doubling times. Specific activities of catalase were low in glucose- and ethanol-grown cells. In the two oleic acid-grown A+-strains (A+T+ and A+T-) high catalase activities were found; catalase activity invariably remained low in the A-T+ strain and was never detected in the A-T- strain. The levels of β-...

  12. Blood superoxiddismutase and catalase: enzymes activity under oxidative stress conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Каріна Леонідівна Шамелашвілі; Інга Володимирівна Леус; Тетяна Іванівна Сергієнко; Марина Вячеславівна Горіла; Наталія Іванівна Штеменко

    2015-01-01

    The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase depends not only on the used compounds of rhenium, and also on their dimensional structure and form of applying. It is established that the cis- and trans-isomers of complex compounds of rhenium did countervailing effect on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Cis-isomers of Rhenium dycarboxylats agreed increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase. While under the action of trans-isomers, where increased activity of superox...

  13. Blood superoxiddismutase and catalase: enzymes activity under oxidative stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Каріна Леонідівна Шамелашвілі

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase depends not only on the used compounds of rhenium, and also on their dimensional structure and form of applying. It is established that the cis- and trans-isomers of complex compounds of rhenium did countervailing effect on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Cis-isomers of Rhenium dycarboxylats agreed increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase. While under the action of trans-isomers, where increased activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase activity decreased

  14. Genes Important for Catalase Activity in Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Hederstedt, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Little in general is known about how heme proteins are assembled from their constituents in cells. The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme and does not depend on it for growth. However, when supplied with heme in the growth medium the cells can synthesize two heme proteins; catalase (KatA) and cytochrome bd (CydAB). To identify novel factors important for catalase biogenesis libraries of E. faecalis gene insertion mutants were generated using two different types of transposons. The libraries of mutants were screened for clones deficient in catalase activity using a colony zymogram staining procedure. Analysis of obtained clones identified, in addition to katA (encoding the catalase enzyme protein), nine genes distributed over five different chromosomal loci. No factors with a dedicated essential role in catalase biogenesis or heme trafficking were revealed, but the results indicate the RNA degradosome (srmB, rnjA), an ABC-type oligopeptide transporter (oppBC), a two-component signal transducer (etaR), and NADH peroxidase (npr) as being important for expression of catalase activity in E. faecalis. It is demonstrated that catalase biogenesis in E. faecalis is independent of the CydABCD proteins and that a conserved proline residue in the N-terminal region of KatA is important for catalase assembly. PMID:22590595

  15. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  16. Polypeptides having catalase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Lan

    2017-05-02

    Provided are isolated polypeptides having catalase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. Also provided are nucleic acid constructs, vectors and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Effect of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the structure and activity of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian; Tang, Bo-Ping; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2014-08-05

    TiO₂ nanoparticles are the most widely used metal oxide nanoparticles and have oxidative toxicity. Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme. Here the understanding of an effect of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the activity and structure of catalase is crucial to characterize the toxicity of TiO₂ nanoparticles. These experimental data revealed that TiO₂ nanoparticles could bind to catalase by the electrostatic and hydrogen bonding forces. On binding TiO₂ nanoparticles, catalase got destabilized with the decrease of α-helices content, the solvent polarity of environment around the fluorescence chromophores on catalase were also affected. In addition, TiO₂ nanoparticles also affected the activity of catalase. TiO₂ nanoparticles acted as an activator of catalase activity at a low molar concentration and as an inhibitor at a higher molar concentration. With regard to human health, the present study could provide a better understanding of the potential nanotoxicity of TiO₂ nanoparticles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Molecular Mechanism of the Catalase-like Activity in Horseradish Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Rovira, Carme

    2015-09-02

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most relevant peroxidase enzymes, used extensively in immunochemistry and biocatalysis applications. Unlike the closely related catalase enzymes, it exhibits a low activity to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The origin of this disparity remains unknown due to the lack of atomistic information on the catalase-like reaction in HRP. Using QM(DFT)/MM metadynamics simulations, we uncover the mechanism for reduction of the HRP Compound I intermediate by H2O2 at atomic detail. The reaction begins with a hydrogen atom transfer, forming a peroxyl radical and a Compound II-like species. Reorientation of the peroxyl radical in the active site, concomitant with the transfer of the second hydrogen atom, is the rate-limiting step, with a computed free energy barrier (18.7 kcal/mol, ∼ 6 kcal/mol higher than the one obtained for catalase) in good agreement with experiments. Our simulations reveal the crucial role played by the distal pocket residues in accommodating H2O2, enabling formation of a Compound II-like intermediate, similar to catalases. However, out of the two pathways for Compound II reduction found in catalases, only one is operative in HRP. Moreover, the hydrogen bond network in the distal side of HRP compensates less efficiently than in catalases for the energetic cost required to reorient the peroxyl radical at the rate-determining step. The distal Arg and a water molecule in the "wet" active site of HRP have a substantial impact on the reaction barrier, compared to the "dry" active site in catalase. Therefore, the lower catalase-like efficiency of heme peroxidases compared to catalases can be directly attributed to the different distal pocket architecture, providing hints to engineer peroxidases with a higher rate of H2O2 disproportionation.

  19. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Promote Autophagy-Dependent Cell Death in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Juul, Trine; Auzina, Aija; Gwiżdż, Sonia; Małolepszy, Anna; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Dam, Svend; Bressendorff, Simon; Lorentzen, Andrea; Roepstorff, Peter; Lehmann Nielsen, Kåre; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo; Hofius, Daniel; Breusegem, Frank Van; Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify an Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxyurea-resistant autophagy mutant, atg2, which also shows reduced sensitivity to cell death triggered by the bacterial effector avrRpm1. To test if catalase deficiency likewise affected both hydroxyurea and avrRpm1 sensitivity, we selected mutants with extremely low catalase activities and showed that they carried mutations in a gene that we named NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 (NCA1). nca1 mutants showed severely reduced activities of all three catalase isoforms in Arabidopsis, and loss of NCA1 function led to strong suppression of RPM1-triggered cell death. Basal and starvation-induced autophagy appeared normal in the nca1 and cat2 mutants. By contrast, autophagic degradation induced by avrRpm1 challenge was compromised, indicating that catalase acted upstream of immunity-triggered autophagy. The direct interaction of catalase with reactive oxygen species could allow catalase to act as a molecular link between reactive oxygen species and the promotion of autophagy-dependent cell death. PMID:24285797

  20. Subchronic exposure to high-dose ACE-inhibitor moexipril induces catalase activity in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeghate, E; Hasan, M Y; Ponery, A S; Nurulain, S M; Petroianu, G A

    2005-12-01

    The long-term clinical effects of ACE-inhibitors have similarities with those of both fibrates and glitazones, activators of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor (PPAR) alpha and gamma, respectively. The antioxidant enzyme catalase, a heme protein that degrades hydrogen peroxide, is found at high concentrations in peroxisomes. Catalase activity is one of the recognized surrogate markers indicative of PPAR activation in the rat liver. The purpose of the study was to establish the effect of moexipril on catalase activity and to compare it with the effect of both saline controls and that of the known PPAR agonist clofibrate (positive control). Three groups of seven rats were used. All substances were applied i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by a 2-day break. The cycle was repeated eight times. After the final cycle (day 56) the animals were sacrificed and liver tissue collected. The number of catalase positive cells in both moexipril group (95% CI 57-61) and clofibrate group (95% CI 72-80) is higher than in controls (95% CI 3-16) (p catalase positive cells in the clofibrate group is higher than in the moexipril group (p inhibitor moexipril induces catalase activity in the rat liver to an extent comparable to fibrates. We suggest that some of the long-term advantages of ACE inhibitor use - beyond mere BP lowering - might be due to a PPAR mediated effect.

  1. Increased microglial catalase activity in multiple sclerosis grey matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Elizabeth; Kemp, Kevin; Hares, Kelly; Redondo, Julianna; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2014-04-22

    Chronic demyelination, on-going inflammation, axonal loss and grey matter neuronal injury are likely pathological processes that contribute to disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Although the precise contribution of each process and their aetiological substrates is not fully known, recent evidence has implicated oxidative damage as a major cause of tissue injury in MS. The degree of tissue injury caused by oxidative molecules, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), is balanced by endogenous anti-oxidant enzymes which detoxify ROS. Understanding endogenous mechanisms which protect the brain against oxidative injury in MS is important, since enhancing anti-oxidant responses is a major therapeutic strategy for preventing irreversible tissue injury in the disease. Our aims were to determine expression and activity levels of the hydrogen peroxide-reducing enzyme catalase in MS grey matter (GM). In MS GM, a catalase enzyme activity was elevated compared to control GM. We measured catalase protein expression by immune dot-blotting and catalase mRNA by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Protein analysis studies showed a strong positive correlation between catalase and microglial marker IBA-1 in MS GM. In addition, calibration of catalase mRNA level with reference to the microglial-specific transcript AIF-1 revealed an increase in this transcript in MS. This was reflected by the extent of HLA-DR immunolabeling in MS GM which was significantly elevated compared to control GM. Collectively, these observations provide evidence that microglial catalase activity is elevated in MS grey matter and may be an important endogenous anti-oxidant defence mechanism in MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Catalase activity in healthy and inflamed pulp tissues of permanent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To evaluate catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) activity in healthy and inflamed dental pulp of young patient's teeth and to investigate if an active defense system oxidizing agents is present as a response to bacterial invasion. Materials and Methods: Twenty young patients between 15 and 25 ages, who were diagnosed to be ...

  3. Catalase activity of cassava ( Manihot esculenta ) plant under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African cassava mosaic virus has caused an immersed low yield of the cassava crop. The virus impacts stress on the cellular metabolism of the plant producing a lot of reactive oxygen species and increases the expression of the antioxidant enzymes. The activity of catalase as a response to oxidative stress was investigated ...

  4. Effects of noise exposure on catalase activity of growing lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Kashif Nawaz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress due to noise was estimated at cell level using model of growing lymphocytes. Lymphocytes were isolated and cultured using conventional methodology. Cell culture of each group was exposed to sound of frequency 1 KHz during incubation. Three groups were defined on the basis of exposure of sound with specific range of intensity and duration of exposure. Group A and Group B were exposed to sound with intensity 110 dBA for four hours per day and for eight hours per day respectively. Control group was exposed to sound less than 85 dBA. Viable cell count was performed using trypan blue. Catalase activity of each group was estimated using ELISA kit.Viable cell count of Group A and Group B was almost same but significantly less than that of control group. Catalase activity of lymphocytes in Group B was significantly low as compared to Group A and controls (p=0.003,p< 0.05. There was no significant difference between catalase activity of Group A and control group.Exposure of sound with frequency 1 KHz and intensity 110 dBA for 4 hours and eight hours per day may induce oxidative stress in growing lymphocytes causing the difference in viable cell count. However the catalase activity depends on duration of exposure. In case of noise exposure of 8 hours per day, it declines significantly as compared to noise exposure of 4 hours per day.

  5. Evaluation of salivary catalase activity in blighted ovum gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ahmadizadeh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anembryonic gestation (blighted ovum is the most common identifiable pathology in the first trimester of pregnancy, always leads to miscarriage. Early pregnancy failures from blighted ovum are often due to chromosomal abnormalities and a poor quality of sperm or egg. Oxidative stresses as a factor of disturbance balance between the production of free radicals and antioxidant defenses is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including mouth and throat cancer and cardiovascular disease. Catalase is one of the defensive systems against damages caused by oxidative stress in human. The aim of this study was to compare the activity of salivary catalase in women with blighted ovum and women with history of normal pregnancy. Methods: This case-control study was performed on 34 patient women with blighted ovum and 34 healthy women as a control group. The study was performed in biochemistry laboratory at the University of Guilan from October 2015 to July 2015. The age range was 20-44 years and 18-45 years in patient and control groups, respectively. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected using spitting method. Catalase activity was measured by evaluating the constant rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in patient and control groups. Results: The patient group matched with healthy subjects in average age and having no other diseases history. The biochemical enzymatic assays indicate that the average catalase activities of saliva in patient and control groups were 14.47±3.8 and 16.42±3.48, respectively. Therefore, the catalase activity was significantly reduced in patient group as compared to the control group (P=0.03. Conclusion: The obtained results suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of blighted ovum. Therefore, determination the activity of other antioxidant enzymes, in addition to catalse, may be used as a marker for diagnosis of blighted ovum. More studies with larger studied

  6. The Catalase Activity of Catalase-Peroxidases Is Modulated by Changes in the pKa of the Distal Histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuqueiro, Miguel; Victor, Bruno; Switala, Jacek; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Rovira, Carme; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2017-05-02

    The unusual Met-Tyr-Trp adduct composed of cross-linked side chains along with an associated mobile Arg is essential for catalase activity in catalase-peroxidases. In addition, acidic residues in the entrance channel, in particular an Asp and a Glu ∼7 and ∼15 Å, respectively, from the heme, significantly enhance catalase activity. The mechanism by which these channel carboxylates influence catalase activity is the focus of this work. Seventeen new variants with fewer and additional acidic residues have been constructed and characterized structurally and for enzymatic activity, revealing that their effect on activity is roughly inversely proportional to their distance from the heme and adduct, suggesting that the electrostatic potential of the heme cavity may be affected. A discrete group of protonable residues are contained within a 15 Å sphere surrounding the heme iron, and a computational analysis reveals that the pK a of the distal His 112 , alone, is modulated within the pH range of catalase activity by the remote acidic residues in a pattern consistent with its protonated form having a key role in the catalase reaction cycle. The electrostatic potential also impacts the catalatic reaction through its influence on the charged status of the Met-Tyr-Trp adduct.

  7. The euryhaline yeast Debaryomyces hansenii has two catalase genes encoding enzymes with differential activity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal-Kischinevzky, Claudia; Rodarte-Murguía, Beatriz; Valdés-López, Victor; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González, Alicia; Alba-Lois, Luisa

    2011-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a spoilage yeast able to grow in a variety of ecological niches, from seawater to dairy products. Results presented in this article show that (i) D. hansenii has an inherent resistance to H2O2 which could be attributed to the fact that this yeast has a basal catalase activity which is several-fold higher than that observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the same culture conditions, (ii) D. hansenii has two genes (DhCTA1 and DhCTT1) encoding two catalase isozymes with a differential enzymatic activity profile which is not strictly correlated with a differential expression profile of the encoding genes.

  8. Hepatic catalase activity after whole-body irradiation of the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neveux, Y.; Drouet, J.; Guillouzo, A.; Rault, H.; Picard, G.

    Using biochemical techniques, the effect of irradiation on catalase rate of different tissues is studied. With cytochemistry, the decrease of catalase activity is studied in situ, after exposure to great ionizing radiation doses [fr

  9. Effect of dose and dose rate of gamma radiation on catalytic activity of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaclav Cuba; Tereza Pavelkova; Viliam Mucka

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic activity of gamma irradiated catalase from bovine liver was studied for hydrogen peroxide decomposition at constant temperature and pressure. The measurement was performed at temperatures 27, 32, 37, 42 and 47 deg C. Solutions containing 1 and 0.01 g dm -3 of catalase in phosphate buffer were used for the study. Repeatability of both sample preparation and kinetics measurement was experimentally verified. Rate constants of the reaction were determined for all temperatures and the activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius plot. Gamma irradiation was performed using 60 Co radionuclide source Gammacell 220 at two different dose rates 5.5 and 70 Gy h -1 , with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 Gy. The observed reaction of irradiated and non-irradiated catalase with hydrogen peroxide is of the first order. Irradiation significantly decreases catalytic activity of catalase, but the activation energy does not depend markedly on the dose. The effect of irradiation is more significant at higher dose rate. (author)

  10. A gasometric method to determine erythrocyte catalase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.S. Siqueira

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new gasometric method to determine erythrocyte catalase activity by the measurement of the volume of oxygen produced as a result of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in a system where enzyme and substrate are separated in a special reaction test tube connected to a manometer and the reagents are mixed with a motor-driven stirrer. The position of the reagents in the test tube permits the continuous measurement of oxygen evolution from the time of mixing, without the need to stop the reaction by the addition of acid after each incubation time. The enzyme activity is reported as KHb, i.e., mg hydrogen peroxide decomposed per second per gram of hemoglobin (s-1 g Hb-1. The value obtained for catalase activity in 28 samples of hemolyzed human blood was 94.4 ± 6.17 mg H2O2 s-1 g Hb-1. The results obtained were precise and consistent, indicating that this rapid, simple and inexpensive method could be useful for research and routine work.

  11. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by shear alone: Characteristics, activity and stability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Nan; Du, Xin-Ying; Xing, Jin-Feng; Ge, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Catalase is a promising therapeutic enzyme; however, it carries risks of inactivation and rapid degradation when it is used in practical bioprocess, such as delivery in vivo. To overcome the issue, we made catalase-only nanoparticles using shear stress alone at a moderate shear rate of 217s(-1) in a coaxial cylinder flow cell. Properties of nanoparticles, including particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential, were characterized. The conformational changes of pre- and post-sheared catalase were determined using spectroscopy techniques. The results indicated that the conformational changes of catalase and reduction in α-helical content caused by shear alone were less significant than that by desolvation method. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by single shear retained over 90% of its initial activity when compared with the native catalase. Catalase nanoparticles lost only 20% of the activity when stored in phosphate buffer solution for 72h at 4°C, whereas native catalase lost 53% under the same condition. Especially, the activity of nanogranulated catalase was decreased only slightly in the simulated intestinal fluid containing α-chymotrypsin during 4h incubation at 37°C, implying that the catalase nanoparticle was more resistant to the degradation of proteases than native catalase molecules. Overall, catalase-only nanoparticles offered a great potential to stabilize enzymes for various pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Chaperone Function of NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Is Required to Maintain Catalase Activity and for Multiple Stress Responses in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Guoqiang; Cha, Joon-Yung; Li, Guannan; Chen, She; Li, Zhen; Guo, Jinghua; Zhang, Caiguo; Yang, Yongqing; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Schumaker, Karen S.; Chen, Zhongzhou; Guo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Catalases are key regulators of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in plant cells. However, the regulation of catalase activity is not well understood. In this study, we isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, no catalase activity1-3 (nca1-3) that is hypersensitive to many abiotic stress treatments. The mutated gene was identified by map-based cloning as NCA1, which encodes a protein containing an N-terminal RING-finger domain and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat-like helical domain. NCA1 interacts with and increases catalase activity maximally in a 240-kD complex in planta. In vitro, NCA1 interacts with CATALASE2 (CAT2) in a 1:1 molar ratio, and the NCA1 C terminus is essential for this interaction. CAT2 activity increased 10-fold in the presence of NCA1, and zinc ion binding of the NCA1 N terminus is required for this increase. NCA1 has chaperone protein activity that may maintain the folding of catalase in a functional state. NCA1 is a cytosol-located protein. Expression of NCA1 in the mitochondrion of the nca1-3 mutant does not rescue the abiotic stress phenotypes of the mutant, while expression in the cytosol or peroxisome does. Our results suggest that NCA1 is essential for catalase activity. PMID:25700484

  13. Effect of menadione and hydrogen peroxide on catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda EFREMOVA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been studied the possibility of utilization of two important oxidant factors as regulators of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts. In this paper results of the screening of some Saccharomyces yeast strains for potential producers of catalase are presented. Results of the screening for potential catalase producer have revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 strain possesses the highest catalase activity (2900 U/mg protein compared with other samples. Maximum increase of catalase activity with 50-60% compared to the reference sample was established in the case of hydrogen peroxide and menadione utilization in optimal concentrations of 15 and 10 mM. This research has been demonstrated the potential benefits of application of hydrogen peroxide and menadione as stimulatory factors of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts.

  14. Endothelin-1 stimulates catalase activity through the PKCδ mediated phosphorylation of Serine 167

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Hou, Yali; Kangath, Archana; Pardo, Daniel; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulates catalase activity in endothelial cells and lambs with acute increases in pulmonary blood flow (PBF), without altering gene expression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Exposing pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) to ET-1 increased catalase activity and decreased cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. These changes correlated with an increase in serine phosphorylated catalase. Using the inhibitory peptide δV1.1, this phosphorylation was shown to be PKCδ dependent. Mass spectrometry identified serine167 as the phosphorylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a phospho-mimic (S167D) catalase. Activity assays using recombinant protein purified from E.coli or transiently transfected COS-7 cells, demonstrated that S167D-catalase had an increased ability to degrade H2O2 compared to the wildtype enzyme. Using a phospho-specific antibody, we were able to verify that pS167 catalase levels are modulated in lambs with acute increases in PBF in the presence and absence of the ET receptor antagonist, tezosentan. S167 is being located on the dimeric interface suggesting it could be involved in regulating the formation of catalase tetramers. To evaluate this possibility we utilized analytical gel-filtration to examine the multimeric structure of recombinant wildtype- and S167D-catalase. We found that recombinant wildtype catalase was present as a mixture of monomers and dimers while S167D catalase was primarily tetrameric. Further, the incubation of wildtype catalase with PKCδ was sufficient to convert wildtype catalase into a tetrameric structure. In conclusion, this is the first report indicating that the phosphorylation of catalase regulates its multimeric structure and activity. PMID:24211614

  15. Wood utilization is dependent on catalase activities in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bourdais

    Full Text Available Catalases are enzymes that play critical roles in protecting cells against the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide. They are implicated in various physiological and pathological conditions but some of their functions remain unclear. In order to decipher the role(s of catalases during the life cycle of Podospora anserina, we analyzed the role of the four monofunctional catalases and one bifunctional catalase-peroxidase genes present in its genome. The five genes were deleted and the phenotypes of each single and all multiple mutants were investigated. Intriguingly, although the genes are differently expressed during the life cycle, catalase activity is dispensable during both vegetative growth and sexual reproduction in laboratory conditions. Catalases are also not essential for cellulose or fatty acid assimilation. In contrast, they are strictly required for efficient utilization of more complex biomass like wood shavings by allowing growth in the presence of lignin. The secreted CATB and cytosolic CAT2 are the major catalases implicated in peroxide resistance, while CAT2 is the major player during complex biomass assimilation. Our results suggest that P. anserina produces external H(2O(2 to assimilate complex biomass and that catalases are necessary to protect the cells during this process. In addition, the phenotypes of strains lacking only one catalase gene suggest that a decrease of catalase activity improves the capacity of the fungus to degrade complex biomass.

  16. Wood utilization is dependent on catalase activities in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdais, Anne; Bidard, Frederique; Zickler, Denise; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Silar, Philippe; Espagne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Catalases are enzymes that play critical roles in protecting cells against the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide. They are implicated in various physiological and pathological conditions but some of their functions remain unclear. In order to decipher the role(s) of catalases during the life cycle of Podospora anserina, we analyzed the role of the four monofunctional catalases and one bifunctional catalase-peroxidase genes present in its genome. The five genes were deleted and the phenotypes of each single and all multiple mutants were investigated. Intriguingly, although the genes are differently expressed during the life cycle, catalase activity is dispensable during both vegetative growth and sexual reproduction in laboratory conditions. Catalases are also not essential for cellulose or fatty acid assimilation. In contrast, they are strictly required for efficient utilization of more complex biomass like wood shavings by allowing growth in the presence of lignin. The secreted CATB and cytosolic CAT2 are the major catalases implicated in peroxide resistance, while CAT2 is the major player during complex biomass assimilation. Our results suggest that P. anserina produces external H(2)O(2) to assimilate complex biomass and that catalases are necessary to protect the cells during this process. In addition, the phenotypes of strains lacking only one catalase gene suggest that a decrease of catalase activity improves the capacity of the fungus to degrade complex biomass.

  17. Wood Utilization Is Dependent on Catalase Activities in the Filamentous Fungus Podospora anserina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdais, Anne; Bidard, Frederique; Zickler, Denise; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Silar, Philippe; Espagne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Catalases are enzymes that play critical roles in protecting cells against the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide. They are implicated in various physiological and pathological conditions but some of their functions remain unclear. In order to decipher the role(s) of catalases during the life cycle of Podospora anserina, we analyzed the role of the four monofunctional catalases and one bifunctional catalase-peroxidase genes present in its genome. The five genes were deleted and the phenotypes of each single and all multiple mutants were investigated. Intriguingly, although the genes are differently expressed during the life cycle, catalase activity is dispensable during both vegetative growth and sexual reproduction in laboratory conditions. Catalases are also not essential for cellulose or fatty acid assimilation. In contrast, they are strictly required for efficient utilization of more complex biomass like wood shavings by allowing growth in the presence of lignin. The secreted CATB and cytosolic CAT2 are the major catalases implicated in peroxide resistance, while CAT2 is the major player during complex biomass assimilation. Our results suggest that P. anserina produces external H2O2 to assimilate complex biomass and that catalases are necessary to protect the cells during this process. In addition, the phenotypes of strains lacking only one catalase gene suggest that a decrease of catalase activity improves the capacity of the fungus to degrade complex biomass. PMID:22558065

  18. [Soil catalase activity of main plant communities in Leymus chinensis grassland in northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Guo, Jixun; Zhu, Li

    2002-06-01

    The seasonal dynamics of soil catalase activity of three different plants communities in Leymus chinensis grassland in northeast China were in a parabolas shape. The seasonal variation of Chloris virgata community was greater than those of Leymus chinensis community and Puccinellia tenuiflora community, and "seed effect" might be the main reason. The correlation between the activity of soil catalase in different soil layers and environmental factors were analyzed. The results showed that the activity of soil catalase was decreased gradually with depth of soil layer. The activity of soil catalase was closely correlated with rainfall and air temperature, and it was affected by soil temperature, soil moisture, and their interactions. The correlation between the activity and aboveground vegetation was very significant, and the growing condition of plant communities could be reflected by the activity of soil catalase.

  19. Effects of some environmental parameters on catalase activity measured in the mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) exposed to lindane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khessiba, Asma [Laboratoire de Bio-surveillance de l' Environnement, Unite d' Ecologie Cotiere, Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte, 7021, Zarzouna (Tunisia); Romeo, Michele [UMR INRA-UNSA 1112, ROSE - Reponse des Organismes aux Stress Environnementaux, Faculte des Sciences, BP 71, 06108, Nice Cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: romeo@unice.fr; Aissa, Patricia [Laboratoire de Bio-surveillance de l' Environnement, Unite d' Ecologie Cotiere, Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte, 7021, Zarzouna (Tunisia)

    2005-01-01

    Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis), collected from the Bizerta lagoon, were acclimated for four days to various conditions of temperature, salinity, photoperiod and food supply and then exposed to lindane at a concentration of 40 {mu}g l{sup -1}. Catalase activity, which is a biomarker of exposure to an oxidative stress, was measured in the whole soft tissues of control and assay groups. In control mussels, high temperature, high salinity and light duration significantly increased catalase activity whereas this activity decreased when food, composed of freeze-dried, algae was available. When mussels were treated with lindane, catalase activities were higher than in controls. This increase was significant with temperature, salinity and light duration. The food supply did not change catalase activity, which was always higher compared to controls. Oxidative stress was shown in mussels exposed to lindane. The results highlight the need of considering abiotic parameters in biomonitoring studies, and especially when using catalase as a biomarker. - Oxidative stress in mussels exposed to lindane was also influenced by a number of abiotic parameters.

  20. Effects of some environmental parameters on catalase activity measured in the mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) exposed to lindane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khessiba, Asma; Romeo, Michele; Aissa, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis), collected from the Bizerta lagoon, were acclimated for four days to various conditions of temperature, salinity, photoperiod and food supply and then exposed to lindane at a concentration of 40 μg l -1 . Catalase activity, which is a biomarker of exposure to an oxidative stress, was measured in the whole soft tissues of control and assay groups. In control mussels, high temperature, high salinity and light duration significantly increased catalase activity whereas this activity decreased when food, composed of freeze-dried, algae was available. When mussels were treated with lindane, catalase activities were higher than in controls. This increase was significant with temperature, salinity and light duration. The food supply did not change catalase activity, which was always higher compared to controls. Oxidative stress was shown in mussels exposed to lindane. The results highlight the need of considering abiotic parameters in biomonitoring studies, and especially when using catalase as a biomarker. - Oxidative stress in mussels exposed to lindane was also influenced by a number of abiotic parameters

  1. Influence of sulphur dioxide on chlorophyll content and catalase activity in some chosen lichen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuziel, S

    1974-01-01

    The influence of SO/sub 2/ on changes in catalase activity and in chlorophyll content were investigated under laboratory conditions in several lichen species and in maize. In all the plants examined the chlorophyll content and catalase activity decreased after treatment with SO/sub 2/ as compared with that in the control plants.

  2. Effects of cysteine on growth, protease production, and catalase activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Himelbloom, B H; Hassan, H M

    1986-01-01

    Cysteine inhibits growth of and protease production by Pseudomonas fluorescens NC3. Catalase activity in P. fluorescens NC3 was increased by cysteine. The addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide did not increase catalase activity, thus suggesting a role for the endogenous generation of hydrogen peroxide via the autoxidation of cysteine.

  3. UV light B-mediated inhibition of skin catalase activity promotes Gr-1+ CD11b+ myeloid cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Nicholas J; Tober, Kathleen L; Burns, Erin M; Schick, Jonathan S; Riggenbach, Judith A; Mace, Thomas A; Bill, Matthew A; Young, Gregory S; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M; Lesinski, Gregory B

    2012-03-01

    Skin cancer incidence and mortality are higher in men compared with women, but the causes of this sex discrepancy remain largely unknown. UV light exposure induces cutaneous inflammation and neutralizes cutaneous antioxidants. Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells are heterogeneous bone marrow-derived cells that promote inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Reduced activity of catalase, an antioxidant present in the skin, has been associated with skin carcinogenesis. We used the outbred, immune-competent Skh-1 hairless mouse model of UVB-induced inflammation and non-melanoma skin cancer to further define sex discrepancies in UVB-induced inflammation. Our results demonstrated that male skin had relatively lower baseline catalase activity, which was inhibited following acute UVB exposure in both sexes. Further analysis revealed that skin catalase activity inversely correlated with splenic Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cell percentage. Acute UVB exposure induced Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cell skin infiltration, which was inhibited to a greater extent in male mice by topical catalase treatment. In chronic UVB studies, we demonstrated that the percentage of splenic Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells was 55% higher in male tumor-bearing mice compared with their female counterparts. Together, our findings indicate that lower skin catalase activity in male mice may at least in part contribute to increased UVB-induced generation of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells and subsequent skin carcinogenesis.

  4. Catalase activity is modulated by calcium and calmodulin in detached mature leaves of sweet potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afiyanti, Mufidah; Chen, Hsien-Jung

    2014-01-15

    Catalase (CAT) functions as one of the key enzymes in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and affects the H2O2 homeostasis in plants. In sweet potato, a major catalase isoform was detected, and total catalase activity showed the highest level in mature leaves (L3) compared to immature (L1) and completely yellow, senescent leaves (L5). The major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity were strongly suppressed by ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). This inhibition could be specifically and significantly mitigated in mature L3 leaves by exogenous CaCl2, but not MgCl2 or CoCl2. EGTA also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Furthermore, chlorpromazine (CPZ), a calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor, drastically suppressed the major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity, and this suppression was alleviated by exogenous sweet potato calmodulin (SPCAM) fusion protein in L3 leaves. CPZ also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Protein blot hybridization showed that both anti-catalase SPCAT1 and anti-calmodulin SPCAM antibodies detect a band at the same position, which corresponds to the activity of the major catalase isoform from unboiled, but not boiled crude protein extract of L3 leaves. An inverse correlation between the major catalase isoform/total enzymatic activity and the H2O2 level was also observed. These data suggest that sweet potato CAT activity is modulated by CaCl2 and SPCAM, and plays an important role in H2O2 homeostasis in mature leaves. Association of SPCAM with the major CAT isoform is required and regulates the in-gel CAT activity band. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Helicobacter Catalase Devoid of Catalytic Activity Protects the Bacterium against Oxidative Stress*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stéphane L.; Maier, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalase, a conserved and abundant enzyme found in all domains of life, dissipates the oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori undergoes host-mediated oxidant stress exposure, and its catalase contains oxidizable methionine (Met) residues. We hypothesized catalase may play a large stress-combating role independent of its classical catalytic one, namely quenching harmful oxidants through its recyclable Met residues, resulting in oxidant protection to the bacterium. Two Helicobacter mutant strains (katAH56A and katAY339A) containing catalase without enzyme activity but that retain all Met residues were created. These strains were much more resistant to oxidants than a catalase-deletion mutant strain. The quenching ability of the altered versions was shown, whereby oxidant-stressed (HOCl-exposed) Helicobacter retained viability even upon extracellular addition of the inactive versions of catalase, in contrast to cells receiving HOCl alone. The importance of the methionine-mediated quenching to the pathogen residing in the oxidant-rich gastric mucus was studied. In contrast to a catalase-null strain, both site-change mutants proficiently colonized the murine gastric mucosa, suggesting that the amino acid composition-dependent oxidant-quenching role of catalase is more important than the well described H2O2-dissipating catalytic role. Over 100 years after the discovery of catalase, these findings reveal a new non-enzymatic protective mechanism of action for the ubiquitous enzyme. PMID:27605666

  6. Relationship between catalase activity and uptake of elemental mercury by rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, I.; Syversen, T.L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Uptake of mercury by brain after intravenous injection of elemental mercury was investigated in the rat. Catalase activity was inhibited by aminotriazole either by intraperitoneal affecting catalase in most tissues of the animal or by intraventricular injections affecting catalase in the brain selectively. Uptake of elemental mercury by rat brain was not influenced by intraperitoneal administration of aminotriazole resulting in 50% inhibition of brain catalase. However, when the inhibitor was injected intraventricularly in concentrations to give a 50% inhibition of brain catalase, it was shown that the mercury uptake by brain was significantly decreased. In the latter case when only brain catalase was inhibited and the supply of elemtal mercury to brain was maintained, mercury uptake by brain was proportional to the activity of catalase in brain tissue and to the injected amount of elemental mercury. Contrary to the intraventricular injection of aminotriazole, in animals recieving aminotriazole intraperitoneally prior to elemental mercury injection, we suggest that the lower activity of brain catalse is compensated by an increased supply of elemtal mercury caused by the generally lower oxidation rate in the animal. This view is supported by the finding that mercury uptake by liver increased due to aminotriazole intraperitoneally although activity of catalase was depressed. (author)

  7. Effect of cimetidine on catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a suggested mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Masoudeh; Ebrahimi, Farnoosh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an important enzyme for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in cells. Bacteria have potent catalase to deal with H2O2 in their medium culture. Any chemicals that inhibit catalase activity can be harmful for cells. Histamine H2 antagonist drugs such as cimetidine and ranitidine are used for the treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders. The present results showed that cimetidine could inhibit the catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a competitive inhibition. The determination of IC50 value and Ki (6.5 μM) of cimetidine demonstrated that the enzyme binds to the drug with high affinity. Binding of the drug to the enzyme was pH-dependent and no binding was observed at basic pH (>9) and acidic pH (effect on the catalase activity. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Loss of catalase increases malignant mouse keratinocyte cell growth through activation of the stress activated JNK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Neale T; Finch, Joanne S; Bowden, G Timothy

    2008-05-01

    A cell line that produces mouse squamous cell carcinoma (6M90) was modified to develop a cell line with an introduced Tet-responsive catalase transgene (MTOC2). We have previously reported that the overexpressed catalase in the MTOC2 cells reverses the malignant phenotype in part by decreasing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. With this work we expanded the investigation into the differences between these two cell lines. We found that the decreased EGFR pathway activity of the MTOC2 cells is not because of reduced autocrine secretion of an epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand but rather because of lower basal receptor activity. Phosphorylated levels of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) members JNK and p38 were both higher in the 6M90 cells with low catalase when compared with the MTOC2 cell line. Although treatment with an EGFR inhibitor, AG1478, blocked the increased activity of JNK in the 6M90 cells, a similar effect was not observed for p38. Basal levels of downstream c-jun transcription were also found to be higher in the 6M90 cells versus MTOC2 cells. Activated p38 was found to down-regulate the JNK MAPK pathway in the 6M90 cells. However, the 6M90 cells contain constitutively high levels of phosphorylated JNK, generating higher levels of phosphorylated c-jun and total c-jun than those in the MTOC2 cells. Inhibition of JNK activity in the 6M90 cells reduced AP-1 transcription and cell proliferation. The data confirm the inhibitory effects of catalase on tumor cell growth, specifically through a ligand-independent decrease in the stress activated JNK pathway. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in isogenous bacteria strains with different radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.I.; Goncharenko, E.N.; Yudz, T.I.; Samojlenko, I.I.

    1984-01-01

    The catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in isogenous bacterial strains with various radiosensitivity is investigated. In micrococcus radiodurans mutants with defects in the DNA repair systems the superoxide dismutase activity is lower than in the wild type cells. In investigated Escherichia coli strains differing in radiosensitivity, no alteration in catalase and superoxide dismutase activity is found. The conclusion is drawn that viability of bacteria subjected to the effect of ionizing radiations is determined by the efficiency of DNA repair systems whose functional reliability is sometimes connected with the catalase and suferoxide dismutase activity

  10. Localization of Glucose Oxidase and Catalase Activities in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Cor F.B.; Veenhuis, Marten; Visser, Jaap

    The subcellular localization of glucose oxidase (EC 1.1.3.4) in Aspergillus niger N400 (CBS 120.49) was investigated by (immuno)cytochemical methods. By these methods, the bulk of the enzyme was found to be localized in the cell wall. In addition, four different catalases (EC 1.11.1.6) were

  11. Catalase activity of a crude enzyme preparation from iron-chlorotic barley (Hordeum vulgaris) seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotaka, S; Krueger, A P; Andriese, P C

    1964-12-19

    An attempt is made to investigate the effect of Fe-EDTA on catalase activity of the enzyme preparation from iron-chlorotic barley. It has been observed that the addition of iron in the form of iron-potassium-ethylene-tetraacetate to cell-free extracts prepared from barley seedlings which had developed chlorosis produced a marked increase in the catalase activity of the extracts. Results are presented which indicate that the pattern of increase in catalase activity is related to the extent of chlorosis. 7 references, 3 figures.

  12. Effects of H2O2 under low- and high-aeration-level conditions on growth and catalase activity in Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Fumihiko; Hara, Isao; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2007-12-01

    The effects of H2O2 under low- and high-aeration-level conditions on growth and catalase activity in Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T were investigated. Continuous addition of 5-200 mM H2O2 to the culture medium from the mid-exponential growth phase enhanced the growth of the strain under the low-aeration-level condition, whereas the addition of 5-50 mM H2O2 decreased intracellular specific catalase activity and extracellular total catalases activity. The detection of extracellular catalase by the cells and the decrease in intracellular specific catalase activity and extracellular total catalase activity under the high-aeration-level condition account for the stimulation of growth by the introduced H2O2 and the decrease in catalase activities induced by O(2) from H2O2 in the medium. On the other hand, the addition of H2O2 to the medium prior to the initiation of growth inhibited the growth but increased the specific activity of intracellular catalase in the stationary growth phase. Strain T-2-2T grew when 10 mM H2O2 was added to the medium prior to growth. However, the growth was completely inhibited by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT). The continuous addition of H2O2 at an appropriate concentration from prior to the initiation of growth to the stationary growth phase under the low-aeration-level condition resulted in higher intracellular specific catalase activity and cell growth rate than single H2O2 addition prior to growth.

  13. Properties of the catalase molecule obtained from acatalasemic and hypocatalasemic mice Part I. Effects of denaturants on the catalase activity in the mouse liver

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 征紀

    1985-01-01

    Homogenates of mouse liver with isotonic sucrose solution were separated by the cell fractionation with repeating centrifugation. The supernatants were used for the inhibition test with the reagents such as 3,5 diiodosalicylic acid lithium salt (LIS), guanidine and azide, heat, acid and alkali. After various treatments, the remaining catalase activities were measured and showed as a relative enzyme activity. Stability of catalase in liver supernatants was compared normal (C3H/C(as)C(as)) and ...

  14. Activation of catalase activity by a peroxisome-localized small heat shock protein Hsp17.6CII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guannan; Li, Jing; Hao, Rong; Guo, Yan

    2017-08-20

    Plant catalases are important antioxidant enzymes and are indispensable for plant to cope with adverse environmental stresses. However, little is known how catalase activity is regulated especially at an organelle level. In this study, we identified that small heat shock protein Hsp17.6CII (AT5G12020) interacts with and activates catalases in the peroxisome of Arabidopsis thaliana. Although Hsp17.6CII is classified into the cytosol-located small heat shock protein subfamily, we found that Hsp17.6CII is located in the peroxisome. Moreover, Hsp17.6CII contains a novel non-canonical peroxisome targeting signal 1 (PTS1), QKL, 16 amino acids upstream from the C-terminus. The QKL signal peptide can partially locate GFP to peroxisome, and mutations in the tripeptide lead to the abolishment of this activity. In vitro catalase activity assay and holdase activity assay showed that Hsp17.6CII increases CAT2 activity and prevents it from thermal aggregation. These results indicate that Hsp17.6CII is a peroxisome-localized catalase chaperone. Overexpression of Hsp17.6CII conferred enhanced catalase activity and tolerance to abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, overexpression of Hsp17.6CII in catalase-deficient mutants, nca1-3 and cat2 cat3, failed to rescue their stress-sensitive phenotypes and catalase activity, suggesting that Hsp17.6CII-mediated stress response is dependent on NCA1 and catalase activity. Overall, we identified a novel peroxisome-located catalase chaperone that is involved in plant abiotic stress resistance by activating catalase activity. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Atividade relativa da catalase de losna-branca (Parthenium hysterophorus comparada à de outras espécies daninhas Catalase relative activity of ragweed (Parthenium hysterophorus compared to that of other weed species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J.P. Carvalho

    2012-06-01

    , Bidens pilosa, Sonchus oleraceus, Cyperus rotundus and Commelina benghalensis. Reaction of ragweed aqueous extract with hydrogen peroxide had increasing linear response regarding plant extract concentration. In all phases, catalase relative activity of ragweed extract was superior to catalase activity of the other weed species. Data obtained in these phases allowed to conclude that higher relative activity observed for ragweed catalase significantly contributes to the tolerance of this species to paraquat. This higher activity might be due to higher enzymatic concentration in ragweed cells or to higher intrinsic enzymatic activity (enzyme-substrate affnity.Therefore, further studies are necessary to support this conclusion.

  16. Low dose X -ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focea, R.; Nadejde, C.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, pbonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  17. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglione, Christine N.; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan, E-mail: Ramanujanv@csmc.edu

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies – can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. - Highlights: • A novel, direct measurement of Catalase enzyme activity via, oxygen sensing method. • Steady-stateprofiles of Catalase activity follow the Michaelis-Menten Kinetics. • Catalase-specific activity demonstrated using genetic and pharmacological tools. • Overcomes limitations of spectroscopic methods and indirect calorimetric approaches. • Clear

  18. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglione, Christine N.; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies – can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. - Highlights: • A novel, direct measurement of Catalase enzyme activity via, oxygen sensing method. • Steady-stateprofiles of Catalase activity follow the Michaelis-Menten Kinetics. • Catalase-specific activity demonstrated using genetic and pharmacological tools. • Overcomes limitations of spectroscopic methods and indirect calorimetric approaches. • Clear

  19. Stability of glucose oxidase and catalase adsorbed on variously activated 13X zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, P G; Vaccari, A; Ricci, G; Poli, G; Ruggeri, O

    1982-10-01

    The use of 13X zeolite (0.1-0.4-mm granules), treated with 2N and 0.01N HCI, 0.01M citric acid, 0.1M citric-phosphate buffer (pH 3.6), and in untreated form to adsorb glucose oxidase of fungal origin and microbial catalase was examined. Physicochemical analysis of the support demonstrated that its crystalline structure, greatly altered by the HCl and buffer, could be partially maintained with citric acid. The specific adsorption of the enzymes increased with decreasing pH and proved to be considerable for all the supports. The stability with storage at 25 degrees C is strictly correlated with the titrable acidity of the activated zeolite expressed as meq NaOH/g and with pH value of the activation solution. It proved to be lower than 55 h for both enzymes if adsorbed on zeolite treated with 2N HCl, and 15-fold and 30-fold higher for glucose oxidase and catalase adsorbed, respectively, on zeolite treated with the 0.1M citric-phosphate buffer and 0.01M citric acid. The specific adsorption of glucose oxidase and catalase was, respectively, 1840 U/g at pH 3.0 and 6910 U/g at pH 5.0. Their half-life at 25 degrees C with storage at pH 3.5 for the former and at pH 5.0 for the latter was 800 and 1560 h vs. 40 and 110 h for the corresponding free enzymes.

  20. Catalase activity in Smicridea McLachlan, 1871 (Insecta, Trichoptera collected from natural and altered/impacted streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Biasus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We compare catalase activity in SmicrideaMcLachlan, 1871 (Insecta, Trichoptera collected in natural and agricultural streams and correlates the enzyme pattern with metal content in the water.MethodsOrganisms were collected in sites classified as natural (riparian vegetation in buffer zone and altered/impacted (agricultural land use in drainage area environments, located at Cravo River and Campo River sub-basins (RS, Brazil. Next the collected larvae were identified and used to proteins quantification and catalase activity measure. The concentration of Mg, Cr, Cu, Pb and Cd in the water was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.ResultsCatalase activity in Smicridea ranged from 1.5 to 6 U, with mean values about 2.63 ± 0.096 U (SEM. The presence of metals was higher in the streams located at agricultural drainage area, except for Mg at the Cravo sub-basin and Cu at the Campo sub-basin. Catalase was higher in Smicridea collected in natural streams as compared to that agriculture streams and was correlated with Pb and Cd levels.ConclusionsThe data showed the potential of this biomarker as a useful tool for complementation of water quality biomonitoring studies using Smicridea as bioindicator.

  1. Comparative study on the catalase activity in grassy and forestry plants exposed to low gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteni, A. A; Mocanasu, R. C.; Arteni, V.; Creanga, I.

    2001-01-01

    Since gamma rays level in atmosphere occasionally increases affecting biosphere,the radiation effect damages seriously certain plant species. This study was focused on a grassy species,Triticum aestivum, in comparison to a forestry species, namely Quercus robur. Young plantlets were exposed to weak gamma rays delivered by a laboratory 60 Co source, for different irradiation times. The enzymatic activity of catalase was evaluated using biochemical methods. Triticum aestivum presented a slight enhancing of catalase, both in caryopsides and leafs. Quercus robur revealed a rapid linear enhancing of catalase in saplings cultivated in laboratory while saplings grown in forestry were characterized by a reduced catalase activity. Concurrent phenomena of enzyme biosynthesis stimulation and enzyme structure damage are presumed to be the cause of such behavior. (authors)

  2. Helicobacter Catalase Devoid of Catalytic Activity Protects the Bacterium against Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stéphane L; Maier, Robert J

    2016-11-04

    Catalase, a conserved and abundant enzyme found in all domains of life, dissipates the oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori undergoes host-mediated oxidant stress exposure, and its catalase contains oxidizable methionine (Met) residues. We hypothesized catalase may play a large stress-combating role independent of its classical catalytic one, namely quenching harmful oxidants through its recyclable Met residues, resulting in oxidant protection to the bacterium. Two Helicobacter mutant strains ( katA H56A and katA Y339A ) containing catalase without enzyme activity but that retain all Met residues were created. These strains were much more resistant to oxidants than a catalase-deletion mutant strain. The quenching ability of the altered versions was shown, whereby oxidant-stressed (HOCl-exposed) Helicobacter retained viability even upon extracellular addition of the inactive versions of catalase, in contrast to cells receiving HOCl alone. The importance of the methionine-mediated quenching to the pathogen residing in the oxidant-rich gastric mucus was studied. In contrast to a catalase-null strain, both site-change mutants proficiently colonized the murine gastric mucosa, suggesting that the amino acid composition-dependent oxidant-quenching role of catalase is more important than the well described H 2 O 2 -dissipating catalytic role. Over 100 years after the discovery of catalase, these findings reveal a new non-enzymatic protective mechanism of action for the ubiquitous enzyme. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Not so monofunctional--a case of thermostable Thermobifida fusca catalase with peroxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    2015-03-01

    Thermobifida fusca is a mesothermophilic organism known for its ability to degrade plant biomass and other organics, and it was demonstrated that it represents a rich resource of genes encoding for potent enzymes for biocatalysis. The thermostable catalase from T. fusca has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 400 mg/L. Heat treatment of disrupted cells at 60 °C for 1 h resulted in enzyme preparation of high purity; hence, no chromatography steps are needed for large-scale production. Except for catalyzing the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide, TfuCat was also found to catalyze oxidations of phenolic compounds. The catalase activity was comparable to other described catalases while peroxidase activity was quite remarkable with a k obs of nearly 1000 s(-1) for catechol. Site directed mutagenesis was used to alter the ratio of peroxidase/catalase activity. Resistance to inhibition by classic catalase inhibitors and an apparent melting temperature of 74 °C classifies this enzyme as a robust biocatalyst. As such, it could compete with other commercially available catalases while the relatively high peroxidase activity also offers new biocatalytic possibilities.

  4. Ultraviolet influence on catalase activity and mineral content in eyeballs of gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formicki, Grzegorz; Stawarz, Robert

    2006-01-01

    UV radiation present in the environment may induce several eye disorders including inflammation and cataract. The aim of this work was to study catalase activity and Mg, Cu, Ca and Zn contents in the eyeballs of gibel carp exposed to ecologically relevant doses of UV radiation (0.09 kJ/m 2 for UV-A and 0.98 kJ/m 2 for UV-B) simulated in laboratory conditions. Ultraviolet exposure resulted in significant reduction of catalase activity in the eyeballs of tested fish. Reductions in Mg, Cu and Ca contents after UV exposure were also observed. The differences in Mg and Cu levels between control and UV exposed animals were statistically significant, whereas the reduction of Ca level was insignificant. Zinc level in the eyeballs of UV-exposed fish was significantly higher than in non-irradiated specimens. The results suggest that ultraviolet radiation affects prooxidant/antioxidant balance and Mg, Cu, Zn contents in the eyes of fish living in shallow habitats. These may lead to cataract formation

  5. Ultraviolet influence on catalase activity and mineral content in eyeballs of gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Formicki, Grzegorz [Cracow Pedagogical Academy, Institute of Biology, Department of Zoology, ul. Podbrzezie 3, 31-054 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: formicki@ap.krakow.pl; Stawarz, Robert [Cracow Pedagogical Academy, Institute of Biology, Department of Zoology, ul. Podbrzezie 3, 31-054 Cracow (Poland)

    2006-10-01

    UV radiation present in the environment may induce several eye disorders including inflammation and cataract. The aim of this work was to study catalase activity and Mg, Cu, Ca and Zn contents in the eyeballs of gibel carp exposed to ecologically relevant doses of UV radiation (0.09 kJ/m{sup 2} for UV-A and 0.98 kJ/m{sup 2} for UV-B) simulated in laboratory conditions. Ultraviolet exposure resulted in significant reduction of catalase activity in the eyeballs of tested fish. Reductions in Mg, Cu and Ca contents after UV exposure were also observed. The differences in Mg and Cu levels between control and UV exposed animals were statistically significant, whereas the reduction of Ca level was insignificant. Zinc level in the eyeballs of UV-exposed fish was significantly higher than in non-irradiated specimens. The results suggest that ultraviolet radiation affects prooxidant/antioxidant balance and Mg, Cu, Zn contents in the eyes of fish living in shallow habitats. These may lead to cataract formation.

  6. Effects of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia on catalase activity and on radiosensitivity to natural ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croute, F.; Dupouy, D.; Charley, J.P.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Planel, H.

    1980-01-01

    Catalase activity of Paramecium tetraurelia decreased during autogamy and recovered to normal 5 days later. Autogamy also caused changes in the ciliate's sensitivity sensitivity to natural ionizing radiations - the decrease in cell growth rate previously described in shielded cultures did not occur when autogamous cells were used. Maximum effect of shielding was observed in 11-day-old postautogamous cells. The role of the catalase in the mechanism of natural irradiation effect is discussed

  7. Protecting peroxidase activity of multilayer enzyme-polyion films using outer catalase layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiyun; Rusling, James F; Hu, Naifei

    2007-12-27

    Films constructed layer-by-layer on electrodes with architecture {protein/hyaluronic acid (HA)}n containing myoglobin (Mb) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were protected against protein damage by H2O2 by using outer catalase layers. Peroxidase activity for substrate oxidation requires activation by H2O2, but {protein/HA}n films without outer catalase layers are damaged slowly and irreversibly by H2O2. The rate and extent of damage were decreased dramatically by adding outer catalase layers to decompose H2O2. Comparative studies suggest that protection results from catalase decomposing a fraction of the H2O2 as it enters the film, rather than by an in-film diffusion barrier. The outer catalase layers controlled the rate of H2O2 entry into inner regions of the film, and they biased the system to favor electrocatalytic peroxide reduction over enzyme damage. Catalase-protected {protein/HA}n films had an increased linear concentration range for H2O2 detection. This approach offers an effective way to protect biosensors from damage by H2O2.

  8. Catalase inhibition in the Arcuate nucleus blocks ethanol effects on the locomotor activity of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Segura, Carles; Correa, Mercé; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2005-03-07

    Previous studies have demonstrated that there is a bidirectional modulation of ethanol-induced locomotion produced by drugs that regulate brain catalase activity. In the present study we have assessed the effect in rats of intraperitoneal, intraventricular or intracraneal administration of the catalase inhibitor sodium azide in the locomotor changes observed after ethanol (1 g/kg) administration. Our results show that sodium azide prevents the effects of ethanol in rats locomotion not only when sodium azide was systemically administered but also when it was intraventricularly injected, then confirming that the interaction between catalase and ethanol takes place in Central Nervous System (CNS). Even more interestingly, the same results were observed when sodium azide administration was restricted to the hypothalamic Arcuate nucleus (ARC), a brain region which has one of the highest levels of expression of catalase. Therefore, the results of the present study not only confirm a role for brain catalase in the mediation of ethanol-induced locomotor changes in rodents but also point to the ARC as a major neuroanatomical location for this interaction. These results are in agreement with our reports showing that ethanol-induced locomotor changes are clearly dependent of the ARC integrity and, especially of the POMc-synthesising neurons of this nucleus. According to these data we propose a model in which ethanol oxidation via catalase could produce acetaldehyde into the ARC and to promote a release of beta-endorphins that would activate opioid receptors to produce locomotion and other ethanol-induced neurobehavioural changes.

  9. Electrochemical monitoring of native catalase activity in skin using skin covered oxygen electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocchi, Sarah; Björklund, Sebastian; Svensson, Birgitta; Engblom, Johan; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2017-07-15

    A skin covered oxygen electrode, SCOE, was constructed with the aim to study the enzyme catalase, which is part of the biological antioxidative system present in skin. The electrode was exposed to different concentrations of H 2 O 2 and the amperometric current response was recorded. The observed current is due to H 2 O 2 penetration through the outermost skin barrier (referred to as the stratum corneum, SC) and subsequent catalytic generation of O 2 by catalase present in the underlying viable epidermis and dermis. By tape-stripping the outermost skin layers we demonstrate that SC is a considerable diffusion barrier for H 2 O 2 penetration. Our experiments also indicate that skin contains a substantial amount of catalase, which is sufficient to detoxify H 2 O 2 that reaches the viable epidermis after exposure of skin to high concentrations of peroxide (0.5-1mM H 2 O 2 ). Further, we demonstrate that the catalase activity is reduced at acidic pH, as compared with the activity at pH 7.4. Finally, experiments with often used penetration enhancer thymol shows that this compound interferes with the catalase reaction. Health aspect of this is briefly discussed. Summarizing, the results of this work show that the SCOE can be utilized to study a broad spectrum of issues involving the function of skin catalase in particular, and the native biological antioxidative system in skin in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of catalase gene polymorphisms with catalase activity and susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus in the Suez Canal area, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, M S; Ghattas, M H; Labib, S M

    2012-10-01

    The present study evaluated the relationship of genetic variants in both promoter (-262 C/T) and in exonic (389 C/T) regions of the catalase (CAT) gene to CAT activity and risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Suez Canal-area patients. CAT gene polymorphisms were assessed by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). CAT activity was measured by using a spectrophotometer. We compared the frequencies of CAT 389 C/T and -262 C/T polymorphic variants between SLE patients (n = 103) and healthy controls (n = 103). CAT 389 C/T is associated with SLE susceptibility, with the T allele being significantly more frequent among SLE patients than healthy controls. There was no association, however, between CAT activity and genotypes of 389 C/T. We did not observe significant differences in the prevalence of CAT -262 C/T polymorphic variants in SLE patients and controls, however, we found that patients with the CAT -262 CT and TT genotypes had low CAT activity, and these genotypes showed a significant association with thrombocytopaenia, leukopaenia and the presence of anti-snRNP in SLE patients. In conclusion, the present study supports the notion of in vivo oxidative stress in SLE as indicated by the decrease in CAT activity. The allelic variations in the CAT gene -262 are more likely to affect the expression or the function of the enzyme. Since CAT may be pathogenetically linked to SLE, and owing to its free-radical origin, it appears reasonable to target lipid peroxidation by dietary and/or pharmacological antioxidants.

  11. Amelioration of radiation induced decrease in activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in mouse liver by Punica granatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Jaimala; Mathur, Aarti

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in irradiated tissue. Cells of liver have their own defence system, the antioxidant system to deactivate ROS. Antioxidant system includes enzymatic and non-enzymatic components. Liver is rich in endogenous antioxidants and related enzymes. Catalase and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) are powerful antioxidant enzymes. In the present study Punica granatum fruit rind Ethanol extract (PGFRE) was tested against 60 Co gamma radiation induced alteration in Swiss albino mouse. Healthy adult (25±2) Swiss albino mouse were selected and divided into four groups. The first group was sham irradiated. The second group was irradiated with 8 Gy 60 Co gamma radiation only and served as control. The third group was administered with Ethanol extract of Punica granatum fruit rind one hour before irradiation at the dose rate of 10 mg/kg body weight orally. Animals were exposed to 8 Gy 60 Co gamma radiation. Fourth group was administered with Ethanol extract of Punica granatum fruit rind at the dose rate of 10 mg/kg body weight. Mice were sacrificed at various post irradiation intervals and liver was removed, weighed and analysed biochemically for Catalase and SOD activity. Catalase and SOD activity decreased up till 7th post irradiation day in 8 Gy irradiated group than normal. In PGFRE pretreated irradiated group catalase and SOD activity were higher than the corresponding control group at all the intervals. These results indicate that PGFRE extract protects damage to the catalase and SOD activity in liver of Swiss albino mouse against lethal dose of gamma radiation. (author)

  12. Natural resistance to ascorbic acid induced oxidative stress is mainly mediated by catalase activity in human cancer cells and catalase-silencing sensitizes to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingelhoeffer Christoph

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ascorbic acid demonstrates a cytotoxic effect by generating hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS involved in oxidative cell stress. A panel of eleven human cancer cell lines, glioblastoma and carcinoma, were exposed to serial dilutions of ascorbic acid (5-100 mmol/L. The purpose of this study was to analyse the impact of catalase, an important hydrogen peroxide-detoxifying enzyme, on the resistance of cancer cells to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative stress. Methods Effective concentration (EC50 values, which indicate the concentration of ascorbic acid that reduced the number of viable cells by 50%, were detected with the crystal violet assay. The level of intracellular catalase protein and enzyme activity was determined. Expression of catalase was silenced by catalase-specific short hairpin RNA (sh-RNA in BT-20 breast carcinoma cells. Oxidative cell stress induced apoptosis was measured by a caspase luminescent assay. Results The tested human cancer cell lines demonstrated obvious differences in their resistance to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative cell stress. Forty-five percent of the cell lines had an EC50 > 20 mmol/L and fifty-five percent had an EC50 50 of 2.6–5.5 mmol/L, glioblastoma cells were the most susceptible cancer cell lines analysed in this study. A correlation between catalase activity and the susceptibility to ascorbic acid was observed. To study the possible protective role of catalase on the resistance of cancer cells to oxidative cell stress, the expression of catalase in the breast carcinoma cell line BT-20, which cells were highly resistant to the exposure to ascorbic acid (EC50: 94,9 mmol/L, was silenced with specific sh-RNA. The effect was that catalase-silenced BT-20 cells (BT-20 KD-CAT became more susceptible to high concentrations of ascorbic acid (50 and 100 mmol/L. Conclusions Fifty-five percent of the human cancer cell lines tested were unable to protect themselves

  13. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Improves Aged and UV-Irradiated Skin by Catalase Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mi Hee; Lee, Se-Rah; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose homeostasis. Its activation stimulates antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, whose expression is decreased in aged human skin. Here we investigated the expression of PPARα in aged and ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated skin, and whether PPARα activation can modulate expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and procollagen through catalase regulation. We found that PPARα mRNA level was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged and photoaged human skin as well as in UV-irradiated skin. A PPARα activator, Wy14643, inhibited UV-induced increase of MMP-1 and decrease of procollagen expression and caused marked increase in catalase expression. Furthermore, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was suppressed by Wy14643 in UV-irradiated and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the PPARα activation-induced upregulation of catalase leads to scavenging of ROS produced due to UV irradiation or aging. PPARα knockdown decreased catalase expression and abolished the beneficial effects of Wy14643. Topical application of Wy14643 on hairless mice restored catalase activity and prevented MMP-13 and inflammatory responses in skin. Our findings indicate that PPARα activation triggers catalase expression and ROS scavenging, thereby protecting skin from UV-induced damage and intrinsic aging.

  14. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies - can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential activation of catalase expression and activity by PPAR agonists: Implications for astrocyte protection in anti-glioma therapy☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Hebbar, Sachin; Zhao, Weiling; Moore, Steven A.; Domann, Frederick E.; Robbins, Mike E.

    2013-01-01

    Glioma survival is dismal, in part, due to an imbalance in antioxidant expression and activity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists have antineoplastic properties which present new redox-dependent targets for glioma anticancer therapies. Herein, we demonstrate that treatment of primary cultures of normal rat astrocytes with PPAR agonists increased the expression of catalase mRNA protein, and enzymatic activity. In contrast, these same agonists had no effect on catalase expression and activity in malignant rat glioma cells. The increase in steady-state catalase mRNA observed in normal rat astrocytes was due, in part, to de novo mRNA synthesis as opposed to increased catalase mRNA stability. Moreover, pioglitazone-mediated induction of catalase activity in normal rat astrocytes was completely blocked by transfection with a PPARγ-dominant negative plasmid. These data suggest that defects in PPAR-mediated signaling and gene expression may represent a block to normal catalase expression and induction in malignant glioma. The ability of PPAR agonists to differentially increase catalase expression and activity in normal astrocytes but not glioma cells suggests that these compounds might represent novel adjuvant therapeutic agents for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:24024139

  16. Superoxide anion production and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in Coxiella burnetii.

    OpenAIRE

    Akporiaye, E T; Baca, O G

    1983-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii was examined for superoxide anion (O2-) production and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. The organism generated O2- at pH 4.5 but not at pH 7.4. The rickettsia displayed superoxide dismutase activity distinguishable from that of the host cell (L-929 mouse fibroblast). Catalase activity was maximal at pH 7.0 and diminished at pH 4.5. These enzymes may account, in part, for the ability of this obligate intracellular parasite to survive within phagocytes.

  17. Further studies on O2-resistant photosynthesis and photorespiration in a tobacco mutant with enhanced catalase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelitch, I.

    1990-01-01

    The increase in net photosynthesis in M 4 progeny of an O 2 -resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutant relative to wild-type plants at 21 and 42% O 2 has been confirmed and further investigated. Self-pollination of an M 3 mutant produced M 4 progeny segregating high catalase phenotypes (average 40% greater than wild type) at a frequency of about 60%. The high catalase phenotype cosegregated precisely with O 2 -resistant photosynthesis. About 25% of the F 1 progeny of reciprocal crosses between the same M 3 mutant and wild type had high catalase activity, whether the mutant was used as the maternal or paternal parent, indicating nuclear inheritance. In high-catalase mutants the activity of NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase, another peroxisomal enzyme, was the same as wild type. The mutants released 15% less photorespiratory CO 2 as a percent of net photosynthesis in CO 2 -free 21% O 2 and 36% less in CO 2 -free 42% O 2 compared with wild type. The mutant leaf tissue also released less 14 CO 2 per [1- 14 C]glycolate metabolized than wild type in normal air, consistent with less photorespiration in the mutant. The O 2 -resistant photosynthesis appears to be caused by a decrease in photorespiration especially under conditions of high O 2 where the stoichiometry of CO 2 release per glycolate metabolized is expected to be enhanced. The higher catalase activity in the mutant may decrease the nonenzymatic peroxidation of keto-acids such as hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate by photorespiratory H 2 O 2

  18. Arrhenius activation energy of damage to catalase during spray-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Joachim; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation of catalase during spray-drying over a range of outlet gas temperatures could be closely represented by the Arrhenius equation. From this an activation energy for damage to the catalase could be calculated. The close fit to Arrhenius suggests that the thermally-induced part of inactivation of the catalase during the complex drying and particle-formation processes takes place at constant temperature. These processes are rapid compared with the residence time of the powder in the collecting vessel of the cyclone where dried catalase is exposed to a constant temperature equal to approximately the drying gas outlet temperature. A lower activation energy after spray drying with the ultrasonic nozzle was found than with the 2-fluid nozzle under otherwise identical spray drying conditions. It is feasible that the ultrasonic nozzle when mounted in the lid of the spray dryer heats up toward the drying gas inlet temperature much more that the air-cooled 2-fluid nozzle. Calculation of the Arrhenius activation energy also showed how the stabilizing efficacy of trehalose and mannitol on the catalase varies in strength across the range of drying gas inlet and outlet temperatures examined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Copper suppresses abscisic acid catabolism and catalase activity, and inhibits seed germination of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Nenghui; Li, Haoxuan; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Yinggao; Liu, Rui; Xu, Weifeng; Jing, Yu; Peng, Xinxiang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-11-01

    Although copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plants, a slight excess of Cu in soil can be harmful to plants. Unfortunately, Cu contamination is a growing problem all over the world due to human activities, and poses a soil stress to plant development. As one of the most important biological processes, seed germination is sensitive to Cu stress. However, little is known about the mechanism of Cu-induced inhibition of seed germination. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between Cu and ABA which is the predominant regulator of seed germination. Cu at a concentration of 30 µM effectively inhibited germination of rice caryopsis. ABA content in germinating seeds under copper stress was also higher than that under control conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that Cu treatment reduced the expression of OsABA8ox2, a key gene of ABA catabolism in rice seeds. In addition, both malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 contents were increased by Cu stress in the germinating seeds. Antioxidant enzyme assays revealed that only catalase activity was reduced by excess Cu, which was consistent with the mRNA profile of OsCATa during seed germination under Cu stress. Together, our results demonstrate that suppression of ABA catabolism and catalase (CAT) activity by excess Cu leads to the inhibition of seed germination of rice. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in two L5178Y murine lymphoma cell strains with different radiosensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworska, A.; Rosiek, O.; Witkowska, K.

    1987-01-01

    Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in two murine leukemia L5178Y strains were determined. It was found that the relatively resistant to ionizing radiation L5178Y-R (LY-R) strain has the SOD activity two times higher than L5178Y-S (LY-S), the sensitive one. On the contrary, LY-S has two times higher activity of CAT than LY-R. These results are in agreement with hypotheses of deleterious role of O 2 - and radioprotective role of SOD. 33 refs., 2 tabs. (author)

  1. Decrease in catalase activity of Folsomia candida fed a Bt rice diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Yiyang; Ke, Xin; Chen, Fajun

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the effects of three Bt-rice varieties and their non-Bt conventional isolines on biological traits including survival, reproduction, and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, in the Collembolan, Folsomia candida. The reproduction...... was significantly lower when fed Kemingdao and Huahui1 than those feeding on their non-GM near-isogenic varieties Xiushui and Minghui63 respectively, this can be explained by the differences of plant compositions depended on variety of rice. The catalase activity of F. candida was significantly lower when fed...

  2. Superoxide dismutase and catalase conjugated to polyethylene glycol increases endothelial enzyme activity and oxidant resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, J.S.; Minor, R.L. Jr.; White, C.W.; Repine, J.E.; Rosen, G.M.; Freeman, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Covalent conjugation of superoxide dismutase and catalase with polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulatory half-lives of these enzymes from 125 I-PEG-catalase or 125 I-PEG-superoxide dismutase produced a linear, concentration-dependent increase in cellular enzyme activity and radioactivity. Fluorescently labeled PEG-superoxide dismutase incubated with endothelial cells showed a vesicular localization. Mechanical injury to cell monolayers, which is known to stimulate endocytosis, further increased the uptake of fluorescent PEG-superoxide dismutase. Addition of PEG and PEG-conjugated enzymes perturbed the spin-label binding environment, indicative of producing an increase in plasma membrane fluidity. Thus, PEG conjugation to superoxide dismutase and catalase enhances cell association of these enzymes in a manner which increases cellular enzyme activities and provides prolonged protection from partially reduced oxygen species

  3. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-11

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based 'cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A manganese catalase from Thermomicrobium roseum with peroxidase and catecholase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Robin; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme with catechol oxidase activity was identified in Thermomicrobium roseum extracts via solution assays and activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Yet, the genome of T. roseum does not harbor a catecholase gene. The enzyme was purified with two anion exchange chromatography steps and ultimately identified to be a manganese catalase with additional peroxidase and catecholase activity. Catalase activity (6280 ± 430 IU/mg) clearly dominated over pyrogallol peroxidase (231 ± 53 IU/mg) and catecholase (3.07 ± 0.56 IU/mg) activity as determined at 70 °C. Most enzyme kinetic properties were comparable to previously characterized manganese catalase enzymes. Catalase activity was highest at alkaline pH values and showed inhibition by excess substrate and chloride. The apparent K m and k cat values were 20 mM and 2.02 × 10 4  s -1 subunit -1 at 25 °C and pH 7.0.

  5. Computational study concerning the effect of some pesticides on the Proteus Mirabilis catalase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isvoran, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of the effects of the herbicides nicosulfuron and chlorsulfuron and the fungicides difenoconazole and drazoxlone upon catalase produced by soil microorganism Proteus mirabilis is performed using the molecular docking technique. The interactions of pesticides with the enzymes are predicted using SwissDock and PatchDock docking tools. There are correlations for predicted binding energy values for enzyme-pesticide complexes obtained using the two docking tools, all the considered pesticides revealing favorable binding to the enzyme, but only the herbicides bind to the catalytic site. These results suggest the inhibitory potential of chlorsulfuron and nicosulfuron on the catalase activity in soil.

  6. Catalase activity in healthy and inflamed pulp tissues of permanent teeth in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Kmc; Kırıcı, D Ö; Evcil, M S

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) activity in healthy and inflamed dental pulp of young patient's teeth and to investigate if an active defense system oxidizing agents is present as a response to bacterial invasion. Twenty young patients between 15 and 25 ages, who were diagnosed to be healthy, were the source of the pulp tissue. The situation of the dental pulps was evaluated using clinical and radiographic assessments. The patients were divided two groups from healthy, and inflamed pulp tissues were obtained; each participant provided one pulp tissue specimens. The specimens were collected during endodontic treatment or by longitudinally grooving and splitting the teeth (if extracted). Catalase activity was determined through spectrophotometric methods and an independent sample t-test assessed the significance of differences between the groups. There was statistically a difference between healthy pulp tissue and inflamed pulp tissue (P catalase activity of healthy group was significantly lower than inflamed pulp groups. The present study has shown that a significant increase in catalase activity is determined in inflamed dental pulps, which is due to pulpitis in comparison to healthy dental pulp.

  7. Inhibition of catalase by aminotriazole in vivo results in reduction of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliak, M; Gospodaryov, D; Semchyshyn, H; Lushchak, V

    2008-04-01

    The inhibitor of catalase 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AMT) was used to study the physiological role of catalase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under starvation. It was shown that AMT at the concentration of 10 mM did not affect the growth of the yeast. In vivo and in vitro the degree of catalase inhibition by AMT was concentration- and time-dependent. Peroxisomal catalase in bakers' yeast was more sensitive to AMT than the cytosolic one. In vivo inhibition of catalase by AMT in S. cerevisiae caused a simultaneous decrease in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and an increase in glutathione reductase activity. At the same time, the level of protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative modification, was not affected. Possible mechanisms compensating the negative effects caused by AMT inhibition of catalase are discussed.

  8. Decrease in catalase activity of Folsomia candida fed a Bt rice diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Yiyang, E-mail: yuanyy@ioz.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Ke Xin, E-mail: xinke@sibs.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 300 Fenglin Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen Fajun, E-mail: fajunchen@njau.edu.cn [College of Plant Protection, Department of Entomology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Krogh, Paul Henning, E-mail: phk@dmu.dk [Department of Bioscience, University of Aarhus, P.O. Box 314, Vejlsoevej 25, DK-8600 Silkeborg (Denmark); Ge Feng, E-mail: gef@ioz.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Here we report the effects of three Bt-rice varieties and their non-Bt conventional isolines on biological traits including survival, reproduction, and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, in the Collembolan, Folsomia candida. The reproduction was significantly lower when fed Kemingdao and Huahui1 than those feeding on their non-GM near-isogenic varieties Xiushui and Minghui63 respectively, this can be explained by the differences of plant compositions depended on variety of rice. The catalase activity of F. candida was significantly lower when fed the Bt-rice variety Kemingdao compared to the near-isogenic non-Bt-rice variety Xiushui. This suggests that some Bt-rice varieties may impose environmental stress to collembolans. We emphasize that changes in activity of antioxidant enzymes of non-target organisms are important in understanding the ecological consequences for organisms inhabiting transgenic Bt-rice plantations. - Highlights: > We examine the effects of Bt-rice on Folsomia candida with laboratory test. > The reproduction of F. candida was decreased by two Bt-rice varieties. > Decreased reproduction caused by the differences of varieties or C/N ratio of rice. > The catalase activity was decreased by Bt-rice Kemingdao. > Some Bt-rice may impose environmental stress on NTOs. - The catalase of the collembolan (Folsomia candida) was decreased when fed Bt-rice, Kemingdao.

  9. Decrease in catalase activity of Folsomia candida fed a Bt rice diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yiyang; Ke Xin; Chen Fajun; Krogh, Paul Henning; Ge Feng

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the effects of three Bt-rice varieties and their non-Bt conventional isolines on biological traits including survival, reproduction, and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, in the Collembolan, Folsomia candida. The reproduction was significantly lower when fed Kemingdao and Huahui1 than those feeding on their non-GM near-isogenic varieties Xiushui and Minghui63 respectively, this can be explained by the differences of plant compositions depended on variety of rice. The catalase activity of F. candida was significantly lower when fed the Bt-rice variety Kemingdao compared to the near-isogenic non-Bt-rice variety Xiushui. This suggests that some Bt-rice varieties may impose environmental stress to collembolans. We emphasize that changes in activity of antioxidant enzymes of non-target organisms are important in understanding the ecological consequences for organisms inhabiting transgenic Bt-rice plantations. - Highlights: → We examine the effects of Bt-rice on Folsomia candida with laboratory test. → The reproduction of F. candida was decreased by two Bt-rice varieties. → Decreased reproduction caused by the differences of varieties or C/N ratio of rice. → The catalase activity was decreased by Bt-rice Kemingdao. → Some Bt-rice may impose environmental stress on NTOs. - The catalase of the collembolan (Folsomia candida) was decreased when fed Bt-rice, Kemingdao.

  10. Low dose X –ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focea, R; Nadejde, C; Creanga, D; Luchian, T

    2012-01-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, p<0.05) suggested the stimulation of the antioxidant enzyme biosynthesis within several hours after exposure at doses of 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy; the putative enzyme inactivation could also occur (due to the injuries on the hydrogen bonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  11. Effects of Soy-Germ Protein on Catalase Activity of Plasma and Erythocyte of Metabolic Syndrome Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERY WINARSI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress always accompany patients with metabolic syndrome (MS. Several researchers reported that soy-protein is able to decrease oxidative stress level. However, there is no report so far about soy-germ protein in relation to its potential to the decrease oxidative stress level of MS patients. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of soy-germ protein on activity of catalase enzyme in blood's plasma as well as erythrocytes of MS patients. Double-blind randomized clinical trial was used as an experimental study. Thirty respondents were included in this study with MS, normal level blood sugar, low-HDL cholesterol but high in triglyceride, 40-65 years old, Body Mass Index > 25 kg/m2, live in Purwokerto and agreed to sign the informed consent. They were randomly grouped into 3 different groups, 10 each: Group I, was given special milk that contains soy-germ protein and Zn; Group II, soy-germ protein, while Group III was placebo; for two consecutive months. Data were taken from blood samples in 3 different periods i.e. 0, 1, and 2 months after treatment. Two months after treatment, there was an increase from 5.36 to 20.17 IU/mg (P = 0.028 in activity of catalase enzyme in blood's plasma respondents who consumed milk containing soy-germ protein with or without Zn. A similar trend of catalase activity, but at a lower level, was also noticed in erythrocyte; which increased from 88.31 to 201.11 IU/mg (P = 0.013. The increase in activity of catalase enzyme in blood's plasma was 2.2 times higher than that in erythrocytes.

  12. Catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of vasoprotective proteins in venous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Floeren, Melanie; Kumpf, Stephanie; Both, Charlotte; Peter, Bärbel; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Kojda, Georg

    2011-11-01

    Physical activity induces favourable changes of arterial gene expression and protein activity, although little is known about its effect in venous tissue. Although our understanding of the initiating molecular signals is still incomplete, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered a key event. This study sought to investigate the effects of two different training protocols on the expression of eNOS and extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) in venous and lung tissue and to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms. C57Bl/6 mice underwent voluntary exercise or forced physical activity. Changes of vascular mRNA and protein levels and activity of eNOS, ecSOD and catalase were determined in aorta, heart, lung and vena cava. Both training protocols similarly increased relative heart weight and resulted in up-regulation of aortic and myocardial eNOS. In striking contrast, eNOS expression in vena cava and lung remained unchanged. Likewise, exercise up-regulated ecSOD in the aorta and in left ventricular tissue but remained unchanged in lung tissue. Catalase expression in lung tissue and vena cava of exercised mice exceeded that in aorta by 6.9- and 10-fold, respectively, suggesting a lack of stimulatory effects of hydrogen peroxide. In accordance, treatment of mice with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole for 6 weeks resulted in significant up-regulation of eNOS and ecSOD in vena cava. These data suggest that physiological venous catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of eNOS and ecSOD. Furthermore, therapeutic inhibition of vascular catalase might improve pulmonary rehabilitation. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Ozone Sensitivity and Catalase Activity in Pigmented and Non-Pigmented Strains of Serratia Marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ondarza, José

    2017-01-01

    Ozone exposure rapidly leads to bacterial death, making ozone an effective disinfectant in food industry and health care arena. However, microbial defenses may moderate this effect and play a role in the effective use of oxidizing agents for disinfection. Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen, expressing genes differentially during infection of a human host. A better understanding of regulatory systems that control expression of Serratia 's virulence genes and defenses is therefore valuable. Here, we investigated the role of pigmentation and catalase in Serratia marcescens on survival to ozone exposure. Pigmented and non-pigmented strains of Serratia marcescens were cultured to exponential or stationary phase and exposed to 5 ppm of gaseous ozone for 2.5 - 10 minutes. Survival was calculated via plate counts. Catalase activity was measured photometrically and tolerance to hydrogen peroxide was assayed by disk-diffusion. Exposure of S. marcescens to 5 ppm gaseous ozone kills > 90% of cells within 10 minutes in a time and concentration-dependent manner. Although pigmented Serratia (grown at 28°C) survived ozonation better than unpigmented Serratia (grown at 35°C), non-pigmented mutant strains of Serratia had similar ozone survival rates, catalase activity and H 2 O 2 tolerance as wild type strains. Rather, ozone survival and catalase activity were elevated in 6 hour cultures compared to 48 hour cultures. Our studies did not bear out a role for prodigiosin in ozone survival. Rather, induction of oxidative stress responses during exponential growth increased both catalase activity and ozone survival in both pigmented and unpigmented S. marcescens .

  14. Brain catalase activity inhibition as well as opioid receptor antagonism increases ethanol-induced HPA axis activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Raúl; Sanchis-Segura, Carles; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2004-12-01

    Growing evidence indicates that brain catalase activity is involved in the psychopharmacological actions of ethanol. Recent data suggest that participation of this enzymatic system in some ethanol effects could be mediated by the endogenous opioid system. The present study assessed whether brain catalase has a role in ethanol-induced activation of the HPA axis, a neuroendocrine system modulated by the endogenous opioid neurotransmission. Swiss male mice received an intraperitoneal injection of the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT; 0-1 g/kg), and 0 to 20 hr after this administration, animals received an ethanol (0-4 g/kg; intraperitoneally) challenge. Thirty, 60, or 120 min after ethanol administration, plasma corticosterone levels were determined immunoenzymatically. In addition, we tested the effects of 45 mg/kg of cyanamide (another catalase inhibitor) and 0 to 2 mg/kg of naltrexone (nonselective opioid receptor antagonist) on ethanol-induced enhancement in plasma corticosterone values. The present study revealed that AT boosts ethanol-induced increase in plasma corticosterone levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, it did not affect corticosterone values when measured after administration of saline, cocaine (4 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), or morphine (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). The catalase inhibitor cyanamide (45 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) also increased ethanol-related plasma corticosterone levels. These effects of AT and cyanamide on ethanol-induced corticosterone values were observed under treatment conditions that decreased significantly brain catalase activity. Indeed, a significant correlation between effects of catalase manipulations on both variables was found. Finally, we found that the administration of naltrexone enhanced the levels of plasma corticosterone after the administration of saline or ethanol. This study shows that the inhibition of brain catalase increases ethanol-induced plasma corticosterone levels. Results are

  15. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  16. KatB, a cyanobacterial Mn-catalase with unique active site configuration: Implications for enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihani, Subhash C; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Manganese catalases (Mn-catalases), a class of H2O2 detoxifying proteins, are structurally and mechanistically distinct from the commonly occurring catalases, which contain heme. Active site of Mn-catalases can serve as template for the synthesis of catalase mimetics for therapeutic intervention in oxidative stress related disorders. However, unlike the heme catalases, structural aspects of Mn-catalases remain inadequately explored. The genome of the ancient cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, shows the presence of two Mn-catalases, KatA and KatB. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of KatB. The KatB protein (with a C-terminal his-tag) was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. On the addition of Mn(2+) to the E. coli growth medium, a substantial increase in production of the soluble KatB protein was observed. The purified KatB protein was an efficient catalase, which was relatively insensitive to inhibition by azide. Crystal structure of KatB showed a hexameric assembly with four-helix bundle fold, characteristic of the Ferritin-like superfamily. With canonical Glu4His2 coordination geometry and two terminal water ligands, the KatB active site was distinctly different from that of other Mn-catalases. Interestingly, the KatB active site closely resembled the active sites of ruberythrin/bacterioferritin, bi-iron members of the Ferritin-like superfamily. The KatB crystal structure provided fundamental insights into the evolutionary relationship within the Ferritin-like superfamily and further showed that Mn-catalases can be sub-divided into two groups, each with a distinct active site configuration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid activation of catalase followed by citrate efflux effectively improves aluminum tolerance in the roots of chick pea (Cicer arietinum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manorma; Sharma, Vinay; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath

    2016-05-01

    The present study demonstrates the comparative response of two contrasting genotypes (aluminum (Al) tolerant and Al sensitive) of chick pea (Cicer arietinum) against Al stress. The Al-tolerant genotype (RSG 974) showed lesser inhibition of root growth as well as lower oxidative damages, measured in terms of the accumulation of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation compared to the Al-sensitive genotype (RSG 945). The accumulation of Al by roots of both genotypes was almost equal at 96 and 144 h after Al treatment; however, it was higher in Al-tolerant than Al-sensitive genotype at 48 h after Al treatment. Further, the Al-mediated induction of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly higher in Al-tolerant than Al-sensitive genotype. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was almost similar in both genotypes. Al treatment promptly activated catalase activity in Al-tolerant genotype, and it was remarkably higher than that of Al-sensitive genotype. As another important Al detoxification mechanism, citrate efflux was almost equal in both genotypes except at 1000 μM Al treatment for 96 and 144 h. Further, citrate carrier and anion channel inhibitor experiment confirmed the contribution of citrate efflux in conferring Al tolerance in Al-tolerant genotype. Based on the available data, the present study concludes that rapid activation of catalase (also SOD) activity followed by citrate efflux effectively improves Al tolerance in chick pea.

  18. The antiproliferative activity of di-2-pyridylketone dithiocarbamate is partly attributed to catalase inhibition: detailing the interaction by spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiping; Liu, Youxun; Fu, Yun; Huang, Tengfei; Kang, Lixia; Li, Changzheng

    2017-08-22

    The bioactivity of drugs is attributed to their interaction with biological molecules, embodied in either their direct or indirect influence on enzyme activity and conformation. Di-2-pyridylketone hydrazine dithiocarbamate (DpdtC) exhibits significant antitumor activity in our preliminary study. We speculated that its activity may partly stem from enzyme inhibition due to strong metal chelating ability. To this end, we assessed its effect on catalase from erythrocytes and found evidence of inhibition, which was further confirmed by ROS determination in vivo. Thus, detailing the interaction between the agent and catalase via spectroscopic methods and molecular docking was required to obtain information on both the dynamics and thermodynamic parameters. The Lineweaver-Burk plot implied an uncompetitive pattern between DpdtC and catalase from beef liver, and IC 50 = ∼7 μM. The thermodynamic parameters from fluorescence quenching measurements indicated that DpdtC could bind to catalase with moderate affinity (K a = approximately 10 4 M -1 ). CD spectra revealed that DpdtC could significantly disrupt the secondary structure of catalase. Docking studies indicated that DpdtC bound to a flexible region of catalase, involving hydrogen bonds and salt bond; this was consistent with thermodynamic results from spectral investigations. Our data clearly showed that catalase inhibition of DpdtC was not due to direct chelation of iron from heme (killing), but through an allosteric effect. Thus, it can be concluded that the antiproliferative activity of DpdtC is partially attributed to its catalase inhibition.

  19. Correlation between biological activity and electron transferring of bovine liver catalase: Osmolytes effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehrani, H. Sepasi; Moosavi-Movahedi, A.A.; Ghourchian, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Proline increases ET in Bovine Liver Catalase (BLC) whereas histidine decreases it. • Proline also increased the biological activity, whereas histidine decreased it. • Electron transferring and biological activity for BLC are directly correlated. • Proline causes favorable ET for BLC shown by positive E 1/2 (E°′) and negative ΔG. • Histidine makes ET unfavorable for BLC, manifested by E 1/2 (E°′) 0. -- Abstract: Catalase is a crucial antioxidant enzyme that protects life against detrimental effects of H 2 O 2 by disproportionating it into water and molecular oxygen. Effect of proline as a compatible and histidine as a non compatible osmolyte on the electron transferring and midpoint potential of catalase has been investigated. Proline increases the midpoint potential (ΔE m > 0), therefore causing the ΔG ET to be less positive and making the electron transfer reaction more facile whereas histidine decreases the E m (ΔE m ET , thereby rendering the electron transfer reaction less efficient. These results indicate the inhibitory effect of histidine evident by a −37% decrease in the cathodic peak current compared to 16% increase in the case of proline indicative of activation. The insight paves the tedious way towards our ultimate goal of elucidating a correlation between biological activity and electron transferring

  20. Role of phosphate on stability and catalase mimetic activity of cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ragini; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have been recently shown to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in different experimental model systems. CeNPs (3+) and CeNPs (4+) have been shown to exhibit superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase mimetic activity, respectively. Due to their nanoscale dimension, CeNPs are expected to interact with the components of biologically relevant buffers and medium, which could alter their catalytic properties. We have demonstrated earlier that CeNPs (3+) interact with phosphate and lose the SOD activity. However, very little is known about the interaction of CeNPs (4+) with the phosphate and other anions, predominantly present in biological buffers and their effects on the catalase mimetic-activity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we report that catalase mimetic-activity of CeNPs (4+) is resistant to the phosphate anions, pH changes and composition of cell culture media. Given the abundance of phosphate anions in the biological system, it is likely that internalized CeNPs would be influenced by cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic concentration of phosphate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Automated evaluation of the effect of ionic liquids on catalase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Paula C A G; Costa, Andreia D F; Lima, José L F C; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2011-03-01

    An automated assay for the evaluation of the influence of ionic liquids on the activity of catalase was developed. The activity and inhibition assays were implemented in a sequential injection analysis (SIA) system and intended to contribute for the estimation of the toxicity of the tested compounds. The fast developed methodology was based on the oxidation of the non-fluorescent probe amplex red, in the presence of H₂O₂, to produce resorufin, a strong fluorescent compound. Catalase activity was monitored by the decreased of the fluorescence intensity due to the consumption of H₂O₂ by the enzyme. The activity assays were performed in strictly aqueous media and in the presence of increasing concentrations of seven commercially available ionic liquids and sodium azide, a strong inhibitor of catalase. IC₅₀ values between 0.15 and 2.77 M were obtained for the tested compounds, revealing distinct inhibitory effects. This allowed us to perform some considerations about the toxicity of the tested cations and anions. The developed SIA methodology showed to be robust and exhibited good repeatability in all the assay conditions. On the other hand, it proved to be in good agreement with the actual concerns of "Green Chemistry" since it involved the consumption of less than 200 μL of reagents and the production of only 1.7 mL of effluent (per cycle) and at the same time reduced the operator exposure resulting in increased environmental and human safety. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Changes in gene expression and catalase activity in Oryza sativa L. under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vighi, I L; Benitez, L C; do Amaral, M N; Auler, P A; Moraes, G P; Rodrigues, G S; da Maia, L C; Pinto, L S; Braga, E J B

    2016-11-03

    Different rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes were subjected to high salinity and low temperature (150 mM NaCl and 13°C, respectively) for 0, 6, 24, 48, or 72 h. We evaluated the simultaneous expression of the genes OsCATA, OsCATB, and OsCATC, correlated gene expression with enzyme activity, and verified the regulation of these genes through identification of cis-elements in the promoter region. The hydrogen peroxide content increased in a tolerant genotype and decreased in a sensitive genotype under both stress conditions. Lipid peroxidation increased in the tolerant genotype when exposed to cold, and in the sensitive genotype when exposed to high salinity. Catalase activity significantly increased in both genotypes when subjected to 13°C. In the tolerant genotype, OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive to high salinity and cold, while in the sensitive genotype, OsCATA and OsCATC responded positively to saline stress, as did OsCATA and OsCATB to low temperature. Cis-element analysis identified different regulatory sequences in the catalase promoter region of each genotype. The sensitive genotype maintained a better balance between hydrogen oxyacid levels, catalase activity, and lipid peroxidation under low temperature than the resistant genotype. OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive in the salt-tolerant genotype to cold, OsCATA and OsCATC were the most responsive to saline stress, and OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive to chilling stress in the sensitive genotype. There were positive correlations between catalase activity and OsCATB expression in the tolerant genotype under saline stress and in the sensitive genotype under cold stress.

  3. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-01-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN - ) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10 -6 M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied

  4. Cytoprotective effect of phloroglucinol on oxidative stress induced cell damage via catalase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Kyoung Hwa; Chae, Sungwook; Zhang, Rui; Jung, Myung Sun; Ham, Young Min; Baik, Jong Seok; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2006-02-15

    We investigated the cytoprotective effect of phloroglucinol, which was isolated from Ecklonia cava (brown alga), against oxidative stress induced cell damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Phloroglucinol was found to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hydroxy radical, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thus prevented lipid peroxidation. As a result, phloroglucinol reduced H(2)O(2) induced apoptotic cells formation in V79-4 cells. In addition, phloroglucinol inhibited cell damage induced by serum starvation and radiation through scavenging ROS. Phloroglucinol increased the catalase activity and its protein expression. In addition, catalase inhibitor abolished the protective effect of phloroglucinol from H(2)O(2) induced cell damage. Furthermore, phloroglucinol increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK). Taken together, the results suggest that phloroglucinol protects V79-4 cells against oxidative damage by enhancing the cellular catalase activity and modulating ERK signal pathway. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G.

    1990-01-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B lt /B lt ) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B lt mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation

  6. Effect of soil contamination with azadirachtin on dehydrogenase and catalase activity of soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rıdvan Kızılkaya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available nsecticides are used in modern agriculture in large quantities to control pests and increase crop yield. Their use, however, has resulted in the disruption of ecosystems because of the effects on non-target soil microorganisms, some environmental problems, and decreasing soil fertility. These negative effects of synthetic pesticides on the environment have led to the search for alternative means of pest control. One such alternative is use of natural plant products such as azadirachtin that have pesticidal activity. The aim of this experiment was to study the effect of soil contamination by azadirachtin (C35H44O16 on dehydrogenase (DHA and catalase activity (CA of soil under field conditions in Perm, Russia. The tests were conducted on loamy soil (pHH2O 6.7, ECH2O 0.213 dSm-1, organic carbon 0.99%, to which the following quantities of azadirachtin were added: 0, 15, 30 and 60 mL da-1 of soil. Experimental design was randomized plot design with three replications. The DHA and CA analyses were performed 7, 14 and 21 days after the field experiment was established. The results of field experiment showed that azadirachtin had a positive influence on the DHA and CA at different soil sampling times. The increased doses of azadirachtin applied resulted in the higher level of DHA and CA in soil. The soil DHA and CA showed the highest activity on the 21th day after 60 mL azadirachtin da-1 application doses.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE AND CATALASE ACTIVITY AND EXPRESSION IN HONEY BEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Tatjana V; Purać, Jelena; Orčić, Snežana; Kojić, Danijela; Vujanović, Dragana; Stanimirović, Zoran; Gržetić, Ivan; Ilijević, Konstantin; Šikoparija, Branko; Blagojević, Duško P

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the cellular stress response in honey bees will significantly contribute to their conservation. The aim of this study was to analyze the response of the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in honey bees related to the presence of toxic metals in different habitats. Three locations were selected: (i) Tunovo on the mountain Golija, as control area, without industry and large human impact, (ii) Belgrade as urban area, and (iii) Zajača, as mining and industrial zone. Our results showed that the concentrations of lead (Pb) in whole body of bees vary according to habitat, but there was very significant increase of Pb in bees from investigated industrial area. Bees from urban and industrial area had increased expression of both Sod1 and Cat genes, suggesting adaptation to increased oxidative stress. However, in spite increased gene expression, the enzyme activity of catalase was lower in bees from industrial area suggesting inhibitory effect of Pb on catalase. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Increased catalase activity by all-trans retinoic acid and its effect on radiosensitivity in rat glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hua; Jeon, Ha Yeun; Park, Woo Yoon; Kim, Won Dong; Ahn, Hee Yul; Yu, Jae Ran

    2005-01-01

    It has been reported that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) can inhibit glioma growing in vitro. However, clinical trials with ATRA alone in gliomas revealed modest results. ATRA has been shown to increase radiosensitivity in other tumor types, so combining radiation and ATRA would be one of alternatives to increase therapeutic efficacy in malignant gliomas. Thus, we intended to know the role of catalase, which is induced by ATRA, for radiosensitivity. If radiation-reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) is removed by catalase, the effect of radiation will be reduced. A rat glioma cell line (36B10) was used for this study. The change of catalase activity and radiosensitivity by ATRA, with or without 3-amino-1, 2, 4-triazole (ATZ), a chemical inhibitor of catalase were measured. Catalase activity was measured by the decomposition of H 2 O 2 spectrophotometrically. Radiosensitivity was measured with clonogenic assay. Also ROS was measured using a 2, 7-dichlorofluores-cein diacetate spectrophotometrically. When 36B10 cells were exposed to 10, 25 and 50 μ M of ATRA for 48 h, the expression of catalase activity were increased with increasing concentration and incubation time of ATRA. Catalase activity was decreased with increasing the concentration of AT (1, 10 mM) dose-dependently. ROS was increased with ATRA and it was augmented with the combination of ATRA and radiation. ATZ decreased ROS production and increased cell survival in combination of ATRA and radiation despite the reduction of catalase. The increase of ROS is one of the reasons for the increased radiosensitivity in combination with ATRA. The catalase that is induced by ATRA doesn't decrease ROS production and radiosensitivity

  9. Fusicoccin-induced catalase inhibitor is produced independently of H+-ATPase activation and behaves as an organic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beffagna, Nicoletta; Riva, Marzia Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    The phytotoxin fusicoccin (FC) was found to induce an increase in apoplastic H₂O₂ content in Arabidopsis thaliana cells, apparently linked to the presence of an as yet unidentified catalase inhibitor detectable even in the external medium of FC-treated cells. This study, aimed to further characterize the inhibitor's features, shows that (1) FC-induced H₂O₂ accumulation increases as a function of FC concentration and correlates to the amount of inhibitor released at apoplastic level. The pattern of H+ efflux, conversely, does not fit with that of these two parameters, suggesting that neither the production nor the release of the catalase inhibitor is linked to the main role of FC in activating the plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase; (2) treatment with 10 µM erythrosine B (EB) early and totally inhibits net H+ and K+ fluxes across the PM, indicative of the H+ pump activity; nevertheless, also in these conditions a huge FC-induced H₂O₂ accumulation occurs, confirming that this effect is not related to the FC-induced PM H+-ATPase activation; (3) the inhibitor's release increases with time in all conditions tested and is markedly affected by extracellular pH (a higher pH value being associated to a larger efflux), in agreement with a weak acid release; and (4) the inhibitor can be almost completely recovered in a CH₂C₂-soluble fraction extracted from the incubation medium by sequential acid-base partitioning which contains nearly all of the organic acids released. These final results strongly suggest that the metabolite responsible for the FC-induced catalase inhibition belongs to the organic acid class. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  10. Uptake of elemental mercury and activity of catalase in rat, hamster, guinea-pig, normal and acatalasemic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, I.; Syversen, T.L.M.

    1982-01-01

    Uptake of elemental mercury after inhalation (3.5 mg/m 3 ) and the activity of catalase in brain, liver, kidney and blood were investigated in rat, hamster, guinea-pig, and normal and acatalasemic mice. The uptake of mercury in the species investigated varied considerably, being highest in the two strains of mice, followed by rat and hamster, and lowest in the guinea-pig. The uptake seemed to be more dependent on pulmonary ventilation than on the activity of catalase. The two strains of mice were exposed to a wide range of mercury concentrations in air (0.002-3.5 mg/m 3 ). The content of mercury in brain, liver and kidney was linearly dependent on the mercury concentration in the air, whereas in blood this relationship was exponential. At the lower concentraions of mercury in the inhaled air, the mercury level in blood was significantly lower, and in kidney higher in the acatalasemic mice compared to the normal ones. In acatalasemic mice the mercury content in the liver has higher at all concentrations investigated, whereas in brain no difference between the two strains was found. (author)

  11. Fluconazole and amphotericin-B resistance are associated with increased catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Blanco Linares

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Candida dubliniensis, a new species of Candida that has been recovered from several sites in healthy people, has been associated with recurrent episodes of oral candidiasis in AIDS and HIV-positive patients. This species is closely related to C. albicans. The enzymatic activity of C. dubliniensis in response to oxidative stress is of interest for the development of drugs to combat C. dubliniensis. Methods Fluconazole- and amphotericin B-resistant strains were generated as described by Fekete-Forgács et al. (2000. Superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase assays were performed as described by McCord and Fridovich (1969 and Aebi (1984, respectively. Results We demonstrated that superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase activities were significantly higher (p<0.05 in the fluconazole- and amphotericin B-resistant strains of C. dubliniensis and C. albicans than in the sensitive strains. The catalase and SOD activities were also significantly (p<0.01 higher in the sensitive and resistant C. albicans strains than in the respective C. dubliniensis strains. Conclusions These data suggest that C. albicans is better protected from oxidative stress than C. dubliniensis and that fluconazole, like amphotericin B, can induce oxidative stress in Candida; oxidative stress induces an adaptive response that results in a coordinated increase in catalase and SOD activities.

  12. Effects of paraoxonase, arylesterase, ceruloplasmin, catalase, and myeloperoxidase activities on prognosis in pediatric patients with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, Ganime; Atmaca, Yasemin Men; Alışık, Murat; Erel, Özcan

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the levels of paraoxonase (PON), stimulated paraoxonase (SPON), arylesterase (ARE), ceruloplasmin (CLP), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and catalase (CAT) in pediatric sepsis and to explore their effects on the prognosis of sepsis. Patients diagnosed with sepsis (n=33) and healthy controls (n=30) were included. PON, SPON, ARE, CLP, MPO, and CAT activities were measured in the sepsis and control groups. Additionally, the parameters were compared between survivors and non-survivors in the sepsis group. The levels of hemoglobin, white blood cell, platelet, lactate, and C-reactive protein were measured in the blood samples drawn from the patients with sepsis at diagnosis, at the 48th hour, and on day 7. The pediatric risk of mortality and pediatric logistic organ dysfunction scores of the patients were used for the estimation of severity of disease. Lower ARE (153.24 vs. 264.32U/L; p<0.001), lower CLP (80.58 vs. 97.98U/L; p=0.032), lower MPO (91.24 vs. 116.55U/L; p=0.023), and higher CAT levels (256.5 vs.145.5kU/L; p=0.003) were determined in the sepsis group as compared to the control group. There was no difference between the groups in terms of PON or SPON levels. No difference was determined between the survivors and non-survivors in terms of any of the parameters. The present study determined that ARE, CLP, CAT, and MPO levels are different between the pediatric patients with sepsis and healthy controls. ARE level can be a potent biomarker for sepsis in critical patients in intensive care units. Further studies with larger samples are required to demonstrate the value of these parameters as prognostic biomarkers in pediatric sepsis. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Catalase-related Hemoprotein in Coral Is Specialized for Synthesis of Short-chain Aldehydes: DISCOVERY OF P450-TYPE HYDROPEROXIDE LYASE ACTIVITY IN A CATALASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teder, Tarvi; Lõhelaid, Helike; Boeglin, William E; Calcutt, Wade M; Brash, Alan R; Samel, Nigulas

    2015-08-07

    In corals a catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein transforms arachidonic acid to the allene oxide 8R,9-epoxy-5,9,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid from which arise cyclopentenones such as the prostanoid-related clavulones. Recently we cloned two catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein genes (a and b) from the coral Capnella imbricata, form a being an allene oxide synthase and form b giving uncharacterized polar products (Lõhelaid, H., Teder, T., Tõldsepp, K., Ekins, M., and Samel, N. (2014) PloS ONE 9, e89215). Here, using HPLC-UV, LC-MS, and NMR methods, we identify a novel activity of fusion protein b, establishing its role in cleaving the lipoxygenase product 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid into the short-chain aldehydes (5Z)-8-oxo-octenoic acid and (3Z,6Z)-dodecadienal; these primary products readily isomerize in an aqueous medium to the corresponding 6E- and 2E,6Z derivatives. This type of enzymatic cleavage, splitting the carbon chain within the conjugated diene of the hydroperoxide substrate, is known only in plant cytochrome P450 hydroperoxide lyases. In mechanistic studies using (18)O-labeled substrate and incubations in H2(18)O, we established synthesis of the C8-oxo acid and C12 aldehyde with the retention of the hydroperoxy oxygens, consistent with synthesis of a short-lived hemiacetal intermediate that breaks down spontaneously into the two aldehydes. Taken together with our initial studies indicating differing gene regulation of the allene oxide synthase and the newly identified catalase-related hydroperoxide lyase and given the role of aldehydes in plant defense, this work uncovers a potential pathway in coral stress signaling and a novel enzymatic activity in the animal kingdom. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  15. Catalase activity of IgG antibodies from the sera of healthy donors and patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Evgeny A; Smirnova, Ludmila P; Bokhan, Nikolay A; Semke, Arkadiy V; Ivanova, Svetlana A; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2017-01-01

    We present first evidence showing that some electrophoretically homogeneous IgGs from the sera of patients with schizophrenia (36.4%) and their Fab and F(ab)2 fragments as well as from healthy donors (33.3%) possess catalase activity. The relative catalase activity of IgGs from the sera of individual schizophrenia patients (and healthy donors) significantly varied from patient to patient, but the activity of IgGs from healthy donors is on average 15.8-fold lower than that for schizophrenia patients. After extensive dialysis of purified IgGs against EDTA chelating metal ions, the relative catalase activity of IgGs decreases on average approximately 2.5-3.7-fold; all IgGs possess metal-dependent and independent catalase activity. The addition of external Me2+ ions to dialyzed and non-dialyzed IgGs leads to a significant increase in their activity. The best activator of dialyzed and non-dialyzed IgGs is Co2+, the activation by Cu2+, Mn2+, and Ni2+ ions were rare and always lower than by Co2+. Every IgG preparation demonstrates several individual sets of very well expressed pH optima in the pH range from 4.0 to 9.5. These data speak for the individual repertoire of catalase IgGs in every person and an extreme diversity of abzymes in their pH optima and activation by different metal ions. It is known that antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutases, catalases, and glutathione peroxidases represent critical defense mechanisms preventing oxidative modifications of DNA, proteins, and lipids. Catalase activity of human IgGs could probably also play a major role in the protection of organisms from oxidative stress and toxic compounds.

  16. Expression and Enzyme Activity of Catalase in Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Is Responsive to Environmental Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanhui; Bai, Qi; Zheng, Xusong; Lu, Zhongxian

    2017-08-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an important antioxidant enzyme that protects organisms against oxidative stresses by eliminating hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we cloned and characterized a full-length cDNA of CAT from Chilo suppressalis (CsCAT) and examined the influence of environmental stresses on CsCAT expression and enzyme activity. The cDNA contains a 1659-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 553 amino acids most closely related (90.14%) to Papilio polytes catalases. The CsCAT was expressed in all developmental stages with the highest expression in the fat body, and the CsCAT enzyme activity closely mirrored its observed mRNA expression patterns. The CsCAT mRNA was up-regulated when the larvae were exposed to high temperature (≥30 °C), insecticides (abamectin and chlorantraniliprole), chemicals (H2O2, CHP, CdCl2, and CuSO4), and a dead-end trap plant (vetiver grass), and the CsCAT enzyme activity again mirrored the observed CsCAT expression patterns. These results suggest that up-regulation of CsCAT may enhance the defense response of C. suppressalis by weakening the effects of environmental stresses, and provide insight into the role of CsCAT during development of C. suppressalis. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Up-regulation of P-glycoprotein expression by catalase via JNK activation in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Xu, Jianfeng; Min, Taishan; Huang, Weida

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of the MDR1 gene is one of the reasons for multidrug resistance (MDR). Some studies suggested that antioxidants could down-regulate MDR1 expression as a possible cancer treatment. In this report, we try to determine the effects of antioxidants (catalase or N-acetylcysteine [NAC]) on the regulation of intrinsic MDR1 overexpression in HepG2 cells. Adding catalase or N-acetylcysteine to the HepG2 culture led to a significant increase of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein drug transporter activity. After catalase or NAC treatment, a reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 abolished the positive effects of catalase on drug transporter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the up-regulation of P-glycoprotein functions by catalase was only observed in HepG2 cells but not in other cell lines tested (MCF-7, A549, A431). These data suggested that catalase can up-regulate P-glycoprotein expression in HepG2 cells via reducing intracellular ROS, and JNK may mediate this process.

  18. Mutual synergy between catalase and peroxidase activities of the bifunctional enzyme KatG is facilitated by electron hole-hopping within the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuma, Olive J; Davis, Ian; Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Krewall, Jessica R; Liu, Aimin; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2017-11-10

    KatG is a bifunctional, heme-dependent enzyme in the front-line defense of numerous bacterial and fungal pathogens against H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative damage from host immune responses. Contrary to the expectation that catalase and peroxidase activities should be mutually antagonistic, peroxidatic electron donors (PxEDs) enhance KatG catalase activity. Here, we establish the mechanism of synergistic cooperation between these activities. We show that at low pH values KatG can fully convert H 2 O 2 to O 2 and H 2 O only if a PxED is present in the reaction mixture. Stopped-flow spectroscopy results indicated rapid initial rates of H 2 O 2 disproportionation slowing concomitantly with the accumulation of ferryl-like heme states. These states very slowly returned to resting ( i.e. ferric) enzyme, indicating that they represented catalase-inactive intermediates. We also show that an active-site tryptophan, Trp-321, participates in off-pathway electron transfer. A W321F variant in which the proximal tryptophan was replaced with a non-oxidizable phenylalanine exhibited higher catalase activity and less accumulation of off-pathway heme intermediates. Finally, rapid freeze-quench EPR experiments indicated that both WT and W321F KatG produce the same methionine-tyrosine-tryptophan (MYW) cofactor radical intermediate at the earliest reaction time points and that Trp-321 is the preferred site of off-catalase protein oxidation in the native enzyme. Of note, PxEDs did not affect the formation of the MYW cofactor radical but could reduce non-productive protein-based radical species that accumulate during reaction with H 2 O 2 Our results suggest that catalase-inactive intermediates accumulate because of off-mechanism oxidation, primarily of Trp-321, and PxEDs stimulate KatG catalase activity by preventing the accumulation of inactive intermediates. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. [The influence of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) extracts on the activity of catalase in THP1 monocytes/macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolska, Jolanta; Janda, Katarzyna; Szkyrpan, Sylwia; Gutowska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Stinging nettle (Urtica dioicd L.) is one of the most valuable plants used in phytotherapy. The herbal raw material is a herb (Urticae herba), leaves (Urticae folium), roots (Urticae radix) and seeds (Urticae semina). This plant is a good source of vitamins, minerals, fibre, protein and biologically active compounds with antioxidant properties. The literature provides limited information about the chemical composition and properties of the seed heads. No papers are available on the effect of extracts of this plant on catalase activity in human cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) extracts on the antioxidant activity of catalase in THP1 macrophages. Two types of extracts: water and alcohol, at two different concentrations, were used in experiments. Nettle was collected in September and October in 2012 in the area of Szczecin. The collected plant material was frozen and lyophilized. After those procedures water and alcohol extracts of nettle were prepared and then added to THP1 cells. The antioxidant activity of catalase was established with the spectrophotometric method. The study showed that both extracts (water and alcohol) significantly increased the antioxidant activity of catalase in THP1 cells. The increase in catalase was directly proportional to the concentration of the added alcohol extract.

  20. Change in catalase and peroxidase activity in rat blood in case of combined radiation and mechanical injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovaya, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Changes of catalase and peroxide activity of blood in rats in case of irradiation at 2.0 and 7.0 Gy, mechanical injury of animal chest and combined radiation injury were studied. The given data testify to considerable increase of the above enzymes activity in case of all these effects. The less decrease of catalase and peroxide activity was observed after infliction of mechanical injury alone. Aggravating effect of mechanical injury on the irradiated organism leads to more noticeable decrease of catalase activity (at early periods of observation) in comparison with radiation effect. Peroxide changes in case of combined radiation and mechanical injury of rats differ slightly from similar factors observed in case of irradiation alone

  1. Effect of γ-radiation on the activities of superoxide dimutase, catalase and peroxidase on the germinating wheat grain (Triticum aestivum,L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborti, M.; Chatterjee, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of γ-radiation on several enzymes like catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in different parts of germinating wheat seeds has been studied. It was found that superoxide dismutase activity under the influence of γ-radiation was highest in the embryo part and showed maximum activity, 24 hours after germination. The activity exhibited a gradual decline with time. catalase and peroxidase, the stimulatory efect being maximum in the case of catalase activity. The catalase and peroxidase activities were found to be maximally localised in the embryo part and the highest value was attained after 72 hrs. in the case of catalase and after 48 hrs in the case of peroxidase activity. The results indicate that γ-radiation stimulates free radical generation in the embryo along with subsequent increase in the activities of superoside dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. (author)

  2. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The effect of low LET (Linear Energy Transfer ionizing radiation to catalase activity of Wistar’s submandibular gland

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    Nevy Triditha Putri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoral periapical radiograph examination is the additional examination which is the most widely used in Dentistry. This radiograph examination using an x-ray ionizing radiation with low LET (Linear Energy Transfer, and may affect submandibular salivary gland. Ionizing radiation exposure can cause damage by inducing a series of changes at the molecular and cellular level. This study aimed to prove the effects of x-ray ionizing radiation with low LET towards the catalase activity of Rattus norvegicus strain Wistar’s submandibular gland. The subjects were 28 male Wistar rats and divided into 4 groups (n=7. Three groups were exposed 4, 8 and 14 times to radiation with 0.002 µSv for each exposure. The catalase activity of each rat was examined by a spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni test. The results showed the average of catalase activity on Wistar rat’s submandibular gland, respectively for: 0.150±0.0895 (KK, 0.1405±0.0607 (K1, 0.1228±0.0290 (K2, 0.1227±0.0556 (K3. Data showed significant differences of catalase activity between test groups, but showed not significant differences of catalase activity between each groups of Rattus norvegicus strain Wistar’s submandibular gland. In this study concluded decreased catalase activity of Rattus norvegicus strain Wistar’s submandibular gland resulting from x-rays ionizing radiation by 4 times, 8 times and 14 times exposures.

  4. MET18 Deficiency Increases the Sensitivity of Yeast to Oxidative Stress and Shortens Replicative Lifespan by Inhibiting Catalase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Qin; Liu, Xin-Guang; Zhao, Wei; Cui, Hongjing; Ruan, Jie; Yuan, Yuan; Tu, Zhiguang

    2017-01-01

    Yeast MET18 , a subunit of the cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe/S) protein assembly (CIA) machinery which is responsible for the maturation of Fe/S proteins, has been reported to participate in the oxidative stress response. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we constructed a MET18/met18Δ heterozygous mutant yeast strain and found that MET18 deficiency in yeast cells impaired oxidative stress resistance as evidenced by increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP). Mechanistically, the mRNA levels of catalase A (CTA1) and catalase T (CTT1) as well as the total catalase activity were significantly reduced in MET18 -deficient cells. In contrast, overexpression of CTT1 or CTA1 in MET18 -deficient cells significantly increased the intracellular catalase activity and enhanced the resistance ability against H 2 O 2 and CHP. In addition, MET18 deficiency diminished the replicative capacity of yeast cells as evidenced by the shortened replicative lifespan, which can be restored by CTT1 overexpression, but not by CTA1 , in the MET18 -deficient cells. These results suggest that MET18 , in a catalase-dependent manner, plays an essential role in enhancing the resistance of yeast cells to oxidative stress and increasing the replicative capacity of yeast cells.

  5. Tratamento pós-menopausa reduz a atividade da catalase e atenua o risco cardiovascular Postmenopausal therapy reduces catalase activity and attenuates cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera S. Castanho

    2012-11-01

    enzyme activities is limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of HT on catalase activity; concentrations of lipids and lipoprotein, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, nitrates, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and carotid thickness in postmenopausal women. METHODS: Ninety-four consecutive women were allocated to one of four groups, without HT and with HT. The latter group was subdivided into women using estrogen and those using estrogen plus progestogen therapy. Plasma biochemical parameters and common carotid intima-media thickness measurements were performed. RESULTS: HT antagonized the decrease in catalase activity after menopause, but had no effect on the levels of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, lipid peroxide, nitrate, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, or on the common carotid intima-media thickness. Multivariate analysis showed that estrogen-based HT attenuated the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and the intima-media thickness of the common carotid. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that HT in postmenopausal women produces beneficial antioxidant and anti-atherosclerotic effects by ameliorating the plasma lipid and lipoprotein profiles, increasing plasma catalase activity and attenuating the association between cardiovascular risk factors and early atherosclerosis.

  6. Interactions of nitrite with catalase: Enzyme activity and reaction kinetics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2017-06-01

    Catalase, a heme enzyme, which catalyzes decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, is one of the main enzymes of the antioxidant defense system of the cell. Nitrite, used as a food preservative has long been regarded as a harmful compound due to its ability to form carcinogenic nitrosamines. Recently, much evidence has been presented that nitrite plays a protective role as a nitric oxide donor under hypoxic conditions. In this work the effect of nitrite on the catalytic reactions of catalase was studied. Catalase was inhibited by nitrite, and this process was pH-dependent. IC 50 values varied from about 1μM at pH5.0 to about 150μM of nitrite at pH7.4. The presence of chloride significantly enhanced nitrite-induced catalase inhibition, in agreement with earlier observations. The kinetics of the reactions of nitrite with ferric catalase, its redox intermediate, Compound I, and catalase inactive form, Compound II, was also studied. Possible mechanisms of nitrite-induced catalase inhibition are analyzed and the biological consequences of the reactions of catalase with nitrite are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of phenol on germination capacity and polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase and catalase activities in lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadić Vojin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO and antioxidant enzymes, peroxidase (POX and catalase (CAT during lettuce seed germination at different concentrations of phenol. Out of eleven varieties of lettuce, four were chosen according to their germination tolerance to phenol as follows: plants exhibiting high (Ljubljanska ledenka - LJL and Nansen - N and low toleranace (Little Gem - LG and Majska kraljica - MK. A decrease in germination efficiency after exposure to LD50 of phenol was determined for these four varieties. The effects of phenol treatment on POX, CAT and PPO activities were determined after 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 days of growth at LD50 concentrations. A trend of increased peroxidase activity was observed in seeds grown on LD50 of phenol compared to control seeds. A significant increase in CAT activity was observed at the beginning of treatment for MK, LG and N in seeds grown on phenol as well as in control seeds. A trend of increased PPO activity was observed in all control seeds. We also investigated the affinity of PPO for two different substrates that were used for the determination of enzyme activity. Our results show that LJL and N are the varieties most tolerant to growth on phenol. Here we report on the activities of their antioxidant enzymes and PPO during seed germination. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON173017

  8. Gaharu Leaf Extract Water Reduce MDA and 8-OHdG Levels and Increase Activities SOD and Catalase in Wistar Rats Provided Maximum Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Oka Adi Parwata

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress occurs due to an imbalance of the number of free radicals by the number of endogenous antioxidant produced by the body i.e. Superoxide Dismutase (SOD, Gluthathione Peroxidase (GPx, and Catalase. The imbalance between the number of free radicals and antioxidants can be overcome with the endogenous antioxidant intake that exogenous oxidative stress can be reduced. One of exogenous antioxidants is natural Gaharu leaf water extract. Objective: This research focus on the effect of Gaharu leaf water extract in reducing MDA and 8-OHdG and increase the activity of SOD and Catalase. Methods: This study was an experimental with post only controls group design. Experiment was divided  into 5 groups of wistar rats, each consisting of 5 animals, i.e. negative control group without extract [K (-], treatment 1 treated 50 mg/kg BW/day of the extract (T1, treatment 2 treated 100 mg/kg BW/day of the extract (T2, treatment 3 treated 200 mg/ kg BW/day of the extract (T3, and positive control group [K (+] treated with vitamin Cat a dose 50 mg/kg BW/day. All groups treated for 10 weeks. Every day, before treatment, each group was given a maximum swimming activity for 1.5 hours for 10 weeks. ELISA was used to measure MDA, 8-OHdG, SOD, and Catalase activities. Result: The research results showed that treatment of extract of  leaves of Gaharu with an higher dose from 50 mg/kg BW up to 200 mg/ kg BW significantly decline (p <0.05 levels of MDA with the average ranging from 6.37±0.23, 5,56±0.27 and 4.32±0.27, 8-OHdG with a mean of 1.64±0.11, 1.26±0.46, and 1.09±0.17. On the other hand the treatment also increase SOD activity with less ranging from 12.15±1.04, 15.70±2.02, and 18.84±1.51, and Catalase ranging from 6,68±0.63, 8.20±1.14 and 9.29±0,79 in the blood of Wistar rats were given a maximum activity compared to the negative control group. This is probably higher phenol compounds (bioflavonoids quantity content of the extract

  9. Purification and Partial Characterization of Catalase from Chicken Erythrocytes and the Effect of Various Inhibitors on Enzyme Activity

    OpenAIRE

    AYDEMİR, Tülin; KURU, Kevser

    2003-01-01

    Catalase plays a major role in the protection of tissues from the toxic effects of H2O2 and partially reduced oxygen species. A nearly 136-fold enzyme purification was obtained from chicken erythrocyte by acetone precipitation, ethanol-chloroform treatment, CM-cellulose and Sephadex G-200 chromatography. The specific activity of purified enzyme was 42,556 U/mg. The molecular weight of the native chicken erythrocyte catalase was estimated at 240 kDa by gel filtration. SDS-gel electr...

  10. Evaluation of a rapid method for measurement of catalase activity in cooked beef and sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C E; Cyrus, S

    1998-02-01

    Catalase (CAT) activity in ground beef and pork was determined on samples cooked from 60 to 71.1 degrees C. One-gram samples of ground round (4% fat), hamburger (24% fat), and commercial pork sausage (38%fat) were cooked in a controlled-temperature waterbath at 65, 68.3 and 71 degrees C. Chilled samples were immersed in direct contact with the cooking water; the test samples were removed every 15 s and immediately immersed in an ice-water bath (O to 1 degrees C) to quick-chill the samples to prevent temperature over-run. Samples retained high (HMB value 20+, over range) CAT activity through 90, 60, and 45 s at 65, 68.3, and 71 degrees C, respectively, before showing rapid activity decreases. Four USDA-FSIS approved meat patty heating processes (66.1 degrees C, 41 s; 67.2 degrees C, 26 s; 68.3 degrees C, 16 s; and 69.4 degrees C, 10 s) were analyzed for CAT activity in meat frozen prior to cooking was slightly lower (P sausage products and may be useful to USDA FSIS process inspectors and food processors in quality assurance and HACCP (hazard analysis critical control points) programs for thermal input verification.

  11. Combined effects of water temperature and copper ion concentration on catalase activity in Crassostrea ariakensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Yang, Hongshuai; Liu, Jiahui; Li, Yanhong; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    A central composite experimental design and response surface method were used to investigate the combined effects of water temperature (18-34°C) and copper ion concentration (0.1-1.5 mg/L) on the catalase (CAT) activity in the digestive gland of Crassostrea ariakensis. The results showed that the linear effects of temperature were significant ( P0.05), and the quadratic effects of copper ion concentration were significant ( P0.05), and the effect of temperature was greater than that of copper ion concentration. A model equation of CAT enzyme activity in the digestive gland of C. ariakensis toward the two factors of interest was established, with R 2, Adj. R 2 and Pred. R 2 values as high as 0.943 7, 0.887 3 and 0.838 5, respectively. These findings suggested that the goodness of fit to experimental data and predictive capability of the model were satisfactory, and could be practically applied for prediction under the conditions of the study. Overall, the results suggest that the simultaneous variation of temperature and copper ion concentration alters the activity of the antioxidant enzyme CAT by modulating active oxygen species metabolism, which may be utilized as a biomarker to detect the effects of copper pollution.

  12. Enhancement of catalase activity by repetitive low-grade H2O2 exposures protects fibroblasts from subsequent stress-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Prosenjit; Mukherjee, Sebanti; Bhaumik, Gayaram; Das, Pradeep; Ganguly, Sandipan; Choudhury, Nandini; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2003-01-01

    Exposure of Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts to mild and repetitive H 2 O 2 doses in culture for 15 weeks produced no change in lipid peroxidation status, GSH/GSSG ratio and glutathione peroxidase activity of these cells (VST cells). In contrast, in VST cells catalase levels underwent a prominent increase which could be significantly inhibited and brought down to control levels after treatment with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT). When control (VC) cells were exposed to UV radiation (UVC 5 J/m 2 ) or H 2 O 2 (7.5 mM, 15 min), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels rose prominently with significant activation of caspase-3. Marked nuclear fragmentation and lower cell viability were also noted in these cells. In contrast, VST cells demonstrated a significantly lower ROS level, an absence of nuclear fragmentation and an unchanged caspase-3 activity after exposure to UVC or H 2 O 2 . Cell viability was also significantly better preserved in VST cells than VC cells after UV or H 2 O 2 exposures. Following 3-AT treatment of VST cells, UVC radiation or H 2 O 2 brought about significantly higher elevations in intracellular ROS, increases in caspase-3 activity, significantly lowered cell viability and marked nuclear fragmentation, indicating the involvement of high catalase levels in the cytoprotective effects of repetitive stress. Therefore, upregulation of the antioxidant defense after repetitive oxidative stress imparted a superior ability to cope with subsequent acute stress and escape apoptotic death and loss of viability

  13. Zymography Methods to Simultaneously Analyze Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activities: Novel Application for Yeast Species Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Matallana, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    We provide an optimized protocol for a double staining technique to analyze superoxide dismutase enzymatic isoforms Cu-Zn SOD (Sod1) and Mn-SOD (Sod2) and catalase in the same polyacrylamide gel. The use of NaCN, which specifically inhibits yeast Sod1 isoform, allows the analysis of Sod2 isoform while the use of H 2 O 2 allows the analysis of catalase. The identification of a different zymography profiling of SOD and catalase isoforms in different yeast species allowed us to propose this technique as a novel yeast identification and classification strategy.

  14. Effects of Greek legume plant extracts on xanthine oxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanou, Chrysoula I; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Stagos, Dimitrios; Liadaki, Kalliopi; Aligiannis, Nectarios; Angelis, Apostolos; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Anastasiadi, Maria; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2012-03-01

    Legumes are considered to have beneficial health implications, which have been attributed to their phytochemical content. Polyphenols are considered the most important phytochemical compounds extensively studied for their antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of potent antioxidant legume plant extracts on xanthine oxidase (XO), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. XO exerts a dual role, as it is the major contributor of free radicals during exercise while it generates uric acid, the most potent antioxidant molecule in plasma. CAT and SOD are two of the main enzymes of the antioxidant defence of tissues. We demonstrate that the majority of the extracts inhibited XO activity, but they had no effect on CAT inhibition and SOD induction when used at low concentrations. These results imply that the tested extracts may be considered as possible source of novel XO inhibitors. However, we have shown that allopurinol administration, a known XO inhibitor, before exercise reduces performance and induces oxidative stress in rats. Considering the fact that the extracts examined had an inhibitory effect on XO activity, possibly posing a restriction in their characterization as antioxidants, phytochemical antioxidant administration before exercise should probably be reconsidered.

  15. Involvement of brain catalase activity in the acquisition of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Laura; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2008-03-18

    It has been suggested that some of the behavioral effects produced by ethanol are mediated by its first metabolite, acetaldehyde. The present research addressed the hypothesis that catalase-dependent metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde in the brain is an important step in the production of ethanol-related affective properties. Firstly, we investigated the contribution of brain catalase in the acquisition of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). Secondly, the specificity of the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT) was evaluated with morphine- and cocaine-induced CPP. Finally, to investigate the role of catalase in the process of relapse to ethanol seeking caused by re-exposure to ethanol, after an initial conditioning and extinction, mice were primed with saline and ethanol or AT and ethanol and tested for reinstatement of CPP. Conditioned place preference was blocked in animals treated with AT and ethanol. Morphine and cocaine CPP were unaffected by AT treatment. However, the reinstatement of place preference was not modified by catalase inhibition. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that the brain catalase-H(2)O(2) system contributes to the acquisition of affective-dependent learning induced by ethanol, and support the involvement of centrally-formed acetaldehyde in the formation of positive affective memories produced by ethanol.

  16. Oxidative status, in vitro iron-induced lipid oxidation and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in rhea meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terevinto, A; Ramos, A; Castroman, G; Cabrera, M C; Saadoun, A

    2010-04-01

    Rhea (Rhea americana) muscles Obturatorius medialis (OM) Iliotibialis lateralis (IL) and Iliofibularis (I), obtained from farmed animals, were evaluated regarding their oxidative/antioxidant status. The mean level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) expressed as malonaldehyde (MDA) content was of 0.84 mg MDA/kg wet tissue for the three muscles. TBARS level was significantly higher in IL than OM and I, with the two latter showing similar levels. The mean level of carbonyl proteins expressed as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was 1.59 nmol DNPH mg(-1). Carbonyl protein levels were significantly different (POM>I). Iron-induced TBARS generation was not significantly different between the three muscles at any time, nor for each muscle during the 5 h of the experiment. Superoxide dismutase activity in IL muscle was significantly higher (P<0.05) than in I muscle. However, the difference between IL and OM muscles was not significant. The differences between the three muscles became not significant when the results were expressed by mg of protein contained in the extract, instead by g of wet tissue. No differences were found for catalase (micromol of discomposed H(2)O(2) min(-1) g(-1) wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) and glutathione peroxidase (micromol ol of oxidized NADPH min(-1) g(-1) of wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) activities between the three muscles. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of sodium nitroprusside on mouse erythrocyte catalase activity and malondialdehyde status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Mamane; Sebai, Hichem; Refinetti, Roberto; Mondal, Mohan; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha; Boughattas, Naceur A; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2016-01-01

    There is controversy about the anti- or pro-oxidative effects of the nitric oxide (NO)-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Hence, the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) and the status of malondialdehyde (MDA) were investigated after a 2.5 mg/kg dose of SNP had been i.p. administered to different and comparable groups of mice (n = 48). The drug was administered at two different circadian times (1 and 13 h after light onset [HALO]). There were, irrespectively of sampling time, no significant differences in the means of CAT activity and MDA status between control and SNP-treated groups, no matter the treatment time. However, CAT activity was significantly (Student's t-test, p < 0.001) increased 1 h following SNP administration at 1 HALO, whereas the significant (p < 0.001) increase in the enzyme activity was found only 3 h after injection at 13 HALO. The drug dosing either at 1 or 13 HALO resulted in no significant differences of MDA status between control and treated groups regardless to the sampling time. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) detected a significant (F0.05(7,88)= 5.3; p < 0.0006) interaction between sampling time and treatment in mice injected at 1 HALO, suggesting the influence of treatment on sampling-time-related changes in CAT activity. However, ANOVA validated no interaction between the two factors in mice treated at 13 HALO, illustrating that the sampling-time differences in enzyme activity were greater. Furthermore, two-way ANOVA revealed no interaction in the variation of MDA status in animals treated either at 1 or 13 HALO. This study indicates that SNP significantly affected the anti-oxidant system.

  18. Piper betle shows antioxidant activities, inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation and increases activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrahim Noor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the focus on finding chemotherapeutic agents have recently shifted to natural products. Piper betle is a medicinal plant with various biological activities. However, not much data is available on the anti-cancer effects of P. betle on breast cancer. Due to the current interest in the potential effects of antioxidants from natural products in breast cancer treatment, we investigated the antioxidant activities of the leaves of P. betle and its inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Methods The leaves of P. betle were extracted with solvents of varying polarities (water, methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane and their phenolic and flavonoid content were determined using colorimetric assays. Phenolic composition was characterized using HPLC. Antioxidant activities were measured using FRAP, DPPH, superoxide anion, nitric oxide and hyroxyl radical scavenging assays. Biological activities of the extracts were analysed using MTT assay and antioxidant enzyme (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase assays in MCF-7 cells. Results Overall, the ethyl acetate extract showed the highest ferric reducing activity and radical scavenging activities against DPPH, superoxide anion and nitric oxide radicals. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolics towards the antioxidant activities. HPLC analyses revealed the presence of catechin, morin and quercetin in the leaves. The ethyl acetate extract also showed the highest inhibitory effect against the proliferation of MCF-7 cells (IC50=65 μg/ml. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with the plant extract increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase. Conclusions Ethyl acetate is the optimal solvent for the extraction of compounds with antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. The increased activities of catalase and superoxide

  19. Piper betle shows antioxidant activities, inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation and increases activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahim, Noor Nazirahanie; Kanthimathi, M S; Abdul-Aziz, Azlina

    2012-11-15

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the focus on finding chemotherapeutic agents have recently shifted to natural products. Piper betle is a medicinal plant with various biological activities. However, not much data is available on the anti-cancer effects of P. betle on breast cancer. Due to the current interest in the potential effects of antioxidants from natural products in breast cancer treatment, we investigated the antioxidant activities of the leaves of P. betle and its inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. The leaves of P. betle were extracted with solvents of varying polarities (water, methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane) and their phenolic and flavonoid content were determined using colorimetric assays. Phenolic composition was characterized using HPLC. Antioxidant activities were measured using FRAP, DPPH, superoxide anion, nitric oxide and hyroxyl radical scavenging assays. Biological activities of the extracts were analysed using MTT assay and antioxidant enzyme (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) assays in MCF-7 cells. Overall, the ethyl acetate extract showed the highest ferric reducing activity and radical scavenging activities against DPPH, superoxide anion and nitric oxide radicals. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolics towards the antioxidant activities. HPLC analyses revealed the presence of catechin, morin and quercetin in the leaves. The ethyl acetate extract also showed the highest inhibitory effect against the proliferation of MCF-7 cells (IC50=65 μg/ml). Treatment of MCF-7 cells with the plant extract increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase. Ethyl acetate is the optimal solvent for the extraction of compounds with antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. The increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the treated cells could alter the antioxidant defense

  20. Change in catalase and peroxidase activity in rat blood in case of combined burn and radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramova, L.P.; Simonova, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    The peroxidase activity of blood and catalase activity were studied in white rats, subjected to whole-body X-irradiation with the dose 129 mC/kg and burn injury (20% of body surface) of 3A-3B degree and also combined burn and radiation injury. It is established that catalase activity was decreased in all groups and at all terms of the investigation. The changes in the blood peroxide activity were of phase character and normalized only by 14th day. The peroxide activity restores to intact level only by 30th day in animals with burn and radiation injury, that testifies to heavier course of the desease and to protracted character of recovery processes

  1. Engineering of a novel tri-functional enzyme with MnSOD, catalase and cell-permeable activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangwattananun, Piriya; Yainoy, Sakda; Eiamphungporn, Warawan; Songtawee, Napat; Bülow, Leif; Ayudhya, Chartchalerm Isarankura Na; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2016-04-01

    Cooperative function of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), in protection against oxidative stress, is known to be more effective than the action of either single enzyme. Chemical conjugation of the two enzymes resulted in molecules with higher antioxidant activity and therapeutic efficacy. However, chemical methods holds several drawbacks; e.g., loss of enzymatic activity, low homogeneity, time-consuming, and the need of chemical residues removal. Yet, the conjugated enzymes have never been proven to internalize into target cells. In this study, by employing genetic and protein engineering technologies, we reported designing and production of a bi-functional protein with SOD and CAT activities for the first time. To enable cellular internalization, cell penetrating peptide from HIV-1 Tat (TAT) was incorporated. Co-expression of CAT-MnSOD and MnSOD-TAT fusion genes allowed simultaneous self-assembly of the protein sequences into a large protein complex, which is expected to contained one tetrameric structure of CAT, four tetrameric structures of MnSOD and twelve units of TAT. The protein showed cellular internalization and superior protection against paraquat-induced cell death as compared to either complex bi-functional protein without TAT or to native enzymes fused with TAT. This study not only provided an alternative strategy to produce multifunctional protein complex, but also gained an insight into the development of therapeutic agent against oxidative stress-related conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Arabidopsis ABI5 plays a role in regulating ROS homeostasis by activating CATALASE 1 transcription in seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Chao; Ma, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Yu, Yong-Tao; Liang, Shan; Lu, Kai; Wang, Xiao-Fang

    2017-05-01

    It has been known that ABA INSENSITIVE 5 (ABI5) plays a vital role in regulating seed germination. In the present study, we showed that inhibition of the catalase activity with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT) inhibits seed germination of Col-0, abi5 mutants and ABI5-overexpression transgenic lines. Compared with Col-0, the seeds of abi5 mutants showed more sensitive to 3-AT during seed germination, while the seeds of ABI5-overexpression transgenic lines showed more insensitive. H 2 O 2 showed the same effect on seed germination of Col-0, abi5 mutants and ABI5-overexpression transgenic lines as 3-AT. These results suggest that ROS is involved in the seed germination mediated by ABI5. Further, we observed that T-DNA insertion mutants of the three catalase members in Arabidopsis displayed 3-AT-insensitive or -hypersensitive phenotypes during seed germination, suggesting that these catalase members regulate ROS homeostasis in a highly complex way. ABI5 affects reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis by affecting CATALASE expression and catalase activity. Furthermore, we showed that ABI5 directly binds to the CAT1 promoter and activates CAT1 expression. Genetic evidence supports the idea that CAT1 functions downstream of ABI5 in ROS signaling during seed germination. RNA-sequencing analysis indicates that the transcription of the genes involved in ROS metabolic process or genes responsive to ROS stress is impaired in abi5-1 seeds. Additionally, expression changes in some genes correlative to seed germination were showed due to the change in ABI5 expression under 3-AT treatment. Together, all the findings suggest that ABI5 regulates seed germination at least partly by affecting ROS homeostasis.

  3. Catalytic Properties and Immobilization Studies of Catalase from Malva sylvestris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arabaci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalase was partially purified from Malva sylvestris L. and immobilized onto chitosan. Then, its catalytic properties were investigated. (NH42SO4 precipitation and dialysis were performed in the extracted enzyme. Further purification was performed with sephadex G-200 column. Kinetic studies of the purified enzyme activity were measured and characterized. The inhibitory effects of KCN, NaN3, CuSO4, and EDTA on M. sylvestris L. catalase activity were observed except NaCl. Furthermore, M. sylvestris L. catalase was immobilized covalently with glutaraldehyde onto chitosan particles. The pH and temperature optima as well as the changes in the kinetics (Km, Vmax of the immobilized and free M. sylvestris L. catalase were determined. The Km value for immobilized catalase (23.4 mM was higher than that of free enzyme (17.6 mM. Optimum temperature was observed higher than that of the free enzyme. The optimum pH was the same for both free and immobilized catalases (pH 7.50. Immobilized catalase showed higher storage and thermal stabilities than free catalases. Free catalase lost all its activity within 60 days whereas immobilized catalase lost 45% of its activity during the same incubation period at 4°C. The remaining immobilized catalase activity was about 70% after 8 cycles of batch operations.

  4. Contribution of the activated catalase to oxidative stress resistance and γ-aminobutyric acid production in Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Changjiang; Hu, Sheng; Huang, Jun; Luo, Maiqi; Lu, Tao; Mei, Lehe; Yao, Shanjing

    2016-12-05

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are generally sensitive to H 2 O 2 , a compound which can paradoxically produce themselves and lead to the growth arrest and cell death. To counteract the potentially toxic effects of this compound, the gene katE encoding a heme-dependent catalase (CAT) belonging to the family of monofunctional CATs was cloned from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC1306. The enhanced homologous CAT expression was achieved using the NICE system. L. brevis cells with overexpressed CAT showed 685-fold and 823-fold higher survival when exposed to 30mmol/L of H 2 O 2 and long-term aerated stress (after 72h), respectively, than that of the wild type cells. Furtherly, the effects of activated CAT on GABA production in L. brevis were investigated. A GABA production level of 66.4g/L was achieved using two-step biotransformation that successively employed the growing and resting cells derived from engineering L. brevis CAT. These results demonstrated clearly that overexpression of the KatE gene in L. brevis led to a marked increased survival in oxidizing environment, and shed light on a novel feasible approach to enhance the GABA production level by improving the antioxidative properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Manganese(II) induces cell division and increases in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in an aging deinococcal culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, F.I.; Tan, S.T.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of Mn(II) at 2.5 microM or higher to stationary-phase cultures of Deinococcus radiodurans IR was found to trigger at least three rounds of cell division. This Mn(II)-induced cell division (Mn-CD) did not occur when the culture was in the exponential or death phase. The Mn-CD effect produced daughter cells proportionally reduced in size, pigmentation, and radioresistance but proportionally increased in activity and amount of the oxygen toxicity defense enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. In addition, the concentration of an Mn-CD-induced protein was found to remain high throughout the entire Mn-CD phase. It was also found that an untreated culture exhibited a growth curve characterized by a very rapid exponential-stationary transition and that cells which had just reached the early stationary phase were synchronous. Our results suggest the presence of an Mn(II)-sensitive mechanism for controlling cell division. The Mn-CD effect appears to be specific to the cation Mn(II) and the radioresistant bacteria, deinococci

  6. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Sofo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT, ascorbate peroxidases (APX, some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants.

  7. Do Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) protect Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Active Arsenicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which can be converted to water and oxygen through the action of catalase. Heterozygous mice of strain B6: 129S7-SodltmlLeb/J were obtained from Jackson Laboratories and bred to produce offspr...

  8. Not so monofunctional-a case of thermostable Thermobifida fusca catalase with peroxidase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    Thermobifida fusca is a mesothermophilic organism known for its ability to degrade plant biomass and other organics, and it was demonstrated that it represents a rich resource of genes encoding for potent enzymes for biocatalysis. The thermostable catalase from T. fusca has been cloned and

  9. The regulation of catalase activity by PPAR gamma is affected by alpha-synuclein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakunin, Eugenia; Kisos, Haya; Kulik, Willem; Grigoletto, Jessica; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Sharon, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    Objective: While evidence for oxidative injury is frequently detected in brains of humans affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) and in relevant animal models, there is uncertainty regarding its cause. We tested the potential role of catalase in the oxidative injury that characterizes PD. Methods:

  10. Developmental changes of erythrocyte catalase activity in rats exposed to acute hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rauchová, Hana; Vokurková, Martina; Koudelová, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2005), s. 527-532 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/04/0500; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : erythrocyte * catalase * development Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2005

  11. Mutation of katG in a clinical isolate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: effects on catalase-peroxidase for isoniazid activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkan; Ihsanawati; Natalia, D; Syah, Y M; Retnoningrum, D S; Kusuma, H S

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in katG gene are often associated with isoniazid (INH) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain. This research was perfomed to identify the katG mutation in clinical isolate (L8) that is resistant to INH at 1 μg/ml. In addition to characterize the catalase-peroxidase of KatG L8 and perform the ab initio structural study of the protein to get a more complete understanding in drug activation and the resistan­ce mechanism. The katG gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, then followed by characterization of catalase-peroxidase of KatG. The structure modelling was performed to know a basis of alterations in enzyme activity. A substitution of A713G that correspond to Asn238Ser replacement was found in the L8 katG. The Asn238Ser modification leads to a decline in the activity of catalase-peroxidase and INH oxidation of the L8 KatG protein. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) of mutant KatGAsn238Ser respectively decreases to 41 and 52% for catalase and peroxidase. The mutant KatGAsn238Ser also shows a decrease of 62% in INH oxidation if compared to a wild type KatG (KatGwt). The mutant Asn238Ser might cause instability in the substrate binding­ site of KatG, because of removal of a salt bridge connecting the amine group of Asn238 to the carbo­xyl group of Glu233, which presents in KatGwt. The lost of the salt bridge in the substrate binding site in mutant KatGAsn238Ser created changes unfavorable for enzyme activities, which in turn emerge as INH resistan­ce in the L8 isolate of M. tuberculosis.

  12. On the enzymatic activity of catalase : an iron L-edge X-ray absorption study of the active centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, Nora; Bonhommeau, Sebastien; Lange, Kathrin M.; Greil, Stefanie M.; Eisebitt, Stefan; de Groot, Frank; Chergui, Majed; Aziz, Emad F.

    2010-01-01

    Catalase and methaemoglobin have very similar haem groups, which are both ferric, yet catalase decomposes hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen very efficiently, while methaemoglobin does not. Structural studies have attributed this behaviour to their different distal environments. Here we present

  13. Enhancement of catalase activity by repetitive low-grade H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposures protects fibroblasts from subsequent stress-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Prosenjit; Mukherjee, Sebanti; Bhaumik, Gayaram; Das, Pradeep; Ganguly, Sandipan; Choudhury, Nandini; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2003-08-28

    Exposure of Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts to mild and repetitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} doses in culture for 15 weeks produced no change in lipid peroxidation status, GSH/GSSG ratio and glutathione peroxidase activity of these cells (VST cells). In contrast, in VST cells catalase levels underwent a prominent increase which could be significantly inhibited and brought down to control levels after treatment with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT). When control (VC) cells were exposed to UV radiation (UVC 5 J/m{sup 2}) or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (7.5 mM, 15 min), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels rose prominently with significant activation of caspase-3. Marked nuclear fragmentation and lower cell viability were also noted in these cells. In contrast, VST cells demonstrated a significantly lower ROS level, an absence of nuclear fragmentation and an unchanged caspase-3 activity after exposure to UVC or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Cell viability was also significantly better preserved in VST cells than VC cells after UV or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposures. Following 3-AT treatment of VST cells, UVC radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} brought about significantly higher elevations in intracellular ROS, increases in caspase-3 activity, significantly lowered cell viability and marked nuclear fragmentation, indicating the involvement of high catalase levels in the cytoprotective effects of repetitive stress. Therefore, upregulation of the antioxidant defense after repetitive oxidative stress imparted a superior ability to cope with subsequent acute stress and escape apoptotic death and loss of viability.

  14. Endogenous superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and radiation resistance in mouse cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, S.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the endogenous cytoplasmic levels of the enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and the inhibition of cell proliferation by γ-radiation has been studied in 11 mouse cell lines. The resistance of these mouse cell lines to radiation was found to vary by over 25-fold. No correlation was found between the cytoplasmic level of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or catalase and the resistance to radiation as measured by extrapolation number (EN), quasi-threshold dose (Dsub(q)), or Dsub(o). None of the cell lines had detectable cytoplasmic Mn-superoxide dismutase. The apparent Ksub(i) of potassium cyanide for mouse CuZn-superoxide dismutase was determined (Ksub(i) = 6.5 μmol dm -3 ). (author)

  15. Protection of Bacillus pumilus spores by catalases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Burbank, Malcolm; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, isolated at spacecraft assembly facilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is difficult to kill by the sterilization method of choice, which uses liquid or vapor hydrogen peroxide. We identified two manganese catalases, YjqC and BPUM_1305, in spore protein extracts of several B. pumilus strains by using PAGE and mass spectrometric analyses. While the BPUM_1305 catalase was present in six of the B. pumilus strains tested, YjqC was not detected in ATCC 7061 and BG-B79. Furthermore, both catalases were localized in the spore coat layer along with laccase and superoxide dismutase. Although the initial catalase activity in ATCC 7061 spores was higher, it was less stable over time than the SAFR-032 enzyme. We propose that synergistic activity of YjqC and BPUM_1305, along with other coat oxidoreductases, contributes to the enhanced resistance of B. pumilus spores to hydrogen peroxide. We observed that the product of the catalase reaction, gaseous oxygen, forms expanding vesicles on the spore surface, affecting the mechanical integrity of the coat layer, resulting in aggregation of the spores. The accumulation of oxygen gas and aggregations may play a crucial role in limiting further exposure of Bacilli spore surfaces to hydrogen peroxide or other toxic chemicals when water is present.

  16. Characterization of partially purified catalase from camel ( Camelus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The liver of camel has high level of catalase (32,225 units/g tissue) as commercially used bovine liver catalase. For the establishment of the enzyme, the rate of catalase activity was linearly increased with increase of the catalase concentration and incubation time. The procedure of partial purification of catalase from camel ...

  17. Catalase deletion promotes prediabetic phenotype in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Claire; Marshall, Stephanie; Singh, Surrendra; Yu, Xiaoqing; Charkoftaki, Georgia; Zhao, Hongyu; Orlicky, David J; Fritz, Kristofer S; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is produced endogenously and can be toxic to living organisms by inducing oxidative stress and cell damage. However, it has also been identified as a signal transduction molecule. By metabolizing hydrogen peroxide, catalase protects cells and tissues against oxidative damage and may also influence signal transduction mechanisms. Studies suggest that acatalasemic individuals (i.e., those with very low catalase activity) have a higher risk for the development of diabetes. We now report catalase knockout (Cat -/- ) mice, when fed a normal (6.5% lipid) chow, exhibit an obese phenotype that manifests as an increase in body weight that becomes more pronounced with age. The mice demonstrate altered hepatic and muscle lipid deposition, as well as increases in serum and hepatic triglycerides (TGs), and increased hepatic transcription and protein expression of PPARγ. Liver morphology revealed steatosis with inflammation. Cat -/- mice also exhibited pancreatic morphological changes that correlated with impaired glucose tolerance and increased fasting serum insulin levels, conditions consistent with pre-diabetic status. RNA-seq analyses revealed a differential expression of pathways and genes in Cat -/- mice, many of which are related to metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and obesity, such as Pparg and Cidec. In conclusion, the results of the present study show mice devoid of catalase develop an obese, pre-diabetic phenotype and provide compelling evidence for catalase (or its products) being integral in metabolic regulation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Improving enzymatic activities and thermostability of a tri-functional enzyme with SOD, catalase and cell-permeable activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangwattananun, Piriya; Eiamphungporn, Warawan; Songtawee, Napat; Bülow, Leif; Isarankura Na Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Yainoy, Sakda

    2017-04-10

    Synergistic action of major antioxidant enzymes, e.g., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) is known to be more effective than the action of any single enzyme. Recently, we have engineered a tri-functional enzyme, 6His-MnSOD-TAT/CAT-MnSOD (M-TAT/CM), with SOD, CAT and cell-permeable activities. The protein actively internalized into the cells and showed superior protection against oxidative stress-induced cell death over native enzymes fused with TAT. To improve its molecular size, enzymatic activity and stability, in this study, MnSOD portions of the engineered protein were replaced by CuZnSOD, which is the smallest and the most heat resistant SOD isoform. The newly engineered protein, CAT-CuZnSOD/6His-CuZnSOD-TAT (CS/S-TAT), had a 42% reduction in molecular size and an increase in SOD and CAT activities by 22% and 99%, respectively. After incubation at 70°C for 10min, the CS/S-TAT retained residual SOD activity up to 54% while SOD activity of the M-TAT/CM was completely abolished. Moreover, the protein exhibited a 5-fold improvement in half-life at 70°C. Thus, this work provides insights into the design and synthesis of a smaller but much more stable multifunctional antioxidant enzyme with ability to enter mammalian cells for further application as protective/therapeutic agent against oxidative stress-related conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation immobilization of catalase and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghui; Ha Hongfei; Wang Xia; Wu Jilan

    1988-01-01

    Catalase was immobilized by a chemical method on porous polyacrylamide particles produced by radiation polymerization of acrylamide monomer at low temperature (-78 0 C). Activity of immobilized catalase was enhanced distinctly by joining a chemical arm to the support. The method of recovery of catalase activity on immobilized polymer was found by soaking it in certain buffer. The treatment of H 2 O 2 both in aqueous solution and alcoholic solution by using the immobilized catalase was performed. (author)

  20. Effect of N+ beam exposure on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and induction of Mn-SOD in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Daojun; Chen Ruolei; Shao Chunlin; Wu Lijun; Yu Zengliang

    2000-01-01

    Though bacteria of the radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans have a high resistance to the lethal and mutagenic effects of many DNA-damaging agents, the mechanisms involved in the response of these bacteria to oxidative stress are poorly understood. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities produced by these bacteria were measured, and the change of SOD and CAT activities by 20 keV N + beam exposure was examined. Their activities were increased by N + beam exposure from 8 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 to 6 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 . The treatment of H 2 O 2 and [CHCl 3 + CH 3 CH 2 OH] and the measurement of absorption spectrum showed that the increase in SOD activity was resulted from inducible activities of Mn-SOD in D. radiodurans AS1.633 by N + beam exposure. These results suggested that this bacteria possess inducible defense mechanisms against the deleterious effects of oxidisation

  1. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase prevents diabetes-induced pathological changes by inhibiting NF-κB signaling activation in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Weitao; Ruan, Dandan; Xuan, Yuanhu; Niu, Chao; Tao, Youli; Wang, Yang; Zhan, Kungao; Cai, Lu; Jin, Litai; Tan, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that specifically catabolizes hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Overexpression of catalase via a heart-specific promoter (CAT-TG) was reported to reduce diabetes-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and further prevent diabetes-induced pathological abnormalities, including cardiac structural derangement and left ventricular abnormity in mice. However, the mechanism by which catalase overexpression protects heart function remains unclear. This study found that activation of a ROS-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway was downregulated in hearts of diabetic mice overexpressing catalase. In addition, catalase overexpression inhibited the significant increase in nitration levels of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism, including α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase E1 component (α-KGD) and ATP synthase α and β subunits (ATP-α and ATP-β). To assess the effects of the NF-κB pathway activation on heart function, Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, was injected into diabetic mice, protecting mice against the development of cardiac damage and increased nitrative modifications of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that catalase protects mouse hearts against diabetic cardiomyopathy, partially by suppressing NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses and associated protein nitration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Catalase reverses tumorigenicity in a malignant cell line by an epidermal growth factor receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Joanne S; Tome, Margaret E; Kwei, Kevin A; Bowden, G Tim

    2006-03-01

    We have used a keratinocyte in vivo/in vitro cell model to test the hypothesis that hydrogen peroxide acts as a signaling molecule, contributing to proliferation and tumorigenesis. A cell line, 6M90, that produces squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), has high levels of ROS and low levels of catalase. A new cell line, MTOC2, generated from parental 6M90 cells by introduction of a Tet-responsive catalase transgene, effectively expressed higher peroxisomal catalase. Increased catalase expression diminished constitutive ROS and enhanced viability after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. Protein tyrosine phosphatase activity was higher in the MTOC2 cells with high catalase, consistent with detection of a lower level of phosphorylation at tyrosine 1068 of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R). Transcription of downstream c-fos, AP-1 transactivation and cell proliferation were higher in the low catalase cells. An EGF-R inhibitor, AG1478, blocks the higher AP-1 transactivation and cell proliferation of the low catalase 6M90 cells. Tumorigenesis in SCID mice was greatly diminished in the high catalase cells. Our data suggest that hydrogen peroxide functions as a signaling molecule that can modulate activity of a protein tyrosine phosphatase/(s) resulting in phosphorylation of tryrosine/(s) on the EGF-R. Therefore, catalase acts as a tumor-suppressor gene in part by decreasing EGF-R signaling.

  3. Francisella tularensis Catalase Restricts Immune Function by Impairing TRPM2 Channel Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerley, Nicole L; Chandrasekaran, Akshaya; Trebak, Mohamed; Miller, Barbara A; Melendez, J Andrés

    2016-02-19

    As an innate defense mechanism, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species that weaken pathogens and serve as secondary messengers involved in immune function. The Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis utilizes its antioxidant armature to limit the host immune response, but the mechanism behind this suppression is not defined. Here we establish that F. tularensis limits Ca(2+) entry in macrophages, thereby limiting actin reorganization and IL-6 production in a redox-dependent fashion. Wild type (live vaccine strain) or catalase-deficient F. tularensis (ΔkatG) show distinct profiles in their H2O2 scavenging rates, 1 and 0.015 pm/s, respectively. Murine alveolar macrophages infected with ΔkatG display abnormally high basal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that did not increase further in response to H2O2. Additionally, ΔkatG-infected macrophages displayed limited Ca(2+) influx in response to ionomycin, as a result of ionophore H2O2 sensitivity. Exogenously added H2O2 or H2O2 generated by ΔkatG likely oxidizes ionomycin and alters its ability to transport Ca(2+). Basal increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and insensitivity to H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry in ΔkatG-infected cells are reversed by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitors 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and SKF-96365. 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate but not SKF-96365 abrogated ΔkatG-dependent increases in macrophage actin remodeling and IL-6 secretion, suggesting a role for H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry through the transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channel in macrophages. Indeed, increases in basal Ca(2+), actin polymerization, and IL-6 production are reversed in TRPM2-null macrophages infected with ΔkatG. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that F. tularensis catalase restricts reactive oxygen species to temper macrophage TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and limit host immune function. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Roles of Catalase and Trehalose in the Protection from Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Watanabe, Takeru; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The roles of catalase and trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae subject to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment were examined by measuring the catalase activity and intracellular trehalose levels in mutants lacking catalase or trehalose synthetase. Intracellular trehalose was elevated but the survival rate after H2O2 treatment remained low in mutants with deletion of the Catalase T gene. On the other hand, deletion of the trehalose synthetase gene increased the catalase activity in mutated yeast to levels higher than those in the wild-type strain, and these mutants exhibited some degree of tolerance to H2O2 treatment. These results suggest that Catalase T is critical in the yeast response to oxidative damage caused by H2O2 treatment, but trehalose also plays a role in protection against H2O2 treatment.

  5. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadati, Shagayegh; Salimi, Abdollah; Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. ► First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. ► With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. ► Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 reduction. ► Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH 2 -IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH 2 -IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H 2 O 2 biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k s ) and Michaelis–Menten constant (K M ) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 × 10 −12 mol cm −2 , 5.28 s −1 and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 μA mM −1 cm −2 and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  6. MAPK/JNK1 activation protects cells against cadmium-induced autophagic cell death via differential regulation of catalase and heme oxygenase-1 in oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Keum-Young; Kim, Sang-Hun; Jung, Ki-Tae; Lee, Hyun-Young; Oh, Seon-Hee

    2017-10-01

    Antioxidant enzymes are related to oral diseases. We investigated the roles of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase in cadmium (Cd)-induced oxidative stress and the underlying molecular mechanism in oral cancer cells. Exposing YD8 cells to Cd reduced the expression levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase 1/2 and induced the expression of HO-1 as well as autophagy and apoptosis, which were reversed by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Cd-exposed YD10B cells exhibited milder effects than YD8 cells, indicating that Cd sensitivity is associated with antioxidant enzymes and autophagy. Autophagy inhibition via pharmacologic and genetic modulations enhanced Cd-induced HO-1 expression, caspase-3 cleavage, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ho-1 knockdown increased autophagy and apoptosis. Hemin treatment partially suppressed Cd-induced ROS production and apoptosis, but enhanced autophagy and CHOP expression, indicating that autophagy induction is associated with cellular stress. Catalase inhibition by pharmacological and genetic modulations increased Cd-induced ROS production, autophagy, and apoptosis, but suppressed HO-1, indicating that catalase is required for HO-1 induction. p38 inhibition upregulated Cd-induced phospho-JNK and catalase, but suppressed HO-1, autophagy, apoptosis. JNK suppression exhibited contrary results, enhancing the expression of phospho-p38. Co-suppression of p38 and JNK1 failed to upregulate catalase and procaspase-3, which were upregulated by JNK1 overexpression. Overall, the balance between the responses of p38 and JNK activation to Cd appears to have an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis via the regulation of antioxidant enzymes and autophagy induction. In addition, the upregulation of catalase by JNK1 activation can play a critical role in cell protection against Cd-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadati, Shagayegh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH{sub 2}-IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH{sub 2}-IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub M}) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} mol cm{sup -2}, 5.28 s{sup -1} and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  8. Disruption of AtWNK8 Enhances Tolerance of Arabidopsis to Salt and Osmotic Stresses via Modulating Proline Content and Activities of Catalase and Peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With no lysine kinases (WNKs play important roles in plant growth and development. However, its role in salt and osmotic stress tolerance is unclear. Here, we report that AtWNK8 is mainly expressed in primary root, hypocotyl, stamen and pistil and is induced by NaCl and sorbitol treatment. Compared to the wild-type, the T-DNA knock-out wnk8 mutant was more tolerant to severe salinity and osmotic stresses, as indicated by 27% and 198% more fresh weight in the NaCl and sorbitol treatment, respectively. The wnk8 mutant also accumulated 1.43-fold more proline than the wild-type in the sorbitol treatment. Under NaCl and sorbitol stresses, catalase (CAT activity in wnk8 mutant was 1.92- and 3.7-times of that in Col-0, respectively. Similarly, under salt and osmotic stress conditions, peroxidase (POD activities in wnk8 mutant were 1.81- and 1.58-times of that in Col-0, respectively. Taken together, we revealed that maintaining higher CAT and POD activities might be one of the reasons that the disruption of AtWNK8 enhances the tolerance to salt stress, and accumulating more proline and higher activities of CAT and POD might result in the higher tolerance of WNK8 to osmotic stress.

  9. Oxidation of C18 Hydroxy-Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids to Epoxide or Ketone by Catalase-Related Hemoproteins Activated with Iodosylbenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teder, Tarvi; Boeglin, William E; Brash, Alan R

    2017-07-01

    Small catalase-related hemoproteins with a facility to react with fatty acid hydroperoxides were examined for their potential mono-oxygenase activity when activated using iodosylbenzene. The proteins tested were a Fusarium graminearum 41 kD catalase hemoprotein (Fg-cat, gene FGSG_02217), a Pseudomonas fluorescens Pfl01 catalase (37.5 kD, accession number WP_011333788.1), and a Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis 33 kD catalase (gene MAP-2744c). 13-Hydroxy-octadecenoic acids (which are normally unreactive) were selected as substrates because these enzymes react specifically with the corresponding 13S-hydroperoxides (Pakhomova et al. 18:2559-2568, 5; Teder et al. 1862:706-715, 14). In the presence of iodosylbenzene Fg-cat converted 13S-hydroxy-fatty acids to two products: the 15,16-double bond of 13S-hydroxy α-linolenic acid was oxidized stereospecifically to the 15S,16R-cis-epoxide or the 13-hydroxyl was oxidized to the 13-ketone. Products were identified by UV, HPLC, LC-MS, NMR and by comparison with authentic standards prepared for this study. The Pfl01-cat displayed similar activity. MAP-2744c oxidized 13S-hydroxy-linoleic acid to the 13-ketone, and epoxidized the double bonds to form the 9,10-epoxy-13-hydroxy, 11,12-epoxy-13-hydroxy, and 9,10-epoxy-13-keto derivatives; equivalent transformations occurred with 9S-hydroxy-linoleic acid as substrate. In parallel incubations in the presence of iodosylbenzene, human catalase displayed no activity towards 13S-hydroxy-linoleic acid, as expected from the highly restricted access to its active site. The results indicated that with suitable transformation to Compound I, monooxygenase activity can be demonstrated by these catalase-related hemoproteins with tyrosine as the proximal heme ligand.

  10. Humic acid effect on catalase activity and the generation of reactive oxygen species in corn (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Flávio Couto; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; Silveira, Vanildo; de Souza, Sonia Regina

    2011-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) have positive effects on plant physiology, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are only partially understood. The induction of root growth and emission of lateral roots (LRs) promoted by exogenous auxin is a natural phenomenon. Exogenous auxins are also associated with HA. Gas nitric oxide (NO) is a secondary messenger produced endogenously in plants. It is associated with metabolic events dependent on auxin. With the application of auxin, NO production is significantly increased, resulting in positive effects on plant physiology. Thus it is possible to evaluate the beneficial effects of the application of HA as an effect of auxin. To investigate the effects of HA the parameters of root growth, Zea mays was studied by evaluating the application of 3 mM C L⁻¹ of HA extracted from Oxisol and 100 µM SNP (sodium nitroprusside) and the NO donor, subject to two N-NO₃⁻, high dose (5.0 mM N-NO₃⁻) and low dose (5.0 mM N-NO₃⁻). Treatments with HA and NO were positively increased, regardless of the N-NO₃⁻ taken, as assessed by fresh weight and dry root, issue of LRs. The effects were more pronounced in the treatment with a lower dose of N-NO₃⁻. Detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo and catalase activity were evaluated; these tests were associated with root growth. Under application of the bioactive substances tested, detection of ROS and catalase activity increased, especially in treatments with lower doses of N-NO₃⁻. The results of this experiment indicate that the effects of HA are dependent on ROS generation, which act as a messenger that induces root growth and the emission of LRs.

  11. Molecular mechanism of catalase activity change under sodium dodecyl sulfate-induced oxidative stress in the mouse primary hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Jiaxi; Xu, Chi; Liu, Rutao; Chen, Yadong

    2016-04-15

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) contributes to adverse effects of organisms probably because of its ability to induce oxidative stress via changing the activity of antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT). But the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. This study characterized the harmful effects of SDS-induced oxidative stress on the mouse primary hepatocytes as well as the structure and function of CAT molecule and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism. After 12h SDS (0.1μM to 0.2mM) exposure, no significant change was observed in CAT activity of the hepatocytes. After 0.5 and 0.8mM SDS exposure, the state of oxidative stress stimulated CAT production in the hepatocytes. The inhibition of CAT activity induced by directly interacting with SDS was unable to catch the synthesis of CAT and therefore resulted in the increased activity and elevated ROS level. Further molecular experiments showed that SDS prefers to bind to the interface with no direct effect on the active site and the structure of heme groups of CAT molecule. When the sites in the interface is saturated, SDS interacts with VAL 73, HIS 74, ASN 147 and PHE 152, the key residues of the enzyme activity, and leads to the decrease of CAT activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A natural xanthone increases catalase activity but decreases NF-kappa B and lipid peroxidation in U-937 and HepG2 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Binay K; Zaidi, Adeel H; Gupta, Pankaj; Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Raviprakash, Nune; Mahali, Sidhartha K; Manna, Sunil K

    2015-10-05

    Mangiferin, a C-glycosyl xanthone, has shown anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumorigenic activities. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism for the antioxidant property of mangiferin. Considering the role of nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) in inflammation and tumorigenesis, we hypothesized that modulating its activity will be a viable therapeutic target in regulating the redox-sensitive ailments. Our results show that mangiferin blocks several inducers, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), lypopolysaccharide (LPS), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) mediated NF-κB activation via inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation. In silico docking studies predicted strong binding energy of mangiferin to the active site of catalase (-9.13 kcal/mol), but not with other oxidases such as myeloperoxidase, glutathione peroxidase, or inducible nitric oxide synthase. Mangiferin increased activity of catalase by 44%, but had no effect on myeloperoxidase activity in vitro. Fluorescence spectroscopy further revealed the binding of mangiferin to catalase at the single site with binding constant and binding affinity of 3.1×10(-7) M(-1) and 1.046 respectively. Mangiferin also inhibits TNF-induced lipid peroxidation and thereby protects apoptosis. Hence, mangiferin with its ability to inhibit NF-κB and increase the catalase activity may prove to be a potent therapeutic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro assembly of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-10-10

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. In Vitro Assembly of Catalase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process. PMID:25148685

  15. Beneficial effects of vitamin C and vitamin E on reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia in rats: critical role of striatal catalase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Rulian Ricardo; Abílio, Vanessa Costhek; Grassl, Christian; Chinen, Cibele Cristina; Negrão, Luciana Takahashi Ribeiro; de Castro, Juliana Pedroso Moraes Vilela; Fukushiro, Daniela Fukue; Rodrigues, Marcelo Scarpari Dutra; Gomes, Patricia Helena Zanier; Registro, Sibele; de Carvalho, Rita de Cassia; D'Almeida, Vania; Silva, Regina Helena; Ribeiro, Rosana de Alencar; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Oral dyskinesias are implicated in a series of neuropathologies and have been associated to an increase in oxidative stress. Several antioxidants, including vitamin E, decrease reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia (OD) in rodents and we have described a protective role of striatal catalase against the development of OD. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of vitamin C alone or in combination with vitamin E on reserpine-induced OD as well as to determine a possible role of catalase in the antidyskinetic property of these vitamins. Different doses of vitamin C attenuated reserpine-induced increase in OD. A similar treatment with an effective dose of vitamin C concomitant to an effective dose of vitamin E potentiated the antidyskinetic effect of both vitamins when administered alone. The administration of these vitamins alone produced an increase in striatal catalase activity that likewise was potentiated by their combined administration. In addition, the antidyskinetic property of vitamin E and vitamin C was abolished by a concomitant treatment with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole. These results indicate a beneficial effect of these vitamins and reinforce the critical role of striatal catalase against the development of oral dyskinesias.

  16. CatB is Critical for Total Catalase Activity and Reduces Bactericidal Effects of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid on Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiayan; Wu, Jian; Xu, Shu; Duan, Yabing; Zhou, Mingguo

    2017-02-01

    Rice bacterial leaf blight, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, and rice bacterial leaf streak, caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, are major diseases of rice. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is a natural product that is isolated from Pseudomonas spp. and is used to control many important rice diseases in China. We previously reported that PCA disturbs the redox balance, which results in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in X. oryzae pv. oryzae. In this study, we found that PCA significantly upregulated the transcript levels of catB and katE, which encode catalases, and that PCA sensitivity was reduced when X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola were cultured with exogenous catalase. Furthermore, catB deletion mutants of X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola showed dramatically decreased total catalase activity, increased sensitivity to PCA, and reduced virulence in rice. In contrast, deletion mutants of srpA and katG, which also encode catalases, exhibited little change in PCA sensitivity. The results indicate that catB in both X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola encodes a catalase that helps protect the bacteria against PCA-induced stress.

  17. High production, purification, biochemical characterization and gene analysis of a novel catalase from the thermophilic bacterium Ureibacillus thermosphaericus FZSF03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xianbo; Lin, Xinjian; Tian, Yandan; Chen, Jichen; You, Minsheng

    2017-10-01

    A catalase-producing thermophilic bacterium, Ureibacillus thermosphaericus FZSF03, was isolated from high-temperature compost. Catalase production in this strain increased 31 times and reached 57,630U/mL after optimization in a shake flask, which might represent the highest catalase activity level among reported wild strains. This catalase was further purified and identified. The purified enzyme showed a specific activity of 219,360U/mg, higher than many other catalases. The molecular weight of this enzyme is 52kDa according to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the enzyme was identified as a monofunctional haeme catalase of Ureibacillus thermosphaericus by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. The optimal reaction temperature for this catalase was found to be 60°C. Stability was observed at 60°C and at a pH of 10.0, indicating the superiority of this enzyme at a high temperature and under alkaline conditions. Therefore, this catalase is a prospective candidate for industrial production and applications. The gene encoding this catalase is 1503bp. As the amino acid sequence shows low similarity with other catalases, we suggest that this is a novel monofunctional haeme catalase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of carbon ion irradiation on survival rate, catalase and peroxidase activity of alfalfa M1 under low temperature stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuyang; Li Jinghua; Jiang Boling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, three kinds of alfalfa including Zhonglan 1, BC-04-477 and Ta Cheng were treated with different doses of "1"2C"6"+ (75 keV) heavy ion radiation, and then the influence of survival rate, catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activity of M1 with low temperature stress were tested. The results showed that under the condition of 400 Gy radiation dose, the survival rate and CAT activity of Zhonglan 1 under low temperature stress have increased by 33.3%, 56.3% respectively compared with those of the control group, while there was no difference in POD activity between those two groups. The survival rate, CAT and POD activity of BC-04-477 treated with low temperature have been improved by 33.3%, 69.2%, 5.1% respectively compared with those of the control group when the radiation dose was 400 Gy. Compared with those of the control group, the survival rate, CAT and POD activity of Ta Cheng under low temperature stress have been improved by 25%, 26%,22.8% respectively when the radiation dose was 800 Gy. These results indicate that the viability and the cold resistance ability of Zhong Lan 1, BC-04-477 and Ta Cheng can be improved by "1"2C"6"+ radiation. (authors)

  19. Effect of heavy metal stress on the catalase activity and expression of isozymes in the leaves of rice seedling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Cailin; Yang Xiaoyong; Zhu Hongxia; Wang Zegang; Luo Shishi; Ma Fei; Sun Jinhe

    2002-01-01

    The effect of heavy metal stress on the catalase (CAT) activity and expression of isozymes in the leaves of rice (Wuyujing, Yangdao 6, Shanyou 818) seedling was measured and analyzed. The results showed as follows. (1) When the concentration of Cu, Cd and Hg was in the range of 0.05-2.0 mM, the CAT activity decreased continuously with the concentration of Cu and Cd increasing. However, with the concentration of Hg increasing the CAT activity rapidly decreased first, and then increased slightly, and again decreased obviously, indicating that the Cu, Cd and Hg of 0.05-2.0 mM inhibited the CAT activity in the leaves of rice seedling. (2) The results by using polyacrylamide concentration gradient gel electrophoresis technique to analyze the CAT isozymes indicated that, on the normal condition, there were 1 to 2 CAT isozymes being expressed in the rice leaves (2 CAT isozymes being expressed in Wuyujing leaves, 1 CAT isozymes in Yangdao 6 and Shanyou 818 leaves). 0.1 mM Cd stress induced Wuyujing leaves to express 1 new CAT isozymes, 0.1 mM Cd and Hg stress also induced Yangdao 6 leaves to express 1 new CAT isozymes, but the expression of CAT isozymes, which were expressed in normal condition, were inhibited by Cu, Cd and Hg stress

  20. The induction of two biosynthetic enzymes helps Escherichia coli sustain heme synthesis and activate catalase during hydrogen peroxide stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Stefano; Imlay, James A

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide pervades many natural environments, including the phagosomes that mediate cell-based immunity. Transcriptomic analysis showed that during protracted low-grade H(2)O(2) stress, Escherichia coli responds by activating both the OxyR defensive regulon and the Fur iron-starvation response. OxyR induced synthesis of two members of the nine-step heme biosynthetic pathway: ferrochelatase (HemH) and an isozyme of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (HemF). Mutations that blocked either adaptation caused the accumulation of porphyrin intermediates, inadequate activation of heme enzymes, low catalase activity, defective clearance of H(2)O(2) and a failure to grow. Genetic analysis indicated that HemH induction is needed to compensate for iron sequestration by the mini-ferritin Dps. Dps activity protects DNA and proteins by limiting Fenton chemistry, but it interferes with the ability of HemH to acquire the iron that it needs to complete heme synthesis. HemF is a manganoprotein that displaces HemN, an iron-sulfur enzyme whose synthesis and/or stability is apparently problematic during H(2)O(2) stress. Thus, the primary responses to H(2)O(2), including the sequestration of iron, require compensatory adjustments in the mechanisms of iron-cofactor synthesis. The results support the growing evidence that oxidative stress is primarily an iron pathology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effect of N+ beam exposure on the activities of Mn-SOD and catalase in deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Daojun; Chen Ruolei; Wu Lifang; Li Hong; Yao JIanming; Shao Chunlin; Wu Lijun; Yu Zengliang

    2000-01-01

    Though the radiation-resistant bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans (D. radiodurans) have a high resistance to the lethal and mutagenic effects of many DNA-damaging agents, the mechanisms involved in the response of these bacteria to oxidative stress are poorly understood. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities produced in bacteria (D. radiodurans AS1.633) and their change caused by 20 keV N'+ beam exposure were examined. Results showed that the activities of the enzymes were increased in the case of N + beam exposure from 8 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 to 6 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 . In addition, the treatment of H 2 O 2 and [CHCl 3 + CH 3 CH 2 OH] and the measurement of absorption spectrum showed that the increase of whole SOD activity resulted from inducible activities of Mn-SOD in (a sub-type) D. radiodurans AS1.633. These results suggested that these bacteria possess inducible defense mechanisms against the deleterious effects of oxidization

  2. Effect of drought stress and subsequent recovery on protein, carbohydrate contents, catalase and peroxidase activities in three chickpea (Cicer arietinum) cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafakheri, A.; Siosemardeh, A.; Bahramnejad, B.; Struik, P.C.; Sohrabi, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the major abiotic stresses in agriculture worldwide. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of drought stress and subsequent recovery on protein, carbohydrate content, catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POX) activities in three varieties of chickpea (drought

  3. Influence of storage period of gamma-irradiated seeds on the catalase activity and the sinthesis of alpha-amilase in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichkov, D.; Antonov, M.; Spasov, S.

    1983-10-01

    It was established that irradiation of the maize hybrid Knezha 2L-611 seeds with the dose 5 Gy showed the most constant and the best expressed stimulation effect. The activity of catalase and synthesis of alpha-amylase showed that the most convenient time for sowing of seeds irradiated with 5 Gy was 2 days after the treatment

  4. The effect of seedling chilling on glutathione content, catalase and peroxidase activity in Brassica oleracea L. var. italica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Wojciechowska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to determine the possible relationship between Brassica oleracea var. italica seedlings stored at 2°C in the dark for seven and fourteen days, respectively, and the level of certain antioxidant parameters in particular organs. A parallel objective of the experiment was to determine if the reaction of seedlings to low temperature might be persistent in fully developed plants until harvest time. After 14 days of chilling a significant increase in the glutathione content was observed in the seedling leaves in comparison to the non-chilled plants. During vegetation in field conditions this effect was maintained in leaves up to the stage of formation of flower buds. At harvest the highest content of glutathione was demonstrated in broccoli heads, obtained from plants, which were previously chilled in the seedling phase for two weeks. Peroxidase activity in broccoli seedlings increased each year of the three-year study due to the duration of the cooling time, whereas in the case of catalase the changes were not so distinct. At harvest time the activity of both enzymes in the leaves and flower buds fluctuated according to the particular year of study.

  5. Catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of vasoprotective proteins in venous tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Floeren, Melanie; Kumpf, Stephanie; Both, Charlotte; Peter, B?rbel; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Kojda, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Physical activity induces favourable changes of arterial gene expression and protein activity, although little is known about its effect in venous tissue. Although our understanding of the initiating molecular signals is still incomplete, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered a key event. This study sought to investigate the effects of two different training protocols on the expression of eNOS and extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) in ...

  6. Zymogram profiling of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities allows Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces species differentiation and correlates to their fermentation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Matallana, Emilia

    2013-05-01

    Aerobic organisms have devised several enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses to deal with reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by cellular metabolism. To combat such stress, cells induce ROS scavenging enzymes such as catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase. In the present research, we have used a double staining technique of SOD and catalase enzymes in the same polyacrylamide gel to analyze the different antioxidant enzymatic activities and protein isoforms present in Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeast species. Moreover, we used a technique to differentially detect Sod1p and Sod2p on gel by immersion in NaCN, which specifically inhibits the Sod1p isoform. We observed unique SOD and catalase zymogram profiles for all the analyzed yeasts and we propose this technique as a new approach for Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeast strains differentiation. In addition, we observed functional correlations between SOD and catalase enzyme activities, accumulation of essential metabolites, such as glutathione and trehalose, and the fermentative performance of different yeasts strains with industrial relevance.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus warneri Catalase

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Daisuke; Mizuno, Kouhei; Kohno, Mamiko; Sonomoto, Kenji; Ishizaki, Ayaaki

    2000-01-01

    The catalase gene was cloned by screening a genomic DNA library of S. warneri ISK-1 strain with a strong catalase activity for complementation of the activity in catalase-deficient E. coli strain. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 2.2-kb DNA fragment revealed an open reading frame, called katA, encoding a peptide of 504 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 58kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence showed high similarities with the monofunctional catalases. No similarities were found...

  8. Activity of peroxisomal enzymes and intracellular distribution of catalase in Zellweger syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrakamp, G.; Bosch, H. van den; Roest, B.; Kos, M.; Meijer, A.J.; Heymans, H.S.A.; Tegelaers, W.H.H.; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Tager, J.M.; Wanders, R.J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The activity of peroxisomal enzymes was studied in human liver and cultured human skin fibroblasts in relation to the finding (Goldfischer, S. et al. (1973) Science 182, 62–64) that morphologically distinct peroxisomes are not detectable in patients with the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger)

  9. Cytochemical Localization of Catalase Activity in Methanol-Grown Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, J.P. van; Veenhuis, M.; Vermeulen, C.A.; Harder, W.

    1975-01-01

    The localization of peroxidase activity in methanol-grown cells of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has been studied by a method based on cytochemical staining with diaminobenzidine (DAB). The oxidation product of DAB occurred in microbodies, which characteristically develop during growth on methanol,

  10. Activity of peroxisomal enzymes and intracellular distribution of catalase in Zellweger syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R. J.; Kos, M.; Roest, B.; Meijer, A. J.; Schrakamp, G.; Heymans, H. S.; Tegelaers, W. H.; van den Bosch, H.; Schutgens, R. B.; Tager, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The activity of peroxisomal enzymes was studied in human liver and cultured human skin fibroblasts in relation to the finding (Goldfischer, S. et al. (1973) Science 182, 62-64) that morphologically distinct peroxisomes are not detectable in patients with the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger)

  11. Effect of Ankaferd Blood Stopper on Skin Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activities in Warfarin-Treated Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktop, Sertaç; Emekli-Alturfan, Ebru; Gönül, Onur; Göçmen, Gökhan; Garip, Hasan; Yarat, Ayşen; Göker, Kamil

    2017-03-01

    Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) is a new promising local hemostatic agent, and its mechanism on hemostasis has been shown by many studies. However, the effects of ABS on skin superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities have not been investigated before. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of this new generation local hemostatic agent on warfarin-treated rats focusing on its the antioxidant potential in short-term soft tissue healing. Twelve systemically warfarin treated (warfarin group) and 12 none treated Wistar Albino rats (control group) were selected for the trial. Rats in the warfarin group were treated intraperitonally with 0.1 mg/kg warfarin, and rats in the control group were given 1 mL/kg saline 3 days earlier to surgical procedure and continued until killing. All rats had incisions on dorsal dermal tissue, which was applied ABS or no hemostatic agent before suturing. Six of each group were killed on day 4, and the other 6 were killed on day 8. Blood and skin samples were taken. Prothrombin time (PT) in blood samples, CAT, and SOD activities in skin samples were determined. Warfarin treatment dose was found to be convenient and warfarin treatment increased the PT levels as expected. Warfarin treatment decreased CAT activity significantly compared to the control group. The ABS treatment significantly increased SOD activities in the warfarin group at the end of the eighth day. Ankaferd Blood Stopper acted positively in short-term tissue healing by increasing SOD activity in warfarin-treated rats. Therefore, ABS may be suggeted as a promoting factor in tissue healing.

  12. Drought controls on H2O2 accumulation, catalase (CAT) activity and CAT gene expression in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Celina M; Pastori, Gabriela M; Driscoll, Simon; Groten, Karin; Bernard, Stephanie; Foyer, Christine H

    2005-01-01

    Plants co-ordinate information derived from many diverse external and internal signals to ensure appropriate control of gene expression under optimal and stress conditions. In this work, the relationships between catalase (CAT) and H2O2 during drought in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are studied. Drought-induced H2O2 accumulation correlated with decreases in soil water content and CO2 assimilation. Leaf H2O2 content increased even though total CAT activity doubled under severe drought conditions. Diurnal regulation of CAT1 and CAT2 mRNA abundance was apparent in all conditions and day/night CAT1 and CAT2 expression patterns were modified by mild and severe drought. The abundance of CAT1 transcripts was regulated by circadian controls that persisted in continuous darkness, while CAT2 was modulated by light. Drought decreased abundance, and modified the pattern, of CAT1 and CAT2 mRNAs. It was concluded that the complex regulation of CAT mRNA, particularly at the level of translation, allows precise control of leaf H2O2 accumulation.

  13. Seasonal changes of peroxidase and catalase activities in leaves of several arborescent species subject to different industrial air pollutions in Upper Silesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raczek, E.; Stolarek, J.

    1979-01-01

    Year-round investigations of seasonal patterns of peroxidase and catalase activities in leaves of several deciduous and coniferous arborescent species in forests of Upper Silesia subjected to various amounts of industrial gases and dusts were carried out. The samples of leaves of Betula verrucosa EHRH, Quercus robur L., Q. rubra L., Pinus nigra ARNOLD, and P. silvestris L. were collected at different distances from an iron smelting plant. It was found that raising level of the pollution enhances peroxidase activity in leaves and needles. The induction of peroxidase activity by pollutants exhibited seasonal changes specific for the species and was subjected to the effect of temperature of the environment and was also related to the natural resistivity of a given species. In contrast to peroxidase, the patterns of catalase activity changes did not appear to be specifically influenced by industrial air pollutants. 22 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Change in the Content of Salicylic Acid and in the Activities of Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase and Catalase in Wheat Seedling Roots Under the Effect of Azospirillum Lectins

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    Alen'kina S.A.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the time course of changes in the endogenous content of salicylic acid, the ratio between the acid's free and bound forms, and changes in the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and catalase in wheat seedling roots under the effect of the lectins of two strains of the associative nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azospirillum: A. brasilense Sp7 and its mutant defective in lectin activity, A. brasilense Sp7.2.3. Differences in plant response to the action of the lectins from these two strains were established. On the basis of the obtained data, a model was proposed for lectin-assisted induction of resistance, according to which the lectin effect on the roots of seedlings results in accumulation of free salicylic acid, which inhibits catalase activity, ultimately leading to accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and to formation of induced resistance.

  15. The effects of the sulfonylurea glyburide on glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the heart tissue of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukan, N; Sancak, B; Bilgihan, A; Kosova, F; Buğdayci, G; Altan, N

    2004-09-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been suggested to be a contributory factor in diabetes complications. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of glyburide on the antioxidant enzyme activities in the heart tissue of diabetic rats. We investigated the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) in the hearts of both control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In the heart of diabetic rats, the activity of total superoxide dismutase decreased significantly (p < 0.005), whereas the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase increased to a large extent (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.05, respectively) at the end of the fourth week compared with the control group. Glyburide treatment of diabetic rats for 4 weeks corrected the changes observed in diabetic heart. In addition, blood glucose levels of untreated diabetic rats decreased following the glyburide treatment. These results demonstrate that the sulfonylurea glyburide is capable of exerting direct insulin-like effect on heart superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities of diabetic rats in vivo.

  16. Inhibition of Catalase by Tea Catechins in Free and Cellular State: A Biophysical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sandip; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Chabita

    2014-01-01

    Tea flavonoids bind to variety of enzymes and inhibit their activities. In the present study, binding and inhibition of catalase activity by catechins with respect to their structure-affinity relationship has been elucidated. Fluorimetrically determined binding constants for (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (−)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) with catalase were observed to be 2.27×106 M−1 and 1.66×106 M−1, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters evidence exothermic and spontaneous interaction between catechins and catalase. Major forces of interaction are suggested to be through hydrogen bonding along with electrostatic contributions and conformational changes. Distinct loss of α-helical structure of catalase by interaction with EGCG was captured in circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Gallated catechins demonstrated higher binding constants and inhibition efficacy than non-gallated catechins. EGCG exhibited maximum inhibition of pure catalase. It also inhibited cellular catalase in K562 cancer cells with significant increase in cellular ROS and suppression of cell viability (IC50 54.5 µM). These results decipher the molecular mechanism by which tea catechins interact with catalase and highlight the potential of gallated catechin like EGCG as an anticancer drug. EGCG may have other non-specific targets in the cell, but its anticancer property is mainly defined by ROS accumulation due to catalase inhibition. PMID:25025898

  17. A high constitutive catalase activity confers resistance to methyl viologen-promoted oxidative stress in a mutant of the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moirangthem, Lakshmipyari Devi; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Stensjö, Karin; Lindblad, Peter; Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy

    2014-04-01

    A spontaneous methyl viologen (MV)-resistant mutant of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 was isolated and the major enzymatic antioxidants involved in combating MV-induced oxidative stress were evaluated. The mutant displayed a high constitutive catalase activity as a consequence of which, the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species in the mutant was lower than the wild type (N. punctiforme) in the presence of MV. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity that consisted of a SodA (manganese-SOD) and a SodB (iron-SOD) was not suppressed in the mutant following MV treatment. The mutant was, however, characterised by a lower peroxidase activity compared with its wild type, and its improved tolerance to externally added H₂O₂ could only be attributed to enhanced catalase activity. Furthermore, MV-induced toxic effects on the wild type such as (1) loss of photosynthetic performance assessed as maximal quantum yield of photosystem II, (2) nitrogenase inactivation, and (3) filament fragmentation and cell lysis were not observed in the mutant. These findings highlight the importance of catalase in preventing MV-promoted oxidative damage and cell death in the cyanobacterium N. punctiforme. Such oxidative stress resistant mutants of cyanobacteria are likely to be a better source of biofertilisers, as they can grow and fix nitrogen in an unhindered manner in agricultural fields that are often contaminated with the herbicide MV, also commonly known as paraquat.

  18. Nitroxides protect horseradish peroxidase from H2O2-induced inactivation and modulate its catalase-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuni, Amram; Maimon, Eric; Goldstein, Sara

    2017-08-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes H 2 O 2 dismutation while undergoing heme inactivation. The mechanism underlying this process has not been fully elucidated. The effects of nitroxides, which protect metmyoglobin and methemoglobin against H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation, have been investigated. HRP reaction with H 2 O 2 was studied by following H 2 O 2 depletion, O 2 evolution and heme spectral changes. Nitroxide concentration was followed by EPR spectroscopy, and its reactions with the oxidized heme species were studied using stopped-flow. Nitroxide protects HRP against H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation. The rate of H 2 O 2 dismutation in the presence of nitroxide obeys zero-order kinetics and increases as [nitroxide] increases. Nitroxide acts catalytically since its oxidized form is readily reduced to the nitroxide mainly by H 2 O 2 . The nitroxide efficacy follows the order 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (TPO)>4-OH-TPO>3-carbamoyl proxyl>4-oxo-TPO, which correlates with the order of the rate constants of nitroxide reactions with compounds I, II, and III. Nitroxide catalytically protects HRP against inactivation induced by H 2 O 2 while modulating its catalase-like activity. The protective role of nitroxide at μM concentrations is attributed to its efficient oxidation by P940, which is the precursor of the inactivated form P670. Modeling the dismutation kinetics in the presence of nitroxide adequately fits the experimental data. In the absence of nitroxide the simulation fits the observed kinetics only if it does not include the formation of a Michaelis-Menten complex. Nitroxides catalytically protect heme proteins against inactivation induced by H 2 O 2 revealing an additional role played by nitroxide antioxidants in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Catalase inhibits ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xia; Luo, Hongmei; Vanek, Kenneth N; LaRue, Amanda C; Schulte, Bradley A; Wang, Gavin Y

    2015-06-01

    Hematologic toxicity is a major cause of mortality in radiation emergency scenarios and a primary side effect concern in patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy. Therefore, there is a critical need for the development of novel and more effective approaches to manage this side effect. Catalase is a potent antioxidant enzyme that coverts hydrogen peroxide into hydrogen and water. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of catalase as a protectant against ionizing radiation (IR)-induced toxicity in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The results revealed that catalase treatment markedly inhibits IR-induced apoptosis in murine hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Subsequent colony-forming cell and cobble-stone area-forming cell assays showed that catalase-treated HSPCs can not only survive irradiation-induced apoptosis but also have higher clonogenic capacity, compared with vehicle-treated cells. Moreover, transplantation of catalase-treated irradiated HSPCs results in high levels of multi-lineage and long-term engraftments, whereas vehicle-treated irradiated HSPCs exhibit very limited hematopoiesis reconstituting capacity. Mechanistically, catalase treatment attenuates IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and inhibits reactive oxygen species. Unexpectedly, we found that the radioprotective effect of catalase is associated with activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 abolishes the protective activity of catalase, suggesting that catalase may protect HSPCs against IR-induced toxicity via promoting STAT3 activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism by which catalase inhibits IR-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in HSPCs.

  20. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase activities and risk of coronary heart disease in generally healthy women: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuman; Jensen, Majken K; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter; Wu, Tianying

    2014-11-01

    Erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes are major circulating antioxidant enzymes in the oxidative stress defense system. Few prospective studies have assessed the association between these enzymes and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in generally healthy adults. We conducted a prospective nested case-control study of CHD among 32,826 women at baseline with 15 years of follow-up from 1989 to 2004 in the Nurses' Health Study. We investigated the association of baseline erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activities with the risk of CHD. A total of 365 cases and 728 controls were included in the analysis. Overall, the relative risks of CHD associated with 1-standard deviation higher SOD, GPx, and CAT activities were 1.07 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 1.22), 1.04 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.18), and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.17), respectively. Multivariable adjustments did not change the associations appreciably. Fasting status did not modify the associations, with the exception that SOD activity was positively associated with the risk of CHD among participants who provided blood samples within 12 hours of fasting. Overall, activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were not associated with CHD among women who were generally healthy at the time of blood collection. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Streptococcus didelphis sp. nov., a streptococcus with marked catalase activity isolated from opossums (Didelphis virginiana) with suppurative dermatitis and liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rurangirwa, F R; Teitzel, C A; Cui, J; French, D M; McDonough, P L; Besser, T

    2000-03-01

    beta-Haemolytic, catalase-positive, Gram-positive cocci that formed chains in broth media but did not react with Lancefield group antisera were isolated from skin lesions, spleen, liver and lungs of nine opossums, including eight from a research colony and one from a wildlife rehabilitation organization. The isolates had vigorous catalase activity that was retained on initial passage on non-blood-containing media, but this activity was lost in subsequent passages. The use of standard phenotypic tests did not lead to satisfactory identification of these organisms beyond the genus level, even if the aberrant catalase reaction was not considered. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolates was most similar (96%) to Streptococcus dysgalactiae, but distinct from that species as 16S rRNA gene similarity of different strains of S. dysgalactiae was > 99%. Characterization of biochemical reactions and cell-wall fatty acid profiles also revealed significant differences between the opossum isolates and all other known Streptococcus spp., thus it is proposed as a new species with the name Streptococcus didelphis, sp. nov. The type strain is ATCC 700828T.

  2. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher H; Catallo, W James; Wilson, Vincent L; Mitchell, James B

    2009-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from enzyme inactivation due to protein amino acid oxidation and (2) induce oxidative DNA damage in NHBE cells. Thus, our aims were to determine the effect of butadiene soot ethanol extract (BSEE) on both enzyme activity and the expression of proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Catalase was found to be sensitive to BDS as catalase activity was potently diminished in the presence of BSEE. Using Western analysis, both the alpha isoform of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (alpha-hOGG1) and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) were shown to be significantly overexpressed as compared to untreated controls after exposure of NHBE cells to BSEE. Our results indicate that BSEE is capable of effectively inactivating the antioxidant enzyme catalase, presumably via oxidation of protein amino acids. The presence of oxidized biomolecules may partially explain the extranuclear fluorescence that is detected when NHBE cells are treated with an organic extract of BDS. Overexpression of both alpha-hOGG1 and APE-1 proteins following treatment of NHBE cells with BSEE suggests that this mixture causes oxidative DNA damage.

  3. Changing of Bacteria Catalase Activity Under the Influence of Electro-Magnetic Radiation on a Frequency of Nitric Oxide Absorption and Radiation Molecular Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Shub

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of catalase activity degree changing in Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is described under the influence of electro-magnetic radiation on a frequency of nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum. The panoramic spectrometric measuring complex, developed in Central Scientific Research Institute of measuring equipment Public corporation, Saratov, was used while carrying out the research. Electromagnetic vibrations of extremely high frequencies were stimulated in this complex imitating the structure of nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum. The growth of activity of the mentioned enzyme of the strains under research was detected. The most significant changes were observed under 60-minutes exposure.

  4. Atividade da catalase e da lactato desidrogenase em tilápias submetidas a estresse de confinamento: efeito da cor do ambiente Catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activity in tilapia subjected to contention stress: effect of the background color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyara Maria Pereira-da-Silva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se os efeitos da cor do ambiente sobre o crescimento e a atividade da enzima antioxidante catalase (CAT e da lactato desidrogenase (LDH em tilápias do Nilo (n=24; 36,2±3,6g. Oito exemplares foram mortos para determinação da atividade basal das enzimas e os demais permaneceram isolados durante 14 dias sob espectro de luz branca ou azul (n=8 peixes/tratamento. A seguir os peixes foram submetidos a um estresse diário de confinamento de 90 minutos (15° ao 28° dia e pesados semanalmente para cálculo da taxa de crescimento específico (TCE. A TCE negativa confirmou que o confinamento provocou estresse nos peixes, independentemente da cor do ambiente. O aumento da atividade da LDH no músculo vermelho dos peixes mantidos sob luz branca ou azul indicou mudança do metabolismo aeróbio para anaeróbio. O estresse reduziu a atividade da CAT no músculo branco dos peixes mantidos sob a luz branca ou azul. Na musculatura vermelha, esta redução ocorreu apenas nos animais mantidos sob a luz branca. O confinamento aumenta os processos metabólicos anaeróbios e é adequado para estudos sobre os efeitos do estresse. O espectro de luz azul não evita a redução do crescimento e a demanda energética anaeróbia em situações de estresse, mas preserva a atividade da CAT, contribuindo para o bem-estar da tilápia.We assess the effects of the background color on the growth and antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in Nile tilapia (n=24; 36.2±3.6g. Eight fish were killed for assessment of basal activity of the enzymes and the others remained isolated for 14 days under white or blue light spectrum (n=8 fish/treatment. Then each animal were subjected to a daily stress of confinement of 90 minutes (15th to 28th day and weighed to calculate the specific growth rate (SGR. The negative SGR confirmed that the confinement stressed in fish, regardless of the background color. The increased activity of LDH in red muscle of fish

  5. Molecular identification of catalases from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willekens, H; Villarroel, R; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Van Camp, W

    1994-09-19

    We have isolated three different catalase cDNAs from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cat1, cat2, and cat3) and a partial sequence of a fourth catalase gene (cat4) that shows no discernible expression based on Northern analysis. The catalase sequences were used to determine the similarity with other plant catalases and to study the transcriptional response to paraquat, 3-aminotriazole, and salicylic acid. 3-Aminotriazole induces mRNA levels of cat1, cat2 and cat3, indicating that a reduction in catalase activity positively affects catalase mRNA abundance. Salicylic acid that binds catalase in vitro, had no effect on catalase transcript levels at physiological concentrations. Paraquat resulted in the induction of cat1.

  6. COMPARED ANALYSIS OF CATALASE AND PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY IN CELLULOLYTIC FUNGUS TRICHODERMA REESEI GROWN ON MEDIUM WITH DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF GRINDED WHEAT AND BARLEY STRAWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Cristica

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the evolution of catalase and peroxidase activity in Trichoderma reesei grown on medium containing grinded wheat and barley straws. Carbon source of cultivation medium - glucose was replaced by various concentrations of grinded wheat and barley straws, finally resulting three experimental variants as follows: V1 = 20 g/l, V2 = 30 g/l, V3 = 40 g/l. ĂŽn addition to these variants a control sample was added in which composition remainded unchanged. The catalase activity was determined by spectrophotometric Sinha method (Artenie et al., 2008 while peroxidase activity was assesed using the o-dianisidine method (Cojocaru, 2009. Enzymatic determinations were carried out at 7 and 14 days from inoculation, in both fungus mycelium and culture liquid. The enzymatic assay showed significant differences between determinations intervals and work variants. Enzyme activity is influenced by the age of fungus and by the different nature of the substrate used.

  7. Fish histopathology and catalase activity as biomarkers of the environmental quality of the industrial district on the Amazon estuary, Brazil - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v35i3.18032

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossineide Martins Rocha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The environment quality of an industrial district on the river Pará, Amazon estuary, Brazil, based on the assessment of histological alterations and on the determination of catalase activity of the hepatic tissue of two fish species, Plagioscion squamossissimus and Lithodoras dorsalis, is provided. Histopathological changes were evaluated semi-quantitatively and qualitatively. Mean Assessment Values (MAV and Histological Alteration Index (HAI of organ lesions were calculated for each zone under analysis, with different impact levels: Zone 1 (industrial district, with high contamination risk; Zone 2 (medium risk and Zone 3 (minimum risk. Strong positive catalase activity and histopathological changes were reported in Zone 1. None of the specimens of either species captured in Zones 1 and 2 was healthy, whereas more than 60% of the specimens from Zone 3 presented healthy hepatic tissue. The principal alterations observed in the tissue of the two species included an increase in the number of Melanomacrophagous centers, fatty degeneration, inflammation, congestion, hepatitis and focal necrosis. The carnivorous P. squamosissimus presented higher levels of alteration than the herbivorous L. dorsalis. Results showed that local anthropogenic impacts were affecting the health of the two fish species under analysis.   

  8. Effects of the hepatocarcinogen nafenopin, a peroxisome proliferator, on the activities of rat liver glutathione-requiring enzymes and catalase in comparison to the action of phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, K; Numoto, S; Furuya, K; Furukawa, N T; Williams, G M

    1985-10-01

    The biochemical effects in the livers of male rats of prolonged administration of the experimental hepatocarcinogen nafenopin, a hypolipidemic agent and peroxisome proliferator, were compared to those of another experimental liver carcinogen, phenobarbital, which acts as a neoplasm promoter. Feeding of nafenopin, 0.03 mmol/kg basal diet for up to 24 weeks increased the numbers of hepatic peroxisomes, increased catalase activity, markedly decreased cytosolic glutathione transferase activities toward two substrates, decreased cytosolic glutathione peroxidase activities toward H2O2 and two organic peroxides, and suppressed the age-related increase in gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity. In contrast the livers of rats fed an equimolar concentration of phenobarbital displayed increases in cytosolic glutathione transferase activities and enhancement of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity but no changes in glutathione peroxidase activities. There was also an enhancement of catalase activity without apparent increase in peroxisome number. Enzyme kinetic analyses revealed that the cytosolic glutathione transferase activities toward two halogenonitrobenzene substrates were inhibited in the rats fed nafenopin and displayed elevated Km and decreased Vmax. Kinetic studies of glutathione transferase activities in which nafenopin was mixed with normal rat liver cytosols in the assay system revealed competitive type inhibition toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and a noncompetitive type of inhibition toward 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene. Likewise activities of glutathione peroxidases toward H2O2 and cumene hydroperoxide were suppressed by in vitro addition. Thus the effects of nafenopin and phenobarbital on liver biochemistry were very different. The inhibition of hepatic biotransformation and scavenger systems by nafenopin is suggested to be relevant to its hepatocarcinogenicity.

  9. The antioxidant effect of hesperetin and nano-hesperetin on activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in the hippocampus of animal model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alizadeh*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Hesperetin flavanone is a natural bioflavonoid found abundantly in citrus fruits with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Nano sizing techniques improve the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs such as hesperetin. Main feature of Parkinson's disease is the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The rate of oxidative damage increases during Parkinson's disease, as the efficiency of antioxidant and repair mechanisms decreases.The purpose of this study was to investigate the beneficial potential of hesperetin and nano-hesperetinon the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase antioxidant enzymes in the animal model of Parkinson's disease. Methods:  Forty nine male rats were divided into 7 groups. All groups except the control group and vehicle with unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine to striatum were converted to Parkinson's models. The four treatment groups received 5 and 10 mg/kg hesperetin and nano-hesperetinper day orally for four weeks. Then, at the end of the fourth week, the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the hippocampus area was measured. Results: The results showed that intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine significantly (p

  10. Active Targeted Macrophage-mediated Delivery of Catalase to Affected Brain Regions in Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuling; Haney, Matthew J; Mahajan, Vivek; Reiner, Benjamin C; Dunaevsky, Anna; Mosley, R Lee; Kabanov, Alexander V; Gendelman, Howard E; Batrakova, Elena V

    2011-09-10

    We previously demonstrated that monocyte-macrophage based drug delivery can be applied to a spectrum of infectious, neoplastic, and degenerative disorders. In particular, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) loaded with nano formulated catalase, "nanozyme", were shown to attenuate neuro inflammation and nigrostriatal degeneration in rodent models of Parkinson's disease (PD). Nonetheless, the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of BMM-incorporated nanozyme has not been explored. To this end, we now demonstrate that BMM, serving as a "depot" for nanozyme, increased area under the curve(AUC), half-life, and mean residence time in blood circulation of the protein when compared to the nanozyme administered alone. Accordingly, bioavailability of the nanozyme for the brain, spleen, kidney, and liver was substantially increased. Importantly, nanozyme-loaded BMM targeted diseased sites and improved transport across the blood brain barrier. This was seen specifically in affected brain subregions in models of PD. Engaging natural immune cells such as monocyte-macrophages as drug carriers provides a new perspective for therapeutic delivery for PD and also likely a range of other inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

  11. Marketing activities of higher education institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Varađanin Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Public sector marketing is a modern-day scientific discipline which is getting more and more attention. Institutions of higher education provide a specific kind of services to their users, which makes these institutions a part of the public sector. Due to dynamic changes in the environment, the demands and needs of higher education institution's users change, which makes it necessary to monitor these changes through certain marketing activities and adjust to them in order to satisfy the users...

  12. A monoclonal IgM directed against immunodominant catalase B of cell wall of Aspergillus fumigatus exerts anti-A. fumigatus activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Kumar, Rohitashw; Kumar, Awanit; Shukla, Praveen K

    2009-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a ubiquitous fungus, has been reported to cause human diseases like allergic pulmonary aspergillosis, aspergilloma and invasive infection. Limited spectrum and emergence of resistance has become a serious problem with available antifungals. Therefore, an alternative approach is required for successful treatment of mycoses. In the present study, immunogenic protein profile of A. fumigatus cell wall was generated using two-dimensional-gel electrophoresis and three hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs; IgM) were selected after fusion experiments. Of these three MAbs, MAb-7 exhibited potent in vitro inhibitory activity, which was confirmed by MTT assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis and immuno-fluorescence studies, and the protein was identified as catalase B using MALDI-TOF-MS.

  13. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) upregulates catalase levels in response to low dose H2O2 treatment through enhancement of mRNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Prosenjit; Chakraborty, Prabir Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2005-08-15

    V79 fibroblasts were repetitively stressed through multiple exposures to a low dose (30 microM) H2O2 in culture for 4 weeks. Catalase activity, protein levels and mRNA levels increased markedly (5-6-fold) during this time and these augmentations were inhibited by the simultaneous presence of SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK). p38MAPK became dually phosphorylated and ATF-2, a p38MAPK substrate also became increasingly phosphorylated over the repetitive stress period. Short interfering RNA that induced effective silencing of p38MAPK, was used to silence p38MAPK in V79 fibroblasts. Silencing of p38MAPK drastically hindered the elevation in catalase (protein and mRNA) levels observed after a single low dose (50 microM) of H2O. The rise in catalase mRNA levels induced by low concentration (single and multiple dose) H2O2 treatment was established to be unconnected with transcriptional upregulation but was brought forth primarily by an enhancement in catalase mRNA stability through the action of p38MAPK. Therefore, our data strongly indicate that activation of p38MAPK is a key controlling step in the upregulation of catalase levels by low dose H2O2 treatment.

  14. Catalytic properties of three catalases from Kohlrabi (Brassica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-19

    Feb 19, 2008 ... active at pH 4.5. Heat inactivation studies showed a decrease in catalases activity at temperatures ... Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), which degrades H2O2 into water and oxygen, is .... bulbs extract in the presence of 10 mM H2O2 at different .... properties of catalase from Wheat germ (Triticum aestivum L.). J. Agric.

  15. Caribbean yellow band disease compromises the activity of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in the reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata exposed to anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia; Cróquer, Aldo

    2016-05-03

    Healthy and diseased corals are threatened by different anthropogenic sources, such as pollution, a problem expected to become more severe in the near future. Despite the fact that coastal pollution and coral diseases might represent a serious threat to coral reef health, there is a paucity of controlled experiments showing whether the response of diseased and healthy corals to xenobiotics differs. In this study, we exposed healthy and Caribbean yellow band disease (CYBD)-affected Orbicella faveolata colonies to 3 sublethal concentrations of anthracene to test if enzymatic responses to this hydrocarbon were compromised in CYBD-affected tissues. For this, a 2-factorial fully orthogonal design was used in a controlled laboratory bioassay, using tissue condition (2 levels: apparently healthy and diseased) and pollutant concentration (4 levels: experimental control, 10, 30 and 100 ppb concentration) as fixed factors. A permutation-based ANOVA (PERMANOVA) was used to test the effects of condition and concentration on the specific activity of 3 enzymatic biomarkers: catalase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase. We found a significant interaction between the concentration of anthracene and the colony condition for catalase (Pseudo-F = 3.84, df = 3, p < 0.05) and glutathione S-transferase (Pseudo-F = 3.29, df = 3, p < 0.05). Moreover, our results indicated that the enzymatic response to anthracene in CYBD-affected tissues was compromised, as the activity of these enzymes decreased 3- to 4-fold compared to healthy tissues. These results suggest that under a potential scenario of increasing hydrocarbon coastal pollution, colonies of O. faveolata affected with CYBD might become more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chemical pollution.

  16. Marketing activities of higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varađanin Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Public sector marketing is a modern-day scientific discipline which is getting more and more attention. Institutions of higher education provide a specific kind of services to their users, which makes these institutions a part of the public sector. Due to dynamic changes in the environment, the demands and needs of higher education institution's users change, which makes it necessary to monitor these changes through certain marketing activities and adjust to them in order to satisfy the users' needs. Each higher education institution sets its own goals which, broadly speaking, are to meet their own needs, the needs of students and the society as a whole. Therefore, when formulating a strategy for achieving the objectives of higher education institutions, it is necessary to have timely information from the environment. The modern approach to business puts forward the service users' needs. When it comes to institutions of higher education, the users are primarily students, who thus get the most attention. Keeping this in mind, we have conducted a research among students in order to identify the choice factors influencing their higher education institution selection process. The results obtained should provide guidelines for creating an adequate marketing mix in order to gain competitive advantage on the market for higher education. In the research descriptive and comparative methods were used. In the practical part of the research, survey technique was applied by means of a non-standardized questionnaire. The research results imply that the analysis of the factors influencing the process of selecting the higher education institution enables the creation of an adequate combination of instruments in a marketing mix which can then be used as an instrument for gaining competitive advantage.

  17. Metallic mercury uptake by catalase Part 1 In Vitro metallic mercury uptake by various kind of animals' erythrocytes and purified human erythrocyte catalase

    OpenAIRE

    劒持,堅志

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of metallic mercury was studied using erythrocytes with different catalase activities taken from various kind of animals. The results were: 1) The uptake of metallic mercury by erythrocytes paralleled the activity of catalase in the erythrocytes with and without hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that the erythrocyte catalase activity is related to the uptake of metallic mercury. 2) The uptake of metallic mercury occurred not only with purified human erythrocyte catalase but also with h...

  18. Exogenous melatonin suppresses dark-induced leaf senescence by activating the superoxide dismutase-catalase antioxidant pathway and down-regulating chlorophyll degradation in excised leaves of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is a typical symptom in plants exposed to dark and may be regulated by plant growth regulators. The objective of this study was to determine whether exogenous application of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine suppresses dark-induced leaf senescence and the effects of melatonin on reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging system and chlorophyll degradation pathway in perennial grass species. Mature perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv. ‘Pinnacle’ leaves were excised and incubated in 3 mM 2-(N-morpholino ethanesulfonic buffer (pH 5.8 supplemented with melatonin or water (control and exposed to dark treatment for 8 d. Leaves treated with melatonin maintained significantly higher endogenous melatonin level, chlorophyll content, photochemical efficiency, and cell membrane stability expressed by lower electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA content compared to the control. Exogenous melatonin treatment also reduced the transcript level of chlorophyll degradation-associated genes and senescence marker genes (LpSAG12.1, Lph36, and Lpl69 during the dark treatment. The endogenous O2- production rate and H2O2 content were significantly lower in these excised leaves treated with melatonin compared to the water control. Exogenous melatonin treatment caused increases in enzymatic activity and transcript levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase but had no significant effects on ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and monohydroascorbate reductase. The content of non-enzymatic antioxidants, such as ascorbate and dehydroascorbate, were decreased by melatonin treatment, while the content of glutathione and oxidized glutathione was not affected by melatonin. These results suggest that the suppression of dark-induced leaf senescence by exogenous melatonin may be associated with its roles in regulating ROS scavenging through activating the superoxide dismutase-catalase enzymatic antioxidant

  19. Catalase-positive microbial detection by using different ultrasonic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, S K; Durán, C; Elvira, L

    2012-01-01

    A method for rapid detection of catalase enzyme activity using ultrasonic parameters is presented in this work. It is based on the detection of the hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide molecule into water and oxygen induced by the enzyme catalase. A special medium was made to amplify changes produced by catalase enzyme during the hydrolysis process. Enzymatic process can be monitored by means of ultrasonic parameters such as wave amplitude, time of flight (TOF), and backscattering measurements which are sensitive to oxygen bubble production. It is shown that catalase activity of the order of 10 −3 unit/ml can be detected using different ultrasonic parameters. The sensitivity provided by them is discussed.

  20. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase from Hydra vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3’- and 5’- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp encoding a putative protein of 505 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.44 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of HvCatalase contained several highly conserved motifs including the heme-ligand signature sequence RLFSYGDTH and the active site signature FXRERIPERVVHAKGXGA. A comparative analysis showed the presence of conserved catalytic amino acids [His(71), Asn(145), and Tyr(354)] in HvCatalase as well. Homology modeling indicated the presence of the conserved features of mammalian catalase fold. Hydrae exposed to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating its catalase mRNA transcription. These results indicated that the HvCatalase gene is involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure. PMID:22521743

  1. Catalytic properties of three catalases from Kohlrabi ( Brassica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) was extracted from kohlrabi bulbs (Brassica oleracea gongylodes) with 0.05 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0. On the basis of kinetic studies and activity stain for catalase, only three isoenzymes of catalases were detected in kohlrabi bulbs extract with pH optima at 4.5, 6.5 and 10. Highest catalytic ...

  2. Nickel in Soil Modifies Sensitivity to Diazinon Measured by the Activity of Acetylcholinesterase, Catalase, and Glutathione S-Transferase in Earthworm Eisenia fetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zawisza-Raszka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel in typical soils is present in a very low concentration, but in the contaminated soils it occurs in locally elevated concentrations. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of nickel in the concentrations of 300 (very high, close to LOEC for reproduction and 900 (extremely high, close to LOEC for mortality mg/kg dry soil on the life history and acetylcholinesterase, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase activities in earthworm Eisenia fetida and to establish how nickel modifies the sensitivity to organophosphorous pesticide—diazinon. Cocoons production and juveniles’ number were significantly lower only in groups exposed to Ni in the concentration of 900 mg/kg dry soil for two months. Diazinon administration diminished the AChE activity in the GI tract and in the body wall. The interaction between diazinon and nickel was observed, and, in consequence, the AChE activity after the pesticide treatment was similar to controls in worms preexposed to nickel. Both pesticide administration and exposure to nickel caused an increase in the GST activity in examined organs and CAT activity in body wall. Both biometric and development data and simple enzymatic analysis, especially the AChE and GST, show a Ni pretreatment effect on the subsequent susceptibility to pesticide.

  3. The role of certain oxidative enzymes, catalase, and beta-glucosidase on virulence of Cephalosporium maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elrazik, A; Darweish, F A; Rushdi, M H

    1978-01-01

    Isolates of Cephalosporium maydis varied in their pathogenicity to D.C. 67 maize cultivar from highly to weakly pathogenic. Highly pathogenic isolates showed lower activity of polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase, cytochrome oxidase, and beta-glucosidase enzymes and higher activity of catalase and dehydrogenase than weakly pathogenic isolates. Enzymes production by the tested isolates increased as the culture age increased; except in case of catalase enzyme, the reverse action was detected. The role of these enzymes in the virulence of C. maydis is suggested and discussed.

  4. Modulation of the Activities of Catalase, Cu-Zn, Mn Superoxide Dismutase, and Glutathione Peroxidase in Adipocyte from Ovariectomised Female Rats with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Cambray Guerra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between estrogen removal, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress generated by obesity in a MS female rat model. Thirty two female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: Control (C, MS, MS ovariectomized (Ovx, and MS Ovx plus estradiol (E2. MS was induced by administering 30% sucrose to drinking water for 24 weeks. After sacrifice, intra-abdominal fat was dissected; adipocytes were isolated and lipid peroxidation, non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity, and the activities of Cu-Zn and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were determined. There were no significant differences in the activities of Cu-Zn, Mn SOD, CAT, and GPx between the C and MS groups, but in the MS Ovx group there was a statistically significant decrease in the activities of these enzymes when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. The increased lipid peroxidation and nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity found in MS Ovx was significantly decreased when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. In conclusion, the removal of E2 by ovariectomy decreases the activity of the antioxidant enzymes in the intra-abdominal tissue of MS female rats; this is reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity.

  5. Catalase activity is stimulated by H2O2 in rich culture medium and is required for H2O2 resistance and adaptation in yeast ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Catalases are efficient scavengers of H2O2 and protect cells against H2O2 stress. Examination of the H2O2 stimulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that the cytosolic catalase T (Ctt1) protein level increases 15-fold on H2O2 challenge in synthetic complete media although previous work revealed that deletion of the CCT1 or CTA1 genes (encoding peroxisomal/mitochondrial catalase A) does not increase the H2O2 sensitivity of yeast challenged in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). This we attributed to...

  6. Optimization of extracellular catalase production from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    extracellular catalase produced by the strain in the optimized medium was about four times higher than ... celial and unicellular fungi in synthetic media (Kurakov et .... covering the appropriate range and the broad calibration kit ... This optimization allowed us to define new cultural con- ..... Ann. New York Academy Sci.

  7. Potential enzyme toxicity of oxytetracycline to catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Zhenxing; Liu Rutao; Zhang Hao

    2010-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a kind of widely used veterinary drugs. The residue of OTC in the environment is potentially harmful. In the present work, the non-covalent toxic interaction of OTC with catalase was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at physiological pH 7.4. OTC can interact with catalase to form a complex mainly by van der Waals' interactions and hydrogen bonds with one binding site. The association constants K were determined to be K 293K = 7.09 x 10 4 L mol -1 and K 311K = 3.31 x 10 4 L mol -1 . The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH o , ΔG o and ΔS o ) of the interaction were calculated. Based on the Foerster theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the distance between bound OTC and the tryptophan residues of catalase was determined to be 6.48 nm. The binding of OTC can result in change of the micro-environment of the tryptophan residues and the secondary structure of catalase. The activity of catalase was also inhibited for the bound OTC. This work establishes a new strategy to probe the enzyme toxicity of veterinary drug residues and is helpful for clarifying the molecular toxic mechanism of OTC in vivo. The established strategy can be used to investigate the potential enzyme toxicity of other small organic pollutants and drugs.

  8. Immobilization and kinetics of catalase on calcium carbonate nanoparticles attached epoxy support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preety; Hooda, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid epoxy/nano CaCO3 composite matrix for catalase immobilization was prepared by polymerizing epoxy resin in the presence of CaCO3 nanoparticles. The hybrid support was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Catalase was successfully immobilized onto epoxy/nano CaCO3 support with a conjugation yield of 0.67 ± 0.01 mg/cm(2) and 92.63 ± 0.80 % retention of activity. Optimum pH and optimum temperature of free and immobilized catalases were found to be 7.0 and 35 °C. The value of Km for H2O2 was higher for immobilized enzyme (31.42 mM) than native enzyme (27.73 mM). A decrease in Vmax value from 1,500 to 421.10 μmol (min mg protein)(-1) was observed after immobilization. Thermal and storage stabilities of catalase improved immensely after immobilization. Immobilized enzyme retained three times than the activity of free enzyme when kept at 75 °C for 1 h and the half-life of enzyme increased five times when stored in phosphate buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0) at 5 °C. The enzyme could be reused 30 times without any significant loss of its initial activity. Desorption of catalase from the hybrid support was minimum at pH 7.0.

  9. Role of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities on oxidative stress in the brain of a phenylketonuria animal model and the effect of lipoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Tarsila Barros; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Diaz; Rosa, Andrea Pereira; Dalazen, Giovana Reche; Terra, Melaine; Coelho, Juliana Gonzalez; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo

    2013-03-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase which leads to accumulation of phenylalanine and its metabolites in tissues of patients with severe neurological involvement. Recently, many studies in animal models or patients have reported the role of oxidative stress in PKU. In the present work we studied the effect of lipoic acid against oxidative stress in rat brain provoked by an animal model of hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA), induced by repetitive injections of phenylalanine and α-methylphenylalanine (a phenylalanine hydroxylase inhibitor) for 7 days, on some oxidative stress parameters. Lipoic acid prevented alterations on catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the oxidative damage of lipids, proteins, and DNA observed in HPA rats. In addition, lipoic acid diminished reactive species generation compared to HPA group which was positively correlated to SOD/CAT ratio. We also observed that in vitro Phe inhibited CAT activity while phenyllactic and phenylacetic acids stimulated superoxide dismutase activity. These results demonstrate the efficacy of lipoic acid to prevent oxidative stress induced by HPA model in rats. The possible benefits of lipoic acid administration to PKU patients should be considered.

  10. Production of catalases by Aspergillus niger isolates as a response to pollutant stress by heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckova, M.; Godocikova, J.; Simonovicova, A.; Polek, B. [Slovakian Academy of Science, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2005-04-15

    Isolates of Aspergillus niger, selected from the coal dust of a mine containing arsenic (As; 400 mg/kg) and from the river sediment of mine surroundings (As, 1651 mg/kg, Sb, 362 mg/kg), growing in minimal nitrate medium in the phase of hyphal development and spore formation, exhibited much higher levels of total catalase activity than the same species from the culture collection or a culture adapted to soil contaminated with As (5 mg/L). Electrophoretic resolution of catalases in cell-free extracts revealed three isozymes of catalases and production of individual isozymes was not significantly affected by stress environments. Exogenously added stressors (As{sup 5+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}) at final concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/L and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (20 or 40 m(M)) mostly stimulated production of catalases only in isolates from mines surroundings, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Hg{sup 2+} caused the disappearance of the smallest catalase I. Isolates exhibited a higher tolerance of the toxic effects of heavy metals and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, as monitored by growth, than did the strain from the culture collection.

  11. Freezability of water buffalo spermatozoa is improved with the addition of catalase in cryodiluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, L; Hassan Andrabi, S M; Ahmed, H; Hussain Shah, A A

    Catalase enzyme is usually distributed in mammalian seminal plasma, where it decomposes hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen and enhances sperm survivability. To evaluate the effect of catalase (0, 100, 200 or 300 IU/ml) added in tris-citric acid (TCA) based extender on motion characteristics, viability and DNA integrity of bubaline spermatozoa at post dilution (PD) and post thawing (PT) stages of cryopreservation. Collection of semen was done in four Nili-Ravi bulls with an artificial vagina (42 degree C). Qualified semen samples from each bull were further subdivided into four aliquots for dilution with the experimental TCA extender containing either 0.0 (T1), 100 IU (T2), 200 IU (T3) or 300 IU (T4) catalase (activity12660 U/mg). At PT, mean computer progressive motility, average path velocity, straight line velocity, curvilinear velocity, visual motility and DNA integrity were higher (P catalase fortified treatment groups as compared with control. Regarding plasma membrane integrity and supra-vital plasma membrane integrity, at PT the mean values were higher (P catalase at a concentration of 300IU/ml in TCA cryodiluent improved the freezability of water buffalo spermatozoa.

  12. Cranberry extract-enriched diets increase NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase and catalase activities in obese but not in nonobese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boušová, Iva; Bártíková, Hana; Matoušková, Petra; Lněničková, Kateřina; Zappe, Lukáš; Valentová, Kateřina; Szotáková, Barbora; Martin, Jan; Skálová, Lenka

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of antioxidant-enriched diets is 1 method of addressing obesity, which is associated with chronic oxidative stress and changes in the activity/expression of various enzymes. In this study, we hypothesized that the modulation of antioxidant enzymes and redox status through a cranberry extract (CBE)-enriched diet would differ between obese and nonobese mice. The CBE used in this study was obtained from the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon, Ericaceae), a popular constituent of dietary supplements that is a particularly rich source of (poly)phenols and has strong antioxidant properties. The present study was designed to test and compare the in vivo effects of 28-day consumption of a CBE-enriched diet (2%) on the antioxidant status of nonobese mice and mice with monosodium glutamate-induced obesity. Plasma, erythrocytes, liver, and small intestine were studied concurrently to obtain more complex information. The specific activities, protein, and messenger RNA expression levels of antioxidant enzymes as well as the levels of malondialdehyde and thiol (SH) groups were analyzed. Cranberry extract treatment increased the SH group content in plasma and the glutathione S-transferase activity in the erythrocytes of the obese and nonobese mice. In addition, in the obese animals, the CBE treatment reduced the malondialdehyde content in erythrocytes and increased quinone oxidoreductase (liver) and catalase (erythrocytes and small intestine) activities. The elevation of hepatic quinone oxidoreductase activity was accompanied by an increase in the corresponding messenger RNA levels. The effects of CBE on the activity of antioxidant enzymes and redox status were more pronounced in the obese mice compared with the nonobese mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimization of extracellular catalase production from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The studies of the effect of each variable and the establishment of a correlation between the response of enzyme activity and variables revealed that the link is a multiple linear regression form. The optimization was carried out through a simplex algorithm. The amount of extracellular catalase produced by the strain in the ...

  14. Redox regulation of antioxidant enzymes: post-translational modulation of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity by resveratrol in diabetic rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Gökhan; Bozan, Davut; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir

    2014-08-01

    Resveratrol is a strong antioxidant that exhibits blood glucose-lowering effects, which might contribute to its usefulness in preventing complications associated with diabetes. The present study aimed to investigate resveratrol effects on catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) gene and protein expression, their phosphorylation states and activities in rat liver of STZ-induced diabetes. Diabetes increased the levels of total protein phosphorylation and p-CAT, while mRNA expression, protein levels, and activity were reduced. Although diabetes induced transcriptional repression over GPx, it did not affect the protein levels and activity. When resveratrol was administered to diabetic rats, an increase in activity was associated with an increase in p-GPx levels. Decrease in Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) gene expression in diabetes were associated with a decrease in CAT and GPx mRNA expression. A possible compensatory mechanism for reduced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes is proved to be nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2 and NFκB in diabetes which is confirmed by the increase in nuclear and decrease in cytoplasmic protein levels of Nrf2 and NFκB. Taken together, these findings revealed that an increase in the oxidized state in diabetes intricately modified the cellular phosphorylation status and regulation of antioxidant enzymes. Gene regulation of antioxidant enzymes was accompanied by nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and NFκB. Resveratrol administration also activated a coordinated cytoprotective response against diabetes-induced changes in liver tissues.

  15. Purification, cloning, expression, and biochemical characterization of a monofunctional catalase, KatP, from Pigmentiphaga sp. DL-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Weiliang; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Yicheng; Huang, Fei; Fu, Lei; Huang, Yan; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-04-01

    Catalases are essential components of the cellular equipment used to cope with oxidative stress. The monofunctional catalase KatP was purified from Pigmentiphaga sp. using ammonium sulfate precipitation (ASP), diethylaminoethyl ion exchange chromatography (IEC), and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The purified catalase formed polymer with an estimated monomer molecular mass of 54kDa, which were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and zymogram analysis. KatP exhibited a specific catalytic activity of 73,000U/mg, which was higher than that of catalase-1 of Comamonas terrigena N3H (55,900U/mg). Seven short tryptic fragments of this catalase were obtained by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF MS/MS), and the gene, katP, was cloned by PCR amplification and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Based on the complete amino acid sequence, KatP was identified as a clade 3 monofunctional catalase. The specific activities of recombinant KatP for hydrogen peroxide (690,000U/mg) increased 9-fold over that of the parent strain. The Km and Vmax of recombinant KatP were 9.48mM and 81.2mol/minmg, respectively. The optimal pH and temperature for KatP were 7.0 and 37°C, respectively, and the enzyme displayed abroad pH-stable range of 4.0-11.0. The enzyme was inhibited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(2+), and Mn(2+), whereas Fe(3+) and Mg(2+) stimulated KatP enzymatic activity. Interestingly, the catalase activity of recombinant KatP displayed high stability under different temperature and pH conditions, suggesting that KatP is a potential candidate for the production of catalase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Lead (Pb Exposure on the Activity of Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase in Battery Manufacturing Workers (BMW of Western Maharashtra (India with Reference to Heme biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusal K. Das

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase in erythrocytes and malondialdehyde (MDA in plasma of battery manufacturing workers (BMW of Western Maharashtra (India who were occupationally exposed to lead (Pb over a long period of time (about 15 years. This study was also aimed to determine the Pb intoxication resulted in a disturbance of heme biosynthesis in BMW group. The blood Pb level of BMW group (n = 28 was found to be in the range of 25.8 – 78.0 μg/dL (mean + SD, 53.63 + 16.98 whereas in Pb unexposed control group (n = 35 the range was 2.8 – 22.0 μg/dL (mean + SD, 12.52 + 4.08. The blood level (Pb-B and urinary lead level (Pb-U were significantly increased in BMW group as compared to unexposed control. Though activated d- aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD activities in BMW group did not show any significant change when compared to control group but activated / non activated erythrocyte – ALAD activities in BMW group showed a significant increase. Erythrocyte- zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP, urinary daminolevulinic acid (ALA-U and porphobilinogen (PBG-U of BMW groups elevated significantly as compared to control. A positive correlation (r = 0.66, p 1.0 were observed in control group. Hematological study revealed a significant decrease of hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume (% and other blood indices and a significant increase of total leucocytes count in BMW group in comparison to control group. The serum MDA content was significantly increased (p< 0.001 and the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as erythrocyte- SOD (p< 0.001 and erythrocytecatalase (p< 0.001 were significantly reduced in BMW group as compared to control group. A positive correlation (r = 0.45, p<0.02 between Pb-B and serum MDA level was observed in BMW group (Pb-B range 25.8 – 78.0 μg / dL but such significant correlation did not notice in

  17. Catalase induction in normal and tumorigenic mice using x-rays, clofibrate, ethanol, or hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, L.; Oberley, L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors studied catalase induction in normal male Swiss mice as well as in male mice harboring H-6 hepatomas. The induction patterns many suggest reasons why tumor cells have lower catalase activity than normal cells. X-rays, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, and clofibrate were used as inducing agents. X-rays interact with tissue and cause free radical formation. This results in an increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration, which ought to induce catalase. Oral administration of hydrogen peroxide should induce catalase similarly. Ethanol can be a substrate for catalase, forming acetalehyde; and as such may induce catalase. Ethanol can also restore inactive catalase compound II to useful catalase. Clofibrate is a hypolipidemic agent which induces catalase, most likely because of its ability to accelerate lipid breakdown, which raises peroxide concentration

  18. Catalases are NAD(PH-dependent tellurite reductases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván L Calderón

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species damage intracellular targets and are implicated in cancer, genetic disease, mutagenesis, and aging. Catalases are among the key enzymatic defenses against one of the most physiologically abundant reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide. The well-studied, heme-dependent catalases accelerate the rate of the dismutation of peroxide to molecular oxygen and water with near kinetic perfection. Many catalases also bind the cofactors NADPH and NADH tenaciously, but, surprisingly, NAD(PH is not required for their dismutase activity. Although NAD(PH protects bovine catalase against oxidative damage by its peroxide substrate, the catalytic role of the nicotinamide cofactor in the function of this enzyme has remained a biochemical mystery to date. Anions formed by heavy metal oxides are among the most highly reactive, natural oxidizing agents. Here, we show that a natural isolate of Staphylococcus epidermidis resistant to tellurite detoxifies this anion thanks to a novel activity of its catalase, and that a subset of both bacterial and mammalian catalases carry out the NAD(PH-dependent reduction of soluble tellurite ion (TeO(3(2- to the less toxic, insoluble metal, tellurium (Te(o, in vitro. An Escherichia coli mutant defective in the KatG catalase/peroxidase is sensitive to tellurite, and expression of the S. epidermidis catalase gene in a heterologous E. coli host confers increased resistance to tellurite as well as to hydrogen peroxide in vivo, arguing that S. epidermidis catalase provides a physiological line of defense against both of these strong oxidizing agents. Kinetic studies reveal that bovine catalase reduces tellurite with a low Michaelis-Menten constant, a result suggesting that tellurite is among the natural substrates of this enzyme. The reduction of tellurite by bovine catalase occurs at the expense of producing the highly reactive superoxide radical.

  19. Effect of Cu(II) coordination compounds on the activity of antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Katarzyna; Malinowska, Katarzyna; Langer, Ewa; Dziki, Łukasz; Dziki, Adam; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2011-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a serious medical and economical problem of our times. It is the most common gastrointestinal cancer in the world. In Poland, the treatment and detection of CRC are poorly developed and the pathogenesis is still unclear. One hypothesis suggests a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of CRC. Experimental studies in recent years confirm the participation of ROS in the initiation and promotion of CRC. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of the following coordination compounds coordination compounds: dinitrate (V) tetra(3,4,5-trimethyl-N1-pyrazole-κN2) copper(II), dichloro di(3,4,5-trimethyl-N1-pyrazole-κN2) copper(II), dinitrate (V) di(1,4,5-trimethyl-N1-pyrazole-κN2) copper(II), dichloro di(1,3,4,5-tetramethyl-N1-pyrazole-κN2) copper(II) on the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, ZnCu-SOD) and catalase (CAT) in a group of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and in the control group consisting of patients with minor gastrointestinal complaints. The study was conducted in 20 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer at the age of 66.5±10.2 years (10 men and 10 women) versus the control group of 20 people (10 men and 10 women) aged 57.89±17.10 years without cancer lesions in the biological material - hemolysate prepared in a proportion of 1ml of water per 1 ml of blood. CAT activity was measured by the Beers method (1952), while SOD activity was measured by the Misra and Fridovich method (1972). We found that patients with CRC showed a statistically significant decrease of SOD and CAT activity (CAT - 12,75±1.97 U/g Hb, SOD - 1111.52±155.52 U/g Hb) in comparison with the control group (CAT - 19.65±2,17 U/g Hb, SOD - 2046.26±507.22 U/g Hb). Simultaneously, we observed that the investigated coordination compounds of Cu(II) significantly increased the antioxidant activity of CAT and SOD in patients with CRC (mean: CAT 25.23±4.86 U/g Hb, SOD - 3075.96±940.20 U/g Hb). Patients with

  20. Daily rhythms of catalase and glutathione peroxidase expression and activity are endogenously driven in the hippocampus and are modified by a vitamin A-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navigatore-Fonzo, Lorena S; Delgado, Silvia M; Gimenez, Maria Sofia; Anzulovich, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in enzymatic antioxidant defense systems lead to a deficit of cognitive functions and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity. The objectives of this study were to investigate endogenous rhythms of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) expression and activity, as well as CREB1 mRNA, in the rat hippocampus, and to evaluate to which extent the vitamin A deficiency could affect those temporal patterns. Rats from control and vitamin A-deficient (VAD) groups received a diet containing 4000 IU of vitamin A/kg diet, or the same diet devoid of vitamin A, respectively, during 3 months. Rats were maintained under 12-hour-dark conditions, during 10 days before the sacrifice. Circadian rhythms of CAT, GPx, RXRγ, and CREB1 mRNA levels were determined by reverse transcriptrase polymerase chain reaction in hippocampus samples isolated every 4 hours during a 24-hour period. CAT and GPx enzymatic activities were also determined by kinetic assays. Regulatory regions of clock and antioxidant enzymes genes were scanned for E-box, RXRE, and CRE sites. E-box, RXRE, and CRE sites were found on regulatory regions of GPx and CAT genes, which display a circadian expression in the rat hippocampus. VAD phase shifted CAT, GPx, and RXRγ endogenous rhythms without affecting circadian expression of CREB1. CAT and GPx expression and enzymatic activity are circadian in the rat hippocampus. The VAD affected the temporal patterns antioxidant genes expression, probably by altering circadian rhythms of its RXR receptors and clock factors; thus, it would impair the temporal orchestration of hippocampal daily cognitive performance.

  1. Development of lyophilization cycle and effect of excipients on the stability of catalase during lyophilization

    OpenAIRE

    Lale, Shantanu V; Goyal, Monu; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of the present study was to screen excipients such as amino acids and non-aqueous solvents for their stabilizing effect on catalase, a model protein, for lyophilization. The present study also includes optimization of lyophilization cycle for catalase formulations, which is essential from the commercial point of view, since lyophilization is an extremely costly process. Materials and Methods: Activity of catalase was determined using catalase activity assay. Differen...

  2. Novel Insights in Mammalian Catalase Heme Maturation: Effect of NO and Thioredoxin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorpo...

  3. Catalytic and physical properties of γ-irradiated catalase in dilute solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasyna, Z.; Bachman, S.

    1974-01-01

    The catalytic and physical properties of irradiated beef liver catalase have been studied. Modification of the enzyme by γ-rays brings about its reducibility by dithionite. The decrease of the catalytic activity is found to correspond to the decrease in the content of nonreducible catalase. Microaggregates of catalase molecules induced by irradiation have been fractionated. The results lead to the conclusion that aggregates are composed of active and modified catalase monomers. (author)

  4. Hinokitiol Exerts Anticancer Activity through Downregulation of MMPs 9/2 and Enhancement of Catalase and SOD Enzymes: In Vivo Augmentation of Lung Histoarchitecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsun Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is extremely resistant to chemotherapy and the death rate is increasing hastily worldwide. Extracellular matrix promotes the migration and invasion of tumor cells through the production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9. Evidence has shown that natural dietary antioxidants are capable of inhibiting cancer cell growth. Our recent studies showed that hinokitiol, a natural bioactive compound, inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and platelets aggregation. The present study is to investigate the anticancer efficacy of hinokitiol against B16-F10 melanoma cells via modulating tumor invasion factors MMPs, antioxidant enzymes in vitro. An in vivo mice model of histological investigation was performed to study the patterns of elastic and collagen fibers. Hinokitiol inhibited the expression and activity of MMPs-2 and -9 in B16-F10 melanoma cells, as measured by western blotting and gelatin zymography, respectively. An observed increase in protein expression of MMPs 2/9 in melanoma cells was significantly inhibited by hinokitiol. Notably, hinokitiol (1–5 μM increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD from the reduction in melanoma cells. Also, hinokitiol (2–10 µM concentration dependently reduced in vitro Fenton reaction induced hydroxyl radical (OH· formation. An in vivo study showed that hinokitiol treatment increased elastic fibers (EF, collagens dispersion, and improved alveolar alterations in the lungs of B16/F10 injected mice. Overall, our findings propose that hinokitiol may be a potent anticancer candidate through down regulation of MMPs 9/2, reduction of OH· production and enhancement of antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT.

  5. Hinokitiol Exerts Anticancer Activity through Downregulation of MMPs 9/2 and Enhancement of Catalase and SOD Enzymes: In Vivo Augmentation of Lung Histoarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hsun; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Chang, Chao-Chien; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Choy, Cheuk-Sing; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2015-09-25

    Melanoma is extremely resistant to chemotherapy and the death rate is increasing hastily worldwide. Extracellular matrix promotes the migration and invasion of tumor cells through the production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9. Evidence has shown that natural dietary antioxidants are capable of inhibiting cancer cell growth. Our recent studies showed that hinokitiol, a natural bioactive compound, inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and platelets aggregation. The present study is to investigate the anticancer efficacy of hinokitiol against B16-F10 melanoma cells via modulating tumor invasion factors MMPs, antioxidant enzymes in vitro. An in vivo mice model of histological investigation was performed to study the patterns of elastic and collagen fibers. Hinokitiol inhibited the expression and activity of MMPs-2 and -9 in B16-F10 melanoma cells, as measured by western blotting and gelatin zymography, respectively. An observed increase in protein expression of MMPs 2/9 in melanoma cells was significantly inhibited by hinokitiol. Notably, hinokitiol (1-5 μM) increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) from the reduction in melanoma cells. Also, hinokitiol (2-10 µM) concentration dependently reduced in vitro Fenton reaction induced hydroxyl radical (OH·) formation. An in vivo study showed that hinokitiol treatment increased elastic fibers (EF), collagens dispersion, and improved alveolar alterations in the lungs of B16/F10 injected mice. Overall, our findings propose that hinokitiol may be a potent anticancer candidate through down regulation of MMPs 9/2, reduction of OH· production and enhancement of antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT.

  6. The Green Tea Component (--Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Sensitizes Primary Endothelial Cells to Arsenite-Induced Apoptosis by Decreasing c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase-Mediated Catalase Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee-Youn Kim

    Full Text Available The green tea component (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG has been shown to sensitize many different types of cancer cells to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, although it protects against non-cancerous primary cells against toxicity from certain conditions such as exposure to arsenic (As or ultraviolet irradiation. Here, we found that EGCG promotes As-induced toxicity of primary-cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC at doses in which treatment with each chemical alone had no such effect. Increased cell toxicity was accompanied by an increased condensed chromatin pattern and fragmented nuclei, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, activity of the pro-apoptotic enzymes caspases 3, 8 and 9, and Bax translocation into mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of an apoptotic signaling pathway. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that compared with EGCG or As alone, combined EGCG and As (EGCG/As treatment significantly induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which was accompanied by decreased catalase activity and increased lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or catalase reversed EGCG/As-induced caspase activation and EC toxicity. EGCG/As also increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, which was not reversed by catalase. However, pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed all of the observed effects of EGCG/As, suggesting that JNK may be the most upstream protein examined in this study. Finally, we also found that all the observed effects by EGCG/As are true for other types of EC tested. In conclusion, this is firstly to show that EGCG sensitizes non-cancerous EC to As-induced toxicity through ROS-mediated apoptosis, which was attributed at least in part to a JNK-activated decrease in catalase activity.

  7. The Green Tea Component (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Sensitizes Primary Endothelial Cells to Arsenite-Induced Apoptosis by Decreasing c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase-Mediated Catalase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee-Youn; Choi, Ji-Young; Lee, Hyeon-Ju; Byun, Catherine Jeonghae; Park, Jung-Hyun; Park, Jae Hoon; Cho, Ho-Seong; Cho, Sung-Jin; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2015-01-01

    The green tea component (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been shown to sensitize many different types of cancer cells to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, although it protects against non-cancerous primary cells against toxicity from certain conditions such as exposure to arsenic (As) or ultraviolet irradiation. Here, we found that EGCG promotes As-induced toxicity of primary-cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at doses in which treatment with each chemical alone had no such effect. Increased cell toxicity was accompanied by an increased condensed chromatin pattern and fragmented nuclei, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), activity of the pro-apoptotic enzymes caspases 3, 8 and 9, and Bax translocation into mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of an apoptotic signaling pathway. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that compared with EGCG or As alone, combined EGCG and As (EGCG/As) treatment significantly induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was accompanied by decreased catalase activity and increased lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or catalase reversed EGCG/As-induced caspase activation and EC toxicity. EGCG/As also increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which was not reversed by catalase. However, pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed all of the observed effects of EGCG/As, suggesting that JNK may be the most upstream protein examined in this study. Finally, we also found that all the observed effects by EGCG/As are true for other types of EC tested. In conclusion, this is firstly to show that EGCG sensitizes non-cancerous EC to As-induced toxicity through ROS-mediated apoptosis, which was attributed at least in part to a JNK-activated decrease in catalase activity.

  8. Activity of Catalase (CAT, ALT and AST in Different Organs of Swiss Albino Mice Treated with Lead Acetate, Vitamin C and Magnesium-L-Threonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilir Nazmi Mazreku

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lead is a natural element with toxic properties and is widespread in the environment. Lead toxicity is associated with generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and consumption of antioxidants elements (vitamin E and C, glutathione, thioredoxin and lipoic acid, melatonin, carotenoids and natural flavonoids in the cell, and unbalancing oxidantsantioxidants levels. Aim: To evaluate the effects of different chemical combinations (lead acetate, Vitamin C and Magnesium-L-threonate on antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase-CAT of liver, kidney, spleen, pancreas and brain, and serum transaminases [Serum Alanine Transaminase (ALT and Serum Aspartate Transaminase (AST]. Materials and Methods: Experimental animals (49 male Mus musculus-swiss albino mice were separated into five different groups. The first group was used as a control, hence the other four groups were treated with sub-lethal doses (90 mg/kg of lead acetate (group 2, lead acetate (90 mg/kg and Vitamin C dose 40mg/kg (group 3, lead acetate (90 mg/kg and Magnesium-Lthreonate dose 100 mg/kg (group 4 and only with MagnesiumL-threonate dose 100 mg/kg (group 5, during the treatment period (40 days. Blood samples were taken from the facial vein and used for transaminase analysis. Organ tissue was collected after euthanizing anaesthetized animals with neck dislocation technique. Results: The results showed that lead acetate treatment has caused significant elevation in the activity of AST (group 2 and 3 and ALT (group 3. Also, CAT activity was significantly (p<0.05 increased in groups treated with lead acetate (liver, pancreas, kidney and brain but not in spleen. Treatment of lead intoxicated groups with Vitamin C and Magnesium L-threonate increased significantly CAT activity in brain. Conclusion: Lead effects by interacting with different molecular systems and increasing enzyme activity (CAT, ALT and AST. Effects on CAT activity of Magnesium-L-threonate and Vitamin C treatment

  9. Histone variant H2A.Z antagonizes the positive effect of the transcriptional activator CPC1 to regulate catalase-3 expression under normal and oxidative stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qing; Wang, Yajun; Qi, Shaohua; Gai, Kexin; He, Qun; Wang, Ying

    2018-05-05

    In eukaryotes, deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z into nucleosomes through the chromatin remodeling complex, SWR1, is a crucial step in modulating gene transcription. Recently, H2A.Z has been shown to control the expression of responsive genes, but the underlying mechanism of how H2A.Z responds to physiological stimuli is not well understood. Here, we reveal that, in Neurospora crassa, H2A.Z is a negative regulator of catalase-3 gene, which is responsible for resistance to oxidative stress. H2A.Z represses cat-3 gene expression through direct incorporation at cat-3 locus in a SWR1 complex dependent pathway. Notably, loss of H2A.Z or SWR1 subunits leads to increased binding of a transcription factor, CPC1, at cat-3 locus. Additionally, introduction of plasmids containing gene encoding H2A.Z or SWR1 complex subunits into wild-type strains decreased CAT-3 expression, indicating that H2A.Z counteracts the positive effect of CPC1 to achieve low level cat-3 expression under non-inductive condition. Furthermore, upon oxidative stress, H2A.Z is rapidly evicted from cat-3 locus for the recruitment of CPC1, resulting in robust and full cat-3 gene expression in response to external stimuli. Collectively, this study strongly demonstrates that H2A.Z antagonizes the function of transcription factor to regulate responsive gene transcription under normal conditions and to poise for gene full activation under oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Radiation-induced inactivation of bovine liver catalase in nitrous oxide-saturated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, L.; Metodiewa, D.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced inactivation of catalase by . OH/H . radicals was studied. It was found that inactivation yield of catalase depended on the dose. Optical spectrum of irradiated catalase showed that no redox processes in active site of enzyme occurred as a result of . OH/H . interaction. (author) 19 refs.; 3 figs

  11. Potential enzyme toxicity of oxytetracycline to catalase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhenxing, Chi; Rutao, Liu; Zhang Hao, E-mail: Trutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a kind of widely used veterinary drugs. The residue of OTC in the environment is potentially harmful. In the present work, the non-covalent toxic interaction of OTC with catalase was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at physiological pH 7.4. OTC can interact with catalase to form a complex mainly by van der Waals' interactions and hydrogen bonds with one binding site. The association constants K were determined to be K{sub 293K} = 7.09 x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1} and K{sub 311K} = 3.31 x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1}. The thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}H{sup o}, {Delta}G{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o}) of the interaction were calculated. Based on the Foerster theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the distance between bound OTC and the tryptophan residues of catalase was determined to be 6.48 nm. The binding of OTC can result in change of the micro-environment of the tryptophan residues and the secondary structure of catalase. The activity of catalase was also inhibited for the bound OTC. This work establishes a new strategy to probe the enzyme toxicity of veterinary drug residues and is helpful for clarifying the molecular toxic mechanism of OTC in vivo. The established strategy can be used to investigate the potential enzyme toxicity of other small organic pollutants and drugs.

  12. Heterologous expression and characterization of a new heme-catalase in Bacillus subtilis 168.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibert, Tuyishime; Rao, Zhiming; Yang, Taowei; Zhou, Junping; Huang, Genshu; Irene, Komera; Samuel, Niyomukiza

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an inherent consequence to all aerobically living organisms that might lead to the cells being lethal and susceptible to oxidative stress. Bacillus pumilus is characterized by high-resistance oxidative stress that stimulated our interest to investigate the heterologous expression and characterization of heme-catalase as potential biocatalyst. Results indicated that recombinant enzyme significantly exhibited the high catalytic activity of 55,784 U/mg expressed in Bacillus subtilis 168 and 98.097 µmol/min/mg peroxidatic activity, the apparent K m of catalytic activity was 59.6 ± 13 mM with higher turnover rate (K cat = 322.651 × 10(3) s(-1)). The pH dependence of catalatic and peroxidatic activity was pH 7.0 and pH 4.5 respectively with temperature dependence of 40 °C and the recombinant heme-catalase exhibited a strong Fe(2+) preference. It was further revealed that catalase KatX2 improved the resistance oxidative stress of B. subtilis. These findings suggest that this B. pumilus heme-catalase can be considered among the industrially relevant biocatalysts due to its exceptional catalytic rate and high stability and it can be a potential candidate for the improvement of oxidative resistance of industrially produced strains.

  13. Positron annihilation studies in lysozyme and catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohilla, Y.; Singh, K.P.; Roy Choudhury, S.; Jain, P.C.

    1992-01-01

    Positron annihilation studies have been carried out in two enzymes, lysozyme and catalase. Temperature dependence of the positron lifetimes in these two enzymes has been investigated. The results explained in terms of the free volume model and fluctuations between different conformational micro states of enzyme structures provide a new insight into the mechanism of bio-activity of these enzymes. (author). 15 refs., 4 figs

  14. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: dynamics of the main antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase and catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreva, Mariya N; Penev, Atanas P; Georgiev, Svetoslav Zh; Aleksandrova, Albena A

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have a particularly strong interest in the mechanisms implicated in the clinical manifestation of atrial fibrillation. To examine dynamically the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (duration enzyme activity was determined by a spectrophotometric method. The average duration of atrial fibrillation episodes until the time of hospitalization was 8.14 hours (from 2 to 24 hours). During patient hospitalization the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase was considerably higher compared to that of the controls (8.46 +/- 0.26 vs 5.81 +/- 0.14 U/mg Hb; 7.36 +/- 0.25 vs 4.76 +/- 0.12 E240/min/mg Hb; P catalase remained increased (5.11 +/- 0.08 vs 4.76 +/- 0.12 E240/min/mg Hb, p catalase even in the early hours of clinical manifestation of the disorder, which then slowly decreased with the restoration of sinus rhythm. Therefore, we can conclude that changes in oxidative status are closely related to the disease and are probably a part of the intimate mechanisms related to its initiation and clinical course.

  15. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase, its...

  16. Effect of catalase-specific inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole on yeast peroxisomal catalase in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Tomoko; Kamasawa, Naomi; Osumi, Masako; Tanaka, Atsuo

    2003-02-14

    3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT) is known as an inhibitor of catalase to whose active center it specifically and covalently binds. Subcellular fractionation and immunoelectronmicroscopic observation of the yeast Candida tropicalis revealed that, in 3-AT-treated cells in which the 3-AT was added to the n-alkane medium from the beginning of cultivation, catalase transported into peroxisomes was inactivated and was present as insoluble aggregated forms in the organelle. The aggregation of catalase in peroxisomes occurred only in these 3-AT-treated cells and not in cells in which 3-AT was added at the late exponential growth phase. Furthermore, 3-AT did not affect the transportation of catalase into peroxisomes. The appearance of aggregation only in cells to which 3-AT was added from the beginning of cultivation suggests that, in the process of catalase transportation into yeast peroxisomes, some conformational change may take place and that correct folding may be inhibited by the binding of 3-AT to the active center of catalase. Accordingly, 3-AT will be an interesting compound for investigation of the transport machinery of the peroxisomal tetrameric catalase.

  17. Novel Insights in Mammalian Catalase Heme Maturation: Effect of NO and Thioredoxin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma. PMID:25659933

  18. Novel insights in mammalian catalase heme maturation: effect of NO and thioredoxin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2015-05-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Roles of catalase and glutathione peroxidase in the tolerance of a pulmonate gastropod to anoxia and reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Alexis F; Moreira, Daniel C; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    Humans and most mammals suffer severe damage when exposed to ischemia and reperfusion episodes due to an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, several hypoxia/anoxia-tolerant animals survive very similar situations. We evaluated herein the redox metabolism in the anoxia-tolerant land snail Helix aspersa after catalase inhibition by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATZ) injection during a cycle of wide and abrupt change in oxygen availability. The exposure to anoxia for 5 h caused a change of only one of several parameters related to free radical metabolism: a rise in selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPX) activity in muscle of both saline- and ATZ-injected animals (by 1.9- and 1.8-fold, respectively). Catalase suppression had no effect in animals under normoxia or anoxia. However, during reoxygenation catalase suppression kept high levels of muscle Se-GPX activity (twofold higher than in saline-injected snails up to 30 min reoxygenation) and induced the increase in hepatopancreas SOD activity (by 22 %), indicating higher levels of ROS in both organs than in saline-injected animals. Additionally, catalase-suppressed snails showed 12 % higher levels of carbonyl protein-a sign of mild oxidative stress-in muscle during reoxygenation than those animals with intact catalase. No changes were observed in glutathione parameters (GSH, GSSG and GSSG:GSH ratio), TBARS, and GST activity in any of the experimental groups, in both organs. These results indicate that catalase inhibition inflicts changes in the free radical metabolism during reoxygenation, prompting a stress-response that is a reorganization in other enzymatic antioxidant defenses to minimize alterations in the redox homeostasis in land snails.

  20. Regulation of catalase expression in healthy and cancerous cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Zamocky, Marcel; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Verrax, Julien; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2015-10-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that dismutates hydrogen peroxide into water and molecular oxygen. The catalase gene has all the characteristics of a housekeeping gene (no TATA box, no initiator element sequence, high GC content in promoter) and a core promoter that is highly conserved among species. We demonstrate in this review that within this core promoter, the presence of DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-Y and Sp1, plays an essential role in the positive regulation of catalase expression. Additional transcription factors, such as FoxO3a, are also involved in this regulatory process. There is strong evidence that the protein Akt/PKB in the PI3K signaling pathway plays a major role in the expression of catalase by modulating the activity of FoxO3a. Over the past decade, other transcription factors (PPARγ, Oct-1, etc.), as well as genetic, epigenetic, and posttranscriptional processes, have emerged as crucial contributors to the regulation of catalase expression. Altered expression levels of catalase have been reported in cancer tissues compared to their normal counterparts. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that regulate catalase expression could, therefore, be of crucial importance for the future development of pro-oxidant cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and K m of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications. PMID:27579320

  2. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xianbo; Chen, Jichen; Lin, Chenqiang; Lin, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and K m of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications.

  3. Evaluation of Potential Mechanisms Controlling the Catalase Expression in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Glorieux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of cancer cell resistance against prooxidant drugs limits its potential clinical use. MCF-7 breast cancer cells chronically exposed to ascorbate/menadione became resistant (Resox cells by increasing mainly catalase activity. Since catalase appears as an anticancer target, the elucidation of mechanisms regulating its expression is an important issue. In MCF-7 and Resox cells, karyotype analysis showed that chromosome 11 is not altered compared to healthy mammary epithelial cells. The genomic gain of catalase locus observed in MCF-7 and Resox cells cannot explain the differential catalase expression. Since ROS cause DNA lesions, the activation of DNA damage signaling pathways may influence catalase expression. However, none of the related proteins (i.e., p53, ChK was activated in Resox cells compared to MCF-7. The c-abl kinase may lead to catalase protein degradation via posttranslational modifications, but neither ubiquitination nor phosphorylation of catalase was detected after catalase immunoprecipitation. Catalase mRNA levels did not decrease after actinomycin D treatment in both cell lines. DNMT inhibitor (5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased catalase protein level in MCF-7 and its resistance to prooxidant drugs. In line with our previous report, chromatin remodeling appears as the main regulator of catalase expression in breast cancer after chronic exposure to an oxidative stress.

  4. Influence of Phytophthora capsici L. inoculation on disease severity, necrosis length, peroxidase and catalase activity, and phenolic content of resistant and susceptible pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants

    OpenAIRE

    KOÇ, Esra; ÜSTÜN, Ayşen Sülün

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the level of infection caused by different inoculum concentrations (102, 103, and 104 zoospores mL-1) of Phytophthora capsici in 3 pepper cultivars at days 2, 4, and 6. The effect that the infection induced on the peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT), and phenolics of resistant and sensitive seedlings, as well as the defense mechanism against the pathogen, were also investigated. The resistance of PM-702 against the isolate used was high, whereas KM-Hot and DEM-8 displayed sen...

  5. Modification of catalase and MAPK in Vicia faba cultivated in soil with high natural radioactivity and treated with a static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighat, Nazanin; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Ghanati, Faezeh; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Payez, Atefeh

    2014-03-01

    The effects of a static magnetic field (SMF) and high natural radioactivity (HR) on catalase and MAPK genes in Vicia faba were investigated. Soil samples with high natural radioactivity were collected from Ramsar in north Iran where the annual radiation absorbed dose from background radiation is higher than 20mSv/year. The specific activity of the radionuclides of (232)Th, (236)Ra, and (40)K was measured using gamma spectrometry. The seeds were planted either in the soil with high natural radioactivity or in the control soils and were then exposed to a SMF of 30mT for 8 days; 8h/day. Levels of expression of catalase and MAPK genes, catalase activity and H2O2 content were evaluated. The results demonstrated significant differences in the expression of catalase and MAPK genes in SMF- and HR-treated plants compared to the controls. An increase in catalase activity was accompanied by increased expression of its gene and accumulation of H2O2. Relative expression of the MAPK gene in treated plants, however, was lower than those of the controls. The results suggest that the response of V. faba plants to SMF and HR may be mediated by modification of catalase and MAPK. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. A Twist on Measuring Catalase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryer, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    "Catalase," an enzyme found in both plant and animal cells, prevents the accumulation of toxic levels of hydrogen peroxide (H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2]) by catalyzing its decomposition to water and oxygen gas. Because this enzyme is ubiquitous, it is frequently used in high school biology laboratories to explore enzyme reactions. This…

  7. Time course of cerebellar catalase levels after neonatal ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Meglio, A.; Caceres, L.; Zieher, L.M.; Guelman, L.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Reactive oxygen species are physiologically generated as a consequence of aerobic respiration, but this generation is increased in response to external stimuli, including ionizing radiation. The central nervous system (CNS) is vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption rate, its high level of polyunsaturated fatty acids and low levels of antioxidant defences. An important compound of this defence system is the antioxidant enzyme catalase, an heme protein that removes hydrogen peroxide from the cell by catalyzing its conversion to water. The aim of the present work was to study if catalase is susceptible to oxidative stress generated by ionizing radiation on the cerebellum. Neonatal rats were irradiated with 5 Gy of X rays and the levels of catalase were measured at 15, 30 and 60 days of age. Results show that there is a decrease in the activity of catalase in irradiated cerebellum at 15 (% respect the control, 65.6 ± 14.8), 30 (51.35± 5.8%), and 60 days (9.3 ± 0.34%). Catalase activity at 15 and 30 days has shown to be positively correlated with the radiation-induced decrease in tissue's weight, while at 60 days there is an extra decrease. It would be suggested that, at long term, radiation exposure might induce, in addition to cerebellar atrophy, the oxidation of the radiosensitive heme group of the enzyme, leading to its inactivation. In conclusion, the antioxidant enzyme catalase has shown to be especially sensitive to ionizing radiation. (author)

  8. Factors Affecting Catalase Expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms and Planktonic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frederick, Jesse R.; Elkins, James G.; Bollinger, Nikki; Hassett, Daniel J.; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2001-01-01

    Previous work with Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed that catalase activity in biofilms was significantly reduced relative to that in planktonic cells. To better understand biofilm physiology, we examined possible explanations for the differential expression of catalase in cells cultured in these two different conditions. For maximal catalase activity, biofilm cells required significantly more iron (25 μM as FeCl3) in the medium, whereas planktonic cultures required no addition of iron. However, ...

  9. Resuscitation effects of catalase on airborne bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Marthi, B; Shaffer, B T; Lighthart, B; Ganio, L

    1991-01-01

    Catalase incorporation into enumeration media caused a significant increase (greater than 63%) in the colony-forming abilities of airborne bacteria. Incubation for 30 to 60 min of airborne bacteria in collection fluid containing catalase caused a greater than 95% increase in colony-forming ability. However, catalase did not have any effects on enumeration at high relative humidities (80 to 90%).

  10. Novel immobilization process of a thermophilic catalase: efficient purification by heat treatment and subsequent immobilization at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Luo, Hui; López, Claudia; Xiao, Jing; Chang, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of the present work is to investigate a novel process of purification and immobilization of a thermophilic catalase at high temperatures. The catalase, originated from Bacillus sp., was overexpressed in a recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pET28-CATHis and efficiently purified by heat treatment, achieving a threefold purification. The purified catalase was then immobilized onto an epoxy support at different temperatures (25, 40, and 55 °C). The immobilizate obtained at higher temperatures reached its maximum activity in a shorter time than that obtained at lower temperatures. Furthermore, immobilization at higher temperatures required a lower ionic strength than immobilization at lower temperatures. The characteristics of immobilized enzymes prepared at different temperatures were investigated. The high-temperature immobilizate (55 °C) showed the highest thermal stability, followed by the 40 °C immobilizate. And the high-temperature immobilizate (55 °C) had slightly higher operational stability than the 25 °C immobilizate. All of the immobilized catalase preparations showed higher stability than the free enzyme at alkaline pH 10.0, while the alkali resistance of the 25 °C immobilizate was slightly better than that of the 40 and 55 °C immobilizates.

  11. Catalase anabolism in yeast: loss of regulation by oxygen of catalase apoprotein synthesis after mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berte, C; Sels, A

    1979-04-17

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which displays catalase activity when grown under strictly anaerobic conditions has been selected on solid media. Although some preformed holoenzyme has accumulated in anaerobic cells, a sharp increase of activity is still measured during adaptation to oxygen in glucose-buffer; however, a striking difference with the wild-type strain is that in the mutant, catalase formation is observed in the presence of cycloheximide that totally inhibits cytoplasmic translation. It is concluded that kat 80 mutant has lost the regulatory control by oxygen of apocatalase synthesis; the later precursor, characterized as apocatalase synthesis; the latter precursor, characterized as apocatalase T, is thought to be activated in vivo, under aerobic conditions, by inclusion of prosthetic group. Regulation of enzyme synthesis by catabolite repression (glucose erfect) persists, unmodified by reference to the wild-type parental strain. Mutation kat 80 specifically hits catalase anabolism, as no significant variations were observed for the edification of the respiratory system and (apo)cytochrome c peroxidase production. Genetic analysis shows that kat 80 phenotype, recessive in heterozygotes, results from a single nuclear mutation.

  12. Purification and Characterization of Catalase from Marine Bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalase from marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810 (YS0810CAT was purified and characterized. Consecutive steps were used to achieve the purified enzyme as follows: ethanol precipitation, DEAE Sepharose ion exchange, Superdex 200 gel filtration, and Resource Q ion exchange. The active enzyme consisted of four identical subunits of 57.256 kDa. It showed a Soret peak at 405 nm, indicating the presence of iron protoporphyrin IX. The catalase was not apparently reduced by sodium dithionite but was inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, hydroxylamine hydrochloride, and sodium azide. Peroxidase-like activity was not found with the substrate o-phenylenediamine. So the catalase was determined to be a monofunctional catalase. N-terminal amino acid of the catalase analysis gave the sequence SQDPKKCPVTHLTTE, which showed high degree of homology with those of known catalases from bacteria. The analysis of amino acid sequence of the purified catalase by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that it was a new catalase, in spite of its high homology with those of known catalases from other bacteria. The catalase showed high alkali stability and thermostability.

  13. Implementation of ICT in Higher Education as Interacting Activity Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvang, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Implementation of ICT in higher education is not a trivial process. It is however a process leading to a number of challenges and problems. The paper develops a theoretical model of the implementation of ICT in higher education based on activity theory and on a case study in a Danish university...... activity and an educational activity. Based on the model and case study the paper suggest a framework of challenges that must be met for an implementation to succeed....

  14. Tamoxifen up-regulates catalase production, inhibits vessel wall neutrophil infiltration, and attenuates development of experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryants, Vladimir; Hannawa, Kevin K; Pearce, Charles G; Sinha, Indranil; Roelofs, Karen J; Ailawadi, Gorav; Deatrick, Kristopher B; Woodrum, Derek T; Cho, Brenda S; Henke, Peter K; Stanley, James C; Eagleton, Matthew J; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), similar to estrogens, possess vasoprotective effects by reducing release of reactive oxygen species. Little is known about the potential effects of SERMs on the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). This study's objective was to investigate the growth of experimental AAAs in the setting of the SERM tamoxifen. In the first set of experiments, adult male rats underwent subcutaneous tamoxifen pellet (delivering 10 mg/kg/day) implantation (n = 14) or sham operation (n = 16). Seven days later, all animals underwent pancreatic elastase perfusion of the abdominal aorta. Aortic diameters were determined at that time, and aortas were harvested 7 and 14 days after elastase perfusion for immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, and zymography. In the second set of experiments, a direct irreversible catalase inhibitor, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT), was administered intraperitoneally (1 mg/kg) daily to tamoxifen-treated (n = 6) and control rats (n = 6), starting on day 7 after elastase perfusion. Aortic diameters were measured on day 14. In a third set of experiments, rats were perfused with catalase (150 mg/kg) after the elastase (n = 5), followed by daily intravenous injections of catalase (150 mg/kg/day) administered for 10 days. A control group of rats (n = 7) received 0.9% NaCl instead of catalase. Mean AAA diameters were approximately 50% smaller in tamoxifen-treated rats compared with sham rats 14 days after elastase perfusion (P = .002). The tamoxifen-treated group's aortas had a five-fold increase in catalase mRNA expression (P = .02) on day 7 and an eight-fold increase in catalase protein on day 14 (P = .04). Matrix metalloprotroteinase-9 activity was 2.4-fold higher (P = .01) on day 7 in the aortas of the controls compared to the tamoxifen-treated group's aortas. Tamoxifen-treated rats had approximately 40% fewer aortic polymorphonuclear neutrophils compared to

  15. The Influence of Sempervivum Tectorum and Melatonin Administration on Erythrocyte Catalase in Rats Exposed to Aluminium Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Gabriela Stana

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to highlight the effect of Sempervivum tectorum and melatonin administration in rats exposed to aluminium sulphate through drinking water on the erythrocyte catalase activity The researches were carried out on Wistar albinos rats, grouped in 8 lots: a control lot (C and 7 experimental lots (E1: 10% Sempervivum tectorum aqueous extract, 3 month; E2: melatonin, 10 mg/100 ml water, 3 month; E3: aluminium sulphate, 3 months; E4: aluminium sulphate with 10% Sempervivum tectorum aqueous extract, 3 months; E5: aluminium sulphate with melatonin 3 months; E6: aluminium sulphate 3 months followed by 10% Sempervivum tectorum aqueous extract for a month; E7: aluminium sulphate 3 months, followed by melatonin for a month. Al(3+ level in drinking water was 1000 ppb. It was registered decrease of catalase activity compared to C group in E3, E4 (p0.05 and an insignificant increase in E1, E2, E6, E7 groups. Sempervivum tectorum and melatonin administration led to the increase of catalase activity comparing to the group exposed only to aluminium. The catalase activity increase was significantly higher in case of consecutive administration to aluminium intake. Melatonin effect was more wellmarked as the one induced by Sempervivum tectorum (p>0.05.

  16. Extracellular localization of catalase is associated with the transformed state of malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Britta; Heinzelmann, Sonja; Motz, Manfred; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Oncogenic transformation is dependent on activated membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX). However, the resultant extracellular superoxide anions are also driving the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl pathway, which eliminates NOX-expressing transformed cells through selective apoptosis induction. Tumor progression is dependent on dominant interference with intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through membrane-associated catalase, which decomposes H2O2 and peroxynitrite and oxidizes NO. Particularly, the decomposition of extracellular peroxynitrite strictly requires membrane-associated catalase. We utilized small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of catalase and neutralizing antibodies directed against the enzyme in combination with challenging H2O2 or peroxynitrite to determine activity and localization of catalase in cells from three distinct steps of multistage oncogenesis. Nontransformed cells did not generate extracellular superoxide anions and only showed intracellular catalase activity. Transformed cells showed superoxide anion-dependent intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling in the presence of suboptimal catalase activity in their membrane. Tumor cells exhibited tight control of intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through a high local concentration of membrane-associated catalase. These data demonstrate that translocation of catalase to the outside of the cell membrane is already associated with the transformation step. A strong local increase in the concentration of membrane-associated catalase is achieved during tumor progression and is controlled by tumor cell-derived H2O2 and by transglutaminase.

  17. Nitrite and nitroso compounds can serve as specific catalase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Vladimir Yu; Osipov, Anatoly N

    2017-03-01

    We present evidence that nitrite and nitrosothiols, nitrosoamines and non-heme dinitrosyl iron complexes can reversibly inhibit catalase with equal effectiveness. Catalase activity was evaluated by the permanganatometric and calorimetric assays. This inhibition is not the result of chemical transformations of these compounds to a single inhibitor, as well as it is not the result of NO release from these substances (as NO traps have no effect on the extent of inhibition). It was found that chloride and bromide in concentration above 80 mM and thiocyanate in concentration above 20 μM enhance catalase inhibition by nitrite and the nitroso compounds more than 100 times. The inhibition degree in this case is comparable with that induced by azide. We propose that the direct catalase inhibitor is a positively charged NO-group. This group acquires a positive charge in the active center of enzyme by interaction of nitrite or nitroso compounds with some enzyme groups. Halides and thiocyanate protect the NO + group from hydration and thus increase its inhibition effect. It is probable that a comparatively low chloride concentration in many cells is the main factor to protect catalase from inhibition by nitrite and nitroso compounds.

  18. IMPROVEMENT OF QUALITY ASSURANCE SYSTEM ACTIVITIES OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Sultalieva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the article is the improvement of quality assessment system of higher education institutions in the aspect of management. The problems of quality improvement are revealed and classified. The analysis of criteria assessment sets used to define the efficiency of higher education institutions activity is carried out. The components of quality of higher education institutions activity are specified. The structural model of quality assessment system of higher education institutions activity is offered. The analysis of macro environment of a university based on the method of strategic management is carried out, i.e. PEST analysis. As a result of the research a new model of macro criteria model of quality assessment system of higher education institutions, characterizing quality management as an approach to university efficiency is offered, moreover, this system can define the level of its competitiveness in the aspect of quality management. 

  19. Activity-Based Costing Systems for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Dennis H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines traditional costing models utilized in higher education and pinpoints shortcomings related to proper identification of costs. Describes activity-based costing systems as a superior alternative for cost identification, measurement, and allocation. (MLF)

  20. Overexpression of Catalase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Prevents the Formation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parastatidis, Ioannis; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Taylor, W Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been reported in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), but which reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes the development of AAA remains unclear. Here we investigate the effect of the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) degrading enzyme catalase on the formation of AAA. Approach and Results AAA were induced with the application of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on mouse infrarenal aortas. The administration of PEG-catalase, but not saline, attenuated the loss of tunica media and protected against AAA formation (0.91±0.1 mm vs. 0.76±0.09 mm). Similarly, in a transgenic mouse model, catalase over-expression in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) preserved the thickness of tunica media and inhibited aortic dilatation by 50% (0.85±0.14 mm vs. 0.57±0.08 mm). Further studies showed that injury with CaCl2 decreased catalase expression and activity in the aortic wall. Pharmacologic administration or genetic over-expression of catalase restored catalase activity and subsequently decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity. In addition, a profound reduction in inflammatory markers and VSMC apoptosis was evident in aortas of catalase over-expressing mice. Interestingly, as opposed to infusion of PEG-catalase, chronic over-expression of catalase in VSMC did not alter the total aortic H2O2 levels. Conclusions The data suggest that a reduction in aortic wall catalase activity can predispose to AAA formation. Restoration of catalase activity in the vascular wall enhances aortic VSMC survival and prevents AAA formation primarily through modulation of matrix metalloproteinase activity. PMID:23950141

  1. Comparable effects in the radiolysis and ultrasound sonolysis of aqueous solutions of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrach, D.; Siefke, B.

    1987-01-01

    Catalase was desactivated in aqueous solution by irradiation with gamma-rays or ultrasound with nearly equal yields, if the applied doses were related to the response of a chemical dosimeter. The decrease of the enzymatic activity proceeded in parallel to the release of 125 iodine from 125 I-(iodo)-catalase. The same competition kinetics were observed in the radiolytic and sonolytic bleaching of p-nitrosodimethylaniline in the presence of catalase. It is concluded that OH-radicals were responsible for the sonolytic destruction of catalase. Phospholipids exerted a protective effect which may be useful in the preparation of liposomes as carriers of macromolecules. (author)

  2. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat b /J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 2 or 4 mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p < 0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50 kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8 h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p < 0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown–rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. - Highlights: • Ethanol (EtOH) exposure causes structural embryopathies in embryo culture. • Genetically enhanced catalase (hCat) protects against EtOH embryopathies. • Genetically deficient catalase (aCat) exacerbates EtOH embryopathies. • Embryonic catalase is developmentally important. • EtOH developmental

  3. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wells, Peter G., E-mail: pg.wells@utoronto.ca [Division of Biomolecular Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat{sup b}/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 2 or 4 mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p < 0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50 kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8 h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p < 0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown–rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. - Highlights: • Ethanol (EtOH) exposure causes structural embryopathies in embryo culture. • Genetically enhanced catalase (hCat) protects against EtOH embryopathies. • Genetically deficient catalase (aCat) exacerbates EtOH embryopathies. • Embryonic catalase is developmentally important. • Et

  4. Radioimmunoassays for catalase and glutathion peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baret, A.; Courtiere, A.; Lorry, D.; Puget, K.; Michelson, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Specific and sensitive radioimmunoassays for human, bovine and rat catalase (CAT) and glutathion Peroxidase (GPX) are described. The obtained values are expressed as enzymatic units per μg of immunoreactive protein. They appear to closely correspond to specific activities of the purified enzymes determined by colorimetric protein-assay. Indeed, the values of the specific activities of purified human CAT is 57.9 k/mg and that of purified rat GPX is 180 units/mg. This result validates the present RIAs and the association of the two techniques allows the determination of a further parameter. In conclusion, RIAs for CAT and GPX can be applied with great specificity and sensitivity to a wide variety of human, rat and bovine medias

  5. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression.

  6. Relation Between Higher Physical Activity and Public Transit Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernez Moudon, Anne; Kang, Bumjoon; Hurvitz, Philip M.; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We isolated physical activity attributable to transit use to examine issues of substitution between types of physical activity and potential confounding of transit-related walking with other walking. Methods. Physical activity and transit use data were collected in 2008 to 2009 from 693 Travel Assessment and Community study participants from King County, Washington, equipped with an accelerometer, a portable Global Positioning System, and a 7-day travel log. Physical activity was classified into transit- and non–transit-related walking and nonwalking time. Analyses compared physical activity by type between transit users and nonusers, between less and more frequent transit users, and between transit and nontransit days for transit users. Results. Transit users had more daily overall physical activity and more total walking than did nontransit users but did not differ on either non–transit-related walking or nonwalking physical activity. Most frequent transit users had more walking time than least frequent transit users. Higher physical activity levels for transit users were observed only on transit days, with 14.6 minutes (12.4 minutes when adjusted for demographics) of daily physical activity directly linked with transit use. Conclusions. Because transit use was directly related to higher physical activity, future research should examine whether substantive increases in transit access and use lead to more physical activity and related health improvements. PMID:24625142

  7. High Dietary Fat Selectively Increases Catalase Expression within Cardiac Mitochondria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, Paul M.; Plafker, Scott M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a predictor of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. One consequence of obesity is dyslipidemia characterized by high blood triglycerides. It has been proposed that oxidative stress, driven by utilization of lipids for energy, contributes to these diseases. The effects of oxidative stress are mitigated by an endogenous antioxidant enzyme network, but little is known about its response to high fat utilization. Our experiments used a multiplexed quantitative proteomics method to measure antioxidant enzyme expression in heart tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. This experiment showed a rapid and specific up-regulation of catalase protein, with subsequent assays showing increases in activity and mRNA. Catalase, traditionally considered a peroxisomal protein, was found to be present in cardiac mitochondria and significantly increased in content and activity during high fat feeding. These data, coupled with the fact that fatty acid oxidation enhances mitochondrial H2O2 production, suggest that a localized catalase increase is needed to consume excessive mitochondrial H2O2 produced by increased fat metabolism. To determine whether the catalase-specific response is a common feature of physiological conditions that increase blood triglycerides and fatty acid oxidation, we measured changes in antioxidant expression in fasted versus fed mice. Indeed, a similar specific catalase increase was observed in mice fasted for 24 h. Our findings suggest a fundamental metabolic process in which catalase expression is regulated to prevent damage while preserving an H2O2-mediated sensing of diet composition that appropriately adjusts insulin sensitivity in the short term as needed to prioritize lipid metabolism for complete utilization. PMID:23204527

  8. High-level expression of heme-dependent catalase gene katA from Lactobacillus Sakei protects Lactobacillus rhamnosus from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Haoran; Zhou, Hui; Huang, Ying; Wang, Guohong; Luan, Chunguang; Mou, Jing; Luo, Yunbo; Hao, Yanling

    2010-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are generally sensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), Lactobacillus sakei YSI8 is one of the very few LAB strains able to degrade H(2)O(2) through the action of a heme-dependent catalase. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains are very important probiotic starter cultures in meat product fermentation, but they are deficient in catalase. In this study, the effect of heterologous expression of L. sakei catalase gene katA in L. rhamnosus on its oxidative stress resistance was tested. The recombinant L. rhamnosus AS 1.2466 was able to decompose H(2)O(2) and the catalase activity reached 2.85 mumol H(2)O(2)/min/10(8) c.f.u. Furthermore, the expression of the katA gene in L. rhamnosus conferred enhanced oxidative resistance on the host. The survival ratios after short-term H(2)O(2) challenge were increased 600 and 10(4)-fold at exponential and stationary phase, respectively. Further, viable cells were 100-fold higher in long-term aerated cultures. Simulation experiment demonstrated that both growth and catalase activity of recombinant L. rhamnosus displayed high stability under environmental conditions similar to those encountered during sausage fermentation.

  9. Purification and characterization of an intracellular catalase-peroxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Marco W.; Roubroeks, Hanno P.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    1996-01-01

    The first dimeric catalase-peroxidase of eucaryotic origin, an intracellular hydroperoxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum which exhibited both catalase and peroxidase activities, has been isolated. The enzyme has an apparent molecular mass of about 170 kDa and is composed of two identical

  10. Cytoplasmic catalase and ghostlike peroxisomes in the liver from a child with atypical chondrodysplasia punctata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espeel, M.; Heikoop, J. C.; Smeitink, J. A.; Beemer, F. A.; de Craemer, D.; van den Berg, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Wanders, R. J.; Schutgens, R. B.; Poll-The, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    In the liver biopsy from an 8.5-year-old girl with the biochemical characteristics of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP), but with normal limbs, normal catalase-containing peroxisomes were absent. Light microscopy after diaminobenzidine staining for catalase activity (the peroxisomal marker

  11. Higher-order force moments of active particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2018-04-01

    Active particles moving through fluids generate disturbance flows due to their activity. For simplicity, the induced flow field is often modeled by the leading terms in a far-field approximation of the Stokes equations, whose coefficients are the force, torque, and stresslet (zeroth- and first-order force moments) of the active particle. This level of approximation is quite useful, but may also fail to predict more complex behaviors that are observed experimentally. In this study, to provide a better approximation, we evaluate the contribution of the second-order force moments to the flow field and, by reciprocal theorem, present explicit formulas for the stresslet dipole, rotlet dipole, and potential dipole for an arbitrarily shaped active particle. As examples of this method, we derive modified Faxén laws for active spherical particles and resolve higher-order moments for active rod-like particles.

  12. Employability and work-related learning activities in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnell, Marie; Kolmos, Anette

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on how academic staff perceive their roles and responsibilities regarding work-related learning, and how they approach and implement work-related learning activities in curricula across academic environments in higher education. The study is based on case studies...

  13. Higher-order chaotic oscillator using active bessel filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Mykolaitis, Gytis; Bumelien, Skaidra

    2010-01-01

    A higher-order oscillator, including a nonlinear unit and an 8th-order low-pass active Bessel filter is described. The Bessel unit plays the role of "three-in-one": a delay line, an amplifier and a filter. Results of hardware experiments and numerical simulation are presented. Depending...

  14. Regulation of higher-activity NARM wastes by EPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandrowski, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently developing standards for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). As part of this Standard, EPA is including regulations for the disposal of naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material (NARM) wastes not covered under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The regulations will cover only higher-activity NARM wastes, defined as NARM waste with specific activity exceeding two nanocuries per gram. The proposed regulations will specify that NARM wastes exceeding the above limits, except for specific exempted items, must be disposed of in regulated radioactive waste disposal facilities. The proposed EPA regulations for NARM wastes will be discussed, as well as the costs and benefits of the regulation, how it will be implemented by EPA, and the rationale for covering only higher-activity NARM wastes exceeding two nanocuries per gram

  15. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative kinetic characterization of catalases from Candida boidinii yeast and bovine liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelitza, D I; Eryomin, A N; Artzukevich, I M; Chernikevich, I P

    1997-04-01

    Catalase with molecular weight 230 +/- kD was isolated and purified from methylotrophic yeasts Candida boidinii by ion-exchange chromatography. The kinetic characteristics of yeast and bovine liver catalases were compared in the reaction of H2O2 decomposition using a wide range of H2O2 concentrations (up to 0.12 M) and PH (2-10). First order rates constants (k, sec-1) were determined for both enzymes from semi-logarithmic anamorphoses of kinetic curves of H2O2 utilization. Anamorphoses of complete kinetic curves as a function of 1/ln([H2O2]0/[H2O2]t) versus 1/t were used for calculation of the effective rate constants of catalase inactivation during the reaction (k(in), sec-1) and the rate constants of interaction of catalase complex I with the second molecule of H2O2 (k2, M-1.sec-1). The effects of initial catalase concentrations, H2O2, and pH on k, k2, and k(in) were similar for both enzymes. Catalytic constant, k2, and the efficacy expressed as a ratio kcat/Km were 1.87-, 1.45-, and 1.3-fold, respectively, higher for bovine catalase than that of yeast catalase. Operational stability of yeast catalase is 3.5-fold higher than the stability of bovine catalase and much higher during cyclic decomposition of 50 mM H2O2. Enhanced operational stability and inexpensive source of its preparation open prospects for practical applications of yeast catalase for co-immobilization with superoxide dismutase on non-toxic carriers.

  17. Effects of peroxisomal catalase inhibition on mitochondrial function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eWalton

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle’s oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process begins in middle-passage cells, we sought to determine whether peroxisomal hydrogen peroxide could contribute to the oxidative damage observed in mitochondria in late-passage cells. Early-passage human fibroblasts (Hs27 treated with aminotriazole (3-AT, an irreversible catalase inhibitor, demonstrated decreased catalase activity, increased levels of cellular hydrogen peroxide, protein carbonyls, and peroxisomal numbers. This treatment increased mitochondrial ROS levels, and decreased the mitochondrial aconitase activity by approximately 85% within 24 hours. In addition, mitochondria from 3-AT treated cells show a decrease in inner membrane potential. These results demonstrate that peroxisome-derived oxidative imbalance may rapidly impair mitochondrial function, and considering that peroxisomal oxidative imbalance begins to occur in middle-passage cells, supports the hypothesis that peroxisomal oxidant release occurs upstream of, and contributes to, the mitochondrial damage observed in aging cells.

  18. Effects of peroxisomal catalase inhibition on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Paul A; Pizzitelli, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle's oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process begins in middle-passage cells, we sought to determine whether peroxisomal hydrogen peroxide could contribute to the oxidative damage observed in mitochondria in late-passage cells. Early-passage human fibroblasts (Hs27) treated with aminotriazole (3-AT), an irreversible catalase inhibitor, demonstrated decreased catalase activity, increased levels of cellular hydrogen peroxide, protein carbonyls, and peroxisomal numbers. This treatment increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels, and decreased the mitochondrial aconitase activity by ∼85% within 24 h. In addition, mitochondria from 3-AT treated cells show a decrease in inner membrane potential. These results demonstrate that peroxisome-derived oxidative imbalance may rapidly impair mitochondrial function, and considering that peroxisomal oxidative imbalance begins to occur in middle-passage cells, supports the hypothesis that peroxisomal oxidant release occurs upstream of, and contributes to, the mitochondrial damage observed in aging cells.

  19. Downregulation of catalase by reactive oxygen species via PI 3 kinase/Akt signaling in mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Balachandar; Mahimainathan, Lenin; Das, Falguni; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Ghosh Choudhury, Goutam

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to many glomerular diseases by targeting mesangial cells. ROS have been shown to regulate expression of many antioxidant enzymes including catalase. The mechanism by which the expression of catalase protein is regulated by ROS is not precisely known. Here we report that increased intracellular ROS level by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) reduced the expression of catalase. H(2)O(2) increased phosphorylation of Akt kinase in a dose-dependent and sustained manner with a concomitant increase in the phosphorylation of FoxO1 transcription factor. Further analysis revealed that H(2)O(2) promoted rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3 kinase. The PI 3 kinase inhibitor Ly294002 and expression of tumor suppressor protein PTEN inhibited Akt kinase activity, resulting in the attenuation of FoxO1 phosphorylation and preventing the downregulating effect of H(2)O(2) on catalase protein level. Dominant negative Akt attenuated the inhibitory effect of H(2)O(2) on expression of catalase. Constitutively active FoxO1 increased the expression of catalase. However, dominant negative FoxO1 inhibited catalase protein level. Catalase transcription was reduced by H(2)O(2) treatment. Furthermore, expression of dominant negative Akt and constitutively active FoxO1 increased catalase transcription, respectively. These results demonstrate that ROS downregulate the expression of catalase in mesangial cells by PI 3 kinase/Akt signaling via FoxO1 as a target. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. [Kinetic characteristics of extracellular catalase from Penicillium piceum F-648 and variants of fungi, adapted to hydrogen peroxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I; Moroz, I V; Pavlovskaia, Zh I; Mikhaĭlova, R V

    2002-01-01

    A comparative kinetic study of extracellular catalases produced by Penicillium piceum F-648 and their variants adapted to H2O2 was performed in culture liquid filtrates. The specific activity of catalase, the maximum rate of catalase-induced H2O2 degradation (Vmax),Vmax/KM ratio, and the catalase inactivation rate constant in the enzymatic reaction (kin, s-1) were estimated in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 30 degrees C. The effective constant representing the rate of catalase thermal inactivation (kin*, s-1) was determined at 45 degrees C. In all samples, the specific activity and KM for catalase were maximum at a protein concentration in culture liquid filtrates of 2.5-3.5 x 10(-4) mg/ml. The effective constants describing the rate of H2O2 degradation (k, s-1) were similar to that observed in the initial culture. These values reflected a twofold decrease in catalase activity in culture liquid filtrates. We hypothesized that culture liquid filtrates contain two isoforms of extracellular catalase characterized by different activities and affinities for H2O2. Catalases from variants 5 and 3 with high and low affinities for H2O2, respectively, had a greater operational stability than the enzyme from the initial culture. The method of adaptive selection for H2O2 can be used to obtain fungal variants producing extracellular catalases with improved properties.

  1. The in vivo toxicity of hydroxyurea depends on its direct target catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Trine; Malolepszy, Anna; Dybkaer, Karen; Kidmose, Rune; Rasmussen, Jan Trige; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2010-07-09

    Hydroxyurea (HU) is a well tolerated ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor effective in HIV, sickle cell disease, and blood cancer therapy. Despite a positive initial response, however, most treated cancers eventually progress due to development of HU resistance. Although RNR properties influence HU resistance in cell lines, the mechanisms underlying cancer HU resistance in vivo remain unclear. To address this issue, we screened for HU resistance in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana and identified seventeen unique catalase mutants, thereby establishing that HU toxicity depends on catalase in vivo. We further demonstrated that catalase is a direct HU target by showing that HU acts as a competitive inhibitor of catalase-mediated hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Considering also that catalase can accelerate HU decomposition in vitro and that co-treatment with another catalase inhibitor alleviates HU effects in vivo, our findings suggests that HU could act as a catalase-activated pro-drug. Clinically, we found high catalase activity in circulating cells from untreated chronic myeloid leukemia, offering a possible explanation for the efficacy of HU against this malignancy.

  2. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat(b)/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug=GD 1), exposed for 24h to 2 or 4mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (pcatalase (PEG-cat) 8h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (pcatalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Soluble epoxide hydrolase contamination of specific catalase preparations inhibits epoxyeicosatrienoic acid vasodilation of rat renal arterioles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lauren; Harder, Adam; Isbell, Marilyn; Imig, John D.; Gutterman, David D.; Falck, J. R.; Campbell, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are important signaling molecules in the kidney. In renal arteries, EETs cause vasodilation whereas H2O2 causes vasoconstriction. To determine the physiological contribution of H2O2, catalase is used to inactivate H2O2. However, the consequence of catalase action on EET vascular activity has not been determined. In rat renal afferent arterioles, 14,15-EET caused concentration-related dilations that were inhibited by Sigma bovine liver (SBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml) but not Calbiochem bovine liver (CBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml). SBL catalase inhibition was reversed by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor tAUCB (1 μM). In 14,15-EET incubations, SBL catalase caused a concentration-related increase in a polar metabolite. Using mass spectrometry, the metabolite was identified as 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET), the inactive sEH metabolite. 14,15-EET hydrolysis was not altered by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-ATZ; 10–50 mM), but was abolished by the sEH inhibitor BIRD-0826 (1–10 μM). SBL catalase EET hydrolysis showed a regioisomer preference with greatest hydrolysis of 14,15-EET followed by 11,12-, 8,9- and 5,6-EET (Vmax = 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.23 ± 0.06, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 ng DHET·U catalase−1·min−1, respectively). Of five different catalase preparations assayed, EET hydrolysis was observed with two Sigma liver catalases. These preparations had low specific catalase activity and positive sEH expression. Mass spectrometric analysis of the SBL catalase identified peptide fragments matching bovine sEH. Collectively, these data indicate that catalase does not affect EET-mediated dilation of renal arterioles. However, some commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with sEH, and these contaminated preparations diminish the biological activity of H2O2 and EETs. PMID:21753077

  4. Purification of camel liver catalase by zinc chelate affinity chromatography and pH gradient elution: An enzyme with interesting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafik, Abdelbasset; Essamadi, Abdelkhalid; Çelik, Safinur Yildirim; Mavi, Ahmet

    2017-12-01

    Climate change and increasing temperatures are global concerns. Camel (Camelus dromedarius) lives most of its life under high environmental stress in the desert and represent ideal model for studying desert adaptation among mammals. Catalase plays a key role in protecting cells against oxidative stress. For the first time, catalase from camel liver was purified to homogeneity by zinc chelate affinity chromatography using pH gradient elution, a better separation was obtained. A purification fold of 201.81 with 1.17% yield and a high specific activity of 1132539.37U/mg were obtained. The native enzyme had a molecular weight of 268kDa and was composed of four subunits of equal size (65kDa). The enzyme showed optimal activity at a temperature of 45°C and pH 7.2. Thiol reagents, β-Mercaptoethanol and D,L-Dithiothreitol, inhibited the enzyme activity. The enzyme was inhibited by Al 3+ , Cd 2+ and Mg 2+ , whereas Ca 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ stimulated the catalase activity. Reduced glutathione has no effect on catalase activity. The K m and V max of the enzyme for hydrogen peroxide were 37.31mM and 6185157U/mg, respectively. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively with K i value of 14.43μM, the IC 50 was found to be 16.71μM. The properties of camel catalase were different comparing to those of mammalian species. Relatively higher molecular weight, higher optimum temperature, protection of reduced glutathione from hydrogen peroxide oxidation and higher affinity for hydrogen peroxide and sodium azide, these could be explained by the fact that camel is able to live in the intense environmental stress in the desert. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficiency assessment models of higher education institution staff activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Dyusekeyev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper substantiates the necessity of improvement of university staff incentive system under the conditions of competition in the field of higher education, the necessity to develop a separate model for the evaluation of the effectiveness of the department heads. The authors analysed the methods for assessing production function of units. The advantage of the application of the methods to assess the effectiveness of border economic structures in the field of higher education is shown. The choice of the data envelopment analysis method to solve the problem has proved. The model for evaluating of university departments activity on the basis of the DEAmethodology has developed. On the basis of operating in Russia, Kazakhstan and other countries universities staff pay systems the structure of the criteria system for university staff activity evaluation has been designed. For clarification and specification of the departments activity efficiency criteria a strategic map has been developed that allowed us to determine the input and output parameters of the model. DEA-methodology using takes into account a large number of input and output parameters, increases the assessment objectivity by excluding experts, receives interim data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the evaluated object.

  6. Characterization of a catalase-deficient strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: evidence for the significance of catalase in the biology of N. gonorrhoeae.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, S R; Steiner, B M; Cruce, D D; Perkins, G H; Arko, R J

    1993-01-01

    We obtained a catalase-deficient (Kat-) strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated from a patient who had been unsuccessfully treated with penicillin. Quantitative enzyme assays and electrophoresis of cell extracts on native polyacrylamide gels subsequently stained for catalase and peroxidase activities failed to detect both enzymes. The strain exhibited no growth anomalies or unusual requirements when grown under ordinary laboratory conditions. However, the Kat- strain proved extremely sensiti...

  7. Altered methanol embryopathies in embryo culture with mutant catalase-deficient mice and transgenic mice expressing human catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the teratogenicity of methanol (MeOH) in rodents, unlike its acute toxicity in humans, are unclear, but may involve reactive oxygen species (ROS). Embryonic catalase, although expressed at about 5% of maternal activity, may protect the embryo by detoxifying ROS. This hypothesis was investigated in whole embryo culture to remove confounding maternal factors, including metabolism of MeOH by maternal catalase. C57BL/6 (C57) mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Catb/J acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 4 mg/ml MeOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally. MeOH was embryopathic in C57 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed and turning, whereas hCat embryos were protected. Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to C3H WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. MeOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, with reduced anterior neuropore closure and head length only in catalase-deficient embryos. These data suggest that ROS may be involved in the embryopathic mechanism of methanol, and that embryonic catalase activity may be a determinant of teratological risk.

  8. Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase of Root-Colonizing Saprophytic Fluorescent Pseudomonads †

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuwon, Jirasak; Anderson, Anne J.

    1990-01-01

    Root-colonizing, saprophytic fluorescent pseudomonads of the Pseudomonas putida-P. fluorescens group express similar levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities during growth on a sucrose- and amino acid-rich medium. Increased specific activities of catalase but not superoxide dismutase were observed during growth of these bacteria on components washed from root surfaces. The specific activities of both enzymes were also regulated during contact of these bacteria with intact bean r...

  9. Protection of Bacillus pumilus Spores by Catalases

    OpenAIRE

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Burbank, Malcolm; Paszczynski, Andrzej J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, isolated at spacecraft assembly facilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is difficult to kill by the sterilization method of choice, which uses liquid or vapor hydrogen peroxide. We identified two manganese catalases, YjqC and BPUM_1305, in spore protein extracts of several B. pumilus strains by using PAGE and mass spectrometric analyses. While the BPUM_1305 catalase was present in six of the B. pumilus strains teste...

  10. Regulation of Neurospora Catalase-3 by global heterochromatin formation and its proximal heterochromatin region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajun; Dong, Qing; Ding, Zhaolan; Gai, Kexin; Han, Xiaoyun; Kaleri, Farah Naz; He, Qun; Wang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Catalase-3 (CAT-3) constitutes the main catalase activity in growing hyphae of Neurospora crassa, and its activity increases during exponential growth or is induced under different stress conditions. Although extensive progress has been made to identify catalase regulators, the regulation mechanism of CAT-3 at the chromatin level still remains unclear. Here, we aim at investigating the molecular regulation mechanisms of cat-3 at the chromatin level. We found that CAT-3 protein levels increased in mutants defective in proper global heterochromatin formation. Bioinformatics analysis identified a 5-kb AT-rich sequence adjacent to the cat-3 promoter as a heterochromatin region because of its enrichment of H3K9me3 and HP1. Expression of CAT-3 was induced by H 2 O 2 treatment in wild-type and such change occurred along with the accumulation of histone H3 acetylation at 5-kb heterochromatin boundaries and cat-3 locus, but without alteration of its H3K9me3 repressive modification. Moreover, disruption of 5-kb heterochromatin region results in elevated cat-3 expression, and higher levels of cat-3 expression were promoted by the combination with global heterochromatin defective mutants. Interestingly, the molecular weight and activity bands of CAT-3 protein are different in heterochromatin defective mutants compared with those in wild-type, suggesting that its N-terminal processing and modification may be altered. Our study indicates that the local chromatin structure creates a heterochromatin repressive environment to repress nearby gene expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of a bacterial catalase in a strictly anaerobic methanogen significantly increases tolerance to hydrogen peroxide but not oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Matthew E.; Schaff, Cody W.; Horne, Alexandra J.; Lessner, Faith H.

    2014-01-01

    Haem-dependent catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that degrades H2O2, producing H2O and O2, and is common in aerobes. Catalase is present in some strictly anaerobic methane-producing archaea (methanogens), but the importance of catalase to the antioxidant system of methanogens is poorly understood. We report here that a survey of the sequenced genomes of methanogens revealed that the majority of species lack genes encoding catalase. Moreover, Methanosarcina acetivorans is a methanogen capable of synthesizing haem and encodes haem-dependent catalase in its genome; yet, Methanosarcina acetivorans cells lack detectable catalase activity. However, inducible expression of the haem-dependent catalase from Escherichia coli (EcKatG) in the chromosome of Methanosarcina acetivorans resulted in a 100-fold increase in the endogenous catalase activity compared with uninduced cells. The increased catalase activity conferred a 10-fold increase in the resistance of EcKatG-induced cells to H2O2 compared with uninduced cells. The EcKatG-induced cells were also able to grow when exposed to levels of H2O2 that inhibited or killed uninduced cells. However, despite the significant increase in catalase activity, growth studies revealed that EcKatG-induced cells did not exhibit increased tolerance to O2 compared with uninduced cells. These results support the lack of catalase in the majority of methanogens, since methanogens are more likely to encounter O2 rather than high concentrations of H2O2 in the natural environment. Catalase appears to be a minor component of the antioxidant system in methanogens, even those that are aerotolerant, including Methanosarcina acetivorans. Importantly, the experimental approach used here demonstrated the feasibility of engineering beneficial traits, such as H2O2 tolerance, in methanogens. PMID:24222618

  12. ENZIME ACTIVITY OF HIGHER BASIDIOMYCETES MUSHROOM GRIFOLA FRONDOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Бухало

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was a revelation and evaluation of spectrum and activity of hydrolytic enzymes of higher basidiomycetes  Grifola frondosa in a surface and submerged culture. 8 strains of  Gf. frondosa,  mushrooms from culture collection of mushrooms at the M.G. Kholodny Institute of  Вotany National  Academy of Sciences of the Ukraine were object of investigation. Researches were conducted by standard microbiological, biochemical and biotechnological methods. All strains  on agar mediums were shown the  following enzymes: amylase, caseinase, polygalacturonase, pectattranselyminase, glucosidase, urease,  xylanase, lipase  and endoglucanase. The demonstration of oxidizing enzymes of laccase and tyrosinase  depended on a culture and did not depend on composition of medium. The estimation of presence and level of activity of hydrolytic enzymes at submerged cultivation indicate primary influence of components of complex nourishing medium on enzyme activity of Gr. frondosa. Strains biochemical features show up in the case of  oxidizing enzymes on agar mediums and for endo-1,4-β-glucanase on liquid mediums with glucose and molasses.

  13. Catalase characterization and implication in bleaching of a symbiotic sea anemone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Sabourault, Cécile; Richier, Sophie; Allemand, Denis; Furla, Paola

    2007-01-15

    Symbiotic cnidarians are marine invertebrates harboring photosynthesizing microalgae (named zooxanthellae), which produce great amounts of oxygen and free radicals upon illumination. Studying antioxidative balance is then crucial to understanding how symbiotic cnidarians cope with ROS production. In particular, it is suspected that oxidative stress triggers cnidarian bleaching, i.e., the expulsion of zooxanthellae from the animal host, responsible for symbiotic cnidarian mass mortality worldwide. This study therefore investigates catalase antioxidant enzymes and their role in bleaching of the temperate symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Using specific separation of animal tissues (ectoderm and endoderm) from the symbionts (zooxanthellae), spectrophotometric assays and native PAGE revealed both tissue-specific and activity pattern distribution of two catalase electrophoretypes, E1 and E2. E1, expressed in all three tissues, presents high sensitivity to the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) and elevated temperatures. The ectodermal E1 form is responsible for 67% of total catalase activity. The E2 form, expressed only within zooxanthellae and their host endodermal cells, displays low sensitivity to ATZ and relative thermostability. We further cloned an ectodermal catalase, which shares 68% identity with mammalian monofunctional catalases. Last, 6 days of exposure of whole sea anemones to ATZ (0.5 mM) led to effective catalase inhibition and initiated symbiont expulsion. This demonstrates the crucial role of this enzyme in cnidarian bleaching, a phenomenon responsible for worldwide climate-change-induced mass mortalities, with catastrophic consequences for marine biodiversity.

  14. Catalase inhibition an anti cancer property of flavonoids: A kinetic and structural evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Debashis; Das, Asmita; Saha, Chabita

    2017-11-01

    Flavonoids are dietary polyphenols that present abundantly in fruits and vegetables. Flavonoids have inhibitory effects on enzymes and catalase is one among them. Catalase is a common enzyme ubiquitously found in all living organisms exposed to oxygen. It catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen (2H 2 O 2 →2H 2 O+O 2 ) . Inhibition of pure and cellular catalase from K562 cells by flavonoids was similar and exhibited the following efficacy; Myrecetin>Quercetin>Kaempferol and Quercetin>Luteolin>Apigenin demonstrating structure activity relationship. Circular Dichroism (CD) spectra have shown distinct loss in α-helical structure of the catalase on interaction with the flavonoids. All flavonoids inhibited the catalase activity by uncompetitive mechanism. The K m and V max values of pure catalase were observed to be 294mM -1 and 0.222mM -1 s -1 respectively and on inhibition with myrecetin the values decreased to a minimum of 23mM -1 and 0.014mM -1 s -1 respectively. Inhibition of catalase will directly results in increased production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and pro-oxidant property of flavonoids. This inhibition was reversed in presence of Cu 2+ ions because of the chelating affect of flavonoids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Post-irradiation modification of oxygen-dependent and independent damage by catalase in barley seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, N.K.; Kesavan, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    If H 2 O 2 is one of the major mediators of the 'oxygen effect' in biological systems then catalase, which enzymically decomposes H 2 O 2 should have a significant influence on radiation damage, particularly under oxygenated conditions. The post-irradiation (300 Gy gamma rays) effect of catalase was, therefore, assessed on barley seeds of about 4% moisture content under oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions at varying temperatures. Catalase affords concentration-dependent radioprotection under oxygenated condition at both 25 0 C and 4 0 C. The level of protection at 4 0 C is less than at 25 0 C. This is obviously due to a decrease in catalase activity at low temperature. Under oxygen-free conditions, catalase enhances radiation damage at 4 0 C while at 25 0 C it it has no effect. This has been substantiated by data on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and on peroxidase activity. Sodium azide, a catalase inhibitor, was found to eliminate the radioprotective action of catalase. The study supports the view that the 'oxygen effect' is mediated largely through peroxides in irradiated biological systems. However, the observations made particularly at 4 0 C under oxygen-free condition seem to involve physicochemical reactions. (author)

  16. Catalytic Properties and Immobilization Studies of Catalase from Malva sylvestris L.

    OpenAIRE

    Arabaci, G.; Usluoglu, A.

    2013-01-01

    Catalase was partially purified from Malva sylvestris L. and immobilized onto chitosan. Then, its catalytic properties were investigated. (NH4)2SO4 precipitation and dialysis were performed in the extracted enzyme. Further purification was performed with sephadex G-200 column. Kinetic studies of the purified enzyme activity were measured and characterized. The inhibitory effects of KCN, NaN3, CuSO4, and EDTA on M. sylvestris L. catalase activity were observed except NaCl. Furthermore, M. sylv...

  17. Considerations for higher efficiency and productivity in research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero, Diego A; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    There are several factors that are known to affect research productivity; some of them imply the need for large financial investments and others are related to work styles. There are some articles that provide suggestions for early career scientists (PhD students and postdocs) but few publications are oriented to professors about scientific leadership. As academic mentoring might be useful at all levels of experience, in this note we suggest several key considerations for higher efficiency and productivity in academic and research activities. More research is needed into the main work style features that differentiate highly productive scientists and research groups, as some of them could be innate and others could be transferable. As funding agencies, universities and research centers invest large amounts of money in order to have a better scientific productivity, a deeper understanding of these factors will be of high academic and societal impact.

  18. Immobilization of catalase on chitosan and amino acid- modified chitosan beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başak, Esra; Aydemir, Tülin

    2013-08-01

    Bovine liver catalase was covalently immobilized onto amino acid-modified chitosan beads. The beads were characterized with SEM, FTIR, TGA and the effects of immobilization on optimum pH and temperature, thermostability, reusability were evaluated. Immobilized catalase showed the maximal enzyme activity at pH 7.0 at 30°C. The kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax, for immobilized catalase on alanine-chitosan beads and lysine-chitosan beads were estimated to be 25.67 mM, 27 mM and 201.39 μmol H2O2/min, 197.50 μmol H2O2/min, respectively. The activity of the immobilized catalase on Ala-CB and Lys-CB retained 40% of its high initial activity after 100 times of reuse.

  19. Isolation, Fractionation and Characterization of Catalase from Neurospora crassa (InaCC F226)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani; Ambarsari, L.; Lindawati, E.

    2017-03-01

    Catalase from Indigenous isolate Neurospora crassa InaCC F226 has been isolated, fractionated and characterized. Production of catalase by Neurospora crassa was done by using PDA medium (Potato Dextrosa Agar) and fractionated with ammonium sulphate with 20-80% saturation. Fraction 60% was optimum saturation of ammonium sulphate and had highest specific activity 3339.82 U/mg with purity 6.09 times, total protein 0.920 mg and yield 88.57%. The optimum pH and temperature for catalase activity were at 40°C and pH 7.0, respectively. The metal ions that stimulated catalase activity acted were Ca2+, Mn2+ and Zn2+, and inhibitors were EDTA, Mg2+ and Cu2+. Based on Km and Vmax values were 0.2384 mM and 13.3156 s/mM.

  20. Electrospun regenerated cellulose nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization method for catalase immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Quan; Hou, Dayin; Zhao, Yong; Xu, Tao; Menkhaus, Todd J; Fong, Hao

    2014-12-10

    In this study, an electrospun regenerated cellulose (RC) nanofibrous membrane with fiber diameters of ∼200-400 nm was prepared first; subsequently, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and acrylic acid (AA) were selected as the monomers for surface grafting of polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. Thereafter, four nanofibrous membranes (i.e., RC, RC-poly(HEMA), RC-poly(DMAEMA), and RC-poly(AA)) were explored as innovative supports for immobilization of an enzyme of bovine liver catalase (CAT). The amount/capacity, activity, stability, and reusability of immobilized catalase were evaluated, and the kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) for immobilized and free catalase were determined. The results indicated that the respective amounts/capacities of immobilized catalase on RC-poly(HEMA) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) nanofibrous membranes reached 78 ± 3.5 and 67 ± 2.7 mg g(-1), which were considerably higher than the previously reported values. Meanwhile, compared to that of free CAT (i.e., 18 days), the half-life periods of RC-CAT, RC-poly(HEMA)-CAT, RC-poly(DMAEMA)-CAT, and RC-poly(AA)-CAT were 49, 58, 56, and 60 days, respectively, indicating that the storage stability of immobilized catalase was also significantly improved. Furthermore, the immobilized catalase exhibited substantially higher resistance to temperature variation (tested from 5 to 70 °C) and lower degree of sensitivity to pH value (tested from 4.0 and 10.0) than the free catalase. In particular, according to the kinetic parameters of Vmax and Km, the nanofibrous membranes of RC-poly(HEMA) (i.e., 5102 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 44.89 mM) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) (i.e., 4651 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 46.98 mM) had the most satisfactory biocompatibility with immobilized catalase. It was therefore concluded that the electrospun RC nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with 3-dimensional nanolayers of polymer chains/brushes would be

  1. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Kim, Duk-Soo; Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. → PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. → PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. → PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. → PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  2. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung [Department of Food Science and Nutrition and RIC Center, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Cheon [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyeok Yil [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk-Soo [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan-Si 330-090 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hyun Sook, E-mail: wazzup@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young, E-mail: sychoi@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  3. Genipin Cross-Linked Glucose Oxidase and Catalase Multi-enzyme for Gluconic Acid Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Caixia; Chen, Haibin; Chen, Biqiang; Tan, Tianwei

    2017-02-01

    In this work, glucose oxidase (GOD) and catalase (CAT) were used simultaneously to produce gluconic acid from glucose. In order to reduce the distance between the two enzymes, and therefore improve efficiency, GOD and CAT were cross-linked together using genipin. Improvements in gluconic acid production were due to quick removal of harmful intermediate hydrogen peroxide by CAT. GOD activity was significantly affected by the proportion of CAT in the system, with GOD activity in the cross-linked multi-enzyme (CLME) being 10 times higher than that in an un-cross-linked GOD/CAT mixture. The glucose conversion rate after 15 h using 15 % glucose was also 10 % higher using the CLME than was measured using a GOD/CAT mixture.

  4. Adventitial gene transfer of catalase attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cun-Fei; Zhang, Jia; Shen, Kai; Gao, Ping-Jin; Wang, Hai-Ya; Jin, Xin; Meng, Chao; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adventitia and adventitia‑derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to vascular remodeling following vascular injury. A previous ex vivo study in adventitial fibroblasts showed that catalase, one of most important anti‑oxide enzymes, was downregulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adventitial gene transfer of catalase affects AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in vivo. Adenoviruses co‑expressing catalase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or expressing eGFP only were applied to the adventitial surface of common carotid arteries of Sprague‑Dawley rats. Alzet minipumps administering AngII (0.75 mg/kg/day) were then implanted subcutaneously for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure and biological parameters of vascular remodeling were measured in each group. Adventitial fibroblasts were cultured and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that adventitial gene transfer of catalase had no effect on AngII‑induced systolic blood pressure elevation. However, catalase adenovirus transfection significantly inhibited AngII‑induced media hypertrophy compared with that of the control virus (Padventitial α‑smooth muscle actin expression. Furthermore, catalase transfection significantly inhibited the AngII‑induced increase in p38MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that adventitial gene transfer of catalase significantly attenuated AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in rats via inhibition of adventitial p38MAPK phosphorylation.

  5. Do pH and flavonoids influence hypochlorous acid-induced catalase inhibition and heme modification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), highly reactive oxidizing and chlorinating species, is formed in the immune response to invading pathogens by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride catalyzed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Catalase, an important antioxidant enzyme, catalyzing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, hampers in vitro HOCl formation, but is also one of the main targets for HOCl. In this work we have investigated HOCl-induced catalase inhibition at different pH, and the influence of flavonoids (catechin, epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin) on this process. It has been shown that HOCl-induced catalase inhibition is independent on pH in the range 6.0-7.4. Preincubation of catalase with epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin before HOCl treatment enhances the degree of catalase inhibition, whereas catechin does not affect this process. Our rapid kinetic measurements of absorption changes around the heme group have revealed that heme modification by HOCl is mainly due to secondary, intramolecular processes. The presence of flavonoids, which reduce active catalase intermediate, Compound I to inactive Compound II have not influenced the kinetics of HOCl-induced heme modification. Possible mechanisms of the reaction of hypochlorous acid with catalase are proposed and the biological consequences are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibitory effects of a novel Val to Thr mutation on the distal heme of human catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Boeglin, William E; Brash, Alan R

    2014-11-01

    True catalases efficiently breakdown hydrogen peroxide, whereas the catalase-related enzyme allene oxide synthase (cAOS) is completely unreactive and instead metabolizes a fatty acid hydroperoxide. In cAOS a Thr residue adjacent to the distal His restrains reaction with H2O2 (Tosha et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281:12610; De Luna et al. (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117: 14635) and its mutation to the consensus Val of true catalases permits the interaction. Here we investigated the effects of the reciprocal experiment in which the Val74 of human catalase is mutated to Thr, Ser, Met, Pro, or Ala. The Val74Thr substitution decreased catalatic activity by 3.5-fold and peroxidatic activity by 3-fold. Substitution with Ser had similar negative effects (5- and 3-fold decreases). Met decreased catalatic activity 2-fold and eliminated peroxidatic activity altogether, whereas the Val74Ala substitution was well tolerated. (The Val74Pro protein lacked heme). We conclude that the conserved Val74 of true catalases helps optimize catalysis. There are rare substitutions of Val74 with Ala, Met, or Pro, but not with Ser of Thr, possibly due their hydrogen bonding affecting the conformation of His75, the essential distal heme residue for activity in catalases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  7. Progeric effects of catalase inactivation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Jay I; Wood, Christopher S; Terlecky, Laura J; Walton, Paul A; Terlecky, Stanley R

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomes generate hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, as part of their normal metabolism. A number of pathological situations exist in which the organelle's capacity to degrade the potentially toxic oxidant is compromised. It is the peroxidase, catalase, which largely determines the functional antioxidant capacity of the organelle, and it is this enzyme that is affected in aging, in certain diseases, and in response to exposure to specific chemical agents. To more tightly control the enzymatic activity of peroxisomal catalase and carefully document the effects of its impaired action on human cells, we employed the inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. We show that by chronically reducing catalase activity to approximately 38% of normal, cells respond in a dramatic manner, displaying a cascade of accelerated aging reactions. Hydrogen peroxide and related reactive oxygen species are produced, protein and DNA are oxidatively damaged, import into peroxisomes and organelle biogenesis is corrupted, and matrix metalloproteinases are hyper-secreted from cells. In addition, mitochondria are functionally impaired, losing their ability to maintain a membrane potential and synthesize reactive oxygen species themselves. These latter results suggest an important redox-regulated connection between the two organelle systems, a topic of considerable interest for future study.

  8. Progeric effects of catalase inactivation in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepke, Jay I.; Wood, Christopher S.; Terlecky, Laura J.; Walton, Paul A.; Terlecky, Stanley R.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisomes generate hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, as part of their normal metabolism. A number of pathological situations exist in which the organelle's capacity to degrade the potentially toxic oxidant is compromised. It is the peroxidase, catalase, which largely determines the functional antioxidant capacity of the organelle, and it is this enzyme that is affected in aging, in certain diseases, and in response to exposure to specific chemical agents. To more tightly control the enzymatic activity of peroxisomal catalase and carefully document the effects of its impaired action on human cells, we employed the inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. We show that by chronically reducing catalase activity to approximately 38% of normal, cells respond in a dramatic manner, displaying a cascade of accelerated aging reactions. Hydrogen peroxide and related reactive oxygen species are produced, protein and DNA are oxidatively damaged, import into peroxisomes and organelle biogenesis is corrupted, and matrix metalloproteinases are hyper-secreted from cells. In addition, mitochondria are functionally impaired, losing their ability to maintain a membrane potential and synthesize reactive oxygen species themselves. These latter results suggest an important redox-regulated connection between the two organelle systems, a topic of considerable interest for future study

  9. Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigation of the Interactions of Ionic Liquids and Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xing; Fan, Yunchang; Yang, Peng; Kong, Jichuan; Li, Dandan; Miao, Juan; Hua, Shaofeng; Hu, Chaobing

    2016-11-01

    The inhibitory effects of nine ionic liquids (ILs) on the catalase activity were investigated using fluorescence, absorption ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The interactions of ILs and catalase on the molecular level were studied. The experimental results indicated that ILs could inhibit the catalase activity and their inhibitory abilities depended on their chemical structures. Fluorescence experiments showed that hydrogen bonding played an important role in the interaction process. The inhibitory abilities of ILs on catalase activity could be simply described by their hydrophobicity and hydrogen bonding abilities. Unexpected less inhibitory effects of trifluoromethanesulfonate (TfO - ) might be ascribed to its larger size, which makes it difficult to go through the substrate channel of catalase to the active site. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Destructive effect of non-enzymatic glycation on catalase and remediation via curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi Najjar, Fayezeh; Taghavi, Fereshteh; Ghadari, Rahim; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2017-09-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins is a post-translational modification that is produced by a covalent binding between reducing sugars and amino groups of lysine and arginine residues. In this paper the effect of pathological conditions, derived from hyperglycemia on bovine liver catalase (BLC) as a model protein was considered by measuring enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and changes in catalase conformational properties. We observed that in the presence of glucose, the catalase activity gradually decreased. ROS generation was also involved in the glycation process. Thus, decreased BLC activity was partly considered as a result of ROS generation through glycation. However, in the presence of curcumin the amount of ROS was reduced resulting in increased activity of the glycated catalase. The effect of high glucose level and the potential inhibitory effect of curcumin on aggregation and structural changes of catalase were also investigated. Molecular dynamic simulations also showed that interaction of catalase with curcumin resulted in changes in accessible surface area (ASA) and pKa, two effective parameters of glycation, in potential glycation lysine residues. Thus, the decrease in ASA and increase in pKa of important lysine residues were considered as predominant factors in decreased glycation of BLC by curcumin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Scholarly Activities in Hospitality and Tourism Higher Education among Private Higher Institutions in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the notion of scholarship and develop research and scholarship strategies among Private Higher Institutions delivering Tourism and Hospitality degree programs in Australia. In doing so, this paper confronts the traditional view of research publications as the only form of scholarship by traditional…

  12. Scholarly activities in hospitality and tourism higher education among private higher institutions in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund Goh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the notion of scholarship and develop research and scholarship strategies among Private Higher Institutions delivering Tourism and Hospitality degree programs in Australia. In doing so, this paper confronts the traditional view of research publications as the only form of scholarship by traditional universities. This paper argues that the purpose of scholarship should be focused towards improving a teacher’s teaching and learning process. These new knowledge need not be limited through peer reviewed journals only, but can be achieved through less formal means of communication such as fieldtrips to industry and attending conferences. This paper utilizes the six Scholarship key points as defined on P. 19 of the National Protocols for Higher Education Approval Processes in Australia by MCEETYA  to investigate methods to capture scholarship beyond traditional research publications. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v3i2.108

  13. Cytochemical localization of catalase and several hydrogen peroxide-producing oxidases in the nucleoids and matrix of rat liver peroxisomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of catalase, amino acid oxidase, α-hydroxy acid oxidase, urate oxidase and alcohol oxidase was studied cytochemically in rat hepatocytes. The presence of catalase was demonstrated with the conventional diaminobenzidine technique. Oxidase activities were visualized with methods based

  14. The cytochemical demonstration of catalase and D-amino acid oxidase in the microbodies of teleost kidney cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of catalase and D-amino acid oxidase, marker enzymes for peroxisomes, was determined cytochemically in the kidney tubules of an euryhaline teleost, the three-spined stickleback. Catalase activity was localized with the diaminobenzidine technique. The presence of D-amino acid oxidase

  15. Binding of Cimetidine to Balb/C Mouse Liver Catalase; Kinetics and Conformational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangirvand, Mahboubeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Razmi, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is responsible for converting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and oxygen in cells. This enzyme has high affinity for hydrogen peroxide and can protect the cells from oxidative stress damage. Catalase is a tetramer protein and each monomer contains a heme group. Cimetidine is a histamine H2 receptor blocker which inhibits acid release from stomach and is used for gasterointestinal diseases. In this research, effect of cimetidine on the activity of liver catalase was studied and the kinetic parameters of this enzyme and its conformational changes were investigated. Cell free extract of mouse liver was used for the catalase assay. The activity of the catalase was detected in the absence and presence of cimetidine by monitoring hydrogen peroxide reduction absorbance at 240 nm. The purified enzyme was used for conformational studies by Fluorescence spectrophotometry. The data showed that cimetidine could inhibit the enzyme in a non-competitive manner. Ki and IC50 values of the drug were determined to be about 0.75 and 0.85 uM, respectively. The Arrhenius plot showed that activation energy was 6.68 and 4.77 kJ/mol in the presence and absence of the drug, respectively. Fluorescence spectrophotometry revealed that the binding of cimetidine to the purified enzyme induced hyperchromicity and red shift which determined the conformational change on the enzyme. Cimetidine could non-competitively inhibit the liver catalase with high affinity. Binding of cimetidine to the enzyme induced conformational alteration in the enzyme.

  16. Immobilized glucose oxidase--catalase and their deactivation in a differential-bed loop reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenosil, J E

    1979-01-01

    Glucose oxidase containing catalase was immobilized with a copolymer of phenylenediamine and glutaraldehyde on pumice and titania carrier to study the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in a differential-bed loop reactor. The reaction rate was found to be first order with respect to the concentration of limiting oxygen substrate, suggesting a strong external mass-transfer resistance for all the flow rates used. The partial pressure of oxygen was varied from 21.3 up to 202.6 kPa. The use of a differential-bed loop reactor for the determination of the active enzyme concentration in the catalyst with negligible internal pore diffusion resistance is shown. Catalyst deactivation was studied, especially with respect to the presence of catalase. It is believed that the hydrogen peroxide formed in the oxidation reaction deactivates catalase first; if an excess of catalase is present, the deactivation of glucose oxidase remains small. The mathematical model subsequently developed adequately describes the experimental results.

  17. TBAL: Technology-Based Active Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilay, Yaron; Ghilay, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    In many institutions of higher education worldwide, faculty members manage lessons based on information transfer whereas their students become passive listeners. According to international research, passive learning has disadvantages mainly because students do not engage in the lesson. The study introduces a new model for higher education called…

  18. The critical role of catalase in prooxidant and antioxidant function of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M Y; Kim, H-B; Piao, C; Lee, K H; Hyun, J W; Chang, I-Y; You, H J

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is an important regulator of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, although downstream mediators of p53 remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that p53 and its downstream targets, p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2) and p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), physically and functionally interact with catalase for efficient regulation of intracellular ROS, depending on stress intensity. Under physiological conditions, the antioxidant functions of p53 are mediated by p53R2, which maintains increased catalase activity and thereby protects against endogenous ROS. After genotoxic stress, high levels of p53 and PIG3 cooperate to inhibit catalase activity, leading to a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance toward an oxidative status, which could augment apoptotic cell death. These results highlight the essential role of catalase in p53-mediated ROS regulation and suggest that the p53/p53R2–catalase and p53/PIG3–catalase pathways are critically involved in intracellular ROS regulation under physiological conditions and during the response to DNA damage, respectively. PMID:22918438

  19. Reversible adsorption of catalase onto Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş Uygun, Deniz; Uygun, Murat; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2015-05-01

    In this presented study, poly(acrylamide-glycidyl methacrylate) [poly(AAm-GMA)] cryogels were synthesized by cryopolymerization technique at sub-zero temperature. Prepared cryogels were then functionalized with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and chelated with Fe(3+) ions in order produce the metal chelate affinity matrix. Synthesized cryogels were characterized with FTIR, ESEM and EDX analysis, and it was found that the cryogel had sponge like structure with interconnected pores and their pore diameter was about 200 μm. Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogels were used for the adsorption of catalase and optimum adsorption conditions were determined by varying the medium pH, initial catalase concentration, temperature and ionic strength. Maximum catalase adsorption onto Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogel was found to be 12.99 mg/g cryogel at 25 °C, by using pH 5.0 acetate buffer. Adsorbed catalase was removed from the cryogel by using 1.0M of NaCl solution and desorption yield was found to be 96%. Additionally, reusability profile of the Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogel was also investigated and it was found that, adsorption capacity of the cryogels didn't decrease significantly at the end of the 40 reuses. Catalase activity studies were also tested and it was demonstrated that desorbed catalase retained 70% of its initial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Catalase expression impairs oxidative stress-mediated signalling in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Anna Cláudia Guimarães; Alves, Ceres Luciana; Goes, Grazielle Ribeiro; Resende, Bruno Carvalho; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Nunes, Vinícius Santana; Aguiar, Pedro Henrique Nascimento; Tahara, Erich Birelli; Franco, Glória Regina; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho; Gadelha, Fernanda Ramos; Guarneri, Alessandra Aparecida; Schenkman, Sergio; Vieira, Leda Quercia; Machado, Carlos Renato

    2017-09-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is exposed to oxidative stresses during its life cycle, and amongst the strategies employed by this parasite to deal with these situations sits a peculiar trypanothione-dependent antioxidant system. Remarkably, T. cruzi's antioxidant repertoire does not include catalase. In an attempt to shed light on what are the reasons by which this parasite lacks this enzyme, a T. cruzi cell line stably expressing catalase showed an increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) when compared with wild-type cells. Interestingly, preconditioning carried out with low concentrations of H2O2 led untransfected parasites to be as much resistant to this oxidant as cells expressing catalase, but did not induce the same level of increased resistance in the latter ones. Also, presence of catalase decreased trypanothione reductase and increased superoxide dismutase levels in T. cruzi, resulting in higher levels of residual H2O2 after challenge with this oxidant. Although expression of catalase contributed to elevated proliferation rates of T. cruzi in Rhodnius prolixus, it failed to induce a significant increase of parasite virulence in mice. Altogether, these results indicate that the absence of a gene encoding catalase in T. cruzi has played an important role in allowing this parasite to develop a shrill capacity to sense and overcome oxidative stress.

  1. Influence of radiation damage repair inhibitor on superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) in different sensitive crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Daojun; Xu Dengyi; Wan Zhaoliang; He Shoulin

    1997-01-01

    The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) were affected remarkably by 60 Co γ-ray irradiation and radiation damage repair inhibitor (Caf, EDTA). SOD, CAT and POD activities showed the similar change pattern in both soybean (sensitive to radiation) and Brassica napus L. (resistant to radiation) seedlings in all treatments. After reaching the maximum value, SOD activity decreased with the increase of doses. CAT activity had the same change pattern as that of SOD in soybean, while with Brassica napus L., CAT activity remained relatively steady from 300 Gy to 1000 Gy. And POD activity increased with the increase of doses. Compared with H 2 O-treatments, CaF, EDAT post-treatments obviously enhanced SOD, CAT and POD activities. With all the treatments, the three enzyme activities were higher in Brassica napus L. than those in soybean seedlings

  2. Involvement of c-Met- and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase dependent pathways in arsenite-induced downregulation of catalase in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soohee; Lee, Seung Heon; Kang, Sukmo; Lee, Lyon; Park, Jung-Duck; Ryu, Doug-Young

    2011-01-01

    Catalase protects cells from reactive oxygen species-induced damage by catalyzing the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Arsenite decreases catalase activity; it activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its key downstream effector Akt in a variety of cells. The PI3K pathway is known to inhibit catalase expression. c-Met, an upstream regulator of PI3K and Akt, is also involved in the regulation of catalase expression. To examine the involvement of c-Met and PI3K pathways in the arsenite-induced downregulation of catalase, catalase mRNA and protein expression were analyzed in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 treated with arsenite and either an inhibitor of c-Met (PHA665752 (PHA)) or of PI3K (LY294002 (LY)). Arsenite treatment markedly activated Akt and decreased the levels of both catalase mRNA and protein. Both PHA and LY attenuated arsenite-induced activation of Akt. PHA and LY treatment also prevented the inhibitory effect of arsenite on catalase protein expression but did not affect the level of catalase mRNA. These findings suggest that arsenite-induced inhibition of catalase expression is regulated at the mRNA and post-transcriptional levels in HepG2 cells, and that the post-transcriptional regulation is mediated via c-Met- and PI3K-dependent mechanisms.

  3. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in macrophages by catalase: role of NF-kappaB and PI3K signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Byeong-Churl; Kim, Do-Hyun; Park, Jong-Wook; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, Sang-Pyo; Song, Dae-Kyu; Park, Jong-Gu; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Mun, Kyo-Chul; Baek, Won-Ki; Suh, Min-Ho; Hla, Timothy; Suh, Seong-Il

    2004-04-02

    Induction of COX-2 by catalase in smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and neuronal cells has been previously reported. However, the mechanism by which catalase up-regulates COX-2 remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of catalase on induction of COX-2 in macrophages. The addition of catalase into Raw 264.7 macrophages induced COX-2 expression that was correlated with increased COX-2 transcription and mRNA stability. Catalase also induced activation of NF-kappaB, PI3K, ERKs, p38s, or JNKs. Catalase-induced COX-2 expression was abrogated by treatment of MG-132 (a NF-kappaB inhibitor) or LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor), but not by treatment of PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor), SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor), or SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor). Moreover, inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 caused partial decrease of catalase-induced COX-2 transcription and steady-state COX-2 transcript levels, but not COX-2 mRNA stability. Together, these results suggest that catalase induces the expression of COX-2 in Raw 264.7 macrophages, and the induction is related with activation of NF-kappaB transcription factor and PI3K signaling pathway.

  4. Chromatin remodeling regulates catalase expression during cancer cells adaptation to chronic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Dejeans, Nicolas; Garbe, James C; Dieu, Marc; Verrax, Julien; Renard, Patricia; Huang, Peng; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of ROS metabolism plays a major role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress in cancer cells, but the molecular mechanism that regulates catalase, a key antioxidant enzyme responsible for conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the transcriptional regulatory mechanism controlling catalase expression in three human mammary cell lines: the normal mammary epithelial 250MK primary cells, the breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and an experimental model of MCF-7 cells resistant against oxidative stress resulting from chronic exposure to H 2 O 2 (Resox), in which catalase was overexpressed. Here we identify a novel promoter region responsible for the regulation of catalase expression at -1518/-1226 locus and the key molecules that interact with this promoter and affect catalase transcription. We show that the AP-1 family member JunB and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) mediate catalase transcriptional activation and repression, respectively, by controlling chromatin remodeling through a histone deacetylases-dependent mechanism. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in redox adaptation to chronic exposure to H 2 O 2 in breast cancer cells. Our study suggests that cancer adaptation to oxidative stress may be regulated by transcriptional factors through chromatin remodeling, and reveals a potential new mechanism to target cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluorescence spectrometry of the interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.; Cai, H.; Miao, J.; Yang, Q.; Li, Y.; Li, J.; Fu, D.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with catalase is investigated using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The results of the fluorescence experiments suggest that MWCNTs quench the intrinsic fluorescence of catalase via a static quenching mechanism. The circular dichroism spectral results reveal the unfolding of catalase with a significant decrease in the α-helix content in the presence of MWCNTs, which indicates that the conformation of catalase is changed in the binding process, thereby remarkably decreasing its activity. The binding constants and the number of binding sites of the MWCNT to the catalase are calculated at different temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the changes in free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS), are calculated using thermodynamic equations. The fact that all negative values of ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS are obtained suggests that the interaction of the MWCNTs with catalase is spontaneous, and that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions play an important role in the binding process. (authors)

  6. Evaluating Teaching Development Activities in Higher Education: A Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneale, Pauline; Winter, Jennie; Turner, Rebecca; Spowart, Lucy; Hughes, Jane; McKenna, Colleen; Muneer, Reema

    2016-01-01

    This toolkit is developed as a resource for providers of teaching-related continuing professional development (CPD) in higher education (HE). It focuses on capturing the longer-term value and impact of CPD for teachers and learners, and moving away from immediate satisfaction measures. It is informed by the literature on evaluating higher…

  7. Assessment of participation in higher education team working activities

    OpenAIRE

    Andreu Andrés, María Angeles; García-Casas, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    [EN] Since among the competences which are most valued by engineering corporations are the ability to make decisions, the capacity for teamwork, one’s initiative and the capacity for solving problems together with an efficient communication, an experience based on active learning and team-working in which participants had to put them into practice was carried out. Before starting the experience with an active learning strategy, students had to decide on what they understood by participation i...

  8. Effects of rs769217 and rs1001179 polymorphisms of catalase gene on blood catalase, carbohydrate and lipid biomarkers in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góth, László; Nagy, Teréz; Kósa, Zsuzsanna; Fejes, Zsolt; Bhattoa, Harjit Pal; Paragh, György; Káplár, Miklós

    2012-10-01

    Oxidative stress and deficiency of the enzyme catalase, which is the primary scavenger of the oxidant H(2)O(2), may contribute to diabetes. The current study examined two polymorphisms in the catalase gene, -262C>nT in the promoter and 111C>T in exon 9, and their effects on blood catalase activity as well as on concentrations of blood glucose, haemoglobin A1c, triglyceride, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, ApoA-I and ApoB. Subjects were type-1 and type-2 diabetics. We evaluated PCR-single strand conformational polymorphism for 111C>T and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism for - 262C>T. TT genotype frequency of 111C>T polymorphism was increased in type-1 diabetes. Type-2 diabetics with the CC or CT genotypes had decreased catalase and increased glucose, hemoglobinA1c and ApoB. Type-2 diabetics who have TT genotype in -262C>T may have elevated risk for diabetes complications; these patients had the lowest mean catalase and HDL, as well as the highest glucose, haemoglobin A1c, cholesterol and ApoB.

  9. Influence of catalase on the radiation sensitizing effect of misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazso, G.L.; Dam, A.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation modifying action of misonidazole and catalase was investigated in Bacillus megaterium spores at various oxygen concentrations. Catalase (120 μg/ml) decreased the radiation sensitizing action of misonidazole. Misonidazole as an electron affinic radiation sensitizer enhanced the build up of H 2 O 2 , thus promoting the reaction with catalase. Protection by catalase was not enough to eliminate the total radiation sensitizing effect of misonidazole. (orig.)

  10. Catalase as a sulfide-sulfur oxido-reductase: An ancient (and modern?) regulator of reactive sulfur species (RSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kenneth R; Gao, Yan; DeLeon, Eric R; Arif, Maaz; Arif, Faihaan; Arora, Nitin; Straub, Karl D

    2017-08-01

    Catalase is well-known as an antioxidant dismutating H 2 O 2 to O 2 and H 2 O. However, catalases evolved when metabolism was largely sulfur-based, long before O 2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) became abundant, suggesting catalase metabolizes reactive sulfide species (RSS). Here we examine catalase metabolism of H 2 S n , the sulfur analog of H 2 O 2 , hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and other sulfur-bearing molecules using H 2 S-specific amperometric electrodes and fluorophores to measure polysulfides (H 2 S n ; SSP4) and ROS (dichlorofluorescein, DCF). Catalase eliminated H 2 S n , but did not anaerobically generate H 2 S, the expected product of dismutation. Instead, catalase concentration- and oxygen-dependently metabolized H 2 S and in so doing acted as a sulfide oxidase with a P 50 of 20mmHg. H 2 O 2 had little effect on catalase-mediated H 2 S metabolism but in the presence of the catalase inhibitor, sodium azide (Az), H 2 O 2 rapidly and efficiently expedited H 2 S metabolism in both normoxia and hypoxia suggesting H 2 O 2 is an effective electron acceptor in this reaction. Unexpectedly, catalase concentration-dependently generated H 2 S from dithiothreitol (DTT) in both normoxia and hypoxia, concomitantly oxidizing H 2 S in the presence of O 2 . H 2 S production from DTT was inhibited by carbon monoxide and augmented by NADPH suggesting that catalase heme-iron is the catalytic site and that NADPH provides reducing equivalents. Catalase also generated H 2 S from garlic oil, diallyltrisulfide, thioredoxin and sulfur dioxide, but not from sulfite, metabisulfite, carbonyl sulfide, cysteine, cystine, glutathione or oxidized glutathione. Oxidase activity was also present in catalase from Aspergillus niger. These results show that catalase can act as either a sulfide oxidase or sulfur reductase and they suggest that these activities likely played a prominent role in sulfur metabolism during evolution and may continue do so in modern cells as well. This also appears

  11. Fluorimetry as a Simple and Sensitive Method for Determination of Catalase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Hedayati

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Catalase enzyme plays an important role in the anti-oxidation defense of body so it is important to measure its activity. Nowadays catalase activity measurement is performed by expensive imported kits in various scientific fields. The purpose of this study was to design a sensitive fluorimetry method for measuring catalase activity with improved sensitivity, accuracy and speed. Materials and Methods: In this study, the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with peroxidase (as a reaction accelerator was used in fluorimetry for catalase activity measuring in serum samples in order to increase the sensitivity of the assay. The sensitivity and intra- and inter-assay accuracy, verification test, recovery and parallelism tests, comparison method and correlation and coherence investigation methods were also performed. In order to increase the accuracy and speed of reading, the assay was performed in microplates and reading was done in fluorimetry plates. Results: The percentage of intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients were measured 3.8- 6.6 % and 4.1-7.3%, respectively. Comparison of the results of mentioned method for 50 serum samples with common colorimetric method showed a good correlation (0.917. In assessing the accuracy, the recovery percent was obtained 91% to 107%. The test sensitivity was measured 0.02 IU/ml. Conclusion: The fluorimetry method by microplate reading has a sufficient precision, accuracy and efficiency for catalase activity measuring as well as speed of measurement. Thus it can be an alternative method to conventional imported colorimetric methods.

  12. ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated PLGA-b-PEG nanoparticles against vascular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Ece; Tunc-Sarisozen, Yeliz; Mutlu, Hulya; Shahbazi, Reza; Ucar, Gulberk; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics is the favourable idea, whereas it is possible to distribute the therapeutically active drug molecule only to the site of action. For this purpose, in this study, catalase encapsulated poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) nanoparticles were developed and an endothelial target molecule (anti-ICAM-1) was conjugated to this carrier system in order to decrease the oxidative stress level in the target site. According to the enzymatic activity results, initial catalase activity of nanoparticles was increased from 27.39 U/mg to up to 45.66 U/mg by adding 5 mg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA). After 4 h, initial catalase activity was preserved up to 46.98% while free catalase retained less than 4% of its activity in proteolytic environment. Furthermore, FITC labelled anti-ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated nanoparticles (anti-ICAM-1/CatNPs) were rapidly taken up by cultured endothelial cells and concomitantly endothelial cells were resistant to H2O2 induced oxidative impairment.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It is...

  14. Novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, Jaime; Alarcón, Pedro; Benadof, Dona; Ulloa, Soledad; Fasce, Rodrigo; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Araya, Pamela; Parra, Bárbara; Olivares, Berta; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report the first description of a rare catalase-negative strain of Staphylococcus aureus in Chile. This new variant was isolated from blood and synovial tissue samples of a pediatric patient. Sequencing analysis revealed that this catalase-negative strain is related to ST10 strain, which has earlier been described in relation to S. aureus carriers. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the catalase gene katA revealed presence of a novel nonsense mutation that causes premature translational truncation of the C-terminus of the enzyme leading to a loss of 222 amino acids. Our study suggests that loss of catalase activity in this rare catalase-negative Chilean strain is due to this novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene, which truncates the enzyme to just 283 amino acids. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of higher brain activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui He; Wang Yunjiu; Chen Runsheng; Tang Xiaowei.

    1996-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs) exhibit small differences in the magnetic resonance signal intensity in positions corresponding to focal areas of brain activation. These signal are caused by variation in the oxygenation state of the venous vasculature. Using this non-invasive and dynamic method, it is possible to localize functional brain activation, in vivo, in normal individuals, with an accuracy of millimeters and a temporal resolution of seconds. Though a series of technical difficulties remain, fMRI is increasingly becoming a key method for visualizing the working brain, and uncovering the topographical organization of the human brain, and understanding the relationship between brain and the mind

  16. Revealing mechanisms of selective, concentration-dependent potentials of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal to induce apoptosis in cancer cells through inactivation of membrane-associated catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling by the expression of membrane-associated catalase. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), a versatile second messenger generated during lipid peroxidation, has been shown to induce apoptosis selectively in malignant cells. The findings described in this paper reveal the strong, concentration-dependent potential of 4-HNE to specifically inactivate extracellular catalase of tumor cells both indirectly and directly and to consequently trigger apoptosis in malignant cells through superoxide anion-mediated intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Namely, 4-HNE caused apoptosis selectively in NOX1-expressing tumor cells through inactivation of their membrane-associated catalase, thus reactivating subsequent intercellular signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and HOCl pathways, followed by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Concentrations of 4-HNE of 1.2 µM and higher directly inactivated membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells, whereas at lower concentrations, 4-HNE triggered a complex amplificatory pathway based on initial singlet oxygen formation through H2O2 and peroxynitrite interaction. Singlet-oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8 increased superoxide anion generation by NOX1 and amplification of singlet oxygen generation, which allowed singlet-oxygen-dependent inactivation of catalase. 4-HNE and singlet oxygen cooperate in complex autoamplificatory loops during this process. The finding of these novel anticancer pathways may be useful for understanding the role of 4-HNE in the control of malignant cells and for the optimization of ROS-dependent therapeutic approaches including antioxidant treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Polysaccharies of higher fungi: Biological role, structure and antioxidative activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozarski, M.S.; Klaus, A.; Niksic, M.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.; Vrvic, M.M.; Jakovljevic, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    The fungal polysaccharides attract a lot of attention due to their multiple challenging bio-logical properties, such as: anti-tumor, anti-viral, anticomplementary, anticoagulant, hypo-lipidemic, immunomodulatory and immune-stimulatory activities, which all together make them suitable for application

  18. Evaluation on the Toxic Effects of NanoAg to Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Zhai, Wenxin; Liu, Rutao; Yu, Zehua; Shen, Hengmei; Hu, Xinxin

    2015-02-01

    Protein is the functional actor of life. Research on protein damage induced by nanomaterials may give insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanoparticles. Studying nano silver over the impact of the structure and function of catalase (CAT) at the molecular level, is of great significance for a comprehensive evaluation of their toxic effects. The toxic effects of nanoAg on catalase were thoroughly investigated using steady state and time resolved fluorescence quenching measurements, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering spectroscopy (RLS), circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). NanoAg could decrease the amount of alpha-helix and increase the beta sheet structure, leading to loose the skeleton structure of catalase. The characteristic fluorescence of catalase was obviously quenched, which showed the exposal of internal hydrophobic amino acids enhanced, and its quenching type is dynamic quenching. The result of RLS and TEM showed that the distribution and size of nanoAg become more uniform and smaller after their interaction, resulting in a decrease of RLS intensity. NanoAg could make the activity of catalase rise. By changing the structure of catalase, nanoAg increases its enzymatic activity to a certain extent, breaking down its balance in vivo, thereby affecting the normal physiological activities. NanoAg has obvious toxic effects on catalase. This paper provided a new perspective and method for the toxic effects of nanoAg to biological macromolecules; provided basic data and reference gist for the hygienics and toxicology studies of nanoAg. It is conducive to the toxicity prevention and control work of nanoAg, promoting nano-technology applied to human production and living better.

  19. Novel Role of Endogenous Catalase in Macrophage Polarization in Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ye Seul; Uddin, Md Jamal; Piao, Lingjuan; Hwang, Inah; Lee, Jung Hwa; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are important components of adipose tissue inflammation, which results in metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance. Notably, obesity induces a proinflammatory phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophages, and oxidative stress facilitates this switch. Thus, we examined the role of endogenous catalase, a key regulator of oxidative stress, in the activity of adipose tissue macrophages in obese mice. Catalase knockout (CKO) exacerbated insulin resistance, amplified oxidative stress, and accelerated macrophage infiltration into epididymal white adipose tissue in mice on normal or high-fat diet. Interestingly, catalase deficiency also enhanced classical macrophage activation (M1) and inflammation but suppressed alternative activation (M2) regardless of diet. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of catalase activity using 3-aminotriazole induced the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages. Finally, the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory responses were observed in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from CKO mice. Taken together, the data indicate that endogenous catalase regulates the polarization of adipose tissue macrophages and thereby inhibits inflammation and insulin resistance.

  20. Catalase coupled gold nanoparticles: Comparison between carbodiimide and biotin-streptavidin methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirra, Hariharasudhan D.; Sexton, Travis; Biswal, Dipti; Hersh, Louis B.; Hilt, J. Zach

    2011-01-01

    The use of proteins for therapeutic applications requires the protein to maintain sufficient activity for the period of in vivo treatment. Many proteins exhibit a short half-life in vivo and, thus, require delivery systems for them to be applied as therapeutics. The relative biocompatibility and the ability to form functionalized bioconjugates via simple chemistry make gold nanoparticles excellent candidates as protein delivery systems. Herein, two protocols for coupling proteins to gold nanoparticles were compared. In the first, the strong biomolecular binding between biotin and streptavidin was used to couple catalase to the surface of gold nanoparticles. In the second protocol, the formation of an amide bond between carboxylic acid coated gold nanoparticles and free surface amines of catalase using carbodiimide chemistry was performed. The stability and kinetics of the different steps involved in these protocols were studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The addition of mercaptoundecanoic acid in conjugation with (N-(6-(biotinamido)hexyl)-3′-(2′-pyridyldithio)-propionamide increased the stability of biotinylated gold nanoparticles. Although the carbodiimide chemistry based bioconjugation approach exhibited a decrease in catalase activity, the carbodiimide chemistry based bioconjugation approach resulted in more active catalase per gold nanoparticle compared to that of mercaptoundecanoic acid stabilized biotinylated gold nanoparticles. Both coupling protocols resulted in gold nanoparticles loaded with active catalase. Thus, these gold nanoparticle systems and coupling protocols represent promising methods for the application of gold nanoparticles for protein delivery. PMID:21232642

  1. A Eukaryote without Catalase-Containing Microbodies : Neurospora crassa Exhibits a Unique Cellular Distribution of Its Four Catalases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schliebs, Wolfgang; Würtz, Christian; Kunau, Wolf-Hubert; Veenhuis, Marten; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Wuertz, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Microbodies usually house catalase to decompose hydrogen peroxide generated within the organelle by the action of various oxidases. Here we have analyzed whether peroxisomes (i.e., catalase-containing microbodies) exist in Neurospora crassa. Three distinct catalase isoforms were identified by native

  2. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase from Hydra vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3’- and 5’- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp ...

  3. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction: role of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F; Roe, Nathan D; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complications in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged with LPS (6 mg/kg) and cardiac function was evaluated. Levels of oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis, and protein damage were examined using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 activity, and carbonyl formation. A Kaplan-Meier curve was constructed for survival after LPS treatment. Our results revealed a lower mortality in catalase mice compared with FVB mice after LPS challenge. LPS injection led to depressed cardiac contractile capacity as evidenced by echocardiography and cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was ablated by catalase overexpression. LPS treatment induced elevated TNF-α level, autophagy, apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation, cleaved caspase-3), production of ROS and O(2)(-), and protein carbonyl formation, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by catalase overexpression. Electron microscopy revealed focal myocardial damage characterized by mitochondrial injury after LPS treatment, which was less severe in catalase mice. Interestingly, LPS-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction was prevented by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Taken together, our data revealed that catalase protects against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and mortality, which may be associated with inhibition of oxidative stress and autophagy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cardiac-Specific Overexpression of Catalase Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction: Role of Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F.; Roe, Nathan D.; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complication in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged with LPS (6 mg/kg) and cardiac function was evaluated. Levels of oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis and protein damage were examined using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 activity and carbonyl formation. Kaplan-Meier curve was constructed for survival following LPS treatment. Our results revealed a lower mortality in catalase mice compared with FVB mice following LPS challenge. LPS injection led to depressed cardiac contractile capacity as evidenced by echocardiography and cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was ablated by catalase overexpression. LPS treatment induced elevated TNF-α level, autophagy, apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation, cleaved caspase-3), production of ROS and O2−, and protein carbonyl formation, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by catalase overexpression. Electron microscopy revealed focal myocardial damage characterized by mitochondrial injury following LPS treatment, which was less severe in catalase mice. Interestingly, LPS-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction was prevented by antioxidant NAC and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Taken together, our data revealed that catalase protects against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and mortality, which may be associated with inhibition of oxidative stress and autophagy. PMID:22902401

  6. NREL Explains the Higher Cellulolytic Activity of a Vital Microorganism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of a new mode of action by C. thermocellum to convert biomass to biofuels is significant because the bacterium is already recognized as one of the most effective in the biosphere. Researchers found that, in addition to using common cellulase degradation mechanisms attached to cells, C. thermocellum also uses a new category of cell-free scaffolded enzymes. The new discovery will influence the strategies used to improve the cellulolytic activity of biomass degrading microbes going forward. Better understanding of this bacterium could lead to cheaper production of ethanol and drop-in fuels. Also, this discovery demonstrates that nature's biomass conversion behaviors are not fully understood and remain as opportunities for future microbial/enzyme engineering efforts.

  7. Structural and functional changes in catalase induced by near-UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigman, S.; Schultz, J.B.; McDaniel, T.

    1996-01-01

    Part one of this study shows that exposure of purified beef liver catalase in buffered solutions to BL lamps that provide a mixture of 99% UVA and 1% UVB (to be labeled UV A ) alters its chemistry and enzymatic activity. Thus, its spectral absorbance lose detail, it aggregated and exhibited a lower isoelectric point and its enzymatic activity was substantially reduced. These photochemically induced changes were increased by irradiation in phosphate buffer or in physiological medium (minimal essential medium) containing riboflavin and tryptophan. Neither α-tocopherol nor deferoxamine were protective against these UV A -induced changes in pure catalase. We further investigated the effect of UV A radiation on the activity of catalase in cultured lens epithelial cells and the protective effects of antioxidants. (Author)

  8. Feedback regulation of an Agrobacterium catalase gene katA involved in Agrobacterium-plant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X Q; Li, L P; Pan, S Q

    2001-11-01

    Catalases are known to detoxify H2O2, a major component of oxidative stress imposed on a cell. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens catalase encoded by a chromosomal gene katA has been implicated as an important virulence factor as it is involved in detoxification of H2O2 released during Agrobacterium-plant interaction. In this paper, we report a feedback regulation pathway that controls the expression of katA in A. tumefaciens cells. We observed that katA could be induced by plant tissue sections and by acidic pH on a minimal medium, which resembles the plant environment that the bacteria encounter during the course of infection. This represents a new regulatory factor for catalase induction in bacteria. More importantly, a feedback regulation was observed when the katA-gfp expression was studied in different genetic backgrounds. We found that introduction of a wild-type katA gene encoding a functional catalase into A. tumefaciens cells could repress the katA-gfp expression over 60-fold. The katA gene could be induced by H2O2 and the encoded catalase could detoxify H2O2. In addition, the katA-gfp expression of one bacterial cell could be repressed by other surrounding catalase-proficient bacterial cells. Furthermore, mutation at katA caused a 10-fold increase of the intracellular H2O2 concentration in the bacteria grown on an acidic pH medium. These results suggest that the endogenous H2O2 generated during A. tumefaciens cell growth could serve as the intracellular and intercellular inducer for the katA gene expression and that the acidic pH could pose an oxidative stress on the bacteria. Surprisingly, one mutated KatA protein, exhibiting no significant catalase activity as a result of the alteration of two important residues at the putative active site, could partially repress the katA-gfp expression. The feedback regulation of the katA gene by both catalase activity and KatA protein could presumably maintain an appropriated level of catalase activity and H2O2 inside A

  9. Synergistic Roles of Helicobacter pylori Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase and GroEL in Repairing Oxidant-damaged Catalase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Manish; Tran, ViLinh; Sharp, Joshua S.; Maier, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced via the enzyme myeloperoxidase is a major antibacterial oxidant produced by neutrophils, and Met residues are considered primary amino acid targets of HOCl damage via conversion to Met sulfoxide. Met sulfoxide can be repaired back to Met by methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr). Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme; we show it constitutes 4–5% of the total Helicobacter pylori protein levels. msr and katA strains were about 14- and 4-fold, respectively, more susceptible than the parent to killing by the neutrophil cell line HL-60 cells. Catalase activity of an msr strain was much more reduced by HOCl exposure than for the parental strain. Treatment of pure catalase with HOCl caused oxidation of specific MS-identified Met residues, as well as structural changes and activity loss depending on the oxidant dose. Treatment of catalase with HOCl at a level to limit structural perturbation (at a catalase/HOCl molar ratio of 1:60) resulted in oxidation of six identified Met residues. Msr repaired these residues in an in vitro reconstituted system, but no enzyme activity could be recovered. However, addition of GroEL to the Msr repair mixture significantly enhanced catalase activity recovery. Neutrophils produce large amounts of HOCl at inflammation sites, and bacterial catalase may be a prime target of the host inflammatory response; at high concentrations of HOCl (1:100), we observed loss of catalase secondary structure, oligomerization, and carbonylation. The same HOCl-sensitive Met residue oxidation targets in catalase were detected using chloramine-T as a milder oxidant. PMID:21460217

  10. Parallel Changes in H2O2 and Catalase during Thermotolerance Induced by Salicylic Acid or Heat Acclimation in Mustard Seedlings1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dat, James F.; Lopez-Delgado, Humberto; Foyer, Christine H.; Scott, Ian M.

    1998-01-01

    Spraying mustard (Sinapis alba L.) seedlings with salicylic acid (SA) solutions between 10 and 500 μm significantly improved their tolerance to a subsequent heat shock at 55°C for 1.5 h. The effects of SA were concentration dependent, with higher concentrations failing to induce thermotolerance. The time course of thermotolerance induced by 100 μm SA was similar to that obtained with seedlings acclimated at 45°C for 1 h. We examined the hypothesis that induced thermotolerance involved H2O2. Heat shock at 55°C caused a significant increase in endogenous H2O2 and reduced catalase activity. A peak in H2O2 content was observed within 5 min of either SA treatment or transfer to the 45°C acclimation temperature. Between 2 and 3 h after SA treatment or heat acclimation, both H2O2 and catalase activity significantly decreased below control levels. The lowered H2O2 content and catalase activity occurred in the period of maximum thermoprotection. It is suggested that thermoprotection obtained either by spraying SA or by heat acclimation may be achieved by a common signal transduction pathway involving an early increase in H2O2. PMID:9536052

  11. Functional and structural changes of human erythrocyte catalase induced by cimetidine: proposed model of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Jahngirvand, Mahboubeh; Almasirad, Ali; Mousavi, Zahra; Masoud, Masoudeh; Mollasalehi, Hamidreza

    2015-06-01

    In erythrocyte, catalase plays an important role to protect cells from hydrogen peroxide toxicity. Hydrogen peroxide is a byproduct compound which is produced during metabolic pathway of cells. Cimetidine, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist, is used for gastrointestinal tract diseases and prevents the extra release of gastric acid. In this study, the effect of cimetidine on the activity of human erythrocyte catalase was investigated. Erythrocytes were broken by hypotonic solution. The supernatant was used for catalase assay and kinetics study. Lineweaver-Burk plot was performed to determine the type of inhibition. The kinetics data revealed that cimetidine inhibited the catalase activity by mixed inhibition. The IC50 (1.54 μM) and Ki (0.45 μM) values of cimetidine determined that the drug was bound to the enzyme with high affinity. Circular dichroism and fluorescence measurement showed that the binding of cimetidine to the enzyme affected the content of secondary structure of the enzyme as well as its conformational changes. Docking studies were carried out to detect the site in which the drug was bound to the enzyme. Molecular modeling and energy calculation of the binding showed that the cyanoguanidine group of the drug connected to Asp59 via two hydrogen bonds, while the imidazole group of the drug interacted with Phe64 in the enzyme by a hydrophobic interaction. In conclusion, cimetidine could bind to human erythrocyte catalase, and its interaction caused functional and conformational changes in the enzyme.

  12. The Hydrogen Peroxide Scavenger, Catalase, Alleviates Ion Transport Dysfunction in Murine Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kim E.; McCole, Declan F.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) contribute to epithelial damage and ion transport dysfunction (key events in inflammatory diarrhea) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify if H2O2 mediates suppression of colonic ion transport function in the murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model by using the H2O2 degrading enzyme, catalase. Colitis was induced by administering DSS (4%) in drinking water for 5 days followed by 3 days on normal H2O. Mice were administered either pegylated-catalase or saline at day −1, 0 and +1 of DSS treatment. Ion transport responses to the Ca2+-dependent agonist, carbachol (CCh), or the cAMP-dependent agonist, forskolin, were measured across distal colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. Parameters of DSS-induced inflammation (loss in body weight, decreased colon length, altered stool consistency), were only partially alleviated by catalase while histology was only minimally improved. However, catalase significantly reversed the DSS-induced reduction in baseline ion transport as well as colonic Isc responses to CCh. However, ion transport responses to forskolin were not significantly restored. Catalase also reduced activation of ERK MAP kinase in the setting of colitis, and increased expression of the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter, NKCC1, consistent with restoration of ion transport function. Ex vivo treatment of inflamed colonic mucosae with catalase also partially restored ion transport function. Therefore, catalase partially prevents, and rescues, the loss of ion transport properties in DSS colitis even in the setting of unresolved tissue inflammation. These findings indicate a prominent role for ROS in ion transport dysfunction in colitis and may suggest novel strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diarrhea. PMID:27543846

  13. Hydrogen peroxide scavenger, catalase, alleviates ion transport dysfunction in murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kim E; McCole, Declan F

    2016-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) contribute to epithelial damage and ion transport dysfunction (key events in inflammatory diarrhoea) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify if H 2 O 2 mediates suppression of colonic ion transport function in the murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model by using the H 2 O 2 degrading enzyme, catalase. Colitis was induced by administering DSS (4%) in drinking water for 5 days followed by 3 days on normal H 2 O. Mice were administered either pegylated catalase or saline at day -1, 0 and +1 of DSS treatment. Ion transport responses to the Ca 2+ -dependent agonist, carbachol (CCh), or the cAMP-dependent agonist, forskolin, were measured across distal colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. Parameters of DSS-induced inflammation (loss in body weight, decreased colon length, altered stool consistency), were only partially alleviated by catalase while histology was only minimally improved. However, catalase significantly reversed the DSS-induced reduction in baseline ion transport as well as colonic I sc responses to CCh. However, ion transport responses to forskolin were not significantly restored. Catalase also reduced activation of ERK MAP kinase in the setting of colitis, and increased expression of the Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransporter, NKCC1, consistent with restoration of ion transport function. Ex vivo treatment of inflamed colonic mucosae with catalase also partially restored ion transport function. Therefore, catalase partially prevents, and rescues, the loss of ion transport properties in DSS colitis even in the setting of unresolved tissue inflammation. These findings indicate a prominent role for ROS in ion transport dysfunction in colitis and may suggest novel strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diarrhoea. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. The role of cellular catalase on the radiosensitization of bacterial vegetative cells by N2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, H.; Takehisa, M.

    1983-01-01

    The radiosensitizing effect of N 2 O on eight strains of bacteria was measured in dilute suspensions. The dose-modifying factors (DMF) of N 2 O on M. radiodurans R 1 , P. radiora O-1, M. lysodeikticus and B. pumilus E601 (vegetative cells) were 3.4, 2.9, 2.4 and 1.7, respectively. But P. radiora RP-C, P. fluorescens B3-1, E. coli B/r and E. coli K-12 were hardly sensitized by N 2 O. From measurements of catalase activity of each bacterium, it was found that the DMF increases with increased catalase activity, suggesting that cellular catalase promotes the sensitizing action of N 2 O. (author)

  15. Effect of a protease inhibitor on the stability of catalase in liver and blood from acatalasemic and normal mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Ogata, Masana

    1991-01-01

    Effects of Gabexate mesilate (GM) (([ethyl-4-(6-guanidino hexanoyloxy) benzoate] methane sulfonate)), a protease inhibitor, on the activities of catalase in liver, erythrocytes and reticulocytes from acatalasemic mice were examined. Preincubation without GM at 37 degrees C for 160 min lowered the catalase activities of liver, erythrocytes and reticulocytes from acatalasemic mice, to 24%, 40% and 10% of the initial levels, respectively. But, preincubation with GM at 37 degrees C for 160 min de...

  16. Extension of mouse lifespan by overexpression of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriner, Samuel E; Linford, Nancy J

    2006-06-01

    The free radical theory of aging was originally proposed 50 years ago, and is arguably the most popular mechanism explaining the aging process. According to this theory, aging results from the progressive decline in organ function due to the damage generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). These chemical species are a normal part of metabolism, and a group of enzymes exists to protect cells against their toxic effects. One of these species is hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), which can be degraded by catalase. To determine the role of hydrogen peroxide in aging and its importance in different subcellular compartments, transgenic mice were developed with increased catalase activities localized to the peroxisome (PCAT), nucleus (NCAT), or mitochondrion (MCAT). The largest effect on lifespan was found in MCAT animals, with a 20% increase in median lifespan and a 10% increase in the maximum lifespan. A more modest effect was seen in PCAT animals, and no significant change was found in NCAT animals. Upon further examination of the MCAT mice, it was found that H(2)O(2) production and H(2)O(2)-induced aconitase inactivation were attenuated, oxidative damage and the development of mitochondrial deletions were reduced, and cardiac pathology and cataract development were delayed. These results are consistent with a role of H(2)O(2) in the development of pathology and in the limitation of mouse lifespan. They also demonstrate the importance of mitochondria as a source, and possible target, of ROS.

  17. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers using catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungwoo; Park, Jeongju; Cho, Jinhan

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach for the preparation of multilayers, based on catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (CAT-Au NP ), allowing electrostatic charge reversal and structural transformation through pH adjustment. CAT-Au NP , which are synthesized directly from CAT stabilizer, can be electrostatically assembled with anionic and cationic PEs as a result of the charge reversal of the catalase stabilizers through pH control. In particular, at pH 5.2, near the pI of catalase, dispersed CAT-Au NP are structurally transformed into colloidal or network CAT-Au NP nanocomposites. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer assembled multilayers composed of PEs and CAT-Au NP induce an effective electron transfer between CAT and the electrode as well as a high loading of CAT and Au NP , and resultantly exhibit a highly catalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 .

  18. Specific Function of the Met-Tyr-Trp Adduct Radical and Residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the Atypical Catalase Reaction of Catalase-Peroxidase KatG*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangbo; Khajo, Abdelahad; Jarrett, Sanchez; Suarez, Javier; Levitsky, Yan; Burger, Richard M.; Jarzecki, Andrzej A.; Magliozzo, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase activity of the dual-function heme enzyme catalase-peroxidase (KatG) depends on several structural elements, including a unique adduct formed from covalently linked side chains of three conserved amino acids (Met-255, Tyr-229, and Trp-107, Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG numbering) (MYW). Mutagenesis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and optical stopped-flow experiments, along with calculations using density functional theory (DFT) methods revealed the basis of the requirement for a radical on the MYW-adduct, for oxyferrous heme, and for conserved residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the rapid catalase reaction. The participation of an oxyferrous heme intermediate (dioxyheme) throughout the pH range of catalase activity is suggested from our finding that carbon monoxide inhibits the activity at both acidic and alkaline pH. In the presence of H2O2, the MYW-adduct radical is formed normally in KatG[D137S] but this mutant is defective in forming dioxyheme and lacks catalase activity. KatG[R418L] is also catalase deficient but exhibits normal formation of the adduct radical and dioxyheme. Both mutants exhibit a coincidence between MYW-adduct radical persistence and H2O2 consumption as a function of time, and enhanced subunit oligomerization during turnover, suggesting that the two mutations disrupting catalase turnover allow increased migration of the MYW-adduct radical to protein surface residues. DFT calculations showed that an interaction between the side chain of residue Arg-418 and Tyr-229 in the MYW-adduct radical favors reaction of the radical with the adjacent dioxyheme intermediate present throughout turnover in WT KatG. Release of molecular oxygen and regeneration of resting enzyme are thereby catalyzed in the last step of a proposed catalase reaction. PMID:22918833

  19. Influence of ionizing radiation on synthesis and molecular heterogeneity of catalase in tissue culture of Rauwolfia serpentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komov, V.P.; Bespalova, E.V.; Strelkova, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in activity and molecular heterogeneity of catalase in tissue culture of Rauwolfia serpentina following irradiation in early growth period at the doses of 8 and 50 Gy has been studied. Ionizing radiation accelerate the synthesis and degradation rates of catalase and total protein. A comparative study of changes in enzyme and protein turnover during growth on irradiated and non-irradiated medium has been made [ru

  20. Structural and functional alterations of catalase induced by acriflavine, a compound causing apoptosis and necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Farnoosh; Khavari-Nejad, Sarah; Keyhani, Jacqueline; Keyhani, Ezzatollah

    2009-08-01

    Acriflavine is an antiseptic agent causing both apoptosis and necrosis in yeast. In this work, its effect on the structure and function of catalase, a vital enzyme actively involved in protection against oxidative stress, was investigated. In vitro kinetic studies showed that acriflavine inhibited the enzymatic activity in a competitive manner. The residual activity detectable after preincubation of catalase (1.5 nmol/L) with various concentrations of acriflavine went from 50% to 20% of the control value as the acriflavine concentration increased from 30 to 90 micromol/L. Correlatively with the decrease in activity, alterations in the enzyme's conformation were observed as indicated by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. The enzyme's intrinsic fluorescence obtained upon excitation at either 297 nm (tryptophan residues) or 280 nm (tyrosine and tryptophan residues) decreased as a function of acriflavine concentration. Circular dichroism studies showed alterations of the protein structure by acriflavine with up to 13% decrease in alpha helix, 16% increase in beta-sheet content, 17% increase in random coil, and 4% increase in beta turns. Spectrophotometric studies showed a blueshift and modifications in the chromicity of catalase at 405 nm, corresponding to an absorbance band due to the enzyme's prosthetic group. Thus, acriflavine induced in vitro a profound change in the structure of catalase so that the enzyme could no longer function. Our results showed that acriflavine, a compound producing apoptosis and necrosis, can have a direct effect on vital functions in cells by disabling key enzymes.

  1. Catalase Induced by All-Trans Retinoic Acid Is Involved in Antiproliferation of 36B10 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woo Yoon; Yu, Jae Ran

    2010-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has antiproliferative effects against brain tumor cells. Recently, ATRA has been reported to induce catalase. We investigated whether catalase induction by ATRA is associated with its antiproliferative effects. 36B10 cells were exposed to 0-50μM ATRA for 24 or 48 hours and mRNA, protein, and activity of catalase were measured. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. A clonogenic assay was used to confirm the cytotoxic effect. The mRNA, protein, and activity of catalase were found to increase in a concentration- and incubation- time-dependent manner. The increase in catalase activity induced by ATRA was decreased by the addition of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATZ). ROS was also increased with ATRA and decreased by the addition of ATZ. The decrease in cell survival induced by ATRA was partly rescued by ATZ. Catalase induction by ATRA is involved in ROS overproduction and thus inhibits the proliferation of 36B10 cells.

  2. Building Better Buildings: Sustainable Building Activities in California Higher Education Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowell, Arnold; Eichel, Amanda; Alevantis, Leon; Lovegreen, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    This article outlines the activities and recommendations of California's sustainable building task force, discusses sustainable building activities in California's higher education systems, and highlights key issues that California is grappling with in its implementation of sustainable building practices. (EV)

  3. Catalase and sodium fluoride mediated rehabilitation of enamel bleached with 37% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching agents bring about a range of unwanted changes in the physical structure of enamel which needs to be restored qualitatively and timely. Catalase being an antioxidant ensures the effective removal of free radicals and improvement in fluoride mediated remineralization from the enamel microstructure which if retained may harm the integrity and affect the hardness of enamel. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted incisors were sectioned to 6 slabs which were divided into 5 groups: Group A, control; Group B, treatment with 37% hydrogen peroxide (HP; Group C, treatment with 37% HP and catalase, Group D, treatment with 37% HP and 5% sodium fluoride application, Group E, treatment with 37% HP followed by catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Scanning electron microscope and microhardness analysis were done for all slabs. One-way ANOVA test was applied among different groups. Results: Vicker′s microhardness number (VHN of Group B and C was significantly lower. No significant difference between VHN of Group B and C. VHN of Group D was significantly higher than Group A, B, and C; but significantly lower than Group E. VHN of Group E was significantly higher than any other experimental group. One-way ANOVA revealed a highly significant P value (P = 0.0001 and so Tukey′s post-hoc Test for the group comparisons was employed. Conclusion: Subsequent treatment of bleached enamel with catalase and fluoride varnish separately results in repairing and significantly increasing the microhardness.

  4. Catalase therapy corrects oxidative stress-induced pathophysiology in incipient diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Courtney R; Roberts, Robin; Krentz, Kendra A; Bissig, David; Talreja, Deepa; Kumar, Ashok; Terlecky, Stanley R; Berkowitz, Bruce A

    2015-05-01

    Preclinical studies have highlighted retinal oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We evaluated whether a treatment designed to enhance cellular catalase reduces oxidative stress in retinal cells cultured in high glucose and in diabetic mice corrects an imaging biomarker responsive to antioxidant therapy (manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [MEMRI]). Human retinal Müller and pigment epithelial cells were chronically exposed to normal or high glucose levels and treated with a cell-penetrating derivative of the peroxisomal enzyme catalase (called CAT-SKL). Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were measured using a quantitative fluorescence-based assay. For in vivo studies, streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic C57Bl/6 mice were treated subcutaneously once a week for 3 to 4 months with CAT-SKL; untreated age-matched nondiabetic controls and untreated diabetic mice also were studied. MEMRI was used to analytically assess the efficacy of CAT-SKL treatment on diabetes-evoked oxidative stress-related pathophysiology in vivo. Similar analyses were performed with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase. After catalase transduction, high glucose-induced peroxide production was significantly lowered in both human retinal cell lines. In diabetic mice in vivo, subnormal intraretinal uptake of manganese was significantly improved by catalase supplementation. In addition, in the peroxisome-rich liver of treated mice catalase enzyme activity increased and oxidative damage (as measured by lipid peroxidation) declined. On the other hand, DFMO was largely without effect in these in vitro or in vivo assays. This proof-of-concept study raises the possibility that augmentation of catalase is a therapy for treating the retinal oxidative stress associated with diabetic retinopathy.

  5. A Salt-Inducible Mn-Catalase (KatB) Protects Cyanobacterium from Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Dhiman; Banerjee, Manisha; Bihani, Subhash C; Ballal, Anand

    2016-02-01

    Catalases, enzymes that detoxify H2O2, are widely distributed in all phyla, including cyanobacteria. Unlike the heme-containing catalases, the physiological roles of Mn-catalases remain inadequately characterized. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena, pretreatment of cells with NaCl resulted in unusually enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress. On exposure to H2O2, the NaCl-treated Anabaena showed reduced formation of reactive oxygen species, peroxides, and oxidized proteins than the control cells (i.e. not treated with NaCl) exposed to H2O2. This protective effect correlated well with the substantial increase in production of KatB, a Mn-catalase. Addition of NaCl did not safeguard the katB mutant from H2O2, suggesting that KatB was indeed responsible for detoxifying the externally added H2O2. Moreover, Anabaena deficient in KatB was susceptible to oxidative effects of salinity stress. The katB gene was strongly induced in response to osmotic stress or desiccation. Promoter-gfp analysis showed katB to be expressed only in the vegetative cells but not in heterocysts. Biochemically, KatB was an efficient, robust catalase that remained active in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl. Our findings unravel the role of Mn-catalase in acclimatization to salt/oxidative stress and demonstrate that the oxidative stress resistance of an organism can be enhanced by a simple compound such as NaCl. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus... Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure culture... cheese, in accordance with the following conditions. (a) The organism Micrococcus lysodeikticus from...

  7. Catalase epitopes vaccine design for Helicobacter pylori : A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catalase, an important enzyme in the virulence of H. pylori, could be a suitable candidate for vaccine design because it is highly conserved, which is important for the survival of H. pylori; it is expressed in high level and it is exposed on the surface of the bacteria. In this study, we designed epitope-based vaccine for catalase ...

  8. Peroxisomal catalase deficiency modulates yeast lifespan depending on growth conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawalek, Adam; Lefevre, Sophie D.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    We studied the role of peroxisomal catalase in chronological aging of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha in relation to various growth substrates. Catalase-deficient (cat) cells showed a similar chronological life span (CLS) relative to the wild-type control upon growth on carbon and nitrogen sources

  9. Normal weight children have higher cognitive performance – Independent of physical activity, sleep, and diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads F.; Sørensen, Louise B.; Andersen, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    % of expected learning within one school year (P breakfast consumption, fewer sleep problems, higher CRF, less total physical activity, more sedentary time, and less light physical activity were associated with higher cognitive performance independently of each other in at least one of the three...

  10. Activity-Based Management System Implementation in Higher Education Institution: Benefits and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Noor Azizi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss how activity-based costing (ABC) technique can be applied in the context of higher education institutions. It also discusses the obstacles and challenges to the successful implementation of activity-based management (ABM) in the higher education environment. Design/methodology/approach: This paper…

  11. Layer-by-layer immobilized catalase on electrospun nanofibrous mats protects against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong; Deng, Hongbing; Cai, Tongjian; Zhan, Yingfei; Wang, Xiankai; Chen, Xuanxuan; Ji, Ailing; Lil, Xueyong

    2014-07-01

    Catalase, a kind of redox enzyme and generally recognized as an efficient agent for protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxicity. The immobilization of catalase was accomplished by depositing the positively charged chitosan and the negatively charged catalase on electrospun cellulose nanofibrous mats through electrospining and layer-by-layer (LBL) techniques. The morphology obtained from Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that more orderly arranged three-dimension (3D) structure and roughness formed with increasing the number of coating bilayers. Besides, the enzyme-immobilized nanofibrous mats were found with high enzyme loading and activity, moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results further demonstrated the successful immobilization of chitosan and catalase on cellulose nanofibers support. Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide in the Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells with or without pretreatment of nanofibrous mats by MTT assay, LDH activity and Flow cytometric evaluation, and confirmed the pronounced hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity, but pretreatment of immobilized catalase reduced the cytotoxicity and protected cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxic effects which were further demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images. The data pointed toward a role of catalase-immobilized nanofibrous mats in protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular damage and their potential application in biomedical field.

  12. Differential expression of catalase genes in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willekens, H; Langebartels, C; Tiré, C; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Van Camp, W

    1994-10-25

    We have analyzed the expression of three catalase (Cat; EC 1.11.1.6) genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia by means of RNA blot and in situ hybridizations. Our data demonstrate that the expression of each catalase is associated with a particular H2O2-producing process. Cat1 appears to be specifically involved in the scavenging of photorespiratory H2O2 and is under control of a circadian rhythm, Cat2 is uniformly expressed in different organs with a cellular preference for vascular tissues, and the expression profile of Cat3 points to a role in glyoxysomal processes. Differential expression of these catalases is also manifested in response to temperature changes. DNA sequence comparison with other dicotyledonous catalases led to the identification of at least three distinct classes, which indicates that the functional organization of catalases is generally conserved in dicotyledonous plants.

  13. Coexpression of bile salt hydrolase gene and catalase gene remarkably improves oxidative stress and bile salt resistance in Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohong; Yin, Sheng; An, Haoran; Chen, Shangwu; Hao, Yanling

    2011-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) encounter various types of stress during industrial processes and gastrointestinal transit. Catalase (CAT) and bile salt hydrolase (BSH) can protect bacteria from oxidative stress or damage caused by bile salts by decomposing hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or deconjugating the bile salts, respectively. Lactobacillus casei is a valuable probiotic strain and is often deficient in both CAT and BSH. In order to improve the resistance of L. casei to both oxidative and bile salts stress, the catalase gene katA from L. sakei and the bile salt hydrolase gene bsh1 from L. plantarum were coexpressed in L. casei HX01. The enzyme activities of CAT and BSH were 2.41 μmol H(2)O(2)/min/10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) and 2.11 μmol glycine/min/ml in the recombinant L. casei CB, respectively. After incubation with 8 mM H(2)O(2), survival ratio of L. casei CB was 40-fold higher than that of L. casei CK. Treatment of L. casei CB with various concentrations of sodium glycodeoxycholate (GDCA) showed that ~10(5) CFU/ml cells survived after incubation with 0.5% GDCA, whereas almost all the L. casei CK cells were killed when treaded with 0.4% GDCA. These results indicate that the coexpression of CAT and BSH confers high-level resistance to both oxidative and bile salts stress conditions in L. casei HX01.

  14. Screening of agricultural wastes as a medium production of catalase for enzymatic fuel cell by Neurospora crassa InaCC F226

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Pugoh; Yopi

    2017-12-01

    Explorations of local microorganisms from Indonesia that can produce of catalase are still limited. Neurospora crassa is a fungus which resulting of two kinds of catalase, namely catalase-1 and catalase-3. We studied the production of catalase by Neurospora crassa (no. F226) from Indonesia Culture Collection (InaCC) in Solid State Fermentation (SSF). Among four screened agro wastes (corn cob, rice straw, oil palm empty fruit bunches, and bagasse), rice straw and oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB) were remarked as the most promising substrate suited for the excellent growth and adequate production of catalase. Based on the result, the method of solid state fermentation was suitable to production of catalase. It is caused that the medium served to maintain microbial growth and metabolism. The filamentous filament is more suitable for living on solid media because it has a high tolerance to low water activity, and it has a high potential to excrete hydrolytic enzymes that caused of its morphology. The filamentous filament morphology allows the fungus to form colonies and penetrate the solid substrates in order to obtain nutrients. The results showed that the highest catalase activity was obtained on rice straw and oil palm empty fruit bunches medium with catalase activity of 39.1 U/mL and 37,7 U/mL in 50% moisture content medium, respectively. Optimization of humidity and pH medium in the rice straw were investigated which is the highest activity obtained in 30% moisture content and pH medium of 6. The catalase activity was reached in the value of 53.761 U/mL and 56.903 U/mL by incubated 48 hours and 96 hours, respectively.

  15. Antioxidant mechanism of heme oxygenase-1 involves an increase in superoxide dismutase and catalase in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkseven, Saadet; Kruger, Adam; Mingone, Christopher J; Kaminski, Pawel; Inaba, Muneo; Rodella, Luigi F; Ikehara, Susumu; Wolin, Michael S; Abraham, Nader G

    2005-08-01

    Increased heme oxygenase (HO)-1 activity attenuates endothelial cell apoptosis and decreases superoxide anion (O2-) formation in experimental diabetes by unknown mechanisms. We examined the effect of HO-1 protein and HO activity on extracellular SOD (EC-SOD), catalase, O2-, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) levels and vascular responses to ACh in control and diabetic rats. Vascular EC-SOD and plasma catalase activities were significantly reduced in diabetic compared with nondiabetic rats (P inhibitor of HO-1 activity, decreased EC-SOD protein. Increased HO-1 activity in diabetic rats was associated with a decrease in iNOS but increases in eNOS and plasma catalase activity. On the other hand, aortic ring segments from diabetic rats exhibited a significant reduction in vascular relaxation to ACh, which was reversed with cobalt protoporphyrin treatment. These data demonstrate that an increase in HO-1 protein and activity, i.e., CO and bilirubin production, in diabetic rats brings about a robust increase in EC-SOD, catalase, and eNOS with a concomitant increase in endothelial relaxation and a decrease in O2-. These observations in experimental diabetes suggest that the vascular cytoprotective mechanism of HO-1 against oxidative stress requires an increase in EC-SOD and catalase.

  16. Nitric oxide protects macrophages from hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by inducing the formation of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Yasuhiro; Kitao, Tatsuya; Kishino, Takashi; Yamamuro, Akiko; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2006-04-15

    We investigated the cytoprotective effect of NO on H2O2-induced cell death in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264. H2O2-treated cells showed apoptotic features, such as activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, nuclear fragmentation, and DNA fragmentation. These apoptotic features were significantly inhibited by pretreatment for 24 h with NO donors, sodium nitroprusside and 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-3,3-bis-(2-aminoethyl)-1-triazene, at a low nontoxic concentration. The cytoprotective effect of NO was abrogated by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole but was not affected by a glutathione synthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine. NO donors increased the level of catalase and its activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, inhibited both the NO-induced increase in the catalase level and the cytoprotective effect of NO. These results indicate that NO at a low concentration protects macrophages from H2O2-induced apoptosis by inducing the production of catalase.

  17. Effects of Radiofrequency Waves on the Catalase Content in Triticum Aestivum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goiceanu, C.; Artenie, A.; Artenie, V.; Creanga, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible effects on enzyme biosynthesis in Triticum aestivum cariopsydes due to exposure to traveling radiofrequency (RF) waves. Triticum cariopsydes have been exposed to traveling RF waves inside a transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell fed by a RF Power Generator. The frequency of the exposure field was 400 MHz. The TEM cell was excited with 2W RF power in order to obtain a power density of about 1 mW/cm2. Four sets of Triticum aestivum samples were placed in four Petri dishes. For each set of Triticum cariopsydes there has been chosen a daily exposure duration of 1, 2, 4 and 8 hours respectively. Experimental exposure was carried out for five consecutive days. After the electromagnetic treatment cariopsydes were let to germinate in Petri dishes on porous filter paper support. A couple of days later the catalase assay was performed. In comparison to the control samples, exposed samples revealed modified catalase content, significantly over the error level (five replays of every sample were assayed in identical experimental conditions in order to provide a reliable statistic result). All exposed samples presented higher catalase levels in comparison to the control samples. However, the experimental data do not suggest an evident analytical dependence between the catalase content and the exposure time duration. We presume that exposure to traveling RF waves seems to be a stimulatory factor of the enzyme biosynthesis being able to improve Triticum capacity of enzyme biosynthesis in the described experimental conditions. (author)

  18. USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATIONAL EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN HIGHER TOURIST INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliia O. Matviyiv-Lozynska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with extracurricular educational activities in higher educational establishment of tourism profile with information technologies usage. It is known that extracurricular activities of higher educational establishment has an impact on the professional activities of future specialists in the tourism industry, as is in the process of extracurricular activities students can put into practice the obtained knowledge and skills. The task of teachers is to build a learning process, in particular activities outside classrooms as its component, so that the students were interested in it. In the modern world of tourism prosperity it is very difficult to do without the usage of multimedia technologies (internet, media, etc.

  19. Sirt1 protects against oxidative stress-induced renal tubular cell apoptosis by the bidirectional regulation of catalase expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Wakino, Shu; Yoshioka, Kyoko; Tatematsu, Satoru; Hara, Yoshikazu; Minakuchi, Hitoshi; Washida, Naoki; Tokuyama, Hirobumi; Hayashi, Koichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    NAD + -dependent protein deacetylase Sirt1 regulates cellular apoptosis. We examined the role of Sirt1 in renal tubular cell apoptosis by using HK-2 cells, proximal tubular cell lines with or without reactive oxygen species (ROS), H 2 O 2 . Without any ROS, Sirt1 inhibitors enhanced apoptosis and the expression of ROS scavenger, catalase, and Sirt1 overexpression downregulated catalase. When apoptosis was induced with H 2 O 2 , Sirt1 was upregulated with the concomitant increase in catalase expression. Sirt1 overexpression rescued H 2 O 2 -induced apoptosis through the upregulation of catalase. H 2 O 2 induced the nuclear accumulation of forkhead transcription factor, FoxO3a and the gene silencing of FoxO3a enhanced H 2 O 2 -induced apoptosis. In conclusion, endogenous Sirt1 maintains cell survival by regulating catalase expression and by preventing the depletion of ROS required for cell survival. In contrast, excess ROS upregulates Sirt1, which activates FoxO3a and catalase leading to rescuing apoptosis. Thus, Sirt1 constitutes a determinant of renal tubular cell apoptosis by regulating cellular ROS levels

  20. Amyloid-beta binds catalase with high affinity and inhibits hydrogen peroxide breakdown.

    OpenAIRE

    Milton, N G

    1999-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) specifically bound purified catalase with high affinity and inhibited catalase breakdown of H(2)O(2). The Abeta-induced catalase inhibition involved formation of the inactive catalase Compound II and was reversible. CatalaseAbeta interactions provide rapid functional assays for the cytotoxic domain of Abeta and suggest a mechanism for some of the observed actions of Abeta plus catalase in vitro.

  1. Pulse radiolysis of catalase in solution: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, Lidia; Metodiewa, Diana; Gebicki, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The time-course of absorption changes of oxygen-saturated solutions of bovine-liver catalase after pulse radiolysis have been studied. The rate constant of formation of Compound I due to the reaction of catalase with hydrogen peroxide has been estimated to be 2.0 x 10 7 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . Radiation generated super-oxide radicals reduce Compound I to Compound II with a rate constant of 5.0 x 10 6 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . The formation of Compound III in the direct reaction of O 2 - with catalase has also been observed. (author)

  2. New evidence on the role of catalase in Escherichia coli-mediated biocorrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza, S.; Vejar, N.; Gulppi, M.; Azocar, M.; Melo, F.; Monsalve, A.; Pérez-Donoso, J.; Vásquez, C.C.; Pavez, J.; Zagal, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Thompson, G.E.; Páez, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► MIC on stainless by catalase deficient Escherichia coli bacteria reveals the enzyme influence. ► The localized damage was greater in the presence of the wild E. coli. ► Catalase assists oxygen generation by disproportionation of H 2 O 2 to H 2 O and O 2 . - Abstract: The role of catalase on the microbiologically influenced corrosion mechanism by Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been examined, employing wild type and catalase-deficient cells. The bacteria were cultured for different times in the presence of AISI 316L stainless steel samples. The morphologies of the metallic surfaces covered by biofilms were studied by optical microscopy. The localized corrosion catalyzed by the bacteria was followed by scanning electron microscopy after immersion in the bacterial culture for different times. Susceptibility to corrosion was further investigated by potentiodynamic measurements. It was found that wild type E. coli is more aggressive than the mutant one, suggesting a role for catalase in increasing the kinetics of the cathodic reaction and, consequently, the global corrosion process. This correlates with oxygen uptake kinetics, as determined by differential pulse voltammetry on a pyrolytic graphite electrode modified with cobalt phthalocyanine, which was higher in the presence of wild type E. coli. When H 2 O 2 was deliberately added to the culture medium, wild type E. coli catalyzed oxygen disproportionation more efficiently than the mutant derivative, thus limiting H 2 O 2 accumulation in the medium and, hence, bacterial poisoning. In fact, the reduced adhesion of mutant cells to the metal substrate is apparently the result of H 2 O 2 accumulation in the culture broth. Thus, the rapid consumption of oxygen and peroxide in the presence of wild type E. coli is associated with the catalysis of H 2 O 2 disproportionation to water and oxygen. On the stainless steel, however, a dual mechanism of oxygen reduction, i.e. through formation of hydrogen peroxide

  3. Overexpression of Catalase Enhances Benzo(a)pyrene Detoxification in Endothelial Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Hong; Ramesh, Aramandla; Goodwin, J Shawn; Okoro, Emmanuel U; Guo, ZhongMao

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that overexpression of catalase upregulated xenobiotic- metabolizing enzyme (XME) expression and diminished benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) intermediate accumulation in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs). Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the most active organelle involved in BaP metabolism. To examine the involvement of ER in catalase-induced BaP detoxification, we compared the level and distribution of XMEs, and the profile of BaP intermediates in the microsomes of wild-type and catalase transgenic endothelial cells. Our data showed that endothelial microsomes were enriched in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP1B1 and epoxide hydrolase 1 (EH1), and contained considerable levels of quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase-pi (GSTP). Treatment of wild-type MAECs with 1μM BaP for 2 h increased the expression of microsomal CYP1A1, 1B1 and NQO1 by ~300, 64 and 116%, respectively. However, the same treatment did not significantly alter the expression of EH1 and GSTP. Overexpression of catalase did not significantly increase EH1, but upregulated BaP-induced expression of microsomal CYP1A1, 1B1, NQO1 and GSTP in the following order: 1A1>NQO1>GSTP>1B1. Overexpression of catalase did not alter the distribution of each of these enzymes in the microsomes. In contrast to our previous report showing lower level of BaP phenols versus BaP diols/diones in the whole-cell, this report demonstrated that the sum of microsomal BaP phenolic metabolites were ~60% greater than that of the BaP diols/diones after exposure of microsomes to BaP. Overexpression of catalase reduced the concentrations of microsomal BaP phenols and diols/diones by ~45 and 95%, respectively. This process enhanced the ratio of BaP phenol versus diol/dione metabolites in a potent manner. Taken together, upregulation of phase II XMEs and CYP1 proteins, but not EH1 in the ER might be the mechanism by which overexpression of catalase reduces the levels of all the BaP metabolites, and

  4. A Laboratory Experiment of the Purification of Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, Montserrat; Franco, Rafael

    1986-01-01

    Describes a simple method for purifying catalase for the study of proteins. Procedures are systematically and diagramatically presented. Also identifies polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, kinetic studies, and apparent molecular weight determination as possible techniques to be used in studying proteins. (ML)

  5. Antioxidant catalase rescues against high fat diet-induced cardiac dysfunction via an IKKβ-AMPK-dependent regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lei; Shou, Xi-Ling; Zhao, Hai-Kang; Ren, Gu-Qun; Wang, Jian-Bang; Wang, Xi-Hui; Ai, Wen-Ting; Maris, Jackie R; Hueckstaedt, Lindsay K; Ma, Ai-Qun; Zhang, Yingmei

    2015-02-01

    Autophagy, a conservative degradation process for long-lived and damaged proteins, participates in a variety of biological processes including obesity. However, the precise mechanism of action behind obesity-induced changes in autophagy still remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the role of the antioxidant catalase in high fat diet-induced changes in cardiac geometry and function as well as the underlying mechanism of action involved with a focus on autophagy. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice with cardiac overexpression of catalase were fed low or high fat diet for 20 weeks prior to assessment of myocardial geometry and function. High fat diet intake triggered obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia, the effects of which were unaffected by catalase transgene. Myocardial geometry and function were compromised with fat diet intake as manifested by cardiac hypertrophy, enlarged left ventricular end systolic and diastolic diameters, fractional shortening, cardiomyocyte contractile capacity and intracellular Ca²⁺ mishandling, the effects of which were ameliorated by catalase. High fat diet intake promoted reactive oxygen species production and suppressed autophagy in the heart, the effects of which were attenuated by catalase. High fat diet intake dampened phosphorylation of inhibitor kappa B kinase β(IKKβ), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) while promoting phosphorylation of mTOR, the effects of which were ablated by catalase. In vitro study revealed that palmitic acid compromised cardiomyocyte autophagy and contractile function in a manner reminiscent of fat diet intake, the effect of which was significantly alleviated by inhibition of IKKβ, activation of AMPK and induction of autophagy. Taken together, our data revealed that the antioxidant catalase counteracts against high fat diet-induced cardiac geometric and functional anomalies possibly via an IKKβ-AMPK-dependent restoration of myocardial

  6. Distribution of a Nocardia brasiliensis Catalase Gene Fragment in Members of the Genera Nocardia, Gordona, and Rhodococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Johnson, Wendy M.; Welsh, Oliverio; Resendiz-Uresti, Francisco L.; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C.

    1999-01-01

    An immunodominant protein from Nocardia brasiliensis, P61, was subjected to amino-terminal and internal sequence analysis. Three sequences of 22, 17, and 38 residues, respectively, were obtained and compared with the protein database from GenBank by using the BLAST system. The sequences showed homology to some eukaryotic catalases and to a bromoperoxidase-catalase from Streptomyces violaceus. Its identity as a catalase was confirmed by analysis of its enzymatic activity on H2O2 and by a double-staining method on a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine and ferricyanide; the result showed only catalase activity, but no peroxidase. By using one of the internal amino acid sequences and a consensus catalase motif (VGNNTP), we were able to design a PCR assay that generated a 500-bp PCR product. The amplicon was analyzed, and the nucleotide sequence was compared to the GenBank database with the observation of high homology to other bacterial and eukaryotic catalases. A PCR assay based on this target sequence was performed with primers NB10 and NB11 to confirm the presence of the NB10-NB11 gene fragment in several N. brasiliensis strains isolated from mycetoma. The same assay was used to determine whether there were homologous sequences in several type strains from the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Gordona, and Streptomyces. All of the N. brasiliensis strains presented a positive result but only some of the actinomycetes species tested were positive in the PCR assay. In order to confirm these findings, genomic DNA was subjected to Southern blot analysis. A 1.7-kbp band was observed in the N. brasiliensis strains, and bands of different molecular weight were observed in cross-reacting actinomycetes. Sequence analysis of the amplicons of selected actinomycetes showed high homology in this catalase fragment, thus demonstrating that this protein is highly conserved in this group of bacteria. PMID:10325357

  7. Active carbon supported molybdenum carbides for higher alcohols synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Chiarello, Gian Luca; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    This work provides an investigation of the high pressure CO hydrogenation to higher alcohols on K2CO3 promoted active carbon supported molybdenum carbide. Both activity and selectivity to alcohols over supported molybdenum carbides increased significantly compared to bulk carbides in literatures...

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits IL-6 expression via PPARγ-mediated expression of catalase in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eun Ah; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-07-01

    Cerulein pancreatitis mirrors human acute pancreatitis. In pancreatic acinar cells exposed to cerulein, reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate inflammatory signaling by Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, and cytokine induction. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) acts as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), which mediates the expression of some antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesized that DHA may induce PPARγ-target catalase expression and reduce ROS levels, leading to the inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 activation and IL-6 expression in cerulein-stimulated acinar cells. Pancreatic acinar AR42J cells were treated with DHA in the presence or absence of the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, or treated with the PPARγ agonist troglitazone, and then stimulated with cerulein. Expression of IL-6 and catalase, ROS levels, JAK2/STAT3 activation, and nuclear translocation of PPARγ were assessed. DHA suppressed the increase in ROS, JAK2/STAT3 activation, and IL-6 expression induced nuclear translocation of PPARγ and catalase expression in cerulein-stimulated AR42J cells. Troglitazone inhibited the cerulein-induced increase in ROS and IL-6 expression, but induced catalase expression similar to DHA in AR42J cells. GW9662 abolished the inhibitory effect of DHA on cerulein-induced increase in ROS and IL-6 expression in AR42J cells. DHA-induced expression of catalase was suppressed by GW9662 in cerulein-stimulated AR42J cells. Thus, DHA induces PPARγ activation and catalase expression, which inhibits ROS-mediated activation of JAK2/STAT3 and IL-6 expression in cerulein-stimulated pancreatic acinar cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Effects of Peroxisomal Catalase Inhibition on Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, Paul A.; Pizzitelli, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle’s oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process begi...

  10. Effects of peroxisomal catalase inhibition on mitochondrial function.

    OpenAIRE

    Paul eWalton

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle’s oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process be...

  11. Properties of catalase-peroxidase lacking its C-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Ruletha D.; Cook, Carma O.; Goodwin, Douglas C.

    2004-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases have a two-domain structure. The N-terminal domain contains the bifunctional active site, but the function of the C-terminal domain is unknown. We produced catalase-peroxidase containing only its N-terminal domain (KatG Nterm ). Removal of the C-terminal domain did not result in unexpected changes in secondary structure as evaluated by CD, but KatG Nterm had neither catalase nor peroxidase activity. Partial recovery of both activities was achieved by incubating KatG Nterm with the separately expressed and isolated KatG C-terminal domain. Spectroscopic measurements revealed a shift in heme environment from a mixture of high-spin species (wtKatG) to exclusively hexacoordinate, low-spin (KatG Nterm ). Moreover, a >1000-fold lower k on for CN - binding was observed for KatG Nterm . EPR spectra for KatG Nterm and the results of site-specific substitution of active site histidines suggested that the distal histidine was the sixth ligand. Thus, one important role for the C-terminal domain may be to support the architecture of the active site, preventing heme ligation by this catalytically essential residue

  12. Physical activity in schizophrenia is higher in the first episode than in subsequent ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eWalther

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is frequently associated with abnormal motor behavior, particularly hypokinesia. The course of the illness tends to deteriorate in the first years. We aimed to assess gross motor activity in patients with a first episode (n = 33 and multiple episodes (n = 115 of schizophrenia spectrum disorders using wrist actigraphy. First episode patients were younger, had higher motor activity and reduced negative symptom severity. Covarying for age, chlorpromazine equivalents and negative symptoms, first episode patients still had higher motor activity. This was also true after excluding patients with schizophreniform disorder from the analyses. In first episode patients but not in patients with multiple episodes, motor activity was correlated with antipsychotic dosage. In conclusion, after controlling for variables related to disorder chronicity, patients with first episodes were still more active than patients with multiple episodes. Thus, reduced motor activity is a marker of deterioration in the course of schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

  13. Recurrent activity in higher order, modality non-specific brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Hans Olav Christensen; Joensson, Morten; Biermann-Ruben, Katja

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that the workings of the brain are mainly intrinsically generated recurrent neuronal activity, with sensory inputs as modifiers of such activity in both sensory and higher order modality non-specific regions. This is supported by the demonstration of recurrent neuronal activity...... in the visual system as a response to visual stimulation. In contrast recurrent activity has never been demonstrated before in higher order modality non-specific regions. Using magneto-encephalography and Granger causality analysis, we tested in a paralimbic network the hypothesis that stimulation may enhance...... causal recurrent interaction between higher-order, modality non-specific regions. The network includes anterior cingulate/medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate/medial parietal cortices together with pulvinar thalami, a network known to be effective in autobiographic memory retrieval and self...

  14. SCIENTIFIC AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION: THE ESSENCE AND INTERACTION OF THE COMPONENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Meniailo, Viktorija

    2017-01-01

    One of the main directions of state policy in education is the development of scientific and innovation activities at institutions of higher education. It imposes on them additional features related to the inclusion of scientific activities in universities united innovative process for the creating and practical application of new knowledge. The purpose of the article is to establish the relationship between scientific and innovation activities and clarify the essence of scientific and innova...

  15. Pseudomonas syringae Catalases Are Collectively Required for Plant Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; Block, Anna; Bryan, Crystal D.; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 must detoxify plant-produced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in order to survive in its host plant. Candidate enzymes for this detoxification include the monofunctional catalases KatB and KatE and the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase KatG of DC3000. This study shows that KatG is the major housekeeping catalase of DC3000 and provides protection against menadione-generated endogenous H2O2. In contrast, KatB rapidly and substantially accumulates in response to exogenous H2O2. Furthermore, KatB and KatG have nonredundant roles in detoxifying exogenous H2O2 and are required for full virulence of DC3000 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Therefore, the nonredundant ability of KatB and KatG to detoxify plant-produced H2O2 is essential for the bacteria to survive in plants. Indeed, a DC3000 catalase triple mutant is severely compromised in its ability to grow in planta, and its growth can be partially rescued by the expression of katB, katE, or katG. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that although KatB and KatG are the major catalases involved in the virulence of DC3000, KatE can also provide some protection in planta. Thus, our results indicate that these catalases are virulence factors for DC3000 and are collectively required for pathogenesis. PMID:22797762

  16. [The catalase inhibitor aminotriazole alleviates acute alcoholic liver injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Qing; Ge, Pu; Dai, Jie; Liang, Tian-Cai; Yang, Qing; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Li

    2015-02-25

    In this study, the effects of catalase (CAT) inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) on alcohol-induced acute liver injury were investigated to explore the potential roles of CAT in alcoholic liver injury. Acute liver injury was induced by intraperitoneal injection of alcohol in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, and various doses of ATZ (100-400 mg/kg) or vehicle were administered intraperitoneally at 30 min before alcohol exposure. After 24 h of alcohol exposure, the levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in plasma were determined. The degree of hepatic histopathological abnormality was observed by HE staining. The activity of hepatic CAT, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in liver tissue were measured by corresponding kits. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma were determined by ELISA method. The results showed that treatment with ATZ dose-dependently suppressed the elevation of ALT, AST and LDH levels induced by alcohol exposure, and that ATZ alleviated alcohol-induced histopathological alterations. Furthermore, ATZ inhibited the activity of CAT, reduced hepatic levels of H₂O₂and MDA in alcohol exposed rats. ATZ also decreased the levels of plasma TNF-α and IL-6 in rats with alcohol exposure. These results indicated that ATZ attenuated alcohol-induced acute liver injury in rats, suggesting that CAT might play important pathological roles in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury.

  17. Three-dimensional structure of the enzyme dimanganese catalase from thermus thermophilus at 1 A resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonyuk, S.V.; Melik-Adamyan, V.R.; Popov, A.N.; Lamzin, V.S.; Hempstead, P.D.; Harrison, P.M.; Artymyuk, P.J.; Barynin, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structures of two forms of the enzyme dimanganese catalase from Thermus Thermophilus (native and inhibited by chloride) were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis at 1.05 and 0.98 A resolution, respectively. The atomic models of the molecules were refined to the R factors 9.8 and 10%, respectively. The three-dimensional molecular structures are characterized in detail. The analysis of electron-density distributions in the active centers of the native and inhibited enzyme forms revealed that the most flexible side chains of the amino acid residues Lys162 and Glu36 exist in two interrelated conformations. This allowed us to obtain the structural data necessary for understanding the mechanism of enzymatic activity of the dimanganese catalase

  18. Post-irradiation repairing processes of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase from Hansenula Polymorpha yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postolache, Carmen; Postolache, Cristian; Dinu, Diana; Dinischiotu, Anca; Sahini, Victor Emanuel

    2002-01-01

    The post-irradiation repairing mechanisms of two Hansenula Polymorpha yeast enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, were studied. The kinetic parameters of the selected enzymes were investigated over one month since the moment of γ-irradiation with different doses in the presence of oxygen. Dose dependent decrease of initial reaction rates was noticed for both enzymes. Small variation of initial reaction rate was recorded for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase over one month, with a decreasing tendency. No significant electrophoretic changes of molecular forms of this enzyme were observed after irradiation. Continuous strong decrease of catalase activity was evident for the first 20 days after irradiation. Partial recovery process of the catalytic activity was revealed by this study. (authors)

  19. N-glycosylation-negative catalase: a useful tool for exploring the role of hydrogen peroxide in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lortz, S; Lenzen, S; Mehmeti, I

    2015-03-01

    Disulfide bond formation during protein folding of nascent proteins is associated with the generation of H2O2 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Approaches to quantifying H2O2 directly within the ER failed because of the oxidative environment in the ER lumen, and ER-specific catalase expression to detoxify high H2O2 concentrations resulted in an inactive protein owing to N-glycosylation. Therefore, the N-glycosylation motifs at asparagine-244 and -439 of the human catalase protein were deleted by site-directed mutagenesis. The ER-targeted expression of these variants revealed that the deletion of the N-glycosylation motif only at asparagine-244 (N244) was associated with the maintenance of full enzymatic activity in the ER. Expression of catalase N244 in the ER (ER-Catalase N244) was ER-specific and protected the cells significantly against exogenously added H2O2. With the expression of ER-Catalase N244, a highly effective H2O2 inactivation within the ER was achieved for the first time. Catalase has a high H2O2-inactivation capacity without the need of reducing cofactors, which might interfere with the ER redox homeostasis, and is not involved in protein folding. With these characteristics ER-Catalase N244 is an ideal tool to explore the impact of ER-generated H2O2 on the generation of disulfide bonds or to study the induction of ER-stress pathways through protein folding overload and accumulation of H2O2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiac-specific catalase overexpression rescues anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction: role of oxidative stress and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandadi, Machender R; Yu, Xuejun; Frankel, Arthur E; Ren, Jun

    2012-11-07

    Lethal and edema toxins secreted by Bacillus anthracis during anthrax infection were found to incite serious cardiovascular complications. However, the underlying mechanisms in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac anomalies remain unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of antioxidant enzyme catalase in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. Wild type (WT) and cardiac-specific catalase overexpression mice were challenged with lethal toxin (2 μg/g, intraperotineally (i.p.)). Cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties were assessed 18 h later using an IonOptix edge-detection system. Proteasome function was assessed using chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities. GFP-LC3 puncta and Western blot analysis were used to evaluate autophagy and protein ubiquitination. Lethal toxin exposure suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function (suppressed peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/re-lengthening, prolonged duration of shortening/re-lengthening, and impaired intracellular Ca(2+) handling), the effects of which were alleviated by catalase. In addition, lethal toxin triggered autophagy, mitochondrial and ubiquitin-proteasome defects, the effects of which were mitigated by catalase. Pretreatment of cardiomyocytes from catalase mice with the autophagy inducer rapamycin significantly attenuated or ablated catalase-offered protection against lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. On the other hand, the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA ablated or significantly attenuated lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Our results suggest that catalase is protective against anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) anomalies, possibly through regulation of autophagy and mitochondrial function.

  1. Cardiac-specific catalase overexpression rescues anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction: role of oxidative stress and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandadi Machender R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lethal and edema toxins secreted by Bacillus anthracis during anthrax infection were found to incite serious cardiovascular complications. However, the underlying mechanisms in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiac anomalies remain unknown. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of antioxidant enzyme catalase in anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. Methods Wild type (WT and cardiac-specific catalase overexpression mice were challenged with lethal toxin (2 μg/g, intraperotineally (i.p.. Cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties were assessed 18 h later using an IonOptix edge-detection system. Proteasome function was assessed using chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities. GFP-LC3 puncta and Western blot analysis were used to evaluate autophagy and protein ubiquitination. Results Lethal toxin exposure suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function (suppressed peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/re-lengthening, prolonged duration of shortening/re-lengthening, and impaired intracellular Ca2+ handling, the effects of which were alleviated by catalase. In addition, lethal toxin triggered autophagy, mitochondrial and ubiquitin-proteasome defects, the effects of which were mitigated by catalase. Pretreatment of cardiomyocytes from catalase mice with the autophagy inducer rapamycin significantly attenuated or ablated catalase-offered protection against lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. On the other hand, the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA ablated or significantly attenuated lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Conclusions Our results suggest that catalase is protective against anthrax lethal toxin-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ anomalies, possibly through regulation of autophagy and mitochondrial function.

  2. Unusual Growth Phase and Oxygen Tension Regulation of Oxidative Stress Protection Enzymes, Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase, in the Phytopathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    OpenAIRE

    Chamnongpol, S.; Mongkolsuk, S.; Vattanaviboon, P.; Fuangthong, M.

    1995-01-01

    The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase play major roles in protecting phytopathogenic bacteria from oxidative stress. In Xanthomonas species, these enzymes are regulated by both growth phase and oxygen tension. The highest enzyme levels were detected within 1 h of growth. Continued growth resulted in a decline of both enzyme activities. High oxygen tension was an inducing signal for both enzyme activities. An 80,000-Da monofunctional catalase and a manganese superoxide dismutase were t...

  3. On the mechanism of regulation of the catalase synthesis rate in the rat liver in the course of acute radiation disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komov, V.P.; Rakhmanina, T.F.

    1976-01-01

    A method has been proposed to determine the activity of factors that regulate the rate of catalase synthesis in the rat liver at the stage of translation. The analysis of certain normal and pathologic parameters of these factors suggests a possibility of interpreting more definitely the effect of radiation on the catalase synthesis. Marked changes have been found both in the structure and the activity of the given factors in the course of the development of radiation damage

  4. Central reinforcing effects of ethanol are blocked by catalase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhnikov, Michael E; Molina, Juan C; Spear, Norman E

    2007-11-01

    Recent studies have systematically indicated that newborn rats are highly sensitive to ethanol's positive reinforcing effects. Central administrations of ethanol (25-200mg %) associated with an olfactory conditioned stimulus (CS) promote subsequent conditioned approach to the CS as evaluated through the newborn's response to a surrogate nipple scented with the CS. It has been shown that ethanol's first metabolite, acetaldehyde, exerts significant reinforcing effects in the central nervous system. A significant amount of acetaldehyde is derived from ethanol metabolism via the catalase system. In newborn rats, catalase levels are particularly high in several brain structures. The present study tested the effect of catalase inhibition on central ethanol reinforcement. In the first experiment, pups experienced lemon odor either paired or unpaired with intracisternal (IC) administrations of 100mg% ethanol. Half of the animals corresponding to each learning condition were pretreated with IC administrations of either physiological saline or a catalase inhibitor (sodium-azide). Catalase inhibition completely suppressed ethanol reinforcement in paired groups without affecting responsiveness to the CS during conditioning or responding by unpaired control groups. A second experiment tested whether these effects were specific to ethanol reinforcement or due instead to general impairment in learning and expression capabilities. Central administration of an endogenous kappa opioid receptor agonist (dynorphin A-13) was used as an alternative source of reinforcement. Inhibition of the catalase system had no effect on the reinforcing properties of dynorphin. The present results support the hypothesis that ethanol metabolism regulated by the catalase system plays a critical role in determination of ethanol reinforcement in newborn rats.

  5. Biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) nanosphere encapsulating superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sushant; Singh, Abhay Narayan; Verma, Anil; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) nanosphere encapsulating superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were successfully synthesized using double emulsion (w/o/w) solvent evaporation technique. Characterization of the nanosphere using dynamic light scattering, field emission scanning electron microscope, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed a spherical-shaped nanosphere in a size range of 812 ± 64 nm with moderate protein encapsulation efficiency of 55.42 ± 3.7 % and high in vitro protein release. Human skin HaCat cells were used for analyzing antioxidative properties of SOD- and CAT-encapsulated PCL nanospheres. Oxidative stress condition in HaCat cells was optimized with exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 1 mM) as external stress factor and verified through reactive oxygen species (ROS) analysis using H2DCFDA dye. PCL nanosphere encapsulating SOD and CAT together indicated better antioxidative defense against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human skin HaCat cells in comparison to PCL encapsulating either SOD or CAT alone as well as against direct supplement of SOD and CAT protein solution. Increase in HaCat cells SOD and CAT activities after treatment hints toward uptake of PCL nanosphere into the human skin HaCat cells. The result signifies the role of PCL-encapsulating SOD and CAT nanosphere in alleviating oxidative stress.

  6. A Review on Direct Electrochemistry of Catalase for Electrochemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Periasamy Arun Prakash

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Catalase (CAT is a heme enzyme with a Fe(III/II prosthetic group at its redox centre. CAT is present in almost all aerobic living organisms, where it catalyzes the disproportionation of H2O2 into oxygen and water without forming free radicals. In order to study this catalytic mechanism in detail, the direct electrochemistry of CAT has been investigated at various modified electrode surfaces with and without nanomaterials. The results show that CAT immobilized on nanomaterial modified electrodes shows excellent catalytic activity, high sensitivity and the lowest detection limit for H2O2 determination. In the presence of nanomaterials, the direct electron transfer between the heme group of the enzyme and the electrode surface improved significantly. Moreover, the immobilized CAT is highly biocompatible and remains extremely stable within the nanomaterial matrices. This review discusses about the versatile approaches carried out in CAT immobilization for direct electrochemistry and electrochemical sensor development aimed as efficient H2O2 determination. The benefits of immobilizing CAT in nanomaterial matrices have also been highlighted.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a cold-adapted catalase from Vibrio salmonicida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riise, Ellen Kristin; Lorentzen, Marit Sjo; Helland, Ronny; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2005-01-01

    Monoclinic (P2 1 ) crystals of a His-tagged form of V. salmonicida catalase without cofactor diffract X-rays to 1.96 Å. Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) catalyses the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen. Recombinant Vibrio salmonicida catalase (VSC) possesses typical cold-adapted features, with higher catalytic efficiency, lower thermal stability and a lower temperature optimum than its mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis. Crystals of VSC were produced by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 98.15, b = 217.76, c = 99.28 Å, β = 110.48°. Data were collected to 1.96 Å and a molecular-replacement solution was found with eight molecules in the asymmetric unit

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a cold-adapted catalase from Vibrio salmonicida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riise, Ellen Kristin [The Norwegian Structural Biology Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Lorentzen, Marit Sjo [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Institute of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Helland, Ronny [The Norwegian Structural Biology Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Willassen, Nils Peder, E-mail: nilspw@fagmed.uit.no [The Norwegian Structural Biology Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Institute of Medical Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)

    2006-01-01

    Monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) crystals of a His-tagged form of V. salmonicida catalase without cofactor diffract X-rays to 1.96 Å. Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) catalyses the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen. Recombinant Vibrio salmonicida catalase (VSC) possesses typical cold-adapted features, with higher catalytic efficiency, lower thermal stability and a lower temperature optimum than its mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis. Crystals of VSC were produced by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.15, b = 217.76, c = 99.28 Å, β = 110.48°. Data were collected to 1.96 Å and a molecular-replacement solution was found with eight molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  9. Imparting functionality to biocatalysts via embedding enzymes into nanoporous materials by a de novo approach: size-selective sheltering of catalase in metal-organic framework microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Fa-Kuen; Wang, Shao-Chun; Yen, Chia-I; Wu, Chang-Cheng; Dutta, Saikat; Chou, Lien-Yang; Morabito, Joseph V; Hu, Pan; Hsu, Ming-Hua; Wu, Kevin C-W; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2015-04-08

    We develop a new concept to impart new functions to biocatalysts by combining enzymes and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The proof-of-concept design is demonstrated by embedding catalase molecules into uniformly sized ZIF-90 crystals via a de novo approach. We have carried out electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, electrophoresis, thermogravimetric analysis, and confocal microscopy to confirm that the ~10 nm catalase molecules are embedded in 2 μm single-crystalline ZIF-90 crystals with ~5 wt % loading. Because catalase is immobilized and sheltered by the ZIF-90 crystals, the composites show activity in hydrogen peroxide degradation even in the presence of protease proteinase K.

  10. Insight into the role of catalases in salt stress in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M'Hamdi M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate a possible link between catalase (CAT activity and salinity tolerance, an in vitro and in vivo study of the behavior of transgenic lines of potato (cv. ‘Désirée’ under salt stress conditions was carried out. Three groups of transgenic lines and non transformed control (DWT were used in this study: lines expressing a bacterial catalase gene and lines repressing catalase activity by either co-suppression or anti-sense strategies. Various concentrations of NaCl were tested: in vitro 0, 25, 50 and 75 mM and in vivo 25, 50 and 75 mM. The results of this work show that the genetic modification of CAT activity affects the multiplication rate of vitroplants, as well as vegetative and physiological growth parameters under salt stress conditions. At 25, 50 and 75 mM of NaCl, over-expression (line KatE16 and repression of CAT increased and reduced respectively the multiplication rate of vitroplants. Differences between the transgenic lines and the wild type were evident in tuber yield and leaf chlorophyll content. These parameters were significantly increased in CAT over-expressing and slightly decreased in SU3 line repressed in CAT under 25 mM of salt stress. A stability of the potential quantum yield (Fv/Fm was observed in the lines over-expressing the CAT at 25, 50 and 75 mM of NaCl. The repression of CAT was associated with a decrease of Fv/Fm value at 50 mM of NaCl. These results show that catalases contribute to salinity tolerance mechanisms in potato.

  11. Temperature dependent investigation on optically active process of higher-order bands in irradiated silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yi; Nanjing Univ., JS; Wu Fengmei; Nanjing Univ., JS; Zheng Youdou; Nanjing Univ., JS; Suezawa, M.; Imai, M.; Sumino, K.

    1996-01-01

    Optically active processes of the higher-order bands (HOB) are investigated at different temperatures in fast neutron irradiated silicon using Fourier transform infrared absorption measurement. It is shown that the optically active process is nearly temperature independent below 80 K, the slow decay process remains up to a heating temperature of 180 K. The observations are analyzed in terms of the relaxation behavior of photoexcited carriers governed by fast neutron radiation induced defect clusters. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of the Higher Education Active Community Fund Project in Bournemouth

    OpenAIRE

    Apostolakis, Christos

    2005-01-01

    This report evaluates the Higher Education Active Community Fund (HEACF) Project from its first year in September 2002 to May 2005.The principle objective of the study was to evaluate the implementation of the HEACF project, its impact and its capacity to achieve the aims during this time. Based on research evidence the HEACF project introduced a holistic and systematic way of organising and developing volunteer activity at Bournemouth University. In addition to this, the project provided an ...

  13. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth in mouse lung by repeated administration of polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase: quantitative analysis with firefly luciferase-expressing melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Umeyama, Yukari; Kobayashi, Yuki; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2004-11-15

    To develop a novel and effective approach to inhibit tumor metastasis based on controlled delivery of catalase, we first evaluated the characteristics of the disposition and proliferation of tumor cells. Then, we examined the effects of polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-catalase) on tumor metastasis. On the basis of the results obtained, PEG-catalase was repetitively administered to completely suppress the growth of tumor cells. Murine melanoma B16-BL6 cells were stably transfected with firefly luciferase gene to obtain B16-BL6/Luc cells. These cells were injected intravenously into syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. PEG-catalase was injected intravenously, and the effect was evaluated by measuring the luciferase activity as the indicator of the number of tumor cells. At 1 hour after injection of B16-BL6/Luc cells, 60 to 90% of the injected cells were recovered in the lung. The numbers decreased to 2 to 4% at 24 hours, then increased. An injection of PEG-catalase just before inoculation significantly reduced the number of tumor cells at 24 hours. Injection of PEG-catalase at 1 or 3 days after inoculation was also effective in reducing the cell numbers. Daily dosing of PEG-catalase greatly inhibited the proliferation and the number assayed at 14 days after inoculation was not significantly different from the minimal number observed at 1 day, suggesting that the growth had been markedly suppressed by the treatment. These findings indicate that sustained catalase activity in the blood circulation can prevent the multiple processes of tumor metastasis in the lung, which could lead to a state of tumor dormancy.

  14. Lower Serum Catalase Level is Associated with Preterm Labor among Pregnant Women at Sanglah Hospital Denpasar, Bali-Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Surya Negara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preterm labor is still become a serious health problem in Obstetric and Perinatology with no sensitive biomarker currently approved. Several studies show that decrease antioxidant activity may play significant role in preterm labor. However, only few studies had been conducted to evaluate blood catalase level in preterm labor and assess its role in preterm labor. Objective: The aim this study was to identify the differences of maternal serum catalase level in preterm labor compared with preterm pregnancy. Methods: An observational analytic cross sectional study was conducted from February to December 2014 using pregnant women with 28-36 weeks’ gestational age. Blood catalase level was evaluated by colorimetric method and the data was analyzed by SPPS for Windows 17.0 program. Results: 12 subjects were enrolled and divided into preterm and control group. No significant differences between mean age, gestational age, and parity between preterm and control group. However, blood catalase level was significantly lower in preterm group compared with control group (81.82 ± 20.38 vs 159.38 ± 35.79; p=0.001. Conclusion: Serum maternal catalase level were significantly lower in preterm labor compared with preterm normal pregnancy.

  15. Mechanism of inhibition of catalase by nitro and nitroso compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V Yu; Petrenko, Yu M; Vanin, A F

    2008-01-01

    Dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with thiolate ligands and S-nitrosothiols, which are NO and NO+ donors, share the earlier demonstrated ability of nitrite for inhibition of catalase. The efficiency of inhibition sharply (by several orders in concentration of these agents) increases in the presence of chloride, bromide, and thiocyanate. The nitro compounds tested--nitroarginine, nitroglycerol, nitrophenol, and furazolidone--gained the same inhibition ability after incubation with ferrous ions and thiols. This is probably the result of their transformation into DNIC. None of these substances lost the inhibitory effect in the presence of the well known NO scavenger oxyhemoglobin. This fact suggests that NO+ ions rather than neutral NO molecules are responsible for the enzyme inactivation due to nitrosation of its structures. The enhancement of catalase inhibition in the presence of halide ions and thiocyanate might be caused by nitrosyl halide formation. The latter protected nitrosonium ions against hydrolysis, thereby ensuring their transfer to the targets in enzyme molecules. The addition of oxyhemoglobin plus iron chelator o-phenanthroline destroying DNIC sharply attenuated the inhibitory effect of DNIC on catalase. o-Phenanthroline added alone did not influence this effect. Oxyhemoglobin is suggested to scavenge nitrosonium ions released from decomposing DNIC, thereby preventing catalase nitrosation. The mixture of oxyhemoglobin and o-phenanthroline did not affect the inhibitory action of nitrite or S-nitrosothiols on catalase.

  16. Collaborative learning in higher education : design, implementation and evaluation of group learning activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hei, de M.S.A.

    2016-01-01

    In higher education, group learning activities (GLAs) are frequently implemented in online, blended or face-to-face educational contexts. A major problem for the design and implementation of good quality GLAs that lead to the desired learning outcomes is that many approaches to GLAs have been

  17. Pavlov's Position on Old Age within the Framework of the Theory of Higher Nervous Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, George

    1995-01-01

    In later life, I. P. Pavlov incorporated his findings on aging into his theory of higher nervous activity. Some of the major findings showed that salivary conditioning and stimulus differentiation were difficult to establish in old dogs, but that conditioned reflexes established earlier in life persisted into old age. Pavlov hypothesized that…

  18. Molecular identification and characterisation of catalase and catalase-like protein genes in urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, T; Kuribayashi, T; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Yamamoto, S; Matsuda, Motoo

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic Campylobacter are important bacterial pathogens of foodborne diseases worldwide. These organisms' physiology requires a microaerophilic atmosphere. To date, little is known about the protective catalase mechanism in urease-positive thermophilic campylobacters (UPTC); hence, it was the aim of this study to identify and characterise catalase and catalase-like protein genes in these organisms. Catalase (katA) and catalase (Kat)-like protein genes from the Japanese UPTC CF89-12 strain were molecularly analysed and compared with C. lari RM2100 and other C. lari and thermophilic Campylobacter reference isolates. A possible open reading frame of 1,422 base pairs, predicted to encode a peptide of 474 amino acid residues, with calculated molecular weight of 52.7 kilo Daltons for katA, was identified within UPTC CF89-12. A probable ribosome binding site, two putative promoters and a putative ρ-independent transcription terminator were also identified within katA. A similar katA cluster also existed in the C. lari RM2100 strain, except that this strain carries no DcuB genes. However, the Kat-like protein gene or any other homologue(s) were never identified in the C. lari RM2100 strain, or in C. jejuni and C. upsaliensis. This study demonstrates the presence of catalase/catalase-like protein genes in UPTC organisms. These findings are significant in that they suggest that UPTC organisms have the protective genetic capability of helping protect the organisms from toxic oxygen stress, which may help them to survive in physiologically harsh environments, both within human and animal hosts, as well as in the natural environment.

  19. Catalase-Negative Staphylococcus lugdunensis Strain with a Novel Point Mutation in the Catalase Gene Isolated from a Patient with Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yong; Wang, Yiping; Ling, Buzhi; Ke, Xianfu; Ying, Jianfei; Yu, Yanhong; He, Mingyang; Li, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the results of the sequence analysis of a methicillin-susceptible strain of catalase-negative Staphylococcus lugdunensis. Molecular characterization of the deduced sequence revealed a novel point mutation in the catalase gene. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a catalase-negative S. lugdunensis strain, although catalase-negative isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis have been previously reported.

  20. Nitric oxide and catalase-sensitive relaxation by scutellarin in the mouse thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weimin; Lust, Robert M; Bofferding, April; Wingard, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    The vascular activity of scutellarin (SCU), a flavonoid isolated from a Chinese traditional medicinal plant, was investigated in isolated thoracic aortic rings of mice. SCU-induced dose-dependent relaxation of phenylephrine (1 microM) stimulated contractions. This relaxation was reduced by endothelium removal, significantly reduced by both the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methylester, 300 microM) and slightly limited by the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (1 H-[1,2,4] oxidazolol [4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one, 100 microM). The catalase inhibitor (3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, 50 mM) augmented the constriction and blocked the lowest SCU concentration relaxation, whereas catalase addition was without effect. Preincubation with 300 and 1000 microM SCU significantly suppressed the contractile dose-response to phenylephrine, causing both a significant rise in half maximal effective concentration and a decrease in the maximal developed force. Western blot analysis showed that SCU inhibition of contraction was independent of reductions in myosin light chain phosphorylation. These results suggested that SCU relaxation was predominantly endothelium dependent and likely involved the catalase-sensitive nitric oxide synthase signaling pathway, without loss of myosin phosphorylation. The potential clinical use of SCU may prove to be effective in increasing vasoreactivity, independently of smooth muscle contractile activity that is mediated by the 20-kDa myosin light chain phosphorylation.

  1. Brazilian savanna fruits contain higher bioactive compounds content and higher antioxidant activity relative to the conventional red delicious apple.

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    Egle Machado de Almeida Siqueira

    Full Text Available The bioactive compounds content and the antioxidant activity (AA of twelve fruits native to the Cerrado were compared with the Red Delicious apple by means of the antiradical efficiency (using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil assay/DPPH, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and the β-carotene/linoleic system. The antiradical efficiency (AE and the kinetic parameters (Efficient concentration/EC50 and time needed to reach the steady state to EC50 concentration/TEC50 of the DPPH curve were also evaluated for comparison with the Trolox equivalent (TE values. A strong, significant and positive correlation was observed between the TE and AE values, whereas a weak and negative correlation was observed between TE and EC50, suggesting that the values of AE and TE are more useful for the determination of antiradical activity in fruits than the widely used EC50. The total phenolic content found in the fruits corresponded positively to their antioxidant activity. The high content of bioactive compounds (flavanols, anthocyanins or vitamin C relative to the apple values found in araticum, cagaita, cajuzinho, jurubeba, lobeira, magaba and tucum corresponded to the high antioxidant activity of these fruits. Flavanols and anthocyanins may be the main bioactive components in these Cerrado fruits. The daily consumption of at least seven of the twelve Cerrado fruits studied, particularly, araticum, cagaita, lobeira and tucum, may confer protection against oxidative stress, and thus, they may prevent chronic diseases and premature aging. The findings of this study should stimulate demand, consumption and cultivation of Cerrado fruits and result in sustainable development of the region where this biome dominates.

  2. Aging and Spaceflight: Catalase Targeted to Mitochondria Alters Skeletal Structure and Responses to Musculoskeletal Disuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Ruth K.; Tahimic, Candice; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie

    2018-01-01

    Microgravity and ionizing radiation in the spaceflight environment pose multiple challenges to homeostasis and may contribute to cellular stress. Effects may include increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA damage and repair error, cell cycle arrest, cell senescence or death. Our central hypothesis is that prolonged exposure to the spaceflight environment leads to excess production of ROS and oxidative damage, culminating in accelerated tissue degeneration which resembles aging. The main goal of this project is to determine the importance of cellular redox defense for physiological adaptations and tissue degeneration in the space environment. To accomplish this, we will use both wildtype (WT) mice and a well-established, genetically-engineered animal model (mCAT mice) which displays extended lifespan (Schriner et al. 2005). The animal model selected to test these ideas is engineered to quench ROS in mitochondria by targeted over-expression of the human catalase gene to the mitochondrial matrix. We showed previously that mCAT mice express the catalase transgene in skeletal tissues, bone forming osteoblasts, and bone resorbing osteoclasts. In addition, mCAT mice also display increased catalase activity in bone. Our findings revealed that exposure of adult, male, C57Bl/6J mice to simulated spaceflight (hindlimb unloading and gamma radiation) led to an increase in markers of oxidative damage (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenol) in skeletal tissue of WT mice but not mCAT mice. To extend our hypothesis to other, spaceflight-relevant tissues, we are performing a ground-based study simulating 30 days of spaceflight by hindlimb unloading to determine potential protective effects of mitochondrial catalase activity on aging of multiple tissues (cardiovascular, nervous and skeletal).

  3. The study of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase during in vitro regeneration of Argyrolobium roseum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Darima; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz; Zia, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the micropropagation protocol of Argyrolobium roseum (Camb.), an endangered herb exhibiting anti-diabetic and immune-suppressant properties, and antioxidant enzymes pattern is evaluated. Maximum callogenic response (60 %) was observed from leaf explant at 1.0 mg L(-1) 1-nephthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium using hypocotyl and root explants (48 % each). Addition of AgNO3 and PVP in the culture medium led to an increase in callogenic response up to 86 % from leaf explant and 72 % from hypocotyl and root explants. The best shooting response was observed in the presence of NAA, while maximum shoot length and number of shoots were achieved based on BA-supplemented MS medium. The regenerated shoots were rooted and successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions. Catalase and peroxidase enzymes showed ascending pattern during in vitro plant development from seed while ascorbate peroxidase showed descending pattern. Totally reverse response of these enzymes was observed during callus induction from three different explants. During shoot induction, catalase and peroxidase increased at high rate while there was a mild reduction in ascorbate peroxidase activity. Catalase and peroxidase continuously increased; on the other hand, ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased during root development and acclimatization states. The protocol described here can be employed for the mass propagation and genetic transformation of this rare herb. This study also highlights the importance and role of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase in the establishment of A. roseum in vitro culture through callogenesis and organogenesis.

  4. NAC selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity: A higher redox homeostasis threshold exists in cancer cells

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    Pengying Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity controls telomere length, and this plays an important role in stem cells, aging and tumors. Antioxidant was shown to protect telomerase activity in normal cells but inhibit that in cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism is elusive. Here we found that 7721 hepatoma cells held a higher redox homeostasis threshold than L02 normal liver cells which caused 7721 cells to have a higher demand for ROS; MnSOD over-expression in 7721 decreased endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS and inhibited telomerase activity; Akt phosphorylation inhibitor and NAC both inhibited 7721 telomerase activity. The over-elimination of ROS by NAC resulted in the inhibition of Akt pathway. Our results suggest that ROS is involved in the regulation of cancer telomerase activity through Akt pathway. The different intracellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant system in normal cells and tumor cells may be the cause of the opposite effect on telomerase activity in response to NAC treatment. Our results provide a theoretical base of using antioxidants selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity. Findings of the present study may provide insights into novel approaches for cancer treatment.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a bifunctional catalase-phenol oxidase from Scytalidium thermophilum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutay Kocabas, Didem; Pearson, Arwen R.; Phillips, Simon E. V.; Bakir, Ufuk; Ogel, Zumrut B.; McPherson, Michael J.; Trinh, Chi H.

    2009-01-01

    The bifunctional enzyme catalase-phenol oxidase from S. thermophilum was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in space group P2 1 and diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution. Catalase-phenol oxidase from Scytalidium thermophilum is a bifunctional enzyme: its major activity is the catalase-mediated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, but it also catalyzes phenol oxidation. To understand the structural basis of this dual functionality, the enzyme, which has been shown to be a tetramer in solution, has been purified by anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography and has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. Streak-seeding was used to obtain larger crystals suitable for X-ray analysis. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution at the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source. The crystals belonged to space group P2 1 and contained one tetramer per asymmetric unit

  6. Catalase in Leishmaniinae: With me or against me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeva, Natalya; Horáková, Eva; Kostygov, Alexei Y; Kořený, Luděk; Butenko, Anzhelika; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Lukeš, Julius

    2017-06-01

    The catalase gene is a virtually ubiquitous component of the eukaryotic genomes. It is also present in the monoxenous (i.e. parasitizing solely insects) trypanosomatids of the subfamily Leishmaniinae, which have acquired the enzyme by horizontal gene transfer from a bacterium. However, as shown here, the catalase gene was secondarily lost from the genomes of all Leishmania sequenced so far. Due to the potentially key regulatory role of hydrogen peroxide in the inter-stagial transformation of Leishmania spp., this loss seems to be a necessary prerequisite for the emergence of a complex life cycle of these important human pathogens. Hence, in this group of protists, the advantages of keeping catalase were uniquely outweighed by its disadvantages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metformin affects macrophages' phenotype and improves the activity of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and decreases malondialdehyde concentration in a partially AMPK-independent manner in LPS-stimulated human monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bułdak, Łukasz; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Bułdak, Rafał Jakub; Kozłowski, Michał; Machnik, Grzegorz; Liber, Sebastian; Suchy, Dariusz; Duława-Bułdak, Anna; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-06-01

    Diabetic patients experience accelerated atherosclerosis. Metformin is a cornerstone of the current therapy of type 2 diabetes. Macrophages are the key cells associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, our aim was to assess the in vitro effects of metformin on macrophages and its influence on the mechanisms involved in the development of atherosclerosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from the group including 16 age-matched healthy non-smoking volunteers aged 18-40 years. Monocytes were further incubated with metformin, LPS and compound C--a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK. The impact of metformin on oxidative stress markers, antioxidative properties, inflammatory cytokines and phenotypical markers of macrophages was studied. We showed that macrophages treated with metformin expressed less reactive oxygen species (ROS), which resulted from increased antioxidative potential. Furthermore, a reduction in inflammatory cytokines was observed. We also observed a phenotypic shift toward the alternative activation of macrophages that was induced by metformin. All the aforementioned results resulted from AMPK activation, but a residual activity of metformin after AMPK blockade was still noticeable even after inhibition of AMPK by compound C. Authors believe that metformin-based therapy, a cornerstone in diabetes therapy, not only improves the prognosis of diabetics by reducing blood glucose but also by reducing oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine production and the shift toward alternative activation of macrophages. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. The Purification and Characterization of Superoxide Dismutase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and the Effects of UV Radiation on the Activity of SOD and Catalase in Hydrothermal Mats of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Vanessa; Blankenship, Robert E.; Rothschild, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermotolerant anoxygenic green phototrophic bacterium that is prominent in alkaline hot springs at temperatures between 52 and 60 C. This species often grows in the hyperoxic environment beneath cyanobacterial mats at higher temperatures up to 70 - 72 C. Cf. aurantiacus is an evolutionarily important organism since it is in the earliest branch of the eubacteria that are capable of photosynthesis and many of its characteristics can be found in other diverse groups of phototrophic bacteria. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Catalase protects Aedes aegypti from oxidative stress and increases midgut infection prevalence of Dengue but not Zika.

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    José Henrique M Oliveira

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Digestion of blood in the midgut of Aedes aegypti results in the release of pro-oxidant molecules that can be toxic to the mosquito. We hypothesized that after a blood meal, the antioxidant capacity of the midgut is increased to protect cells against oxidative stress. Concomitantly, pathogens present in the blood ingested by mosquitoes, such as the arboviruses Dengue and Zika, also have to overcome the same oxidative challenge, and the antioxidant program induced by the insect is likely to influence infection status of the mosquito and its vectorial competence.We found that blood-induced catalase mRNA and activity in the midgut peaked 24 h after feeding and returned to basal levels after the completion of digestion. RNAi-mediated silencing of catalase (AAEL013407-RB reduced enzyme activity in the midgut epithelia, increased H2O2 leakage and decreased fecundity and lifespan when mosquitoes were fed H2O2. When infected with Dengue 4 and Zika virus, catalase-silenced mosquitoes showed no alteration in infection intensity (number of plaque forming units/midgut 7 days after the infectious meal. However, catalase knockdown reduced Dengue 4, but not Zika, infection prevalence (percent of infected midguts.Here, we showed that blood ingestion triggers an antioxidant response in the midgut through the induction of catalase. This protection facilitates the establishment of Dengue virus in the midgut. Importantly, this mechanism appears to be specific for Dengue because catalase silencing did not change Zika virus prevalence. In summary, our data suggest that redox balance in the midgut modulates mosquito vectorial competence to arboviral infections.

  10. Catalase protects Aedes aegypti from oxidative stress and increases midgut infection prevalence of Dengue but not Zika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, José Henrique M; Talyuli, Octávio A C; Goncalves, Renata L S; Paiva-Silva, Gabriela Oliveira; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique F; Alvarenga, Patricia Hessab; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2017-04-01

    Digestion of blood in the midgut of Aedes aegypti results in the release of pro-oxidant molecules that can be toxic to the mosquito. We hypothesized that after a blood meal, the antioxidant capacity of the midgut is increased to protect cells against oxidative stress. Concomitantly, pathogens present in the blood ingested by mosquitoes, such as the arboviruses Dengue and Zika, also have to overcome the same oxidative challenge, and the antioxidant program induced by the insect is likely to influence infection status of the mosquito and its vectorial competence. We found that blood-induced catalase mRNA and activity in the midgut peaked 24 h after feeding and returned to basal levels after the completion of digestion. RNAi-mediated silencing of catalase (AAEL013407-RB) reduced enzyme activity in the midgut epithelia, increased H2O2 leakage and decreased fecundity and lifespan when mosquitoes were fed H2O2. When infected with Dengue 4 and Zika virus, catalase-silenced mosquitoes showed no alteration in infection intensity (number of plaque forming units/midgut) 7 days after the infectious meal. However, catalase knockdown reduced Dengue 4, but not Zika, infection prevalence (percent of infected midguts). Here, we showed that blood ingestion triggers an antioxidant response in the midgut through the induction of catalase. This protection facilitates the establishment of Dengue virus in the midgut. Importantly, this mechanism appears to be specific for Dengue because catalase silencing did not change Zika virus prevalence. In summary, our data suggest that redox balance in the midgut modulates mosquito vectorial competence to arboviral infections.

  11. Self-Evaluation of the Scientific Activity of a Higher Educational Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayevnyeva Olena V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the problem of self-evaluation of the scientific activity of a higher educational institution (HEI as a component of its overall ranking evaluation. On the basis of a potentially effective approach to studying this problem, there proposed a system of indicators for evaluating the scientific activity of a HEI, which makes it possible to determine the potential of its scientific activity in terms of staff and resource provision, and the efficiency — in terms of quality of the training of scientific staff (students, graduate students, young scientists, etc., financial results of scientific activity and publication activity. To obtain an integral ranking score of the scientific activity of a HEI, the use of the taxonomic method is justified, the necessity of applying weight coefficients of the significance of primary indicators is determined. The approbation of the approach was carried out on the basis of the data of S. Kuznets KhNEU for the period of 2013-2016, which made it possible to obtain not only point estimates of the integral indicator of the scientific activity of an HEI but also determine the trends in its changes and identify their reasons. The proposed approach to the self-evaluation of the scientific activity of a HEI allows its administration to develop effective management solutions to increase the level of scientific activity of its scientific and pedagogical, and scientific staff, which will provide additional competitive advantages in the national and world educational space.

  12. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1’s heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification. PMID:25422453

  13. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-09

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification.

  14. The effect of alcohol and hydrogen peroxide on liver hepcidin gene expression in mice lacking antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase-1 or catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee; Lu, Sizhao

    2015-05-06

    This study investigates the regulation of hepcidin, the key iron-regulatory molecule, by alcohol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in glutathione peroxidase-1 (gpx-1(-/-)) and catalase (catalase(-/-)) knockout mice. For alcohol studies, 10% ethanol was administered in the drinking water for 7 days. Gpx-1(-/-) displayed significantly higher hepatic H2O2 levels than catalase(-/-) compared to wild-type mice, as measured by 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). The basal level of liver hepcidin expression was attenuated in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Alcohol increased H2O2 production in catalase(-/-) and wild-type, but not gpx-1(-/-), mice. Hepcidin expression was inhibited in alcohol-fed catalase(-/-) and wild-type mice. In contrast, alcohol elevated hepcidin expression in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Gpx-1(-/-) mice also displayed higher level of basal liver CHOP protein expression than catalase(-/-) mice. Alcohol induced CHOP and to a lesser extent GRP78/BiP expression, but not XBP1 splicing or binding of CREBH to hepcidin gene promoter, in gpx-1(-/-) mice. The up-regulation of hepatic ATF4 mRNA levels, which was observed in gpx-1(-/-) mice, was attenuated by alcohol. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that H2O2 inhibits hepcidin expression in vivo. Synergistic induction of CHOP by alcohol and H2O2, in the absence of gpx-1, stimulates liver hepcidin gene expression by ER stress independent of CREBH.

  15. Toward "stable-on-the-table" enzymes: improving key properties of catalase by covalent conjugation with poly(acrylic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Caterina M; Cole, Kyle S; Benson, Kyle R; Ward, Jessamyn R; Bassett, Kayla M; Zhang, Yiren; Zore, Omkar V; Stromer, Bobbi; Kasi, Rajeswari M; Kumar, Challa V

    2014-08-20

    Several key properties of catalase such as thermal stability, resistance to protease degradation, and resistance to ascorbate inhibition were improved, while retaining its structure and activity, by conjugation to poly(acrylic acid) (PAA, Mw 8000) via carbodiimide chemistry where the amine groups on the protein are appended to the carboxyl groups of the polymer. Catalase conjugation was examined at three different pH values (pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0) and at three distinct mole ratios (1:100, 1:500, and 1:1000) of catalase to PAA at each reaction pH. The corresponding products are labeled as Cat-PAA(x)-y, where x is the protein to polymer mole ratio and y is the pH used for the synthesis. The coupling reaction consumed about 60-70% of the primary amines on the catalase; all samples were completely water-soluble and formed nanogels, as evidenced by gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated substantial retention of protein secondary structure for all samples, which increased to 100% with increasing pH of the synthesis and polymer mole fraction. Soret CD bands of all samples indicated loss of ∼50% of band intensities, independent of the reaction pH. Catalytic activities of the conjugates increased with increasing synthesis pH, where 55-80% and 90-100% activity was retained for all samples synthesized at pH 5.0 and pH 7.0, respectively, and the Km or Vmax values of Cat-PAA(100)-7 did not differ significantly from those of the free enzyme. All conjugates synthesized at pH 7.0 were thermally stable even when heated to ∼85-90 °C, while native catalase denatured between 55 and 65 °C. All conjugates retained 40-90% of their original activities even after storing for 10 weeks at 8 °C, while unmodified catalase lost all of its activity within 2 weeks, under similar storage conditions. Interestingly, PAA surrounding catalase limited access to the enzyme from large molecules like proteases and significantly increased

  16. Studies to reveal the nature of interactions between catalase and curcumin using computational methods and optical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi Najjar, Fayezeh; Ghadari, Rahim; Yousefi, Reza; Safari, Naser; Sheikhhasani, Vahid; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin is an important antioxidant compound, and is widely reported as an effective component for reducing complications of many diseases. However, the detailed mechanisms of its activity remain poorly understood. We found that curcumin can significantly increase catalase activity of BLC (bovine liver catalase). The mechanism of curcumin action was investigated using a computational method. We suggested that curcumin may activate BLC by modifying the bottleneck of its narrow channel. The molecular dynamic simulation data showed that placing curcumin on the structure of enzyme can increase the size of the bottleneck in the narrow channel of BLC, and readily allow the access of substrate to the active site. Because of the increase of the distance between amino acids of the bottleneck in the presence of curcumin, the entrance space of substrate increased from 250Å 3 to 440Å 3 . In addition, the increase in emission of intrinsic fluorescence of BLC in presence of curcumin demonstrated changes in tertiary structure of catalase, and possibility of less quenching. We also used circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimetry to determine how curcumin may alter the enzyme secondary structure. Catalase spectra in the presence of various concentrations of curcumin showed an increase in the amount of α-helix content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers using catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungwoo; Park, Jeongju [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jinhan, E-mail: jinhan71@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-17

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach for the preparation of multilayers, based on catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (CAT-Au{sub NP}), allowing electrostatic charge reversal and structural transformation through pH adjustment. CAT-Au{sub NP}, which are synthesized directly from CAT stabilizer, can be electrostatically assembled with anionic and cationic PEs as a result of the charge reversal of the catalase stabilizers through pH control. In particular, at pH 5.2, near the pI of catalase, dispersed CAT-Au{sub NP} are structurally transformed into colloidal or network CAT-Au{sub NP} nanocomposites. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer assembled multilayers composed of PEs and CAT-Au{sub NP} induce an effective electron transfer between CAT and the electrode as well as a high loading of CAT and Au{sub NP}, and resultantly exhibit a highly catalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  18. Elucidating the interaction of clofazimine with bovine liver catalase; a comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular docking approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Masihuz; Nusrat, Saima; Zakariya, Syed Mohammad; Khan, Mohsin Vahid; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, understanding of interface between protein and drugs has become an active research area of interest. These types of interactions provide structural guidelines in drug design with greater clinical efficacy. Thus, structural changes in catalase induced by clofazimine were monitored by various biophysical techniques including UV-visible spectrometer, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and dynamic light scattering techniques. Increase in absorption spectra (UV-visible spectrum) confers the complex formation between drug and protein. Fluorescence quenching with a binding constants of 2.47 × 10 4  M -1 revealed that clofazimine binds with protein. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance (r) between the protein (donor) and drug (acceptor) was found to be 2.89 nm. Negative Gibbs free energy change (ΔG°) revealed that binding process is spontaneous. In addition, an increase in α-helicity was observed by far-UV circular dichroism spectra by adding clofazimine to protein. Dynamic light scattering results indicate that topology of bovine liver catalase was slightly altered in the presence of clofazimine. Hydrophobic interactions are the main forces between clofazimine and catalase interaction as depicted by molecular docking studies. Apart from hydrophobic interactions, some hydrogen bonding was also observed during docking method. The results obtained from the present study may establish abundant in optimizing the properties of ligand-protein mixtures relevant for numerous formulations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. On the role of catalase in the oxidation of tissue fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, D.; Masters, C.

    1984-01-01

    The role of catalase in lipid metabolism has been studied by means of a comparison of the turnover characteristics of the major lipid classes in the normal mouse with those of animals in which the catalase activity had been inhibited and blocked by aminotriazole and allylisopropylacetamide. Double isotope ratios were determined in the lipid fractions of several tissues following the injection of labeled glycerol, and a number of significant differences were identified between these treatments. Since catalase is recognized as an integral component of the peroxisomal pathway of fatty acid oxidation, these results may be taken as indicating that interruption of the process of peroxisomal beta-oxidation in this manner cause extensive perturbations of lipid metabolism in the living animal, and these perturbations extend well beyond those tissues where the predominant localization of these organelles occurs. The concept which derives from these data--that of a significant regulatory role of peroxisomes in relation to the overall balance of lipid metabolism in the animal body--is described and discussed

  20. Isolation and Purification of Heterotetrameric Catalase from a Desiccation Tolerant Cyanobacterium Lyngbya arboricola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor, Shivali

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The desiccation tolerant cyanobacterium Lyngbya arboricola, isolated from bark surfaces of Mangifera indica, possessed up to four stable isoforms of catalase in addition to other antioxidative enzymes, for several years under a dry state. Purification of the two most persistent isoforms of catalase (Cat has been undertaken by employing acetone precipitation, ethanol: chloroform treatment, gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The two isoforms of catalase remained almost unchanged on varying matric and osmotic hydration levels of mats of the cyanobacterium. The purification procedures resulted in a 1.3 % yield of purified single isoform (0.22 mg mL-1 protein with 709 Units mg-1 specific activity and a purity index of 0.83. Five millimolar of dithiothreitol (DTT was observed to be pertinent in maintaining the optimum redox state of the enzyme. The purification procedures additionally facilitated the simultaneous elimination and procurement of phycoerythrins (PE and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAA. Each purified isoform gave a single band (~45kDa upon SDS-PAGE and denaturing urea isoelectric focusing (IEF depicted the presence of 2 subunits each of CatA and CatB. The monoisotopic mass and pI value of CatA and CatB as revealed by LC-MS analysis and internal amino acid sequencing was 78.96, 5.89 and 80.77, 5.92, respectively, showing resemblance with CatA of Erysiphe graminis subs. hordei and CatB of Ajellomyces capsulata. The heterotetrameric monofunctional catalase (~320 kDa, due to its stability in the form of resistance to ethanol: chloroform, its thermoalkaliphilic nature and the presence of innumerable hydrophobic amino acid residues (~40%, thus exhibited its potential for biotechnological applications.

  1. Higher Physical Activity Is Associated With Lower Aortic Stiffness but Not With Central Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anne Sofie Dam; Hansen, Anne-Louise Smidt; Wiinberg, Niels

    2015-01-01

    .47; -0.03). Associations with central systolic blood pressure and central pulse pressure were not statistically significant. We observed no difference in central hemodynamics when substituting 1 hour sedentary behavior with 1 hour light or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. In this relatively...... was assessed by applanation tonometry, as aortic pulse wave velocity, and central blood pressure was estimated from radial waveforms. Associations between physical activity energy expenditure and central hemodynamics were examined by linear regression. Furthermore, the consequence of substituting 1 hour...... sedentary behavior with 1 hour light or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on central hemodynamics was examined. Median physical activity energy expenditure was 28.0 kJ/kg/d (IQR: 19.8; 38.7). A 10 kJ/kg/d higher energy expenditure was associated with 0.75% lower aortic pulse wave velocity (CI: -1...

  2. Using superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics to manipulate the redox environment of neural precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Giedzinski, E.; Baure, J.; Doctrow, S. R.; Rola, R.; Fike, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    Past work has shown that neural precursor cells are predisposed to redox sensitive changes, and that oxidative stress plays a critical role in the acute and persistent changes that occur within the irradiated CNS. Irradiation leads to a marked rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) that correlates with oxidative endpoints in vivo and reductions in neuro-genesis. To better understand the impact of oxidative stress on neural precursor cells, and to determine if radiation-induced oxidative damage and precursor cell loss after irradiation could be reduced, a series of antioxidant compounds (EUK-134, EUK-163, EUK-172, EUK-189) were tested, three of which possess both superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities and one (EUK-163) whose only significant activity is SOD. Our results show that these SOD/catalase mimetics apparently increase the oxidation of a ROS-sensitive fluorescent indicator dye, particularly after short (12 h) treatments, but that longer treatments (24 h) decrease oxidation attributable to radiation-induced ROS. Similarly, other studies found that cells incubated with CuZnSOD showed some increase in intracellular ROS levels. Subsequent data suggested that the dye-oxidising capabilities of the EUK compounds were linked to differences in their catalase activity and, most likely, their ability to catalyse per-oxidative pathways. In unirradiated mice, the EUK-134 analogue induced some decrease of proliferating precursor cells and immature neurons 48 h after radiation, an effect that may be attributable to cytotoxicity and/or inhibition of precursor proliferation. In irradiated mice, a single injection of EUK-134 was not found to be an effective radioprotector at acute times (48 h). The present results support continued development of our in vitro model as a tool for predicting certain in vivo responses, and suggest that in some biological systems the capability to scavenge superoxide but produce excess H 2 O 2 , as is known for CuZnSOD, may be

  3. [Catalase gene rs1001179 polymorphism and oxidative stress in patients with chronic hepatitis C and ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatova, I A; Tretyakova, Yu I; Shchekotov, V V; Shchekotova, A P; Ulitina, P V; Krivtsov, A V; Nenasheva, O Yu

    2015-01-01

    To study the rs1001179 polymorphism of the catalase (CAT) gene and to estimate the serum levels of the enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GP) in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and in those with ulcerative colitis (UC) in the Perm Territory. Ninety patients with reactivation-phase CHC and 50 patients with exacerbation-phase UC were examined. The serum levels of catalase and GP were determined and the polymorphic variants of the marker of CAT gene rs1001179 in the DNA isolated from whole blood were found in all the patients. In the CHC and UC groups, the levels of catalase and GP were found to be lower than that in apparently healthy individuals. Furthermore, both groups showed a direct correlation between the activities of the enzymes. In the patients with CHC and in those with UC, the spread of genotypes and alleles generally failed to virtually differ from that in the control group. The G/G genotype was prevalent in all the groups. In the patients with CHC, the minor A allele demonstrated a significant inverse correlation with the enzyme catalase (r = -0.16; p = 0.02) and GP (r = -0.13; p = 0.047). The lower serum levels of catalase and GP are indicative of oxidative stress in the patients with CHC or UC. In the patients with CHC, the significant correlation of the pathological rs1701179 A allele marker with the processes of synthesis of antioxidant enzymes may suggest that CAT gene polymorphism in the A/A homozygotes might affect the regulation mechanism involved in the antioxidant system in the liver.

  4. Arg354 in the catalytic centre of bovine liver catalase is protected from methylglyoxal-mediated glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckhuber, Christian Q

    2015-12-30

    In addition to controlled post-translational modifications proteins can be modified with highly reactive compounds. Usually this leads to a compromised functionality of the protein. Methylglyoxal is one of the most common agents that attack arginine residues. Methylglyoxal is also regarded as a pro-oxidant that affects cellular redox homeostasis by contributing to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Antioxidant enzymes like catalase are required to protect the cell from oxidative damage. These enzymes are also targets for methylglyoxal-mediated modification which could severely affect their catalytic activity in breaking down reactive oxygen species to less reactive or inert compounds. Here, bovine liver catalase was incubated with high levels of methylglyoxal to induce its glycation. This treatment did not lead to a pronounced reduction of enzymatic activity. Subsequently methylglyoxal-mediated arginine modifications (hydroimidazolone and dihydroxyimidazolidine) were quantitatively analysed by sensitive nano high performance liquid chromatography/electron spray ionisation/tandem mass spectrometry. Whereas several arginine residues displayed low to moderate levels of glycation (e.g., Arg93, Arg365, Arg444) Arg354 in the active centre of catalase was never found to be modified. Bovine liver catalase is able to tolerate very high levels of the modifying α-oxoaldehyde methylglyoxal so that its essential enzymatic function is not impaired.

  5. Improving catalase-based propelled motor endurance by enzyme encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmchen, Juliane; Baeza, Alejandro; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed.Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02459a

  6. Catalase in Leishmaniinae: With me or against me?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraeva, N.; Horáková, Eva; Kostygov, A.Y.; Kořený, Luděk; Butenko, A.; Yurchenko, V.; Lukeš, Julius

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, JUN (2017), s. 121-127 ISSN 1567-1348 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18699S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Catalase * Leishmania * Trypanosomatids * Gene loss Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 2.885, year: 2016

  7. Ecological restoration success is higher for natural regeneration than for active restoration in tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzeilles, Renato; Ferreira, Mariana S; Chazdon, Robin L; Lindenmayer, David B; Sansevero, Jerônimo B B; Monteiro, Lara; Iribarrem, Alvaro; Latawiec, Agnieszka E; Strassburg, Bernardo B N

    2017-11-01

    Is active restoration the best approach to achieve ecological restoration success (the return to a reference condition, that is, old-growth forest) when compared to natural regeneration in tropical forests? Our meta-analysis of 133 studies demonstrated that natural regeneration surpasses active restoration in achieving tropical forest restoration success for all three biodiversity groups (plants, birds, and invertebrates) and five measures of vegetation structure (cover, density, litter, biomass, and height) tested. Restoration success for biodiversity and vegetation structure was 34 to 56% and 19 to 56% higher in natural regeneration than in active restoration systems, respectively, after controlling for key biotic and abiotic factors (forest cover, precipitation, time elapsed since restoration started, and past disturbance). Biodiversity responses were based primarily on ecological metrics of abundance and species richness (74%), both of which take far less time to achieve restoration success than similarity and composition. This finding challenges the widely held notion that natural forest regeneration has limited conservation value and that active restoration should be the default ecological restoration strategy. The proposition that active restoration achieves greater restoration success than natural regeneration may have arisen because previous comparisons lacked controls for biotic and abiotic factors; we also did not find any difference between active restoration and natural regeneration outcomes for vegetation structure when we did not control for these factors. Future policy priorities should align the identified patterns of biophysical and ecological conditions where each or both restoration approaches are more successful, cost-effective, and compatible with socioeconomic incentives for tropical forest restoration.

  8. Developments in Transnational Research Collaborations: Evidence from U.S. Higher-education Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Koehn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In our knowledge-driven era, multiple and mutual benefits accrue from transnational research linkages. The article identifies important directions in transnational research collaborations involving U.S. universities revealed by key dimensions of 369 projects profiled on a U.S. higher-education association’s database. Project initiators, principal research fields, regional and country distributions, and the sources and amounts of funding for different types of transnational research activity are selected for analysis. The balanced total portfolio of reported current research projects by region suggests that U.S. university principal investigators increasingly recognize the value of collaborative knowledge generation in the Global South as well as in other OECD countries. The data also show concentrations in the distribution of transnational research projects by principal field of activity that could exacerbate intra-regional asymmetries. The multi-institutional data draw attention to the often unnoticed, but vital, role that higher-education institutions play in supporting transnational research endeavors that address issues of current and future global concern. The conclusion considers wider implications for higher-education involvement in transnational knowledge generation and calls for increased symmetry in collaborative research ventures.

  9. Clinical research in dermatology: resources and activities associated with a higher scientific productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Descalzo, Miguel A; García-Doval, Ignacio

    2018-03-06

    Clinical research papers and their derived metrics can be useful to assess the scientific production of medical and research centers. Diverse factors are probably associated to differences in scientific production. But there are scarce studies analyzing them. Resources are limited and have to be distributed efficiently. The objective of this study is to explore what resources and activities are potentially associated with a higher scientific productivity. A bibliometric study was performed to obtain information about scientific productivity. Papers included had to meet criteria to be considered clinical research in dermatology, additionally had to be published between the years 2005-2014, had to be included in Pubmed or Embase and had to include a Spanish center of dermatology as the correspondence address. Information about research resources and activities of the year 2015 was gathered by means of an online survey sent to the authors identified in the bibliometric study. The search strategy returned 8617 papers and only 1104 of them (12.81%) met the inclusion criteria. 63 out of 113 centers responded to the survey (55.75%). Factors associated with a higher scientific productivity were: the size of the resident program, the amount of time specifically dedicated to research, a lower clinical workload, and the number of clinical trials performed in the last year. We have demonstrated that some factors are associated with a higher scientific productivity. Residency program, more research staff, clinical workload redistribution and research motivation/initiatives are key strategies that could improve scientific productivity of a center.

  10. Higher exercise intensity delays postexercise recovery of impedance-derived cardiac sympathetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Scott; Jay, Ollie; Graham, Kenneth S; Davis, Glen M

    2017-08-01

    Systolic time intervals (STIs) provide noninvasive insights into cardiac sympathetic neural activity (cSNA). As the effect of exercise intensity on postexercise STI recovery is unclear, this study investigated the STI recovery profile after different exercise intensities. Eleven healthy males cycled for 8 min at 3 separate intensities: LOW (40%-45%), MOD (75%-80%), and HIGH (90%-95%) of heart-rate (HR) reserve. Bio-impedance cardiography was used to assess STIs - primarily pre-ejection period (PEP; inversely correlated with cSNA), as well as left ventricular ejection time (LVET) and PEP:LVET - during 10 min seated recovery immediately postexercise. Heart-rate variability (HRV), i.e., natural-logarithm of root mean square of successive differences (Ln-RMSSD), was calculated as an index of cardiac parasympathetic neural activity (cPNA). Higher preceding exercise intensity elicited a slower recovery of HR and Ln-RMSSD (p return to baseline by 10 min following any intensity (p ≤ 0.009). Recovery of STIs was also slower following higher intensity exercise (p ≤ 0.002). By 30 s postexercise, higher preceding intensity resulted in a lower PEP (98 ± 14 ms, 75 ± 6 ms, 66 ± 5 ms for LOW, MOD, and HIGH, respectively, p fashion. While exercise intensity must be considered, acute recovery may be a valuable period during which to concurrently monitor these noninvasive indices, to identify potentially abnormal cardiac autonomic responses.

  11. Higher Physical Activity is Associated with Increased Attentional Network Connectivity in the Healthy Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geon Ha Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential alterations in structural network properties related to physical activity (PA in healthy elderly. We recruited 76 elderly individuals with normal cognition from Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea. All participants underwent the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery and 3.0T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Participants were subdivided into quartiles according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire scores, which represents the amount of PA. Through graph theory based analyses, we compared global and local network topologies according to PA quartile. The higher PA group demonstrated better performance in speed processing compared to the lower PA group. Regional nodal strength also significantly increased in the higher PA group, which involved the bilateral middle frontal, bilateral inferior parietal, right medial orbitofrontal, right superior and middle temporal gyri. These results were further replicated when the highest and the lowest quartile groups were compared in terms of regional nodal strengths and local efficiency. Our findings that the regional nodal strengths associated with the attentional network were increased in the higher PA group suggest the preventive effects of PA on age-related cognitive decline, especially in attention.

  12. The higher level of complexity of K-Ras4B activation at the membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunbum; Banerjee, Avik; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Lu, Shaoyong; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Is nucleotide exchange sufficient to activate K-Ras4B? To signal, oncogenic rat sarcoma (Ras) anchors in the membrane and recruits effectors by exposing its effector lobe. With the use of NMR and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we observed that in solution, farnesylated guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP)-bound K-Ras4B is predominantly autoinhibited by its hypervariable region (HVR), whereas the GTP-bound state favors an activated, HVR-released state. On the anionic membrane, the catalytic domain adopts multiple orientations, including parallel (∼180°) and perpendicular (∼90°) alignments of the allosteric helices, with respect to the membrane surface direction. In the autoinhibited state, the HVR is sandwiched between the effector lobe and the membrane; in the active state, with membrane-anchored farnesyl and unrestrained HVR, the catalytic domain fluctuates reinlessly, exposing its effector-binding site. Dimerization and clustering can reduce the fluctuations. This achieves preorganized, productive conformations. Notably, we also observe HVR-autoinhibited K-Ras4B-GTP states, with GDP-bound-like orientations of the helices. Thus, we propose that the GDP/GTP exchange may not be sufficient for activation; instead, our results suggest that the GDP/GTP exchange, HVR sequestration, farnesyl insertion, and orientation/localization of the catalytic domain at the membrane conjointly determine the active or inactive state of K-Ras4B. Importantly, K-Ras4B-GTP can exist in active and inactive states; on its own, GTP binding may not compel K-Ras4B activation.—Jang, H., Banerjee, A., Chavan, T. S, Lu, S., Zhang, J., Gaponenko, V., Nussinov, R. The higher level of complexity of K-Ras4B activation at the membrane. PMID:26718888

  13. The higher level of complexity of K-Ras4B activation at the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunbum; Banerjee, Avik; Chavan, Tanmay S; Lu, Shaoyong; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    Is nucleotide exchange sufficient to activate K-Ras4B? To signal, oncogenic rat sarcoma (Ras) anchors in the membrane and recruits effectors by exposing its effector lobe. With the use of NMR and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we observed that in solution, farnesylated guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-bound K-Ras4B is predominantly autoinhibited by its hypervariable region (HVR), whereas the GTP-bound state favors an activated, HVR-released state. On the anionic membrane, the catalytic domain adopts multiple orientations, including parallel (∼180°) and perpendicular (∼90°) alignments of the allosteric helices, with respect to the membrane surface direction. In the autoinhibited state, the HVR is sandwiched between the effector lobe and the membrane; in the active state, with membrane-anchored farnesyl and unrestrained HVR, the catalytic domain fluctuates reinlessly, exposing its effector-binding site. Dimerization and clustering can reduce the fluctuations. This achieves preorganized, productive conformations. Notably, we also observe HVR-autoinhibited K-Ras4B-GTP states, with GDP-bound-like orientations of the helices. Thus, we propose that the GDP/GTP exchange may not be sufficient for activation; instead, our results suggest that the GDP/GTP exchange, HVR sequestration, farnesyl insertion, and orientation/localization of the catalytic domain at the membrane conjointly determine the active or inactive state of K-Ras4B. Importantly, K-Ras4B-GTP can exist in active and inactive states; on its own, GTP binding may not compel K-Ras4B activation.-Jang, H., Banerjee, A., Chavan, T. S, Lu, S., Zhang, J., Gaponenko, V., Nussinov, R. The higher level of complexity of K-Ras4B activation at the membrane. © FASEB.

  14. Enzymes extracted from apple peels have activity in reducing higher alcohols in Chinese liquors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qi'an; Shi, Junling; Zhu, Jing; Lv, Hongliang; Du, Shuangkui

    2014-10-01

    As the unavoidable byproducts of alcoholic fermentation, higher alcohols are unhealthy compounds widespread in alcoholic drinks. To investigate the activity of apple crude enzymes toward higher alcohols in liquors, five kinds of apple peels, namely, Fuji, Gala, Golden Delicious, Red Star, and Jonagold, were chosen to prepare enzymes, and three kinds of Chinese liquors, namely, Xifeng (containing 45% ethanol), Taibai (containing 50% ethanol), and Erguotou (containing 56% ethanol), were tested. Enzymes were prepared in the forms of liquid solution, powder, and immobilized enzymes using sodium alginate (SA) and chitosan. The treatment was carried out at 37 °C for 1 h. The relative amounts of different alcohols (including ethanol, 1-propanol, isobutanol, 1-butanol, isoamylol, and 1-hexanol) were measured using gas chromatography (GC). Conditions for preparing SA-immobilized Fuji enzymes (SA-IEP) were optimized, and the obtained SA-IEP (containing 0.3 g of enzyme) was continuously used to treat Xifeng liquor eight times, 20 mL per time. Significant degradation rates (DRs) of higher alcohols were observed at different degrees, and it also showed enzyme specificity according to the apple varieties and enzyme preparations. After five repeated treatments, the DRs of the optimized Fuji SA-IEP remained 70% for 1-hexanol and >15% for other higher alcohols.

  15. Optimisation of the Management of Higher Activity Waste in the UK - 13537

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Ciara; Buckley, Matthew [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    T