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Sample records for high-throughput neutralization assay

  1. A novel high-throughput vaccinia virus neutralization assay and preexisting immunity in populations from different geographic regions in China.

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    Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV neutralization assay that used the attenuated replication-competent VTT carrying the firefly luciferase gene of Photinus pyralis (rTV-Fluc was established and standardized for critical parameters that included the choice of cell line, viral infection dose, and the infection time. The current study evaluated the maintenance of virus-specific immunity after smallpox vaccination by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis of antiviral antibody-mediated immune responses in volunteers examined 30-55 years after vaccination. The rTV-Fluc neutralization assay was able to detect neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against Vaccinia virus without the ability to differentiate strains of Vaccinia virus. We showed that the neutralizing titers measured by our assay were similar to those obtained by the traditional plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT. Using this assay, we found a low prevalence of NAb to VTT (7.6% in individuals born before 1980 from Beijing and Anhui provinces in China, and when present, anti-VTT NAb titers were low. No NAbs were detected in all 222 samples from individuals born after 1980. There was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender, age range and geographic origin. CONCLUSION: A simplified, sensitive, standardized, reproducible, and high-throughput assay was developed for the quantitation of NAbs against different Vaccinia strains. The current study provides useful insights for the future development of VTT-based vaccination in

  2. A Novel High-Throughput Vaccinia Virus Neutralization Assay and Preexisting Immunity in Populations from Different Geographic Regions in China

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    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Nie, Jianhui; Zhu, Rong; Gao, Dongying; Song, Aijing; Meng, Shufang; Xu, Xuemei; Wang, Youchun

    2012-01-01

    Background Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT) resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. Methodology/Principal Findings A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV) neutralization assay that used the attenuated replication-competent VTT carrying the firefly luciferase gene of Photinus pyralis (rTV-Fluc) was established and standardized for critical parameters that included the choice of cell line, viral infection dose, and the infection time. The current study evaluated the maintenance of virus-specific immunity after smallpox vaccination by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis of antiviral antibody-mediated immune responses in volunteers examined 30–55 years after vaccination. The rTV-Fluc neutralization assay was able to detect neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against Vaccinia virus without the ability to differentiate strains of Vaccinia virus. We showed that the neutralizing titers measured by our assay were similar to those obtained by the traditional plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Using this assay, we found a low prevalence of NAb to VTT (7.6%) in individuals born before 1980 from Beijing and Anhui provinces in China, and when present, anti-VTT NAb titers were low. No NAbs were detected in all 222 samples from individuals born after 1980. There was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender, age range and geographic origin. Conclusion A simplified, sensitive, standardized, reproducible, and high-throughput assay was developed for the quantitation of NAbs against different Vaccinia strains. The current study provides useful insights for the future development of VTT-based vaccination in Beijing and Anhui

  3. A novel high-throughput vaccinia virus neutralization assay and preexisting immunity in populations from different geographic regions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Nie, Jianhui; Zhu, Rong; Gao, Dongying; Song, Aijing; Meng, Shufang; Xu, Xuemei; Wang, Youchun

    2012-01-01

    Pre-existing immunity to Vaccinia Tian Tan virus (VTT) resulting from a large vaccination campaign against smallpox prior to the early 1980s in China, has been a major issue for application of VTT-vector based vaccines. It is essential to establish a sensitive and high-throughput neutralization assay to understand the epidemiology of Vaccinia-specific immunity in current populations in China. A new anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV) neutralization assay that used the attenuated replication-competent VTT carrying the firefly luciferase gene of Photinus pyralis (rTV-Fluc) was established and standardized for critical parameters that included the choice of cell line, viral infection dose, and the infection time. The current study evaluated the maintenance of virus-specific immunity after smallpox vaccination by conducting a non-randomized, cross-sectional analysis of antiviral antibody-mediated immune responses in volunteers examined 30-55 years after vaccination. The rTV-Fluc neutralization assay was able to detect neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against Vaccinia virus without the ability to differentiate strains of Vaccinia virus. We showed that the neutralizing titers measured by our assay were similar to those obtained by the traditional plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Using this assay, we found a low prevalence of NAb to VTT (7.6%) in individuals born before 1980 from Beijing and Anhui provinces in China, and when present, anti-VTT NAb titers were low. No NAbs were detected in all 222 samples from individuals born after 1980. There was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender, age range and geographic origin. A simplified, sensitive, standardized, reproducible, and high-throughput assay was developed for the quantitation of NAbs against different Vaccinia strains. The current study provides useful insights for the future development of VTT-based vaccination in Beijing and Anhui provinces of China.

  4. High-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay for analysis of natural and vaccine-induced antibodies against human papillomaviruses.

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    Peter Sehr

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, automated, purely add-on, high-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (HT-PBNA with excellent repeatability and run-to-run reproducibility was developed for human papillomavirus types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 45, 52, 58 and bovine papillomavirus type 1. Preparation of 384 well assay plates with serially diluted sera and the actual cell-based assay are separated in time, therefore batches of up to one hundred assay plates can be processed sequentially. A mean coefficient of variation (CV of 13% was obtained for anti-HPV 16 and HPV 18 titers for a standard serum tested in a total of 58 repeats on individual plates in seven independent runs. Natural antibody response was analyzed in 35 sera from patients with HPV 16 DNA positive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ lesions. The new HT-PBNA is based on Gaussia luciferase with increased sensitivity compared to the previously described manual PBNA (manPBNA based on secreted alkaline phosphatase as reporter. Titers obtained with HT-PBNA were generally higher than titers obtained with the manPBNA. A good linear correlation (R(2 = 0.7 was found between HT-PBNA titers and anti-HPV 16 L1 antibody-levels determined by a Luminex bead-based GST-capture assay for these 35 sera and a Kappa-value of 0.72, with only 3 discordant sera in the low titer range. In addition to natural low titer antibody responses the high sensitivity of the HT-PBNA also allows detection of cross-neutralizing antibodies induced by commercial HPV L1-vaccines and experimental L2-vaccines. When analyzing the WHO international standards for HPV 16 and 18 we determined an analytical sensitivity of 0.864 and 1.105 mIU, respectively.

  5. Optimization of fixed-permeabilized cell monolayers for high throughput micro-neutralizing antibody assays: application to the zebrafish/viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (vhsv) model.

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    Chinchilla, Blanca; Encinas, Paloma; Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio; Gomez-Casado, Eduardo

    2013-11-01

    A new high throughput centrifugation-free method to estimate viral neutralizing antibody levels in low volumes and large numbers of plasma blood samples is described. Cell monolayers were, (i) plated on poly-d-Lys coated 96-wells, (ii) infected with viruses previously incubated with fish plasma containing antibodies, (iii) fixed with formaldehyde to increase cell recovery and avoid centrifugation steps, (iv) permeabilized with Saponin, (v) immunostained in the presence of Saponin by using a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to viral protein, (vi) digested with trypsin to detach cells from the monolayer, in the absence of Saponin to reduce damage of intracellular MAb-antigen complexes, and (vii) gated by flow cytometry using automatic 96-well batch analysis. The method was applied to the determination of plasma neutralizing antibodies from zebrafish (Danio rerio) surviving infections with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) (an important rhabdovirus of salmonids). This semi-automatic, rapid and practical assay detected anti-VHSV neutralizing antibodies in the plasma (∼3 μl per fish) of 95.1% of the zebrafish surviving VHSV infections. The fixed-permeabilized monolayer (FIXPERM) micro-neutralization method might help to analyze sera/plasma from small fish under standarized high throughput conditions.

  6. Second generation of pseudotype-based serum neutralization assay for Nipah virus antibodies: sensitive and high-throughput analysis utilizing secreted alkaline phosphatase.

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    Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Marsh, Glenn A; Barr, Jennifer A; Okutani, Akiko; Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Broder, Christopher C; Yamada, Akio; Inoue, Satoshi; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV), Paramyxoviridae, Henipavirus, is classified as a biosafety level (BSL) 4 pathogen, along with the closely related Hendra virus (HeV). A novel serum neutralization test was developed for measuring NiV neutralizing antibodies under BSL2 conditions using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and pseudotyped with NiV F/G proteins (VSV-NiV-SEAP). A unique characteristic of this novel assay is the ability to obtain neutralization titers by measuring SEAP activity in supernatant using a common ELISA plate reader. This confers a remarkable advantage over the first generation of NiV-pseudotypes expressing green fluorescent protein or luciferase, which require expensive and specific measuring equipment. Using panels of NiV- and HeV-specific sera from various species, the VSV-NiV-SEAP assay demonstrated neutralizing antibody status (positive/negative) consistent with that obtained by conventional live NiV test, and gave higher antibody titers than the latter. Additionally, when screening sixty-six fruit bat sera at one dilution, the VSV-NiV-SEAP assay produced identical results to the live NiV test and only required a very small amount (2μl) of sera. The results suggest that this novel VSV-NiV-SEAP assay is safe, useful for high-throughput screening of sera using an ELISA plate reader, and has high sensitivity and specificity.

  7. Comparison of two high-throughput assays for quantification of adenovirus type 5 neutralizing antibodies in a population of donors in China.

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    Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The presence of various levels of Adenovirus serotype 5 neutralizing antibodies (Ad5NAb is thought to contribute to the inconsistent clinical results obtained from vaccination and gene therapy studies. Currently, two platforms based on high-throughput technology are available for Ad5NAb quantification, chemiluminescence- and fluorescence-based assays. The aim of this study was to compare the results of two assays in the seroepidemiology of Ad5NAb in a local population of donors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The fluorescence-based neutralizing antibody detection test (FRNT using recombinant Ad5-EGFP virus and the chemiluminescence-based neutralizing antibody test (CLNT using Ad5-Fluc were developed and standardized for detecting the presence of Ad5NAb in serum samples from the population of donors in Beijing and Anhui provinces, China. First, the overall percentage of people positive for Ad5NAb performed by CLNT was higher than that obtained by FRNT (85.4 vs 69.9%, p<0.001. There was an 84.5% concordance between the two assays for the 206 samples tested (144 positive in both assays and 30 negative in both assays. All 32 discordant sera were CLNT-positive/FRNT-negative and were confirmed positive by western blot. Secondly, for all 144 sera positive by both assays, the two assays showed high correlation (r = 0.94, p<0.001 and close agreement (mean difference: 0.395 log(10, 95% CI: -0.054 log(10 to 0.845 log(10. Finally, it was found by both assays that there was no significant difference observed for titer or prevalence by gender (p = 0.503 vs 0.818, for two assays; however, age range (p = 0.049 vs 0.010 and geographic origin (p = 0.007 vs 0.011 were correlated with Ad5NAb prevalence in northern regions of China. CONCLUSION: The CLNT assay was relatively more simple and had higher sensitivity than the FRNT assay for determining Ad5NAb titers. It is strongly suggested that the CLNT assay be used for future

  8. Droplet microfluidics for high-throughput biological assays.

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    Guo, Mira T; Rotem, Assaf; Heyman, John A; Weitz, David A

    2012-06-21

    Droplet microfluidics offers significant advantages for performing high-throughput screens and sensitive assays. Droplets allow sample volumes to be significantly reduced, leading to concomitant reductions in cost. Manipulation and measurement at kilohertz speeds enable up to 10(8) samples to be screened in one day. Compartmentalization in droplets increases assay sensitivity by increasing the effective concentration of rare species and decreasing the time required to reach detection thresholds. Droplet microfluidics combines these powerful features to enable currently inaccessible high-throughput screening applications, including single-cell and single-molecule assays.

  9. Towards a high throughput droplet-based agglutination assay

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-10-22

    This work demonstrates the detection method for a high throughput droplet based agglutination assay system. Using simple hydrodynamic forces to mix and aggregate functionalized microbeads we avoid the need to use magnetic assistance or mixing structures. The concentration of our target molecules was estimated by agglutination strength, obtained through optical image analysis. Agglutination in droplets was performed with flow rates of 150 µl/min and occurred in under a minute, with potential to perform high-throughput measurements. The lowest target concentration detected in droplet microfluidics was 0.17 nM, which is three orders of magnitude more sensitive than a conventional card based agglutination assay.

  10. Spectrophotometric Enzyme Assays for High-Throughput Screening

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    Jean-Louis Reymond

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews high-throughput screening enzyme assays developed in our laboratory over the last ten years. These enzyme assays were initially developed for the purpose of discovering catalytic antibodies by screening cell culture supernatants, but have proved generally useful for testing enzyme activities. Examples include TLC-based screening using acridone-labeled substrates, fluorogenic assays based on the β-elimination of umbelliferone or nitrophenol, and indirect assays such as the back-titration method with adrenaline and the copper-calcein fluorescence assay for aminoacids.

  11. A system for performing high throughput assays of synaptic function.

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    Chris M Hempel

    Full Text Available Unbiased, high-throughput screening has proven invaluable for dissecting complex biological processes. Application of this general approach to synaptic function would have a major impact on neuroscience research and drug discovery. However, existing techniques for studying synaptic physiology are labor intensive and low-throughput. Here, we describe a new high-throughput technology for performing assays of synaptic function in primary neurons cultured in microtiter plates. We show that this system can perform 96 synaptic vesicle cycling assays in parallel with high sensitivity, precision, uniformity, and reproducibility and can detect modulators of presynaptic function. By screening libraries of pharmacologically defined compounds on rat forebrain cultures, we have used this system to identify novel effects of compounds on specific aspects of presynaptic function. As a system for unbiased compound as well as genomic screening, this technology has significant applications for basic neuroscience research and for the discovery of novel, mechanism-based treatments for central nervous system disorders.

  12. High throughput functional assays of the variant antigen PfEMP1 reveal a single domain in the 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum genome that binds ICAM1 with high affinity and is targeted by naturally acquired neutralizing antibodies.

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    Andrew V Oleinikov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind endothelial receptors to sequester in vascular beds, and binding to ICAM1 has been implicated in cerebral malaria. Binding to ICAM1 may be mediated by the variant surface antigen family PfEMP1: for example, 6 of 21 DBLbetaC2 domains from the IT4 strain PfEMP1 repertoire were shown to bind ICAM1, and the PfEMP1 containing these 6 domains are all classified as Group B or C type. In this study, we surveyed binding of ICAM1 to 16 DBLbetaC2 domains of the 3D7 strain PfEMP1 repertoire, using a high throughput Bioplex assay format. Only one DBL2betaC2 domain from the Group A PfEMP1 PF11_0521 showed strong specific binding. Among these 16 domains, DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 best preserved the residues previously identified as conserved in ICAM1-binding versus non-binding domains. Our analyses further highlighted the potential role of conserved residues within predominantly non-conserved flexible loops in adhesion, and, therefore, as targets for intervention. Our studies also suggest that the structural/functional DBLbetaC2 domain involved in ICAM1 binding includes about 80 amino acid residues upstream of the previously suggested DBLbetaC2 domain. DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 binding to ICAM1 was inhibited by immune sera from east Africa but not by control US sera. Neutralizing antibodies were uncommon in children but common in immune adults from east Africa. Inhibition of binding was much more efficient than reversal of binding, indicating a strong interaction between DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 and ICAM1. Our high throughput approach will significantly accelerate studies of PfEMP1 binding domains and protective antibody responses.

  13. A high-throughput chemically induced inflammation assay in zebrafish

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    Liebel Urban

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on innate immunity have benefited from the introduction of zebrafish as a model system. Transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocyte populations allow direct, quantitative visualization of an inflammatory response in vivo. It has been proposed that this animal model can be used for high-throughput screens aimed at the identification of novel immunomodulatory lead compounds. However, current assays require invasive manipulation of fish individually, thus preventing high-content screening. Results Here we show that specific, noninvasive damage to lateral line neuromast cells can induce a robust acute inflammatory response. Exposure of fish larvae to sublethal concentrations of copper sulfate selectively damages the sensory hair cell population inducing infiltration of leukocytes to neuromasts within 20 minutes. Inflammation can be assayed in real time using transgenic fish expressing fluorescent proteins in leukocytes or by histochemical assays in fixed larvae. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method for chemical and genetic screens to detect the effect of immunomodulatory compounds and mutations affecting the leukocyte response. Moreover, we transformed the assay into a high-throughput screening method by using a customized automated imaging and processing system that quantifies the magnitude of the inflammatory reaction. Conclusions This approach allows rapid screening of thousands of compounds or mutagenized zebrafish for effects on inflammation and enables the identification of novel players in the regulation of innate immunity and potential lead compounds toward new immunomodulatory therapies. We have called this method the chemically induced inflammation assay, or ChIn assay. See Commentary article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/148.

  14. High-throughput protein analysis integrating bioinformatics and experimental assays.

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    del Val, Coral; Mehrle, Alexander; Falkenhahn, Mechthild; Seiler, Markus; Glatting, Karl-Heinz; Poustka, Annemarie; Suhai, Sandor; Wiemann, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The wealth of transcript information that has been made publicly available in recent years requires the development of high-throughput functional genomics and proteomics approaches for its analysis. Such approaches need suitable data integration procedures and a high level of automation in order to gain maximum benefit from the results generated. We have designed an automatic pipeline to analyse annotated open reading frames (ORFs) stemming from full-length cDNAs produced mainly by the German cDNA Consortium. The ORFs are cloned into expression vectors for use in large-scale assays such as the determination of subcellular protein localization or kinase reaction specificity. Additionally, all identified ORFs undergo exhaustive bioinformatic analysis such as similarity searches, protein domain architecture determination and prediction of physicochemical characteristics and secondary structure, using a wide variety of bioinformatic methods in combination with the most up-to-date public databases (e.g. PRINTS, BLOCKS, INTERPRO, PROSITE SWISSPROT). Data from experimental results and from the bioinformatic analysis are integrated and stored in a relational database (MS SQL-Server), which makes it possible for researchers to find answers to biological questions easily, thereby speeding up the selection of targets for further analysis. The designed pipeline constitutes a new automatic approach to obtaining and administrating relevant biological data from high-throughput investigations of cDNAs in order to systematically identify and characterize novel genes, as well as to comprehensively describe the function of the encoded proteins.

  15. High-throughput DNA droplet assays using picoliter reactor volumes.

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    Srisa-Art, Monpichar; deMello, Andrew J; Edel, Joshua B

    2007-09-01

    The online characterization and detection of individual droplets at high speeds, low analyte concentrations, and perfect detection efficiencies is a significant challenge underpinning the application of microfluidic droplet reactors to high-throughput chemistry and biology. Herein, we describe the integration of confocal fluorescence spectroscopy as a high-efficiency detection method for droplet-based microfluidics. Issues such as surface contamination, rapid mixing, and rapid detection, as well as low detections limits have been addressed with the approach described when compared to conventional laminar flow-based fluidics. Using such a system, droplet size, droplet shape, droplet formation frequencies, and droplet compositions can be measured accurately and precisely at kilohertz frequencies. Taking advantage of this approach, we demonstrate a high-throughput biological assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). By attaching a FRET donor (Alexa Fluor 488) to streptavidin and labeling a FRET acceptor (Alexa Fluor 647) on one DNA strand and biotin on the complementary strand, donor and acceptor molecules are brought in proximity due to streptavidin-biotin binding, resulting in FRET. Fluorescence bursts of the donor and acceptor from each droplet can be monitored simultaneously using separate avalanche photodiode detectors operating in single photon counting mode. Binding assays were investigated and compared between fixed streptavidin and DNA concentrations. Binding curves fit perfectly to Hill-Waud models, and the binding ratio between streptavidin and biotin was evaluated and found to be in agreement with the biotin binding sites on streptavidin. FRET efficiency for this FRET pair was also investigated from the binding results. Efficiency results show that this detection system can precisely measure FRET even at low FRET efficiencies.

  16. High-throughput comet assay using 96 minigels.

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    Gutzkow, Kristine B; Langleite, Torgrim M; Meier, Silja; Graupner, Anne; Collins, Andrew R; Brunborg, Gunnar

    2013-05-01

    The single-cell gel electrophoresis--the comet assay--has proved to be a sensitive and relatively simple method that is much used in research for the analysis of specific types of DNA damage, and its use in genotoxicity testing is increasing. The efficiency of the comet assay, in terms of number of samples processed per experiment, has been rather poor, and both research and toxicological testing should profit from an increased throughput. We have designed and validated a format involving 96 agarose minigels supported by a hydrophilic polyester film. Using simple technology, hundreds of samples may be processed in one experiment by one person, with less time needed for processing, less use of chemicals and requiring fewer cells per sample. Controlled electrophoresis, including circulation of the electrophoresis solution, improves the homogeneity between replicate samples in the 96-minigel format. The high-throughput method described in this paper should greatly increase the overall capacity, versatility and robustness of the comet assay.

  17. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2015-12-14

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  18. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

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    Othman Soufan

    Full Text Available High-throughput screening (HTS experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  19. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays.

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    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare.

  20. High throughput comet assay to study genotoxicity of nanomaterials

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    Naouale El Yamani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The unique physicochemical properties of engineered nanomaterials (NMs have accelerated their use in diverse industrial and domestic products. Although their presence in consumer products represents a major concern for public health safety, their potential impact on human health is poorly understood. There is therefore an urgent need to clarify the toxic effects of NMs and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. In view of the large number of NMs currently being used, high throughput (HTP screening technologies are clearly needed for efficient assessment of toxicity. The comet assay is the most used method in nanogenotoxicity studies and has great potential for increasing throughput as it is fast, versatile and robust; simple technical modifications of the assay make it possible to test many compounds (NMs in a single experiment. The standard gel of 70-100 μL contains thousands of cells, of which only a tiny fraction are actually scored. Reducing the gel to a volume of 5 μL, with just a few hundred cells, allows twelve gels to be set on a standard slide, or 96 as a standard 8x12 array. For the 12 gel format, standard slides precoated with agarose are placed on a metal template and gels are set on the positions marked on the template. The HTP comet assay, incorporating digestion of DNA with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG to detect oxidised purines, has recently been applied to study the potential induction of genotoxicity by NMs via reactive oxygen. In the NanoTEST project we investigated the genotoxic potential of several well-characterized metal and polymeric nanoparticles with the comet assay. All in vitro studies were harmonized; i.e. NMs were from the same batch, and identical dispersion protocols, exposure time, concentration range, culture conditions, and time-courses were used. As a kidney model, Cos-1 fibroblast-like kidney cells were treated with different concentrations of iron oxide NMs, and cells embedded in minigels (12

  1. High throughput RNAi assay optimization using adherent cell cytometry

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    Pradhan Leena

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background siRNA technology is a promising tool for gene therapy of vascular disease. Due to the multitude of reagents and cell types, RNAi experiment optimization can be time-consuming. In this study adherent cell cytometry was used to rapidly optimize siRNA transfection in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (AoSMC. Methods AoSMC were seeded at a density of 3000-8000 cells/well of a 96well plate. 24 hours later AoSMC were transfected with either non-targeting unlabeled siRNA (50 nM, or non-targeting labeled siRNA, siGLO Red (5 or 50 nM using no transfection reagent, HiPerfect or Lipofectamine RNAiMax. For counting cells, Hoechst nuclei stain or Cell Tracker green were used. For data analysis an adherent cell cytometer, Celigo® was used. Data was normalized to the transfection reagent alone group and expressed as red pixel count/cell. Results After 24 hours, none of the transfection conditions led to cell loss. Red fluorescence counts were normalized to the AoSMC count. RNAiMax was more potent compared to HiPerfect or no transfection reagent at 5 nM siGLO Red (4.12 +/-1.04 vs. 0.70 +/-0.26 vs. 0.15 +/-0.13 red pixel/cell and 50 nM siGLO Red (6.49 +/-1.81 vs. 2.52 +/-0.67 vs. 0.34 +/-0.19. Fluorescence expression results supported gene knockdown achieved by using MARCKS targeting siRNA in AoSMCs. Conclusion This study underscores that RNAi delivery depends heavily on the choice of delivery method. Adherent cell cytometry can be used as a high throughput-screening tool for the optimization of RNAi assays. This technology can accelerate in vitro cell assays and thus save costs.

  2. High-throughput Saccharification assay for lignocellulosic materials.

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    Gomez, Leonardo D; Whitehead, Caragh; Roberts, Philip; McQueen-Mason, Simon J

    2011-07-03

    Polysaccharides that make up plant lignocellulosic biomass can be broken down to produce a range of sugars that subsequently can be used in establishing a biorefinery. These raw materials would constitute a new industrial platform, which is both sustainable and carbon neutral, to replace the current dependency on fossil fuel. The recalcitrance to deconstruction observed in lignocellulosic materials is produced by several intrinsic properties of plant cell walls. Crystalline cellulose is embedded in matrix polysaccharides such as xylans and arabinoxylans, and the whole structure is encased by the phenolic polymer lignin, that is also difficult to digest (1). In order to improve the digestibility of plant materials we need to discover the main bottlenecks for the saccharification of cell walls and also screen mutant and breeding populations to evaluate the variability in saccharification (2). These tasks require a high throughput approach and here we present an analytical platform that can perform saccharification analysis in a 96-well plate format. This platform has been developed to allow the screening of lignocellulose digestibility of large populations from varied plant species. We have scaled down the reaction volumes for gentle pretreatment, partial enzymatic hydrolysis and sugar determination, to allow large numbers to be assessed rapidly in an automated system. This automated platform works with milligram amounts of biomass, performing ball milling under controlled conditions to reduce the plant materials to a standardised particle size in a reproducible manner. Once the samples are ground, the automated formatting robot dispenses specified and recorded amounts of material into the corresponding wells of 96 deep well plate (Figure 1). Normally, we dispense the same material into 4 wells to have 4 replicates for analysis. Once the plates are filled with the plant material in the desired layout, they are manually moved to a liquid handling station (Figure 2

  3. Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays DE DeGroot, RS Thomas, and SO SimmonsNational Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC USAThe EPA’s ToxCast program utilizes a wide variety of high-throughput s...

  4. A High-Throughput MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry-Based Assay of Chitinase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    A high-throughput MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric assay is described for assay of chitolytic enzyme activity. The assay uses unmodified chitin oligosaccharide substrates, and is readily achievable on a microliter scale (2 µL total volume, containing 2 µg of substrate and 1 ng of protein). The speed a...

  5. Development of an Easy and High-Throughput Cell Assay System with a Culture Chip and an Assay Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kanako; Kaji, Noritada; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tokeshi, Manabu; Baba, Yoshinobu

    High throughput cell assay is significantly important in drug screening, assessment of toxicity etc. Cell assay with a microchip is one of the candidates for high throughput cell assay. However, reported cell assay system with the microchip requires expensive apparatus for refluxing medium and investigation of optimum experimental condition for steady data. For an inexpensive, easy and high throughput cell assay, we introduce a new cell assay system combined with a culture chip and an assay chip made of poly(dimethyl siloxane). Cell culture chips enabled cell to proliferate along the microchannel without refluxing medium and permitted to prepare cell patterning easily. Also, assay chips formed concentration gradient inside the chip and allowed the cell assay with different concentrations of drug at the same time. Thus, our developed cell assay system can overcome the problems of the present cell assay and would promote the drug discovery, assessment of toxicity etc.

  6. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal.

  7. Development of a high-throughput replicon assay for the identification of respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong-Yip, Choi-Lai; Plant, Helen; Sharpe, Paul; Fan, Jun; Rich, Kirsty; Gorseth, Elise; Yu, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) drug discovery has been hindered by the lack of good chemistry starting points and would benefit from robust and convenient assays for high-throughput screening (HTS). In this paper, we present the development and optimization of a 384-well RSV replicon assay that enabled HTS for RSV replication inhibitors with a low bio-containment requirement. The established replicon assay was successfully implemented for high-throughput screening. A validation screen was performed which demonstrated high assay performance and reproducibility. Assay quality was further confirmed via demonstration of appropriate pharmacology for different classes of RSV replication tool inhibitors. RSV replicon and cytotoxicity assays were further developed into a multiplexed format that measured both inhibition of viral replication and cytotoxicity from the same well. This provided a time and cost efficient approach to support lead optimization. In summary, we have developed a robust RSV replicon assay to help expedite the discovery of novel RSV therapeutics.

  8. High-throughput screening of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes using novel insoluble chromogenic substrate assay kits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schückel, Julia; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Willats, William George Tycho

    2016-01-01

    for this is that advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatics tools allow for rapid identification of candidate CAZymes, but technology for determining an enzyme's biochemical characteristics has advanced more slowly. To address this technology gap, a novel high-throughput assay...

  9. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human ATAD5 is an excellent biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATADS protein levels increase post-transcriptionally following exposure to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Here we report a novel quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-Iuciferase assay that can moni...

  10. Considerations for the design and reporting of enzyme assays in high-throughput screening applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Acker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the key steps and methods which are used to develop enzyme assays suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS applications. The goals of HTS enzyme assays are defined relative to lower-throughput bench top assays and important aspects which go into constructing robust and sensitive enzyme assays are described. Methods that have been applied to common enzyme classes are reviewed and pitfalls related to assay artifacts are discussed. We also suggest a reporting format to describe the steps in HTS enzyme assays.

  11. Monitoring Genomic Sequences during SELEX Using High-Throughput Sequencing: Neutral SELEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Doris; Lorenz, Christina; Schroeder, Renée

    2010-01-01

    Background SELEX is a well established in vitro selection tool to analyze the structure of ligand-binding nucleic acid sequences called aptamers. Genomic SELEX transforms SELEX into a tool to discover novel, genomically encoded RNA or DNA sequences binding a ligand of interest, called genomic aptamers. Concerns have been raised regarding requirements imposed on RNA sequences undergoing SELEX selection. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate SELEX and assess the extent of these effects, we designed and performed a Neutral SELEX experiment omitting the selection step, such that the sequences are under the sole selective pressure of SELEX's amplification steps. Using high-throughput sequencing, we obtained thousands of full-length sequences from the initial genomic library and the pools after each of the 10 rounds of Neutral SELEX. We compared these to sequences obtained from a Genomic SELEX experiment deriving from the same initial library, but screening for RNAs binding with high affinity to the E. coli regulator protein Hfq. With each round of Neutral SELEX, sequences became less stable and changed in nucleotide content, but no sequences were enriched. In contrast, we detected substantial enrichment in the Hfq-selected set with enriched sequences having structural stability similar to the neutral sequences but with significantly different nucleotide selection. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that positive selection in SELEX acts independently of the neutral selective requirements imposed on the sequences. We conclude that Genomic SELEX, when combined with high-throughput sequencing of positively and neutrally selected pools, as well as the gnomic library, is a powerful method to identify genomic aptamers. PMID:20161784

  12. Monitoring genomic sequences during SELEX using high-throughput sequencing: neutral SELEX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Zimmermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SELEX is a well established in vitro selection tool to analyze the structure of ligand-binding nucleic acid sequences called aptamers. Genomic SELEX transforms SELEX into a tool to discover novel, genomically encoded RNA or DNA sequences binding a ligand of interest, called genomic aptamers. Concerns have been raised regarding requirements imposed on RNA sequences undergoing SELEX selection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate SELEX and assess the extent of these effects, we designed and performed a Neutral SELEX experiment omitting the selection step, such that the sequences are under the sole selective pressure of SELEX's amplification steps. Using high-throughput sequencing, we obtained thousands of full-length sequences from the initial genomic library and the pools after each of the 10 rounds of Neutral SELEX. We compared these to sequences obtained from a Genomic SELEX experiment deriving from the same initial library, but screening for RNAs binding with high affinity to the E. coli regulator protein Hfq. With each round of Neutral SELEX, sequences became less stable and changed in nucleotide content, but no sequences were enriched. In contrast, we detected substantial enrichment in the Hfq-selected set with enriched sequences having structural stability similar to the neutral sequences but with significantly different nucleotide selection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that positive selection in SELEX acts independently of the neutral selective requirements imposed on the sequences. We conclude that Genomic SELEX, when combined with high-throughput sequencing of positively and neutrally selected pools, as well as the gnomic library, is a powerful method to identify genomic aptamers.

  13. Adapting Cell-Based Assays to the High Throughput Screening Platform: Problems Encountered and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Clinton B; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile

    2008-06-01

    In recent years, cell-based phenotypic assays have emerged as an effective and robust addition to the array of assay technologies available for drug discovery in the high throughput screening arena. Previously, biochemical target-based assays have been the technology of choice. With the emergence of stem cells as a basis for a new screening technology, it is important to keep in mind the lessons that have been learned from the adaptation of existing stable cell lines onto the high throughput screening drug discovery platform, with special consideration being given to assay miniaturization, liquid handling complications and instrument-introduced artifacts. We present an overview of the problems encountered with the implementation of multiple cell-based assays at the High Throughput Screening Center at Southern Research Institute as well as empirically defined effective solutions to these problems. These include examples of artifacts induced by temperature differences throughout the screening campaign, cell plating conditions including the effect of room temperature incubation on assay consistency, DMSO carry-over, and incubator induced artifacts.

  14. Non-isotopic dual parameter competition assay suitable for high-throughput screening of histone deacetylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, Daniel; Hildmann, Christian; Haus, Patricia; Galetovic, Antonia; Schober, Andreas; Schwienhorst, Andreas; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2009-07-01

    Histone deacetylases reside among the most important and novel target classes in oncology. Selective lead structures are intensively developed to improve efficacy and reduce adverse effects. The common assays used so far to identify new lead structures suffer from many false positive hits due to auto-fluorescence of compounds or triggering undesired signal transduction pathways. These drawbacks are eliminated by the dual parameter competition assay reported in this study. The assay involves a new fluorescent inhibitor probe that shows an increase in both, fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence lifetime upon binding to the enzyme. The assay is well suited for high-throughput screening.

  15. High throughput heme assay by detection of chemiluminescence of reconstituted horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2009-06-01

    In living organisms, heme is an essential molecule for various biological functions. Recent studies also suggest that heme functions as organelle-derived signal that regulates fundamental cell processes. Furthermore, estimation of heme is widely used for studying various blood disorders. In this regard, development of a rapid, sensitive, and high throughput heme assay has been sought. The most frequently used method of measuring heme by pyridine hemochrome is time, labor, and material intensive, and therefore limiting in its utility for large scale, high throughput analysis. Recently, we reported alternative method that is sensitive and specific to heme, which is based on the ability of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) apo-enzyme to reconstitute with heme to form an active holo-enzyme. Here, we developed high throughput heme assay by performing reactions on multi-well plate with highly sensitive chemiluminescence detection reagents. Detection of chemiluminescence in charged coupled device (CCD)-based gel doc apparatus enables simultaneous measurement of multiple samples. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of this assay allowed a direct measurement of heme in solvent extracts after dilution. This assay is sensitive, quick, provides a large dynamic range, and is well suited for large-scale analysis of heme extracted from minute amount of samples.

  16. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Saet-byul [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Junhoe [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Im-kyung [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Joo Chun [Department of Microbiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Joon [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Myun [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young, E-mail: kylee117@yuhs.ac [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongsun, E-mail: jkim63@yuhs.ac [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  17. Patterning cell using Si-stencil for high-throughput assay

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo

    2011-01-01

    In this communication, we report a newly developed cell pattering methodology by a silicon-based stencil, which exhibited advantages such as easy handling, reusability, hydrophilic surface and mature fabrication technologies. Cell arrays obtained by this method were used to investigate cell growth under a temperature gradient, which demonstrated the possibility of studying cell behavior in a high-throughput assay. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  18. High-throughput kinase assays with protein substrates using fluorescent polymer superquenching

    OpenAIRE

    Weatherford Wendy; Stankewicz Casey; Rininsland Frauke; McBranch Duncan

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background High-throughput screening is used by the pharmaceutical industry for identifying lead compounds that interact with targets of pharmacological interest. Because of the key role that aberrant regulation of protein phosphorylation plays in diseases such as cancer, diabetes and hypertension, kinases have become one of the main drug targets. With the exception of antibody-based assays, methods to screen for specific kinase activity are generally restricted to the use of small s...

  19. Novel method for the high-throughput processing of slides for the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbaschi, Mahsa; Cooke, Marcus S

    2014-11-26

    Single cell gel electrophoresis (the comet assay), continues to gain popularity as a means of assessing DNA damage. However, the assay's low sample throughput and laborious sample workup procedure are limiting factors to its application. "Scoring", or individually determining DNA damage levels in 50 cells per treatment, is time-consuming, but with the advent of high-throughput scoring, the limitation is now the ability to process significant numbers of comet slides. We have developed a novel method by which multiple slides may be manipulated, and undergo electrophoresis, in batches of 25 rather than individually and, importantly, retains the use of standard microscope comet slides, which are the assay convention. This decreases assay time by 60%, and benefits from an electrophoresis tank with a substantially smaller footprint, and more uniform orientation of gels during electrophoresis. Our high-throughput variant of the comet assay greatly increases the number of samples analysed, decreases assay time, number of individual slide manipulations, reagent requirements and risk of damage to slides. The compact nature of the electrophoresis tank is of particular benefit to laboratories where bench space is at a premium. This novel approach is a significant advance on the current comet assay procedure.

  20. A Cell-based High-throughput Screening Assay for Farnesoid X Recepter Agonist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop a high-throughput screening assay for Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists based on mammalian one-hybrid system (a chimera receptor gene system) for the purpose of identifying new lead compounds for dyslipidaemia drug from the chemical library. Methods cDNA encoding the human FXR ligand binding domain (LBD) was amplified by RT-PCR from a human liver total mRNA and fused to the DNA binding domain (DBD) of yeast GAL4 of pBIND to construct a GAL4-FXR (LBD) chimera expression plasmid. Five copies of the GAL4 DNA binding site were synthesized and inserted into upstream of the SV40 promoter of pGL3-promoter vector to construct a reporter plasmid pG5-SV40 Luc. The assay was developed by transient co-transfection with pG5-SV40 Luc reporter plasmid and pBIND-FXR-LBD (189-472) chimera expression plasmid. Results After optimization, CDCA, a FXR natural agonist, could induce expression of the luciferase gene in a dose-dependent manner, and had a signal/noise ratio of 10 and Z'factor value of 0.65. Conclusion A stable and sensitive cell-based high-throughput screening model can be used in high-throughput screening for FXR agonists from the synthetic and natural compound library.

  1. Identification of inhibitors of a bacterial sigma factor using a new high-throughput screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mowafi, S A; Sineva, E; Alumasa, J N; Nicoloff, H; Tomsho, J W; Ades, S E; Keiler, K C

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are formidable pathogens because their cell envelope presents an adaptable barrier to environmental and host-mediated challenges. The stress response pathway controlled by the alternative sigma factor σ(E) is critical for maintenance of the cell envelope. Because σ(E) is required for the virulence or viability of several Gram-negative pathogens, it might be a useful target for antibiotic development. To determine if small molecules can inhibit the σ(E) pathway, and to permit high-throughput screening for antibiotic lead compounds, a σ(E) activity assay that is compatible with high-throughput screening was developed and validated. The screen employs a biological assay with positive readout. An Escherichia coli strain was engineered to express yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) under negative regulation by the σ(E) pathway, such that inhibitors of the pathway increase the production of YFP. To validate the screen, the reporter strain was used to identify σ(E) pathway inhibitors from a library of cyclic peptides. Biochemical characterization of one of the inhibitory cyclic peptides showed that it binds σ(E), inhibits RNA polymerase holoenzyme formation, and inhibits σ(E)-dependent transcription in vitro. These results demonstrate that alternative sigma factors can be inhibited by small molecules and enable high-throughput screening for inhibitors of the σ(E) pathway.

  2. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Gagnon, David [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Gjoerup, Ole [Molecular Oncology Research Institute, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Archambault, Jacques [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Bullock, Peter A., E-mail: Peter.Bullock@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  3. High-throughput fluorescent-based NKCC functional assay in adherent epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmosino, Monica; Rizzo, Federica; Torretta, Silvia; Procino, Giuseppe; Svelto, Maria

    2013-03-18

    The kidney-specific NKCC cotransporter isoform NKCC2 is involved in the Na(+) reabsorption in the Thich Ascending Limb (TAL) cells and in the regulation of body fluid volume. In contrast, the isoform NKCC1 represents the major pathway for Cl- entry in endothelial cells, playing a crucial role in cell volume regulation and vascular tone. Importantly, both NKCC isoforms are involved in the regulation of blood pressure and represent important potential drug targets for the treatment of hypertension. Taking advantage of an existing Thallium (Tl(+))-based kit, we set up a Tl(+) influx-based fluorescent assay, that can accurately and rapidly measure NKCC transporter activity in adherent epithelial cells using the high-throughput Flex station device. We assessed the feasibility of this assay in the renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells stably transfected with a previously characterized chimeric NKCC2 construct (c-NKCC2). We demonstrated that the assay is highly reproducible, offers high temporal resolution of NKCC-mediated ion flux profiles and, importantly, being a continuous assay, it offers improved sensitivity over previous endpoint NKCC functional assays. So far the screening of NKCC transporters activity has been done by (86)Rb(+) influx assays. Indeed, a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening method for testing NKCC inhibitors would be extremely useful in the development and characterization of new anti-hypertensive drugs.

  4. A comparison of sugar indicators enables a universal high-throughput sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Rocco; Thorson, Jon S

    2008-06-15

    A systematic comparison of six sugar indicators for their sensitivity, specificity, cross-reactivity, and suitability in the context of crude lysates revealed para-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide (pHBH) to be best suited for application in a plate-based phosphatase-assisted universal sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase assay. The addition of a general phosphatase to nucleotidyltransferase reaction aliquots enabled the conversion of remaining sugar-1-phosphate to free sugar, the concentration of which could be rapidly assessed via the pHBH assay. The assay was validated using the model glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase from Salmonella enterica (RmlA) and compared favorably with a previously reported HPLC assay. This coupled discontinuous assay is quantitative, high throughput, and robust; relies only on commercially available enzymes and reagents; does not require chromatography, specialized detectors (e.g., mass or evaporative light scattering detectors), or radioisotopes; and is capable of detecting less than 5 nmol of sugar-1-phosphate. It is anticipated that this high-throughput assay system will greatly facilitate nucleotidyltransferase mechanistic and directed evolution/engineering studies.

  5. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Assay for High-Throughput Screening of ADAMTS1 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Du

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type I motifs-1 (ADAMTS1 plays a crucial role in inflammatory joint diseases and its inhibitors are potential candidates for anti-arthritis drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, we reported the development and validation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of the ADAMTS1 inhibitors. A FRET substrate was designed for a quantitative assay of ADAMTS1 activity and enzyme kinetics studies. The assay was developed into a 50-µL, 384-well assay format for high throughput screening of ADAMTS1 inhibitors with an overall Z’ factor of 0.89. ADAMTS1 inhibitors were screened against a diverse library of 40,960 total compounds with the established HTS system. Four structurally related hits, naturally occurring compounds, kuwanon P, kuwanon X, albafuran C and mulberrofuran J, extracted from the Chinese herb Morus alba L., were identified for further investigation. The results suggest that this FRET assay is an excellent tool, not only for measurement of ADAMTS1 activity but also for discovery of novel ADAMTS1 inhibitors with HTS.

  6. High-Throughput Microplate-Based Assay to Monitor Plasma Membrane Wounding and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Pathak-Sharma

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane of mammalian cells is susceptible to disruption by mechanical and biochemical damages that frequently occur within tissues. Therefore, efficient and rapid repair of the plasma membrane is essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival. Excessive damage of the plasma membrane and defects in its repair are associated with pathological conditions such as infections, muscular dystrophy, heart failure, diabetes, and lung and neurodegenerative diseases. The molecular events that remodel the plasma membrane during its repair remain poorly understood. In the present work, we report the development of a quantitative high-throughput assay that monitors the efficiency of the plasma membrane repair in real time using a sensitive microplate reader. In this assay, the plasma membrane of living cells is perforated by the bacterial pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O and the integrity and recovery of the membrane are monitored at 37°C by measuring the fluorescence intensity of the membrane impermeant dye propidium iodide. We demonstrate that listeriolysin O causes dose-dependent plasma membrane wounding and activation of the cell repair machinery. This assay was successfully applied to cell types from different origins including epithelial and muscle cells. In conclusion, this high-throughput assay provides a novel opportunity for the discovery of membrane repair effectors and the development of new therapeutic compounds that could target membrane repair in various pathological processes, from degenerative to infectious diseases.

  7. A novel high-throughput nematicidal assay using embryo cells and larvae of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yiling; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Shuchun; Li, Erwei; Che, Yongsheng; Liu, Xingzhong

    2014-04-01

    Human health safety and environmental concerns have resulted in the widespread deregistration of several agronomic important nematicides. New and safer nematicides are urgently needed. However, a high-throughput bioassay for screening potential nematicides has not been established. We developed a two-step high-throughput nematicidal screening method to combine a cell-based MTS colorimetric assay with Caenorhabditis elegans embryo cells for preliminary cytotoxicity screening (step 1) followed by in vitro larval assay for nematicidal activity (step 2). Based on three conventional nematicides' test, high correlations were obtained between cell viability and larval viability and "r" values were 0.78 for Avermectin, 0.95 for Fosthiazate, and 0.65 for Formaldehyde solution. Further assays with 60 fungal secondary metabolites (extracts, fractions and pure compounds) also demonstrated the high correlation between cell viability and larval viability (r=0.60) and between the C. elegans cell viability and the juvenile viability of soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines (r=0.48) and pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (r=0.56). Six metabolites with high cytotoxicity have performed high larval mortality with a LC50 range of 6.8-500μg/ml. These results indicate that the proposed two-step screening assay represents an efficient and labor-saving method for screening natural nematicidal products.

  8. A high-throughput in vitro ring assay for vasoactivity using magnetic 3D bioprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Shen, Tsaiwei; Hebel, Chris; Barthlow, Herbert G.; Wagoner, Matthew; Souza, Glauco R.

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive liabilities are typically assayed using wire myography, which is limited by its high cost and low throughput. To meet the demand for higher throughput in vitro alternatives, this study introduces a magnetic 3D bioprinting-based vasoactivity assay. The principle behind this assay is the magnetic printing of vascular smooth muscle cells into 3D rings that functionally represent blood vessel segments, whose contraction can be altered by vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. A cost-effective imaging modality employing a mobile device is used to capture contraction with high throughput. The goal of this study was to validate ring contraction as a measure of vasoactivity, using a small panel of known vasoactive drugs. In vitro responses of the rings matched outcomes predicted by in vivo pharmacology, and were supported by immunohistochemistry. Altogether, this ring assay robustly models vasoactivity, which could meet the need for higher throughput in vitro alternatives. PMID:27477945

  9. Miniaturization of High-Throughput Epigenetic Methyltransferase Assays with Acoustic Liquid Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bonnie; Lesnick, John; Wang, Jing; Tang, Nga; Peters, Carl

    2016-02-01

    Epigenetics continues to emerge as an important target class for drug discovery and cancer research. As programs scale to evaluate many new targets related to epigenetic expression, new tools and techniques are required to enable efficient and reproducible high-throughput epigenetic screening. Assay miniaturization increases screening throughput and reduces operating costs. Echo liquid handlers can transfer compounds, samples, reagents, and beads in submicroliter volumes to high-density assay formats using only acoustic energy-no contact or tips required. This eliminates tip costs and reduces the risk of reagent carryover. In this study, we demonstrate the miniaturization of a methyltransferase assay using Echo liquid handlers and two different assay technologies: AlphaLISA from PerkinElmer and EPIgeneous HTRF from Cisbio.

  10. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication.

  11. A high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism multiplex assay for parentage assignment in New Zealand sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M Clarke

    Full Text Available Accurate pedigree information is critical to animal breeding systems to ensure the highest rate of genetic gain and management of inbreeding. The abundance of available genomic data, together with development of high throughput genotyping platforms, means that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are now the DNA marker of choice for genomic selection studies. Furthermore the superior qualities of SNPs compared to microsatellite markers allows for standardization between laboratories; a property that is crucial for developing an international set of markers for traceability studies. The objective of this study was to develop a high throughput SNP assay for use in the New Zealand sheep industry that gives accurate pedigree assignment and will allow a reduction in breeder input over lambing. This required two phases of development--firstly, a method of extracting quality DNA from ear-punch tissue performed in a high throughput cost efficient manner and secondly a SNP assay that has the ability to assign paternity to progeny resulting from mob mating. A likelihood based approach to infer paternity was used where sires with the highest LOD score (log of the ratio of the likelihood given parentage to likelihood given non-parentage are assigned. An 84 "parentage SNP panel" was developed that assigned, on average, 99% of progeny to a sire in a problem where there were 3,000 progeny from 120 mob mated sires that included numerous half sib sires. In only 6% of those cases was there another sire with at least a 0.02 probability of paternity. Furthermore dam information (either recorded, or by genotyping possible dams was absent, highlighting the SNP test's suitability for paternity testing. Utilization of this parentage SNP assay will allow implementation of progeny testing into large commercial farms where the improved accuracy of sire assignment and genetic evaluations will increase genetic gain in the sheep industry.

  12. Multiplexed homogeneous proximity ligation assays for high throughput protein biomarker research in serological material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Martin; Thorsen, Stine Buch; Assarsson, Erika;

    2011-01-01

    A high throughput protein biomarker discovery tool has been developed based on multiplexed proximity ligation assays (PLA) in a homogeneous format in the sense of no washing steps. The platform consists of four 24-plex panels profiling 74 putative biomarkers with sub pM sensitivity each consuming...... only 1 micro Litre of human plasma sample. The system uses either matched monoclonal antibody pairs or the more readily available single batches of affinity purified polyclonal antibodies to generate the target specific reagents by covalently linking with unique nucleic acid sequences. These paired...

  13. Towards sensitive, high-throughput, biomolecular assays based on fluorescence lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanna Skilitsi, Anastasia; Turko, Timothé; Cianfarani, Damien; Barre, Sophie; Uhring, Wilfried; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Léonard, Jérémie

    2017-09-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence detection for robust sensing of biomolecular interactions is developed by implementing time-correlated single photon counting in high-throughput conditions. Droplet microfluidics is used as a promising platform for the very fast handling of low-volume samples. We illustrate the potential of this very sensitive and cost-effective technology in the context of an enzymatic activity assay based on fluorescently-labeled biomolecules. Fluorescence lifetime detection by time-correlated single photon counting is shown to enable reliable discrimination between positive and negative control samples at a throughput as high as several hundred samples per second.

  14. High-throughput kinase assays with protein substrates using fluorescent polymer superquenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weatherford Wendy

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput screening is used by the pharmaceutical industry for identifying lead compounds that interact with targets of pharmacological interest. Because of the key role that aberrant regulation of protein phosphorylation plays in diseases such as cancer, diabetes and hypertension, kinases have become one of the main drug targets. With the exception of antibody-based assays, methods to screen for specific kinase activity are generally restricted to the use of small synthetic peptides as substrates. However, the use of natural protein substrates has the advantage that potential inhibitors can be detected that affect enzyme activity by binding to a site other than the catalytic site. We have previously reported a non-radioactive and non-antibody-based fluorescence quench assay for detection of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation using synthetic peptide substrates. The aim of this work is to develop an assay for detection of phosphorylation of chemically unmodified proteins based on this polymer superquenching platform. Results Using a modified QTL Lightspeed™ assay, phosphorylation of native protein was quantified by the interaction of the phosphorylated proteins with metal-ion coordinating groups co-located with fluorescent polymer deposited onto microspheres. The binding of phospho-protein inhibits a dye-labeled "tracer" peptide from associating to the phosphate-binding sites present on the fluorescent microspheres. The resulting inhibition of quench generates a "turn on" assay, in which the signal correlates with the phosphorylation of the substrate. The assay was tested on three different proteins: Myelin Basic Protein (MBP, Histone H1 and Phosphorylated heat- and acid-stable protein (PHAS-1. Phosphorylation of the proteins was detected by Protein Kinase Cα (PKCα and by the Interleukin -1 Receptor-associated Kinase 4 (IRAK4. Enzyme inhibition yielded IC50 values that were comparable to those obtained using

  15. In vitro activity assays for MYST histone acetyltransferases and adaptation for high-throughput inhibitor screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Cheryl E.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification that is carried out by acetyltransferases. The MYST proteins form the largest and most diverse family of acetyltransferases, which regulate gene expression, DNA repair, and cell cycle homeostasis, among other activities, by acetylating both histone and non-histone proteins. This chapter will describe methods for the preparation and biochemical characterization of MYST family acetyltransferases, including protocols for the preparation of recombinant protein, enzyme assays for measuring steady state parameters and binding assays to measure cofactor and inhibitor binding. We also provide details on adapting these assays for high throughput screening for small molecule MYST inhibitors. This chapter seeks to prepare researchers for some hurdles that they may encounter when studying the MYST proteins so that there may be better opportunity to plan appropriate controls and obtain high quality data. PMID:27372752

  16. A universal homogeneous assay for high-throughput determination of binding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Felix; Ayaz, Pelin; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for assay technologies that enable accurate, cost-effective, and high-throughput measurements of drug-target association and dissociation rates. Here we introduce a universal homogeneous kinetic probe competition assay (kPCA) that meets these requirements. The time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer (TR-FRET) procedure combines the versatility of radioligand binding assays with the advantages of homogeneous nonradioactive techniques while approaching the time resolution of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and related biosensors. We show application of kPCA for three important target classes: enzymes, protein-protein interactions, and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This method is capable of supporting early stages of drug discovery with large amounts of kinetic information.

  17. Scaling and automation of a high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Heng; Chen, Yu-Chih; Brien, Riley; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-10-07

    Recent research suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the key subpopulation for tumor relapse and metastasis. Due to cancer plasticity in surface antigen and enzymatic activity markers, functional tumorsphere assays are promising alternatives for CSC identification. To reliably quantify rare CSCs (1-5%), thousands of single-cell suspension cultures are required. While microfluidics is a powerful tool in handling single cells, previous works provide limited throughput and lack automatic data analysis capability required for high-throughput studies. In this study, we present the scaling and automation of high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chips, facilitating the tracking of up to ∼10 000 cells on a chip with ∼76.5% capture rate. The presented cell capture scheme guarantees sampling a representative population from the bulk cells. To analyze thousands of single-cells with a variety of fluorescent intensities, a highly adaptable analysis program was developed for cell/sphere counting and size measurement. Using a Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) coating on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a suspension culture environment was created to test a controversial hypothesis: whether larger or smaller cells are more stem-like defined by the capability to form single-cell-derived spheres. Different cell lines showed different correlations between sphere formation rate and initial cell size, suggesting heterogeneity in pathway regulation among breast cancer cell lines. More interestingly, by monitoring hundreds of spheres, we identified heterogeneity in sphere growth dynamics, indicating the cellular heterogeneity even within CSCs. These preliminary results highlight the power of unprecedented high-throughput and automation in CSC studies.

  18. High-throughput viability assay using an autonomously bioluminescent cell line with a bacterial Lux reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Bradley; Thorne, Natasha; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Cell viability assays are extensively used to determine cell health, evaluate growth conditions, and assess compound cytotoxicity. Most existing assays are endpoint assays, in which data are collected at one time point after termination of the experiment. The time point at which toxicity of a compound is evident, however, depends on the mechanism of that compound. An ideal cell viability assay allows the determination of compound toxicity kinetically without having to terminate the assay prematurely. We optimized and validated a reagent-addition-free cell viability assay using an autoluminescent HEK293 cell line that stably expresses bacterial luciferase and all substrates necessary for bioluminescence. This cell viability assay can be used for real-time, long-term measurement of compound cytotoxicity in live cells with a signal-to-basal ratio of 20- to 200-fold and Z-factors of ~0.6 after 24-, 48- 72-, or 96-h incubation with compound. We also found that the potencies of nine cytotoxic compounds correlated well with those measured by four other commonly used cell viability assays. The results demonstrated that this kinetic cell viability assay using the HEK293(lux) autoluminescent cell line is useful for high-throughput evaluation of compound cytotoxicity.

  19. Using the BioAssay Ontology for analyzing high-throughput screening data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander Balderud, Linda; Murray, David; Larsson, Niklas; Vempati, Uma; Schürer, Stephan C; Bjäreland, Marcus; Engkvist, Ola

    2015-03-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is the main starting point for hit identification in drug discovery programs. This has led to a rapid increase of available screening data both within pharmaceutical companies and the public domain. We have used the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) 2.0 for assay annotation within AstraZeneca to enable comparison with external HTS methods. The annotated assays have been analyzed to identify technology gaps, evaluate new methods, verify active hits, and compare compound activity between in-house and PubChem assays. As an example, the binding of a fluorescent ligand to formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1, involved in inflammation, for example) in an in-house HTS was measured by fluorescence intensity. In total, 155 active compounds were also tested in an external ligand binding flow cytometry assay, a method not used for in-house HTS detection. Twelve percent of the 155 compounds were found active in both assays. By the annotation of assay protocols using BAO terms, internal and external assays can easily be identified and method comparison facilitated. They can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of different assay methods, design appropriate confirmatory and counterassays, and analyze the activity of compounds for identification of technology artifacts.

  20. Identification of adiponectin receptor agonist utilizing a fluorescence polarization based high throughput assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyi Sun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (--arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases.

  1. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Eakin, Ann E; Walkup, Grant K; Rivin, Olga

    2011-06-01

    DNA ligase is the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the backbone phosphodiester bond between the 5'-PO(4) and 3'-OH of adjacent DNA nucleotides at single-stranded nicks. These nicks occur between Okazaki fragments during replication of the lagging strand of the DNA as well as during DNA repair and recombination. As essential enzymes for DNA replication, the NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases of pathogenic bacteria are potential targets for the development of antibacterial drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, a high-throughput assay for DNA ligase activity is invaluable. This article describes a straightforward, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based DNA ligase assay that is well suited for high-throughput screening for DNA ligase inhibitors as well as for use in enzyme kinetics studies. Its use is demonstrated for measurement of the steady-state kinetic constants of Haemophilus influenzae NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase and for measurement of the potency of an inhibitor of this enzyme.

  2. High-throughput screening assay for new ligands at human melatonin receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-hua YAN; Hao-ran SU; Jean A BOUTIN; M Pierre RENARD; Ming-wei WANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Melatonin (MT) is a neurohormone produced and secreted primarily by the pineal gland in a circadian manner, and mainly acta through 2 receptor subtypes: MT1 and MT2 in humans. The diversity in their tissue distribution is in favor of different functions for each receptor subtype. Selective modulators are therefore required to determine the physiological roles of these melatonin receptor sub-types and their implications in pathological processes. Methods: A homogenous MT1/MT2 receptor binding assay was established for high-throughput screening of new ligands at the hMT1 and/or hMT2 receptors. The functional properties (agonists or antagonists) were assessed by a conventional guanosine-5'[γ-35S] triphosphate (GTP-γS) assay. Results: Three hMT, receptor-selective small mol-ecule antagonists and 1 hMT2 receptor-selective small molecule antagonist with novel structural features were identified following a high-throughput screening campaign of 48 240 synthetic and natural compounds. Conclusion: The findings may assist in the expansion of chemical probes to these 2 receptor subtypes.

  3. Identification of Adiponectin Receptor Agonist Utilizing a Fluorescence Polarization Based High Throughput Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiyi; Zang, Zhihe; Zhong, Ling; Wu, Min; Su, Qing; Gao, Xiurong; Zan, Wang; Lin, Dong; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Zhonglin

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (-)-arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases. PMID:23691032

  4. High throughput screening assay for UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 glucuronidation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, O V; Finel, M; Kurkela, M; Fitzgerald, M; Peters, N R; Hoffman, F M; Trubetskoy, V S

    2007-06-01

    Development of high throughput screening (HTS) assays for evaluation of a compound's toxicity and potential for drug-drug interactions is a critical step towards production of better drug candidates and cost reduction in the drug development process. HTS assays for drug metabolism mediated by cytochrome P450s are now routinely used in compound library characterization and for computer modeling studies. However, development and application of HTS assays involving UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are lagging behind. Here we describe the development of a fluorescence-based HTS assay for UGT1A1 using recombinant enzyme and fluorescent substrate in the presence of an aqueous solution of PreserveX-QML (QBI Life Sciences, Madison, WI) polymeric micelles, acting as a stabilizer and a blocker of nonspecific interactions. The data include assay characteristics in 384-well plate format obtained with robotic liquid handling equipment and structures of hits (assay modifiers) obtained from the screening of a small molecule library at the University of Wisconsin HTS screening facility. The application of the assay for predicting UGT-related drug-drug interactions and building pharmacophore models, as well as the effects of polymeric micelles on the assay performance and compound promiscuity, is discussed.

  5. A quantitative and high-throughput assay of human papillomavirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, David; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) double-stranded DNA genome is accomplished by the two viral proteins E1 and E2 in concert with host DNA replication factors. HPV DNA replication is an established model of eukaryotic DNA replication and a potential target for antiviral therapy. Assays to measure the transient replication of HPV DNA in transfected cells have been developed, which rely on a plasmid carrying the viral origin of DNA replication (ori) together with expression vectors for E1 and E2. Replication of the ori-plasmid is typically measured by Southern blotting or PCR analysis of newly replicated DNA (i.e., DpnI digested DNA) several days post-transfection. Although extremely valuable, these assays have been difficult to perform in a high-throughput and quantitative manner. Here, we describe a modified version of the transient DNA replication assay that circumvents these limitations by incorporating a firefly luciferase expression cassette in cis of the ori. Replication of this ori-plasmid by E1 and E2 results in increased levels of firefly luciferase activity that can be accurately quantified and normalized to those of Renilla luciferase expressed from a control plasmid, thus obviating the need for DNA extraction, digestion, and analysis. We provide a detailed protocol for performing the HPV type 31 DNA replication assay in a 96-well plate format suitable for small-molecule screening and EC50 determinations. The quantitative and high-throughput nature of the assay should greatly facilitate the study of HPV DNA replication and the identification of inhibitors thereof.

  6. Development of a thyroperoxidase inhibition assay for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Katie B; Hedge, Joan M; Rotroff, Daniel M; Hornung, Michael W; Crofton, Kevin M; Simmons, Steven O

    2014-03-17

    High-throughput screening (HTPS) assays to detect inhibitors of thyroperoxidase (TPO), the enzymatic catalyst for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, are not currently available. Herein, we describe the development of a HTPS TPO inhibition assay. Rat thyroid microsomes and a fluorescent peroxidase substrate, Amplex UltraRed (AUR), were employed in an end-point assay for comparison to the existing kinetic guaiacol (GUA) oxidation assay. Following optimization of assay metrics, including Z', dynamic range, and activity, using methimazole (MMI), the assay was tested with a 21-chemical training set. The potency of MMI-induced TPO inhibition was greater with AUR compared to GUA. The dynamic range and Z' score with MMI were as follows: 127-fold and 0.62 for the GUA assay, 18-fold and 0.86 for the 96-well AUR assay, and 11.5-fold and 0.93 for the 384-well AUR assay. The 384-well AUR assay drastically reduced animal use, requiring one-tenth of the rat thyroid microsomal protein needed for the GUA 96-well format assay. Fourteen chemicals inhibited TPO, with a relative potency ranking of MMI > ethylene thiourea > 6-propylthiouracil > 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy-benzophenone > 2-mercaptobenzothiazole > 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole > genistein > 4-propoxyphenol > sulfamethazine > daidzein > 4-nonylphenol > triclosan > iopanoic acid > resorcinol. These data demonstrate the capacity of this assay to detect diverse TPO inhibitors. Seven chemicals acted as negatives: 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, dibutylphthalate, diethylhexylphthalate, diethylphthalate, 3,5-dimethylpyrazole-1-methanol, methyl 2-methyl-benzoate, and sodium perchlorate. This assay could be used to screen large numbers of chemicals as an integral component of a tiered TH-disruptor screening approach.

  7. Fluorescence polarization assays in high-throughput screening and drug discovery: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew D.; Yasgar, Adam; Peryea, Tyler; Braisted, John C.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Coussens, Nathan P.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of fluorescence polarization (FP) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) to molecular weight changes has enabled the interrogation of diverse biological mechanisms, ranging from molecular interactions to enzymatic activity. Assays based on FP/FA technology have been widely utilized in high-throughput screening (HTS) and drug discovery due to the homogenous format, robust performance and relative insensitivity to some types of interferences, such as inner filter effects. Advancements in assay design, fluorescent probes, and technology have enabled the application of FP assays to increasingly complex biological processes. Herein we discuss different types of FP/FA assays developed for HTS, with examples to emphasize the diversity of applicable targets. Furthermore, trends in target and fluorophore selection, as well as assay type and format, are examined using annotated HTS assays within the PubChem database. Finally, practical considerations for the successful development and implementation of FP/FA assays for HTS are provided based on experience at our center and examples from the literature, including strategies for flagging interference compounds among a list of hits.

  8. Functional recombinant MHC class II molecules and high-throughput peptide-binding assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    of peptide-binding assay were developed including a homogeneous, non-radioactive, high-throughput (HTS) binding assay. Binding isotherms were generated allowing the affinities of interaction to be determined. The affinities of the best binders were found to be in the low nanomolar range. Recombinant MHC...... in the generation of MHC-II molecules as reagents to study and manipulate specific T helper cell responses. Methods to generate functional MHC-II molecules recombinantly, and measure their interaction with peptides, would be highly desirable; however, no consensus methodology has yet emerged. RESULTS: We generated....... CONCLUSION: We have successfully developed versatile MHC-II resources, which may assist in the generation of MHC class II -wide reagents, data, and tools....

  9. Time-stretch microscopy on a DVD for high-throughput imaging cell-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anson H L; Yeung, P; Chan, Godfrey C F; Chan, Barbara P; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-02-01

    Cell-based assay based on time-stretch imaging is recognized to be well-suited for high-throughput phenotypic screening. However, this ultrafast imaging technique has primarily been limited to suspension-cell assay, leaving a wide range of solid-substrate assay formats uncharted. Moreover, time-stretch imaging is generally restricted to intrinsic biophysical phenotyping, but lacks the biomolecular signatures of the cells. To address these challenges, we develop a spinning time-stretch imaging assay platform based on the functionalized digital versatile disc (DVD). We demonstrate that adherent cell culture and biochemically-specific cell-capture can now be assayed with time-stretch microscopy, thanks to the high-speed DVD spinning motion that naturally enables on-the-fly cellular imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate of >10MHz. As scanning the whole DVD at such a high speed enables ultra-large field-of-view imaging, it could be favorable for scaling both the assay throughput and content as demanded in many applications, e.g. drug discovery, and rare cancer cell screening.

  10. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay for Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Iván; Lafuente, María José; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Cid, Concepción

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is a mitochondrial membrane-associated flavoenzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. DHODH is a validated target for malaria, and DSM265, a potent inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate using flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactor in the first half of the reaction. Reoxidation of FMN to regenerate the active enzyme is mediated by ubiquinone (CoQD), which is the physiological final electron acceptor and second substrate of the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence-based high-throughput enzymatic assay to find DHODH inhibitors. In this assay, the CoQD has been replaced by a redox-sensitive fluorogenic dye, resazurin, which changes to a fluorescent state on reduction to resorufin. Remarkably, the assay sensitivity to find competitive inhibitors of the second substrate is higher than that reported for the standard colorimetric assay. It is amenable to 1536-well plates with Z' values close to 0.8. The fact that the human enzyme can also be assayed in the same format opens additional applications of this assay to the discovery of inhibitors to treat cancer, transplant rejection, autoimmune diseases, and other diseases mediated by rapid cellular growth.

  11. Cytochrome P450 2C24: expression, tissue distribution, high-throughput assay, and pharmacological inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 (CYP-mediated epoxidation of arachidonic acid (AA contributes to important biological functions, including the pain-relieving responses produced by analgesic drugs. However, the relevant epoxygenase(s remain unidentified. Presently, we describe the tissue distribution, high-throughput assay, and pharmacological characteristics of the rat epoxygenase CYP2C24. Following cloning from male rat liver, recombinant baculovirus containing the C-terminal His-tagged cDNA was constructed and used to express the protein in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9 cells. Enzymatic activity was detected with membranes, NADPH regenerating system and CYP reductase, and optimized for high throughput screening by use of the Vivid Blue© BOMCC fluorescence substrate. Quantitative real-time PCR identified CYP2C24 m-RNA in liver, kidney, heart, lung, gonad and brain. Screening of CYP2C24 activity against a panel of inhibitors showed a very strong correlation with activity against the human homologue CYP2C19. In agreement with recent findings on CYP2C19, the epoxygenase blockers PPOH and MS-PPOH inhibited CYP2C24 only weakly, confirming that these drugs are not universal epoxygenase inhibitors. Finally, comparisons of the CYP2C24 inhibitor profile with anti-analgesic activity suggests that this isoform does not contribute to brain analgesic drug action. The present methods and pharmacological data will aid in study of the biological significance of this CYP isoform.

  12. A novel high-throughput assay for islet respiration reveals uncoupling of rodent and human islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob D Wikstrom

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pancreatic beta cell is unique in its response to nutrient by increased fuel oxidation. Recent studies have demonstrated that oxygen consumption rate (OCR may be a valuable predictor of islet quality and long term nutrient responsiveness. To date, high-throughput and user-friendly assays for islet respiration are lacking. The aim of this study was to develop such an assay and to examine bioenergetic efficiency of rodent and human islets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The XF24 respirometer platform was adapted to islets by the development of a 24-well plate specifically designed to confine islets. The islet plate generated data with low inter-well variability and enabled stable measurement of oxygen consumption for hours. The F1F0 ATP synthase blocker oligomycin was used to assess uncoupling while rotenone together with myxothiazol/antimycin was used to measure the level of non-mitochondrial respiration. The use of oligomycin in islets was validated by reversing its effect in the presence of the uncoupler FCCP. Respiratory leak averaged to 59% and 49% of basal OCR in islets from C57Bl6/J and FVB/N mice, respectively. In comparison, respiratory leak of INS-1 cells and C2C12 myotubes was measured to 38% and 23% respectively. Islets from a cohort of human donors showed a respiratory leak of 38%, significantly lower than mouse islets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The assay for islet respiration presented here provides a novel tool that can be used to study islet mitochondrial function in a relatively high-throughput manner. The data obtained in this study shows that rodent islets are less bioenergetically efficient than human islets as well as INS1 cells.

  13. A novel multiplex cell viability assay for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Daniel F; Erdmann, Gerrit; Zhang, Xian; Fritzsche, Anja; Demir, Kubilay; Jaedicke, Andreas; Muehlenberg, Katja; Wanker, Erich E; Boutros, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based high-throughput RNAi screening has become a powerful research tool in addressing a variety of biological questions. In RNAi screening, one of the most commonly applied assay system is measuring the fitness of cells that is usually quantified using fluorescence, luminescence and absorption-based readouts. These methods, typically implemented and scaled to large-scale screening format, however often only yield limited information on the cell fitness phenotype due to evaluation of a single and indirect physiological indicator. To address this problem, we have established a cell fitness multiplexing assay which combines a biochemical approach and two fluorescence-based assaying methods. We applied this assay in a large-scale RNAi screening experiment with siRNA pools targeting the human kinome in different modified HEK293 cell lines. Subsequent analysis of ranked fitness phenotypes assessed by the different assaying methods revealed average phenotype intersections of 50.7±2.3%-58.7±14.4% when two indicators were combined and 40-48% when a third indicator was taken into account. From these observations we conclude that combination of multiple fitness measures may decrease false-positive rates and increases confidence for hit selection. Our robust experimental and analytical method improves the classical approach in terms of time, data comprehensiveness and cost.

  14. A novel multiplex cell viability assay for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F Gilbert

    Full Text Available Cell-based high-throughput RNAi screening has become a powerful research tool in addressing a variety of biological questions. In RNAi screening, one of the most commonly applied assay system is measuring the fitness of cells that is usually quantified using fluorescence, luminescence and absorption-based readouts. These methods, typically implemented and scaled to large-scale screening format, however often only yield limited information on the cell fitness phenotype due to evaluation of a single and indirect physiological indicator. To address this problem, we have established a cell fitness multiplexing assay which combines a biochemical approach and two fluorescence-based assaying methods. We applied this assay in a large-scale RNAi screening experiment with siRNA pools targeting the human kinome in different modified HEK293 cell lines. Subsequent analysis of ranked fitness phenotypes assessed by the different assaying methods revealed average phenotype intersections of 50.7±2.3%-58.7±14.4% when two indicators were combined and 40-48% when a third indicator was taken into account. From these observations we conclude that combination of multiple fitness measures may decrease false-positive rates and increases confidence for hit selection. Our robust experimental and analytical method improves the classical approach in terms of time, data comprehensiveness and cost.

  15. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-08-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this end, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to 1,000 domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from human papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human 'PDZome'. We obtained sharply sequence-dependent binding profiles that quantitatively describe the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes.

  16. Perfect high throughput screening assay: a crucial technique for drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-hua DU

    2005-01-01

    @@ Since being developed approximately 20 years ago, high throughput screening (HTS) has become one of the key techniques used in drug discovery[1]. However, three main problems are recognized with the use of HTS; namely, with the compound library, drug targets, and assay methods. Until now, the compound library has evolved based on the techniques of combinatorial chemistry and modern phytochemistry. Several functional proteins have emerged following the advance of genomics and proteomics. However,although many functional proteins have been discovered recently, they are not, as sometimes claimed, real drug targets;at best, they might be potential drug targets. The ideal targets selected for drug screening should qualify as drug targets[2]. The selection of targets for drug screening is a crucial procedure in drug screening.

  17. Development of a cell-based, high-throughput screening assay for ATM kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kexiao; Shelat, Anang A; Guy, R Kiplin; Kastan, Michael B

    2014-04-01

    The ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) protein kinase is a major regulator of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), DNA lesions that can be caused by ionizing irradiation (IR), oxidative damage, or exposure to certain chemical agents. In response to DSBs, the ATM kinase is activated and subsequently phosphorylates numerous downstream substrates, including p53, Chk2, BRCA1, and KAP1, which affect processes such as cell cycle progression and DNA repair. Numerous studies have demonstrated that loss of ATM function results in enhanced sensitivity to ionizing irradiation in clinically relevant dose ranges, suggesting that ATM kinase is an attractive therapeutic target for enhancing tumor cell kill with radiotherapy. Previously identified small-molecule ATM kinase inhibitors, such as CP466722 and Ku55933, were identified using in vitro kinase assays carried out with recombinant ATM kinase isolated from mammalian cells. Since it has not been feasible to express full-length recombinant ATM in bacterial or baculovirus systems, a robust in vitro screening tool has been lacking. We have developed a cell-based assay that is robust, straightforward, and sensitive. Using this high-throughput assay, we screened more than 7000 compounds and discovered additional small molecules that inhibit the ATM kinase and further validated these hits by secondary assays.

  18. High-throughput colorimetric assays for nucleotide sugar formation and glycosyl transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Richard W; Thorson, Jon S

    2012-01-01

    Glycosyltransferases are ubiquitous in nature, catalyzing glycosidic bond formation in the context of an enormous range of substrates, which include all major classes of biological molecules. Because this wide range of substrates lacks a shared, distinguishable feature that can be altered by glycosyl transfer, general assays for detection of glycosyltransferase activity have long been largely limited to low-throughput methods. Of those high-throughput assays reported in the literature, many are confined to specific glycosyl transfer reactions with modified aglycon acceptors selected for their unique analytical properties. Herein are described a series of protocols centered on the use of 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl glycoside donors and the reversibility of glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions to enable a colorimetric assay for the formation of sugar nucleotides, coupled reaction systems for the glycodiversification of small molecules, and a general colorimetric assay for glycosyltransfer, applicable to drug discovery, protein engineering, and other fundamental sugar nucleotide-dependent investigations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. RABiT-II: Implementation of a High-Throughput Micronucleus Biodosimetry Assay on Commercial Biotech Robotic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repin, Mikhail; Pampou, Sergey; Karan, Charles; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2017-02-23

    We demonstrate the use of high-throughput biodosimetry platforms based on commercial high-throughput/high-content screening robotic systems. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay, using only 20 μl whole blood from a fingerstick, was implemented on a PerkinElmer cell::explorer and General Electric IN Cell Analyzer 2000. On average 500 binucleated cells per sample were detected by our FluorQuantMN software. A calibration curve was generated in the radiation dose range up to 5.0 Gy using the data from 8 donors and 48,083 binucleated cells in total. The study described here demonstrates that high-throughput radiation biodosimetry is practical using current commercial high-throughput/high-content screening robotic systems, which can be readily programmed to perform and analyze robotics-optimized cytogenetic assays. Application to other commercial high-throughput/high-content screening systems beyond the ones used in this study is clearly practical. This approach will allow much wider access to high-throughput biodosimetric screening for large-scale radiological incidents than is currently available.

  20. High-Throughput Screening Assay for Inhibitors of TonB-Dependent Iron Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mathew; Jordan, Lorne D; Shipelskiy, Yan; Newton, Salete M; Klebba, Phillip E

    2016-03-01

    The TonB-dependent Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein FepA actively transports the siderophore ferric enterobactin (FeEnt) into the periplasm. We developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that observes FeEnt uptake through FepA in living Escherichia coli, by monitoring fluorescence quenching that occurs upon binding of FeEnt, and then unquenching as the bacteria deplete it from solution by transport. We optimized the labeling and spectroscopic methods to screen for inhibitors of TonB-dependent iron uptake through the outer membrane. The assay works like a molecular switch that is on in the presence of TonB activity and off in its absence. It functions in 96-well microtiter plates, in a variety of conditions, with Z factors of 0.8-1.0. TonB-dependent iron transport is energy dependent, and the inhibitory effects of the metabolic inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2,4-dinitrophenol, azide, cyanide, and arsenate on FeEnt uptake were readily detected by the assay. Because iron acquisition is a determinant of bacterial pathogenesis, HTS with this method may identify inhibitors that block TonB function and constitute novel therapeutics against infectious disease caused by Gram-negative bacteria. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  1. A high-throughput scintillation proximity assay for sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashem, Mohammed A; Wa, Chunling; Wolak, John P; Grafos, Nicholas S; Ryan, Kelli R; Sanville-Ross, Mary L; Fogarty, Kylie E; Rybina, Irina V; Shoultz, Alycia; Molinaro, Teresa; Desai, Sudha N; Rajan, Anusha; Huber, John D; Nelson, Richard M

    2014-06-01

    The emergence of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SPL) as a promising therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases has heightened interest in the identification of small molecules that modulate its activity. The enzymatic activity of SPL is typically measured using radiometric or fluorescence-based assays that require a lipid extraction step, or by direct quantitation of reaction products using mass spectrometry (MS). To facilitate testing large numbers of compounds to identify SPL modulators, we developed a robust scintillation proximity assay (SPA) that is compatible with high-throughput screening (HTS). This assay employs recombinant human full-length SPL in insect cell membrane preparations to catalyze the conversion of biotinylated aminosphingosine-1-[(33)P]phosphate (S1(33)P-biotin) to trans-2-hexadecenal-biotin and ethanolamine [(33)P]phosphate. To validate the SPA and confirm the fidelity of its measurement of SPL enzyme activity, we developed a Rapid-Fire MS method that quantitates nonradiolabeled S1P-biotin. In addition, we developed a simple, scalable method to produce S1(33)P-biotin in quantities sufficient for HTS. The optimized SPA screen in 384-well microplates produced a mean plate-wise Z'-statistic of 0.58 across approximately 3,000 plates and identified several distinct structural classes of SPL inhibitor. Among the inhibitors that the screen identified was one compound with an IC50 of 1.6 μM in the SPA that induced dose-dependent lymphopenia in mice.

  2. High-Throughput Screening Assay for Laccase Engineering toward Lignosulfonate Valorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Escribano, David; de Salas, Felipe; Pardo, Isabel; Camarero, Susana

    2017-08-01

    Lignin valorization is a pending issue for the integrated conversion of lignocellulose in consumer goods. Lignosulfonates (LS) are the main technical lignins commercialized today. However, their molecular weight should be enlarged to meet application requirements as additives or dispersing agents. Oxidation of lignosulfonates with fungal oxidoreductases, such as laccases, can increase the molecular weight of lignosulfonates by the cross-linking of lignin phenols. To advance in this direction, we describe here the development of a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for the directed evolution of laccases, with lignosulfonate as substrate and the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent (FCR), to detect the decrease in phenolic content produced upon polymerization of lignosulfonate by the enzyme. Once the reaction conditions were adjusted to the 96-well-plate format, the enzyme for validating the assay was selected from a battery of high-redox-potential laccase variants functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae (the preferred host for the directed evolution of fungal oxidoreductases). The colorimetric response (absorbance at 760 nm) correlated with laccase activity secreted by the yeast. The HTS assay was reproducible (coefficient of variation (CV) = 15%) and sensitive enough to detect subtle differences in activity among yeast clones expressing a laccase mutant library obtained by error-prone PCR (epPCR). The method is therefore feasible for screening thousands of clones during the precise engineering of laccases toward valorization of lignosulfonates.

  3. Development of a central nervous system axonal myelination assay for high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lariosa-Willingham, Karen D; Rosler, Elen S; Tung, Jay S; Dugas, Jason C; Collins, Tassie L; Leonoudakis, Dmitri

    2016-04-22

    Regeneration of new myelin is impaired in persistent multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, leaving neurons unable to function properly and subject to further degeneration. Current MS therapies attempt to ameliorate autoimmune-mediated demyelination, but none directly promote the regeneration of lost and damaged myelin of the central nervous system (CNS). Development of new drugs that stimulate remyelination has been hampered by the inability to evaluate axonal myelination in a rapid CNS culture system. We established a high throughput cell-based assay to identify compounds that promote myelination. Culture methods were developed for initiating myelination in vitro using primary embryonic rat cortical cells. We developed an immunofluorescent phenotypic image analysis method to quantify the morphological alignment of myelin characteristic of the initiation of myelination. Using γ-secretase inhibitors as promoters of myelination, the optimal growth, time course and compound treatment conditions were established in a 96 well plate format. We have characterized the cortical myelination assay by evaluating the cellular composition of the cultures and expression of markers of differentiation over the time course of the assay. We have validated the assay scalability and consistency by screening the NIH clinical collection library of 727 compounds and identified ten compounds that promote myelination. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values for these compounds were determined to rank them according to potency. We have designed the first high capacity in vitro assay that assesses myelination of live axons. This assay will be ideal for screening large compound libraries to identify new drugs that stimulate myelination. Identification of agents capable of promoting the myelination of axons will likely lead to the development of new therapeutics for MS patients.

  4. Applications of high-throughput clonogenic survival assays in high-LET particle microbeams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios eGeorgantzoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Charged particle therapy is increasingly becoming a valuable tool in cancer treatment, mainly due to the favorable interaction of particle radiation with matter. Its application is still limited due, in part, to lack of data regarding the radiosensitivity of certain cell lines to this radiation type, especially to high-LET particles. From the earliest days of radiation biology, the clonogenic survival assay has been used to provide radiation response data. This method produces reliable data but it is not optimized for high-throughput microbeam studies with high-LET radiation where high levels of cell killing lead to a very low probability of maintaining cells’ clonogenic potential. A new method, therefore, is proposed in this paper, which could potentially allow these experiments to be conducted in a high-throughput fashion. Cells are seeded in special polypropylene dishes and bright-field illumination provides cell visualization. Digital images are obtained and cell detection is applied based on corner detection, generating individual cell targets as x-y points. These points in the dish are then irradiated individually by a micron field size high-LET microbeam. Post-irradiation, time-lapse imaging follows cells’ response. All irradiated cells are tracked by linking trajectories in all time-frames, based on finding their nearest position. Cell divisions are detected based on cell appearance and individual cell temporary corner density. The number of divisions anticipated is low due to the high probability of cell killing from high-LET irradiation. Survival curves are produced based on cell’s capacity to divide at least 4-5 times. The process is repeated for a range of doses of radiation. Validation shows the efficiency of the proposed cell detection and tracking method in finding cell divisions.

  5. DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2016-11-10

    Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Results Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemann–Pick type C disease. Conclusion We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between existing

  6. Robotic Mammosphere Assay for High-Throughput Screening in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, P A; Akrap, N; Söderberg, E M V; Harrison, H; Thomson, G J; Landberg, G

    2017-02-01

    In order to identify novel treatment principles specifically affecting cancer stem cells in triple-negative breast cancer, we have developed a high-throughput screening method based on the mammosphere and anoikis resistance assays allowing us to screen compounds using a functional readout. The assay was validated against manual protocols and through the use of positive controls, such as the response to hypoxia and treatment with the known cancer stem cell-targeting compound salinomycin. Manual and robotic procedures were compared and produced similar results in cell handling, cell cultures, and counting techniques, with no statistically significant difference produced from either method. The variance between samples processed manually versus robotically was no greater than 0.012, while Levene's test of significance was 0.2, indicating no significant difference between mammosphere data produced manually or robotically. Through the screening of 989 FDA-approved drugs and a follow-up screen assessing the antineoplastic subgroup, we have identified three therapeutic compounds with the ability to modulate the breast cancer stem cell fraction in the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, highlighting their potential usage as stem cell-specific adjuvant treatments.

  7. Auxotrophy-based High Throughput Screening assay for the identification of Bacillus subtilis stringent response inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Liis; Varik, Vallo; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Jimmy, Steffi; Lindberg, Stina; Tenson, Tanel; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2016-01-01

    The stringent response is a central adaptation mechanism that allows bacteria to adjust their growth and metabolism according to environmental conditions. The functionality of the stringent response is crucial for bacterial virulence, survival during host invasion as well as antibiotic resistance and tolerance. Therefore, specific inhibitors of the stringent response hold great promise as molecular tools for disarming and pacifying bacterial pathogens. By taking advantage of the valine amino acid auxotrophy of the Bacillus subtilis stringent response-deficient strain, we have set up a High Throughput Screening assay for the identification of stringent response inhibitors. By screening 17,500 compounds, we have identified a novel class of antibacterials based on the 4-(6-(phenoxy)alkyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole core. Detailed characterization of the hit compounds as well as two previously identified promising stringent response inhibitors – a ppGpp-mimic nucleotide Relacin and cationic peptide 1018 – showed that neither of the compounds is sufficiently specific, thus motivating future application of our screening assay to larger and more diverse molecular libraries. PMID:27775002

  8. A Microfabricated 96-Well 3D Assay Enabling High-Throughput Quantification of Cellular Invasion Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rui; Wei, Yuanchen; Li, Chaobo; Chen, Feng; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Xiaoting; Luan, Shaoliang; Fan, Beiyuan; Guo, Wei; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 96-well microfabricated assay to study three-dimensional (3D) invasion of tumor cells. A 3D cluster of tumor cells was first generated within each well by seeding cells onto a micro-patterned surface consisting of a central fibronectin-coated area that promotes cellular attachment, surrounded by a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) coated area that is resistant to cellular attachment. Following the formation of the 3D cell clusters, a 3D collagen extracellular matrix was formed in each well by thermal-triggered gelation. Invasion of the tumor cells into the extracellular matrix was subsequently initiated and monitored. Two modes of cellular infiltration were observed: A549 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix following the surfaces previously coated with PEG molecules in a pseudo-2D manner, while H1299 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix in a truly 3D manner including multiple directions. Based on the processing of 2D microscopic images, a key parameter, namely, equivalent invasion distance (the area of invaded cells divided by the circumference of the initial cell cluster) was obtained to quantify migration capabilities of these two cell types. These results validate the feasibility of the proposed platform, which may function as a high-throughput 3D cellular invasion assay. PMID:28240272

  9. Development of a facile method for high throughput screening with reporter gene assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, A S; Andrews, J L; Littleton, T R; Ignar, D M

    2000-10-01

    This report describes a facile methodology for high throughput screening with stable mammalian cell reporter gene assays. We have adapted a 96-well adherent cell method to an assay in which cells propagated in suspension are dispensed into 96- or 384-well plates containing test compounds in 100% DMSO. The validation of a stable CHO cell line that expresses 6xCRE-luciferase for use as a reporter gene host cell line is described. The reporter gene, when expressed in this particular CHO cell line, appears to respond specifically to modulation of cAMP levels, thus the cell line is appropriate for screening and pharmacological analysis of Galpha(s)- and Galpha(i)-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors. The development of the new suspension cell assay in both 96- and 384-well formats was performed using a derivative of the CHO host reporter cell line that was stably transfected with human melanocortin-1 receptor. The response of this cell line to NDP-alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and forskolin was nearly identical between the adherent and suspension methods. The new method offers improvements in cost, throughput, cell culture effort, compound stability, accuracy of compound delivery, and hands-on time. The 384-well assay can be performed at high capacity in any laboratory without the use of expensive automation systems such that a single person can screen 100 plates per day with 3.5-4 h hands-on time. Although the system has been validated using Galpha(s)-coupled receptor-mediated activation of a cAMP response element, the method can be applied to other types of targets and/or transcriptional response elements.

  10. A new non-radioactive deoxyhypusine synthase assay adaptable to high throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myung Hee; Mandal, Ajeet; Mandal, Swati; Wolff, Edith C

    2017-08-17

    Deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) catalyzes the post-translational modification of eukaryotic translation factor 5A (eIF5A) by the polyamine, spermidine, that converts one specific lysine residue to deoxyhypusine [N (ε) -4-aminobutyl(lysine)], which is subsequently hydroxylated to hypusine [N (ε) -4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl(lysine)]. Hypusine synthesis represents the most critical function of polyamine. As eIF5A has been implicated in various human diseases, identification of specific inhibitors of hypusine modification is of vital importance. DHS catalyzes a complex reaction that occurs in two stages, first, the NAD-dependent cleavage of spermidine to form an enzyme-butylimine intermediate and enzyme-bound NADH, and second, the transfer of the butylimine moiety from the enzyme intermediate to the eIF5A precursor and subsequent reduction of the eIF5A-butylimine intermediate by enzyme-bound NADH to form deoxyhypusine [N (ε) -4-aminobutyl(lysine)]. Our data demonstrate that there is a measurable release of enzyme-bound NADH in the absence of eIF5A precursor and that the DHS activity can be determined by coupling the first phase reaction with the NADH-Glo assay in which the generation of luminescence is dependent on NADH derived from the DHS partial reaction. The conventional DHS assay that measures the incorporation of radioactivity from [1,8-(3)H]spermidine into the eIF5A precursor in the complete reaction cannot be readily adapted for high throughput screening (HTS). In contrast, the non-radioactive DHS/NADH-Glo coupled assay is highly specific, sensitive and reproducible and could be configured for HTS of small molecule libraries for the identification of new inhibitors of DHS. Furthermore, the coupled assay provides new insights into the dynamics of the DHS reaction especially regarding the fate of NADH.

  11. Application of a high throughput Alamar blue biofilm susceptibility assay to Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pettit George R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis biofilms differ in structure, growth and regulation, and thus the high-throughput method of evaluating biofilm susceptibility that has been published for S. epidermidis cannot be applied to S. aureus without first evaluating the assay's reproducibility and reliability with S. aureus biofilms. Methods Staphylococcus aureus biofilms were treated with eleven approved antibiotics, lysostaphin, or Conflikt®, exposed to the oxidation reduction indicator Alamar blue, and reduction relative to untreated controls was determined visually and spectrophotometrically. The minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC was defined as ≤ 50% Alamar blue reduction and a purple/blue well 60 min after the addition of Alamar blue. Because all of the approved antibiotics had MBICs >128 μg/ml (most >2048 μg/ml, lysostaphin and Conflikt®, with relatively low MBICs, were used to correlate Alamar blue reduction with 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT reduction and viable counts (CFU/ml for S. aureus ATCC 29213 and three clinical isolates. Alamar blue's stability and lack of toxicity allowed CFU/ml to be determined from the same wells as Alamar blue absorbances. Results Overall, Alamar blue reduction had excellent correlation with XTT reduction and with CFU/ml. For ATCC 29213 and two clinical isolates treated with lysostaphin or Conflikt®, Alamar blue reduction had excellent correlation with XTT reduction (r = 0.93-0.99 and with CFU/ml (r = 0.92-0.98. For one of the clinical isolates, the results were moderately correlated for Conflikt® (r = 0.76, Alamar blue vs. XTT; r = 0.81, Alamar blue vs. CFU/ml and had excellent correlation for lysostaphin (r = 0.95, Alamar blue vs. XTT; r = 0.97, Alamar blue vs. CFU/ml. Conclusion A reliable, reproducible method for evaluating biofilm susceptibility was successfully applied to S. aureus biofilms. The described method

  12. A high-throughput clinical assay for testing drug facilitation of exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L; Levinson, Cheri A; Lenze, Eric J

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that D-cycloserine (DCS) facilitates exposure therapy. We developed a standardized test of this facilitation (i.e., a clinical assay), with the goal of testing for facilitation more quickly and inexpensively than a full clinical trial. We developed a standardized brief exposure in which participants with social anxiety disorder gave a videotaped speech. Participants were randomized to receive a single capsule of 250 mg DCS or a matching placebo prior to preparation for the speech. Distress levels were rated during the speech and again, approximately 1 week later, during a speech in an identical situation. Our primary measure of DCS's exposure-facilitating effect was between-session habituation: whether or not the participants showed less distress during the second speech compared to the first. We also measured levels of subjective anxiety and fear of scrutiny. Subjects randomized to receive DCS prior to their first speech were more likely to show between-session habituation than those who received placebo. We also found greater reduction of performance-related fear overall in the DCS group. Our clinical assay was able to detect exposure facilitation effects rapidly and in a highly standardized way, and is estimated to take a fraction of the time and costs of a clinical trial. Given the increasing interest in using medications to enhance learning-based psychotherapy, this high-throughput clinical assay approach may be a favorable method for testing novel mechanisms of action, and clarifying optimal parameters, for therapy facilitation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. BioAssay Ontology (BAO: a semantic description of bioassays and high-throughput screening results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Robin P

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput screening (HTS is one of the main strategies to identify novel entry points for the development of small molecule chemical probes and drugs and is now commonly accessible to public sector research. Large amounts of data generated in HTS campaigns are submitted to public repositories such as PubChem, which is growing at an exponential rate. The diversity and quantity of available HTS assays and screening results pose enormous challenges to organizing, standardizing, integrating, and analyzing the datasets and thus to maximize the scientific and ultimately the public health impact of the huge investments made to implement public sector HTS capabilities. Novel approaches to organize, standardize and access HTS data are required to address these challenges. Results We developed the first ontology to describe HTS experiments and screening results using expressive description logic. The BioAssay Ontology (BAO serves as a foundation for the standardization of HTS assays and data and as a semantic knowledge model. In this paper we show important examples of formalizing HTS domain knowledge and we point out the advantages of this approach. The ontology is available online at the NCBO bioportal http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/44531. Conclusions After a large manual curation effort, we loaded BAO-mapped data triples into a RDF database store and used a reasoner in several case studies to demonstrate the benefits of formalized domain knowledge representation in BAO. The examples illustrate semantic querying capabilities where BAO enables the retrieval of inferred search results that are relevant to a given query, but are not explicitly defined. BAO thus opens new functionality for annotating, querying, and analyzing HTS datasets and the potential for discovering new knowledge by means of inference.

  14. A high-throughput pipeline for designing microarray-based pathogen diagnostic assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reifman Jaques

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a methodology for high-throughput design of oligonucleotide fingerprints for microarray-based pathogen diagnostic assays. The oligonucleotide fingerprints, or DNA microarray probes, are designed for identifying target organisms in environmental or clinical samples. The design process is implemented in a high-performance computing software pipeline that incorporates major algorithmic improvements over a previous version to both reduce computation time and improve specificity assessment. Results The algorithmic improvements result in significant reduction in runtimes, with the updated pipeline being nearly up to five-times faster than the previous version. The improvements in specificity assessment, based on multiple specificity criteria, result in robust and consistent evaluation of cross-hybridization with nontarget sequences. In addition, the multiple criteria provide finer control on the number of resulting fingerprints, which helps in obtaining a larger number of fingerprints with high specificity. Simulation tests for Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis, using a well-established hybridization model to estimate cross-hybridization with nontarget sequences, show that the improved specificity criteria yield a larger number of fingerprints as compared to using a single specificity criterion. Conclusion The faster runtimes, achieved as the result of algorithmic improvements, are critical for extending the pipeline to process multiple target genomes. The larger numbers of identified fingerprints, obtained by considering broader specificity criteria, are essential for designing probes for hard-to-distinguish target sequences.

  15. Adapting high-throughput screening methods and assays for biocontainment laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Tigabu, Bersabeh; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Tower, Nichole; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has been integrated into the drug discovery process, and multiple assay formats have been widely used in many different disease areas but with limited focus on infectious agents. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of HTS campaigns using infectious wild-type pathogens rather than surrogates or biochemical pathogen-derived targets. Concurrently, enhanced emerging pathogen surveillance and increased human mobility have resulted in an increase in the emergence and dissemination of infectious human pathogens with serious public health, economic, and social implications at global levels. Adapting the HTS drug discovery process to biocontainment laboratories to develop new drugs for these previously uncharacterized and highly pathogenic agents is now feasible, but HTS at higher biosafety levels (BSL) presents a number of unique challenges. HTS has been conducted with multiple bacterial and viral pathogens at both BSL-2 and BSL-3, and pilot screens have recently been extended to BSL-4 environments for both Nipah and Ebola viruses. These recent successful efforts demonstrate that HTS can be safely conducted at the highest levels of biological containment. This review outlines the specific issues that must be considered in the execution of an HTS drug discovery program for high-containment pathogens. We present an overview of the requirements for HTS in high-level biocontainment laboratories.

  16. Spectral Unmixing Plate Reader: High-Throughput, High-Precision FRET Assays in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Tory M; Peterson, Kurt C; Grant, Benjamin D; Thomas, David D; Gillispie, Gregory D

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a microplate reader that records a complete high-quality fluorescence emission spectrum on a well-by-well basis under true high-throughput screening (HTS) conditions. The read time for an entire 384-well plate is less than 3 min. This instrument is particularly well suited for assays based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Intramolecular protein biosensors with genetically encoded green fluorescent protein (GFP) donor and red fluorescent protein (RFP) acceptor tags at positions sensitive to structural changes were stably expressed and studied in living HEK cells. Accurate quantitation of FRET was achieved by decomposing each observed spectrum into a linear combination of four component (basis) spectra (GFP emission, RFP emission, water Raman, and cell autofluorescence). Excitation and detection are both conducted from the top, allowing for thermoelectric control of the sample temperature from below. This spectral unmixing plate reader (SUPR) delivers an unprecedented combination of speed, precision, and accuracy for studying ensemble-averaged FRET in living cells. It complements our previously reported fluorescence lifetime plate reader, which offers the feature of resolving multiple FRET populations within the ensemble. The combination of these two direct waveform-recording technologies greatly enhances the precision and information content for HTS in drug discovery.

  17. Evaluating the Impact of Uncertainties in Clearance and Exposure When Prioritizing Chemicals Screened in High-Throughput Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toxicity-testing paradigm has evolved to include high-throughput (HT) methods for addressing the increasing need to screen hundreds to thousands of chemicals rapidly. Approaches that involve in vitro screening assays, in silico predictions of exposure concentrations, and phar...

  18. Development of a high-throughput opsonophagocytic assay for the determination of functional antibody activity against Streptococcus pyogenes using bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Natalie; Loh, Jacelyn M S; Moreland, Nicole J; Proft, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The lack of standardised protocols for the assessment of functional antibodies has hindered Streptococcus pyogenes research and the development of vaccines. A robust, high throughput opsonophagocytic bactericidal assay to determine protective antibodies in human and rabbit serum has been developed that utilises bioluminescence as a rapid read out.

  19. High-throughput 1,536-well fluorescence polarization assays for α(1-acid glycoprotein and human serum albumin binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Yasgar

    Full Text Available Two major plasma proteins in humans are primarily responsible for drug binding, the α(1-acid-glycoprotein (AGP and human serum albumin (HSA. The availability of at least a semiquantitative high-throughput assay for assessment of protein binding is expected to aid in bridging the current gap between high-throughput screening and early lead discovery, where cell-based and biochemical assays are deployed routinely to test up to several million compounds rapidly, as opposed to the late-stage candidate drug profiling methods which test at most dozens of compounds at a time. Here, we describe the miniaturization of a pair of assays based on the binding- and displacement-induced changes in fluorescence polarization (FP of fluorescent small molecule probes known to specifically target the drug-binding sites of these two proteins. A robust and reproducible assay performance was achieved in ≤4 µL assay volume in 1,536-well format. The assays were tested against a validation set of 10 known protein binders, and the results compared favorably with data obtained using protein-coated beads with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The miniaturized assays were taken to a high-throughput level in a screen of the LOPAC(1280 collection of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds. The adaptation of the AGP and HSA FP assays to a 1,536-well format should allow their use in early-stage profiling of large-size compound sets.

  20. A high throughput screening assay system for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of gsp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisan Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available Mis-sense mutations in the α-subunit of the G-protein, Gsα, cause fibrous dysplasia of bone/McCune-Albright syndrome. The biochemical outcome of these mutations is constitutively active Gsα and increased levels of cAMP. The aim of this study was to develop an assay system that would allow the identification of small molecule inhibitors specific for the mutant Gsα protein, the so-called gsp oncogene. Commercially available Chinese hamster ovary cells were stably transfected with either wild-type (WT or mutant Gsα proteins (R201C and R201H. Stable cell lines with equivalent transfected Gsα protein expression that had relatively lower (WT or higher (R201C and R201H cAMP levels were generated. These cell lines were used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-based cAMP assay in 1536-well microplate format for high throughput screening of small molecule libraries. A small molecule library of 343,768 compounds was screened to identify modulators of gsp activity. A total of 1,356 compounds with inhibitory activity were initially identified and reconfirmed when tested in concentration dose responses. Six hundred eighty-six molecules were selected for further analysis after removing cytotoxic compounds and those that were active in forskolin-induced WT cells. These molecules were grouped by potency, efficacy, and structural similarities to yield 22 clusters with more than 5 of structurally similar members and 144 singleton molecules. Seven chemotypes of the major clusters were identified for further testing and analyses.

  1. One-step seeding of neural stem cells with vitronectin-supplemented medium for high throughput screening assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Li, Rong; Long, Yan; Titus, Steve; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Human neuronal cells differentiated from induced pluripotent cells have emerged as a new model system for the study of disease pathophysiology and evaluation of drug efficacy. Differentiated neuronal cells are more similar in genetics and biological content to the human brain cells than other animal disease models. However, culture of neuronal cells in assay plates requires a labor-intensive procedure of plate pre-coating, hampering its applications in high throughput screening (HTS). We developed a simplified method with one-step seeding of neural stem cells in assay plates by supplementing the medium with a recombinant human vitronectin (VTN), thus avoiding plate pre-coating. Robust results were obtained from cell viability, calcium response, and neurite outgrowth assays using this new method. Our data demonstrate that this approach greatly simplifies high throughput assays using neuronal cells differentiated from human stem cells for translational research. PMID:27647668

  2. A high-throughput, in-vitro assay for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi Willcoxon, Michi; Dennis, Jaclyn R; Lau, Sabina I; Xie, Weiping; You, You; Leng, Song; Fong, Ryan C; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-01-10

    A high-throughput, in-vitro assay for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins designated as Cry was developed and evaluated for screening a large number of Cry protein variants produced by DNA shuffling. This automation-amenable assay exploits an insect cell line expressing a single receptor of Bt Cry proteins. The Cry toxin used to develop this assay is a variant of the Cry1Ab protein called IP1-88, which was produced previously by DNA shuffling. Cell mortality caused by the activated Bt Cry toxin was determined by chemical cell viability assay in 96/384-well microtiter plates utilizing CellTiter 96(®) obtained from Promega. A widely-accepted mode-of-action theory of certain Bt Cry proteins suggests that the activated toxin binds to one or more receptors and forms a pore through the insect gut epithelial cell apical membrane. A number of insect proteins such as cadherin-like protein (Cad), aminopeptidase-N (APN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and ABC transporter (ABCC) have been identified as the receptors of Bt Cry toxins. In this study, Bt Cry toxin receptors Ostrinia nubilalis (European corn borer) cadherin-like protein (On-Cad) and aminopeptidase-N 1 and 3 (On-APN1, On-APN3) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) cadherin-like protein (Sf-Cad) were cloned in an insect cell line, Sf21, and a mammalian cell line, Expi293F. It was observed by ligand blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy that trypsin-activated IP1-88 bound to On-Cad and On-APN1, but not Sf-Cad or On-APN3. In contrast, IP1-88 bound only to APN1 in BBMV (Brush Border Membrane Vesicles) prepared from the third and fourth-instar O. nubilalis larval midgut. The sensitivity of the recombinant cells to the toxin was then tested. IP1-88 showed no toxicity to non-recombinant Sf21 and Expi293F. Toxicity was observed only when the On-Cad gene was cloned and expressed. Sf-Cad and On-APN1 were not able to make those cells sensitive to the toxin. Since the expression of On-Cad alone was

  3. Design and analysis of experiments with high throughput biological assay data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, David M

    2004-12-01

    The design and analysis of experiments using gene expression microarrays is a topic of considerable current research, and work is beginning to appear on the analysis of proteomics and metabolomics data by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. The literature in this area is evolving rapidly, and commercial software for analysis of array or proteomics data is rarely up to date, and is essentially nonexistent for metabolomics data. In this paper, I review some of the issues that should concern any biologists planning to use such high-throughput biological assay data in an experimental investigation. Technical details are kept to a minimum, and may be found in the referenced literature, as well as in the many excellent papers which space limitations prevent my describing. There are usually a number of viable options for design and analysis of such experiments, but unfortunately, there are even more non-viable ones that have been used even in the published literature. This is an area in which up-to-date knowledge of the literature is indispensable for efficient and effective design and analysis of these experiments. In general, we concentrate on relatively simple analyses, often focusing on identifying differentially expressed genes and the comparable issues in mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy (consistent differences in peak heights or areas for example). Complex multivariate and pattern recognition methods also need much attention, but the issues we describe in this paper must be dealt with first. The literature on analysis of proteomics and metabolomics data is as yet sparse, so the main focus of this paper will be on methods devised for analysis of gene expression data that generalize to proteomics and metabolomics, with some specific comments near the end on analysis of metabolomics data by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Development of a high-throughput colorimetric Zika virus infection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Janis A; Harms, Mirja; Schubert, Axel; Mayer, Benjamin; Jansen, Stephanie; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe; Michel, Detlef; Mertens, Thomas; Vapalahti, Olli; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Münch, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen that causes congenital infections which may result in birth defects, such as microcephaly. Currently, no approved treatment or vaccination is available. ZIKV can be readily detected in cell culture where virally infected cells are normally stained by specific antibodies. As ZIKV regularly causes a cytopathic effect, we were wondering whether this viral property can be used to quantitatively determine viral infectivity. We here describe the use of an 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide-(MTT)-based cell viability assay that allows to determine ZIKV-induced cell death. We show that this colorimetric assay quantifies ZIKV infection over a broad range of viral dilutions in both monkey and human cells. It allows to determine inhibitory activities of antivirals that block ZIKV or to define the neutralizing antibody titers of ZIKV antisera. This MTT-based ZIKV detection assay can be evaluated by naked eye or computational tools, has a broad linear range, does not require large equipment or costly reagents, and thus represents a promising alternative to antibody-based assays, in particular in resource-poor settings. We propose to use this simple, fast, and cheap method for quantification of ZIKV neutralizing antibodies and testing of antiviral compounds.

  5. Mass Spectrometry-based Assay for High Throughput and High Sensitivity Biomarker Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xuejiang; Tang, Keqi

    2017-06-14

    Searching for disease specific biomarkers has become a major undertaking in the biomedical research field as the effective diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of many complex human diseases are largely determined by the availability and the quality of the biomarkers. A successful biomarker as an indicator to a specific biological or pathological process is usually selected from a large group of candidates by a strict verification and validation process. To be clinically useful, the validated biomarkers must be detectable and quantifiable by the selected testing techniques in their related tissues or body fluids. Due to its easy accessibility, protein biomarkers would ideally be identified in blood plasma or serum. However, most disease related protein biomarkers in blood exist at very low concentrations (<1ng/mL) and are “masked” by many none significant species at orders of magnitude higher concentrations. The extreme requirements of measurement sensitivity, dynamic range and specificity make the method development extremely challenging. The current clinical protein biomarker measurement primarily relies on antibody based immunoassays, such as ELISA. Although the technique is sensitive and highly specific, the development of high quality protein antibody is both expensive and time consuming. The limited capability of assay multiplexing also makes the measurement an extremely low throughput one rendering it impractical when hundreds to thousands potential biomarkers need to be quantitatively measured across multiple samples. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays have recently shown to be a viable alternative for high throughput and quantitative candidate protein biomarker verification. Among them, the triple quadrupole MS based assay is the most promising one. When it is coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) separation and electrospray ionization (ESI) source, a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in a special selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode

  6. A High-Throughput Assay for Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Based on the Transcreener GDP Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Melvin; Schabdach, Amanda; Kumar, Meera; Zielinski, Tom; Donover, Preston S; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa D; Lowery, Robert G

    2015-12-01

    Ras homologous (Rho) family GTPases act as molecular switches controlling cell growth, movement, and gene expression by cycling between inactive guanosine diphosphate (GDP)- and active guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound conformations. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) positively regulate Rho GTPases by accelerating GDP dissociation to allow formation of the active, GTP-bound complex. Rho proteins are directly involved in cancer pathways, especially cell migration and invasion, and inhibiting GEFs holds potential as a therapeutic strategy to diminish Rho-dependent oncogenesis. Methods for measuring GEF activity suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) are limited. We developed a simple, generic biochemical assay method for measuring GEF activity based on the fact that GDP dissociation is generally the rate-limiting step in the Rho GTPase catalytic cycle, and thus addition of a GEF causes an increase in steady-state GTPase activity. We used the Transcreener GDP Assay, which relies on selective immunodetection of GDP, to measure the GEF-dependent stimulation of steady-state GTP hydrolysis by small GTPases using Dbs (Dbl's big sister) as a GEF for Cdc42, RhoA, and RhoB. The assay is well suited for HTS, with a homogenous format and far red fluorescence polarization (FP) readout, and it should be broadly applicable to diverse Rho GEF/GTPase pairs. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  7. Real-time, high-throughput measurements of peptide-MHC-I dissociation using a scintillation proximity assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael; Røder, Gustav Andreas;

    2011-01-01

    timed data needed to determine the rate of dissociation is not simple. Ideally, one should use a homogenous assay involving an inexhaustible and label-free assay principle. Here, we present a homogenous, high-throughput peptide-MHC class I dissociation assay, which by and large fulfill these ideal...... requirements. To avoid labeling of the highly variable peptide, we labeled the invariant ß2m and monitored its dissociation by a scintillation proximity assay, which has no separation steps and allows for real-time quantitative measurement of dissociation. Validating this work-around to create a virtually...

  8. Automated image-based assay for evaluation of HIV neutralization and cell-to-cell fusion inhibition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Özkaya Şahin, Gülsen; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Jansson, Marianne; Carpenter, Anne E; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2014-01-01

    .... Here, we present a high-throughput, high-content automated plaque reduction (APR) assay based on automated microscopy and image analysis that allows evaluation of neutralization and inhibition of cell-cell fusion within the same assay...

  9. Quantitative digital image analysis of chromogenic assays for high throughput screening of alpha-amylase mutant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Manoharan; Priyadharshini, Ramachandran; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis-based method for high throughput screening of an alpha-amylase mutant library using chromogenic assays was developed. Assays were performed in microplates and high resolution images of the assay plates were read using the Virtual Microplate Reader (VMR) script to quantify the concentration of the chromogen. This method is fast and sensitive in quantifying 0.025-0.3 mg starch/ml as well as 0.05-0.75 mg glucose/ml. It was also an effective screening method for improved alpha-amylase activity with a coefficient of variance of 18%.

  10. Development and implementation of a high-throughput compound screening assay for targeting disrupted ER calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Honarnejad

    Full Text Available Disrupted intracellular calcium homeostasis is believed to occur early in the cascade of events leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Particularly familial AD mutations linked to Presenilins result in exaggerated agonist-evoked calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Here we report the development of a fully automated high-throughput calcium imaging assay utilizing a genetically-encoded FRET-based calcium indicator at single cell resolution for compound screening. The established high-throughput screening assay offers several advantages over conventional high-throughput calcium imaging technologies. We employed this assay for drug discovery in AD by screening compound libraries consisting of over 20,000 small molecules followed by structure-activity-relationship analysis. This led to the identification of Bepridil, a calcium channel antagonist drug in addition to four further lead structures capable of normalizing the potentiated FAD-PS1-induced calcium release from ER. Interestingly, it has recently been reported that Bepridil can reduce Aβ production by lowering BACE1 activity. Indeed, we also detected lowered Aβ, increased sAPPα and decreased sAPPβ fragment levels upon Bepridil treatment. The latter findings suggest that Bepridil may provide a multifactorial therapeutic modality for AD by simultaneously addressing multiple aspects of the disease.

  11. Validation of high-throughput real time polymerase chain reaction assays for simultaneous detection of invasive citrus pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saponari, Maria; Loconsole, Giuliana; Liao, Hui-Hong; Jiang, Bo; Savino, Vito; Yokomi, Raymond K

    2013-11-01

    A number of important citrus pathogens are spread by graft propagation, arthropod vector transmission and inadvertent import and dissemination of infected plants. For these reasons, citrus disease management and clean stock programs require pathogen detection systems which are economical and sensitive to maintain a healthy industry. To this end, multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays were developed allowing high-throughput and simultaneous detection of some major invasive citrus pathogens. Automated high-throughput extraction comparing several bead-based commercial extraction kits were tested and compared with tissue print and manual extraction to obtain nucleic acids from healthy and pathogen-infected citrus trees from greenhouse in planta collections and field. Total nucleic acids were used as templates for pathogen detection. Multiplex reverse transcription-qPCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed for simultaneous detection of six targets including a virus, two viroids, a bacterium associated with huanglongbing and a citrus RNA internal control. Specifically, two one-step TaqMan-based multiplex RT-qPCR assays were developed and tested with target templates to determine sensitivity and detection efficiency. The first assay included primers and probes for 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas) and Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) broad spectrum detection and genotype differentiation (VT- and T3-like genotypes). The second assay contained primers and probes for Hop stunt viroid (HSVd), Citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd) and the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase (nad5) mRNA as an internal citrus host control. Primers and TaqMan probes for the viroids were designed in this work; whereas those for the other pathogens were from reports of others. Based on quantitation cycle values, automated high-throughput extraction of samples proved to be as suitable as manual extraction. The multiplex RT-qPCR assays detected both RNA and DNA pathogens in the same dilution series

  12. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based endothelial cell apoptosis assay and its application for screening vascular disrupting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Afu [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Luo, Kathy Qian, E-mail: kluo@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An endothelial cell apoptosis assay using FRET-based biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue during apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method was developed into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This assay was applied to screen vascular disrupting agents. -- Abstract: In this study, we developed a high-throughput endothelial cell apoptosis assay using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor. After exposure to apoptotic inducer UV-irradiation or anticancer drugs such as paclitaxel, the fluorescence of the cells changed from green to blue. We developed this method into a high-throughput assay in 96-well plates by measuring the emission ratio of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to monitor the activation of a key protease, caspase-3, during apoptosis. The Z Prime factor for this assay was above 0.5 which indicates that this assay is suitable for a high-throughput analysis. Finally, we applied this functional high-throughput assay for screening vascular disrupting agents (VDA) which could induce endothelial cell apoptosis from our in-house compounds library and dioscin was identified as a hit. As this assay allows real time and sensitive detection of cell apoptosis, it will be a useful tool for monitoring endothelial cell apoptosis in living cell situation and for identifying new VDA candidates via a high-throughput screening.

  13. Versatile assays for high throughput screening for activators or inhibitors of intracellular proteases and their cellular regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Intracellular proteases constitute a class of promising drug discovery targets. Methods for high throughput screening against these targets are generally limited to in vitro biochemical assays that can suffer many technical limitations, as well as failing to capture the biological context of proteases within the cellular pathways that lead to their activation. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026;We describe here a versatile system for reconstituting protease activation networks in yeast and assaying the activity of these pathways using a cleavable transcription factor substrate in conjunction with reporter gene read-outs. The utility of these versatile assay components and their application for screening strategies was validated for all ten human Caspases, a family of intracellular proteases involved in cell death and inflammation, including implementation of assays for high throughput screening (HTS of chemical libraries and functional screening of cDNA libraries. The versatility of the technology was also demonstrated for human autophagins, cysteine proteases involved in autophagy.Altogether, the yeast-based systems described here for monitoring activity of ectopically expressed mammalian proteases provide a fascile platform for functional genomics and chemical library screening.

  14. The modified FACS calcein AM retention assay: A high throughput flow cytometer based method to measure cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillissen, M A; Yasuda, E; de Jong, G; Levie, S E; Go, D; Spits, H; van Helden, P M; Hazenberg, M D

    2016-07-01

    Current methods to determine cellular cytotoxicity in vitro are hampered by background signals that are caused by auto-fluorescent target and effector cells and by non-specific cell death. We combined and adjusted existing cell viability assays to develop a method that allows for highly reproducible, accurate, single cell analysis by high throughput FACS, in which non-specific cell death is corrected for. In this assay the number of living, calcein AM labeled cells that are green fluorescent are quantified by adding a fixed number of unlabeled calibration beads to the analysis. Using this modified FACS calcein AM retention method, we found EC50 values to be highly reproducible and considerably lower compared to EC50 values obtained by conventional assays, displaying the high sensitivity of this assay.

  15. Growth-Based Bacterial Viability Assay for Interference-Free and High-Throughput Toxicity Screening of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian A; Nguyen, Thu Ha Thi; Hudson-Smith, Natalie V; Clement, Peter L; Forester, Dona-Carla; Frew, Hilena; Hang, Mimi N; Murphy, Catherine J; Hamers, Robert J; Feng, Z Vivian; Haynes, Christy L

    2017-02-07

    Current high-throughput approaches evaluating toxicity of chemical agents toward bacteria typically rely on optical assays, such as luminescence and absorbance, to probe the viability of the bacteria. However, when applied to toxicity induced by nanomaterials, scattering and absorbance from the nanomaterials act as interferences that complicate quantitative analysis. Herein, we describe a bacterial viability assay that is free of optical interference from nanomaterials and can be performed in a high-throughput format on 96-well plates. In this assay, bacteria were exposed to various materials and then diluted by a large factor into fresh growth medium. The large dilution ensured minimal optical interference from the nanomaterial when reading optical density, and the residue left from the exposure mixture after dilution was confirmed not to impact the bacterial growth profile. The fractions of viable cells after exposure were allowed to grow in fresh medium to generate measurable growth curves. Bacterial viability was then quantitatively correlated to the delay of bacterial growth compared to a reference regarded as 100% viable cells; data analysis was inspired by that in quantitative polymerase chain reactions, where the delay in the amplification curve is correlated to the starting amount of the template nucleic acid. Fast and robust data analysis was achieved by developing computer algorithms carried out using R. This method was tested on four bacterial strains, including both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, showing great potential for application to all culturable bacterial strains. With the increasing diversity of engineered nanomaterials being considered for large-scale use, this high-throughput screening method will facilitate rapid screening of nanomaterial toxicity and thus inform the risk assessment of nanoparticles in a timely fashion.

  16. A novel high-throughput format assay for HIV-1 integrase strand transfer reaction using magnetic beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-qiu HE; Xiao-hui MA; Bin LIU; Wei-zu CHEN; Cun-xin WANG; Shao-hui CHENG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To develop a novel high-throughput format assay to monitor the integrase (IN) strand transfer (ST) reaction in vitro and apply it to a reaction character study and the identification of antiviral drugs.Methods:The donor DNA duplex,with a sequence identical to the U5 end of HIV-1 long terminal repeats,is labeled at its 5' end with biotin (BIO).The target DNA duplex is labeled at its 3' end with digoxin (DIG).IN mediates the integration of donor DNA into target DNA and results in a 5' BIO and 3' DIG-labeled duplex DNA product.Streptavidin-coated magnetic beads were used to capture the product,and the amount of DIG was measured as the ST reaction product.The assay was optimized in 96-well microplate format for high-throughput screening purpose.Moreover,the assay was applied in a ST reaction character study,and the efficiency of the assay in the identification of antiviral compounds was tested.Results:The end-point values,measured as absorbance at 405 nm was approximately 1.5 for the IN-mediated ST reaction as compared with no more than 0.05 of background readings.The ST reaction char-acter and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 2 known IN inhibitors obtained in our assay were similar to previously reported results using other assays.The evaluation parameter Z' factor for this assay ranged from 0.6 to 0.9.Conclusion:The assay presented here has been proven to be rapid,sensitive,and specific for the detection of IN ST activity,the reaction character study,as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN.

  17. A homogeneous, high-throughput assay for phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase with a novel, rapid substrate preparation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindy I Davis

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositide kinases regulate diverse cellular functions and are important targets for therapeutic development for diseases, such as diabetes and cancer. Preparation of the lipid substrate is crucial for the development of a robust and miniaturizable lipid kinase assay. Enzymatic assays for phosphoinositide kinases often use lipid substrates prepared from lyophilized lipid preparations by sonication, which result in variability in the liposome size from preparation to preparation. Herein, we report a homogeneous 1536-well luciferase-coupled bioluminescence assay for PI5P4Kα. The substrate preparation is novel and allows the rapid production of a DMSO-containing substrate solution without the need for lengthy liposome preparation protocols, thus enabling the scale-up of this traditionally difficult type of assay. The Z'-factor value was greater than 0.7 for the PI5P4Kα assay, indicating its suitability for high-throughput screening applications. Tyrphostin AG-82 had been identified as an inhibitor of PI5P4Kα by assessing the degree of phospho transfer of γ-(32P-ATP to PI5P; its inhibitory activity against PI5P4Kα was confirmed in the present miniaturized assay. From a pilot screen of a library of bioactive compounds, another tyrphostin, I-OMe tyrphostin AG-538 (I-OMe-AG-538, was identified as an ATP-competitive inhibitor of PI5P4Kα with an IC(50 of 1 µM, affirming the suitability of the assay for inhibitor discovery campaigns. This homogeneous assay may apply to other lipid kinases and should help in the identification of leads for this class of enzymes by enabling high-throughput screening efforts.

  18. Testing candidate genes for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in fruit flies using a high throughput assay for complex behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Madsen, Lisbeth Strøm; Arvidson, Sandra Marie Neumann

    2016-01-01

    Fruit flies are important model organisms for functional testing of candidate genes in multiple disciplines, including the study of human diseases. Here we use a high-throughput locomotor activity assay to test the response on activity behavior of gene disruption in Drosophila melanogaster. The aim...... was to investigate the impact of disruption of 14 candidate genes for human attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on fly behavior. By obtaining a range of correlated measures describing the space of variables for behavioral activity we show, that some mutants display similar phenotypic responses...... in fruit flies. Results provide additional support for the investigated genes being risk candidate genes for ADHD in humans....

  19. A universal indicator dye pH assay for crystallization solutions and other high-throughput applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Janet; Sayle, Roger A; Fazio, Vincent J

    2012-08-01

    In protein crystallization, as well as in many other fields, it is known that the pH at which experiments are performed is often the key factor in the success or failure of the trials. With the trend towards plate-based high-throughput experimental techniques, measuring the pH values of solutions one by one becomes prohibitively time- and reagent-expensive. As part of an HT crystallization facility, a colour-based pH assay that is rapid, uses very little reagent and is suitable for 96-well or higher density plates has been developed.

  20. Integrated Model of Chemical Perturbations of a Biological PathwayUsing 18 In Vitro High Throughput Screening Assays for the Estrogen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    We demonstrate a computational network model that integrates 18 in vitro, high-throughput screening assays measuring estrogen receptor (ER) binding, dimerization, chromatin binding, transcriptional activation and ER-dependent cell proliferation. The network model uses activity pa...

  1. A high-throughput screening assay for assessing the viability of Cryptococcus neoformans under nutrient starvation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehdashti, Seameen J; Abbott, Jennifer; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; McKew, John C; Williamson, Peter R; Zheng, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes an estimated 600,000 AIDS-related deaths annually that occur primarily in resource-limited countries. Fluconazole and amphotericin B are currently available for the treatment of cryptococcal-related infections. However, fluconazole has limited clinical efficacy and amphotericin B requires intravenous infusion and is associated with high renal toxicity. Therefore, there is an unmet need for a new orally administrable anti-cryptococcal drug. We have developed a high-throughput screening assay for the measurement of C. neoformans viability in 1,536-well plate format. The signal-to-basal ratio of the ATP content assay was 21.9 fold with a coefficient of variation and Z' factor of 7.1% and 0.76, respectively. A pilot screen of 1,280 known compounds against the wild-type C. neoformans (strain H99) led to the identification of four active compounds including niclosamide, malonoben, 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, and 5-[(4-ethylphenyl)methylene]-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone. These compounds were further tested against nine clinical isolates of C. neoformans, and their fungicidal activities were confirmed. The results demonstrate that this miniaturized C. neoformans assay is advantageous for the high-throughput screening of large compound collections to identify lead compounds for new anti-cryptococcal drug development.

  2. A low cost and high throughput magnetic bead-based immuno-agglutination assay in confined droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teste, Bruno; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Viovy, Jean Louis; Malaquin, Laurent

    2013-06-21

    Although passive immuno-agglutination assays consist of one step and simple procedures, they are usually not adapted for high throughput analyses and they require expensive and bulky equipment for quantitation steps. Here we demonstrate a low cost, multimodal and high throughput immuno-agglutination assay that relies on a combination of magnetic beads (MBs), droplets microfluidics and magnetic tweezers. Antibody coated MBs were used as a capture support in the homogeneous phase. Following the immune interaction, water in oil droplets containing MBs and analytes were generated and transported in Teflon tubing. When passing in between magnetic tweezers, the MBs contained in the droplets were magnetically confined in order to enhance the agglutination rate and kinetics. When releasing the magnetic field, the internal recirculation flows in the droplet induce shear forces that favor MBs redispersion. In the presence of the analyte, the system preserves specific interactions and MBs stay in the aggregated state while in the case of a non-specific analyte, redispersion of particles occurs. The analyte quantitation procedure relies on the MBs redispersion rate within the droplet. The influence of different parameters such as magnetic field intensity, flow rate and MBs concentration on the agglutination performances have been investigated and optimized. Although the immuno-agglutination assay described in this work may not compete with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in terms of sensitivity, it offers major advantages regarding the reagents consumption (analysis is performed in sub microliter droplet) and the platform cost that yields to very cheap analyses. Moreover the fully automated analysis procedure provides reproducible analyses with throughput well above those of existing technologies. We demonstrated the detection of biotinylated phosphatase alkaline in 100 nL sample volumes with an analysis rate of 300 assays per hour and a limit of detection of 100 pM.

  3. A High Throughput, 384-Well, Semi-Automated, Hepatocyte Intrinsic Clearance Assay for Screening New Molecular Entities in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinle, Lance; Peterkin, Vincent; de Morais, Sonia M; Jenkins, Gary J; Badagnani, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput, semi-automated clearance screening assay in hepatocytes was developed allowing a scientist to generate data for 96 compounds in one week. The 384-well format assay utilizes a Thermo Multidrop Combi and an optimized LC-MS/MS method. The previously reported LCMS/ MS method reduced the analytical run time by 3-fold, down to 1.2 min injection-to-injection. The Multidrop was able to deliver hepatocytes to 384-well plates with minimal viability loss. Comparison of results from the new 384-well and historical 24-well assays yielded a correlation of 0.95. In addition, results obtained for 25 marketed drugs with various metabolism pathways had a correlation of 0.75 when compared with literature values. Precision was maintained in the new format as 8 compounds tested in ≥39 independent experiments had coefficients of variation ≤21%. The ability to predict in vivo clearances using the new stability assay format was also investigated using 22 marketed drugs and 26 AbbVie compounds. Correction of intrinsic clearance values with binding to hepatocytes (in vitro data) and plasma (in vivo data) resulted in a higher in vitro to in vivo correlation when comparing 22 marketed compounds in human (0.80 vs 0.35) and 26 AbbVie Discovery compounds in rat (0.56 vs 0.17), demonstrating the importance of correcting for binding in clearance studies. This newly developed high throughput, semi-automated clearance assay allows for rapid screening of Discovery compounds to enable Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) analysis based on high quality hepatocyte stability data in sufficient quantity and quality to drive the next round of compound synthesis.

  4. A high-throughput assay for quantification of starch hydrolase inhibition based on turbidity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingting; Song, Lixia; Wang, Hongyu; Huang, Dejian

    2011-09-28

    A high-throughput method for rapid determination of starch hydrolase inhibition was developed using a 96-well microplate UV-vis reader to monitor the turbidity decrease over time. The area under the curve of turbidity measured over time was used to quantify the inhibitory effect of polyphenolic compounds on porcine pancreatic amylase, rat intestine α-glucosidase, and fungal amyloglucosidase. Acarbose equivalence (AE) was introduced for the first time and defined as IC50 of acarbose divided by the IC50 of the sample measured under the same 96-well plate. This way, the run-to-run variations are canceled out. Among the plant extracts tested, grape seed extracts (1,440 μmolAE/g) and cinnamon bark extracts (1600 μmolAE/g) are the most active in inhibiting rat intestine α-glucosidase. For porcine α-amylase inhibition, grape seed extracts (5710 μmol AE/g) are close to four times more active (equal weight basis) than acarbose (1550 μmolAE/g).

  5. Validation of a high-throughput in vitro alkaline elution/rat hepatocyte assay for DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gealy, Robert; Wright-Bourque, Jennifer L; Kraynak, Andrew R; McKelvey, Troy W; Barnum, John E; Storer, Richard D

    2007-04-20

    In vitro alkaline elution is a sensitive and specific short term assay which measures DNA strand breakage in a mammalian test system (primary rat hepatocytes). This lab has previously demonstrated the performance of the assay with known genotoxic and non-genotoxic compounds. The methodology employed has relatively low sample throughput and is labor-intensive, requiring a great deal of manual processing of samples in a format that is not amenable to automation. Here, we present an automated version of the assay. This high-throughput alkaline elution assay (HT-AE) was made possible through 3 key developments: (1) DNA quantitation using PicoGreen and OliGreen fluorescent DNA binding dyes; (2) design and implementation of a custom automation system; and (3) reducing the assay to a 96-well plate format. The assay can now be run with 5-50mg of test compound. HT-AE was validated in a similar manner as the original assay, including assessment of non-genotoxic and non-carcinogenic compounds and evaluation of cytotoxicity to avoid confounding effects of toxicity-associated DNA degradation. The validation test results from compounds of known genotoxic potential were used to set appropriate criteria to classify alkaline elution results for genotoxicity.

  6. A novel high throughput screening assay for binding affinities of perfluoroalkyl iodide for estrogen receptor alpha and beta isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenting; Zhao, Lixia; Sun, Zhendong; Yang, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Qunfang; Jiang, Guibin

    2017-12-01

    Contaminants of emerging concern are continuously increasing, which makes it important to develop high throughput screening techniques for the evaluation of their potential biological effects, especially endocrine disrupting effects, which would directly influence the population dynamics in environment. A novel competitive binding assay based on enzyme fragmentation complementation technology was established to screen the binding affinities of emerging chemicals for estrogen receptor (ER) α or β isoforms. Exogenous compounds could compete with the fragment (ED-ES) of genetically engineered β-galactosidase enzyme (β-gal) for the binding to ERα or β, thus quantitatively altering the formation of enzymatically active β-gal and the hydrolysis of luminescent substrate. According to the monitoring of luminescence curves and the optimization of ERα or β concentrations, it was found that luminescent signals were sustainably emitted for 9h, and 40nM ERα or β in the system would lead to the most sensitive luminescence response. Using 17β-estrodiol (E2) and genistein as the representative estrogenic hormones, their binding affinities for ERα and β were evaluated. The results were consistent with those determined by traditional methods, which confirmed the reliability of this competitive binding assay based on β-gal. Four polyfluorinated iodine alkanes (PFIs) with specific structural characteristics in iodine substitution and carbon chain length were screened, and the results showed diverse binding affinities and different preferences of these chemicals to ERα or β isoforms. The binding affinities of PFIs for ERα were consistent with the result from MVLN transcriptional reporter assay. Overall, the competitive binding assay presented in this study provided a promising alternative to high throughput screening of emerging chemicals with estrogenic effects, which would be important in explanation of their potential toxicological effects and human exposure risks

  7. Use of the melting curve assay as a means for high-throughput quantification of Illumina sequencing libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Shinozuka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiplexed sequencing is commonly performed on massively parallel short-read sequencing platforms such as Illumina, and the efficiency of library normalisation can affect the quality of the output dataset. Although several library normalisation approaches have been established, none are ideal for highly multiplexed sequencing due to issues of cost and/or processing time. Methods. An inexpensive and high-throughput library quantification method has been developed, based on an adaptation of the melting curve assay. Sequencing libraries were subjected to the assay using the Bio-Rad Laboratories CFX ConnectTM Real-Time PCR Detection System. The library quantity was calculated through summation of reduction of relative fluorescence units between 86 and 95 °C. Results.PCR-enriched sequencing libraries are suitable for this quantification without pre-purification of DNA. Short DNA molecules, which ideally should be eliminated from the library for subsequent processing, were differentiated from the target DNA in a mixture on the basis of differences in melting temperature. Quantification results for long sequences targeted using the melting curve assay were correlated with those from existing methods (R2 > 0.77, and that observed from MiSeq sequencing (R2 = 0.82. Discussion.The results of multiplexed sequencing suggested that the normalisation performance of the described method is equivalent to that of another recently reported high-throughput bead-based method, BeNUS. However, costs for the melting curve assay are considerably lower and processing times shorter than those of other existing methods, suggesting greater suitability for highly multiplexed sequencing applications.

  8. A high throughput in vivo assay for taste quality and palatability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kyle Palmer

    Full Text Available Taste quality and palatability are two of the most important properties measured in the evaluation of taste stimuli. Human panels can report both aspects, but are of limited experimental flexibility and throughput capacity. Relatively efficient animal models for taste evaluation have been developed, but each of them is designed to measure either taste quality or palatability as independent experimental endpoints. We present here a new apparatus and method for high throughput quantification of both taste quality and palatability using rats in an operant taste discrimination paradigm. Cohorts of four rats were trained in a modified operant chamber to sample taste stimuli by licking solutions from a 96-well plate that moved in a randomized pattern beneath the chamber floor. As a rat's tongue entered the well it disrupted a laser beam projecting across the top of the 96-well plate, consequently producing two retractable levers that operated a pellet dispenser. The taste of sucrose was associated with food reinforcement by presses on a sucrose-designated lever, whereas the taste of water and other basic tastes were associated with the alternative lever. Each disruption of the laser was counted as a lick. Using this procedure, rats were trained to discriminate 100 mM sucrose from water, quinine, citric acid, and NaCl with 90-100% accuracy. Palatability was determined by the number of licks per trial and, due to intermediate rates of licking for water, was quantifiable along the entire spectrum of appetitiveness to aversiveness. All 96 samples were evaluated within 90 minute test sessions with no evidence of desensitization or fatigue. The technology is capable of generating multiple concentration-response functions within a single session, is suitable for in vivo primary screening of tastant libraries, and potentially can be used to evaluate stimuli for any taste system.

  9. Micropatterned comet assay enables high throughput and sensitive DNA damage quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jing; Chow, Danielle N; Fessler, Jessica L; Weingeist, David M; Wood, David K; Engelward, Bevin P

    2015-01-01

    The single cell gel electrophoresis assay, also known as the comet assay, is a versatile method for measuring many classes of DNA damage, including base damage, abasic sites, single strand breaks and double strand breaks. However, limited throughput and difficulties with reproducibility have limited its utility, particularly for clinical and epidemiological studies. To address these limitations, we created a microarray comet assay. The use of a micrometer scale array of cells increases the number of analysable comets per square centimetre and enables automated imaging and analysis. In addition, the platform is compatible with standard 24- and 96-well plate formats. Here, we have assessed the consistency and sensitivity of the microarray comet assay. We showed that the linear detection range for H2O2-induced DNA damage in human lymphoblastoid cells is between 30 and 100 μM, and that within this range, inter-sample coefficient of variance was between 5 and 10%. Importantly, only 20 comets were required to detect a statistically significant induction of DNA damage for doses within the linear range. We also evaluated sample-to-sample and experiment-to-experiment variation and found that for both conditions, the coefficient of variation was lower than what has been reported for the traditional comet assay. Finally, we also show that the assay can be performed using a 4× objective (rather than the standard 10× objective for the traditional assay). This adjustment combined with the microarray format makes it possible to capture more than 50 analysable comets in a single image, which can then be automatically analysed using in-house software. Overall, throughput is increased more than 100-fold compared to the traditional assay. Together, the results presented here demonstrate key advances in comet assay technology that improve the throughput, sensitivity, and robustness, thus enabling larger scale clinical and epidemiological studies.

  10. High-throughput screening assays for CYP2B6 metabolism and inhibition using fluorogenic vivid substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Bryan D; Goossens, Tony A; Braun, Heidi A; Ozers, Mary S; Smith, Ronald W; Lebakken, Connie; Trubetskoy, Olga V

    2003-01-01

    CYP2B6 is a highly polymorphic P450 isozyme involved in the metabolism of endo- and xenobiotics with known implications for the activation of many procarcinogens resulting in carcinogenesis. However, lack of validated high-throughput screening (HTS) CYP2B6 assays has limited the current understanding and full characterization of this isozyme's involvement in human drug metabolism. Here, we have developed and characterized a fluorescence-based HTS assay employing recombinant human CYP2B6 and 2 novel fluorogenic substrates (the Vivid CYP2B6 Blue and Cyan Substrates). Assay validation included testing the inhibitory potency of a panel of drugs and compounds known to be metabolized by this isozyme, including CYP2B6 substrates, inhibitors, and known inducers. Compound rankings based on inhibitory potency in the Vivid CYP2B6 Blue and Cyan Assays matched compound rankings based on relative affinity measurements from previously published data (K(i), K(d), or K(m) values) for the CYP2B6 isozyme. In conclusion, these assays are proven to be robust and sensitive, with broad dynamic ranges and kinetic parameters allowing screening in HTS mode of a large panel of compounds for CYP2B6 metabolism and inhibition, and are a valuable new tool for CYP2B6 studies.

  11. A high-throughput, nonisotopic, competitive binding assay for kinases using nonselective inhibitor probes (ED-NSIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, Inna; Silveria, Scott; Kaul, Poonam; Rouhani, Riaz; Eglen, Richard M; Wang, John

    2002-12-01

    A novel competitive binding assay for protein kinase inhibitors has been developed for high-throughput screening (HTS). Unlike functional kinase assays, which are based on detection of substrate phosphorylation by the enzyme, this novel method directly measures the binding potency of compounds to the kinase ATP binding site through competition with a conjugated binding probe. The binding interaction is coupled to a signal amplification system based on complementation of beta-galactosidase enzyme fragments, a homogeneous, nonisotopic assay technology platform developed by DiscoveRx Corp. In the present study, staurosporine, a potent, nonselective kinase inhibitor, was chemically conjugated to a small fragment of beta-galactosidase (termed ED-SS). This was used as the binding probe to the kinase ATP binding pocket. The binding potencies of several inhibitors with diverse structures were assessed by displacement of ED-SS from the kinase. The assay format was specifically evaluated with GSK3alpha, an enzyme previously screened in a radioactive kinase assay (i.e., measurement of [(33)P]-gamma-ATP incorporation into the kinase peptide substrate). Under optimized assay conditions, nonconjugated staurosporine inhibited ED-SS binding in a concentration-dependent manner with an apparent potency (IC(50)) of 11 nM, which was similar to the IC(50) value determined in a radioactive assay. Furthermore, 9 kinase inhibitors with diverse structures, previously identified from chemical compound library screening, were screened using the competitive binding assay. The potencies in the binding assay were in very good agreement with those obtained previously in the isotopic functional activity assay. The binding assay was adapted for automated HTS using selected compound libraries in a 384-well microtiter plate format. The HTS assay was observed to be highly robust and reproducible (Z' factors > 0.7) with high interassay precision (R(2) > 0.96). Interference of compounds with the beta

  12. Functional characterisation of human glycine receptors in a fluorescence-based high throughput screening assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.

    2005-01-01

    The human glycine receptor subtypes alpha1beta and alpha2 have been expressed stably in HEK293 cells, and the functional characteristics of the receptors have been characterised in the FLIPR Membrane Potential Assay. The pharmacological properties obtained for nine standard ligands at the two...

  13. High-throughput micro plate vanillin assay for determination of tannin in sorghum grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum tannins are phenolic compounds that offer health promoting antioxidant properties. The conventional HCl-vanillin assay for determining tannin content is a time-consuming method for screening large sample sets as seen in association mapping panels or breeder nursery samples. The objective of ...

  14. Peptide Binding to HLA Class I Molecules: Homogenous, High-Throughput Screening, and Affinity Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl; Lamberth, Kasper;

    2009-01-01

    present a homogenous, proximity-based assay for detection of peptide binding to HLA class I molecules. It uses a conformation-dependent anti-HLA class I antibody, W6/32, as one tag and a biotinylated recombinant HLA class I molecule as the other tag, and a proximity-based signal is generated through...

  15. High-throughput fluorescence polarization assay for chemical library screening against anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bfl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Dayong; Godoi, Paulo; Sergienko, Eduard; Dahl, Russell; Chan, Xochella; Brown, Brock; Rascon, Justin; Hurder, Andrew; Su, Ying; Chung, Thomas D Y; Jin, Chaofang; Diaz, Paul; Reed, John C

    2012-03-01

    Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins occurs commonly in human cancers. Bfl-1 is highly expressed in some types of malignant cells, contributing significantly to tumor cell survival and chemoresistance. Therefore, it would be desirable to have chemical antagonists of Bfl-1. To this end, we devised a fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) using Bfl-1 protein and fluorescein-conjugated Bid BH3 peptide, which was employed for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. Approximately 66 000 compounds were screened for the ability to inhibit BH3 peptide binding to Bfl-1, yielding 14 reproducible hits with ≥50% displacement. After dose-response analysis and confirmation using a secondary assay based on time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), two groups of Bfl-1-specific inhibitors were identified, including chloromaleimide and sulfonylpyrimidine series compounds. FPAs generated for each of the six anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins demonstrated selective binding of both classes of compounds to Bfl-1. Analogs of the sulfonylpyrimidine series were synthesized and compared with the original hit for Bfl-1 binding by both FPAs and TR-FRET assays. The resulting structure-activity relation analysis led to the chemical probe compound CID-2980973 (ML042). Collectively, these findings demonstrate the feasibility of using the HTS assay for discovery of selective chemical inhibitors of Bfl-1.

  16. High-throughput spectrophotometric assay of reactive oxygen species in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ikue; Morishita, Yukari; Imai, Kazue; Nakamura, Masakazu; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2007-07-10

    The derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (D-ROM) test has been developed to determine the amount of oxygen-centered free radicals in a blood sample as a marker of oxidative stress. This study aims to improve the D-ROM test and develop an automated assay system by use of a clinical chemistry analyzer. Five microliters of serum was added to 1 well of a 96-well microtiter plate for a total 240microl of reaction solution containing alkylamine and metals. This was followed by automatic mixing, incubation and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels as a color development at 505nm using a spectrophotometer with catalytic capability for transition metals. This assay system was used to measure serum levels of ROS in cigarette smokers and never-smokers, by way of example. The levels of serum ROS determined by this system correlate with the amounts of free radicals and peroxides, which reacted with various molecules in the body and formed stable metabolites. This test can use frozen sera as well as fresh ones. The inter- and intra-deviation of this system was within 5% and showed consistent linearity in the range between 4 and 500mg/l of hydrogen peroxides. Serum ROS levels among smokers increased with the number of cigarettes smoked per day (36.5% increment per pack per day; P<0.0001). This assay system will be a simple, inexpensive, and reliable tool for assessing oxidative stress in human populations. Our preliminary results on cigarette smoking imply that this assay system has potential for application in various epidemiological and clinical settings.

  17. Continuous perfusion microfluidic cell culture array for high-throughput cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Paul J; Lee, Philip J; Sabounchi, Poorya; Lin, Robert; Lee, Luke P

    2005-01-05

    We present for the first time a microfluidic cell culture array for long-term cellular monitoring. The 10 x 10 array could potentially assay 100 different cell-based experiments in parallel. The device was designed to integrate the processes used in typical cell culture experiments on a single self-contained microfluidic system. Major functions include repeated cell growth/passage cycles, reagent introduction, and real-time optical analysis. The single unit of the array consists of a circular microfluidic chamber, multiple narrow perfusion channels surrounding the main chamber, and four ports for fluidic access. Human carcinoma (HeLa) cells were cultured inside the device with continuous perfusion of medium at 37 degrees C. The observed doubling time was 1.4 +/- 0.1 days with a peak cell density of approximately 2.5*10(5) cells/cm(2). Cell assay was demonstrated by monitoring the fluorescence localization of calcein AM from 1 min to 10 days after reagent introduction. Confluent cell cultures were passaged within the microfluidic chambers using trypsin and successfully regrown, suggesting a stable culture environment suitable for continuous operation. The cell culture array could offer a platform for a wide range of assays with applications in drug screening, bioinformatics, and quantitative cell biology. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. High-throughput respirometric assay identifies predictive toxicophore of mitochondrial injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wills, Lauren P. [MitoHealth Inc., Charleston, SC 29403 (United States); Beeson, Gyda C.; Trager, Richard E.; Lindsey, Christopher C. [Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Beeson, Craig C. [MitoHealth Inc., Charleston, SC 29403 (United States); Peterson, Yuri K. [Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Schnellmann, Rick G., E-mail: schnell@musc.edu [Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC 29401 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Many environmental chemicals and drugs negatively affect human health through deleterious effects on mitochondrial function. Currently there is no chemical library of mitochondrial toxicants, and no reliable methods for predicting mitochondrial toxicity. We hypothesized that discrete toxicophores defined by distinct chemical entities can identify previously unidentified mitochondrial toxicants. We used a respirometric assay to screen 1760 compounds (5 μM) from the LOPAC and ChemBridge DIVERSet libraries. Thirty-one of the assayed compounds decreased uncoupled respiration, a stress test for mitochondrial dysfunction, prior to a decrease in cell viability and reduced the oxygen consumption rate in isolated mitochondria. The mitochondrial toxicants were grouped by chemical similarity and two clusters containing four compounds each were identified. Cheminformatic analysis of one of the clusters identified previously uncharacterized mitochondrial toxicants from the ChemBridge DIVERSet. This approach will enable the identification of mitochondrial toxicants and advance the prediction of mitochondrial toxicity for both drug discovery and risk assessment. - Highlights: • Respirometric assay conducted in RPTC to create mitochondrial toxicant database. • Chemically similar mitochondrial toxicants aligned as mitochondrial toxicophores • Mitochondrial toxicophore identifies five novel mitochondrial toxicants.

  19. Development of a novel 96-microwell assay with high throughput for determination of olmesartan medoxomil in its tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwish Ibrahim A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A novel 96-microwell-based spectrophotometric assay has been developed and validated for determination of olmesartan medoxomil (OLM in tablets. The formation of a colored charge-transfer (CT complex between OLM as a n-electron donor and 2, 5-dichloro-3, 6-dihydroxy-1, 4-benzoquinone (p-chloranilic acid, pCA as a π-electron acceptor was investigated, for the first time, and employed as a basis in the development of the proposed assay. The proposed assay was carried out in 96-microwell plates. The absorbance of the colored-CT complex was measured at 490 nm by microwell-plate absorbance reader. The optimum conditions of the reaction and the analytical procedures of the assay were established. Under the optimum conditions, linear relationship with good correlation coefficient was found between the absorbance and the concentration of OLM in the range of 1-200 μg ml-1. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.3 and 1 μg ml-1, respectively. No interference was observed from the additives that are present in the pharmaceutical formulation or from hydrochlorothiazide and amlodipine that are co-formulated with OLM in some formulations. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of OLM in tablets with good accuracy and precision. The assay described herein has great practical value in the routine analysis of OLM in quality control laboratories, as it has high throughput property, consumes minimum volume of organic solvent thus it offers the reduction in the exposures of the analysts to the toxic effects of organic solvents, and reduction in the analysis cost by 50-fold. Although the proposed assay was validated for OLM, however, the same methodology could be used for any electron-donating analyte for which a CT reaction can be performed.

  20. A cell-based luciferase assay amenable to high-throughput screening of inhibitors of arenavirus budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capul, Althea A; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2008-12-05

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans for which there are no licensed vaccines, and current therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin (Rib) that is only partially effective and associated with significant side effects. In addition, compelling evidence indicates that the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. Therefore, it is important to develop novel and effective anti-arenaviral drugs. The arenavirus Z protein is the driving force of arenavirus budding, and PPPY and PTAP late (L) domain motifs within Z are critical for Z-mediated budding, which involves the interaction of Z with a variety of host cellular factors. Compounds capable of inhibiting these virus-host cell interactions represent candidate anti-arenaviral drugs. The identification of these candidate compounds would be facilitated by the availability of a Z budding assay amenable to high-throughput screens (HTS). To this end, we have developed a novel assay that allows for rapid and quantitative assessment of Z-mediated budding. We provide evidence that this novel assay is amenable to HTS to identify small molecule inhibitors of Z-mediated budding, as well as to uncover cellular genes contributing to arenavirus budding.

  1. Automated reporter quantification in vivo: high-throughput screening method for reporter-based assays in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Walker

    Full Text Available Reporter-based assays underlie many high-throughput screening (HTS platforms, but most are limited to in vitro applications. Here, we report a simple whole-organism HTS method for quantifying changes in reporter intensity in individual zebrafish over time termed, Automated Reporter Quantification in vivo (ARQiv. ARQiv differs from current "high-content" (e.g., confocal imaging-based whole-organism screening technologies by providing a purely quantitative data acquisition approach that affords marked improvements in throughput. ARQiv uses a fluorescence microplate reader with specific detection functionalities necessary for robust quantification of reporter signals in vivo. This approach is: 1 Rapid; achieving true HTS capacities (i.e., >50,000 units per day, 2 Reproducible; attaining HTS-compatible assay quality (i.e., Z'-factors of ≥0.5, and 3 Flexible; amenable to nearly any reporter-based assay in zebrafish embryos, larvae, or juveniles. ARQiv is used here to quantify changes in: 1 Cell number; loss and regeneration of two different fluorescently tagged cell types (pancreatic beta cells and rod photoreceptors, 2 Cell signaling; relative activity of a transgenic Notch-signaling reporter, and 3 Cell metabolism; accumulation of reactive oxygen species. In summary, ARQiv is a versatile and readily accessible approach facilitating evaluation of genetic and/or chemical manipulations in living zebrafish that complements current "high-content" whole-organism screening methods by providing a first-tier in vivo HTS drug discovery platform.

  2. A high throughput Cre–lox activated viral membrane fusion assay identifies pharmacological inhibitors of HIV entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Anthony M. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Cheung, Pamela [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Swartz, Talia H.; Li, Hongru [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Tsibane, Tshidi [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Durham, Natasha D. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Basler, Christopher F. [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Felsenfeld, Dan P. [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Benjamin K., E-mail: benjamin.chen@mssm.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Enveloped virus entry occurs when viral and cellular membranes fuse releasing particle contents into the target cell. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry occurs by cell-free virus or virus transferred between infected and uninfected cells through structures called virological synapses. We developed a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell-free or virological synapse-mediated entry. An HIV clone carrying Cre recombinase as a Gag-internal gene fusion releases active Cre into cells upon viral entry activating a recombinatorial gene switch changing dsRed to GFP-expression. A screen of a 1998 known-biological profile small molecule library identified pharmacological HIV entry inhibitors that block both cell-free and cell-to-cell infection. Many top hits were noted as HIV inhibitors in prior studies, but not previously recognized as entry antagonists. Modest therapeutic indices for simvastatin and nigericin were observed in confirmatory HIV infection assays. This robust assay is adaptable to study HIV and heterologous viral pseudotypes. - Highlights: • Cre recombinase viral fusion assay screens cell-free or cell–cell entry inhibitors. • This Gag-iCre based assay is specific for the entry step of HIV replication. • Screened a library of known pharmacologic compounds for HIV fusion antagonists. • Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but here are classified as entry antagonists. Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but not as entry antagonists. • The assay is compatible with pseudotyping with HIV and heterologous viruses.

  3. Development of a homogeneous calcium mobilization assay for high throughput screening of mas-related gene receptor agonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui ZHANG; Pang-ke YAN; Cai-hong ZHOU; Jia-yu LIAO; Ming-wei WANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To develop homogeneous calcium mobilization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of mas-related gene (Mrg) receptor agonists. Methods: CHO-K1 cells stably expressing the full-length MrgD receptor and a calcium-sensitive dye were used to develop an HTS assay based on intracellular calcium influx. This method was applied to large-scale screening of a library containing 8000 synthetic compounds and natural product extracts, cAMP measurements were camed out to verify the bioactivities of the hits found by the calcium mobilization assay. Similar approaches were also employed in the identification of the MrgA1 recep-tor agonists following HTS of 16 000 samples. Results: EC50 values of the positive control compounds (β-alanine for MrgD receptor and dynorphin A for MrgA1 receptor) determined by the calcium mobilization assay were consistent with those reported in the literature, and the Z' factors were 0.65 and 0.50 for MrgD and MrgA1 receptor assay, respectively. About 31 compounds for the MrgD receptor and 48 compounds for the MrgA1 receptor showing ≥20% of the maximal agonist activities found in the controls were initially identified as hits. Secondary screen- ing confirmed that 2 compounds for each receptor possessed specific agonist activities. Intracellular cAMP level measurements indicated that the 2 confirmed hits displayed the functionality of the MrgD receptor agonists. Conclusion: A series of validation studies demonstrated that the homogeneous calcium mobili-zation assay developed was highly efficient, amenable to automation and a robust tool to screen potential MrgD and MrgA1 receptor agonists. Its application may be expanded to other G-protein coupled receptors that mobilize calcium influx upon activation.

  4. Effects of genetic mutations and chemical exposures on Caenorhabditis elegans feeding: evaluation of a novel, high-throughput screening assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windy A Boyd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Government agencies have defined a need to reduce, refine or replace current mammalian-based bioassays with testing methods that use alternative species. Invertebrate species, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, provide an attractive option because of their short life cycles, inexpensive maintenance, and high degree of evolutionary conservation with higher eukaryotes. The C. elegans pharynx is a favorable model for studying neuromuscular function, and the effects of chemicals on neuromuscular activity, i.e., feeding. Current feeding methodologies, however, are labor intensive and only semi-quantitative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here a high-throughput assay is described that uses flow cytometry to measure C. elegans feeding by determining the size and intestinal fluorescence of hundreds of nematodes after exposure to fluorescent-labeled microspheres. This assay was validated by quantifying fluorescence in feeding-defective C. elegans (eat mutants, and by exposing wild-type nematodes to the neuroactive compounds, serotonin and arecoline. The eat mutations previously determined to cause slow pumping rates exhibited the lowest feeding levels with our assay. Concentration-dependent increases in feeding levels after serotonin exposures were dependent on food availability, while feeding levels decreased in arecoline-exposed nematodes regardless of the presence of food. The effects of the environmental contaminants, cadmium chloride and chlorpyrifos, on wild-type C. elegans feeding were then used to demonstrate an application of the feeding assay. Cadmium exposures above 200 microM led to a sharp drop in feeding levels. Feeding of chlorpyrifos-exposed nematodes decreased in a concentration-dependent fashion with an EC(50 of 2 microM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The C. elegans fluorescence microsphere feeding assay is a rapid, reliable method for the assessment of neurotoxic effects of pharmaceutical drugs, industrial chemicals or

  5. High throughput microwell spectrophotometric assay for olmesartan medoxomil in tablets based on its charge-transfer reaction with DDQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwish Ibrahim A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the development and validation of a new microwell-based spectrophotometric assay for determination of olmesartan medoxomil (OLM in tablets. The formation of a colored charge-transfer (CT complex between OLM as an n-electron donor and 2,3-dichloro- -5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ as a p-electron acceptor was investigated, and employed as the basis for the development of the new assay. The proposed assay was conducted in 96-microwell plates. The absorbance of the colored-CT complex was measured at 460 nm with a microplate reader. Optimum conditions of the reaction and the analytical procedures of the assay were established. Under the optimum conditions, a linear relationship with a good correlation coefficient was found between the absorbance and the concentration of OLM in the range of 2-200 μg per well. The limits of detection and quantitation were 0.53 and 1.61 μg per well, respectively. No interference was observed from the excipients present in OLM tablets or from hydrochlorothiazide and amlodipine besylate that were co-formulated with OLM in some of its formulations. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of OLM in tablets with good accuracy and precision. The assay described herein has a great practical value in the routine analysis of OLM in quality control laboratories, since it has a high throughput property and consumes low volumes of organic solvent. It thus offers a reduction in the exposure of analysts to the toxic effects of organic solvents, as well as a reduction in the cost of analysis.

  6. A novel high throughput assay for anthelmintic drug screening and resistance diagnosis by real-time monitoring of parasite motility.

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    Michael J Smout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helminth parasites cause untold morbidity and mortality to billions of people and livestock. Anthelmintic drugs are available but resistance is a problem in livestock parasites, and is a looming threat for human helminths. Testing the efficacy of available anthelmintic drugs and development of new drugs is hindered by the lack of objective high-throughput screening methods. Currently, drug effect is assessed by observing motility or development of parasites using laborious, subjective, low-throughput methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a novel application for a real-time cell monitoring device (xCELLigence that can simply and objectively assess anthelmintic effects by measuring parasite motility in real time in a fully automated high-throughput fashion. We quantitatively assessed motility and determined real time IC(50 values of different anthelmintic drugs against several developmental stages of major helminth pathogens of humans and livestock, including larval Haemonchus contortus and Strongyloides ratti, and adult hookworms and blood flukes. The assay enabled quantification of the onset of egg hatching in real time, and the impact of drugs on hatch rate, as well as discriminating between the effects of drugs on motility of drug-susceptible and -resistant isolates of H. contortus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that this technique will be suitable for discovery and development of new anthelmintic drugs as well as for detection of phenotypic resistance to existing drugs for the majority of helminths and other pathogens where motility is a measure of pathogen viability. The method is also amenable to use for other purposes where motility is assessed, such as gene silencing or antibody-mediated killing.

  7. Utilizing high throughput screening data for predictive toxicology models: protocols and application to MLSCN assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Rajarshi; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2008-06-01

    Computational toxicology is emerging as an encouraging alternative to experimental testing. The Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network (MLSCN) as part of the NIH Molecular Libraries Roadmap has recently started generating large and diverse screening datasets, which are publicly available in PubChem. In this report, we investigate various aspects of developing computational models to predict cell toxicity based on cell proliferation screening data generated in the MLSCN. By capturing feature-based information in those datasets, such predictive models would be useful in evaluating cell-based screening results in general (for example from reporter assays) and could be used as an aid to identify and eliminate potentially undesired compounds. Specifically we present the results of random forest ensemble models developed using different cell proliferation datasets and highlight protocols to take into account their extremely imbalanced nature. Depending on the nature of the datasets and the descriptors employed we were able to achieve percentage correct classification rates between 70% and 85% on the prediction set, though the accuracy rate dropped significantly when the models were applied to in vivo data. In this context we also compare the MLSCN cell proliferation results with animal acute toxicity data to investigate to what extent animal toxicity can be correlated and potentially predicted by proliferation results. Finally, we present a visualization technique that allows one to compare a new dataset to the training set of the models to decide whether the new dataset may be reliably predicted.

  8. Inhibitors of the influenza A virus M2 proton channel discovered using a high-throughput yeast growth restoration assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna D Balgi

    Full Text Available The M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus is the target of the anti-influenza drugs amantadine and rimantadine. The effectiveness of these drugs has been dramatically limited by the rapid spread of drug resistant mutations, mainly at sites S31N, V27A and L26F in the pore of the channel. Despite progress in designing inhibitors of V27A and L26F M2, there are currently no drugs targeting these mutated channels in clinical trials. Progress in developing new drugs has been hampered by the lack of a robust assay with sufficient throughput for discovery of new active chemotypes among chemical libraries and sufficient sensitivity to provide the SAR data essential for their improvement and development as drugs. In this study we adapted a yeast growth restoration assay, in which expression of the M2 channel inhibits yeast growth and exposure to an M2 channel inhibitor restores growth, into a robust and sensitive high-throughput screen for M2 channel inhibitors. A screen of over 250,000 pure chemicals and semi-purified fractions from natural extracts identified 21 active compounds comprising amantadine, rimantadine, 13 related adamantanes and 6 non-adamantanes. Of the non-adamantanes, hexamethylene amiloride and a triazine derivative represented new M2 inhibitory chemotypes that also showed antiviral activity in a plaque reduction assay. Of particular interest is the fact that the triazine derivative was not sufficiently potent for detection as an inhibitor in the traditional two electrode voltage clamp assay for M2 channel activity, but its discovery in the yeast assay led to testing of analogues of which one was as potent as amantadine.

  9. A novel high-throughput screening assay for HCN channel blocker using membrane potential-sensitive dye and FLIPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Dmitry V; Shan, Qin J; Lee, Yan T; Soloveva, Veronica; Nawoschik, Stanley P; Kaftan, Edward J; Dunlop, John; Mayer, Scott C; Bowlby, Mark R

    2009-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cation nonselective (HCN) channels represent an interesting group of targets for drug development. In this study, the authors report the development of a novel membrane potential-sensitive dye (MPSD) assay for HCN channel modulators that has been miniaturized into 384-well fluorescent imaging plate reader (FLIPR) high-throughput screening (HTS) format. When optimized (by cell plating density, plate type, cell recovery from cryopreservation), the well-to-well signal variability was low, with a Z' = 0.73 and coefficient of variation = 6.4%, whereas the MPSD fluorescence signal amplitude was -23,700 +/- 1500 FLIPR(3) relative fluorescence units (a linear relationship was found between HCN1 MPSD fluorescence signal and the cell plating density) and was completely blocked by 30 microM ZD7288. The assay tolerated up to 1% DMSO, inclusion of which did not significantly change the signal kinetics or amplitude. A single-concentration screening of an ion channel-focused library composed of 4855 compounds resulted in 89 HCN1 blocker hits, 51 of which were subsequently analyzed with an 8-point concentration-response analysis on the IonWorks HT electrophysiology platform. The correlation between MPSD and the electrophysiology assay was moderate, as shown by the linear regression analysis (r(2) = 0.56) between the respective IC(50)s obtained using these 2 assays. The reported HTS-compatible HCN channel blocker assay can serve as a tool in drug discovery in the pursuit of HCN channel isoform-selective small molecules that could be used in the development of clinically relevant compounds.

  10. High-throughput real-time assay based on molecular beacons for HIV-1 integrase 3'-processing reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-qiu HE; Xiao-hui MA; Bin LIU; Xiao-yi ZHANG; Wei-zu CHEN; Cun-xin WANG; Shao-hui CHENG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To develop a high-throughput real-time assay based on molecular beacons to monitor the integrase 3'-processing reaction in vitro and apply it to inhibitor screening.Methods: The recombinant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN) is incubated with a 38 mer oligonucleotide substrate, a sequence identical to the U5 end of HIV-1 long terminal repeats (LTR). Based on the fluores-cence properties of molecular beacons, the substrate is designed to form a stem-loop structure labeled with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3'end.IN cleaves the terminal 3'-dinucleotide containing the quencher, resulting in an increase in fluorescence which can be monitored on a spectrofluorometer. To optimize this assay, tests were performed to investigate the effects of substrates, enzyme and the metal ion concentrations on the IN activity and optimal param-eters were obtained. Moreover, 2 IN inhibitors were employed to test the perfor-mance of this assay in antiviral compound screening.Results: The fluorescent intensity of the reaction mixture varies linearly with time and is proportional to the velocity of the 3'-processing reaction. Tests were performed and the results showed that the optimal rate was obtained for a reaction mixture containing 50 mg/L recom-binant HIV-1 IN, 400 nmol/L substrate, and 10 mmol/L Mn2+. The IN 3'-processing reaction under the optimal conditions showed a more than 18-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity compared to the enzyme-free control. The IC50 values of the IN inhibitors obtained in our assay were similar to the values obtained from a radiolabeled substrate assay.Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that this is a fast, reliable, and sensitive method to monitor HIV IN 3'-processing reaction and that it can be used for inhibitor screening.

  11. The FMCA-GM assays, high throughput non-clonogenic alternatives to CFU-GM in preclinical hematotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Caroline; Aleskog, Anna; Håkansson, Lena Douhan; Höglund, Martin; Jacobsson, Stefan; Larsson, Rolf; Lindhagen, Elin

    2010-05-04

    One of the most common dose limiting adverse effects in cancer treatment is myelotoxicity. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro method for measuring potential myelotoxic properties of a drug candidate in a high throughput setting. Human CD34(+) progenitor cells from umbilical cord blood were plated in 384-well microplates with drugs in liquid culture, supplemented with specific cytokines for the granulocytopoietic-macrophage lineage. After 7 or 14 days of proliferation and differentiation the cells were analyzed using the automated non-clonogenic fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA). Two types of assays setups were evaluated, the FMCA-GM7 where cells were exposed to drugs directly after thawing and cytotoxicity measured on day 7 in contrast to the FMCA-GM14 where the cells were cultured 7 days prior to plating and drug exposure, with viability analysis on day 14 of differentiation. Drug sensitivity was similar in both assays and method validation was performed using 24 drugs with known myelotoxic profile (acyclovir, bortezomib, busulfan, carboplatin, chloramphenicol, chlorpromazine, cisplatin, cytarabine, clozapine, doxorubicin, erlotinib, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, fludarabine, gefitinib, gemcitabine, hydroxyurea, imatinib, lomustine, melphalan, sorafenib, sunitinib, taxol and 6-thioguanine). The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) from the FMCA-GM7 and the FMCA-GM14 correlated highly (r = 0.83) and (r = 0.82), respectively, with IC(50) from the established clonogenic assay (CFU-GM), obtained from the literature. The current data suggests that the FMCA-GM could offer a simple and robust alternative to the CFU-GM assay in preclinical hematotoxicity studies.

  12. Analysis of epitopes on dengue virus envelope protein recognized by monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal human sera by a high throughput assay.

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    Hong-En Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The envelope (E protein of dengue virus (DENV is the major target of neutralizing antibodies and vaccine development. While previous studies on domain III or domain I/II alone have reported several epitopes of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against DENV E protein, the possibility of interdomain epitopes and the relationship between epitopes and neutralizing potency remain largely unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a dot blot assay by using 67 alanine mutants of predicted surface-exposed E residues as a systematic approach to identify epitopes recognized by mAbs and polyclonal sera, and confirmed our findings using a capture-ELISA assay. Of the 12 mouse mAbs tested, three recognized a novel epitope involving residues (Q211, D215, P217 at the central interface of domain II, and three recognized residues at both domain III and the lateral ridge of domain II, suggesting a more frequent presence of interdomain epitopes than previously appreciated. Compared with mAbs generated by traditional protocols, the potent neutralizing mAbs generated by a new protocol recognized multiple residues in A strand or residues in C strand/CC' loop of DENV2 and DENV1, and multiple residues in BC loop and residues in DE loop, EF loop/F strand or G strand of DENV1. The predominant epitopes of anti-E antibodies in polyclonal sera were found to include both fusion loop and non-fusion residues in the same or adjacent monomer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses have implications for epitope-specific diagnostics and epitope-based dengue vaccines. This high throughput method has tremendous application for mapping both intra and interdomain epitopes recognized by human mAbs and polyclonal sera, which would further our understanding of humoral immune responses to DENV at the epitope level.

  13. Supplementary Material for: DRABAL: novel method to mine large high-throughput screening assays using Bayesian active learning

    KAUST Repository

    Soufan, Othman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Mining high-throughput screening (HTS) assays is key for enhancing decisions in the area of drug repositioning and drug discovery. However, many challenges are encountered in the process of developing suitable and accurate methods for extracting useful information from these assays. Virtual screening and a wide variety of databases, methods and solutions proposed to-date, did not completely overcome these challenges. This study is based on a multi-label classification (MLC) technique for modeling correlations between several HTS assays, meaning that a single prediction represents a subset of assigned correlated labels instead of one label. Thus, the devised method provides an increased probability for more accurate predictions of compounds that were not tested in particular assays. Results Here we present DRABAL, a novel MLC solution that incorporates structure learning of a Bayesian network as a step to model dependency between the HTS assays. In this study, DRABAL was used to process more than 1.4 million interactions of over 400,000 compounds and analyze the existing relationships between five large HTS assays from the PubChem BioAssay Database. Compared to different MLC methods, DRABAL significantly improves the F1Score by about 22%, on average. We further illustrated usefulness and utility of DRABAL through screening FDA approved drugs and reported ones that have a high probability to interact with several targets, thus enabling drug-multi-target repositioning. Specifically DRABAL suggests the Thiabendazole drug as a common activator of the NCP1 and Rab-9A proteins, both of which are designed to identify treatment modalities for the Niemannâ Pick type C disease. Conclusion We developed a novel MLC solution based on a Bayesian active learning framework to overcome the challenge of lacking fully labeled training data and exploit actual dependencies between the HTS assays. The solution is motivated by the need to model dependencies between

  14. New high-throughput screening protease assay based upon supramolecular self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitten, David G.; Tang, Yanli; Zhou, Zhijun; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.

    2008-11-01

    We previously demonstrated that the supramolecular self-assembly of cyanines could be useful for developing fluorescent enzymatic assays. We took that concept a step further by synthesizing a covalent adduct of the tetrapeptide Asp-Glu-Val-Asp (DEVD) and a cyanine (DEVD-cyanine). The DEVD-cyanine due to its canonical sequence was recognized and hydrolyzed by the proteases, Caspase-3 and -7 in 96- or 384-microwell plate reactions. The catalytically liberated cyanine self-assembled upon scaffolds of carboxymethylamylose (CMA), carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), or a mixture of CMA and CMC resulting in a J aggregate exhibiting bright fluorescence at a 470 nm emission wavelength (optimum signal/background using excitation wavelengths of 415-440 nm). The fluorescence intensity increased with enzyme and substrate concentrations or reaction time and exhibited classical saturation profiles of a rectangular hyperbola. Saturation of the reaction was at 30 U/mL (1 {micro}g/mL) Caspase-3 and 250 {micro}M DEVD-cyanine. The reaction kinetics was linear between 1 and 20 min and saturated at 60 min. The affinity constant (Km) for DEVD-cyanine was 23 {micro}M, similar to those of previously reported values for other DEVD substrates of Caspase-3. Maximal fluorescence emission was observed by using a mixture of CMA and CMC scaffolds at 65 and 35 {micro}M, respectively. The reaction kinetics of Caspase-7 executed in a 384-well plate was similar to the reaction kinetics of Caspase-3 conducted in a 96-well plate. We believe that this is the first demonstration of a cyanine liberated from a covalent adduct due to protease action, leading to supramolecular self-assembly and the detection of protease activity.

  15. A fluorescence-based assay to monitor autopalmitoylation of zDHHC proteins applicable to high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Laura D; Deschenes, Robert J; Mitchell, David A

    2014-09-01

    Palmitoylation, the posttranslational thioester-linked modification of a 16-carbon saturated fatty acid onto the cysteine residue of a protein, has garnered considerable attention due to its implication in a multitude of disease states. The signature DHHC motif (Asp-His-His-Cys) identifies a family of protein acyltransferases (PATs) that catalyze the S-palmitoylation of target proteins via a two-step mechanism. In the first step, autopalmitoylation, palmitate is transferred from palmitoyl-CoA to the PAT, creating a palmitoyl:PAT intermediate and releasing reduced CoA. The palmitoyl moiety is then transferred to a protein substrate in the second step of the reaction. We have developed an in vitro, single-well, fluorescence-based enzyme assay that monitors the first step of the PAT reaction by coupling the production of reduced CoA to the reduction of NAD(+) using the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. This assay is suitable for determining PAT kinetic parameters, elucidating lipid donor specificity and measuring PAT inhibition by 2-bromopalmitate. Finally, it can be used for high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns for modulators of protein palmitoylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adaptation of the bivalve embryotoxicity assay for the high throughput screening of emerging contaminants in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Rita; Montagna, Michele; Balbi, Teresa; Raffo, Enrico; Palumbo, Franca; Canesi, Laura

    2014-08-01

    Emerging contaminants (such as Endocrine disrupting chemicals-EDCs, brominated and perfluorinated compounds-BFRs and PFCs, pharmaceuticals) are chemicals currently not included in regulatory monitoring programs, and whose fate and biological impacts are poorly understood. Assessment of ecosystem health with respect to these chemicals is of particular concern also in the marine environment: in this respect, data on the effects on early life stages are important to establish the sensitivity of marine species. In this work, the acute (48 h) bivalve embryo toxicity test was applied for screening the developmental effects of different emerging contaminants in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The assay was adapted to 96-microwell plates, and standardized in order to obtain to normal D-shaped larvae with acceptability of test results based on negative control and positive control (copper) comparable with those reported in literature for Mytilus spp. The effects of different model compounds representative of EDCs (Nonylphenol-NP and Bisphenol A-BPA), BFRs (Tetrabromobisphenol A-TBBPA), PFCs (perfluorooctanoid acid-PFOA and perfluorooctane sulphonate-PFOAS) and pharmaceuticals (Ibuprofen-IBU, Diclofenac-DCF, Bezafibrate-BEZA) in a wide concentration range (0.01-0.1-1-10-100-1000 μg/L) were evaluated. The assay proved as a sensitive tool for high throughput screening of emerging contaminants in a marine species, leading to production of significant amounts of data that may be useful for regulatory purposes.

  17. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay system for appetite-regulating gene and drug screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Shimada

    Full Text Available The increasing number of people suffering from metabolic syndrome and obesity is becoming a serious problem not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries. However, there are few agents currently approved for the treatment of obesity. Those that are available are mainly appetite suppressants and gastrointestinal fat blockers. We have developed a simple and rapid method for the measurement of the feeding volume of Danio rerio (zebrafish. This assay can be used to screen appetite suppressants and enhancers. In this study, zebrafish were fed viable paramecia that were fluorescently-labeled, and feeding volume was measured using a 96-well microplate reader. Gene expression analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf, knockdown of appetite-regulating genes (neuropeptide Y, preproinsulin, melanocortin 4 receptor, agouti related protein, and cannabinoid receptor 1, and the administration of clinical appetite suppressants (fluoxetine, sibutramine, mazindol, phentermine, and rimonabant revealed the similarity among mechanisms regulating appetite in zebrafish and mammals. In combination with behavioral analysis, we were able to evaluate adverse effects on locomotor activities from gene knockdown and chemical treatments. In conclusion, we have developed an assay that uses zebrafish, which can be applied to high-throughput screening and target gene discovery for appetite suppressants and enhancers.

  18. Bringing the light to high throughput screening: use of optogenetic tools for the development of recombinant cellular assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus, Viviana; Di Silvio, Alberto; Rolland, Jean Francois; Mondini, Anna; Tremolada, Sara; Montag, Katharina; Scarabottolo, Lia; Redaelli, Loredana; Lohmer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The use of light-activated proteins represents a powerful tool to control biological processes with high spatial and temporal precision. These so called "optogenetic" technologies have been successfully validated in many recombinant systems, and have been widely applied to the study of cellular mechanisms in intact tissues or behaving animals; to do that, complex, high-intensity, often home-made instrumentations were developed to achieve the optimal power and precision of light stimulation. In our study we sought to determine if this optical modulation can be obtained also in a miniaturized format, such as a 384-well plate, using the instrumentations normally dedicated to fluorescence analysis in High Throughput Screening (HTS) activities, such as for example the FLIPR (Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader) instrument. We successfully generated optogenetic assays for the study of different ion channel targets: the CaV1.3 calcium channel was modulated by the light-activated Channelrhodopsin-2, the HCN2 cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channel was modulated by the light activated bPAC adenylyl cyclase, and finally the genetically encoded voltage indicator ArcLight was efficiently used to measure potassium, sodium or chloride channel activity. Our results showed that stable, robust and miniaturized cellular assays can be developed using different optogenetic tools, and efficiently modulated by the FLIPR instrument LEDs in a 384-well format. The spatial and temporal resolution delivered by this technology might enormously advantage the early stages of drug discovery, leading to the identification of more physiological and effective drug molecules.

  19. Evaluation of a High-Throughput Peptide Reactivity Format Assay for Assessment of the Skin Sensitization Potential of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chin Lin; Lam, Ai-Leen; Smith, Maree T.; Ghassabian, Sussan

    2016-01-01

    the difficulty in adapting in vitro methods to high-throughput format for screening the skin sensitization potential of large numbers of chemicals whilst ensuring that the data produced are both accurate and reproducible. PMID:27014067

  20. MSP-HTPrimer: a high-throughput primer design tool to improve assay design for DNA methylation analysis in epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ram Vinay; Pulverer, Walter; Kallmeyer, Rainer; Beikircher, Gabriel; Pabinger, Stephan; Kriegner, Albert; Weinhäusel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Bisulfite (BS) conversion-based and methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme (MSRE)-based PCR methods have been the most commonly used techniques for locus-specific DNA methylation analysis. However, both methods have advantages and limitations. Thus, an integrated approach would be extremely useful to quantify the DNA methylation status successfully with great sensitivity and specificity. Designing specific and optimized primers for target regions is the most critical and challenging step in obtaining the adequate DNA methylation results using PCR-based methods. Currently, no integrated, optimized, and high-throughput methylation-specific primer design software methods are available for both BS- and MSRE-based methods. Therefore an integrated, powerful, and easy-to-use methylation-specific primer design pipeline with great accuracy and success rate will be very useful. We have developed a new web-based pipeline, called MSP-HTPrimer, to design primers pairs for MSP, BSP, pyrosequencing, COBRA, and MSRE assays on both genomic strands. First, our pipeline converts all target sequences into bisulfite-treated templates for both forward and reverse strand and designs all possible primer pairs, followed by filtering for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and known repeat regions. Next, each primer pairs are annotated with the upstream and downstream RefSeq genes, CpG island, and cut sites (for COBRA and MSRE). Finally, MSP-HTPrimer selects specific primers from both strands based on custom and user-defined hierarchical selection criteria. MSP-HTPrimer produces a primer pair summary output table in TXT and HTML format for display and UCSC custom tracks for resulting primer pairs in GTF format. MSP-HTPrimer is an integrated, web-based, and high-throughput pipeline and has no limitation on the number and size of target sequences and designs MSP, BSP, pyrosequencing, COBRA, and MSRE assays. It is the only pipeline, which automatically designs primers on both genomic

  1. Use of activity-based probes to develop high throughput screening assays that can be performed in complex cell extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Deu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High throughput screening (HTS is one of the primary tools used to identify novel enzyme inhibitors. However, its applicability is generally restricted to targets that can either be expressed recombinantly or purified in large quantities. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we described a method to use activity-based probes (ABPs to identify substrates that are sufficiently selective to allow HTS in complex biological samples. Because ABPs label their target enzymes through the formation of a permanent covalent bond, we can correlate labeling of target enzymes in a complex mixture with inhibition of turnover of a substrate in that same mixture. Thus, substrate specificity can be determined and substrates with sufficiently high selectivity for HTS can be identified. In this study, we demonstrate this method by using an ABP for dipeptidyl aminopeptidases to identify (Pro-Arg2-Rhodamine as a specific substrate for DPAP1 in Plasmodium falciparum lysates and Cathepsin C in rat liver extracts. We then used this substrate to develop highly sensitive HTS assays (Z'>0.8 that are suitable for use in screening large collections of small molecules (i.e >300,000 for inhibitors of these proteases. Finally, we demonstrate that it is possible to use broad-spectrum ABPs to identify target-specific substrates. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that this approach will have value for many enzymatic systems where access to large amounts of active enzyme is problematic.

  2. Aqueous biphasic cancer cell migration assay enables robust, high-throughput screening of anti-cancer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmo, Stephanie; Nasrollahi, Samila; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-03-01

    Migration of tumor cells is a fundamental event implicated in metastatic progression of cancer. Therapeutic compounds with the ability to inhibit the motility of cancer cells are critical for preventing cancer metastasis. Achieving this goal requires new technologies that enable high-throughput drug screening against migration of cancer cells and expedite drug discovery. We report an easy-to-implement, robotically operated, cell migration microtechnology with the capability of simultaneous screening of multiple compounds. The technology utilizes a fully biocompatible polymeric aqueous two-phase system to pattern a monolayer of cells containing a cell-excluded gap that serves as the migration niche. We adapted this technology to a standard 96-well plate format and parametrically optimized it to generate highly consistent migration niches. The analysis of migration is done automatically using computerized schemes. We use statistical metrics and show the robustness of this assay for drug screening and its sensitivity to identify effects of different drug compounds on migration of cancer cells. This technology can be employed in core centers, research laboratories, and pharmaceutical industries to evaluate the efficacy of compounds against migration of various types of metastatic cancer cells prior to expensive animal tests and thus, streamline anti-migratory drug screening.

  3. Discovery of novel BRD4 inhibitors by high-throughput screening, crystallography, and cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongya; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Zhifeng; Xie, Yiqian; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Limin; Ding, Hong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hualiang; Zheng, Mingyue; Luo, Cheng

    2017-03-09

    As an epigenetic reader, BRD4 regulates the transcription of important downstream genes that are essential for the survival of tumor cells. Small molecular inhibitors targeting the first bromodomain of BRD4 (BRD4-BD1) have showed promising potentials in the therapies of BRD4-related cancers. Through AlphaScreen-based high-throughput screening assay, a novel small molecular inhibitor was identified, and named DCBD-005, which inhibited the binding between BRD4-BD1 and acetylated lysines with an IC50 value of 0.81±0.03μM. The compound DCBD-005 effectively inhibited the viability, caused cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis in human leukemia MV4-11 cells. Moreover, the crystal structure of compound DCBD-005 with the BRD4-BD1 was determined at 1.72Å resolution, which revealed the binding mechanism of the leading compound, and also provided solid basis for further structure-based optimization. These results indicated that this novel BRD4-BD1 inhibitor DCBD-005 is promising to be developed into a drug candidate in the treatment of BRD4-related diseases.

  4. Ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assay for therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in pediatric HIV-1 infection applying dried blood spots.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, R.J.; Kampen, J.J. van; Reedijk, M.L.; Scheuer, R.D.; Dekker, L.J.; Burger, D.M.; Hartwig, N.G.; Osterhaus, A.D.; Luider, T.M.; Gruters, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Kaletra (Abott Laboratories) is a co-formulated medication used in the treatment of HIV-1-infected children, and it contains the two antiretroviral protease inhibitor drugs lopinavir and ritonavir. We validated two new ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assays to be used for therapeuti

  5. High-throughput Screening of ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell (mESC) Assay Reveals Disruption of Potential Toxicity Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information is available regarding the potential for many commercial chemicals to induce developmental toxicity. The mESC Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytoxicity (ACDC) assay is a high-throughput screen used to close this data gap. Thus, ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals wer...

  6. A high throughput colorimetric assay of β-1,3-D-glucans by Congo red dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semedo, Magda C; Karmali, Amin; Fonseca, Luís

    2015-02-01

    Mushroom strains contain complex nutritional biomolecules with a wide spectrum of therapeutic and prophylactic properties. Among these compounds, β-d-glucans play an important role in immuno-modulating and anti-tumor activities. The present work involves a novel colorimetric assay method for β-1,3-d-glucans with a triple helix tertiary structure by using Congo red. The specific interaction that occurs between Congo red and β-1,3-d-glucan was detected by bathochromic shift from 488 to 516 nm (>20 nm) in UV-Vis spectrophotometer. A micro- and high throughput method based on a 96-well microtiter plate was devised which presents several advantages over the published methods since it requires only 1.51 μg of polysaccharides in samples, greater sensitivity, speed, assay of many samples and very cheap. β-D-Glucans of several mushrooms (i.e., Coriolus versicolor, Ganoderma lucidum, Pleurotus ostreatus, Ganoderma carnosum, Hericium erinaceus, Lentinula edodes, Inonotus obliquus, Auricularia auricular, Polyporus umbellatus, Cordyseps sinensis, Agaricus blazei, Poria cocos) were isolated by using a sequence of several extractions with cold and boiling water, acidic and alkaline conditions and quantified by this microtiter plate method. FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the structural features of β-1,3-D-glucans in these mushroom samples as well as the specific interaction of these polysaccharides with Congo red. The effect of NaOH on triple helix conformation of β-1,3-D-glucans was investigated in several mushroom species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A sensitive high throughput ELISA for human eosinophil peroxidase: a specific assay to quantify eosinophil degranulation from patient-derived sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochkur, Sergei I; Kim, John Dongil; Protheroe, Cheryl A; Colbert, Dana; Condjella, Rachel M; Bersoux, Sophie; Helmers, Richard A; Moqbel, Redwan; Lacy, Paige; Kelly, Elizabeth A; Jarjour, Nizar N; Kern, Robert; Peters, Anju; Schleimer, Robert P; Furuta, Glenn T; Nair, Parameswaran; Lee, James J; Lee, Nancy A

    2012-10-31

    Quantitative high throughput assays of eosinophil-mediated activities in fluid samples from patients in a clinical setting have been limited to ELISA assessments for the presence of the prominent granule ribonucleases, ECP and EDN. However, the demonstration that these ribonucleases are expressed by leukocytes other than eosinophils, as well as cells of non-hematopoietic origin, limits the usefulness of these assays. Two novel monoclonal antibodies recognizing eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) were used to develop an eosinophil-specific and sensitive sandwich ELISA. The sensitivity of this EPX-based ELISA was shown to be similar to that of the commercially available ELISA kits for ECP and EDN. More importantly, evidence is also presented confirming that among these granule protein detection options, EPX-based ELISA is the only eosinophil-specific assay. The utility of this high throughput assay to detect released EPX was shown in ex vivo degranulation studies with isolated human eosinophils. In addition, EPX-based ELISA was used to detect and quantify eosinophil degranulation in several in vivo patient settings, including bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained following segmental allergen challenge of subjects with allergic asthma, induced sputum derived from respiratory subjects following hypotonic saline inhalation, and nasal lavage of chronic rhinosinusitis patients. This unique EPX-based ELISA thus provides an eosinophil-specific assay that is sensitive, reproducible, and quantitative. In addition, this assay is adaptable to high throughput formats (e.g., automated assays utilizing microtiter plates) using the diverse patient fluid samples typically available in research and clinical settings.

  8. Evaluation of a high-throughput peptide reactivity format assay for assessment of the skin sensitization potential of chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Lin eWong

    2016-03-01

    highlight the difficulty in adapting in vitro methods to high-throughput format for screening the skin sensitization potential of large numbers of chemicals whilst ensuring that the data produced are both accurate and reproducible.

  9. Statistics of assay validation in high throughput cell imaging of nuclear factor kappaB nuclear translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelock, Maurice M; Hunter, Edward A; Moran, Timothy J; Heynen, Susanne; Laris, Casey; Thieleking, Michael; Akong, Michael; Mikic, Ivana; Callaway, Scott; DeLeon, Rodney P; Goodacre, Angela; Zacharias, David; Price, Jeffrey H

    2005-10-01

    This report describes statistical validation methods implemented on assay data for inhibition of subcellular redistribution of nuclear factor kappaB (NF kappaB) in HeLa cells. We quantified cellular inhibition of cytoplasmic-nuclear translocation of NF kappaB in response to a range of concentrations of interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist in the presence of IL-1alpha using eight replicate rows in each four 96-well plates scanned five times on each of 2 days. Translocation was measured as the fractional localized intensity of the nucleus (FLIN), an implementation of our more general fractional localized intensity of the compartments (FLIC), which analyzes whole compartments in the context of the entire cell. The NF kappaB antagonist assay (inhibition of IL-1- induced NF kappaB translocation) data were collected on a Q3DM (San Diego, CA) EIDAQtrade mark 100 high throughput microscopy system. [In 2003, Q3DM was purchased by Beckman Coulter Inc. (Fullerton, CA), which released the IC 100 successor to the EIDAQ 100.] The generalized FLIC method is described along with two-point (minimum-maximum) and multiple point titration statistical methods. As a ratio of compartment intensities that tend to change proportionally, FLIN was resistant to photobleaching errors. Two-point minimum-maximum statistical analyses yielded the following: a Z' of 0.174 with the data as n = 320 independent well samples; Z' by row data in a range of 0.393-0.933, with a mean of 0.766; by-plate Z' data of 0.310, 0.443, 0.545, and 0.794; and by-plate means of columns Z' data of 0.879, 0.927, 0.945, and 0.963. The mean 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for IL-1 receptor antagonist over all experiments was 213 ng/ml. The combined IC50 coefficients of variation (CVs) were 0.74%, 0.85%, 2.09%, and 2.52% for the four plates. Repeatability IC50 CVs were as follows: day to day 3.0%, row to row 8.0%, plate to plate 2.8%, and day to day 0.6%. The number of cells required for statistically resolvable

  10. Evaluation of Compatibility of ToxCast High-Throughput/High-Content Screening Assays with Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput and high-content screens are attractive approaches for prioritizing nanomaterial hazards and informing targeted testing due to the impracticality of using traditional toxicological testing on the large numbers and varieties of nanomaterials. The ToxCast program a...

  11. Development of a Coxsackievirus A16 neutralization assay based on pseudoviruses for measurement of neutralizing antibody titer in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Ma, Hongxia; Xu, Lin; An, Dong; Sun, Shiyang; Huang, Xueyong; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2013-02-01

    Serum neutralizing antibody titers are indicative of protective immunity against Coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) and Enterovirus 71 (EV71), the two main etiological agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and provide the basis for evaluating vaccine efficacy. The current CV-A16 neutralization assay based on inhibition of cytopathic effects requires manual microscopic examination, which is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, a high-throughput neutralization assay was developed by employing CV-A16 pseudoviruses expressing luciferase for detecting infectivity in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells and measuring serum viral neutralizing antibodies. Without the need to use infectious CV-A16 strains, the neutralizing antibody titer against CV-A16 could be determined within 15h by measuring luciferase signals by this assay. The pseudovirus CV-A16 neutralization assay (pCNA) was validated by comparison with a conventional CV-A16 neutralization assay (cCNA) in testing 174 human serum samples collected from children (age <5 years). The neutralizing antibody titers determined by these two assays were well correlated (R(2)=0.7689). These results suggest that the pCNA can serve as a rapid and objective procedure for the measurement of neutralizing antibodies against CV-A16.

  12. Development of a Novel Nonradiometric Assay for Nucleic Acid Binding to TDP-43 Suitable for High-Throughput Screening Using AlphaScreen® Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Cassel, Joel A.; Blass, Benjamin E.; Reitz, Allen B.; Pawlyk, Aaron C.

    2010-01-01

    TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a nucleic acid binding protein that is associated with the pathology of cystic fibrosis and neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar dementia. We have developed a robust, quantitative, nonradiometric high-throughput assay measuring oligonucleotide binding to TDP-43 using AlphaScreen® technology. Biotinylated single-stranded TAR DNA (bt-TAR-32) and 6 TG repeats (bt-TG6) bound with high affinity to TDP-43, w...

  13. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of a Type 2 Blood Group A Tetrasaccharide and Development of High-throughput Assays Enables a Platform for Screening Blood Group Antigen-cleaving Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, David H; Ernst, Sabrina; Kötzler, Miriam P; Withers, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    A facile enzymatic synthesis of the methylumbelliferyl β-glycoside of the type 2 A blood group tetrasaccharide in good yields is reported. Using this compound, we developed highly sensitive fluorescence-based high-throughput assays for both endo-β-galactosidase and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity specific for the oligosaccharide structure of the blood group A antigen. We further demonstrate the potential to use this assay to screen the expressed gene products of metagenomic libraries in the search for efficient blood group antigen-cleaving enzymes.

  14. Optimization of a Yellow fluorescent protein-based iodide influx high-throughput screening assay for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jinliang; Cotard, Shakira; Andersen, Jennifer; Zhu, Ping; Staunton, Jane; Lee, Margaret; Lin, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited, life-threatening disease associated with mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The most common mutation, F508del CFTR, is found in 90% of CF patients. The loss of a single amino acid (phenylalanine at position 508) results in malformed CFTR with defective trafficking to the plasma membrane and impaired channel function. A functional assay with cells expressing F508del CFTR has been previously described by others using genetically engineered halide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein to screen for CFTR modulators. We adapted this yellow fluorescent protein assay to 384-well plate format with a high-throughput screening plate reader, and optimized the assay in terms of data quality, resolution, and throughput, with target-specific protocols. The optimized assay was validated with reference compounds from cystic fibrosis foundation therapeutics. On the basis of the Z-factor range (≥0.5) and the potential productivity, this assay is well suited for high-throughput screening. It was successfully used to screen for active single agent and synergistic combinations of single agent modulators of F508del CFTR from a library collection of current active pharmaceutical ingredients (supported by Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics).

  15. Lead discovery for mammalian elongation of long chain fatty acids family 6 using a combination of high-throughput fluorescent-based assay and RapidFire mass spectrometry assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Mari; Sakurai, Masaaki; Teranishi, Fumie; Ikeda, Tomoko; Kamiyama, Tsutomu; Asai, Akira

    2016-11-25

    A high-throughput RapidFire mass spectrometry assay is described for elongation of very long-chain fatty acids family 6 (Elovl6). Elovl6 is a microsomal enzyme that regulates the elongation of C12-16 saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Elovl6 may be a new therapeutic target for fat metabolism disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. To identify new Elovl6 inhibitors, we developed a high-throughput fluorescence screening assay in 1536-well format. However, a number of false positives caused by fluorescent interference have been identified. To pick up the real active compounds among the primary hits from the fluorescence assay, we developed a RapidFire mass spectrometry assay and a conventional radioisotope assay. These assays have the advantage of detecting the main products directly without using fluorescent-labeled substrates. As a result, 276 compounds (30%) of the primary hits (921 compounds) in a fluorescence ultra-high-throughput screening method were identified as common active compounds in these two assays. It is concluded that both methods are very effective to eliminate false positives. Compared with the radioisotope method using an expensive (14)C-labeled substrate, the RapidFire mass spectrometry method using unlabeled substrates is a high-accuracy, high-throughput method. In addition, some of the hit compounds selected from the screening inhibited cellular fatty acid elongation in HEK293 cells expressing Elovl6 transiently. This result suggests that these compounds may be promising lead candidates for therapeutic drugs. Ultra-high-throughput fluorescence screening followed by a RapidFire mass spectrometry assay was a suitable strategy for lead discovery against Elovl6.

  16. Development of an efficient transformation method by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and high throughput spray assay to identify transgenic plants for woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) using NPTII selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazis, Christopher J; Fisk, Sarah; Mills, Kerri; Flinn, Barry S; Shulaev, Vladimir; Veilleux, Richard E; Dan, Yinghui

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We developed an efficient Agrobacterium -mediated transformation method using an Ac/Ds transposon tagging construct for F. vesca and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to identify its transformants for strawberry functional genomics. Genomic resources for Rosaceae species are now readily available, including the Fragaria vesca genome, EST sequences, markers, linkage maps, and physical maps. The Rosaceae Genomic Executive Committee has promoted strawberry as a translational genomics model due to its unique biological features and transformability for fruit trait improvement. Our overall research goal is to use functional genomic and metabolic approaches to pursue high throughput gene discovery in the diploid woodland strawberry. F. vesca offers several advantages of a fleshy fruit typical of most fruit crops, short life cycle (seed to seed in 12-16 weeks), small genome size (206 Mbb/C), small plant size, self-compatibility, and many seeds per plant. We have developed an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated strawberry transformation method using kanamycin selection, and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to efficiently identify transgenic strawberry plants. Using our kanamycin transformation method, we were able to produce up to 98 independent kanamycin resistant insertional mutant lines using a T-DNA construct carrying an Ac/Ds transposon Launchpad system from a single transformation experiment involving inoculation of 22 leaf explants of F. vesca accession 551572 within approx. 11 weeks (from inoculation to soil). Transgenic plants with 1-2 copies of a transgene were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Using our paromomycin spray assay, transgenic F. vesca plants were rapidly identified within 10 days after spraying.

  17. High-throughput screening for small-molecule inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding via a novel fluorescence polarization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R; Ferng, Timothy; Rojas, Rafael J; Larsen, Martha J; Sondek, John; Neubig, Richard R

    2009-02-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) stimulate guanine nucleotide exchange and the subsequent activation of Rho-family proteins in response to extracellular stimuli acting upon cytokine, tyrosine kinase, adhesion, integrin, and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon Rho activation, several downstream events occur, such as morphological and cytoskeletal changes, motility, growth, survival, and gene transcription. The leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) is a member of the regulators of G-protein signaling homology domain (RH) family of GEFs originally identified as a result of chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemia. Using a novel fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide-binding assay using BODIPY-Texas Red-GTPgammaS (BODIPY-TR-GTPgammaS), the authors performed a 10,000-compound high-throughput screen for inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding. Five compounds identified from the high-throughput screen were confirmed in a nonfluorescent radioactive guanine nucleotide-binding assay measuring LARG-stimulated [( 35)S] GTPgammaS binding to RhoA, thus ruling out nonspecific fluorescent effects. All 5 compounds selectively inhibited LARG-stimulated RhoA [( 35)S] GTPgammaS binding but had little to no effect on RhoA or Galpha( o) [(35)S] GTPgammaS binding. Therefore, these 5 compounds should serve as promising starting points for the development of small-molecule inhibitors of LARG-mediated nucleotide exchange as both pharmacological tools and therapeutics. In addition, the fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide-binding assay described here should serve as a useful approach for both high-throughput screening and general biological applications.

  18. Development of a photosensitive, high-throughput chip-based superoxide dismutase (SOD) assay to explore the radioprotective activity of herbal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoghare, Pravin K; Kwon, Ho Taik; Song, Joon Myong

    2009-08-15

    Appropriate pharmacological interventions and modalities are needed to protect humans against the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. We disclose a rapid chip-based approach to elucidate the radioprotective/antioxidant potential of herbal plants using a photodiode array (PDA) microchip system. Red light absorption property of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) formazan was applied to chip-based superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity measurements of six herbal plant extracts in a high-throughput manner. SOD activities obtained via gel-based assays were in line with the data obtained through the chip-based assay and hence validated our approach. Compared to amifostine, all the tested herbal plant extracts, except apricot kernel, demonstrated greater radioprotective properties. Among the tested herbal extracts, pueraria root showed the highest antioxidant/radioprotective activity and can be considered a preferred radioprotector candidate. Low standard deviations and high statistical confidence obtained during the assay prove the sensitivity and consistency of this approach. The developed approach has several advantages (simplicity, rapidness and portability) over existing methods and can be applied to high-throughput screening of the radioprotective properties of various unexplored plants species.

  19. A High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry Assay Coupled with Redox Activity Testing Reduces Artifacts and False Positives in Lysine Demethylase Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigle, Tim J; Swinger, Kerren K; Campbell, John E; Scholle, Michael D; Sherrill, John; Admirand, Elizabeth A; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Kuntz, Kevin W; Chesworth, Richard; Moyer, Mikel P; Scott, Margaret Porter; Copeland, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Demethylation of histones by lysine demethylases (KDMs) plays a critical role in controlling gene transcription. Aberrant demethylation may play a causal role in diseases such as cancer. Despite the biological significance of these enzymes, there are limited assay technologies for study of KDMs and few quality chemical probes available to interrogate their biology. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of self-assembled monolayer desorption/ionization (SAMDI) mass spectrometry for the investigation of quantitative KDM enzyme kinetics and for high-throughput screening for KDM inhibitors. SAMDI can be performed in 384-well format and rapidly allows reaction components to be purified prior to injection into a mass spectrometer, without a throughput-limiting liquid chromatography step. We developed sensitive and robust assays for KDM1A (LSD1, AOF2) and KDM4C (JMJD2C, GASC1) and screened 13,824 compounds against each enzyme. Hits were rapidly triaged using a redox assay to identify compounds that interfered with the catalytic oxidation chemistry used by the KDMs for the demethylation reaction. We find that overall this high-throughput mass spectrometry platform coupled with the elimination of redox active compounds leads to a hit rate that is manageable for follow-up work.

  20. Development of a Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) Based, High Throughput Screening Feasible Method for the Identification of PDE12 Activity Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Samuel; Bucher, Hannes; Nickolaus, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology has been widely used to establish high throughput screens (HTS) for a range of targets in the pharmaceutical industry. PDE12 (aka. 2'- phosphodiesterase) has been published to participate in the degradation of oligoadenylates that are involved in the establishment of an antiviral state via the activation of ribonuclease L (RNAse-L). Degradation of oligoadenylates by PDE12 terminates these antiviral activities, leading to decreased resistance of cells for a variety of viral pathogens. Therefore inhibitors of PDE12 are discussed as antiviral therapy. Here we describe the use of the yttrium silicate SPA bead technology to assess inhibitory activity of compounds against PDE12 in a homogeneous, robust HTS feasible assay using tritiated adenosine-P-adenylate ([3H]ApA) as substrate. We found that the used [3H]ApA educt, was not able to bind to SPA beads, whereas the product [3H]AMP, as known before, was able to bind to SPA beads. This enables the measurement of PDE12 activity on [3H]ApA as a substrate using a wallac microbeta counter. This method describes a robust and high throughput capable format in terms of specificity, commonly used compound solvents, ease of detection and assay matrices. The method could facilitate the search for PDE12 inhibitors as antiviral compounds.

  1. A 96-well microtiter plate assay for high-throughput screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoxia; Sha, Shanshan; Liu, Likun; Li, Xin; Ma, Yufang

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase (RmlB) is the second enzyme for the biosynthesis of dTDP-l-rhamnose, which is a sugar donor to the synthesis of the cell wall linker, d-N-acetylglucosamine-l-rhamnose. RmlB is essential to mycobacterial growth and is not found in humans; therefore, it is a potential target for developing new anti-tuberculosis drugs. So far, there has been no suitable method for high-throughput screening of RmlB inhibitors. Here, the recombinant M. tuberculosis RmlB was purified and an absorbance-based microtiter plate assay was developed for RmlB activity. It could be used for high-throughput screening of RmlB inhibitors. The kinetic properties of M. tuberculosis RmlB, including optimal pH, optimal temperature, the effect of metal ions, and the kinetic parameters, were determined with this assay. The inhibitory effects of dTTP and dTDP on M. tuberculosis RmlB were also studied with the assay.

  2. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures.

  3. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Parker, Terry L; Walker, David A; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B; Gellert, Paul R; Garnett, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  4. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyan P Ivanov

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  5. An Automated High-Throughput Metabolic Stability Assay Using an Integrated High-Resolution Accurate Mass Method and Automated Data Analysis Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pranav; Kerns, Edward; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Obach, R. Scott; Wang, Amy Q.; Zakharov, Alexey; McKew, John; Simeonov, Anton; Hop, Cornelis E. C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Advancement of in silico tools would be enabled by the availability of data for metabolic reaction rates and intrinsic clearance (CLint) of a diverse compound structure data set by specific metabolic enzymes. Our goal is to measure CLint for a large set of compounds with each major human cytochrome P450 (P450) isozyme. To achieve our goal, it is of utmost importance to develop an automated, robust, sensitive, high-throughput metabolic stability assay that can efficiently handle a large volume of compound sets. The substrate depletion method [in vitro half-life (t1/2) method] was chosen to determine CLint. The assay (384-well format) consisted of three parts: 1) a robotic system for incubation and sample cleanup; 2) two different integrated, ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) platforms to determine the percent remaining of parent compound, and 3) an automated data analysis system. The CYP3A4 assay was evaluated using two long t1/2 compounds, carbamazepine and antipyrine (t1/2 > 30 minutes); one moderate t1/2 compound, ketoconazole (10 < t1/2 < 30 minutes); and two short t1/2 compounds, loperamide and buspirone (t½ < 10 minutes). Interday and intraday precision and accuracy of the assay were within acceptable range (∼12%) for the linear range observed. Using this assay, CYP3A4 CLint and t1/2 values for more than 3000 compounds were measured. This high-throughput, automated, and robust assay allows for rapid metabolic stability screening of large compound sets and enables advanced computational modeling for individual human P450 isozymes. PMID:27417180

  6. A High Throughput Screening Assay for Anti-Mycobacterial Small Molecules Based on Adenylate Kinase Release as a Reporter of Cell Lysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Forbes

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is well-established to be one of the most important bacterial pathogens for which new antimicrobial therapies are needed. Herein, we describe the development of a high throughput screening assay for the identification of molecules that are bactericidal against Mycobacteria. The assay utilizes the release of the intracellular enzyme adenylate kinase into the culture medium as a reporter of mycobacterial cell death. We demonstrate that the assay is selective for mycobactericidal molecules and detects anti-mycobacterial activity at concentrations below the minimum inhibitory concentration of many molecules. Thus, the AK assay is more sensitive than traditional growth assays. We have validated the AK assay in the HTS setting using the Mtb surrogate organism M. smegmatis and libraries of FDA approved drugs as well as a commercially available Diversity set. The screen of the FDA-approved library demonstrated that the AK assay is able to identify the vast majority of drugs with known mycobactericidal activity. Importantly, our screen of the Diversity set revealed that the increased sensitivity of the AK assay increases the ability of M. smegmatis-based screens to detect molecules with relatively poor activity against M. smegmatis but good to excellent activity against Mtb.

  7. A Substrate Mimic Allows High-Throughput Assay of the FabA Protein and Consequently the Identification of a Novel Inhibitor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa FabA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynié, Lucile; Hope, Anthony G; Finzel, Kara; Schmidberger, Jason; Leckie, Stuart M; Schneider, Gunter; Burkart, Michael D; Smith, Andrew D; Gray, David W; Naismith, James H

    2016-01-16

    Eukaryotes and prokaryotes possess fatty acid synthase (FAS) biosynthetic pathways that comprise iterative chain elongation, reduction, and dehydration reactions. The bacterial FASII pathway differs significantly from human FAS pathways and is a long-standing target for antibiotic development against Gram-negative bacteria due to differences from the human FAS, and several existing antibacterial agents are known to inhibit FASII enzymes. N-Acetylcysteamine (NAC) fatty acid thioesters have been used as mimics of the natural acyl carrier protein pathway intermediates to assay FASII enzymes, and we now report an assay of FabV from Pseudomonas aeruginosa using (E)-2-decenoyl-NAC. In addition, we have converted an existing UV absorbance assay for FabA, the bifunctional dehydration/epimerization enzyme and key target in the FASII pathway, into a high-throughput enzyme coupled fluorescence assay that has been employed to screen a library of diverse small molecules. With this approach, N-(4-chlorobenzyl)-3-(2-furyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-amine (N42FTA) was found to competitively inhibit (pIC50=5.7±0.2) the processing of 3-hydroxydecanoyl-NAC by P. aeruginosa FabA. N42FTA was shown to be potent in blocking crosslinking of Escherichia coli acyl carrier protein and FabA, a direct mimic of the biological process. The co-complex structure of N42FTA with P. aeruginosa FabA protein rationalises affinity and suggests future design opportunities. Employing NAC fatty acid mimics to develop further high-throughput assays for individual enzymes in the FASII pathway should aid in the discovery of new antimicrobials.

  8. High throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for mercapturic acids of acrolein and crotonaldehyde in cigarette smokers' urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmella, Steven G; Chen, Menglan; Zarth, Adam; Hecht, Stephen S

    2013-09-15

    3-Hydroxypropylmercapturic acid (3-HPMA) and 3-hydroxy-1-methylpropylmercapturic acid (HMPMA) are urinary metabolites of the toxicants acrolein and crotonaldehyde, respectively. Virtually all human urine samples contain these metabolites, resulting from the action of glutathione-S-transferases on acrolein and crotonaldehyde, which are lipid peroxidation products, environmental and dietary contaminants, and constituents of cigarette smoke. We have developed a high throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for quantitative analysis of 3-HPMA and HMPMA in large numbers of small urine samples, as would be required in molecular epidemiology and clinical studies relating levels of these metabolites to cancer risk. Solid-phase extraction on mixed mode reverse phase-anion exchange 96-well plates provided sufficient purification for LC-MS/MS analysis, which was performed by auto-injection using a 96-well format, and resulted in clean, readily interpretable chromatograms, with detection limits of 4.5pmol/mL urine for 3-HPMA and 3.5pmol/mL urine for HMPMA. Accuracy was 92% for 3-HPMA and 97% for HMPMA while inter-day precision was 9.1% (coefficient of variation) for 3-HPMA and 11.0% for HMPMA. The method was applied to more than 2600 urine samples from smokers; mean levels of 3-HPMA and HMPMA were 4800±5358 (S.D.)pmol/mL and 3302±3341pmol/mL, respectively.

  9. High-Throughput Colorimetric Assay for Identifying PARP-1 Inhibitors Using a Large Small-Molecule Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, Elena; Tulin, Alexei V

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) protein became a popular target for treatment of several types of cancer. A number of PARP-1 inhibitors are currently in clinical trials. Most of them were designed competitors with NAD for a binding site on PARP-1 molecule. This strategy resulted in a discovery of mainly nucleotide-like PARP-1 inhibitors, which may target not only PARP-1 but also other pathways involving NAD and other nucleotides. Many cancer types demonstrate rapid development of resistance to NAD-like PARP-1 inhibitors. Thus, identification and characterization of new small molecules inhibit PARP-1 with high specificity and efficacy is important for the clinical research. We have proposed a new approach to screen libraries for new PARP-1 inhibitors based on histone H4-dependent PARP-1 activation. Beside identification of NAD competitors in a small molecules collection, this approach allows finding other classes of PARP-1 inhibitors that specifically disrupt H4-based PARP-1 activation or arrest inactive allosteric conformation of PARP-1. Here, we present an adaptation of this approach for a large-scale high-throughput screen.

  10. Peptide reactivity assay using spectrophotometric method for high-throughput screening of skin sensitization potential of chemical haptens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yun Hyeok; An, Susun; Shin, Kyeho; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2013-02-01

    Haptens must react with cellular proteins to be recognized by antigen presenting cells. Therefore, monitoring reactivity of chemicals with peptide/protein has been considered an in vitro skin sensitization testing method. The reactivity of peptides with chemicals (peptide reactivity) has usually been monitored by chromatographic methods like HPLC or LC/MS, which are robust tools for monitoring common chemical reactions but are rather expensive and time consuming. Here, we examined the possibility of using spectrophotometric methods to monitor peptide reactivity. Two synthetic peptides, Ac-RWAACAA and Ac-RWAAKAA, were reacted with 48 chemicals (34 sensitizers and 14 non-sensitizers). Peptide reactivity was measured by monitoring unreacted peptides with UV-Vis spectrophotometer using 5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid as a detection reagent for the free thiol group of cysteine-containing peptide or fluorometer using fluorescamine™ as a detection reagent for the free amine group of lysine-containing peptide. Chemicals were categorized as sensitizers when they induced more than 10% depletion of cysteine-containing peptide or 20% depletion of lysine-containing peptide. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of this method were 82.4%, 85.7%, and 83.3%, respectively. These results demonstrate that spectrophotometric methods can be easy, fast, and high-throughput screening tools for the prediction of the skin sensitization potential of chemical haptens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a high-throughput screening assay for stearoyl-CoA desaturase using rat liver microsomes, deuterium labeled stearoyl-CoA and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulard, Patricia; McLaughlin, Meg; Stevens, Jessica; Connolly, Brendan; Coli, Rocco; Wang, Leyu; Moore, Jennifer; Kuo, Ming-Shang T; LaMarr, William A; Ozbal, Can C; Bhat, B Ganesh

    2008-10-03

    Several recent reports suggest that stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), the rate-limiting enzyme in monounsaturated fatty acid synthesis, plays an important role in regulating lipid homeostasis and lipid oxidation in metabolically active tissues. As several manifestations of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders are associated with alterations in intracellular lipid partitioning, pharmacological manipulation of SCD1 activity might be of benefit in the treatment of these disease states. In an effort to identify small molecule inhibitors of SCD1, we have developed a mass spectrometry based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay using deuterium labeled stearoyl-CoA substrate and induced rat liver microsomes. The methodology developed allows the use of a nonradioactive substrate which avoids interference by the endogenous SCD1 substrate and/or product that exist in the non-purified enzyme source. Throughput of the assay was up to twenty 384-well assay plates per day. The assay was linear with protein concentration and time, and was saturable for stearoyl-CoA substrate (K(m)=10.5 microM). The assay was highly reproducible with an average Z' value=0.6. Conjugated linoleic acid and sterculic acid, known inhibitors of SCD1, exhibited IC(50) values of 0.88 and 0.12 microM, respectively. High-throughput mass spectrometry screening of over 1.7 million compounds in compressed format demonstrated that the enzyme target is druggable. A total of 2515 hits were identified (0.1% hit rate), and 346 were confirmed active (>40% inhibition of total SCD activity at 20 microM--14% conformation rate). Of the confirmed hits 172 had IC(50) values of <10 microM, including 111 <1 microM and 48 <100 nM. A large number of potent drug-like (MW<450) hits representing six different chemical series were identified. The application of mass spectrometry to high-throughput screening permitted the development of a high-quality screening protocol for an otherwise intractable target, SCD1. Further

  12. Development of a high-throughput screening assay for stearoyl-CoA desaturase using rat liver microsomes, deuterium labeled stearoyl-CoA and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulard, Patricia; McLaughlin, Meg; Stevens, Jessica; Connolly, Brendan; Coli, Rocco; Wang Leyu [Research Technology Center, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Moore, Jennifer; Kuo, Ming-Shang T. [Pfizer Global Research and Development, San Diego, CA (United States); LaMarr, William A.; Ozbal, Can C. [Biotrove, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States); Bhat, B. Ganesh [Pfizer Global Research and Development, San Diego, CA (United States)], E-mail: gbhat@gnf.org

    2008-10-03

    Several recent reports suggest that stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), the rate-limiting enzyme in monounsaturated fatty acid synthesis, plays an important role in regulating lipid homeostasis and lipid oxidation in metabolically active tissues. As several manifestations of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders are associated with alterations in intracellular lipid partitioning, pharmacological manipulation of SCD1 activity might be of benefit in the treatment of these disease states. In an effort to identify small molecule inhibitors of SCD1, we have developed a mass spectrometry based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay using deuterium labeled stearoyl-CoA substrate and induced rat liver microsomes. The methodology developed allows the use of a nonradioactive substrate which avoids interference by the endogenous SCD1 substrate and/or product that exist in the non-purified enzyme source. Throughput of the assay was up to twenty 384-well assay plates per day. The assay was linear with protein concentration and time, and was saturable for stearoyl-CoA substrate (K{sub m} = 10.5 {mu}M). The assay was highly reproducible with an average Z' value = 0.6. Conjugated linoleic acid and sterculic acid, known inhibitors of SCD1, exhibited IC{sub 50} values of 0.88 and 0.12 {mu}M, respectively. High-throughput mass spectrometry screening of over 1.7 million compounds in compressed format demonstrated that the enzyme target is druggable. A total of 2515 hits were identified (0.1% hit rate), and 346 were confirmed active (>40% inhibition of total SCD activity at 20 {mu}M - 14% conformation rate). Of the confirmed hits 172 had IC{sub 50} values of <10 {mu}M, including 111 <1 {mu}M and 48 <100 nM. A large number of potent drug-like (MW < 450) hits representing six different chemical series were identified. The application of mass spectrometry to high-throughput screening permitted the development of a high-quality screening protocol for an otherwise intractable

  13. High-throughput screening assay used in pharmacognosy: Selection, optimization and validation of methods of enzymatic inhibition by UV-visible spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Granados-Guzmán

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In research laboratories of both organic synthesis and extraction of natural products, every day a lot of products that can potentially introduce some biological activity are obtained. Therefore it is necessary to have in vitro assays, which provide reliable information for further evaluation in in vivo systems. From this point of view, in recent years has intensified the use of high-throughput screening assays. Such trials should be optimized and validated for accurate and precise results, i.e. reliable. The present review addresses the steps needed to develop and validate bioanalytical methods, emphasizing UV-Visible spectrophotometry as detection system. Particularly focuses on the selection of the method, the optimization to determine the best experimental conditions, validation, implementation of optimized and validated method to real samples, and finally maintenance and possible transfer it to a new laboratory.

  14. A one-day, dispense-only IP-One HTRF assay for high-throughput screening of Galphaq protein-coupled receptors: towards cells as reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsdorf, Christian; Kropp-Goerkis, Carmen; Kaehler, Irene; Ketscher, Lars; Boemer, Ulf; Parczyk, Karsten; Bader, Benjamin

    2008-02-01

    Abstract: Compared to biochemical high-throughput screening (HTS) assays, cell-based functional assays are generally thought to be more time consuming and complex because of additional efforts for running continuous cell cultures as well as the numerous assay steps when transferring media and compounds. A common strategy to compensate the anticipated reduction in overall throughput is to implement highly automated cell culture and screening systems. However, such systems require substantial investments in sophisticated hardware and highly specialized personnel. In trying to set up alternatives to increasing throughput in functional cell-based screening, we combined several approaches. By using (1) cryopreserved cell aliquots instead of continuous cell culture, (2) cells in suspension instead of adherent cells, and (3) "ready-to-screen" assay plates with nanoliter aliquots of test compounds, an assay procedure was developed that very much resembles a standard biochemical, enzymatic assay comprising only a few dispense steps. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably overexpressing a Galphaq-coupled receptor were used as a model system to measure receptor activation by detection of intracellular D-myo-inositol 1-phosphate with the help of homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF, CISbio International, Bagnols-sur-Cèze, France). Initially established in 384-well adherent cell format, the assay was successfully transferred to 1,536-well format. The assay quality was sufficient to run HTS campaigns in both formats with good Z'-factors and excellent reproducibility of antagonists. Subsequently, the assay procedure was optimized for usage of suspension cells. The influences of cell culture media, plate type, cell number, and incubation time were assessed. Finally, the suspension cell assay was applied to pharmacological characterization of a small molecule antagonist by Schild plot analysis. Our data demonstrate not only the application of the IP-One HTRF assay (CISbio

  15. High-throughput immunoturbidimetric assays for in-process determination of polyclonal antibody concentration and functionality in crude samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Hanne; Kyhse-Andersen, J.; Thomas, O.R.T.

    2007-01-01

    We present fast, simple immunoturbidimetric assays suitable for direct determination of antibody 'concentration' and 'functionality' in crude samples, such as in-process samples taken at various stages during antibody purification. Both assays display excellent linearity and analytical recovery....... The 'functionality' assay displayed concentration dependent sensitivity to interference for ammonium sulphate and Tris(hydroxymethyl)-amino-methane, but was essentially unaffected by all other salts and buffer combinations tested. The immunoturbidimetric assays described here are generically applicable to polyclonal...... antibodies, require only basic laboratory equipment, are robust, fast, cheap, easy to perform, and readily adapted to automation....

  16. High-throughput enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA) electrochemiluminescent detection of botulinum toxins in foods for food safety and defence purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R W; Abbott, D

    2008-09-01

    Clostridum species produce seven serotypes (A-G) of botulinum toxin, four of which (A, B, E, and F) are normally associated with human illness. To date, the most reliable test for botulinum toxin is the mouse bioassay. The authors' laboratory has been exploring the use of an antibody-based assay similar to an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA) but utilizing electrochemiluminescent technology (BioVerify assay) as an alternative to the mouse bioassay for testing food samples. The detection limit of this assay is as low as 10 ng g(-1) depending on the food matrix and the serotype detected. Detection of botulinum toxin between 10 and 200 ng g(-1) is a linear curve allowing for the possibility of performing quantitative as well as qualitative testing of samples. The ease of the assay, limited sample preparation, and low detection limit make the BioVerify assay and instrument an excellent, high-throughput option for detecting botulinum toxins in food matrices.

  17. Multiplexing Fluo-4 NW and a GeneBLAzer transcriptional assay for high-throughput screening of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Bonnie J

    2006-09-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) leads to a cascade of signaling events, including calcium mobilization and downstream transcriptional activation of various proteins. Two commonly used methods of high-throughput screening for GPCRs include calcium-sensitive dyes, such as Fluo-4 NW, and reporter gene assays, such as beta-lactamase. To determine whether the advantages of each assay format could be combined by multiplexing, Jurkat and CHO-K1 cell lines over-expressing the M1 muscarinic receptor and beta-lactamase under control of an NFAT response element were tested in a multiplexed format. The Jurkat cell line was further screened with a subset of the LOPAC(1280) library. The multiplexing assay was compatible with both the CHO-K1 and Jurkat cell lines. For the screen, there was 100% correlation of on-target hits in the multiplexed format, and several false positives with each assay format were identified. Therefore, not only can the assays be multiplexed, but by multiplexing, the false positives associated with each assay format also could be easily identified. In addition to enhanced reliability, this method saves time and money because only half the amount of compounds, cells, and consumables are needed to screen a cell line in a multiplexed mode versus separate screening by both methods.

  18. High throughput cell-based assay for identification of glycolate oxidase inhibitors as a potential treatment for Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengqiao; Xu, Miao; Long, Yan; Fargue, Sonia; Southall, Noel; Hu, Xin; McKew, John C.; Danpure, Christopher J.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GO) and alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) are both involved in the peroxisomal glyoxylate pathway. Deficiency in AGT function causes the accumulation of intracellular oxalate and the primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1). AGT enhancers or GO inhibitors may restore the abnormal peroxisomal glyoxylate pathway in PH1 patients. With stably transformed cells which mimic the glyoxylate metabolic pathway, we developed an indirect glycolate cytotoxicity assay in a 1,536-well plate format for high throughput screening. This assay can be used to identify compounds that reduce indirect glycolate-induced cytotoxicity by either enhancing AGT activity or inhibiting GO. A pilot screen of 4,096 known compounds identified two membrane permeable GO inhibitors: dichromate salt and colistimethate. We also developed a GO enzyme assay using the hydrogen peroxide-Amplex red reporter system. The IC50 values of potassium dichromate, sodium dichromate, and colistimethate sodium were 0.096, 0.108, and 2.3 μM in the GO enzyme assay, respectively. Further enzyme kinetic study revealed that both types of compounds inhibit GO activity by the mixed linear inhibition. Our results demonstrate that the cell-based assay and GO enzyme assay developed in this study are useful for further screening of large compound libraries for drug development to treat PH1. PMID:27670739

  19. Discovery of novel inhibitors of human S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase based on in silico high-throughput screening and a non-radioactive enzymatic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chenzeng; Wang, Yanlin; Tan, Xiao; Sun, Lidan; Liu, Sen

    2015-06-01

    Natural polyamines are small polycationic molecules essential for cell growth and development, and elevated level of polyamines is positively correlated with various cancers. As a rate-limiting enzyme of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) has been an attractive drug target. In this report, we present the discovery of novel human AdoMetDC (hAdoMetDC) inhibitors by coupling computational and experimental tools. We constructed a reasonable computational structure model of hAdoMetDC that is compatible with general protocols for high-throughput drug screening, and used this model in in silico screening of hAdoMetDC inhibitors against a large compound library using a battery of computational tools. We also established and validated a simple, economic, and non-radioactive enzymatic assay, which can be adapted for experimental high-throughput screening of hAdoMetDC inhibitors. Finally, we obtained an hAdoMetDC inhibitor lead with a novel scaffold. This study provides both new tools and a new lead for the developing of novel hAdoMetDC inhibitors.

  20. A homogeneous, high-throughput-compatible, fluorescence intensity-based assay for UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductase (MurB) with nanomolar product detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Livchak, Stephania; Gao, Ning; Whiteaker, James; Thresher, Jason; Jahić, Haris; Huang, Jian; Gu, Rong-Fang

    2012-03-01

    A novel assay for the NADPH-dependent bacterial enzyme UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductase (MurB) is described that has nanomolar sensitivity for product formation and is suitable for high-throughput applications. MurB catalyzes an essential cytoplasmic step in the synthesis of peptidoglycan for the bacterial cell wall, reduction of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine to UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UNAM). Interruption of this biosynthetic pathway leads to cell death, making MurB an attractive target for antibacterial drug discovery. In the new assay, the UNAM product of the MurB reaction is ligated to L-alanine by the next enzyme in the peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway, MurC, resulting in hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP). The ADP is detected with nanomolar sensitivity by converting it to oligomeric RNA with polynucleotide phosphorylase and detecting the oligomeric RNA with a fluorescent dye. The product sensitivity of the new assay is 1000-fold greater than that of the standard assay that follows the absorbance decrease resulting from the conversion of NADPH to NADP(+). This sensitivity allows inhibitor screening to be performed at the low substrate concentrations needed to make the assay sensitive to competitive inhibition of MurB.

  1. A luciferase based viability assay for ATP detection in 384-well format for high throughput whole cell screening of Trypanosoma brucei brucei bloodstream form strain 427

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery Vicky M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT is caused by two trypanosome species, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Current drugs available for the treatment of HAT have significant issues related to toxicity, administration regimes with limited effectiveness across species and disease stages, thus there is a considerable need to find alternative drugs. A well recognised approach to identify new drug candidates is high throughput screening (HTS of large compound library collections. Results We describe here the development of a luciferase based viability assay in 384-well plate format suitable for HTS of T.b.brucei. The parameters that were explored to determine the final HTS assay conditions are described in detail and include DMSO tolerability, Z', diluents and cell inoculum density. Reference compound activities were determined for diminazene, staurosporine and pentamidine and compared to previously published IC50 data obtained. The assay has a comparable sensitivity to reference drugs and is more cost effective than the 96-well format currently reported for T.b.brucei. Conclusion Due to the reproducibility and sensitivity of this assay it is recommended for potential HTS application. As it is commercially available this assay can also be utilised in many laboratories for both large and small scale screening.

  2. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  3. High-throughput screening of cellulase F mutants from multiplexed plasmid sets using an automated plate assay on a functional proteomic robotic workcell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Nasib

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The field of plasmid-based functional proteomics requires the rapid assay of proteins expressed from plasmid libraries. Automation is essential since large sets of mutant open reading frames are being cloned for evaluation. To date no integrated automated platform is available to carry out the entire process including production of plasmid libraries, expression of cloned genes, and functional testing of expressed proteins. Results We used a functional proteomic assay in a multiplexed setting on an integrated plasmid-based robotic workcell for high-throughput screening of mutants of cellulase F, an endoglucanase from the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces PC-2. This allowed us to identify plasmids containing optimized clones expressing mutants with improved activity at lower pH. A plasmid library of mutagenized clones of the celF gene with targeted variations in the last four codons was constructed by site-directed PCR mutagenesis and transformed into Escherichia coli. A robotic picker integrated into the workcell was used to inoculate medium in a 96-well deep well plate, combining the transformants into a multiplexed set in each well, and the plate was incubated on the workcell. Plasmids were prepared from the multiplexed culture on the liquid handler component of the workcell and used for in vitro transcription/translation. The multiplexed expressed recombinant proteins were screened for improved activity and stability in an azo-carboxymethylcellulose plate assay. The multiplexed wells containing mutants with improved activity were identified and linked back to the corresponding multiplexed cultures stored in glycerol. Spread plates were prepared from the glycerol stocks and the workcell was used to pick single colonies from the spread plates, prepare plasmid, produce recombinant protein, and assay for activity. The screening assay and subsequent deconvolution of the multiplexed wells resulted in identification of improved Cel

  4. A high throughput screening assay to screen for CYP2E1 metabolism and inhibition using a fluorogenic vivid p450 substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Bryan D; Smith, Ronald W; Braun, Heidi A; Goossens, Tony A; Christenson, Marie; Ozers, Mary S; Lebakken, Connie S; Trubetskoy, Olga V

    2002-11-01

    Large-scale screening of multiple compound libraries and combinatorial libraries for pharmacological activity is one of the novel approaches of the modern drug discovery process. The application of isozyme-specific high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for characterizing the interactions of potential drug candidates with major human drug-metabolizing cytochrome p450 enzymes (p450s) is newly becoming an essential part of this process. Fluorescence-based HTS assays have been successfully employed for in vitro assessment of drug-drug interactions and enzyme inhibition with several p450 isoforms, including CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19. Here we describe a fluorescence-based HTS assay for detecting drug metabolism and inhibition with human CYP2E1. CYP2E1 plays an important role in the metabolism of several drugs, many solvents, and toxins and therefore has been repeatedly linked to numerous pathologies, including cancer, liver and kidney toxicity, diabetes, and alcoholism. The assay is based on the ability of a drug to compete with the fluorogenic Vivid CYP2E1 Blue Substrate for CYP2E1 metabolism and thus enables rapid screening of lead molecules for their inhibitory potential. We have used this assay to screen a panel of drugs and compounds for their effects on CYP2E1 metabolism and inhibition. Our results demonstrate the assay's usefulness in identifying CYP2E1 substrates and inhibitors and in enabling in-depth characterization of their interactions with the CYP2E1 isozyme. We also present detailed characteristics of the assay, including its dynamic range and Z'-factor values, which indicate that this robust assay is well suited for kinetic and inhibition studies in HTS formats.

  5. High-throughput micro-plate HCL-vanillin assay for screening tannin content in sorghum grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum contains tannin which is a phenolic compound that offers health promoting antioxidant capacity. The HCl-vanillin assay is a common and time consuming method for determining tannin content, but is not efficient for screening large sample sets as seen in association mapping panels or breeding ...

  6. Development of a universal high-throughput calcium assay for G-protein-coupled receptors with promiscuous G-protein Gα15/16

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting ZHU; Li-yan FANG; Xin XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To develop a universal high-throughput screening assay based on Gα15/16-mediated calcium mobilization for the identification of novel modulators of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Methods:In the present study, CHO-K1 or HEK293 cells were co-transfected with plasmids encoding promiscuous G-protein Cα15/16 and various receptors originally coupled to Gαs, Gαi, or Gαq pathways. Intracellular calcium change was monitored with fluorescent dye Fluo-4. Results:We found out for all the receptors tested, Gα15/16 could shift the receptors' coupling to the calcium mobilization pathway, and the EC50 values of the ligands generated with this method were comparable with reported values that were ob-tained using traditional methods. This assay was validated and optimized with the δ-opioid receptor, which originally coupled to God and was recently found to play important roles in neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. A large-scale screening of 48 000 compounds was performed based on this system. Sev-eral new modulators were identified and confirmed with the traditional GTPγS binding assay. Conclusion:This cell-based calcium assay was proved to be robust and easy to automate, and could be used as a universal method in search-ing for GPCR modulators.

  7. A Cell-Based High-Throughput Assay for Gap Junction Communication Suitable for Assessing Connexin 43-Ezrin Interaction Disruptors Using IncuCyte ZOOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukic, Aleksandra R; McClymont, David W; Taskén, Kjetil

    2017-01-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43), the predominant gap junction (GJ) protein, directly interacts with the A-kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP) Ezrin in human cytotrophoblasts and a rat liver epithelial cells (IAR20). The Cx43-Ezrin-protein kinase (PKA) complex facilitates Cx43 phosphorylation by PKA, which triggers GJ opening in cytotrophoblasts and IAR20 cells and may be a general mechanism regulating GJ intercellular communication (GJIC). Considering the importance of Cx43 GJs in health and disease, they are considered potential pharmaceutical targets. The Cx43-Ezrin interaction is a protein-protein interaction that opens possibilities for targeting with peptides and small molecules. For this reason, we developed a high-throughput cell-based assay in which GJIC can be assessed and new compounds characterized. We used two pools of IAR20 cells, calcein loaded and unloaded, that were mixed and allowed to attach. Next, GJIC was monitored over time using automated imaging via the IncuCyte imager. The assay was validated using known GJ inhibitors and anchoring peptide disruptors, and we further tested new peptides that interfered with the Cx43-Ezrin binding region and reduced GJIC. Although an AlphaScreen assay can be used to screen for Cx43-Ezrin interaction inhibitors, the cell-based assay described is an ideal secondary screen for promising small-molecule hits to help identify the most potent compounds.

  8. A novel cell-based duplex high-throughput screening assay combining fluorescent Ca(2+) measurement with homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, László; Cselenyák, Attila; Varga, Ágnes; Visegrády, András

    2016-08-15

    Cell-based assays for G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation applied in high-throughput screening (HTS) monitor various readouts for second messengers or intracellular effectors. Recently, our understanding of diverging signaling pathways downstream of receptor activation and the capability of small molecules to selectively modulate signaling routes has increased substantially, underlining the importance of selecting appropriate readouts in cellular functional screens. To minimize the rate of false negatives in large-scale screening campaigns, it is crucial to maximize the chance of a ligand being detected, and generally applicable methods for detecting multiple analytes from a single well might serve this purpose. The few assays developed so far based on multiplexed GPCR readouts are limited to only certain applications and usually rely on genetic manipulations hindering screening in native or native-like cellular systems. Here we describe a more generally applicable and HTS-compatible homogeneous assay based on the combination of fluorometric detection of [Ca(2+)] with subsequent homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) cAMP readout in the same well. Besides describing development and validation of the assay, using a cell line recombinantly expressing the human PTH1 receptor screening of a small library is also presented, demonstrating the robustness and HTS compatibility of the novel paradigm.

  9. Microscopy-based Assays for High-throughput Screening of Host Factors Involved in Brucella Infection of Hela Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Alain; Low, Shyan H; Emmenlauer, Mario; Conde-Alvarez, Raquel; Salcedo, Suzana P; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Dehio, Christoph

    2016-08-05

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular pathogens that infect animals as their natural hosts. Transmission to humans is most commonly caused by direct contact with infected animals or by ingestion of contaminated food and can lead to severe chronic infections. Brucella can invade professional and non-professional phagocytic cells and replicates within endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vacuoles. The host factors required for Brucella entry into host cells, avoidance of lysosomal degradation, and replication in the ER-like compartment remain largely unknown. Here we describe two assays to identify host factors involved in Brucella entry and replication in HeLa cells. The protocols describe the use of RNA interference, while alternative screening methods could be applied. The assays are based on the detection of fluorescently labeled bacteria in fluorescently labeled host cells using automated wide-field microscopy. The fluorescent images are analyzed using a standardized image analysis pipeline in CellProfiler which allows single cell-based infection scoring. In the endpoint assay, intracellular replication is measured two days after infection. This allows bacteria to traffic to their replicative niche where proliferation is initiated around 12 hr after bacterial entry. Brucella which have successfully established an intracellular niche will thus have strongly proliferated inside host cells. Since intracellular bacteria will greatly outnumber individual extracellular or intracellular non-replicative bacteria, a strain constitutively expressing GFP can be used. The strong GFP signal is then used to identify infected cells. In contrast, for the entry assay it is essential to differentiate between intracellular and extracellular bacteria. Here, a strain encoding for a tetracycline-inducible GFP is used. Induction of GFP with simultaneous inactivation of extracellular bacteria by gentamicin enables the differentiation between intracellular and extracellular

  10. Risk-based high-throughput chemical screening and prioritization using exposure models and in vitro bioactivity assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Ernstoff, Alexi; Arnot, Jon;

    2015-01-01

    . Bioactivity quotients (BQs) are calculated as iR/OED to obtain estimates of potential impact associated with each relevant use scenario. Of the 180 chemicals considered, 38 had maximum iRs exceeding minimum OEDs (i.e., BQs > 1). For most of these compounds, exposures are associated with direct intake, food...... with use scenario-specific estimates of chemical quantity to calculate daily intake rates (iR; mg/kg/day). These intake rates are compared to oral equivalent doses (OED; mg/kg/day), calculated from a suite of ToxCast in vitro bioactivity assays using in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation and reverse dosimetry...

  11. Design of a high-throughput human neural crest cell migration assay to indicate potential developmental toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Johanna; Karreman, Christiaan; Leisner, Heidrun; Kim, Yong Jun; Lee, Gabsang; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Migration of neural crest cells (NCCs) is one of the pivotal processes of human fetal development. Malformations arise if NCC migration and differentiation are impaired genetically or by toxicants. In the currently available test systems for migration inhibition of NCC (MINC), the manual generation of a cell-free space results in extreme operator dependencies, and limits throughput. Here a new test format was established. The assay avoids scratching by plating cells around a commercially available circular stopper. Removal of the stopper barrier after cell attachment initiates migration. This microwell-based circular migration zone NCC function assay (cMINC) was further optimized for toxicological testing of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived NCCs. The challenge of obtaining data on viability and migration by automated image processing was addressed by developing a freeware. Data on cell proliferation were obtained by labelling replicating cells, and by careful assessment of cell viability for each experimental sample. The role of cell proliferation as an experimental confounder was tested experimentally by performing the cMINC in the presence of the proliferation-inhibiting drug cytosine arabinoside (AraC), and by a careful evaluation of mitotic events over time. Data from these studies led to an adaptation of the test protocol, so that toxicant exposure was limited to 24 h. Under these conditions, a prediction model was developed that allows classification of toxicants as either inactive, leading to unspecific cytotoxicity, or specifically inhibiting NC migration at non-cytotoxic concentrations.

  12. High-throughput Characterization of HIV-1 Reservoir Reactivation Using a Single-Cell-in-Droplet PCR Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Yucha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of latent viral reservoirs is on the forefront of HIV-1 eradication research. However, it is unknown if latency reversing agents (LRAs increase the level of viral transcription from cells producing HIV RNA or harboring transcriptionally-inactive (latent infection. We therefore developed a microfluidic single-cell-in-droplet (scdPCR assay to directly measure the number of CD4+ T cells that produce unspliced (usRNA and multiply spliced (msRNA following ex vivo latency reversal with either an histone deacetylase inhibitor (romidepsin or T cell receptor (TCR stimulation. Detection of HIV-1 transcriptional activity can also be performed on hundreds of thousands of CD4+ T-cells in a single experiment. The scdPCR method was then applied to CD4+ T cells obtained from HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Overall, our results suggest that effects of LRAs on HIV-1 reactivation may be heterogeneous—increasing transcription from active cells in some cases and increasing the number of transcriptionally active cells in others. Genomic DNA and human mRNA isolated from HIV-1 reactivated cells could also be detected and quantified from individual cells. As a result, our assay has the potential to provide needed insight into various reservoir eradication strategies.

  13. Tackling heterogeneity: a leaf disc-based assay for the high-throughput screening of transient gene expression in tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Piotrzkowski

    Full Text Available Transient Agrobacterium-mediated gene expression assays for Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum are frequently used because they facilitate the comparison of multiple expression constructs regarding their capacity for maximum recombinant protein production. However, for three model proteins, we found that recombinant protein accumulation (rpa was significantly influenced by leaf age and leaf position effects. The ratio between the highest and lowest amount of protein accumulation (max/min ratio was found to be as high as 11. Therefore, construct-based impacts on the rpa level that are less than 11-fold will be masked by background noise. To address this problem, we developed a leaf disc-based screening assay and infiltration device that allows the rpa level in a whole tobacco plant to be reliably and reproducibly determined. The prototype of the leaf disc infiltration device allows 14 Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration events to be conducted in parallel. As shown for three model proteins, the average max/min rpa ratio was reduced to 1.4 using this method, which allows for a sensitive comparison of different genetic elements affecting recombinant protein expression.

  14. High-Throughput Assay Development for Cystine-Glutamate Antiporter (xc-) Highlights Faster Cystine Uptake than Glutamate Release in Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ajit G; Sattler, Rita; Tendyke, Karen; Loiacono, Kara A; Hansen, Hans; Sahni, Vishal; Hashizume, Yutaka; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S

    2015-01-01

    The cystine-glutamate antiporter (system xc-) is a Na+-independent amino acid transporter that exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate. It is thought to play a critical role in cellular redox processes through regulation of intracellular glutathione synthesis via cystine uptake. In gliomas, system xc- expression is universally up-regulated while that of glutamate transporters down-regulated, leading to a progressive accumulation of extracellular glutamate and excitotoxic cell death of the surrounding non-tumorous tissue. Additionally, up-regulation of system xc- in activated microglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders mediated by excess glutamate. Consequently, system xc- is a new drug target for brain cancer and neuroinflammatory diseases associated with excess extracellular glutamate. Unfortunately no potent and selective small molecule system xc- inhibitors exist and to our knowledge, no high throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed to identify new scaffolds for inhibitor design. To develop such an assay, various neuronal and non-neuronal human cells were evaluated as sources of system xc-. Human glioma cells were chosen based on their high system xc- activity. Using these cells, [14C]-cystine uptake and cystine-induced glutamate release assays were characterized and optimized with respect to cystine and protein concentrations and time of incubation. A pilot screen of the LOPAC/NINDS libraries using glutamate release demonstrated that the logistics of the assay were in place but unfortunately, did not yield meaningful pharmacophores. A larger, HTS campaign using the 384-well cystine-induced glutamate release as primary assay and the 96-well 14C-cystine uptake as confirmatory assay is currently underway. Unexpectedly, we observed that the rate of cystine uptake was significantly faster than the rate of glutamate release in human glioma cells. This was in contrast to the same rates of

  15. An automated, high-throughput, 384 well Cytochrome P450 cocktail IC50 assay using a rapid resolution LC-MS/MS end-point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdim, Kuresh A; Lyons, Richard; Payne, Leon; Jones, Barry C; Saunders, Kenneth

    2008-09-10

    The current study focused on the development of an automated IC50 cocktail assay in a miniaturized 384 well assay format. This was developed in combination with a significantly shorter high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) run-time; than those currently reported in the literature. The 384-well assay used human liver microsomes in conjunction with a cocktail of probe substrates metabolized by the five major CYPs (tacrine for CYP1A2, diclofenac for CYP2C9, (S)-mephenytoin for CYP2C19, dextromethorphan for CYP2D6 and midazolam for CYP3A4). To validate the usefulness of the automated and analytical methodologies, IC50 determinations were performed for a series of test compounds known to exhibit inhibition across these five major P450s. Eight compounds (sertraline, disulfuram, ticlopidine fluconazole, fluvoxamine, ketoconazole, miconazole, paroxetine, flunitrazepam) were studied as part of a cocktail assay, and against each CYPs individually. The data showed that the IC50s generated with cocktail incubations did not differ to a great extent from those obtained in the single probe experiments and hence unlikely to significantly influence the predicted clinical DDI risk. In addition the present method offered a significant advantage over some of the existing cocktail analytical methodology in that separation can be achieved with run times as short as 1 min without compromising data integrity. Although numerous studies have been reported to measure CYP inhibition in a cocktail format the need to support growing discovery libraries not only relies on higher throughput assays but quicker analytical run times. The current study reports a miniaturized high-throughput cocktail IC50 assay, in conjunction with a robust, rapid resolution LC-MS/MS end-point offered increased sample throughput without compromising analytical sensitivity or analyte resolution.

  16. 临近闪烁分析法在高通量筛选中的应用%Scintillation Proximity Assays in High Throughput Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭钢; 刘白玲; 王斌; 李晨英

    2012-01-01

    起源于放射性免疫分析的临近闪烁分析法(scintillation proximity assay,SPA)是一种均相、灵敏、快速和简便的基于闪烁载体的分析平台。该平台可用于筛选药物靶点的先导化合物和研究其生理过程。由于无需分离,易于固定药物靶点和检测其活性,SPA成为一种重要的高通量筛选方法。由于放射性标记分子和亲和标签分子的多样化和商业化、以及液闪计数器和液相操作等技术的发展,SPA已经广泛用于受体结合、高通量药物筛选、酶分析、放射性免疫分析、蛋白质-蛋白质相互作用和细胞水平分析等方面。本文阐述了SPA原理,讨论了其关键技术(包括闪烁载体、液闪计数器和放射性标记分子),分析了其评价体系;同时简述了SPA分析的发展,并介绍了其在高通量筛选中的应用实例,归纳了存在的问题,给出了未来的发展趋势。目前,基于SPA和荧光分析方法已成为高通量药物筛选的热点研究领域,这些筛选技术的革新必然提升我们对细胞体系生物学的全面理解和促进先导化合物筛选过程的显著进步。%Originated from a radioimmunoassay method, scintillation proximity assay (SPA) is a homogenous, sensitive, fast and simple scintillant carrier-based platform. This platform can be used to screen lead compounds for drug targets and investigate their biological processes. SPA becomes an important method in high throughput screening (HTS) due to no separation step, easy binding of drug targets and measuring their activities. Because of the diversification and commercialization of radio-labeled molecules and affinity tags, as well as the development of scintillation readers and liquid handling technologies, SPAs have been widely applied in receptor binding, high throughput drug screening, enzyme assay, radioimmunoassay, protein-protein interaction,cell-based assay and so on. This review presents the principle of SPA

  17. Evaluation of the Effects of Mitragyna speciosa Alkaloid Extract on Cytochrome P450 Enzymes Using a High Throughput Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Elina Raja Aziddin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The extract from Mitragyna speciosa has been widely used as an opium substitute, mainly due to its morphine-like pharmacological effects. This study investigated the effects of M. speciosa alkaloid extract (MSE on human recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP enzyme activities using a modified Crespi method. As compared with the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method, this method has shown to be a fast and cost-effective way to perform CYP inhibition studies. The results indicated that MSE has the most potent inhibitory effect on CYP3A4 and CYP2D6, with apparent half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 0.78 µg/mL and 0.636 µg/mL, respectively. In addition, moderate inhibition was observed for CYP1A2, with an IC50 of 39 µg/mL, and weak inhibition was detected for CYP2C19. The IC50 of CYP2C19 could not be determined, however, because inhibition was < 50%. Competitive inhibition was found for the MSE-treated CYP2D6 inhibition assay, whereas non-competitive inhibition was shown in inhibition assays using CYP3A4, CYP1A2 and CYP2C19. Quinidine (CYP2D6, ketoconazole (CYP3A4, tranylcypromine (CYP2C19 and furafylline (CYP1A2 were used as positive controls throughout the experiments. This study shows that MSE may contribute to an herb-drug interaction if administered concomitantly with drugs that are substrates for CYP3A4, CYP2D6 and CYP1A2.

  18. High-throughput in vitro assay to evaluate the cytotoxicity of liberated platinum compounds for stimulating neural electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Kyle M; Kumsa, Doe W; Srivastava, Vishnupriya; Hudak, Eric M; Untereker, Darrel F; Kelley, Shawn C; von Recum, Horst A; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2016-11-01

    It is currently unclear how the platinum (Pt) species released from platinum-containing stimulating electrodes may affect the health of the surrounding tissue. This study develops an effective system to assess the cytotoxicity of any electrode-liberated Pt over a short duration, to screen systems before future in vivo testing. A platinum electrode was stimulated for two hours under physiologically relevant conditions to induce the liberation of Pt species. The total concentration of liberated Pt species was quantified and the concentration found was used to develop a range of Pt species for our model system comprised of microglia and neuron-like cells. Under our stimulation conditions (k=2.3, charge density of 57.7μC/cm(2)), Pt was liberated to a concentration of 1ppm. Interestingly, after 24h of Pt exposure, the dose-dependent cytotoxicity plots revealed that cell death became statistically significant at 10ppm for microglia and 20ppm for neuronal cells. However, in neuron-like cell cultures, concentrations above 1ppm resulted in significant neurite loss after 24h. To our knowledge, there does not exist a simple, in vitro assay system for assessing the cytotoxicity of Pt liberated from stimulating neural electrodes. This work describes a simple model assay that is designed to be applicable to almost any electrode and stimulation system where the electrode is directly juxtaposed to the neural target. Based on the application, the duration of stimulation and Pt exposure may be varied. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. High-throughput screening with a miniaturized radioligand competition assay identifies new modulators of human α2-adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallarero, Adyary; Pohjanoksa, Katariina; Wissel, Gloria; Parkkisenniemi-Kinnunen, Ulla-Mari; Xhaard, Henri; Scheinin, Mika; Vuorela, Pia

    2012-12-18

    Human α(2)-adrenoceptors (α(2)-ARs) are rhodopsin-like G-protein coupled receptors, and potential drug targets. The three different human α(2)-AR subtypes α(2A), α(2B) and α(2C) are widely distributed in tissues, but so far only a few subtype-selective ligands have been identified. In this project, we set off to conduct a large chemical screen for activity on the human α(2B)-AR and studied the selectivity of the active compounds towards the human α(2A)- and α(2C)-AR subtypes. We employed a radioligand competition binding assay that was optimized and miniaturized into a robotic environment. Membrane fractions containing recombinant human receptor subtypes were prepared from stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Initially identified hits were followed up and characterized, and chemoinformatics tools were applied to gain better understanding of the relevance of the results. After a primary screen against α(2B)-AR, 176 compounds of the 17,952 included in the library were declared as active at 10 μM, of which 89 compounds were further selected for potency and affinity determinations using the three human α(2)-AR subtypes. One of the identified positive hits was 2″,2″″-Bisepigallocatechin digallate, which was found to have high affinity at all three human α(2)-AR subtypes. This represents the first non-protonable molecule identified as able to interact with these receptors. Additionally, results obtained with a functional assay (agonist-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTPγS binding) supported the identification of another positive hit, lysergol, as a partial agonist of the human α(2)-AR subtypes. The dataset of confirmed active chemical species represents a readily available, high quality source for follow-up studies. Altogether, these results provide novel research approaches for drug discovery of modulators of the α(2)-AR subtypes.

  20. A novel high throughput biochemical assay to evaluate the HuR protein-RNA complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito G D'Agostino

    Full Text Available The RNA binding protein HuR/ELAVL1 binds to AU-rich elements (AREs promoting the stabilization and translation of a number of mRNAs into the cytoplasm, dictating their fate. We applied the AlphaScreen technology using purified human HuR protein, expressed in a mammalian cell-based system, to characterize in vitro its binding performance towards a ssRNA probe whose sequence corresponds to the are present in TNFα 3' untranslated region. We optimized the method to titrate ligands and analyzed the kinetic in saturation binding and time course experiments, including competition assays. The method revealed to be a successful tool for determination of HuR binding kinetic parameters in the nanomolar range, with calculated Kd of 2.5±0.60 nM, k on of 2.76±0.56*10(6 M(-1 min(-1, and k off of 0.007±0.005 min(-1. We also tested the HuR-RNA complex formation by fluorescent probe-based RNA-EMSA. Moreover, in a 384-well plate format we obtained a Z-factor of 0.84 and an averaged coefficient of variation between controls of 8%, indicating that this biochemical assay fulfills criteria of robustness for a targeted screening approach. After a screening with 2000 small molecules and secondary verification with RNA-EMSA we identified mitoxantrone as an interfering compound with rHuR and TNFα probe complex formation. Notably, this tool has a large versatility and could be applied to other RNA Binding Proteins recognizing different RNA, DNA, or protein species. In addition, it opens new perspectives in the identification of small-molecule modulators of RNA binding proteins activity.

  1. High-throughput fluorescence screening assay for the identification and comparison of antimicrobial peptides' activity on various yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-09-10

    New antifungal compounds that circumvent the resistance of the pathogen by directly damaging yeast cell surface structures are promising agents for the treatment of fungal infections, due to their different mechanism of action from current clinically used antifungal drugs. We present here a rapid and cost-effective fluorescence method suitable for identifying new potent drugs that directly target yeast cell surface structures, causing cell permeabilization and thus bypassing the multidrug resistance mechanisms of pathogens. The fluorescence assay enabled us to detect with high sensitivity damage to the Candida plasma membrane (its hyperpolarization and permeabilization) as a result of short-term exposure to the antifungal compounds. Results can be obtained in 1-2h with minimal effort and consumption of the tested compounds, also 96 samples can be analysed simultaneously. We used this method to study antimicrobial peptides isolated from the venom of bees and their synthetic analogs, compare the potency of the peptides and determine their minimal effective concentrations. The antimicrobial peptides were able to kill yeast cells at low concentrations within a 15-min treatment, the LL-III peptide exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity on various Saccharomyces, pathogenic Candida and osmotolerant yeast species.

  2. Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence-Based Assay to Monitor Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signalling in a High-Throughput Format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli eAyoub

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs are key components of multiple important cell signalling pathways regulating diverse biological responses. This signalling is characterized by phosphorylation cascades leading to ERK1/2 activation and promoted by various cell surface receptors including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. We report the development of a new cell-based phospho-ERK1/2 assay (designated Phospho-ERK, which is a sandwich proximity-based assay using the homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology. We have validated the assay on endogenously expressed ERK1/2 activated by the epidermal growth factor (EGFR as a prototypical RTK, as well as various GPCRs belonging to different classes and coupling to different heterotrimeric G proteins. The assay was successfully miniaturized in 384-well plates using various cell lines endogenously, transiently or stably expressing the different receptors. The validation was performed for agonists, antagonists and inhibitors in dose-response as well as kinetic analysis, and the signalling and pharmacological properties of the different receptors were reproduced. Furthermore, the determination of a Z’-factor value of 0.7 indicates the potential of the Phospho-ERK assay for high-throughput screening of compounds that may modulate ERK1/2 signalling. Finally, our study is of great interest in the current context of investigating ERK1/2 signalling with respect to the emerging concepts of biased ligands, G protein-dependent/independent ERK1/2 activation, and functional transactivation between GPCRs and RTKs, illustrating the importance of considering the ERK1/2 pathway in cell signalling.

  3. A new method with flexible and balanced control of false negatives and false positives for hit selection in RNA interference high-throughput screening assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2007-08-01

    The z-score method and its variants for testing mean difference are commonly used for hit selection in high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD) offers a way to measure and classify the short interfering RNA (siRNA) effects. In this article, based on SSMD, the authors propose a new testing method for hit selection in RNA interference (RNAi) HTS assays. This SSMD-based method allows the differentiation between siRNAs with large and small effects on the assay output and maintains flexible and balanced control of both the false-negative rate, in which the siRNAs with strong effects are not selected as hits, and the restricted false-positive rate, in which the siRNAs with weak or no effects are selected as hits. This method directly addresses the size of siRNA effects represented by the strength of difference between an siRNA and a negative reference, whereas the classic z-score method and t-test of testing no mean difference address whether the mean of an siRNA is exactly the same as the mean of a negative reference. This method can readily control the false-negative rate, whereas it is nontrivial for the classic z-score method and t-test to control the false-negative rate. Therefore, theoretically, the SSMD-based method offers better control of the sizes of siRNA effects and the associated false-positive and false-negative rates than the commonly used z-score method and t-test for hit selection in HTS assays. The SSMD-based method should generally be applicable to any assay in which the end point is a difference in signal compared to a reference sample, including those for RNAi, receptor, enzyme, and cellular function.

  4. Setting up a Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer high throughput screening assay to search for protein/protein interaction inhibitors in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril eCouturier

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Each step of the cell life and its response or adaptation to its environment are mediated by a network of protein/protein interactions termed interactome. Our knowledge of this network keeps growing due to the development of sensitive techniques devoted to study these interactions. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET technique was primarily developed to allow the dynamic monitoring of protein-protein interactions in living cells, and has widely been used to study receptor activation by intra- or extra-molecular conformational changes within receptors and activated complexes in mammal cells. Some interactions are described as crucial in human pathological processes, and a new class of drugs targeting them has recently emerged. The BRET method is well suited to identify inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and here is described why and how to set up and optimize a High Throughput Screening assay based on BRET to search for such inhibitory compounds. The different parameters to take into account when developing such BRET assays in mammal cells are reviewed to give general guidelines: considerations on the targeted interaction, choice of BRET version, inducibility of the interaction, kinetic of the monitored interaction, and of the BRET reading, influence substrate concentration, number of cells and medium composition used on the Z’ factor, and expected interferences for colored or fluorescent compounds.

  5. Enzymatic Characterization of ER Stress-Dependent Kinase, PERK, and Development of a High-Throughput Assay for Identification of PERK Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Dariusz; Seyb, Kathleen; Liu, Min; Ray, Soumya S; Concannon, John; Huang, Mickey; Cuny, Gregory D; Diehl, J Alan; Glicksman, Marcie A

    2014-08-01

    PERK is serine/threonine kinase localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. PERK is activated and contributes to cell survival in response to a variety of physiological stresses that affect protein quality control in the ER, such as hypoxia, glucose depravation, increased lipid biosynthesis, and increased protein translation. Pro-survival functions of PERK are triggered by such stresses, suggesting that development of small-molecule inhibitors of PERK may be efficacious in a variety of disease scenarios. Hence, we have conducted a detailed enzymatic characterization of the PERK kinase to develop a high-throughput-screening assay (HTS) that will permit the identification of small-molecule PERK inhibitors. In addition to establishing the K(m) of PERK for both its primary substrate, eIF2α, and for adenosine triphosphate, further mechanistic studies revealed that PERK targets its substrate via either a random/steady-state ordered mechanism. For HTS, we developed a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay that yielded a robust Z' factor and percent coefficient of variation value, enabling the successful screening of 79,552 compounds. This approach yielded one compound that exhibited good in vitro and cellular activity. These results demonstrate the validity of this screen and represent starting points for drug discovery efforts.

  6. Development of a high-throughput ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assay to profile 18 eicosanoids as exploratory biomarkers for atherosclerotic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Brian; Fu, Cexiong

    2013-10-01

    Abundant evidence suggests a prominent role for eicosanoids and metabolites in the pathogenesis and prognosis of inflammatory diseases. A sensitive and high-throughput SPE UPLC-MS/MS method was developed to quantitatively interrogate the levels of 18 eicosanoids in human and monkey plasma samples. A limit of quantitation of 0.25ng/mL was achieved for all 18 investigated compounds with linear ranges spanning four orders of magnitude. Bioanalytical performance of this assay was fully characterized including SPE extraction efficiency, matrix effect, autosampler stability, benchtop stability and freeze-thaw cycle variability. Endogenous levels of the eicosanoids and analogs within a set of monkey plasma samples challenged with lipopolysaccharide and human plasma samples were quantified by this ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) assay. Quantitative eicosanoid profiles of the human samples were further analyzed by a non-supervised cluster analysis, which revealed a set of potential positive and negative lipid biomarkers to distinguish the following three groups: healthy individuals, hypertensive patients and severe atherosclerosis patients. The components of the negative biomarker cluster (8-HETE, LTB4, 9-HODE and 13-HODE) are putative ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), a family of master genes controlling the resolution of inflammatory signaling.

  7. Method for Assaying the Lipid Kinase Phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase α in Quantitative High-Throughput Screening (qHTS) Bioluminescent Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mindy I.; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Simeonov, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Summary ipid kinases are important regulators of a variety of cellular processes and their dysregulation causes diseases such as cancer and metabolic diseases. Distinct lipid kinases regulate the seven different phosphorylated forms of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns). Some lipid kinases utilize long-chain lipid substrates that have limited solubility in aqueous solutions, which can lead to difficulties in developing a robust and miniaturizable biochemical assay. The ability to prepare the lipid substrate and develop assays to identify modulators of lipid kinases is important and is the focus of this methods chapter. Herein, we describe a method to prepare a DMSO-based lipid mixture that enables the 1536-well screening of the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase α (PI5P4Kα) utilizing the D-myo-di16-PtIns(5)P substrate in quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format using the ADP-Glo™ technology to couple the production of ADP to a bioluminescent readout. PMID:26552670

  8. 3D models of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer metastasis: high-throughput screening assay development, validation, and pilot screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Chen, Chaoyu; Kapadia, Amit; Zhou, Qiong; Harper, Mary Kay; Schaack, Jerome; LaBarbera, Daniel V

    2011-02-01

    Despite advancements in therapies developed for the treatment of cancer, patient prognosis and mortality rates have improved minimally, and metastasis remains the primary cause of cancer mortality worldwide. An underlying mechanism promoting metastasis in many types of cancer is epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here the authors report a novel 3D model of EMT and metastatic breast cancer suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) drug discovery. The primary assay incorporates the expression of the prognostic biomarker vimentin, as a luciferase reporter of EMT, in basil-like/triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma spheroids. Using this model, the authors developed a number of known antitumor agents as control modulators of EMT. U0126, PKC412, PF2341066, dasatinib, and axitinib downregulated vimentin expression by 70% to 90% as compared to untreated spheroids. Counterassays were developed to measure spheroid viability and the invasive potential of MDA-MB-231 spheroids after small-molecule treatment and used to confirm hits from primary screening. Finally, the authors conducted a pilot screen to validate this model for HTS using a purified library of marine secondary metabolites. From 230 compounds screened, they obtained a Z' score of 0.64, indicative of an excellent assay, and confirmed 4 hits, including isonaamidine B, papuamine, mycalolide E, and jaspamide. This HTS model demonstrates the potential to identify small-molecule modulators of EMT that could be used to discover novel antimetastatic agents for the treatment of cancer.

  9. High throughput drug profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Entzeroth, Michael; Chapelain, Béatrice; Guilbert, Jacques; Hamon, Valérie

    2000-01-01

    High throughput screening has significantly contributed to advances in drug discovery. The great increase in the number of samples screened has been accompanied by increases in costs and in the data required for the investigated compounds. High throughput profiling addresses the issues of compound selectivity and specificity. It combines conventional screening with data mining technologies to give a full set of data, enabling development candidates to be more fully compared.

  10. Detection of knockdown resistance (kdr mutations in Anopheles gambiae: a comparison of two new high-throughput assays with existing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball Amanda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knockdown resistance (kdr is a well-characterized mechanism of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in many insect species and is caused by point mutations of the pyrethroid target site the para-type sodium channel. The presence of kdr mutations in Anopheles gambiae, the most important malaria vector in Africa, has been monitored using a variety of molecular techniques. However, there are few reports comparing the performance of these different assays. In this study, two new high-throughput assays were developed and compared with four established techniques. Methods Fluorescence-based assays based on 1 TaqMan probes and 2 high resolution melt (HRM analysis were developed to detect kdr alleles in An. gambiae. Four previously reported techniques for kdr detection, Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (AS-PCR, Heated Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay (HOLA, Sequence Specific Oligonucleotide Probe – Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (SSOP-ELISA and PCR-Dot Blot were also optimized. The sensitivity and specificity of all six assays was then compared in a blind genotyping trial of 96 single insect samples that included a variety of kdr genotypes and African Anopheline species. The relative merits of each assay was assessed based on the performance in the genotyping trial, the length/difficulty of each protocol, cost (both capital outlay and consumable cost, and safety (requirement for hazardous chemicals. Results The real-time TaqMan assay was both the most sensitive (with the lowest number of failed reactions and the most specific (with the lowest number of incorrect scores. Adapting the TaqMan assay to use a PCR machine and endpoint measurement with a fluorimeter showed a slight reduction in sensitivity and specificity. HRM initially gave promising results but was more sensitive to both DNA quality and quantity and consequently showed a higher rate of failure and incorrect scores. The sensitivity and specificity of AS

  11. Development of a high-throughput G4-FID assay for screening and evaluation of small molecules binding quadruplex nucleic acid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largy, Eric; Hamon, Florian; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2011-07-01

    G4-FID (G-quadruplex fluorescent intercalator displacement) is a simple and fast method that allows to evaluate the affinity of a compound for G-quadruplex DNA and its selectivity towards duplex DNA. This assay is based on the loss of fluorescence of thiazole orange (TO) upon competitive displacement from DNA by a putative ligand. We describe here the development of a high-throughput version of this assay performed in 96-well microplates, and fully transposable to 384-well microplates. The test was calibrated with a set of G-quadruplex ligands characterized for their ability to bind quadruplex within a large range of affinity. The comparison of the results obtained in microplates and in cuvettes was conducted indicating a full agreement. Additionally, the spectral range of the test was enlarged using two other fluorescent on/off probes whose absorption are red-shifted (TO-PRO-3) and blue-shifted (Hoechst 33258) as compared to that of TO. These labels enable to screen a large diversity of compounds with various optical properties, which was exemplified by evaluation of affinity and selectivity of the porphyrin TMPyP4 that could not be evaluated previously. Altogether, our study demonstrates that the HT-G4-FID assay offers the possibility to label a large variety of G-quadruplexes of biological interest and should enable screening of collections of putative G4-ligands of high structural diversity. It thus represents a powerful tool to bring into light new ligands able to discriminate between quadruplexes of different structures.

  12. Identification of MMV malaria box inhibitors of plasmodium falciparum early-stage gametocytes using a luciferase-based high-throughput assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Duffy, Sandra; Adjalley, Sophie H; Fidock, David A; Avery, Vicky M

    2013-12-01

    The design of new antimalarial combinations to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections requires drugs that, in addition to resolving disease symptoms caused by asexual blood stage parasites, can also interrupt transmission to the mosquito vector. Gametocytes, which are essential for transmission, develop as sexual blood stage parasites in the human host over 8 to 12 days and are the most accessible developmental stage for transmission-blocking drugs. Considerable effort is currently being devoted to identifying compounds active against mature gametocytes. However, investigations on the drug sensitivity of developing gametocytes, as well as screening methods for identifying inhibitors of early gametocytogenesis, remain scarce. We have developed a luciferase-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay using tightly synchronous stage I to III gametocytes from a recombinant P. falciparum line expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-luciferase. The assay has been used to evaluate the early-stage gametocytocidal activity of the MMV Malaria Box, a collection of 400 compounds with known antimalarial (asexual blood stage) activity. Screening this collection against early-stage (I to III) gametocytes yielded 64 gametocytocidal compounds with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) below 2.5 μM. This assay is reproducible and suitable for the screening of large compound libraries, with an average percent coefficient of variance (%CV) of ≤5%, an average signal-to-noise ratio (S:N) of >30, and a Z' of ∼0.8. Our findings highlight the need for screening efforts directed specifically against early gametocytogenesis and indicate the importance of experimental verification of early-stage gametocytocidal activity in the development of new antimalarial candidates for combination therapy.

  13. Targeting aphA : a new high-throughput screening assay identifies compounds that reduce prime virulence factors of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Galina; Roy, Sambit; Zapol'skii, Viktor A; Kaufmann, Dieter E; Schnürch, Michael; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Nandy, Ranjan K; Tegge, Werner

    2016-07-01

    A high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was developed for identifying compounds with inhibitory effect on aphA, one of the key regulators positively controlling Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis. An inhibitory effect on aphA was expected to lead to attenuation in the secretion of the major pathogenicity factors of V. cholerae, cholera toxin and toxin co-regulated pilus. The plasmid construct pAKSB was developed with a kanamycin resistance (KmR) gene under the control of the aphA -like promoter for conferring a KmR phenotype under aphA -expressing conditions. The HTS assay was performed to identify compounds with inhibitory effect on the growth of O139 V. cholerae MO10 carrying the construct pAKSB in growth medium containing Km (30 g ml-1), but not in its absence. Of 20 338 compounds screened, six compounds were identified to inhibit the pAKSB-induced KmR phenotype and these compounds caused transcriptional inhibition of aphA in V. cholerae O139 strain MO10 as well as variant V. cholerae O1 El Tor strain NM06-058. Of the three most active substances, compound 53760866 showed lowest half-maximal cytotoxicity in a eukaryotic cell viability assay and was characterized further. Compound 53760866 caused reduction in cholera toxin secretion and expression of TcpA in vitro. The in vitro virulence attenuation corroborated well in a suckling mouse model in vivo, which showed reduction of colonization by V. cholerae NM06-058 when co-administered with 53760866. The screening method and the compounds may lead to new preventive strategies for cholera by reducing the pathogenicity of V. cholerae .

  14. High-throughput screening for monoamine oxidase-A and monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors using one-step fluorescence assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-mei GUANG; Guan-hua DU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To develop high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A and MAO-B inhibitors. Methods: A fluorescence probe based method measuring MAO-A and MAO-B activity was established and optimized, with its sensitivity, stability and specificity evaluated. Reaction conditions including enzyme sources, substrate concentrations, incubation volume and reaction time in 384-well format were optimized to achieve sensitive and low consumptive goal. Results: In optimized conditions, dynamic parameters of MAO-A and MAO-B were obtained. The Km value of serotonin to MAO-A was 1.66 μmol/L, while that of benzylamine to MAO-B was 0.80 umol/L. The IC50 value of clorgyline to MAO-A was 2.99 nmol/L, and that of deprenyl to MAO-B was 7.04 nmol/L, matching those obtained from traditional spectrometric assays. Among tested samples, one compound exerted an inhibitory effect on MAO-A activity with IC50 as 0.36 μmol/L, and three compounds had an inhibitory effect on MAO-B activity with IC50 as 0.13,0.19, and 0.13 μmol/L. The Z' factor was 0.71±0.03 and 0.75±0.03 in MAO-A-inhibitor and MAO-B-inhibitor HTS system, respectively. Conclusion: The established assays can be well applied to MAO-A and MAO-B inhibitor screening with high quality, precision and reproducibility.

  15. Application of a kosmotrope-based solubility assay to multiple protein therapeutic classes indicates broad use as a high-throughput screen for protein therapeutic aggregation propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Ditto, Noah; Patel, Mehul; Dai, Jun; Sejwal, Preeti; Stetsko, Paul; Doyle, Michael L

    2013-08-01

    Aggregation propensity is a critical attribute of protein therapeutics that can influence production, manufacturing, delivery, and potential activity and safety (immunogenicity). It is therefore imperative to select molecules with low aggregation propensity in the early stages of drug discovery to mitigate the risk of delays or failure in clinical development. Although many biophysical methods have been developed to characterize protein aggregation, most established methods are low-throughput, requiring large quantities of protein, lengthy assay times, and/or significant upstream sample preparation, which can limit application in early candidate screening. To avoid these limitations, we developed a reliable method to characterize aggregation propensity, by measuring the relative solubility of protein therapeutic candidates in the presence of the kosmotropic salt ammonium sulfate. Manual bench-scale and automated plate-based methods were applied to different protein therapeutic formats including Adnectins, domain antibodies, PEGylated Adnectins, Fc fusion proteins, and monoclonal antibodies. The kosmotrope solubility data agreed well with the aggregation propensity observed by established methods, while being amenable to high-throughput screening because of speed, simplicity, versatility and low protein material requirements. The results suggest that kosmotrope-based solubility assessment has broad applicability to selecting protein therapeutic candidates with low aggregation propensity and high "developability" to progress into development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Development of a novel nonradiometric assay for nucleic acid binding to TDP-43 suitable for high-throughput screening using AlphaScreen technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Joel A; Blass, Benjamin E; Reitz, Allen B; Pawlyk, Aaron C

    2010-10-01

    TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a nucleic acid binding protein that is associated with the pathology of cystic fibrosis and neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar dementia. We have developed a robust, quantitative, nonradiometric high-throughput assay measuring oligonucleotide binding to TDP-43 using AlphaScreen technology. Biotinylated single-stranded TAR DNA (bt-TAR-32) and 6 TG repeats (bt-TG6) bound with high affinity to TDP-43, with K(D) values of 0.75 nM and 0.63 nM, respectively. Both oligonucleotides exhibited slow dissociation rates, with half-lives of 750 min for bt-TAR-32 and 150 min for bt-TG6. The affinities of unlabeled oligonucleotides, as determined by displacement of either bt-TAR-32 or bt-TG6, were consistent with previous reports of nucleic acid interactions with TDP-43, where increasing TG or UG repeats yield greater affinity. A diversity library of 7360 compounds was screened for inhibition of TDP-43 binding to bt-TAR-32, and a series of compounds was discovered with nascent SAR and IC(50) values ranging from 100 nM to 10 µM. These compounds may prove to be useful biochemical tools to elucidate the function of TDP-43 and may lead to novel therapeutics for indications where the TDP-43 nucleic acid interaction is causal to the associated pathology.

  17. SRIdent: A novel pipeline for real-time identification of species from high-throughput sequencing reads in Metagenomics and clinical diagnostic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ramin; Hajdu, Andras

    2015-01-01

    New advances in rapid sequencing of large amounts of DNA have brought a great potential for the study of complex communities of microorganisms. One of the challenging problems is rapid identification of species from sequenced reads. Delays in the identification of pathogens are a barrier to the early diagnosis and proper treatment of infectious diseases. In this paper we proposed SRIdent (Short Read Identifier), an effective pipeline for real-time identification of species from high-throughput sequencing reads in Metagenomics and clinical diagnostic assays. This pipeline is based on generating k-mers from the short reads and searching the existence of DNA signatures in the Reads k-mers, by using Apache Hive data-warehousing. RkmerG (Read k-mers Generator) is a software program presented in this paper, for producing k-mers of the short reads, in order to use in the pipeline. The purpose of this study is to identify the species in a sample, directly from the reads without assembling and alignment.

  18. Quantification of rapid Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation using high-throughput in-cell Western assays: comparison to Western immunoblots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector N Aguilar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quantification of phospho-proteins (PPs is crucial when studying cellular signaling pathways. Western immunoblotting (WB is commonly used for the measurement of relative levels of signaling intermediates in experimental samples. However, WB is in general a labour-intensive and low-throughput technique. Because of variability in protein yield and phospho-signal preservation during protein harvesting, and potential loss of antigen during protein transfer, WB provides only semi-quantitative data. By comparison, the "in-cell western" (ICW technique has high-throughput capacity and requires less extensive sample preparation. Thus, we compared the ICW technique to WB for measuring phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain (PMLC(20 in primary cultures of uterine myocytes to assess their relative specificity, sensitivity, precision, and quantification of biologically relevant responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ICWs are cell-based microplate assays for quantification of protein targets in their cellular context. ICWs utilize a two-channel infrared (IR scanner (Odyssey(R to quantify signals arising from near-infrared (NIR fluorophores conjugated to secondary antibodies. One channel is dedicated to measuring the protein of interest and the second is used for data normalization of the signal in each well of the microplate. Using uterine myocytes, we assessed oxytocin (OT-stimulated MLC(20 phosphorylation measured by ICW and WB, both using NIR fluorescence. ICW and WB data were comparable regarding signal linearity, signal specificity, and time course of phosphorylation response to OT. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: ICW and WB yield comparable biological data. The advantages of ICW over WB are its high-throughput capacity, improved precision, and reduced sample preparation requirements. ICW might provide better sensitivity and precision with low-quantity samples or for protocols requiring large numbers of samples. These features make the ICW

  19. A Rapid Zika Diagnostic Assay to Measure Neutralizing Antibodies in Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential association of microcephaly and other congenital abnormalities with Zika virus (ZIKV infection during pregnancy underlines the critical need for a rapid and accurate diagnosis. Due to the short duration of ZIKV viremia in infected patients, a serologic assay that detects antibody responses to viral infection plays an essential role in diagnosing patient specimens. The current serologic diagnosis of ZIKV infection relies heavily on the labor-intensive Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test (PRNT that requires more than one-week turnaround time and represents a major bottleneck for patient diagnosis. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a high-throughput assay for ZIKV and dengue virus (DENV diagnosis that can attain the “gold standard” of the current PRNT assay. The new assay is homogeneous and utilizes luciferase viruses to quantify the neutralizing antibody titers in a 96-well format. Using 91 human specimens, we showed that the reporter diagnostic assay has a higher dynamic range and maintains the relative specificity of the traditional PRNT assay. Besides the improvement of assay throughput, the reporter virus technology has also shortened the turnaround time to less than two days. Collectively, our results suggest that, along with the viral RT-PCR assay, the reporter virus-based serologic assay could be potentially used as the first-line test for clinical diagnosis of ZIKV infection as well as for vaccine clinical trials.

  20. High-throughput assay for quantification of the plasma concentrations of thiopental using automated solid phase extraction (SPE) directly coupled to LC-MS/MS instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Seyed Mojtaba; Shekar, Kiran; Fraser, John; Smith, Maree T; Ghassabian, Sussan

    2016-12-01

    Most previous assays for thiopental are time-consuming due to laborious sample extraction steps prior to analysis using gas chromatography or high pressure liquid chromatography. Here, we describe the first high-throughput liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for quantification of thiopental concentrations in samples of human plasma. Robotic on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to elute the analytes of interest from samples of human plasma (50μL) loaded onto C18 SPE cartridges to which were added aliquots (50μL) of internal standard solution (thiopental-d5 100ng/mL) and 0.5% formic acid in water (100μL). Cartridges were washed using 10% methanol in ammonium acetate buffer (50mM, pH 7) before elution with mobile phase comprising 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile with a flow rate of 0.55mL/min using a 7.2min run time. The analytes were separated on a C18 XTerra(®) analytical column. Mass spectrometry detection was performed using a QTrap 5500 mass spectrometer (AB Sciex) with negative ionisation. The multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for thiopental and the internal standard were 241→58, and 246→58, respectively. The calibration curve was linear over a range of 6-600ng/mL. Thiopental was stable in human plasma samples for at least 36h in the autosampler, as well as after three cycles of freeze and thaw, and after 3h storage at room temperature. The absolute recovery and matrix effect were 102% and 6.9%, respectively, and the within-run and between-run precision and accuracy were ≤15%. Our method is fully-validated and satisfies the requirements of the 2012 European Medicines Agency (EMEA) guideline for Bioanalytical Method Validation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fast, Continuous, and High-Throughput (Bio)Chemical Activity Assay for N-Acyl-l-Homoserine Lactone Quorum-Quenching Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Daniel; Krüger, Georg H. E.; Dörr, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing, the bacterial cell-cell communication by small molecules, controls important processes such as infection and biofilm formation. Therefore, it is a promising target with several therapeutic and technical applications besides its significant ecological relevance. Enzymes inactivating N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones, the most common class of communication molecules among Gram-negative proteobacteria, mainly belong to the groups of quorum-quenching lactonases or quorum-quenching acylases. However, identification, characterization, and optimization of these valuable biocatalysts are based on a very limited number of fundamentally different methods with their respective strengths and weaknesses. Here, a (bio)chemical activity assay is described, which perfectly complements the other methods in this field. It enables continuous and high-throughput activity measurements of purified and unpurified quorum-quenching enzymes within several minutes. For this, the reaction products released by quorum-quenching lactonases and quorum-quenching acylases are converted either by a secondary enzyme or by autohydrolysis to l-homoserine. In turn, l-homoserine is detected by the previously described calcein assay, which is sensitive to α-amino acids with free N and C termini. Besides its establishment, the method was applied to the characterization of three previously undescribed quorum-quenching lactonases and variants thereof and to the identification of quorum-quenching acylase-expressing Escherichia coli clones in an artificial library. Furthermore, this study indicates that porcine aminoacylase 1 is not active toward N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones as published previously but instead converts the autohydrolysis product N-acyl-l-homoserine. IMPORTANCE In this study, a novel method is presented for the identification, characterization, and optimization of quorum-quenching enzymes that are active toward N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones. These are the most common

  2. High-throughput Assays for MicroRNA Target Genes%MicroRNA靶基因的高通量鉴定方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈灵锋; 张均平; 王明席

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs(miRNAs)are a class of endogenous non-coding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. miRNAs play pivotal roles in cell growth, development and disease pathogenesis. Therefore, to identify and validate miRNAs target genes regulated is essential to understand the functions of miRNAs in disease. miRNAs bind the complementary sequences of target mRN As to mediate translational repression or target degradation and gene silencing, both computer-aided predication and biological experimental screening can be used for target identification. The former may produce a large number of miRNA target genes with higher false positive genes to be further excluded by the biological experiments. The latter approaches can be further greatly facilitated with high-throughput multiple target screening assays, such as microarray, proteome analysis, or RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The applications involving these assays were summarized and compared, together with the discussion on the further development of related technologies.%MicroRNAs (miRNAs)是一类内源性非编码小RNA,可在转录后水平调节基因的表达,在细胞生长、发育、疾病发生等过程中发挥着重要作用.明确miRNAs所调控的靶基因对阐明miRNAs的功能及在各种生命过程和疾病发生机制的角色非常关键.目前,鉴定miRNAs的靶基因的方法主要计算机预测方法和生物学实验方法.前者对miRNA靶基因的寻找作出巨大贡献,但常存在很多假阳性,必须通过生物学实验方法加以验证.后者涉及单靶基因鉴定技术和高通量多靶基因鉴定技术,高通量技术又包括基因芯片分析技术、蛋白质组学分析技术、RNA连接酶介导的cDNA末端扩增技术和生物化学法等.本文主要对这些高通量技术的应用、优劣进行归纳,并对其改进方向予以讨论.

  3. A novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon-based two-phase hybridization assay for accurate and high-throughput detection of multiple drug resistance-conferring point mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinghai; Wu, Nan; Xie, Meng; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianjun; Zhuo, Lisha; Kuang, Hong; Fu, Weiling

    2012-04-01

    The accurate and high-throughput detection of drug resistance-related multiple point mutations remains a challenge. Although the combination of molecular beacons with bio-immobilization technology, such as microarray, is promising, its application is difficult due to the ineffective immobilization of molecular beacons on the chip surface. Here, we propose a novel asymmetric-loop molecular beacon in which the loop consists of 2 parts. One is complementary to a target, while the other is complementary to an oligonucleotide probe immobilized on the chip surface. With this novel probe, a two-phase hybridization assay can be used for simultaneously detecting multiple point mutations. This assay will have advantages, such as easy probe availability, multiplex detection, low background, and high-efficiency hybridization, and may provide a new avenue for the immobilization of molecular beacons and high-throughput detection of point mutations.

  4. High Throughput Screening for Neurodegeneration and Complex Disease Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, Hemant; Lo, Donald C.; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2008-01-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) for complex diseases is challenging. This stems from the fact that complex phenotypes are difficult to adapt to rapid, high throughput assays. We describe the recent development of high throughput and high-content screens (HCS) for neurodegenerative diseases, with a focus on inherited neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington's disease. We describe, among others, HTS assays based on protein aggregation, neuronal death, caspase activation and mutant protei...

  5. Microplate assay for quantitation of neutral lipids in extracts from microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Brendan T; Thornton-Dunwoody, Alexander; Labavitch, John M; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2014-11-15

    Lipid quantitation is widespread in the algae literature, but popular methods such as gravimetry, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and Nile red cell staining suffer drawbacks, including poor quantitation of neutral lipids, expensive equipment, and variable results among algae species, respectively. A high-throughput microplate assay was developed that uses Nile red dye to quantify neutral lipids that have been extracted from algae cells. Because the algal extracts contained pigments that quenched Nile red fluorescence, a mild bleach solution was used to destroy pigments, resulting in a nearly linear response for lipid quantities in the range of 0.75 to 40 μg. Corn oil was used as a standard for quantitation, although other vegetable oils displayed a similar response. The assay was tested on lipids extracted from three species of Chlorella and resulted in close agreement with triacylglycerol (TAG) levels determined by thin layer chromatography. The assay was found to more accurately measure algal lipids conducive to biodiesel production and nutrition applications than the widely used gravimetric assay. Assay response was also consistent among different species, in contrast to Nile red cell staining procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A High-Throughput (HTS) Assay for Enzyme Reaction Phenotyping in Human Recombinant P450 Enzymes Using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Suhar, Tom; Glass, Lateca; Rajaraman, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme reaction phenotyping is employed extensively during the early stages of drug discovery to identify the enzymes responsible for the metabolism of new chemical entities (NCEs). Early identification of metabolic pathways facilitates prediction of potential drug-drug interactions associated with enzyme polymorphism, induction, or inhibition, and aids in the design of clinical trials. Incubation of NCEs with human recombinant enzymes is a popular method for such work because of the specificity, simplicity, and high-throughput nature of this approach for phenotyping studies. The availability of a relative abundance factor and calculated intersystem extrapolation factor for the expressed recombinant enzymes facilitates easy scaling of in vitro data, enabling in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. Described in this unit is a high-throughput screen for identifying enzymes involved in the metabolism of NCEs. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the human recombinant enzymes CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4, including the calculation of the intrinsic clearance for each.

  7. High throughput sample processing and automated scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar eBrunborg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for assessing DNA damage in cells. In the traditional version of the assay, there are many manual steps involved and few samples can be treated in one experiment. High throughput modifications have been developed during recent years, and they are reviewed and discussed. These modifications include accelerated scoring of comets; other important elements that have been studied and adapted to high throughput are cultivation and manipulation of cells or tissues before and after exposure, and freezing of treated samples until comet analysis and scoring. High throughput methods save time and money but they are useful also for other reasons: large-scale experiments may be performed which are otherwise not practicable (e.g., analysis of many organs from exposed animals, and human biomonitoring studies, and automation gives more uniform sample treatment and less dependence on operator performance. The high throughput modifications now available vary largely in their versatility, capacity, complexity and costs. The bottleneck for further increase of throughput appears to be the scoring.

  8. A non-radioactive DAPI-based high-throughput in vitro assay to assess Plasmodium falciparum responsiveness to antimalarials--increased sensitivity of P. falciparum to chloroquine in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Daouda; Patel, Vishal; Demas, Allison; LeRoux, Michele; Ndir, Omar; Mboup, Souleymane; Clardy, Jon; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Daily, Johanna P; Wirth, Dyann F

    2010-02-01

    The spread of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance is outpacing new antimalarial development and compromising effective malaria treatment. Combination therapy is widely implemented to prolong the effectiveness of currently approved antimalarials. To maximize utility of available drugs, periodic monitoring of drug efficacy and gathering of accurate information regarding parasite-sensitivity changes are essential. We describe a high-throughput, non-radioactive, field-based assay to evaluate in vitro antimalarial drug sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates from 40 Senegalese patients. Compared with earlier years, we found a significant decrease in chloroquine in vitro and in genotypic resistances (> 50% and > 65%, respectively, in previous studies) with only 23% of isolates showing resistance. This is possibly caused by a withdrawal of chloroquine from Senegal in 2002. We also found a range of artemisinin responses. Prevalence of drug resistance is dynamic and varies by region. Therefore, the implementation of non-radioactive, robust, high-throughput antimalarial sensitivity assays is critical for defining region-specific prophylaxis and treatment guidelines.

  9. A Non-Radioactive DAPI-based High-Throughput In Vitro Assay to Assess Plasmodium falciparum Responsiveness to Antimalarials—Increased Sensitivity of P. falciparum to Chloroquine in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Daouda; Patel, Vishal; Demas, Allison; LeRoux, Michele; Ndir, Omar; Mboup, Souleymane; Clardy, Jon; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Daily, Johanna P.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2010-01-01

    The spread of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance is outpacing new antimalarial development and compromising effective malaria treatment. Combination therapy is widely implemented to prolong the effectiveness of currently approved antimalarials. To maximize utility of available drugs, periodic monitoring of drug efficacy and gathering of accurate information regarding parasite-sensitivity changes are essential. We describe a high-throughput, non-radioactive, field-based assay to evaluate in vitro antimalarial drug sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates from 40 Senegalese patients. Compared with earlier years, we found a significant decrease in chloroquine in vitro and in genotypic resistances (> 50% and > 65%, respectively, in previous studies) with only 23% of isolates showing resistance. This is possibly caused by a withdrawal of chloroquine from Senegal in 2002. We also found a range of artemisinin responses. Prevalence of drug resistance is dynamic and varies by region. Therefore, the implementation of non-radioactive, robust, high-throughput antimalarial sensitivity assays is critical for defining region-specific prophylaxis and treatment guidelines. PMID:20133997

  10. Development of resazurin-based assay in 384-well format for high throughput whole cell screening of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense strain STIB 900 for the identification of potential anti-trypanosomal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kah Tee; Zahari, Zuriati; Amanah, Azimah; Zainuddin, Zafarina; Adenan, Mohd Ilham

    2016-03-01

    To accelerate the discovery of novel leads for the treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), it is necessary to have a simple, robust and cost-effective assay to identify positive hits by high throughput whole cell screening. Most of the fluorescence assay was made in black plate however in this study the HTS assay developed in 384-well format using clear plate and black plate, for comparison. The HTS assay developed is simple, sensitive, reliable and reproducible in both types of plates. Assay robustness and reproducibility were determined under the optimized conditions in 384-well plate was well tolerated in the HTS assay, including percentage of coefficient of variation (% CV) of 4.68% and 4.74% in clear and black 384-well plate, signal-to-background ratio (S/B) of 12.75 in clear 384-well plate and 12.07 in black 384-well plate, Z' factor of 0.79 and 0.82 in clear 384-well plate and black 384-well plate, respectively and final concentration of 0.30% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in both types of plate. Drug sensitivity was found to be comparable to the reported anti-trypanosomal assay in 96-well format. The reproducibility and sensitivity of this assay make it compliant to automated liquid handler use in HTS applications.

  11. Development and qualification of a high sensitivity, high throughput Q-PCR assay for quantitation of residual host cell DNA in purification process intermediate and drug substance samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Meng; Menesale, Emily; Lu, Tongjun; Magliola, Aeona; Bergelson, Svetlana

    2014-11-01

    Methods of high sensitivity, accuracy and throughput are needed for quantitation of low level residual host cell DNA in purification process intermediates and drug substances of therapeutic proteins. In this study, we designed primer/probe sets targeting repetitive Alu repeats or Alu-equivalent sequences in the human, Chinese hamster and murine genomes. When used in quantitative polymerase chain reactions (Q-PCRs), these primer/probe sets showed high species specificity and gave significantly higher sensitivity compared to those targeting the low copy number GAPDH gene. This allowed for detection of residual host cell DNA of much lower concentrations and, for some samples, eliminated the need for DNA extraction. By combining the high sensitivity Alu Q-PCR with high throughput automated DNA extraction using an automated MagMAX magnetic particle processor, we successfully developed and qualified a highly accurate, specific, sensitive and efficient method for the quantitation of residual host cell DNA in process intermediates and drug substances of multiple therapeutic proteins purified from cells of multiple species. Compared to the previous method using manual DNA extraction and primer/probe sets targeting the GAPDH gene, this new method increased our DNA extraction throughput by over sevenfold, and lowered the lower limit of quantitation by up to eightfold.

  12. A focus reduction neutralization assay for hepatitis C virus neutralizing antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wychowski Czeslaw

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim The role of humoral immunity in hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is poorly understood. Nevertheless, there is increasing interest in characterizing the neutralizing antibodies in the serum of HCV-infected patients. Focus reduction assays have been widely used to evaluate neutralizing antibody responses against a range of non-cytopathic viruses. Based on the recent development of a HCV cell culture system using the genotype 2 JFH-1-strain, we developed a focus reduction assay for HCV-neutralizing antibodies. Methods The focus reduction assay was based on a standard microneutralization assay in which immunostained foci on tissue culture plates are counted. The neutralizing anti-HCV antibodies titers of purified serum immunoglobulin samples from seventy-seven individuals were determined using a 50% focus reduction neutralization assay. Each titer was determined as the log value of the reciprocal antibody dilution that reduced the number of viral foci by 50%. IgG antibodies were first purified from each serum in order to avoid the facilitating effect of HDL on HCV entry. Results The assay's cut-off using an ELISA and RNA HCV-negative samples was found to be 1.25 log, corresponding to a dilution of 1:18. The assay was compared with a commercial HCV ELISA and exhibited specificity and sensitivity values of 100% and 96.5%, respectively, and good reproducibility (with intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation of 6.7% and 12.6%, respectively. The assay did not show any cross-reactivity with anti-HIV, anti-HBs or heterophile antibody-positive samples. The neutralizing antibodies titers were 2.13 log (1:134 for homologous samples from HCV genotype 2 infected patients harboring the same genotype as JFH-1 and 1.93 log (1:85 for heterologous samples from patients infected by genotypes other than type 2. These results confirm the presence of broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies already reported using the HCV pseudoparticles

  13. Bioluminescence Methods for Assaying Kinases in Quantitative High-Throughput Screening (qHTS) Format Applied to Yes1 Tyrosine Kinase, Glucokinase, and PI5P4Kα Lipid Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mindy I; Auld, Douglas S; Inglese, James

    2016-01-01

    Assays in which the detection of a biological phenomenon is coupled to the production of bioluminescence by luciferase have gained widespread use. As firefly luciferases (FLuc) and kinases share a common substrate (ATP), coupling of a kinase to FLuc allows for the amount of ATP remaining following a kinase reaction to be assessed by quantitating the amount of luminescence produced. Alternatively, the amount of ADP produced by the kinase reaction can be coupled to FLuc through a two-step process. This chapter describes the bioluminescent assays that were developed for three classes of kinases (lipid, protein, and metabolic kinases) and miniaturized to 1536-well format, enabling their use for quantitative high-throughput (qHTS) of small-molecule libraries.

  14. A 155-plex high-throughput in vitro coregulator binding assay for (anti-)estrogenicity testing evaluated with 23 reference compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si; Houtman, René; Melchers, Diana; Aarts, Jac; Peijnenburg, Ad; van Beuningen, Rinie; Rietjens, Ivonne; Bovee, Toine F

    2013-01-01

    To further develop an integrated in vitro testing strategy for replacement of in vivo tests for (anti-)estrogenicity testing, the ligand-modulated interaction of coregulators with estrogen receptor α was assessed using a PamChip® plate. The relative estrogenic potencies determined, based on ERα binding to coregulator peptides in the presence of ligands on the PamChip® plate, were compared to the relative estrogenic potencies as determined in the in vivo uterotrophic assay. The results show that the estrogenic potencies predicted by the 57 coactivators on the peptide microarray for 18 compounds that display a clear E2 dose-dependent response (goodness of fit of a logistic dose-response model of 0.90 or higher) correlated very well with their in vivo potencies in the uterotrophic assay, i.e., coefficient of determination values for 30 coactivators higher than or equal to 0.85. Moreover, this coregulator binding assay is able to distinguish ER agonists from ER antagonists: profiles of selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as tamoxifen, were distinct from those of pure ER agonists, such as dienestrol. Combination of this coregulator binding assay with other types of in vitro assays, e.g., reporter gene assays and the H295R steroidogenesis assay, will frame an in vitro test panel for screening and prioritization of chemicals, thereby contributing to the reduction and ultimately the replacement of animal testing for (anti-)estrogenic effects.

  15. Development and Validation of a Novel Leishmania donovani Screening Cascade for High-Throughput Screening Using a Novel Axenic Assay with High Predictivity of Leishmanicidal Intracellular Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nühs, Andrea; De Rycker, Manu; Manthri, Sujatha; Comer, Eamon; Scherer, Christina A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Gray, David W

    2015-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease of the developing world with a limited arsenal of drugs available for treatment. The existing drugs have significant deficiencies so there is an urgent need for new and improved drugs. In the human host, Leishmania are obligate intracellular parasites which poses particular challenges in terms of drug discovery. To achieve sufficient throughput and robustness, free-living parasites are often used in primary screening assays as a surrogate for the more complex intracellular assays. We and others have found that such axenic assays have a high false positive rate relative to the intracellular assays, and that this limits their usefulness as a primary platform for screening of large compound collections. While many different reasons could lie behind the poor translation from axenic parasite to intracellular parasite, we show here that a key factor is the identification of growth slowing and cytostatic compounds by axenic assays in addition to the more desirable cytocidal compounds. We present a screening cascade based on a novel cytocidal-only axenic amastigote assay, developed by increasing starting density of cells and lowering the limit of detection, and show that it has a much improved translation to the intracellular assay. We propose that this assay is an improved primary platform in a new Leishmania screening cascade designed for the screening of large compound collections. This cascade was employed to screen a diversity-oriented-synthesis library, and yielded two novel antileishmanial chemotypes. The approach we have taken may have broad relevance to anti-infective and anti-parasitic drug discovery.

  16. A novel 96-microwell-based high-throughput spectrophotometric assay for pharmaceutical quality control of crizotinib, a novel potent drug for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanveer Ahmed Wani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the development and validation of a novel 96-microwell-based high throughput spectrophotometric assay for pharmaceutical quality control of crizotinib (CZT, a novel drug for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. We examined the reaction between CZT and 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate, a chromogenic reagent. A red-colored product showing a maximum absorption peak (λmax at 490 nm was produced in an alkaline medium (pH 9. We examined stoichiometry of the reaction and postulated the reaction mechanism. To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe a color-developing reaction for the proposed assay. The reaction was performed in a 96-microwell plate, and the absorbance of the colored product was measured using an absorbance reader at 490 nm. Under optimized reaction conditions, Beer's law, which shows a correlation between absorbance and CZT concentration, was obeyed in the range of 4-50 µg/well with an appropriate correlation coefficient (0.999. The limits of detection and quantification were 1.73 and 5.23 µg/well, respectively. The assay showed high precision and accuracy. The proposed assay was applied successfully for the determination of CZT in capsules. Thus, the assay proposed in this study is practical and valuable for routine application in pharmaceutical quality control laboratories.

  17. Modeling Steroidogenesis Disruption Using High-Throughput ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental chemicals can elicit endocrine disruption by altering steroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism (steroidogenesis) causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. Historically, a lack of assays resulted in few chemicals having been evaluated for effects on steroidogenesis. The steroidogenic pathway is a series of hydroxylation and dehydrogenation steps carried out by CYP450 and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, yet the only enzyme in the pathway for which a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed is aromatase (CYP19A1), responsible for the aromatization of androgens to estrogens. Recently, the ToxCast HTS program adapted the OECD validated H295R steroidogenesis assay using human adrenocortical carcinoma cells into a high-throughput model to quantitatively assess the concentration-dependent (0.003-100 µM) effects of chemicals on 10 steroid hormones including progestagens, androgens, estrogens and glucocorticoids. These results, in combination with two CYP19A1 inhibition assays, comprise a large dataset amenable to clustering approaches supporting the identification and characterization of putative mechanisms of action (pMOA) for steroidogenesis disruption. In total, 514 chemicals were tested in all CYP19A1 and steroidogenesis assays. 216 chemicals were identified as CYP19A1 inhibitors in at least one CYP19A1 assay. 208 of these chemicals also altered hormone levels in the H295R assay, suggesting 96% sensitivity in the

  18. Evaluation of a high throughput starch analysis optimised for wood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Bellasio

    Full Text Available Starch is the most important long-term reserve in trees, and the analysis of starch is therefore useful source of physiological information. Currently published protocols for wood starch analysis impose several limitations, such as long procedures and a neutralization step. The high-throughput standard protocols for starch analysis in food and feed represent a valuable alternative. However, they have not been optimised or tested with woody samples. These have particular chemical and structural characteristics, including the presence of interfering secondary metabolites, low reactivity of starch, and low starch content. In this study, a standard method for starch analysis used for food and feed (AOAC standard method 996.11 was optimised to improve precision and accuracy for the analysis of starch in wood. Key modifications were introduced in the digestion conditions and in the glucose assay. The optimised protocol was then evaluated through 430 starch analyses of standards at known starch content, matrix polysaccharides, and wood collected from three organs (roots, twigs, mature wood of four species (coniferous and flowering plants. The optimised protocol proved to be remarkably precise and accurate (3%, suitable for a high throughput routine analysis (35 samples a day of specimens with a starch content between 40 mg and 21 µg. Samples may include lignified organs of coniferous and flowering plants and non-lignified organs, such as leaves, fruits and rhizomes.

  19. Evaluation of a high throughput starch analysis optimised for wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Fini, Alessio; Ferrini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Starch is the most important long-term reserve in trees, and the analysis of starch is therefore useful source of physiological information. Currently published protocols for wood starch analysis impose several limitations, such as long procedures and a neutralization step. The high-throughput standard protocols for starch analysis in food and feed represent a valuable alternative. However, they have not been optimised or tested with woody samples. These have particular chemical and structural characteristics, including the presence of interfering secondary metabolites, low reactivity of starch, and low starch content. In this study, a standard method for starch analysis used for food and feed (AOAC standard method 996.11) was optimised to improve precision and accuracy for the analysis of starch in wood. Key modifications were introduced in the digestion conditions and in the glucose assay. The optimised protocol was then evaluated through 430 starch analyses of standards at known starch content, matrix polysaccharides, and wood collected from three organs (roots, twigs, mature wood) of four species (coniferous and flowering plants). The optimised protocol proved to be remarkably precise and accurate (3%), suitable for a high throughput routine analysis (35 samples a day) of specimens with a starch content between 40 mg and 21 µg. Samples may include lignified organs of coniferous and flowering plants and non-lignified organs, such as leaves, fruits and rhizomes.

  20. Evaluation of a High Throughput Starch Analysis Optimised for Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Fini, Alessio; Ferrini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Starch is the most important long-term reserve in trees, and the analysis of starch is therefore useful source of physiological information. Currently published protocols for wood starch analysis impose several limitations, such as long procedures and a neutralization step. The high-throughput standard protocols for starch analysis in food and feed represent a valuable alternative. However, they have not been optimised or tested with woody samples. These have particular chemical and structural characteristics, including the presence of interfering secondary metabolites, low reactivity of starch, and low starch content. In this study, a standard method for starch analysis used for food and feed (AOAC standard method 996.11) was optimised to improve precision and accuracy for the analysis of starch in wood. Key modifications were introduced in the digestion conditions and in the glucose assay. The optimised protocol was then evaluated through 430 starch analyses of standards at known starch content, matrix polysaccharides, and wood collected from three organs (roots, twigs, mature wood) of four species (coniferous and flowering plants). The optimised protocol proved to be remarkably precise and accurate (3%), suitable for a high throughput routine analysis (35 samples a day) of specimens with a starch content between 40 mg and 21 µg. Samples may include lignified organs of coniferous and flowering plants and non-lignified organs, such as leaves, fruits and rhizomes. PMID:24523863

  1. Functional characterisation of homomeric ionotropic glutamate receptors GluR1-GluR6 in a fluorescence-based high throughput screening assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strange, Mette; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Jensen, Anders A.

    2006-01-01

    using Fluo-4/AM as a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. In this assay, the pharmacological properties of nine standard GluR ligands correlated nicely with those previously observed in electrophysiology studies of GluRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes or mammalian cells. The potencies and efficacies displayed...

  2. A new homogeneous high-throughput screening assay for profiling compound activity on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Steven A; Beacham, Daniel; Shahane, Sampada A; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Hooten, Elizabeth; Zhao, Yong; Shou, Louie; Austin, Christopher P; Zheng, Wei

    2009-11-01

    Long QT syndrome, either inherited or acquired from drug treatments, can result in ventricular arrhythmia (torsade de pointes) and sudden death. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel inhibition by drugs is now recognized as a common reason for the acquired form of long QT syndrome. It has been reported that more than 100 known drugs inhibit the activity of the hERG channel. Since 1997, several drugs have been withdrawn from the market due to the long QT syndrome caused by hERG inhibition. Food and Drug Administration regulations now require safety data on hERG channels for investigative new drug (IND) applications. The assessment of compound activity on the hERG channel has now become an important part of the safety evaluation in the process of drug discovery. During the past decade, several in vitro assay methods have been developed and significant resources have been used to characterize hERG channel activities. However, evaluation of compound activities on hERG have not been performed for large compound collections due to technical difficulty, lack of throughput, and/or lack of biological relevance to function. Here we report a modified form of the FluxOR thallium flux assay, capable of measuring hERG activity in a homogeneous 1536-well plate format. To validate the assay, we screened a 7-point dilution series of the LOPAC 1280 library collection and reported rank order potencies of ten common hERG inhibitors. A correlation was also observed for the hERG channel activities of 10 known hERG inhibitors determined in this thallium flux assay and in the patch clamp experiment. Our findings indicate that this thallium flux assay can be used as an alternative method to profile large-volume compound libraries for compound activity on the hERG channel.

  3. Development of a high-throughput screening-compatible assay to identify inhibitors of the CK2alpha/CK2beta interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochscherf, Jennifer; Lindenblatt, Dirk; Steinkrueger, Michaela;

    2015-01-01

    active site-directed approaches. The current article describes the development of a fluorescence anisotropy-based assay that mimics the principle of CK2 subunit interaction by using CK2alpha1-335 and the fluorescent probe CF-Ahx-Pc as a CK2beta analog. In addition, we identified new inhibitors able......Increased activity of protein kinase CK2 is associated with various types of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and chronic inflammation. In the search for CK2 inhibitors, attention has expanded toward compounds disturbing the interaction between CK2alpha and CK2beta in addition to established...... crystal structure of the Pc/CK2alpha1-335 complex. The dissociation constants obtained in the fluorescence anisotropy assay for binding of all compounds to human CK2alpha1-335 were validated by isothermal titration calorimetry. I-Pc was identified as the tightest binding ligand with a KD value of 240n...

  4. Development and validation of a high-throughput stereoselective LC-MS/MS assay for bupropion, hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion, and threohydrobupropion in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Flaker, Alicia M; Kharasch, Evan D

    2016-04-01

    A stereoselective analytical method was developed and validated for the quantification of bupropion, and principle metabolites hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion in human plasma. Separation of individual enantiomers (R)-bupropion, (S)-bupropion, (R,R)-hydroxybupropion, (S,S-hydroxybupropion), (1S,2S)-threohydrobupropion, (1R,2R)-threohydrobupropion, (1R,2S)-erythrohydrobupropion, and (1S,2R)-erythrohydrobupropion was achieved utilizing an α1-acid glycoprotein column within a 12-min run time. Chromatograph separation was significantly influenced by mobile phase pH and variability between columns. Analytes were quantified by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry following plasma protein precipitation with 20% trichloroacetic acid. Identification of erythrohydrobupropion enantiomer peaks and threohydrobupropion enantiomer peaks was achieved by sodium borohydride reduction of enantiopure (R)- and (S)-bupropion. Initial assay validation and sensitivity determination was on AB Sciex 3200, 4000 QTRAP, and 6500 mass spectrometers. Accuracy and precision were within 15% for each analyte. The assay was fully validated over analyte-specific concentrations using an AB Sciex 3200 mass spectrometer. Intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy were within 12% for each analyte. The limits of quantification for bupropion (R and S), hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S), threohydrobupropion (1S,2S and 1R,2R), and erythrohydrobupropion (1R,2S and 1S,2R) were 0.5, 2, 1, and 1ng/mL, respectively. All analytes were stable following freeze thaw cycles at -80°C and while stored at 4°C in the instrument autosampler. This method was applicable to clinical pharmacokinetic investigations of bupropion in patients. This is the first chromatographic method to resolve erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion enantiomers, and the first stereoselective LC-MS/MS assay to quantify bupropion, and principle metabolites hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion

  5. A cAMP Biosensor-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay for Identification of Gs-Coupled GPCR Ligands and Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff

    2015-01-01

    resulted in prolonged signaling and enabled detection of weak partial agonists and/or ligands with low potency, which is highly advantageous in large HTS settings and hit identification. In addition, the assay enabled detection of β2AR inverse agonists and PDE inhibitors. High signal-to-noise ratios were...... in living cells. We used the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) as a representative Gs-coupled receptor and characterized two cell lines with different expression levels. Low receptor expression allowed detection of desensitization kinetics and delineation of partial agonism, whereas high receptor expression...

  6. Development of a robust cell-based high-throughput screening assay to identify targets of HIV-1 viral protein R dimerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zych C

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Courtney Zych,1 Alexander Domling,2 Velpandi Ayyavoo11Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Pharmacology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Targeting protein–protein interactions (PPI is an emerging field in drug discovery. Dimerization and PPI are essential properties of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 proteins, their mediated functions, and virus biology. Additionally, dimerization is required for the functional interaction of HIV-1 proteins with many host cellular components. In this study, a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC-based screening assay was developed that can quantify changes in dimerization, using HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr dimerization as a "proof of concept." Results demonstrated that Venus Vpr (generated by BiFC Vpr constructs could be competed off in a dose-dependent manner using untagged, full-length Vpr as a competitor molecule. The change in signal intensity was measured quantitatively through flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy in a high content screening assay. High content imaging was used to screen a library of small molecules for an effect on Vpr dimerization. Among the tested molecules, a few of the small molecules demonstrate an effect on Vpr dimerization in a dose-dependent manner.Keywords: BiFC, protein–protein interaction, HIV-1 Vpr, dimerization, drug targets

  7. Development of a high-throughput enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the routine detection of the carcinogen acrylamide in food, via rapid derivatisation pre-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Andrew; Fodey, Terence; Elliott, Christopher

    2008-02-11

    The spontaneous formation of the neurotoxic carcinogen acrylamide in a wide range of cooked foods has recently been discovered. These foods include bread and other bakery products, crisps, chips, breakfast cereals, and coffee. To date, the diminutive size of acrylamide (71.08 Da) has prevented the development of screening immunoassays for this chemical. In this study, a polyclonal antibody capable of binding the carcinogen was produced by the synthesis of an immunogen comprising acrylamide derivatised with 3-mercaptobenzoic acid (3-MBA), and its conjugation to the carrier protein bovine thyroglobulin. Antiserum from the immunised rabbit was harvested and fully characterised. It displayed no binding affinity for acrylamide or 3-MBA but had a high affinity for 3-MBA-derivitised acrylamide. The antisera produced was utilised in the development of an ELISA based detection system for acrylamide. Spiked water samples were assayed for acrylamide content using a previously published extraction method validated for coffee, crispbread, potato, milk chocolate and potato crisp matrices. Extracted acrylamide was then subjected to a rapid 1-h derivatisation with 3-MBA, pre-analysis. The ELISA was shown to have a high specificity for acrylamide, with a limit of detection in water samples of 65.7 microgkg(-1), i.e. potentially suitable for acrylamide detection in a wide range of food commodities. Future development of this assay will increase sensitivity further. This is the first report of an immunoassay capable of detecting the carcinogen, as its small size has necessitated current analytical detection via expensive, slower, physico-chemical techniques such as Gas or Liquid Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

  8. Force-activated substrates for high-precision, high-throughput optical trapping assays of ssDNA motor proteins (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoniewski, Stephen; Perkins, Thomas T.

    2016-09-01

    Optical-trapping-based assays can measure individual proteins bind to and move along DNA with sub-nm resolution, and have yielded insight into a broad array of protein-DNA interactions. Unfortunately, collecting large numbers of high-resolution traces remains an ongoing challenge. Studying helicase motion along DNA exemplifies this challenge. One major difficulty is that helicase binding often requires a single stranded (ss)-double stranded (ds) DNA junction flanked by ssDNA with a minimum size and orientation. Historically, creating such DNA substrates is inefficient. More problematic is that data throughput is low in standard surface-based assays since all substrates are unwound upon introduction of ATP. The net result is 2-4 high-resolution traces on a good day. To improve throughput, we sought to turn-on or activate a substrate for a helicase one molecule at a time and thereby sequentially study many molecules on an individual microscope slide. As a first step towards this goal, we engineered a dsDNA that contains two site-specific nicks along the same strand of the dsDNA but no ssDNA. Upon overstretching the DNA (F = 65 pN), the strand between the two nicks was mechanically dissociated. We demonstrated this with two different substrates: one yielding an internal ssDNA region of 1100 nt and the other yielding a 20-bp long hairpin flanked by 30 nt of ssDNA. Unwinding a hairpin yields a 3-fold larger signal while the 30-nt ssDNA serves as the binding site for the helicase. We expect that these force-activated substrates to significantly accelerate high-resolution optical-trapping studies of DNA helicases.

  9. High-throughput LC-MS/MS assay for 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid, an active metabolite of nabumetone in human plasma and its application to bioequivalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavin N; Sharma, Naveen; Sanyal, Mallika; Prasad, Arpana; Shrivastav, Pranav S

    2008-11-01

    A simple, precise and accurate assay for the determination of 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA), an active metabolite of nabumetone in human plasma, was developed and validated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The analyte (6-MNA) and propranolol (internal standard, IS) were extracted from 200 microL aliquot of human plasma via solid-phase extraction employing HLB Oasis cartridges and separated on a Discovery HS C18 (50 x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) column. Detection of analyte and IS was done by tandem mass spectrometry with a turbo ion spray interface operating in positive ion and multiple reaction monitoring acquisition mode. The total chromatographic runtime was 3.0 min with retention time for 6-MNA and IS at 1.97 and 1.26 min, respectively. The method was validated over a dynamic linear range of 0.20-60.00 microg/mL for 6-MNA with mean correlation coefficient r > or = 0.9986. The intra-batch and inter-batch precision (%CV) across five validation runs (lower limit of quantiation, low-, medium- and high-quality controls and upper limit of quantitation) was less than 7.5%. The accuracy determined at these levels was within -5.8 to +0.2% in terms of percentage bias. The method was successfully applied for a bioequivalence study of 750 mg nabumetone tablet formulation in 12 healthy Indian male subjects under fasted condition.

  10. Development of a neutralization assay for influenza virus using an endpoint assessment based on quantitative reverse-transcription PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belete Teferedegne

    Full Text Available A microneutralization assay using an ELISA-based endpoint assessment (ELISA-MN is widely used to measure the serological response to influenza virus infection and vaccination. We have developed an alternative microneutralization assay for influenza virus using a quantitative reverse transcription PCR-based endpoint assessment (qPCR-MN in order to improve upon technical limitations associated with ELISA-MN. For qPCR-MN, infected MDCK-London cells in 96-well cell-culture plates are processed with minimal steps such that resulting samples are amenable to high-throughput analysis by downstream one-step quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR; SYBR Green chemistry with primers targeting a conserved region of the M1 gene of influenza A viruses. The growth curves of three recent vaccine strains demonstrated that the qRT-PCR signal detected at 6 hours post-infection reflected an amplification of at least 100-fold over input. Using ferret antisera, we have established the feasibility of measuring virus neutralization at 6 hours post-infection, a duration likely confined to a single virus-replication cycle. The neutralization titer for qPCR-MN was defined as the highest reciprocal serum dilution necessary to achieve a 90% inhibition of the qRT-PCR signal; this endpoint was found to be in agreement with ELISA-MN using the same critical reagents in each assay. qPCR-MN was robust with respect to assay duration (6 hours vs. 12 hours. In addition, qPCR-MN appeared to be compliant with the Percentage Law (i.e., virus neutralization results appear to be consistent over an input virus dose ranging from 500 to 12,000 TCID(50. Compared with ELISA-MN, qPCR-MN might have inherent properties conducive to reducing intra- and inter-laboratory variability while affording suitability for automation and high-throughput uses. Finally, our qRT-PCR-based approach may be broadly applicable to the development of neutralization assays for a wide variety of viruses.

  11. A rapid and robust assay for the determination of the amino acid hypusine as a possible biomarker for a high-throughput screening of antimalarials and for the diagnosis and therapy of different diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Annette; Khomutov, Alex R; Simonian, Alina; Agostinelli, Enzo

    2012-05-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) has recently been identified as a biomarker of prognostic significance and therapeutic potential for the treatment in hepatocellular carcinoma. This prompted us to establish a rapid and robust assay to determine deoxyhypusine and hypusine formed with the purified enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) from Plasmodium to develop a rapid screening assay for antimalarial drugs. The peptide hydrolysate obtained from hypusinylated eIF5A was analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with retention times for deoxyhypusine of 7.44 min and for hypusine of 7.30 min, respectively. The limit of detection for both compounds was 0.144 ng/μl. Determination of the specific activity of Plasmodium DOHH resulted in a twofold higher specific activity than its human counterpart. Following the iron-complexing strategy of the ferrous iron which is present in the active site of Plasmodium DOHH, a series of iron chelating compounds was tested. 2,2'-Dipyridyl and mimosine abolished DOHH activity completely while 4-oxo-piperidine-carboxylates i.e. the nitrophenylether JK8-2 and EHW 437, the oxime ether of the piperidine aldehyde, showed no inhibition although they were highly active in in vitro cultures of Plasmodium and in vivo in a rodent mouse model. The method allows a high-throughput screening (HPTS) of antimalarial drugs and the evaluation of eIF5A as a biomarker.

  12. 靶向G蛋白偶联受体的高通量药物筛选方法%High-throughput screening assays for G-protein-coupled receptors-targeted drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静; 谢欣

    2012-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) , also known as 7 trans-membrane receptors, are the largest family of cell surface receptors. GPCR mediate many important physiological functions and are among the most successful therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. These receptors are the targets of > 50% of the current therapeutic agents on the market. Therefore, GPCR assay development and GPCR ligand screening remain the major focus of drug discovery research worldwide. In this review, we summarize the most widely used GPCR assays and recent advances in high-throughput screening technology for GPCR drug discovery.%G蛋白偶联受体( G-protein-coupled receptors,GPCR)是一类具有7次跨膜结构的膜蛋白.GPCR介导多种重要的生理功能,与很多疾病密切相关,是最重要的现代药物靶点家族.目前市场上有近50%的药物是以GPCR为靶点的.因此,GPCR分析方法和GPCR配体筛选方法的研究是当今世界新药研究的重点和热点.本文归纳介绍了近年来被广泛使用的GPCR药物发现方法,以及靶向GPCR高通量筛选技术的最新研究进展.

  13. New Gateway-compatible vectors for a high-throughput protein-protein interaction analysis by a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay in plants and their application to a plant clathrin structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kohji; Ishikawa, Syouta; Matsunami, Erika; Yamauchi, Junji; Homma, Keiichi; Faulkner, Christine; Oparka, Karl; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Nagaya, Tsutomu; Yokota, Kazushige; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play key roles in various biological processes. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay is an excellent tool for routine PPI analyses in living cells. We developed new Gateway vectors for a high-throughput BiFC analysis of plants, adopting a monomeric Venus split just after the tenth β-strand, and analyzed the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana coated vesicle coatmers, the clathrin heavy chain (CHC), and the clathrin light chain (CLC). In competitive BiFC tests, CLC interacted with CHC through a coiled-coil motif in the middle section of CLC. R1340, R1448, and K1512 in CHC and W94 in CLC are potentially key amino acids underlying the inter-chain interaction, consistent with analyses based on homology modeling. Our Gateway BiFC system, the V10-BiFC system, provides a useful tool for a PPI analysis in living plant cells. The CLC-CHC interaction identified may facilitate clathrin triskelion assembly needed for cage formation.

  14. A novel assay for high-throughput screening of anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs to determine their efficacy by real-time monitoring of changes in PC12 cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xue-Qin; Yan, Rong; Yang, Cong; Zhang, Lei; Su, Ru-Yu; Liu, Si-Jun; Zhang, Shi-Jie; He, Wen-Qing; Fang, Shu-Huan; Cheng, Shu-Yi; Su, Zi-Ren; Chen, Yun-Bo; Wang, Qi

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the accumulation of senile plaque and neurofibrilary tangle formation in the brain, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Nowadays, the first-line treatment for AD is the application of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. However, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are basically anti-symptomatic for a limited aspect of AD pathology and are associated with serious side-effects. With the advantage of multiple targets, pathways and systems, Chinese herbal compounds hold promising potential for the development of drugs for the treatment of AD. Over the past few years, with the development of Chinese herbal compounds and in vitro pharmacological studies, cell-based disease models are one of the main methods used to screen Chinese herbal compounds for potential efficacy. Testing the efficacy of possible anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs and the development of new drugs are hindered by the lack of objective high-throughput screening methods. Currently, the assessment of the effects of drugs is usually made by MTT assays, involving laborious, subjective, low-throughput methods. Herein, we suggest a novel application for a real-time cell monitoring device (xCELLigence) that can simply and objectively assess the effective composition of Chinese herbal compounds by assessing amyloid-β peptide Aβ1-42-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. We detected the proliferation and motility of the cells using a fully automated high-throughput and real-time system. We quantitatively assessed cell motility and determined the real-time IC50 values of various anti-AD drugs that intervene in several developmental stages of Aβ1-42-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, Then, we identified the optimal time phase by curative efficacy. Our data indicate that this technique may aid in the discovery and development of novel anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs. It is possible to utilize a similar technique to measure changes in

  15. LabKey Server NAb: A tool for analyzing, visualizing and sharing results from neutralizing antibody assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Hongmei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple types of assays allow sensitive detection of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. For example, the extent of antibody neutralization of HIV-1, SIV and SHIV can be measured in the TZM-bl cell line through the degree of luciferase reporter gene expression after infection. In the past, neutralization curves and titers for this standard assay have been calculated using an Excel macro. Updating all instances of such a macro with new techniques can be unwieldy and introduce non-uniformity across multi-lab teams. Using Excel also poses challenges in centrally storing, sharing and associating raw data files and results. Results We present LabKey Server's NAb tool for organizing, analyzing and securely sharing data, files and results for neutralizing antibody (NAb assays, including the luciferase-based TZM-bl NAb assay. The customizable tool supports high-throughput experiments and includes a graphical plate template designer, allowing researchers to quickly adapt calculations to new plate layouts. The tool calculates the percent neutralization for each serum dilution based on luminescence measurements, fits a range of neutralization curves to titration results and uses these curves to estimate the neutralizing antibody titers for benchmark dilutions. Results, curve visualizations and raw data files are stored in a database and shared through a secure, web-based interface. NAb results can be integrated with other data sources based on sample identifiers. It is simple to make results public after publication by updating folder security settings. Conclusions Standardized tools for analyzing, archiving and sharing assay results can improve the reproducibility, comparability and reliability of results obtained across many labs. LabKey Server and its NAb tool are freely available as open source software at http://www.labkey.com under the Apache 2.0 license. Many members of the HIV research community can also access the Lab

  16. LabKey Server NAb: A tool for analyzing, visualizing and sharing results from neutralizing antibody assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple types of assays allow sensitive detection of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. For example, the extent of antibody neutralization of HIV-1, SIV and SHIV can be measured in the TZM-bl cell line through the degree of luciferase reporter gene expression after infection. In the past, neutralization curves and titers for this standard assay have been calculated using an Excel macro. Updating all instances of such a macro with new techniques can be unwieldy and introduce non-uniformity across multi-lab teams. Using Excel also poses challenges in centrally storing, sharing and associating raw data files and results. Results We present LabKey Server's NAb tool for organizing, analyzing and securely sharing data, files and results for neutralizing antibody (NAb) assays, including the luciferase-based TZM-bl NAb assay. The customizable tool supports high-throughput experiments and includes a graphical plate template designer, allowing researchers to quickly adapt calculations to new plate layouts. The tool calculates the percent neutralization for each serum dilution based on luminescence measurements, fits a range of neutralization curves to titration results and uses these curves to estimate the neutralizing antibody titers for benchmark dilutions. Results, curve visualizations and raw data files are stored in a database and shared through a secure, web-based interface. NAb results can be integrated with other data sources based on sample identifiers. It is simple to make results public after publication by updating folder security settings. Conclusions Standardized tools for analyzing, archiving and sharing assay results can improve the reproducibility, comparability and reliability of results obtained across many labs. LabKey Server and its NAb tool are freely available as open source software at http://www.labkey.com under the Apache 2.0 license. Many members of the HIV research community can also access the LabKey Server NAb tool without

  17. Pseudotype-based neutralization assays for influenza: a systematic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George William Carnell

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of vaccination against the influenza virus remains the most effective method of mitigating the significant morbidity and mortality caused by this virus. Antibodies elicited by currently licensed influenza vaccines are predominantly hemagglutination-inhibition (HI-competent antibodies that target the globular head of HA thus inhibiting influenza virus entry into target cells. These antibodies predominantly confer homosubtypic/strain specific protection and only rarely confer heterosubtypic protection. However, recent academia or pharma-led R&D towards the production of a universal vaccine has centered on the elicitation of antibodies directed against the stalk of the influenza HA that has been shown to confer broad protection across a range of different subtypes (H1 to H16. The accurate and sensitive measurement of antibody responses elicited by these next-generation influenza vaccines is however hampered by the lack of sensitivity of the traditional influenza serological assays hemagglutinin inhibition (HI, single radial hemolysis (SRH and microneutralization (MN. Assays utilizing pseudotypes, chimeric viruses bearing influenza glycoproteins, have been shown to be highly efficient for the measurement of homosubtypic and heterosubtypic broadly-neutralizing antibodies, making them ideal serological tools for the study of cross-protective responses against multiple influenza subtypes with pandemic potential. In this review, we will analyze and compare literature involving the production of influenza pseudotypes with particular emphasis on their use in serum antibody neutralization assays. This will enable us to establish the parameters required for optimization and propose a consensus protocol to be employed for the further deployment of these assays in influenza vaccine immunogenicity studies.

  18. Analysis of variola and vaccinia virus neutralization assays for smallpox vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christine M; Newman, Frances K; Davidson, Whitni B; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Holman, Robert C; Yan, Lihan; Frey, Sharon E; Belshe, Robert B; Karem, Kevin L; Damon, Inger K

    2012-07-01

    Possible smallpox reemergence drives research for third-generation vaccines that effectively neutralize variola virus. A comparison of neutralization assays using different substrates, variola and vaccinia (Dryvax and modified vaccinia Ankara [MVA]), showed significantly different 90% neutralization titers; Dryvax underestimated while MVA overestimated variola neutralization. Third-generation vaccines may rely upon neutralization as a correlate of protection.

  19. A high-throughput multiplex method adapted for GMO detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouachi, Maher; Chupeau, Gaëlle; Berard, Aurélie; McKhann, Heather; Romaniuk, Marcel; Giancola, Sandra; Laval, Valérie; Bertheau, Yves; Brunel, Dominique

    2008-12-24

    A high-throughput multiplex assay for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMO) was developed on the basis of the existing SNPlex method designed for SNP genotyping. This SNPlex assay allows the simultaneous detection of up to 48 short DNA sequences (approximately 70 bp; "signature sequences") from taxa endogenous reference genes, from GMO constructions, screening targets, construct-specific, and event-specific targets, and finally from donor organisms. This assay avoids certain shortcomings of multiplex PCR-based methods already in widespread use for GMO detection. The assay demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity. The results suggest that this assay is reliable, flexible, and cost- and time-effective for high-throughput GMO detection.

  20. High-throughput epitope binning assays on label-free array-based biosensors can yield exquisite epitope discrimination that facilitates the selection of monoclonal antibodies with functional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmina Noubia Abdiche

    Full Text Available Here, we demonstrate how array-based label-free biosensors can be applied to the multiplexed interaction analysis of large panels of analyte/ligand pairs, such as the epitope binning of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. In this application, the larger the number of mAbs that are analyzed for cross-blocking in a pairwise and combinatorial manner against their specific antigen, the higher the probability of discriminating their epitopes. Since cross-blocking of two mAbs is necessary but not sufficient for them to bind an identical epitope, high-resolution epitope binning analysis determined by high-throughput experiments can enable the identification of mAbs with similar but unique epitopes. We demonstrate that a mAb's epitope and functional activity are correlated, thereby strengthening the relevance of epitope binning data to the discovery of therapeutic mAbs. We evaluated two state-of-the-art label-free biosensors that enable the parallel analysis of 96 unique analyte/ligand interactions and nearly ten thousand total interactions per unattended run. The IBIS-MX96 is a microarray-based surface plasmon resonance imager (SPRi integrated with continuous flow microspotting technology whereas the Octet-HTX is equipped with disposable fiber optic sensors that use biolayer interferometry (BLI detection. We compared their throughput, versatility, ease of sample preparation, and sample consumption in the context of epitope binning assays. We conclude that the main advantages of the SPRi technology are its exceptionally low sample consumption, facile sample preparation, and unparalleled unattended throughput. In contrast, the BLI technology is highly flexible because it allows for the simultaneous interaction analysis of 96 independent analyte/ligand pairs, ad hoc sensor replacement and on-line reloading of an analyte- or ligand-array. Thus, the complementary use of these two platforms can expedite applications that are relevant to the discovery of therapeutic

  1. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Guoxin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  2. High Throughput Plasma Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujovic, Selman; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    The troublesome emergence of new classes of micro-pollutants, such as pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors, poses challenges for conventional water treatment systems. In an effort to address these contaminants and to support water reuse in drought stricken regions, new technologies must be introduced. The interaction of water with plasma rapidly mineralizes organics by inducing advanced oxidation in addition to other chemical, physical and radiative processes. The primary barrier to the implementation of plasma-based water treatment is process volume scale up. In this work, we investigate a potentially scalable, high throughput plasma water reactor that utilizes a packed bed dielectric barrier-like geometry to maximize the plasma-water interface. Here, the water serves as the dielectric medium. High-speed imaging and emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the reactor discharges. Changes in methylene blue concentration and basic water parameters are mapped as a function of plasma treatment time. Experimental results are compared to electrostatic and plasma chemistry computations, which will provide insight into the reactor's operation so that efficiency can be assessed. Supported by NSF (CBET 1336375).

  3. The high throughput biomedicine unit at the institute for molecular medicine Finland: high throughput screening meets precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietiainen, Vilja; Saarela, Jani; von Schantz, Carina; Turunen, Laura; Ostling, Paivi; Wennerberg, Krister

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Biomedicine (HTB) unit at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM was established in 2010 to serve as a national and international academic screening unit providing access to state of the art instrumentation for chemical and RNAi-based high throughput screening. The initial focus of the unit was multiwell plate based chemical screening and high content microarray-based siRNA screening. However, over the first four years of operation, the unit has moved to a more flexible service platform where both chemical and siRNA screening is performed at different scales primarily in multiwell plate-based assays with a wide range of readout possibilities with a focus on ultraminiaturization to allow for affordable screening for the academic users. In addition to high throughput screening, the equipment of the unit is also used to support miniaturized, multiplexed and high throughput applications for other types of research such as genomics, sequencing and biobanking operations. Importantly, with the translational research goals at FIMM, an increasing part of the operations at the HTB unit is being focused on high throughput systems biological platforms for functional profiling of patient cells in personalized and precision medicine projects.

  4. A High Throughput Protein Microarray Approach to Classify HIV Monoclonal Antibodies and Variant Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Y Dotsey

    Full Text Available In recent years, high throughput discovery of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs has been applied to greatly advance our understanding of the specificity, and functional activity of antibodies against HIV. Thousands of antibodies have been generated and screened in functional neutralization assays, and antibodies associated with cross-strain neutralization and passive protection in primates, have been identified. To facilitate this type of discovery, a high throughput-screening tool is needed to accurately classify mAbs, and their antigen targets. In this study, we analyzed and evaluated a prototype microarray chip comprised of the HIV-1 recombinant proteins gp140, gp120, gp41, and several membrane proximal external region peptides. The protein microarray analysis of 11 HIV-1 envelope-specific mAbs revealed diverse binding affinities and specificities across clades. Half maximal effective concentrations, generated by our chip analysis, correlated significantly (P<0.0001 with concentrations from ELISA binding measurements. Polyclonal immune responses in plasma samples from HIV-1 infected subjects exhibited different binding patterns, and reactivity against printed proteins. Examining the totality of the specificity of the humoral response in this way reveals the exquisite diversity, and specificity of the humoral response to HIV.

  5. High throughput screening operations at the University of Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anuradha

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Screening Laboratory at University of Kansas plays a critical role in advancing academic interest in the identification of chemical probes as tools to better understand the biological and biochemical basis of new therapeutic targets. The HTS laboratory has an open service policy and collaborates with internal and external academia as well as for-profit organizations to execute projects requiring HTS-compatible assay development and screening of chemical libraries for target validation, probe selection, hit identification and lead optimization.

  6. EL4 cell-based colorimetric toxin neutralization activity assays for determination of neutralizing anti-ricin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Changhong Y; Brown, J Edward; Torabazar, Nahid R; Smith, Leonard A

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant ricin toxin A-chain 1-33/44-198 vaccine (RVEc), developed at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases as a vaccine candidate, is under investigation in a phase 1 clinical study. To effectively evaluate the immunogenicity of this ricin vaccine and to eliminate the use of radioactive material, an EL4 cell-based colorimetric toxin neutralization activity (TNA) assay using a CellTiter 96 AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay Reagent has been developed, optimized, and applied in the vaccine efficacy studies. The TNA assay measures the protective neutralizing anti-ricin antibodies in animal sera by determining the cell viability after ricin exposure in the assay system and comparing it to a purified mouse polyclonal antiricin IgG standard curve. The standard curve of the anti-ricin TNA assay closely fits a four-parameter logistic regression model. The unknown test sample concentration was expressed as microg/mL, but not the 50% effective concentration (EC50), which was determined by most TNA assays. The neutralizing endpoint titers, not the 50% effective dilution (ED50), of human specimens were measured with the TNA assay in support of the clinical study of the RVEc vaccine. The optimal amount of ricin toxin, EL4 cells, and concentration of standards used in the assay system was established to minimize false-negative and false-positive results of serum specimens from the nonclinical and clinical studies of RVEc. The testing conditions were adjusted to optimize assay performance. The colorimetric TNA assay replaced a radioactive TNA assay previously used in the ricin vaccine studies.

  7. EMBRYONIC VASCULAR DISRUPTION ADVERSE OUTCOMES: LINKING HIGH THROUGHPUT SIGNALING SIGNATURES WITH FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embryonic vascular disruption is an important adverse outcome pathway (AOP) given the knowledge that chemical disruption of early cardiovascular system development leads to broad prenatal defects. High throughput screening (HTS) assays provide potential building blocks for AOP d...

  8. Fluorescent biosensors for high throughput screening of protein kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Van, Thi Nhu Ngoc; Morris, May C

    2014-02-01

    High throughput screening assays aim to identify small molecules that interfere with protein function, activity, or conformation, which can serve as effective tools for chemical biology studies of targets involved in physiological processes or pathways of interest or disease models, as well as templates for development of therapeutics in medicinal chemistry. Fluorescent biosensors constitute attractive and powerful tools for drug discovery programs, from high throughput screening assays, to postscreen characterization of hits, optimization of lead compounds, and preclinical evaluation of candidate drugs. They provide a means of screening for inhibitors that selectively target enzymatic activity, conformation, and/or function in vitro. Moreover, fluorescent biosensors constitute useful tools for cell- and image-based, multiplex and multiparametric, high-content screening. Application of fluorescence-based sensors to screen large and complex libraries of compounds in vitro, in cell-based formats or whole organisms requires several levels of optimization to establish robust and reproducible assays. In this review, we describe the different fluorescent biosensor technologies which have been applied to high throughput screens, and discuss the prerequisite criteria underlying their successful application. Special emphasis is placed on protein kinase biosensors, since these enzymes constitute one of the most important classes of therapeutic targets in drug discovery.

  9. Ultraspecific probes for high throughput HLA typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggers Rick

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The variations within an individual's HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen genes have been linked to many immunological events, e.g. susceptibility to disease, response to vaccines, and the success of blood, tissue, and organ transplants. Although the microarray format has the potential to achieve high-resolution typing, this has yet to be attained due to inefficiencies of current probe design strategies. Results We present a novel three-step approach for the design of high-throughput microarray assays for HLA typing. This approach first selects sequences containing the SNPs present in all alleles of the locus of interest and next calculates the number of base changes necessary to convert a candidate probe sequences to the closest subsequence within the set of sequences that are likely to be present in the sample including the remainder of the human genome in order to identify those candidate probes which are "ultraspecific" for the allele of interest. Due to the high specificity of these sequences, it is possible that preliminary steps such as PCR amplification are no longer necessary. Lastly, the minimum number of these ultraspecific probes is selected such that the highest resolution typing can be achieved for the minimal cost of production. As an example, an array was designed and in silico results were obtained for typing of the HLA-B locus. Conclusion The assay presented here provides a higher resolution than has previously been developed and includes more alleles than previously considered. Based upon the in silico and preliminary experimental results, we believe that the proposed approach can be readily applied to any highly polymorphic gene system.

  10. High-throughput metal susceptibility testing of microbial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Raymond J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial biofilms exist all over the natural world, a distribution that is paralleled by metal cations and oxyanions. Despite this reality, very few studies have examined how biofilms withstand exposure to these toxic compounds. This article describes a batch culture technique for biofilm and planktonic cell metal susceptibility testing using the MBEC assay. This device is compatible with standard 96-well microtiter plate technology. As part of this method, a two part, metal specific neutralization protocol is summarized. This procedure minimizes residual biological toxicity arising from the carry-over of metals from challenge to recovery media. Neutralization consists of treating cultures with a chemical compound known to react with or to chelate the metal. Treated cultures are plated onto rich agar to allow metal complexes to diffuse into the recovery medium while bacteria remain on top to recover. Two difficulties associated with metal susceptibility testing were the focus of two applications of this technique. First, assays were calibrated to allow comparisons of the susceptibility of different organisms to metals. Second, the effects of exposure time and growth medium composition on the susceptibility of E. coli JM109 biofilms to metals were investigated. Results This high-throughput method generated 96-statistically equivalent biofilms in a single device and thus allowed for comparative and combinatorial experiments of media, microbial strains, exposure times and metals. By adjusting growth conditions, it was possible to examine biofilms of different microorganisms that had similar cell densities. In one example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was up to 80 times more resistant to heavy metalloid oxyanions than Escherichia coli TG1. Further, biofilms were up to 133 times more tolerant to tellurite (TeO32- than corresponding planktonic cultures. Regardless of the growth medium, the tolerance of biofilm and planktonic

  11. International network for comparison of HIV neutralization assays: the NeutNet report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Fenyö

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutralizing antibody assessments play a central role in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 vaccine development but it is unclear which assay, or combination of assays, will provide reliable measures of correlates of protection. To address this, an international collaboration (NeutNet involving 18 independent participants was organized to compare different assays. METHODS: Each laboratory evaluated four neutralizing reagents (TriMab, 447-52D, 4E10, sCD4 at a given range of concentrations against a panel of 11 viruses representing a wide range of genetic subtypes and phenotypes. A total of 16 different assays were compared. The assays utilized either uncloned virus produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs (virus infectivity assays, VI assays, or their Env-pseudotyped (gp160 derivatives produced in 293T cells (PSV assays from molecular clones or uncloned virus. Target cells included PBMC and genetically-engineered cell lines in either a single- or multiple-cycle infection format. Infection was quantified by using a range of assay read-outs that included extracellular or intracellular p24 antigen detection, RNA quantification and luciferase and beta-galactosidase reporter gene expression. FINDINGS: PSV assays were generally more sensitive than VI assays, but there were important differences according to the virus and inhibitor used. For example, for TriMab, the mean IC50 was always lower in PSV than in VI assays. However, with 4E10 or sCD4 some viruses were neutralized with a lower IC50 in VI assays than in the PSV assays. Inter-laboratory concordance was slightly better for PSV than for VI assays with some viruses, but for other viruses agreement between laboratories was limited and depended on both the virus and the neutralizing reagent. CONCLUSIONS: The NeutNet project demonstrated clear differences in assay sensitivity that were dependent on both the neutralizing reagent and the virus. No single assay was

  12. A microdroplet dilutor for high-throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xize; Gielen, Fabrice; Edel, Joshua B.; Demello, Andrew J.

    2011-06-01

    Pipetting and dilution are universal processes used in chemical and biological laboratories to assay and experiment. In microfluidics such operations are equally in demand, but difficult to implement. Recently, droplet-based microfluidics has emerged as an exciting new platform for high-throughput experimentation. However, it is challenging to vary the concentration of droplets rapidly and controllably. To this end, we developed a dilution module for high-throughput screening using droplet-based microfluidics. Briefly, a nanolitre-sized sample droplet of defined concentration is trapped within a microfluidic chamber. Through a process of droplet merging, mixing and re-splitting, this droplet is combined with a series of smaller buffer droplets to generate a sequence of output droplets that define a digital concentration gradient. Importantly, the formed droplets can be merged with other reagent droplets to enable rapid chemical and biological screens. As a proof of concept, we used the dilutor to perform a high-throughput homogeneous DNA-binding assay using only nanolitres of sample.

  13. Spotsizer: High-throughput quantitative analysis of microbial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffares, Daniel C.; Arzhaeva, Yulia; Bähler, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    Microbial colony growth can serve as a useful readout in assays for studying complex genetic interactions or the effects of chemical compounds. Although computational tools for acquiring quantitative measurements of microbial colonies have been developed, their utility can be compromised by inflexible input image requirements, non-trivial installation procedures, or complicated operation. Here, we present the Spotsizer software tool for automated colony size measurements in images of robotically arrayed microbial colonies. Spotsizer features a convenient graphical user interface (GUI), has both single-image and batch-processing capabilities, and works with multiple input image formats and different colony grid types. We demonstrate how Spotsizer can be used for high-throughput quantitative analysis of fission yeast growth. The user-friendly Spotsizer tool provides rapid, accurate, and robust quantitative analyses of microbial growth in a high-throughput format. Spotsizer is freely available at https://data.csiro.au/dap/landingpage?pid=csiro:15330 under a proprietary CSIRO license. PMID:27712582

  14. High-throughput assay of adenosine in fermentation broth based on enzyme catalysis%酶法高通量测定发酵液中的腺苷含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁; 董会娜; 祖昕; 张大伟; 吴勇杰

    2015-01-01

    腺苷是合成阿糖腺苷、腺苷酸(AMP)、三磷酸腺苷(ATP)的主要原料,是一种重要的医药原料.目前,微生物发酵生产腺苷越来越受到重视,会产生大量的发酵液样品需要检测.基于腺苷脱氨酶(ADA)建立了一种快速、高通量检测发酵液腺苷的方法.实验结果表明,响应面方法优化检测试剂浓度为碳酸钠-碳酸氢钠34.20mmol/L-27.40 mmol/L,亚硝基铁氰化钠3.35 g/L,次氯酸钠的有效氯为0.172 5%,百里香酚6.64 g/L.该方法检测灵敏,检测限为0.025~6 mmol/L,能够满足发酵检测和高通量筛选的需要.%Adenosine is the main raw material for the production of vidarabine,adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosinetriphosphate (ATP).Adenosine is also an important pharmaceutical raw materials.At present,microbial fermentation production of adenosoine will produce large amounts of fermentation samples to be detected A rapid high -throughput method for detecting adenosine in fermentation broth based on adenosine deaminase (ADA)was estabished.Using response surface model analysis to determine the optimum concentration of four substances,the results showed sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate 34.20 mmol/L-27.40 mmol/L,sodium nitropmssid 3.35 g/L,the effective chlorine of sodium hypochlorite 0.172 5%,thymol 6.64 g/L.The limit of detection was between 0.025 mmo1/L and 6 mmo1/L,this method is sensitive and can meet the needs of the fermentation detection and high-throughput screening.

  15. Data Management for High-Throughput Genomics

    CERN Document Server

    Roehm, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Today's sequencing technology allows sequencing an individual genome within a few weeks for a fraction of the costs of the original Human Genome project. Genomics labs are faced with dozens of TB of data per week that have to be automatically processed and made available to scientists for further analysis. This paper explores the potential and the limitations of using relational database systems as the data processing platform for high-throughput genomics. In particular, we are interested in the storage management for high-throughput sequence data and in leveraging SQL and user-defined functions for data analysis inside a database system. We give an overview of a database design for high-throughput genomics, how we used a SQL Server database in some unconventional ways to prototype this scenario, and we will discuss some initial findings about the scalability and performance of such a more database-centric approach.

  16. A high-throughput cidality screen for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvinder Kaur

    Full Text Available Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb aerosols is a major threat to tuberculosis (TB researchers, even in bio-safety level-3 (BSL-3 facilities. Automation and high-throughput screens (HTS in BSL3 facilities are essential for minimizing manual aerosol-generating interventions and facilitating TB research. In the present study, we report the development and validation of a high-throughput, 24-well 'spot-assay' for selecting bactericidal compounds against Mtb. The bactericidal screen concept was first validated in the fast-growing surrogate Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm and subsequently confirmed in Mtb using the following reference anti-tubercular drugs: rifampicin, isoniazid, ofloxacin and ethambutol (RIOE, acting on different targets. The potential use of the spot-assay to select bactericidal compounds from a large library was confirmed by screening on Mtb, with parallel plating by the conventional gold standard method (correlation, r2 = 0.808. An automated spot-assay further enabled an MBC90 determination on resistant and sensitive Mtb clinical isolates. The implementation of the spot-assay in kinetic screens to enumerate residual Mtb after either genetic silencing (anti-sense RNA, AS-RNA or chemical inhibition corroborated its ability to detect cidality. This relatively simple, economical and quantitative HTS considerably minimized the bio-hazard risk and enabled the selection of novel vulnerable Mtb targets and mycobactericidal compounds. Thus, spot-assays have great potential to impact the TB drug discovery process.

  17. Development of an in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-anthrax Lethal Toxin Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd Rijpkema

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lethal toxin (LT of Bacillus anthracis reduces the production of a number of inflammatory mediators, including transcription factors, chemokines and cytokines in various human cell lines, leading to down-regulation of the host inflammatory response. Previously we showed that the reduction of interleukin-8 (IL-8 is a sensitive marker of LT-mediated intoxication in human neutrophil-like NB-4 cells and that IL-8 levels are restored to normality when therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAb with toxin-neutralising (TN activity are added. We used this information to develop cell-based assays that examine the effects of TN therapeutic mAbs designed to treat LT intoxication and here we extend these findings. We present an in vitro assay based on human endothelial cell line HUVEC jr2, which measures the TN activity of therapeutic anti-LT mAbs using IL-8 as a marker for intoxication. HUVEC jr2 cells have the advantage over NB-4 cells that they are adherent, do not require a differentiation step and can be used in a microtitre plate format and therefore can facilitate high throughput analysis. This human cell-based assay provides a valid alternative to the mouse macrophage assay as it is a more biologically relevant model of the effects of toxin-neutralising antibodies in human infection.

  18. A multi-endpoint, high-throughput study of nanomaterial toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Qu, Xiaolei; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Wang, Tianxiao; Riepe, Celeste; Liu, Zheng; Li, Qilin; Zhong, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    The booming nanotech industry has raised public concerns about the environmental health and safety impact of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). High-throughput assays are needed to obtain toxicity data for the rapidly increasing number of ENMs. Here we present a suite of high-throughput methods to study nanotoxicity in intact animals using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. At the population level, our system measures food consumption of thousands of animals to evaluate population fitness. At t...

  19. High-throughput computing in the sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Mark; Grimshaw, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    While it is true that the modern computer is many orders of magnitude faster than that of yesteryear; this tremendous growth in CPU clock rates is now over. Unfortunately, however, the growth in demand for computational power has not abated; whereas researchers a decade ago could simply wait for computers to get faster, today the only solution to the growing need for more powerful computational resource lies in the exploitation of parallelism. Software parallelization falls generally into two broad categories--"true parallel" and high-throughput computing. This chapter focuses on the latter of these two types of parallelism. With high-throughput computing, users can run many copies of their software at the same time across many different computers. This technique for achieving parallelism is powerful in its ability to provide high degrees of parallelism, yet simple in its conceptual implementation. This chapter covers various patterns of high-throughput computing usage and the skills and techniques necessary to take full advantage of them. By utilizing numerous examples and sample codes and scripts, we hope to provide the reader not only with a deeper understanding of the principles behind high-throughput computing, but also with a set of tools and references that will prove invaluable as she explores software parallelism with her own software applications and research.

  20. INTRODUCTION OF THE HIGH THROUGHPUT SCREENING SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李元

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the system of high throughput screening (HTS). Its role in new drug study and current development is described. The relationship between research achievements of genome study and new type screening model of new drugs is emphasized. The personal opinions of current problems about HTS study in China are raised.

  1. INTRODUCTION OF THE HIGH THROUGHPUT SCREENING SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李元

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the system of high throughput screening (HTS). Its role in new drug study and current development is described. The relationship between research achievements of genome study and new type screening model of new drugs is emphasized. The personal opinions of current problems about HTS study in China are raised.``

  2. High Throughput Analysis of Photocatalytic Water Purification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romao, Joana; Barata, David; Habibovic, Pamela; Mul, Guido; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel high throughput photocatalyst efficiency assessment method based on 96-well microplates and UV-Vis spectroscopy. We demonstrate the reproducibility of the method using methyl orange (MO) decomposition, and compare kinetic data obtained with those provided in the literature for lar

  3. High-Throughput Contact Flow Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Gaelle C; Lee, Jiseok; Gupta, Ankur; Hill, William Adam; Doyle, Patrick S

    2015-10-01

    High-throughput fabrication of graphically encoded hydrogel microparticles is achieved by combining flow contact lithography in a multichannel microfluidic device and a high capacity 25 mm LED UV source. Production rates of chemically homogeneous particles are improved by two orders of magnitude. Additionally, the custom-built contact lithography instrument provides an affordable solution for patterning complex microstructures on surfaces.

  4. Safe and Objective Assay of Enterovirus 71 Neutralizing Antibodies via Pseudovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Jun; XU Lin; GUO Shi-jie; SUN Shi-yang; ZHANG Shu; ZHU Chang-lin; KONG Wei; JIANG Chun-lai

    2012-01-01

    Current serum neutralization assays based on the inhibition of the eytopathic effect(Nt-CPE) need to manipulate live viruses,which are time-consuming,labor-intensive,and have the potential exposure to infectious agents,so a safe and objective assay via pseudovirus for the fast and efficient detection of enterovirus 71(EV71 ) neutralizing antibodies was developed.First,we generated EV71 pseudovirus containing firefly luciferase gene in place of the capsid gene P1 in EV71 genome.Vero cells infected with 200 CCID50(50% cell culture infective dose) of EV71 pseudovirus for 24 h were found to have the best performance.Seval sera were measured by EV71 pseudoparticle neutralization assay(Nt-PPN) and the conventional serological method Nt-CPE.Neutralizing antibody titers measured by Nt-PPN and those obtained by Nt-CPE demonstrate a high correlation between the two methods.Overall,the PPN assay represents a valid alternative to conventional serological methods for the evaluation of EV71 neutralizing antibodies.This method can be used for detecting neutralizing antibodies of other picornaviruses,such as hepatitis A virus(HAV) and coxsackievirus 16(CVA16),and make it possible to determine whether there is cross-reactivity between EV71 and CVA16.

  5. HTRF(®): pioneering technology for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degorce, François

    2006-12-01

    Cisbio international pioneered the field of homogeneous fluorescence methodologies and time-resolved fluorescence resonance in particular, through its proprietary technology, HTRF(®). The development was based on Prof. Jean-Marie Lehn's research on rare earth fluorescence properties (awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1987) and on Cisbio's expertise in homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF). The technology is used in assay development and drug screening, most notably in high-throughput screening applications. This highly powerful technology is particularly applied to the areas of G-protein-coupled receptor and kinase screening, as well as a series of targets related to inflammation, metabolic diseases and CNS disorders.

  6. High throughput production of mouse monoclonal antibodies using antigen microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Masi, Federico; Chiarella, P.; Wilhelm, H.;

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in proteomics research underscore the increasing need for high-affinity monoclonal antibodies, which are still generated with lengthy, low-throughput antibody production techniques. Here we present a semi-automated, high-throughput method of hybridoma generation and identification....... Monoclonal antibodies were raised to different targets in single batch runs of 6-10 wk using multiplexed immunisations, automated fusion and cell-culture, and a novel antigen-coated microarray-screening assay. In a large-scale experiment, where eight mice were immunized with ten antigens each, we generated...

  7. International network for comparison of HIV neutralization assays: the NeutNet report II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Heyndrickx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutralizing antibodies provide markers for vaccine-induced protective immunity in many viral infections. By analogy, HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by immunization may well predict vaccine effectiveness. Assessment of neutralizing antibodies is therefore of primary importance, but is hampered by the fact that we do not know which assay(s can provide measures of protective immunity. An international collaboration (NeutNet involving 18 different laboratories previously compared different assays using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and soluble CD4 (Phase I study. METHODS: In the present study (Phase II, polyclonal reagents were evaluated by 13 laboratories. Each laboratory evaluated nine plasmas against an 8 virus panel representing different genetic subtypes and phenotypes. TriMab, a mixture of three mAbs, was used as a positive control allowing comparison of the results with Phase I in a total of nine different assays. The assays used either uncloned virus produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs (Virus Infectivity Assays, VIA, or Env (gp160-pseudotyped viruses (pseudoviruses, PSV produced in HEK293T cells from molecular clones or from uncloned virus. Target cells included PBMC and genetically engineered cell lines in either single- or multiple-cycle infection format. Infection was quantified by using a range of assay read-outs including extra- or intra-cellular p24 antigen detection, luciferase, beta-galactosidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene expression. FINDINGS: Using TriMab, results of Phase I and Phase II were generally in agreement for six of the eight viruses tested and confirmed that the PSV assay is more sensitive than PBMC (p = 0.014. Comparisons with the polyclonal reagents showed that sensitivities were dependent on both virus and plasma. CONCLUSIONS: Here we further demonstrate clear differences in assay sensitivities that were dependent on both the neutralizing reagent and the virus

  8. International Network for Comparison of HIV Neutralization Assays: The NeutNet Report II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyndrickx, Leo; Heath, Alan; Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Alcami, Jose; Bongertz, Vera; Jansson, Marianne; Malnati, Mauro; Montefiori, David; Moog, Christiane; Morris, Lynn; Osmanov, Saladin; Polonis, Victoria; Ramaswamy, Meghna; Sattentau, Quentin; Tolazzi, Monica; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Willems, Betty; Wrin, Terri; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Background Neutralizing antibodies provide markers for vaccine-induced protective immunity in many viral infections. By analogy, HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by immunization may well predict vaccine effectiveness. Assessment of neutralizing antibodies is therefore of primary importance, but is hampered by the fact that we do not know which assay(s) can provide measures of protective immunity. An international collaboration (NeutNet) involving 18 different laboratories previously compared different assays using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and soluble CD4 (Phase I study). Methods In the present study (Phase II), polyclonal reagents were evaluated by 13 laboratories. Each laboratory evaluated nine plasmas against an 8 virus panel representing different genetic subtypes and phenotypes. TriMab, a mixture of three mAbs, was used as a positive control allowing comparison of the results with Phase I in a total of nine different assays. The assays used either uncloned virus produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (Virus Infectivity Assays, VIA), or Env (gp160)-pseudotyped viruses (pseudoviruses, PSV) produced in HEK293T cells from molecular clones or from uncloned virus. Target cells included PBMC and genetically engineered cell lines in either single- or multiple-cycle infection format. Infection was quantified by using a range of assay read-outs including extra- or intra-cellular p24 antigen detection, luciferase, beta-galactosidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene expression. Findings Using TriMab, results of Phase I and Phase II were generally in agreement for six of the eight viruses tested and confirmed that the PSV assay is more sensitive than PBMC (p = 0.014). Comparisons with the polyclonal reagents showed that sensitivities were dependent on both virus and plasma. Conclusions Here we further demonstrate clear differences in assay sensitivities that were dependent on both the neutralizing reagent and the virus

  9. Microfabricated high-throughput electronic particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D. K.; Requa, M. V.; Cleland, A. N.

    2007-10-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and use of a radio frequency reflectometer integrated with a microfluidic system, applied to the very high-throughput measurement of micron-scale particles, passing in a microfluidic channel through the sensor region. The device operates as a microfabricated Coulter counter [U.S. Patent No. 2656508 (1953)], similar to a design we have described previously, but here with significantly improved electrode geometry as well as including electronic tuning of the reflectometer; the two improvements yielding an improvement by more than a factor of 10 in the signal to noise and in the diametric discrimination of single particles. We demonstrate the high-throughput discrimination of polystyrene beads with diameters in the 4-10μm range, achieving diametric resolutions comparable to the intrinsic spread of diameters in the bead distribution, at rates in excess of 15×106beads/h.

  10. HIGH THROUGHPUT DRILLING OF TITANIUM ALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui; SHIH Albert Jau-Min

    2007-01-01

    The experiments of high throughput drilling of Ti-6Al-4V at 183 m/min cutting speed and 156 mm3/s material removal rate using a 4 mm diameter WC-Co spiral point drill are conducted. At this material removal rate, it took only 0.57 s to drill a hole in a 6.35 mm thick Ti plate. Supplying the cutting fluid via through-the-drill holes and the balance of cutting speed and feed have proven to be critical for drill life. An inverse heat transfer model is developed to predict the heat flux and the drill temperature distribution in drilling. A three-dimensional finite element modeling of drilling is conducted to predict the thrust force and torque. Experimental result demonstrates that, using proper machining process parameters, tool geometry, and fine-grained WC-Co tool material, the high throughput machining of Ti alloy is technically feasible.

  11. High Throughput Neuro-Imaging Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Miller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes neuroinformatics technologies at 1 mm anatomical scale based on high throughput 3D functional and structural imaging technologies of the human brain. The core is an abstract pipeline for converting functional and structural imagery into their high dimensional neuroinformatic representations index containing O(E3-E4 discriminating dimensions. The pipeline is based on advanced image analysis coupled to digital knowledge representations in the form of dense atlases of the human brain at gross anatomical scale. We demonstrate the integration of these high-dimensional representations with machine learning methods, which have become the mainstay of other fields of science including genomics as well as social networks. Such high throughput facilities have the potential to alter the way medical images are stored and utilized in radiological workflows. The neuroinformatics pipeline is used to examine cross-sectional and personalized analyses of neuropsychiatric illnesses in clinical applications as well as longitudinal studies. We demonstrate the use of high throughput machine learning methods for supporting (i cross-sectional image analysis to evaluate the health status of individual subjects with respect to the population data, (ii integration of image and non-image information for diagnosis and prognosis.

  12. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile.

  13. New technologies for ultra-high throughput genotyping in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Nikki; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Molecular genetic markers represent one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of plant genomes and the association of heritable traits with underlying genetic variation. Molecular marker technology has developed rapidly over the last decade, with the development of high-throughput genotyping methods. Two forms of sequence-based marker, simple sequence repeats (SSRs), also known as microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) now predominate applications in modern plant genetic analysis, along the anonymous marker systems such as amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and diversity array technology (DArT). The reducing cost of DNA sequencing and increasing availability of large sequence data sets permits the mining of this data for large numbers of SSRs and SNPs. These may then be used in applications such as genetic linkage analysis and trait mapping, diversity analysis, association studies and marker-assisted selection. Here, we describe automated methods for the discovery of molecular markers and new technologies for high-throughput, low-cost molecular marker genotyping. Genotyping examples include multiplexing of SSRs using Multiplex-Ready marker technology (MRT); DArT genotyping; SNP genotyping using the Invader assay, the single base extension (SBE), oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) SNPlex system, and Illumina GoldenGate and Infinium methods.

  14. A semi-automated multiplex high-throughput assay for measuring IgG antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) domains in small volumes of plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cham, Gerald K K; Kurtis, Jonathan; Lusingu, John;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The level of antibodies against PfEMP1 is routinely quantified by the conventional microtitre enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, ELISA only measures one analyte at a time and requires a relatively large plasma volume if the complete antibody profile of the sample...... of twenty nine PfEMP1 domains were PCR amplified from 3D7 genomic DNA, expressed in the Baculovirus system and purified by metal-affinity chromatography. The antibody reactivity level to the recombinant PfEMP1 proteins in human hyper-immune plasma was measured by ELISA. In parallel, these recombinant PfEMP1......-based assay was sensitive, accurate and reproducible. Four recombinant PfEMP1 proteins C17, D5, D9 and D12, selected on the basis that they showed a spread of median fluorescent intensity (MFI) values from low to high when analysed by the bead-based assay were analysed by ELISA and the results from both...

  15. Neutral red uptake assay for the estimation of cell viability/cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Guillermo; del Peso, Ana; Zurita, Jorge L

    2008-01-01

    The neutral red uptake assay provides a quantitative estimation of the number of viable cells in a culture. It is one of the most used cytotoxicity tests with many biomedical and environmental applications. It is based on the ability of viable cells to incorporate and bind the supravital dye neutral red in the lysosomes. Most primary cells and cell lines from diverse origin may be successfully used. Cells are seeded in 96-well tissue culture plates and are treated for the appropriate period. The plates are then incubated for 2 h with a medium containing neutral red. The cells are subsequently washed, the dye is extracted in each well and the absorbance is read using a spectrophotometer. The procedure is cheaper and more sensitive than other cytotoxicity tests (tetrazolium salts, enzyme leakage or protein content). Once the cells have been treated, the assay can be completed in <3 h.

  16. Cytotoxicity evaluation of Clinacanthus nutans through dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium bromide and neutral red uptake assays

    OpenAIRE

    Vajrabhaya, La-ongthong; Korsuwannawong, Suwanna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the results of dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and neutral red uptake (NRU) assays of Clinacanthus nutans cytotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Mouse fibroblast (L929) cells were exposed to 0.01%, 0.1%, 0.25%, and 0.5% (W/V) C. nutans in a 96-cluster-well-culture plate for 24 h. The cell viability after exposure to C. nutans was determined by MTT and NRU assays in separate tissue culture plates. The two assays were compared thr...

  17. High-throughput screening assays for the assessment of CYP2C9*1, CYP2C9*2, and CYP2C9*3 metabolism using fluorogenic Vivid substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Bryan D; Thompson, David V; Goossens, Tony A; Trubetskoy, Olga V

    2004-08-01

    CYP2C9 is a genetically polymorphic human cytochrome P450 isozyme involved in the oxidative metabolism of many drugs, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compounds. Individuals genotyped heterozygous or homozygous for CYP2C9 allelic variants have demonstrated altered metabolism of some drugs primarily metabolized by CYP2C9. The ability to expand screening of CYP2C9 allelic variants to a larger set of drugs and pharmaceutical agents would contribute to a better understanding of the significance of CYP2C9 polymorphisms in the population and to predictions of possible outcomes. The authors report the development of an in vitro fluorescence-based assay employing recombinant CYP2C9 variants (CYP2C9*1, CYP2C9*2, and CYP2C9*3) and fluorogenic Vivid(R) CYP2C9 substrates to explore the effects of CYP2C9 polymorphisms on drug metabolism, using drugs primarily metabolized by CYP2C9. Several chemically diverse fluorogenic substrates (Vivid(R) CYP2C9 blue, green, and red substrates) were used as prototypic probes to obtain in vitro CYP2C9 metabolic rates and kinetic parameters, such as apparent K(m), V(max), and V(max)/K(m) ratios for each allelic variant. In addition, a diverse panel of drugs was screened as assay modifiers with CYP2C9*1, CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3, and the fluorogenic Vivid(R) CYP2C9 substrates. The inhibitory potential of this large group of chemically diverse drugs and compounds has been assessed on the basis of their ability to compete with Vivid(R) CYP2C9 substrates in fluorescent reporter assays, thus providing a sensitive and quick assessment of polymorphism-dependent changes in CYP2C9 metabolism.

  18. High Throughput PBTK: Open-Source Data and Tools for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation on High Throughput PBTK at the PBK Modelling in Risk Assessment meeting in Ispra, Italy Presentation on High Throughput PBTK at the PBK Modelling in Risk Assessment meeting in Ispra, Italy

  19. Emerging metrology for high-throughput nanomaterial genotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bryant C; Wright, Christa W; Ibuki, Yuko; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Karlsson, Hanna L; Hendriks, Giel; Sims, Christopher M; Singh, Neenu; Doak, Shareen H

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of the engineered nanomaterial (ENM) manufacturing industry has accelerated the incorporation of ENMs into a wide variety of consumer products across the globe. Unintentionally or not, some of these ENMs may be introduced into the environment or come into contact with humans or other organisms resulting in unexpected biological effects. It is thus prudent to have rapid and robust analytical metrology in place that can be used to critically assess and/or predict the cytotoxicity, as well as the potential genotoxicity of these ENMs. Many of the traditional genotoxicity test methods [e.g. unscheduled DNA synthesis assay, bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) test, etc.,] for determining the DNA damaging potential of chemical and biological compounds are not suitable for the evaluation of ENMs, due to a variety of methodological issues ranging from potential assay interferences to problems centered on low sample throughput. Recently, a number of sensitive, high-throughput genotoxicity assays/platforms (CometChip assay, flow cytometry/micronucleus assay, flow cytometry/γ-H2AX assay, automated 'Fluorimetric Detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding' (FADU) assay, ToxTracker reporter assay) have been developed, based on substantial modifications and enhancements of traditional genotoxicity assays. These new assays have been used for the rapid measurement of DNA damage (strand breaks), chromosomal damage (micronuclei) and for detecting upregulated DNA damage signalling pathways resulting from ENM exposures. In this critical review, we describe and discuss the fundamental measurement principles and measurement endpoints of these new assays, as well as the modes of operation, analytical metrics and potential interferences, as applicable to ENM exposures. An unbiased discussion of the major technical advantages and limitations of each assay for evaluating and predicting the genotoxic potential of ENMs is also provided. Published by Oxford University Press on

  20. Automated High Throughput Drug Target Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupp, B

    2005-02-18

    The molecular structures of drug target proteins and receptors form the basis for 'rational' or structure guided drug design. The majority of target structures are experimentally determined by protein X-ray crystallography, which as evolved into a highly automated, high throughput drug discovery and screening tool. Process automation has accelerated tasks from parallel protein expression, fully automated crystallization, and rapid data collection to highly efficient structure determination methods. A thoroughly designed automation technology platform supported by a powerful informatics infrastructure forms the basis for optimal workflow implementation and the data mining and analysis tools to generate new leads from experimental protein drug target structures.

  1. Use of High Throughput Screening Data in IARC Monograph ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Evaluation of carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in IARC monograph evaluations, and can lead to “upgrade” or “downgrade” of the carcinogenicity conclusions based on human and animal evidence alone. Three recent IARC monograph Working Groups (110, 112, and 113) pioneered analysis of high throughput in vitro screening data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast program in evaluations of carcinogenic mechanisms. Methods: For monograph 110, ToxCast assay data across multiple nuclear receptors were used to test the hypothesis that PFOA acts exclusively through the PPAR family of receptors, with activity profiles compared to several prototypical nuclear receptor-activating compounds. For monographs 112 and 113, ToxCast assays were systematically evaluated and used as an additional data stream in the overall evaluation of the mechanistic evidence. Specifically, ToxCast assays were mapped to 10 “key characteristics of carcinogens” recently identified by an IARC expert group, and chemicals’ bioactivity profiles were evaluated both in absolute terms (number of relevant assays positive for bioactivity) and relative terms (ranking with respect to other compounds evaluated by IARC, using the ToxPi methodology). Results: PFOA activates multiple nuclear receptors in addition to the PPAR family in the ToxCast assays. ToxCast assays offered substantial coverage for 5 of the 10 “key characteristics,” with the greates

  2. High throughput discovery of new fouling-resistant surfaces†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mingyan; Liu, Hongwei; Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Kilduff, James; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert; Belfort, Georges

    2017-01-01

    A novel high throughput method for synthesis and screening of customized protein-resistant surfaces was developed. This method is an inexpensive, fast, reproducible and scalable approach to synthesize and screen protein-resistant surfaces appropriate for a specific feed. The method is illustrated here by combining a high throughput platform (HTP) approach together with our patented photo-induced graft polymerization (PGP) method developed for facile modification of commercial poly(aryl sulfone) membranes. We demonstrate that the HTP–PGP approach to synthesize and screen fouling-resistant surfaces is general, and thus provides the capability to develop surfaces optimized for specific feeds. Surfaces were prepared via graft polymerization onto poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membranes and were evaluated using a protein adsorption assay followed by pressure-driven filtration. We have employed the HTP–PGP approach to confirm previously reported successful monomers and to develop new antifouling surfaces from a library of 66 monomers for four different challenges of interest to the biotechnology community: hen egg-white lysozyme, supernatant from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution as a model cell suspension, and immunoglobulin G (IgG) precipitated in the absence and presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in high salt solution as a model precipitation process.

  3. High throughput electrophysiology: new perspectives for ion channel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willumsen, Niels J; Bech, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Jensen, Bo Skaaning; Korsgaard, Mads P G; Christophersen, Palle

    2003-01-01

    Proper function of ion channels is crucial for all living cells. Ion channel dysfunction may lead to a number of diseases, so-called channelopathies, and a number of common diseases, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, and type II diabetes, are primarily treated by drugs that modulate ion channels. A cornerstone in current drug discovery is high throughput screening assays which allow examination of the activity of specific ion channels though only to a limited extent. Conventional patch clamp remains the sole technique with sufficiently high time resolution and sensitivity required for precise and direct characterization of ion channel properties. However, patch clamp is a slow, labor-intensive, and thus expensive, technique. New techniques combining the reliability and high information content of patch clamping with the virtues of high throughput philosophy are emerging and predicted to make a number of ion channel targets accessible for drug screening. Specifically, genuine HTS parallel processing techniques based on arrays of planar silicon chips are being developed, but also lower throughput sequential techniques may be of value in compound screening, lead optimization, and safety screening. The introduction of new powerful HTS electrophysiological techniques is predicted to cause a revolution in ion channel drug discovery.

  4. Compression of structured high-throughput sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Campagne

    Full Text Available Large biological datasets are being produced at a rapid pace and create substantial storage challenges, particularly in the domain of high-throughput sequencing (HTS. Most approaches currently used to store HTS data are either unable to quickly adapt to the requirements of new sequencing or analysis methods (because they do not support schema evolution, or fail to provide state of the art compression of the datasets. We have devised new approaches to store HTS data that support seamless data schema evolution and compress datasets substantially better than existing approaches. Building on these new approaches, we discuss and demonstrate how a multi-tier data organization can dramatically reduce the storage, computational and network burden of collecting, analyzing, and archiving large sequencing datasets. For instance, we show that spliced RNA-Seq alignments can be stored in less than 4% the size of a BAM file with perfect data fidelity. Compared to the previous compression state of the art, these methods reduce dataset size more than 40% when storing exome, gene expression or DNA methylation datasets. The approaches have been integrated in a comprehensive suite of software tools (http://goby.campagnelab.org that support common analyses for a range of high-throughput sequencing assays.

  5. Preliminary High-Throughput Metagenome Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusheyko, Serge; Furman, Craig; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank

    2007-03-26

    Metagenome data sets present a qualitatively different assembly problem than traditional single-organism whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The unique aspects of such projects include the presence of a potentially large number of distinct organisms and their representation in the data set at widely different fractions. In addition, multiple closely related strains could be present, which would be difficult to assemble separately. Failure to take these issues into account can result in poor assemblies that either jumble together different strains or which fail to yield useful results. The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced a number of metagenomic projects and plans to considerably increase this number in the coming year. As a result, the JGI has a need for high-throughput tools and techniques for handling metagenome projects. We present the techniques developed to handle metagenome assemblies in a high-throughput environment. This includes a streamlined assembly wrapper, based on the JGI?s in-house WGS assembler, Jazz. It also includes the selection of sensible defaults targeted for metagenome data sets, as well as quality control automation for cleaning up the raw results. While analysis is ongoing, we will discuss preliminary assessments of the quality of the assembly results (http://fames.jgi-psf.org).

  6. Comparison of Microscopy, Nested-PCR, and Real-Time-PCR Assays Using High-Throughput Screening of Pooled Samples for Diagnosis of Malaria in Asymptomatic Carriers from Areas of Endemicity in Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Han, Soe-Soe; Cho, Cho; Han, Jin-Hee; Cheng, Yang; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Galappaththy, Gawrie N. L; Thimasarn, Krongthong; Soe, Myat Thu; Oo, Htet Wai; Kyaw, Myat Phone

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic infection is an important obstacle for controlling disease in countries where malaria is endemic. Because asymptomatic carriers do not seek treatment for their infections, they can have high levels of gametocytes and constitute a reservoir available for new infection. We employed a sample pooling/PCR-based molecular detection strategy for screening malaria infection in residents from areas of Myanmar where malaria is endemic. Blood samples (n = 1,552) were collected from residents in three areas of malaria endemicity (Kayin State, Bago, and Tanintharyi regions) of Myanmar. Two nested PCR and real-time PCR assays showed that asymptomatic infection was detected in about 1.0% to 9.4% of residents from the surveyed areas. The sensitivities of the two nested PCR and real-time PCR techniques were higher than that of microscopy examination (sensitivity, 100% versus 26.4%; kappa values, 0.2 to 0.5). Among the three regions, parasite-positive samples were highly detected in subjects from the Bago and Tanintharyi regions. Active surveillance of residents from regions of intense malaria transmission would reduce the risk of morbidity and mitigate transmission to the population in these areas of endemicity. Our data demonstrate that PCR-based molecular techniques are more efficient than microscopy for nationwide surveillance of malaria in countries where malaria is endemic. PMID:24648557

  7. A novel imaging-based high-throughput screening approach to anti-angiogenic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evensen, Lasse; Micklem, David R; Link, Wolfgang; Lorens, James B

    2010-01-01

    The successful progression to the clinic of angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer treatment has spurred interest in developing new classes of anti-angiogenic compounds. The resulting surge in available candidate therapeutics highlights the need for robust, high-throughput angiogenesis screening systems that adequately capture the complexity of new vessel formation while providing quantitative evaluation of the potency of these agents. Available in vitro angiogenesis assays are either cumbersome, impeding adaptation to high-throughput screening formats, or inadequately model the complex multistep process of new vessel formation. We therefore developed an organotypic endothelial-mural cell co-culture assay system that reflects several facets of angiogenesis while remaining compatible with high-throughput/high-content image screening. Co-culture of primary human endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) results in assembly of a network of tubular endothelial structures enveloped with vascular basement membrane proteins, thus, comprising the three main components of blood vessels. Initially, EC are dependent on vSMC-derived VEGF and sensitive to clinical anti-angiogenic therapeutics. A subsequent phenotypic VEGF-switch renders EC networks resistant to anti-VEGF therapeutics, demarcating a mature vascular phenotype. Conversely, mature EC networks remain sensitive to vascular disrupting agents. Therefore, candidate anti-angiogenic compounds can be interrogated for their relative potency on immature and mature networks and classified as either vascular normalizing or vascular disrupting agents. Here, we demonstrate that the EC-vSMC co-culture assay represents a robust high-content imaging high-throughput screening system for identification of novel anti-angiogenic agents. A pilot high-throughput screening campaign was used to define informative imaging parameters and develop a follow-up dose-response scheme for hit characterization. High-throughput

  8. Development of a neutralization assay for Nipah virus using pseudotype particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamin, Azaibi; Harcourt, Brian H; Lo, Michael K; Roth, James A; Wolf, Mike C; Lee, Benhur; Weingartl, Hana; Audonnet, Jean-Christophe; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2009-09-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are zoonotic paramyxoviruses capable of causing severe disease in humans and animals. These viruses require biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment. Like other paramyxoviruses, the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) can be used to detect antibodies to the surface glycoproteins, fusion (F) and attachment (G), and PRNT titers give an indication of protective immunity. Unfortunately, for NiV and HeV, the PRNT must be performed in BSL-4 containment and takes several days to complete. Thus, we have developed a neutralization assay using VSV pseudotype particles expressing the F and G proteins of NiV (pVSV-NiV-F/G) as target antigens. This rapid assay, which can be performed at BSL-2, was evaluated using serum samples from outbreak investigations and more than 300 serum samples from an experimental NiV vaccination study in swine. The results of the neutralization assays with pVSV-NiV-F/G as antigen showed a good correlation with those of standard PRNT. Therefore, this new method has the potential to be a rapid and cost-effective diagnostic method, especially in locations that lack high containment facilities, and will provide a valuable tool for basic research and vaccine development.

  9. A high-throughput neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, Anton; Noakes, Terry; Bartsch, Friedl; Bertinshaw, Joel; Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica; Nateghi, Ebrahim; Raeside, Tyler; Yethiraj, Mohana; Danilkin, Sergey; Kearley, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    A cross-disciplinary high-throughput neutron spectrometer is currently under construction at OPAL, ANSTO's open pool light-water research reactor. The spectrometer is based on the design of a Be-filter spectrometer (FANS) that is operating at the National Institute of Standards research reactor in the USA. The ANSTO filter-spectrometer will be switched in and out with another neutron spectrometer, the triple-axis spectrometer, Taipan. Thus two distinct types of neutron spectrometers will be accessible: one specialised to perform phonon dispersion analysis and the other, the filter-spectrometer, designed specifically to measure vibrational density of states. A summary of the design will be given along with a detailed ray-tracing analysis. Some preliminary results will be presented from the spectrometer.

  10. Applications of High Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, Johannes Eichler

    The recent advent of high throughput sequencing of nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) has vastly expanded research into the functional and structural biology of the genome of all living organisms (and even a few dead ones). With this enormous and exponential growth in biological data generation come......-sequencing, a study of the effects on alternative RNA splicing of KO of the nonsense mediated RNA decay system in Mus, using digital gene expression and a custom-built exon-exon junction mapping pipeline is presented (article I). Evolved from this work, a Bioconductor package, spliceR, for classifying alternative...... splicing events and coding potential of isoforms from full isoform deconvolution software, such as Cufflinks (article II), is presented. Finally, a study using 5’-end RNA-seq for alternative promoter detection between healthy patients and patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia is presented (article III...

  11. High-throughput Identification of Phage-derived Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of phage-displayed peptide libraries is a powerful method for selecting peptides with desired binding properties. However, the validation and prioritization of “hits” obtained from this screening approach remains challenging. Here, we describe the development and testing of a new analysis method to identify and display hits from phage-display experiments and high-throughput enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay screens. We test the method using a phage screen against activated macrophages to develop imaging agents with higher specificity for active disease processes. The new methodology should be useful in identifying phage hits and is extendable to other library screening methods such as small-molecule and nanoparticle libraries.

  12. High-throughput methods for electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, David L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Gonen, Tamir; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a tremendously important role in cell physiology and serve as a target for an increasing number of drugs. Structural information is key to understanding their function and for developing new strategies for combating disease. However, the complex physical chemistry associated with membrane proteins has made them more difficult to study than their soluble cousins. Electron crystallography has historically been a successful method for solving membrane protein structures and has the advantage of providing a native lipid environment for these proteins. Specifically, when membrane proteins form two-dimensional arrays within a lipid bilayer, electron microscopy can be used to collect images and diffraction and the corresponding data can be combined to produce a three-dimensional reconstruction, which under favorable conditions can extend to atomic resolution. Like X-ray crystallography, the quality of the structures are very much dependent on the order and size of the crystals. However, unlike X-ray crystallography, high-throughput methods for screening crystallization trials for electron crystallography are not in general use. In this chapter, we describe two alternative methods for high-throughput screening of membrane protein crystallization within the lipid bilayer. The first method relies on the conventional use of dialysis for removing detergent and thus reconstituting the bilayer; an array of dialysis wells in the standard 96-well format allows the use of a liquid-handling robot and greatly increases throughput. The second method relies on titration of cyclodextrin as a chelating agent for detergent; a specialized pipetting robot has been designed not only to add cyclodextrin in a systematic way, but to use light scattering to monitor the reconstitution process. In addition, the use of liquid-handling robots for making negatively stained grids and methods for automatically imaging samples in the electron microscope are described.

  13. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function.

  14. A practical fluorogenic substrate for high-throughput screening of glutathione S-transferase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Morisaki, Fumika; Ogura, Asami; Morohashi, Kana; Enya, Sora; Niwa, Ryusuke; Goto, Shinji; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Inoue, Hideshi

    2015-07-21

    We report a new fluorogenic substrate for glutathione S-transferase (GST), 3,4-DNADCF, enabling the assay with a low level of nonenzymatic background reaction. Inhibitors against Noppera-bo/GSTe14 from Drosophila melanogaster were identified by high throughput screening using 3,4-DNADCF, demonstrating the utility of this substrate.

  15. High throughput screening of physicochemical properties and in vitro ADME profiling in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hong; Holmén, Anders G

    2009-03-01

    Current advances of new technologies with robotic automated assays combined with highly selective and sensitive LC-MS enable high-speed screening of lead series libraries in many in vitro assays. In this review, we summarize state of the art high throughput assays for screening of key physicochemical properties such as solubility, lipophilicity, pKa, drug-plasma protein binding and brain tissue binding as well as in vitro ADME profiling. We discuss two primary approaches for high throughput screening of solubility, i.e. an automated 96-well plate assay integrated with LC-MS and a rapid multi-wavelength UV plate reader. We address the advantages of newly developed miniaturized techniques for high throughput pKa screening by capillary electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry (CE-MS) with automated data analysis flow. Several new lipophilicity approaches other than octanol-water partitioning are critically reviewed, including rapid liquid chromatographic retention based approach, immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) partitioning and liposome, and potential microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) for accurate screening of LogP. We highlight the sample pooling (namely cassette dosing, all-in-one, cocktail) as an efficient approach for high throughput screening of physicochemical properties and in vitro ADME profiling with emphasis on the benefit of on-line quality control. This cassette dosing approach has been widely adapted in drug discovery for rapid screening of in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters with significantly increased capacity and dramatically reduced animal usage.

  16. Reporter gene assay for the quantification of the activity and neutralizing antibody response to TNFα antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemand, Christophe; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Steenholdt, Casper;

    2011-01-01

    relative to Renilla luciferase expression. Thus, results are independent of cell number or differences in cell viability, resulting in intra and inter assay coefficients of variation of 10% or less. Normalization of results relative to the expression of an internal standard also provides a means......A cell-based assay has been developed for the quantification of the activity of TNFa antagonists based on human erythroleukemic K562 cells transfected with a NF¿B regulated firefly luciferase reporter-gene construct. Both drug activity and anti-drug neutralizing antibodies can be quantified...... with a high degree of precision within 2h, and without interference from cytokines and other factors known to activate NF¿B. The assay cells also contain the Renilla luciferase reporter gene under the control of a constitutive promoter that allows TNFa-induced firefly luciferase activity to be normalized...

  17. Reporter gene assay for the quantification of the activity and neutralizing antibody response to TNFα antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemand, Christophe; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Steenholdt, Casper;

    2011-01-01

    relative to Renilla luciferase expression. Thus, results are independent of cell number or differences in cell viability, resulting in intra and inter assay coefficients of variation of 10% or less. Normalization of results relative to the expression of an internal standard also provides a means......A cell-based assay has been developed for the quantification of the activity of TNFα antagonists based on human erythroleukemic K562 cells transfected with a NFκB regulated firefly luciferase reporter-gene construct. Both drug activity and anti-drug neutralizing antibodies can be quantified...... with a high degree of precision within 2h, and without interference from cytokines and other factors known to activate NFκB. The assay cells also contain the Renilla luciferase reporter gene under the control of a constitutive promoter that allows TNFα-induced firefly luciferase activity to be normalized...

  18. A Functional High-Throughput Assay of Myelination in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Myelination in Vitro PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Moore, Michael J. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Tulane University...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect

  19. A Functional High-Throughput Assay of Myelination in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    commercial neural induction medium (life Technologies, Inc.) produced embryoid bodies (EBs), which were passaged at different frequencies to...Cultivation of neurons derived from human iPS cells. A) Typical embryoid bodies. B) Mixed population of cells not showing neuronal morphology (top

  20. Development and application of fluorescence polarization assay for high throughput screening of geldanamycin-Hsp90α binding%荧光偏振法建立格尔德霉素-Hsp90α结合高通量筛选模型及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董飚; 陶佩珍; 李艳萍; 李玉环

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To establish a high throughput screening, fluorescence polarization assay of binding between Hsp90α and geldanamycin, to identify novel geldanamycin derivatives. Methods: The assay was based on the fluorescence polarization theory by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled geldanamycin (GA) for binding to Hsp90α in homogeneous solution. Affinity of novel geldanamycin derivatives for Hsp90α was measured by competitive assay. Results:The fluorescence polarization assay for Hsp90 using a fluorescent GA ligand was successfully established, of which Z factor value reached 0. 641. Among the measured geldanamycin derivative samples, GA-APML and GA-AEPD caused inhibition effects on the binding of GA-Hsp90α with IC50 of 82.98 and 90. 06 nmol·L-1, respectively. Conclusion: The fluorescence polarization assay for GA-Hsp binding basically meets the standard required by high throughput screening experiments. The designed geldanamycin derivatives still have same affinity to Hsp90α as the geldanamycin itself, which shows it is feasible to modify the structure of geldanamycin at these sites.%目的:建立格尔德霉素(geldanamycin,GA)-Hsp90α结合高通量荧光偏振法筛选模型及应用此模型探查新的格尔德霉素衍生物.方法:本模型利用荧光偏振原理,在均相溶液中,以异硫氰酸荧光素(FITC)标记的格尔德霉素作为配基,与Hsp90α蛋白作用,采用荧光仪检测荧光偏振值.以竞争性结合方式评价新格尔德霉素衍生物对Hsp90α的亲和力,以期找出更好的格尔德霉素衍生物.结果:成功建立了荧光偏振原理的格尔德霉素-Hsp90α结合模型,其Z因子可达0.641.所测试的格尔德霉素衍生物样品中,GA-APML和GA-AEPD抑制GA-Hsp90α结合的IC50分别为82.98和90.06 nmol·L-1.结论:建立的格尔德霉素-Hsp90α结合荧光偏振法模型基本达到进行高通量实验所需的标准.所设计格尔德霉素衍生物仍具备与格尔德霉素相同的对Hsp90

  1. High-throughput imaging: Focusing in on drug discovery in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linfeng; Zhou, Qiong; Voss, Ty C; Quick, Kevin L; LaBarbera, Daniel V

    2016-03-01

    3D organotypic culture models such as organoids and multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are becoming more widely used for drug discovery and toxicology screening. As a result, 3D culture technologies adapted for high-throughput screening formats are prevalent. While a multitude of assays have been reported and validated for high-throughput imaging (HTI) and high-content screening (HCS) for novel drug discovery and toxicology, limited HTI/HCS with large compound libraries have been reported. Nonetheless, 3D HTI instrumentation technology is advancing and this technology is now on the verge of allowing for 3D HCS of thousands of samples. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art high-throughput imaging systems, including hardware and software, and recent literature examples of 3D organotypic culture models employing this technology for drug discovery and toxicology screening.

  2. High-throughput microcavitation bubble induced cellular mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Jonathan Lee

    inhibitor to IP 3 induced Ca2+ release. This capability opens the development of a high-throughput screening platform for molecules that modulate cellular mechanotransduction. We have applied this approach to screen the effects of a small set of small molecules, in a 96-well plate in less than an hour. These detailed studies offer a basis for the design, development, and implementation of a novel high-throughput mechanotransduction assay to rapidly screen the effect of small molecules on cellular mechanotransduction at high throughput.

  3. High-throughput mass spectrometric cytochrome P450 inhibition screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kheng B; Ozbal, Can C; Kassel, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a high-throughput assay to support rapid evaluation of drug discovery compounds for possible drug-drug interaction (DDI). Each compound is evaluated for its DDI potential by incubating over a range of eight concentrations and against a panel of six cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes: 1A2, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4. The method utilizes automated liquid handling for sample preparation, and online solid-phase extraction/tandem mass spectrometry (SPE/MS/MS) for sample analyses. The system is capable of generating two 96-well assay plates in 30 min, and completes the data acquisition and analysis of both plates in about 30 min. Many laboratories that perform the CYP inhibition screening automate only part of the processes leaving a throughput bottleneck within the workflow. The protocols described in this chapter are aimed to streamline the entire process from assay to data acquisition and processing by incorporating automation and utilizing high-precision instrument to maximize throughput and minimize bottleneck.

  4. High throughput screening for drug discovery of autophagy modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chih-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionally conserved process in cells for cleaning abnormal proteins and organelles in a lysosome dependent manner. Growing studies have shown that defects or induced autophagy contributes to many diseases including aging, neurodegeneration, pathogen infection, and cancer. However, the precise involvement of autophagy in health and disease remains controversial because the theories are built on limited assays and chemical modulators, indicating that the role of autophagy in diseases may require further verification. Many food and drug administration (FDA) approved drugs modulate autophagy signaling, suggesting that modulation of autophagy with pharmacological agonists or antagonists provides a potential therapy for autophagy-related diseases. This suggestion raises an attractive issue on drug discovery for exploring chemical modulators of autophagy. High throughput screening (HTS) is becoming a powerful tool for drug discovery that may accelerate screening specific autophagy modulators to clarify the role of autophagy in diseases. Herein, this review lays out current autophagy assays to specifically measure autophagy components such as LC3 (mammalian homologue of yeast Atg8) and Atg4. These assays are feasible or successful for HTS with certain chemical libraries, which might be informative for this intensively growing field as research tools and hopefully developing new drugs for autophagy-related diseases.

  5. Development of Neutralization Assay Using an eGFP Chikungunya Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Lin Deng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, a member of the Alphavirus genus, is an important human emerging/re-emerging pathogen. Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs or vaccines against CHIKV infection. Herein, we construct an infectious clone of CHIKV and an eGFP reporter CHIKV (eGFP-CHIKV with an isolated strain (assigned to Asian lineage from CHIKV-infected patients. The eGFP-CHIKV reporter virus allows for direct visualization of viral replication through the levels of eGFP expression. Using a known CHIKV inhibitor, ribavirin, we confirmed that the eGFP-CHIKV reporter virus could be used to identify inhibitors against CHIKV. Importantly, we developed a novel and reliable eGFP-CHIKV reporter virus-based neutralization assay that could be used for rapid screening neutralizing antibodies against CHIKV.

  6. A robust robotic high-throughput antibody purification platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter M; Abdo, Michael; Butcher, Rebecca E; Yap, Min-Yin; Scotney, Pierre D; Ramunno, Melanie L; Martin-Roussety, Genevieve; Owczarek, Catherine; Hardy, Matthew P; Chen, Chao-Guang; Fabri, Louis J

    2016-07-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become the fastest growing segment in the drug market with annual sales of more than 40 billion US$ in 2013. The selection of lead candidate molecules involves the generation of large repertoires of antibodies from which to choose a final therapeutic candidate. Improvements in the ability to rapidly produce and purify many antibodies in sufficient quantities reduces the lead time for selection which ultimately impacts on the speed with which an antibody may transition through the research stage and into product development. Miniaturization and automation of chromatography using micro columns (RoboColumns(®) from Atoll GmbH) coupled to an automated liquid handling instrument (ALH; Freedom EVO(®) from Tecan) has been a successful approach to establish high throughput process development platforms. Recent advances in transient gene expression (TGE) using the high-titre Expi293F™ system have enabled recombinant mAb titres of greater than 500mg/L. These relatively high protein titres reduce the volume required to generate several milligrams of individual antibodies for initial biochemical and biological downstream assays, making TGE in the Expi293F™ system ideally suited to high throughput chromatography on an ALH. The present publication describes a novel platform for purifying Expi293F™-expressed recombinant mAbs directly from cell-free culture supernatant on a Perkin Elmer JANUS-VariSpan ALH equipped with a plate shuttle device. The purification platform allows automated 2-step purification (Protein A-desalting/size exclusion chromatography) of several hundred mAbs per week. The new robotic method can purify mAbs with high recovery (>90%) at sub-milligram level with yields of up to 2mg from 4mL of cell-free culture supernatant.

  7. Orthogonal NGS for High Throughput Clinical Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennagiri, Niru; White, Eric J; Frieden, Alexander; Lopez, Edgardo; Lieber, Daniel S; Nikiforov, Anastasia; Ross, Tristen; Batorsky, Rebecca; Hansen, Sherry; Lip, Va; Luquette, Lovelace J; Mauceli, Evan; Margulies, David; Milos, Patrice M; Napolitano, Nichole; Nizzari, Marcia M; Yu, Timothy; Thompson, John F

    2016-04-19

    Next generation sequencing is a transformative technology for discovering and diagnosing genetic disorders. However, high-throughput sequencing remains error-prone, necessitating variant confirmation in order to meet the exacting demands of clinical diagnostic sequencing. To address this, we devised an orthogonal, dual platform approach employing complementary target capture and sequencing chemistries to improve speed and accuracy of variant calls at a genomic scale. We combined DNA selection by bait-based hybridization followed by Illumina NextSeq reversible terminator sequencing with DNA selection by amplification followed by Ion Proton semiconductor sequencing. This approach yields genomic scale orthogonal confirmation of ~95% of exome variants. Overall variant sensitivity improves as each method covers thousands of coding exons missed by the other. We conclude that orthogonal NGS offers improvements in variant calling sensitivity when two platforms are used, better specificity for variants identified on both platforms, and greatly reduces the time and expense of Sanger follow-up, thus enabling physicians to act on genomic results more quickly.

  8. High-throughput rod-induced electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Teh, Kwok Siong; Han, Zhibin; Luo, Guoxi; Shi, Chuan; Sun, Daoheng; Zhao, Jinbao; Lin, Liwei

    2016-09-01

    A high throughput electrospinning process, directly from flat polymer solution surfaces induced by a moving insulating rod, has been proposed and demonstrated. Different rods made of either phenolic resin or paper with a diameter of 1-3 cm and a resistance of about 100-500 MΩ, has been successfully utilized in the process. The rod is placed approximately 10 mm above the flat polymer solution surface with a moving speed of 0.005-0.4 m s-1 this causes the solution to generate multiple liquid jets under an applied voltage of 15-60 kV for the tip-less electrospinning process. The local electric field induced by the rod can boost electrohydrodynamic instability in order to generate Taylor cones and liquid jets. Experimentally, it is found that a large rod diameter and a small solution-to-rod distance can enhance the local electrical field to reduce the magnitude of the applied voltage. In the prototype setup with poly (ethylene oxide) polymer solution, an area of 5 cm  ×  10 cm and under an applied voltage of 60 kV, the maximum throughput of nanofibers is recorded to be approximately144 g m-2 h-1.

  9. EDITORIAL: Combinatorial and High-Throughput Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2005-01-01

    still remain in the rapid characterization of materials in a number of key technological areas. Scientists are taking on the challenges, and we can expect many more innovations in the future. We thank the authors and reviewers for their contributions. Special thanks go to Professor Peter Hauptmann for encouragement and support of this project, and to Natasha Leeper and James Dimond, for their assistance in putting this special issue together. References [1] Borman S 2002 Millennial analysis Chem Eng. News 80 (18) 49-52 [2] Chang H et al 1998 Combinatorial synthesis and high throughput evaluation of ferroelectric/dielectric thin film libraries for microwave applications Appl. Phys. Lett. 72 2185-7 [3] Kyranos J N, Lee H, Goetzinger W K and Li L Y T 2004 One-minute full-gradient HPLC/UV/ELSD/MS analysis to support high-throughput parallel synthesis J. Comb. Chem. 6 796-804 [4] Danielson E et al 1998 A rare-earth phosphor containing one-dimensional chains identified through combinatorial methods Science 279 837-9 [5] Tan D S, Foley M A, Shair M D and Schreiber S L 1998 Stereoselective synthesis of over two million compounds having structural features both reminiscent of natural products and compatible with miniaturized cell-based assays J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120 8565-6

  10. Fluorescent Approaches to High Throughput Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Achari, Aniruddha

    2006-01-01

    We have shown that by covalently modifying a subpopulation, less than or equal to 1%, of a macromolecule with a fluorescent probe, the labeled material will add to a growing crystal as a microheterogeneous growth unit. Labeling procedures can be readily incorporated into the final stages of purification, and the presence of the probe at low concentrations does not affect the X-ray data quality or the crystallization behavior. The presence of the trace fluorescent label gives a number of advantages when used with high throughput crystallizations. The covalently attached probe will concentrate in the crystal relative to the solution, and under fluorescent illumination crystals show up as bright objects against a dark background. Non-protein structures, such as salt crystals, will not incorporate the probe and will not show up under fluorescent illumination. Brightly fluorescent crystals are readily found against less bright precipitated phases, which under white light illumination may obscure the crystals. Automated image analysis to find crystals should be greatly facilitated, without having to first define crystallization drop boundaries as the protein or protein structures is all that shows up. Fluorescence intensity is a faster search parameter, whether visually or by automated methods, than looking for crystalline features. We are now testing the use of high fluorescence intensity regions, in the absence of clear crystalline features or "hits", as a means for determining potential lead conditions. A working hypothesis is that kinetics leading to non-structured phases may overwhelm and trap more slowly formed ordered assemblies, which subsequently show up as regions of brighter fluorescence intensity. Preliminary experiments with test proteins have resulted in the extraction of a number of crystallization conditions from screening outcomes based solely on the presence of bright fluorescent regions. Subsequent experiments will test this approach using a wider

  11. High-throughput screening technologies for drug glucuronidation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, Olga; Finel, Moshe; Trubetskoy, Vladimir

    2008-08-01

    A significant number of endogenous and exogenous compounds, including many therapeutic agents, are metabolized in humans via glucuronidation, catalysed by uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). The study of the UGTs is a growing field of research, with constantly accumulated and updated information regarding UGT structure, purification, substrate specificity and inhibition, including clinically relevant drug interactions. Development of reliable UGT assays for the assessment of individual isoform substrate specificity and for the discovery of novel isoform-specific substrates and inhibitors is crucial for understanding the function and regulation of the UGT enzyme family and its clinical and pharmacological relevance. High-throughput screening (HTS) is a powerful technology used to search for novel substrates and inhibitors for a wide variety of targets. However, application of HTS in the context of UGTs is complicated because of the poor stability, low levels of expression, low affinity and broad substrate specificity of the enzymes, combined with difficulties in obtaining individual UGT isoforms in purified format, and insufficient information regarding isoform-specific substrates and inhibitors. This review examines the current status of HTS assays used in the search for novel UGT substrates and inhibitors, emphasizing advancements and challenges in HTS technologies for drug glucuronidation profiling, and discusses possible avenues for future advancement of the field.

  12. A High Throughput Biochemical Fluorometric Method for Measuring Lipid Peroxidation in HDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Roberts, Christian K.; Huynh, Diana; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Currier, Judith S.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Yang, Otto O.

    2014-01-01

    Current cell-based assays for determining the functional properties of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) have limitations. We report here the development of a new, robust fluorometric cell-free biochemical assay that measures HDL lipid peroxidation (HDLox) based on the oxidation of the fluorochrome Amplex Red. HDLox correlated with previously validated cell-based (r = 0.47, pHDL in established animal models of atherosclerosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) patients. Using an immunoaffinity method for capturing HDL, we demonstrate the utility of this novel assay for measuring HDLox in a high throughput format. Furthermore, HDLox correlated significantly with measures of cardiovascular diseases including carotid intima media thickness (r = 0.35, pHDL function/quality that is suitable for high throughput implementation. PMID:25368900

  13. Human semen cryopreservation: a sperm DNA fragmentation study with alkaline and neutral Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Maynou, J; Fernández-Encinas, A; García-Peiró, A; Prada, E; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2014-01-01

    Sperm cryopreservation is widely used for both research and reproduction purposes, but its effect on sperm DNA damage remains controversial. Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) has become an important biomarker to assess male infertility. In particular, the differentiation between single- and double-stranded DNA fragmentation (ssSDF and dsSDF) has clinical implications for male infertility where ssSDF is associated with reduced fertility, whereas dsSDF is associated with increased risk of miscarriage. In this study, semen samples from 30 human males have been analysed in both fresh and cryopreserved using the alkaline and neutral Comet assays. Results show an increase of about 10% of ssSDF, assessed by the alkaline Comet assay, regardless of the male fertility status. Neutral Comet analysis of dsSDF does not show any statistical increase when comparing fresh and cryopreserved samples in any of the patient groups. Results support previous reports that oxidative stress is the major effector in DNA damage during sample cryopreservation, as, on one hand, ssSDF has previously been related to oxidative damage and, on the other hand, we have not found any effect on dsSDF. Therefore, there might be a slight risk of decreased fertility after using a freezed sample, but no evidence for increased miscarriage risk from cryopreserved spermatozoa should be expected. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  14. A high-throughput UPLC method for the characterization of chemical modifications in monoclonal antibody molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Nicole; Miller, Amanda K; Gadgil, Himanshu S

    2011-12-01

    Development of high-throughput release and characterization assays is critical for the effective support of the rapidly growing biologics pipeline for biotherapeutics. Clipping of polypeptide chains is commonly monitored during process optimization, formulation development, and stability studies. A reduced capillary electrophoresis-sodium dodecyl sulfate (rCE -SDS) method is often used as a purity release assay for monitoring clips in monoclonal antibodies (mAbs); however, it has a cycle time of approximately 40 min, which is not suited for high-throughput screening. Additionally, the characterization of clips and variants from electropherograms is not straightforward and takes significant time. Reduced reversed-phase (RP) chromatography has been a popular assay for the characterization and identification of clips and variants because it can be directly coupled with online mass spectrometric analysis. However, the high-column temperature and low pH required for RP assays can induce on-column cleavage and therefore skew the results. To minimize on-column degradation, we have developed a high-throughput method with a significantly shorter cycle time of 5 min. The short cycle time was achieved using an ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UPLC) system with a 1.7 μm phenyl column. This UPLC method allowed quantitation of hinge clipping in an IgG1 molecule and acid induced aspartic acid/proline (D/P) clip in an IgG2 molecule. The results from the UPLC method were comparable to those obtained with rCE-SDS. Additionally, the phenyl column offered partial resolution of oxidation and other chemical modifications, making this technique an attractive assay for high-throughput process characterization and formulation screens. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. 人白介素-6受体小分子拮抗剂高通量筛选模型的建立%Establishment of a novel high throughput screening assay for identifying small molecular antagonists of human interleukin-6 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎雨; 何阳阳; 张畅; 庞晓斌; 杜鹏; 孙志伟; 王双; 杜冠华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish a high throughput screening assay for identifying human small molecular antagonists targeted IL-6R.Methods The full length gene of the human IL-6R extracellular region was amplified by PCR and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector to construct recombination expression plasmid pABHis -IL6R that was then transfected transiently into HEK293T cells to prepare recombination protein IL-6R.Western blotting assay and receptor-ligand binding experiment were used to analyze the bioactivity of IL-6R.A new screening method based on ELISA was established using the function of IL-6R binding to its ligand and the characteristics of Fc fragment binding to IgG-HRP.Then Z′-factor was calculated and a known antagonist ab 47215 was used to assess the stability and reliability of the new assay .Results Recombination plasmid pABHis-IL6R was constructed and soluble IL-6R was prepared.IL-6R reported herein could be recognized by an anti-IL-6R antibody and specifically bind to its ligand in a dose response manner .A Z′-factor of 0.53 was obtained that could serve high throughput screening assay .Ab47215 , as a known specific antagonist , was able to block rhIL-6 from binding to the receptor in a dose-dependent manner in the new screening assay , the IC50 of which was (0.55 ± 0.11)μg/ml.Conclusion An innovative and easy screening assay for identifying human IL-6R antagonists is established , which might help discover potent and specific antagonists .%目的:建立新的白介素-6受体( interleukin-6 receptor, IL-6R)小分子拮抗剂高通量筛选模型。方法PCR扩增IL-6R胞外区基因,将其克隆至真核表达载体构建重组质粒pABHis-IL6R,瞬时转染HEK293T细胞进行分泌表达。利用Western 印迹实验、受体配体结合实验对表达产物进行活性验证。利用二者的相互作用以及Fc片段与酶标二抗结合的特性建立基于ELISA法的IL-6R拮抗剂筛选模型,并用Z′-因

  16. Applications of ambient mass spectrometry in high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Ping; Feng, Bao-Sheng; Yang, Jian-Wang; Chang, Cui-Lan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Hu-Wei

    2013-06-07

    The development of rapid screening and identification techniques is of great importance for drug discovery, doping control, forensic identification, food safety and quality control. Ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) allows rapid and direct analysis of various samples in open air with little sample preparation. Recently, its applications in high-throughput screening have been in rapid progress. During the past decade, various ambient ionization techniques have been developed and applied in high-throughput screening. This review discusses typical applications of AMS, including DESI (desorption electrospray ionization), DART (direct analysis in real time), EESI (extractive electrospray ionization), etc., in high-throughput screening (HTS).

  17. Optimization of Neutral Comet Assay for studying DNA double-strand breaks in pea and wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelina Nikolova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an adaptation of the Comet assay under neutral conditions for mono- and dicotyledonous plants pea (Pisum sativum L. and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Modifications concern lysis and electrophoresis steps, respectively. Electrophoresis was carried out varying the intensity of the electric field. A linear relationship between the percentages of DNA in the tail from control background with alteration of intensity was found. Trypan blue dye exclusion test was used in order to determine the intactness of nuclear membrane of the isolated nuclei from both plant model systems. Assessment was conducted on non-irradiated and irradiated nuclei on a monolayer with three doses of UVC. It was found that the share of intact nuclei (trypan blue negative ones is about 95% in controls. Gradual dose-related increase of damaged nuclei was observed in both species, reaching statistical significance only at the higher dose applied.

  18. High-throughput screening of small molecule libraries using SAMDI mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Scholle, Michael D; Eisenberg, Adam H; Mrksich, Milan

    2011-07-11

    High-throughput screening is a common strategy used to identify compounds that modulate biochemical activities, but many approaches depend on cumbersome fluorescent reporters or antibodies and often produce false-positive hits. The development of "label-free" assays addresses many of these limitations, but current approaches still lack the throughput needed for applications in drug discovery. This paper describes a high-throughput, label-free assay that combines self-assembled monolayers with mass spectrometry, in a technique called SAMDI, as a tool for screening libraries of 100,000 compounds in one day. This method is fast, has high discrimination, and is amenable to a broad range of chemical and biological applications.

  19. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T

    2010-07-27

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity.

  20. High Throughput T Epitope Mapping and Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Li Pira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mapping of antigenic peptide sequences from proteins of relevant pathogens recognized by T helper (Th and by cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL is crucial for vaccine development. In fact, mapping of T-cell epitopes provides useful information for the design of peptide-based vaccines and of peptide libraries to monitor specific cellular immunity in protected individuals, patients and vaccinees. Nevertheless, epitope mapping is a challenging task. In fact, large panels of overlapping peptides need to be tested with lymphocytes to identify the sequences that induce a T-cell response. Since numerous peptide panels from antigenic proteins are to be screened, lymphocytes available from human subjects are a limiting factor. To overcome this limitation, high throughput (HTP approaches based on miniaturization and automation of T-cell assays are needed. Here we consider the most recent applications of the HTP approach to T epitope mapping. The alternative or complementary use of in silico prediction and experimental epitope definition is discussed in the context of the recent literature. The currently used methods are described with special reference to the possibility of applying the HTP concept to make epitope mapping an easier procedure in terms of time, workload, reagents, cells and overall cost.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of high-throughput screening data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyse, Stephan

    2002-06-01

    High-Throughput Screening (HTS) data in its entirety is a valuable raw material for the drug-discovery process. It provides the most compete information about the biological activity of a company's compounds. However, its quantity, complexity and heterogeneity require novel, sophisticated approaches in data analysis. At GeneData, we are developing methods for large-scale, synoptical mining of screening data in a five-step analysis: (1) Quality Assurance: Checking data for experimental artifacts and eliminating low quality data. (2) Biological Profiling: Clustering and ranking of compounds based on their biological activity, taking into account specific characteristics of HTS data. (3) Rule-based Classification: Applying user-defined rules to biological and chemical properties, and providing hypotheses on the biological mode-of-action of compounds. (4) Joint Biological-Chemical Analysis: Associating chemical compound data to HTS data, providing hypotheses for structure- activity relationships. (5) integration with Genomic and Gene Expression Data: Linking into other components of GeneData's bioinformatics platform, and assessing the compounds' modes-of-action, toxicity, and metabolic properties. These analyses address issues that are crucial for a correct interpretation and full exploitation of screening data. They lead to a sound rating of assays and compounds at an early state of the lead-finding process.

  2. Hydrodynamic Cell Trapping for High Throughput Single-Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Abbaszadeh Banaeiyan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to conduct complete cell assays under a precisely controlled environment while consuming minor amounts of chemicals and precious drugs have made microfluidics an interesting candidate for quantitative single-cell studies. Here, we present an application-specific microfluidic device, cellcomb, capable of conducting high-throughput single-cell experiments. The system employs pure hydrodynamic forces for easy cell trapping and is readily fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS using soft lithography techniques. The cell-trapping array consists of V-shaped pockets designed to accommodate up to six Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast cells with the average diameter of 4 μm. We used this platform to monitor the impact of flow rate modulation on the arsenite (As(III uptake in yeast. Redistribution of a green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged version of the heat shock protein Hsp104 was followed over time as read out. Results showed a clear reverse correlation between the arsenite uptake and three different adjusted low = 25 nL min−1, moderate = 50 nL min−1, and high = 100 nL min−1 flow rates. We consider the presented device as the first building block of a future integrated application-specific cell-trapping array that can be used to conduct complete single cell experiments on different cell types.

  3. A high-throughput screen for antibiotic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Thomas C; Dostal, Sarah M; Griswold, Karl E

    2014-02-01

    We describe an ultra-high-throughput screening platform enabling discovery and/or engineering of natural product antibiotics. The methodology involves creation of hydrogel-in-oil emulsions in which recombinant microorganisms are co-emulsified with bacterial pathogens; antibiotic activity is assayed by use of a fluorescent viability dye. We have successfully utilized both bulk emulsification and microfluidic technology for the generation of hydrogel microdroplets that are size-compatible with conventional flow cytometry. Hydrogel droplets are ∼25 pL in volume, and can be synthesized and sorted at rates exceeding 3,000 drops/s. Using this technique, we have achieved screening throughputs exceeding 5 million clones/day. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate efficient selection of antibiotic-secreting yeast from a vast excess of negative controls. In addition, we have successfully used this technique to screen a metagenomic library for secreted antibiotics that kill the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Our results establish the practical utility of the screening platform, and we anticipate that the accessible nature of our methods will enable others seeking to identify and engineer the next generation of antibacterial biomolecules. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. High throughput screening for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Rodríguez, Ana

    2014-12-01

    The discovery of new therapeutic options against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, stands as a fundamental need. Currently, there are only two drugs available to treat this neglected disease, which represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Both available therapies, benznidazole and nifurtimox, have significant toxic side effects and their efficacy against the life-threatening symptomatic chronic stage of the disease is variable. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, improved anti-T. cruzi drugs. With the objective to reliably accelerate the drug discovery process against Chagas disease, several advances have been made in the last few years. Availability of engineered reporter gene expressing parasites triggered the development of phenotypic in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS) as well as the establishment of new in vivo protocols that allow faster experimental outcomes. Recently, automated high content microscopy approaches have also been used to identify new parasitic inhibitors. These in vitro and in vivo early drug discovery approaches, which hopefully will contribute to bring better anti-T. cruzi drug entities in the near future, are reviewed here.

  5. High-Throughput Screening Using Mass Spectrometry within Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohman, Mattias; Wingfield, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In order to detect a biochemical analyte with a mass spectrometer (MS) it is necessary to ionize the analyte of interest. The analyte can be ionized by a number of different mechanisms, however, one common method is electrospray ionization (ESI). Droplets of analyte are sprayed through a highly charged field, the droplets pick up charge, and this is transferred to the analyte. High levels of salt in the assay buffer will potentially steal charge from the analyte and suppress the MS signal. In order to avoid this suppression of signal, salt is often removed from the sample prior to injection into the MS. Traditional ESI MS relies on liquid chromatography (LC) to remove the salt and reduce matrix effects, however, this is a lengthy process. Here we describe the use of RapidFire™ coupled to a triple-quadrupole MS for high-throughput screening. This system uses solid-phase extraction to de-salt samples prior to injection, reducing processing time such that a sample is injected into the MS ~every 10 s.

  6. High throughput screening for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Alonso-Padilla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of new therapeutic options against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, stands as a fundamental need. Currently, there are only two drugs available to treat this neglected disease, which represents a major public health problem in Latin America. Both available therapies, benznidazole and nifurtimox, have significant toxic side effects and their efficacy against the life-threatening symptomatic chronic stage of the disease is variable. Thus, there is an urgent need for new, improved anti-T. cruzi drugs. With the objective to reliably accelerate the drug discovery process against Chagas disease, several advances have been made in the last few years. Availability of engineered reporter gene expressing parasites triggered the development of phenotypic in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS as well as the establishment of new in vivo protocols that allow faster experimental outcomes. Recently, automated high content microscopy approaches have also been used to identify new parasitic inhibitors. These in vitro and in vivo early drug discovery approaches, which hopefully will contribute to bring better anti-T. cruzi drug entities in the near future, are reviewed here.

  7. High throughput screening to investigate the interaction of stem cells with their extracellular microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Ankam, Soneela; Teo, Benjamin KK; Kukumberg, Marek; Yim, Evelyn KF

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells in vivo are housed within a functional microenvironment termed the “stem cell niche.” As the niche components can modulate stem cell behaviors like proliferation, migration and differentiation, evaluating these components would be important to determine the most optimal platform for their maintenance or differentiation. In this review, we have discussed methods and technologies that have aided in the development of high throughput screening assays for stem cell research, including ...

  8. A high-throughput approach to identify compounds that impair envelope integrity in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Kristin Renee; Jana, Bimal; Franzyk, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    was to develop and validate an assay for identifying compounds that increase envelope permeability, thereby conferring antimicrobial susceptibility by weakening of the cell envelope barrier in Gram-negative bacteria. A high-throughput whole-cell screening platform was developed to measure Escherichia coli......- to 125-fold) the MICs of erythromycin, fusidic acid, novobiocin and rifampin and displayed synergy (fractional inhibitory concentration index, risk multidrug-resistant, CTX-M-15-producing...

  9. Antileishmanial High-Throughput Drug Screening Reveals Drug Candidates with New Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Siqueira-Neto, Jair L; Ok-Ryul Song; Hyunrim Oh; Jeong-Hun Sohn; Gyongseon Yang; Jiyoun Nam; Jiyeon Jang; Jonathan Cechetto; Chang Bok Lee; Seunghyun Moon; Auguste Genovesio; Eric Chatelain; Thierry Christophe; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Drugs currently available for leishmaniasis treatment often show parasite resistance, highly toxic side effects and prohibitive costs commonly incompatible with patients from the tropical endemic countries. In this sense, there is an urgent need for new drugs as a treatment solution for this neglected disease. Here we show the development and implementation of an automated high-throughput viability screening assay for the discovery of new drugs against Leishmania. Assa...

  10. Detection of extensive cross-neutralization between pandemic and seasonal A/H1N1 Influenza Viruses using a pseudotype neutralization assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Labrosse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cross-immunity between seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses remains uncertain. In particular, the extent that previous infection or vaccination by seasonal A/H1N1 viruses can elicit protective immunity against pandemic A/H1N1 is unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Neutralizing titers against seasonal A/H1N1 (A/Brisbane/59/2007 and against pandemic A/H1N1 (A/California/04/2009 were measured using an HIV-1-based pseudovirus neutralization assay. Using this highly sensitive assay, we found that a large fraction of subjects who had never been exposed to pandemic A/H1N1 express high levels of pandemic A/H1N1 neutralizing titers. A significant correlation was seen between neutralization of pandemic A/H1N1 and neutralization of a standard seasonal A/H1N1 strain. Significantly higher pandemic A/H1N1 neutralizing titers were measured in subjects who had received vaccination against seasonal influenza in 2008-2009. Higher pandemic neutralizing titers were also measured in subjects over 60 years of age. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings reveal that the extent of protective cross-immunity between seasonal and pandemic A/H1N1 influenza viruses may be more important than previously estimated. This cross-immunity could provide a possible explanation of the relatively mild profile of the recent influenza pandemic.

  11. High Throughput Hall Thruster for Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Co. Inc. proposes to develop a high throughput, nominal 100 W Hall Effect Thruster (HET). This HET will be sized for small spacecraft (< 180 kg), including...

  12. High Throughput Hall Thruster for Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek is developing a high throughput nominal 100-W Hall Effect Thruster. This device is well sized for spacecraft ranging in size from several tens of kilograms to...

  13. AOPs & Biomarkers: Bridging High Throughput Screening and Regulatory Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    As high throughput screening (HTS) approaches play a larger role in toxicity testing, computational toxicology has emerged as a critical component in interpreting the large volume of data produced. Computational models for this purpose are becoming increasingly more sophisticated...

  14. HIGH THROUGHPUT OF MAP PROCESSOR USING PIPELINE WINDOW DECODING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Nithya

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Turbo codes are one of the most efficient error correcting code which approaches the Shannon limit.The high throughput in turbo decoder can be achieved by parallelizing several soft Input Soft Output(SISOunits together.In this way,multiple SISO decoders work on the same data frame at the same values and delievers soft outputs can be split into three terms like the soft channel and a priori input and the extrinsic value.The extrinsic value is used for the next iteration.The high throughput of Max-Log-MAP processor tha supports both single Binary(SBand Double-binary(DB convolutional turbo codes.Decoding of these codes however an iterative processing is requires high computation rate and latency.Thus in order to achieve high throughput and to reduce latency by using serial processing techniques.The pipeline window(PWdecoding is introduced to support arbitrary frame sizes with high throughput.

  15. MIPHENO: Data normalization for high throughput metabolic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    High throughput methodologies such as microarrays, mass spectrometry and plate-based small molecule screens are increasingly used to facilitate discoveries from gene function to drug candidate identification. These large-scale experiments are typically carried out over the course...

  16. Data from Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — High-throughput screening for potential thyroid-disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge...

  17. FLASH Assembly of TALENs Enables High-Throughput Genome Editing

    OpenAIRE

    Reyon, Deepak; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A.; Sander, Jeffry D.; Joung, J. Keith

    2012-01-01

    Engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have shown promise as facile and broadly applicable genome editing tools. However, no publicly available high-throughput method for constructing TALENs has been published and large-scale assessments of the success rate and targeting range of the technology remain lacking. Here we describe the Fast Ligation-based Automatable Solid-phase High-throughput (FLASH) platform, a rapid and cost-effective method we developed to enable ...

  18. Inferential literacy for experimental high-throughput biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Mathieu; Nadon, Robert

    2006-02-01

    Many biologists believe that data analysis expertise lags behind the capacity for producing high-throughput data. One view within the bioinformatics community is that biological scientists need to develop algorithmic skills to meet the demands of the new technologies. In this article, we argue that the broader concept of inferential literacy, which includes understanding of data characteristics, experimental design and statistical analysis, in addition to computation, more adequately encompasses what is needed for efficient progress in high-throughput biology.

  19. Virtual high throughput screening (vHTS) - A perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, Sangeetha; Mehrotra, Monica; Gupta, Dinesh,

    2008-01-01

    With the exponential rise in the number of viable novel drug targets, computational methods are being increasingly applied to accelerate the drug discovery process. Virtual High Throughput Screening (vHTS) is one such established methodology to identify drug candidates from large collection of compound libraries. Although it complements the expensive and time consuming High Throughput Screening (HTS) of compound libraries, vHTS possess inherent challenges. The successful vHTS requires the car...

  20. C. elegans in high-throughput drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    O’Reilly, Linda P.; Cliff J Luke; Perlmutter, David H.; Silverman, Gary A.; Pak, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    C. elegans has proven to be a useful model organism for investigating molecular and cellular aspects of numerous human diseases. More recently, investigators have explored the use of this organism as a tool for drug discovery. Although earlier drug screens were labor-intensive and low in throughput, recent advances in high-throughput liquid workflows, imaging platforms and data analysis software have made C. elegans a viable option for automated high-throughput drug screens. This review will ...

  1. 基于报告基因技术的MDR1转录抑制剂高通量筛选模型的建立和应用%Development and application of high throughput report gene assay for MDR1 transcriptional inhibitor screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎廷元; 晏菊芳; 胡昌华

    2011-01-01

    MDR1, also known as ABCB1 (ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1), is a recognized target for cancer multidrug resistance. To identify novel transcriptional inhibitor of MDR1, we developed a high throughput reporter gene assay that utilizes -434-+158 region of MDR1 promoter to drive luciferase expression in HepG2 cells. A total of 480 extracts from Traditional Chinese Medicine were screened. Two extracts, Lesser Galangal Rhizome extract(EC50: 16.37 mg L-1) and Fructus Galangae extract (EC50: 14.96 mg L-1), have shown stable transcriptional inhibitory effects of MDR1 gene. RT-PCR was conducted to identify the activity of positive extracts.%MDR1基因是引起肿瘤多药耐药的主要基因,其编码的P-gp蛋白可持续将药物由胞内排出胞外以降低胞内药物浓度导致多药耐药,MDR1基因的转录抑制剂可抑制MDR1基因在癌细胞中的表达,从而逆转肿瘤多药耐药.通过克隆MDR1基因的启动子,将其插入pGL3-basic质粒构建MDR1-luc+报告基因载体,再将重组载体转染入HepG2肝癌细胞并筛选单克隆细胞株,构建了MDR1启动子的高通量筛选模型,Z’因子为0.75;通过对中药样品库的筛选,得到两种中药提取物高良姜水提物、红豆蔻醇提物有明显耐药逆转效果,EC50值分别为高良姜水提物16.37 mg L-1和红豆蔻醇提物14.96 mg L-1,RT-PCR验证上述两种阳性样品具有明显的抑制MDR1基因表达的作用.以上结果为MDR1基因的转录抑制剂高通量筛选奠定了基础.

  2. Comparison of competitive ligand-binding assay and bioassay formats for the measurement of neutralizing antibodies to protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, Deborah; Baltrukonis, Daniel; Clements-Egan, Adrienne; Delaria, Kathy; Gunn, George R; Lowe, John; Maia, Mauricio; Wong, Teresa

    2011-01-25

    Administration of biological therapeutic proteins can lead to unwanted immunogenicity in recipients of these products. The assessment and characterization of such immune reactions can be helpful to better understand their clinical relevance and how they relate to patient safety and therefore, have become an integral part of a product development program for biological therapeutics. Testing for anti-drug antibodies (ADA) to biological/biotechnology-derived therapeutic proteins generally follows a tiered approach. Samples are initially screened for binding antibodies; presumptive positives are then confirmed in a confirmatory assay; subsequently, confirmed-positive samples may be further characterized by titration and with a neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay. Regulatory guidances on immunogenicity state that assessing the neutralizing capacity of antibodies should preferably be done using functional bioassays, while recognizing that competitive ligand-binding (CLB) assays may be substituted when neutralizing bioassays are inadequate or not feasible. This manuscript describes case studies from four companies in which CLB assays and functional bioassays were compared for their ability to detect neutralizing ADA against a variety of biotechnology-derived therapeutic proteins. Our findings indicate that CLB assays are comparable to bioassays for the detection of NAbs, in some cases offering better detection sensitivity, lower variability, and less matrix interference.

  3. High-throughput screening and rapid inhibitor triage using an infectious chimeric Hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichroski, Michael J; Fang, Jie; Eggers, Betsy J; Rose, Ronald E; Mazzucco, Charles E; Pokornowski, Kevin A; Baldick, Carl J; Anthony, Monique N; Dowling, Craig J; Barber, Lauren E; Leet, John E; Beno, Brett R; Gerritz, Samuel W; Agler, Michele L; Cockett, Mark I; Tenney, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of a Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infectious virus cell culture model system has facilitated the development of whole-virus screening assays which can be used to interrogate the entire virus life cycle. Here, we describe the development of an HCV growth assay capable of identifying inhibitors against all stages of the virus life cycle with assay throughput suitable for rapid screening of large-scale chemical libraries. Novel features include, 1) the use of an efficiently-spreading, full-length, intergenotypic chimeric reporter virus with genotype 1 structural proteins, 2) a homogenous assay format compatible with miniaturization and automated liquid-handling, and 3) flexible assay end-points using either chemiluminescence (high-throughput screening) or Cellomics ArrayScan™ technology (high-content screening). The assay was validated using known HCV antivirals and through a large-scale, high-throughput screening campaign that identified novel and selective entry, replication and late-stage inhibitors. Selection and characterization of resistant viruses provided information regarding inhibitor target and mechanism. Leveraging results from this robust whole-virus assay represents a critical first step towards identifying inhibitors of novel targets to broaden the spectrum of antivirals for the treatment of HCV.

  4. Acoustic Droplet Ejection Applications for High-Throughput Screening of Infectious Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, James R

    2016-02-01

    When acoustic droplet ejection technology was first introduced for high-throughput applications, it was used primarily for dispensing compounds dissolved in DMSO. The high precision and accuracy achieved for low-volume transfers in this application were noted by those working outside of the compound management area, and interest was generated in expanding the scope of the technology to include other liquid types. Later-generation instruments included calibrations for several aqueous buffers that were applicable to the life sciences. The High Throughput Screening Center at Southern Research has made use of this range of liquid calibrations for the Infectious Disease Program. The original calibration for DMSO has allowed the preparation of assay-ready plates that can be sent to remote locations. This process was used as part of the collaboration between Southern Research and Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, to develop high-throughput screening for biological safety level 4 containment and to provide compounds for two pilot screens that were run there with BSL-4-level pathogens. The aqueous calibrations have been instrumental in miniaturizing assays used for infectious disease, such as qPCR, tissue culture infectious dose 50, and bacterial motility, to make them compatible with HTS operations.

  5. Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzes, Eric; Medkova, Martina; Savenelli, Neal; Marran, Dave; Twardowski, Mariusz; Hutchison, J Brian; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Link, Darren R; Perrimon, Norbert; Samuels, Michael L

    2009-08-25

    We present a droplet-based microfluidic technology that enables high-throughput screening of single mammalian cells. This integrated platform allows for the encapsulation of single cells and reagents in independent aqueous microdroplets (1 pL to 10 nL volumes) dispersed in an immiscible carrier oil and enables the digital manipulation of these reactors at a very high-throughput. Here, we validate a full droplet screening workflow by conducting a droplet-based cytotoxicity screen. To perform this screen, we first developed a droplet viability assay that permits the quantitative scoring of cell viability and growth within intact droplets. Next, we demonstrated the high viability of encapsulated human monocytic U937 cells over a period of 4 days. Finally, we developed an optically-coded droplet library enabling the identification of the droplets composition during the assay read-out. Using the integrated droplet technology, we screened a drug library for its cytotoxic effect against U937 cells. Taken together our droplet microfluidic platform is modular, robust, uses no moving parts, and has a wide range of potential applications including high-throughput single-cell analyses, combinatorial screening, and facilitating small sample analyses.

  6. Adaptation and validation of DNA synthesis detection by fluorescent dye derivatization for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranall, Max V; Gabrielli, Brian G; Gonda, Thomas J

    2010-05-01

    Cellular proliferation is fundamental to organism development, tissue renewal, and diverse disease states such as cancer. In vitro measurement of proliferation by high-throughput screening allows rapid characterization of the effects of small-molecule or genetic treatments on primary and established cell lines. Current assays that directly measure the cell cycle are not amenable to high-throughput processing and analysis. Here we report the adaptation of the chemical method for detecting DNA synthesis by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation into both high-throughput liquid handling and high-content imaging analysis. We demonstrate that chemical detection of EdU incorporation is effective for high-resolution analysis and quantitation of DNA synthesis by high-content imaging. To validate this assay platform we used treatments of MCF10A cells with media supplements and pharmacological inhibitors that are known to affect cell proliferation. Treatments with specific kinase inhibitors indicate that EGF and serum stimulation employs both the mitogen extracellular kinase (MEK)/extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling networks. As described here, this method is fast, reliable, and inexpensive and yields robust data that can be easily interpreted.

  7. High-throughput gene expression profiling of memory differentiation in primary human T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Kate

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differentiation of naive T and B cells into memory lymphocytes is essential for immunity to pathogens. Therapeutic manipulation of this cellular differentiation program could improve vaccine efficacy and the in vitro expansion of memory cells. However, chemical screens to identify compounds that induce memory differentiation have been limited by 1 the lack of reporter-gene or functional assays that can distinguish naive and memory-phenotype T cells at high throughput and 2 a suitable cell-line representative of naive T cells. Results Here, we describe a method for gene-expression based screening that allows primary naive and memory-phenotype lymphocytes to be discriminated based on complex genes signatures corresponding to these differentiation states. We used ligation-mediated amplification and a fluorescent, bead-based detection system to quantify simultaneously 55 transcripts representing naive and memory-phenotype signatures in purified populations of human T cells. The use of a multi-gene panel allowed better resolution than any constituent single gene. The method was precise, correlated well with Affymetrix microarray data, and could be easily scaled up for high-throughput. Conclusion This method provides a generic solution for high-throughput differentiation screens in primary human T cells where no single-gene or functional assay is available. This screening platform will allow the identification of small molecules, genes or soluble factors that direct memory differentiation in naive human lymphocytes.

  8. Package of NDV-pseudotyped HIV-Luc virus and its application in the neutralization assay for NDV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Bin; Liu, Peixin; Li, Tao; Si, Wei; Xiu, Jinsheng; Liu, Henggui

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is a member of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily and can infect most species of birds. It has been a great threat for the poultry industry all around the world. In this report, we successfully produced infectious pseudotyped pNL4-3-Luc-R(-)E(-) (HIV-Luc) viruses with the HN and F envelope proteins of NDV. Further investigation revealed the cytoplasmic domains of HN and F, especially HN, plays a significant role in the infection efficiency of these pseudotyped HIV-Luc viruses. Replacement of, or direct fusion to the cytoplasmic domain of the HN protein by that of vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) could greatly enhance or destroy the infective potential of HN and F-pseudotyped (NDV-pseudotyped) HIV-Luc virus. We further established a novel neutralization assay to evaluate neutralizing antibodies against NDV with the NDV-pseudotyped HIV-Luc viruses. Comparative neutralization data indicate that the results determined by using the NDV-pseudotyped HIV-Luc viruses are as reliable as those by the conventional virus-neutralization assay (VN test) with native NDV. Moreover, the results show that the novel neutralization assay is more sensitive than the VN test.

  9. Radiometric cytolysis inhibition assay, a new rapid test for neutralizing antibodies to intact and trypsin-cleaved poliovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovi, T.; Roivainen, M.

    1989-04-01

    We have developed a new rapid test, the radiometric cytolysis inhibition assay (RACINA), for the determination of neutralizing poliovirus antibodies. HeLa cells prelabeled with /sup 51/Cr, (/sup 3/H)leucine, or, preferentially, with (/sup 3/H)uridine are used as sensitive quantitative indicators of residual infectious virus. Both suspensions and monolayer cultures of the indicator cells can be used. Neutralization of a fraction of a high-titer virus preparation can be scored after the first replication cycle at 8 to 10 h. By lowering the incubation temperature to 30/degree/C, the completion of the cytolysis due to the first replication cycle of poliovirus was delayed beyond 21 h. This makes it possible to use the RACINA, unlike the standard microneutralization assay, for measuring antibodies to trypsin-cleaved polioviruses. The RACINA was found to be as sensitive as and more reproducible than the standard microneutralization assay in the measurement of neutralizing poliovirus antibodies. The RACINA is a rapid and reliable test for neutralizing antibodies and in principle it may be applicable for quantitation of neutralizing antibodies to other cytolytic agents as well.

  10. Miniature high-throughput chemosensing of yield, ee, and absolute configuration from crude reaction mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Keith W.; Zhang, Peng; Wolf, Christian

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput experimentation (HTE) has emerged as a widely used technology that accelerates discovery and optimization processes with parallel small-scale reaction setups. A high-throughput screening (HTS) method capable of comprehensive analysis of crude asymmetric reaction mixtures (eliminating product derivatization or isolation) would provide transformative impact by matching the pace of HTE. We report how spontaneous in situ construction of stereodynamic metal probes from readily available, inexpensive starting materials can be applied to chiroptical chemosensing of the total amount, enantiomeric excess (ee), and absolute configuration of a wide variety of amines, diamines, amino alcohols, amino acids, carboxylic acids, α-hydroxy acids, and diols. This advance and HTS potential are highlighted with the analysis of 1 mg of crude reaction mixtures of a catalytic asymmetric reaction. This operationally simple assay uses a robust mix-and-measure protocol, is amenable to microscale platforms and automation, and provides critical time efficiency and sustainability advantages over traditional serial methods. PMID:26933684

  11. Fully automatized high-throughput enzyme library screening using a robotic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Mark; Fibinger, Michael P C; Last, Daniel; Schmidt, Sandy; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Böttcher, Dominique; Hummel, Anke; Vickers, Clare; Voss, Moritz; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2016-07-01

    A fully automatized robotic platform has been established to facilitate high-throughput screening for protein engineering purposes. This platform enables proper monitoring and control of growth conditions in the microtiter plate format to ensure precise enzyme production for the interrogation of enzyme mutant libraries, protein stability tests and multiple assay screenings. The performance of this system has been exemplified for four enzyme classes important for biocatalysis such as Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase, transaminase, dehalogenase and acylase in the high-throughput screening of various mutant libraries. This allowed the identification of novel enzyme variants in a sophisticated and highly reliable manner. Furthermore, the detailed optimization protocols should enable other researchers to adapt and improve their methods. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1421-1432. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. From cradle to grave: high-throughput studies of aging in model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Eric C; Finkelstein, Ilya J

    2014-07-01

    Aging-the progressive decline of biological functions-is a universal fact of life. Decades of intense research in unicellular and metazoan model organisms have highlighted that aging manifests at all levels of biological organization - from the decline of individual cells, to tissue and organism degeneration. To better understand the aging process, we must first aim to integrate quantitative biological understanding on the systems and cellular levels. A second key challenge is to then understand the many heterogeneous outcomes that may result in aging cells, and to connect cellular aging to organism-wide degeneration. Addressing these challenges requires the development of high-throughput aging and longevity assays. In this review, we highlight the emergence of high-throughput aging approaches in the most commonly used model organisms. We conclude with a discussion of the critical questions that can be addressed with these new methods.

  13. Turning tumor-promoting copper into an anti-cancer weapon via high-throughput chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Jiao, P; Qi, M; Frezza, M; Dou, Q P; Yan, B

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an essential element for multiple biological processes. Its concentration is elevated to a very high level in cancer tissues for promoting cancer development through processes such as angiogenesis. Organic chelators of copper can passively reduce cellular copper and serve the role as inhibitors of angiogenesis. However, they can also actively attack cellular targets such as proteasome, which plays a critical role in cancer development and survival. The discovery of such molecules initially relied on a step by step synthesis followed by biological assays. Today high-throughput chemistry and high-throughput screening have significantly expedited the copper-binding molecules discovery to turn "cancer-promoting" copper into anti-cancer agents.

  14. 基于报告基因检测的PXR、FXR和LXRα激动剂高通量筛选模型的建立%Establishment of cell models for PXR, FXR and LXRαagonists high-throughput screening based on reporter gene assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄嘉琅; 曾行; 钟国平; 金晶; 苟晓丽; 毕惠嫦; 黄民

    2015-01-01

    Aim To develop an in vitro high throughput drug screening system based on reporter gene assay for identification of novel compounds with PXR, FXR and LXRα agonist activity. Methods The expressions of exogenous PXR, FXR and LXRαgene in HEK293, HepG2 and LS174T cells were examined by Real-Time quantity PCR. pSG5-hPXR and pGL3-XREM-CYP3A4, pEGFP-N3-hFXR and EcRE-TK-Luc, pCMX-FLAG-hLXRα and pGL3-XREM-CYP3A4 were cotransfected into cells and the optimal ratio of three plasmids was determined. The dose-response relationship between the positive drug and the fold induction was determined. The specificity of the model was ex-amined, and the repeatability was also determined by Z′ value. Results ① The PXR, FXR and LXRα mRNA expression in HEK293 cell is low among three different cells. ②reporter gene vector and expression plasmid ratio of 1∶ 1, 2∶ 1 and 2∶ 1 were proved to be suitable for highest relative luciferase activity for PXR, FXR or LXRα agonist screening model. ③ The relative luciferase activity was induced by Rif, CDCA or T0901317 in a dose-dependent manner. ④Only Rif, CDCA or T0901317 could significantly increase the relative luciferase activity in PXR,FXR or LXRα agonist screening model, no effect of other nuclear re-ceptors agonist was observed, and the values of Z′-factor for PXR, FXR and LXRαagonist screening model were 0. 58, 0. 66 and 0. 63, respectively. Conclusion An in vitro PXR, FXR and LXRα agonist high-throughput screening models are devel-oped with acceptable specificity and repeatability, and the mod-els can be used to screen PXR, FXR and LXRα agonist.%目的:建立基于报告基因法的高通量筛选细胞模型,用来发现PXR、FXR和LXRα受体激动剂。方法利用Re-al-time定量PCR方法比较HEK293、HepG2和LS174T细胞中内源性核受体 PXR、FXR 和 LXRα的表达量,将 pSG5-hPXR 和 pGL3-XREM-CYP3A4、pEGFP-N3-hFXR 和 EcRE-TK-Luc、 pCMX-FLAG-hLXRα和 pGL3-XREM-CYP3A4等质粒分别共转染到工

  15. High-throughput screening of chemical effects on steroidogenesis using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental chemicals can result in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. A high-throughput assay using H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells was used to evaluate the effect of 2,060 chemical samples...

  16. Combinatorial and high-throughput screening approaches for strain engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenshan; Jiang, Rongrong

    2015-03-01

    Microbes have long been used in the industry to produce valuable biochemicals. Combinatorial engineering approaches, new strain engineering tools derived from inverse metabolic engineering, have started to attract attention in recent years, including genome shuffling, error-prone DNA polymerase, global transcription machinery engineering (gTME), random knockout/overexpression libraries, ribosome engineering, multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering (COMPACTER), and library construction of "tunable intergenic regions" (TIGR). Since combinatorial approaches and high-throughput screening methods are fundamentally interconnected, color/fluorescence-based, growth-based, and biosensor-based high-throughput screening methods have been reviewed. We believe that with the help of metabolic engineering tools and new combinatorial approaches, plus effective high-throughput screening methods, researchers will be able to achieve better results on improving microorganism performance under stress or enhancing biochemical yield.

  17. Development and evaluation of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay to detect antibodies to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna; Goldberg, Tony; Marcquenski, Susan; Olson, Wendy; Goetz, Frederick; Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas M.; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a target of surveillance by many state and federal agencies in the United States. Currently, the detection of VHSV relies on virus isolation, which is lethal to fish and indicates only the current infection status. A serological method is required to ascertain prior exposure. Here, we report two serologic tests for VHSV that are nonlethal, rapid, and species independent, a virus neutralization (VN) assay and a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that the VN assay had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 42.9%; the anti-nucleocapsid-blocking ELISA detected nonneutralizing VHSV antibodies at a specificity of 88.2% and a sensitivity of 96.4%. The VN assay and ELISA are valuable tools for assessing exposure to VHSV.

  18. The gut microbiotassay – a high-throughput real-time PCR chip combined with next generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mølbak, Lars

    this assay with the high-throughput real-time PCR chip “Access Array 48.48” from Fluidigm. The chip executes 2304 individual reactions in parallel and afterwards it is possible to harvest the amplicons for next-generation sequencing. This approach gives a taxonomical overview of the gut microbiota, hence...... generation sequencing both provides a quantitative measure in terms of Cq-values achieved from the real-time PCR, as well as the deeper information obtained from next-generation sequencing of the amplicons. It is quick to perform and offers a high-throughput at a relatively low cost. These features make...

  19. A critical comparison of two high-throughput ascorbate analyses methods for plant samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshiaki; Wu, Linbo; Frei, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Ascorbate (AsA) is an important metabolite involved in stress response and development of plants. Therefore it is necessary to quantify the AsA content in many fields of plant science, including high throughput and critical applications. In this study we compared two different microplate-based AsA assays, which are suitable for high throughput applications: an ascorbate oxidase (AO)-based assay and a dipyridyl (DPD)-based assay. These methods were compared in critical applications, i.e. (i) when AsA concentrations were very low such as in apoplastic extracts, (ii) when plants contained pigments interfering with the spectrometric measurements, and (iii) when plants contained high iron concentration interfering with the color reactions. The precision of measurements was higher with the DPD method, as illustrated by higher recovery rates of internal AsA standards. On the other hand, the AO method was more sensitive to low levels of AsA. This was an advantage in determining apoplastic AsA concentration in rice, which was substantially lower than that of whole tissues. The AO method also had the advantage that plant pigments and high iron concentrations in plants tissues did not interfere with the analysis, as opposed to the DPD assay. In conclusion, both assays had advantages and the choice of a suitable method depends on the specific application.

  20. High-throughput genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms with rolling circle amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhenyu

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are the foundation of powerful complex trait and pharmacogenomic analyses. The availability of large SNP databases, however, has emphasized a need for inexpensive SNP genotyping methods of commensurate simplicity, robustness, and scalability. We describe a solution-based, microtiter plate method for SNP genotyping of human genomic DNA. The method is based upon allele discrimination by ligation of open circle probes followed by rolling circle amplification of the signal using fluorescent primers. Only the probe with a 3' base complementary to the SNP is circularized by ligation. Results SNP scoring by ligation was optimized to a 100,000 fold discrimination against probe mismatched to the SNP. The assay was used to genotype 10 SNPs from a set of 192 genomic DNA samples in a high-throughput format. Assay directly from genomic DNA eliminates the need to preamplify the target as done for many other genotyping methods. The sensitivity of the assay was demonstrated by genotyping from 1 ng of genomic DNA. We demonstrate that the assay can detect a single molecule of the circularized probe. Conclusions Compatibility with homogeneous formats and the ability to assay small amounts of genomic DNA meets the exacting requirements of automated, high-throughput SNP scoring.

  1. Rabies neutralizing antibody detection by indirect immunperoxidase serum neutralization assay performed on chicken embryo related cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Cristina Cardoso

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the indirect immunoperoxidase virus neutralization (IPVN and mouse neutralization test (MNT to detect antibodies against rabies virus from vaccinated dogs and cattle. The IPVN was set up for the ability to measure 0.5 International Units/ml (IU of antibody required by the World Health Organization and the Office International des Epizooties as the minimum response for proof of rabies immunization. IPVN was developed and standardized in chicken embryo related (CER cell line when 141 dog and 110 cattle sera were applied by serial five-fold dilutions (1:5, 1:25, 1:125 as well as the positive and negative reference controls, all added in four adjacent wells, of 96-well microplates. A 50 µl amount of CVS32 strain dilution containing 50-200 TCID50/ml was mixed to each serum dilution, and after 90 min 50 µl of 3 x 10(5 cells/mlcell suspension added to each well. After five days of incubation, the monolayers were fixed and the IPVN test performed. The correlation coefficient between the MNT and IPVN performed in CER cells was r = 0.9949 for dog sera (n = 100 and r = 0.9307 for cattle sera (n = 99, as well as good specificity (94.7%, sensitivity (87.5%, and agreement (96.6% were also obtained. IPVN technique can adequately identify vaccinated and unvaccinated animals, even from low-responding vaccinated animals, with the advantage of low cost and faster then MNT standard test.

  2. Best practice recommendations for the transfer of cell-based assays for the measurement of neutralizing anti-drug antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belouski, Shelley S; Born, Danika; Jacques, Susan; Harder, Brandon; Reynhardt, Kai; Kaliyaperumal, Arunan; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-09-01

    We recommend the application of a strategically designed step-wise approach to transfer cell-based assays that includes assessing analytical performance (through a fit for purpose validation and/or design of experiment robustness characterization), clinical performance (i.e., concordance) and performance or proficiency testing for long-term method monitoring. Here we focus on the application of this strategy to cell-based assays for the measurement of neutralizing anti-drug antibodies. This application is unique in that it requires a custom cell-based assay to be used over a long period of time (potentially phase 1a through the life of a marketed product) with the confidence of consistent method performance and result reporting. But, the process is adaptable to a variety of assay types and applications. We present lessons learned from two cell-based assay transfers that met relevant challenges while implementing alternative permutations of the recommended method transfer process.

  3. High-throughput Binary Vectors for Plant Gene Function Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Yong Lei; Ping Zhao; Min-Jie Cao; Rong Cui; Xi Chen; Li-Zhong Xiong; Qi-Fa Zhang; David J. Oliver; Cheng-Bin Xiang

    2007-01-01

    A series of high-throughput binary cloning vectors were constructed to facilitate gene function analysis in higher plants. This vector series consists of plasmids designed for plant expression, promoter analysis, gene silencing,and green fluorescent protein fusions for protein localization. These vectors provide for high-throughput and efficient cloning utilizing sites for λ phage integrase/excisionase. In addition, unique restriction sites are incorporated in a multiple cloning site and enable promoter replacement. The entire vector series are available with complete sequence information and detailed annotations and are freely distributed to the scientific community for non-commercial uses.

  4. Screening and synthesis: high throughput technologies applied to parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R E; Westwood, N J

    2004-01-01

    High throughput technologies continue to develop in response to the challenges set by the genome projects. This article discusses how the techniques of both high throughput screening (HTS) and synthesis can influence research in parasitology. Examples of the use of targeted and phenotype-based HTS using unbiased compound collections are provided. The important issue of identifying the protein target(s) of bioactive compounds is discussed from the synthetic chemist's perspective. This article concludes by reviewing recent examples of successful target identification studies in parasitology.

  5. Perspective: Data infrastructure for high throughput materials discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeif, E. A.; Kroenlein, K.

    2016-05-01

    Computational capability has enabled materials design to evolve from trial-and-error towards more informed methodologies that require large amounts of data. Expert-designed tools and their underlying databases facilitate modern-day high throughput computational methods. Standard data formats and communication standards increase the impact of traditional data, and applying these technologies to a high throughput experimental design provides dense, targeted materials data that are valuable for material discovery. Integrated computational materials engineering requires both experimentally and computationally derived data. Harvesting these comprehensively requires different methods of varying degrees of automation to accommodate variety and volume. Issues of data quality persist independent of type.

  6. High throughput materials research and development for lithium ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of next generation batteries requires a breakthrough in materials. Traditional one-by-one method, which is suitable for synthesizing large number of sing-composition material, is time-consuming and costly. High throughput and combinatorial experimentation, is an effective method to synthesize and characterize huge amount of materials over a broader compositional region in a short time, which enables to greatly speed up the discovery and optimization of materials with lower cost. In this work, high throughput and combinatorial materials synthesis technologies for lithium ion battery research are discussed, and our efforts on developing such instrumentations are introduced.

  7. High throughput recombinant protein production of fungal secreted proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vala, Andrea Lages Lino; Roth, Doris; Grell, Morten Nedergaard

    2011-01-01

    a high-throughput protein production system with a special focus on fungal secreted proteins. We use a ligation independent cloning to clone target genes into expression vectors for E. coli and P. pastoris and a small scale test expression to identify constructs producing soluble protein. Expressed...... interaction), between fungi of the order Entomophthorales and aphids (pathogenic interaction), and in the mycoparasitic interaction between the oomycetes Pythium oligandrum and P. ultimum. In general, the high-throughput protein production system can lead to a better understanding of fungal/host interactions...

  8. Application of high-throughput affinity-selection mass spectrometry for screening of chemical compound libraries in lead discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehender, Hartmut; Mayr, Lorenz M

    2007-02-01

    High-throughput screening of chemical libraries for compounds that interfere with a particular molecular target is among the most powerful methodologies applied in lead discovery at present. In this review, the authors describe a label-free, homogeneous, affinity-selection-based technology developed at Novartis, termed SpeedScreen, which is compared with similar technologies used for high-throughput screening in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. The focus at present of SpeedScreen is twofold: first, this technology is applied to orphan genomic targets and to those targets that are non-tractable by a functional assay; second, this technology is applied complementary to the well-established traditional methodologies for the screening of molecular targets. In summary, the authors discuss the value of affinity-selection-based high-throughput screening as a complementary technology to the common functional screening platforms and the benefits as well as the limitations of this new technology are outlined.

  9. Microfluidic-Enabled Print-to-Screen Platform for High-Throughput Screening of Combinatorial Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuzhe; Li, Jiannan; Xiao, Wenwu; Xiao, Kai; Lee, Joyce; Bhardwaj, Urvashi; Zhu, Zijie; Digiglio, Philip; Yang, Gaomai; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-10-20

    Since the 1960s, combination chemotherapy has been widely utilized as a standard method to treat cancer. However, because of the potentially enormous number of drug candidates and combinations, conventional identification methods of the effective drug combinations are usually associated with significantly high operational costs, low throughput screening, laborious and time-consuming procedures, and ethical concerns. In this paper, we present a low-cost, high-efficiency microfluidic print-to-screen (P2S) platform, which integrates combinatorial screening with biomolecular printing for high-throughput screening of anticancer drug combinations. This P2S platform provides several distinct advantages and features, including automatic combinatorial printing, high-throughput parallel drug screening, modular disposable cartridge, and biocompatibility, which can potentially speed up the entire discovery cycle of potent drug combinations. Microfluidic impact printing utilizing plug-and-play microfluidic cartridges is experimentally characterized with controllable droplet volume and accurate positioning. Furthermore, the combinatorial print-to-screen assay is demonstrated in a proof-of-concept biological experiment which can identify the positive hits among the entire drug combination library in a parallel and rapid manner. Overall, this microfluidic print-to-screen platform offers a simple, low-cost, high-efficiency solution for high-throughput large-scale combinatorial screening and can be applicable for various emerging applications in drug cocktail discovery.

  10. Efficient Management of High-Throughput Screening Libraries with SAVANAH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; Schmidt, Steffen;

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis for such scr...

  11. High-throughput bioinformatics with the Cyrille2 pipeline system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiers, M.W.E.J.; Burgt, van der A.; Datema, E.; Groot, de J.C.W.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background - Modern omics research involves the application of high-throughput technologies that generate vast volumes of data. These data need to be pre-processed, analyzed and integrated with existing knowledge through the use of diverse sets of software tools, models and databases. The analyses a

  12. Algorithms for mapping high-throughput DNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frellsen, Jes; Menzel, Peter; Krogh, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Abstract High-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies revolutionized the field of molecular biology by enabling large scale whole genome sequencing as well as a broad range of experiments for studying the cell's inner workings directly on DNA or RNA level. Given the dramatically increased rate...

  13. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning (EF

  14. High-throughput cloning and expression in recalcitrant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertsma, Eric R.; Poolman, Bert

    2007-01-01

    We developed a generic method for high-throughput cloning in bacteria that are less amenable to conventional DNA manipulations. The method involves ligation-independent cloning in an intermediary Escherichia coli vector, which is rapidly converted via vector-backbone exchange (VBEx) into an organism

  15. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning

  16. Chemometric Optimization Studies in Catalysis Employing High-Throughput Experimentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, S.R.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main topic of this thesis is the investigation of the synergies between High-Throughput Experimentation (HTE) and Chemometric Optimization methodologies in Catalysis research and of the use of such methodologies to maximize the advantages of using HTE methods. Several case studies were analysed

  17. High-Throughput, Large-Scale SNP Genotyping: Bioinformatics Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Margetic, Nino

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide a high-throughput, large-scale genotyping facility at the national level we have developed a set of inter-dependent information systems. A combination of commercial, publicly-available and in-house developed tools links a series of data repositories based both on flat files and relational databases providing an almost complete semi-automated pipeline.

  18. An improved high throughput sequencing method for studying oomycete communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapkota, Rumakanta; Nicolaisen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Culture-independent studies using next generation sequencing have revolutionizedmicrobial ecology, however, oomycete ecology in soils is severely lagging behind. The aimof this study was to improve and validate standard techniques for using high throughput sequencing as a tool for studying oomyce...

  19. Efficient Management of High-Throughput Screening Libraries with SAVANAH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; Schmidt, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has become an indispensable tool for the pharmaceutical industry and for biomedical research. A high degree of automation allows for experiments in the range of a few hundred up to several hundred thousand to be performed in close succession. The basis...

  20. Automatic Spot Identification for High Throughput Microarray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eunice; Su, Yan A.; Billings, Eric; Brooks, Bernard R.; Wu, Xiongwu

    2013-01-01

    High throughput microarray analysis has great potential in scientific research, disease diagnosis, and drug discovery. A major hurdle toward high throughput microarray analysis is the time and effort needed to accurately locate gene spots in microarray images. An automatic microarray image processor will allow accurate and efficient determination of spot locations and sizes so that gene expression information can be reliably extracted in a high throughput manner. Current microarray image processing tools require intensive manual operations in addition to the input of grid parameters to correctly and accurately identify gene spots. This work developed a method, herein called auto-spot, to automate the spot identification process. Through a series of correlation and convolution operations, as well as pixel manipulations, this method makes spot identification an automatic and accurate process. Testing with real microarray images has demonstrated that this method is capable of automatically extracting subgrids from microarray images and determining spot locations and sizes within each subgrid, regardless of variations in array patterns and background noises. With this method, we are one step closer to the goal of high throughput microarray analysis. PMID:24298393

  1. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning (EF

  2. A Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Data Analysis Pipeline for Activity Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruili

    2016-01-01

    The US Tox21 program has developed in vitro assays to test large collections of environmental chemicals in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format, using triplicate 15-dose titrations to generate over 50 million data points to date. Counter screens are also employed to minimize interferences from non-target-specific assay artifacts, such as compound auto fluorescence and cytotoxicity. New data analysis approaches are needed to integrate these data and characterize the activities observed from these assays. Here, we describe a complete analysis pipeline that evaluates these qHTS data for technical quality in terms of signal reproducibility. We integrate signals from repeated assay runs, primary readouts, and counter screens to produce a final call on on-target compound activity.

  3. MIPHENO: data normalization for high throughput metabolite analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Shannon M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput methodologies such as microarrays, mass spectrometry and plate-based small molecule screens are increasingly used to facilitate discoveries from gene function to drug candidate identification. These large-scale experiments are typically carried out over the course of months and years, often without the controls needed to compare directly across the dataset. Few methods are available to facilitate comparisons of high throughput metabolic data generated in batches where explicit in-group controls for normalization are lacking. Results Here we describe MIPHENO (Mutant Identification by Probabilistic High throughput-Enabled Normalization, an approach for post-hoc normalization of quantitative first-pass screening data in the absence of explicit in-group controls. This approach includes a quality control step and facilitates cross-experiment comparisons that decrease the false non-discovery rates, while maintaining the high accuracy needed to limit false positives in first-pass screening. Results from simulation show an improvement in both accuracy and false non-discovery rate over a range of population parameters (p -16 and a modest but significant (p -16 improvement in area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.955 for MIPHENO vs 0.923 for a group-based statistic (z-score. Analysis of the high throughput phenotypic data from the Arabidopsis Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/ showed ~ 4-fold increase in the ability to detect previously described or expected phenotypes over the group based statistic. Conclusions Results demonstrate MIPHENO offers substantial benefit in improving the ability to detect putative mutant phenotypes from post-hoc analysis of large data sets. Additionally, it facilitates data interpretation and permits cross-dataset comparison where group-based controls are missing. MIPHENO is applicable to a wide range of high throughput screenings and the code is

  4. Combination of Culture, Antigen and Toxin Detection, and Cytotoxin Neutralization Assay for Optimal Clostridium difficile Diagnostic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle J Alfa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been a growing interest in developing an appropriate laboratory diagnostic algorithm for Clostridium difficile, mainly as a result of increases in both the number and severity of cases of C difficile infection in the past decade. A C difficile diagnostic algorithm is necessary because diagnostic kits, mostly for the detection of toxins A and B or glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH antigen, are not sufficient as stand-alone assays for optimal diagnosis of C difficile infection. In addition, conventional reference methods for C difficile detection (eg, toxigenic culture and cytotoxin neutralization [CTN] assays are not routinely practiced in diagnostic laboratory settings.

  5. Detection of measles, mumps and rubella viruses by immuno-colorimetric assay and its application in focus reduction neutralization tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Kumbhar, Neelakshi S; Bhide, Vandana S

    2014-12-01

    Measles, mumps and rubella are vaccine-preventable diseases; however limited epidemiological data are available from low-income or developing countries. Thus, it is important to investigate the transmission of these viruses in different geographical regions. In this context, a cell culture-based rapid and reliable immuno-colorimetric assay (ICA) was established and its utility studied. Twenty-three measles, six mumps and six rubella virus isolates and three vaccine strains were studied. Detection by ICA was compared with plaque and RT-PCR assays. In addition, ICA was used to detect viruses in throat swabs (n = 24) collected from patients with suspected measles or mumps. Similarly, ICA was used in a focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT) and the results compared with those obtained by a commercial IgG enzyme immuno assay. Measles and mumps virus were detected 2 days post-infection in Vero or Vero-human signaling lymphocytic activation molecule cells, whereas rubella virus was detected 3 days post-infection in Vero cells. The blue stained viral foci were visible by the naked eye or through a magnifying glass. In conclusion, ICA was successfully used on 35 virus isolates, three vaccine strains and clinical specimens collected from suspected cases of measles and mumps. Furthermore, an application of ICA in a neutralization test (i.e., FRNT) was documented; this may be useful for sero-epidemiological, cross-neutralization and pre/post-vaccine studies. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. CSI-FID: high throughput label-free detection of DNA binding molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Karl E; Stover, James S; Boger, Dale L; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2009-07-15

    Determining the sequence specifity of DNA binding molecules is a non-trivial task. Here we describe the development of a platform for assaying the sequence specificity of DNA ligands using label free detection on high density DNA microarrays. This is achieved by combining Cognate Site Identification (CSI) with Fluorescence Intercalation Displacement (FID) to create CSI-FID. We use the well-studied small molecule DNA ligand netropsin to develop this high throughput platform. Analysis of the DNA binding properties of protein- and small molecule-based libraries with CSI-FID will advance the development of genome-anchored molecules for therapeutic purposes.

  7. NanoLuc luciferase - A multifunctional tool for high throughput antibody screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eBoute

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the recent development of NanoLuc Luciferase a small (19 kDa, highly stable, ATP independent, bioluminescent protein, an extremely robust and ultra high sensitivity screening system has been developed whereby primary hits of therapeutic antibodies and antibody fragments could be characterized and quantified without purification. This system is very versatile allowing cellular and solid phase ELISA but also homogeneous BRET based screening assays, relative affinity determinations with competition ELISA and direct western blotting. The new NanoLuc Luciferase protein fusion represents a swiss army knife solution for today and future high throughput antibody drug screenings.

  8. Advance of bioassay methods used in high throughput screening%高通量药物筛选生物活性分析技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 张海霞; 任德成; 杜冠华

    2001-01-01

    A variety of technologies continue to develop for high-throughput screening. This review summarized recent advances of bioassay techniques used in high-throughput screening. The principles, applications, characteristics and other parameters of these methods were described such as homogeneous time resolved fluorescence, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and scintillation proximity assay.

  9. A high-throughput pipeline for the design of real-time PCR signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reifman Jaques

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogen diagnostic assays based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR technology provide high sensitivity and specificity. However, the design of these diagnostic assays is computationally intensive, requiring high-throughput methods to identify unique PCR signatures in the presence of an ever increasing availability of sequenced genomes. Results We present the Tool for PCR Signature Identification (TOPSI, a high-performance computing pipeline for the design of PCR-based pathogen diagnostic assays. The TOPSI pipeline efficiently designs PCR signatures common to multiple bacterial genomes by obtaining the shared regions through pairwise alignments between the input genomes. TOPSI successfully designed PCR signatures common to 18 Staphylococcus aureus genomes in less than 14 hours using 98 cores on a high-performance computing system. Conclusions TOPSI is a computationally efficient, fully integrated tool for high-throughput design of PCR signatures common to multiple bacterial genomes. TOPSI is freely available for download at http://www.bhsai.org/downloads/topsi.tar.gz.

  10. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinzon, NM; Aukema, KG; Gralnick, JA; Wackett, LP

    2011-06-28

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been renewed interest in advanced biofuel sources such as bacterial hydrocarbon production. Previous studies used solvent extraction of bacterial cultures followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and quantify ketones and hydrocarbons (Beller HR, Goh EB, Keasling JD, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 1212-1223, 2010; Sukovich DJ, Seffernick JL, Richman JE, Gralnick JA, Wackett LP, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 3850-3862, 2010). While these analyses are powerful and accurate, their labor-intensive nature makes them intractable to high-throughput screening; therefore, methods for rapid identification of bacterial strains that are overproducing hydrocarbons are needed. The use of high-throughput

  11. High-Throughput Method for Automated Colony and Cell Counting by Digital Image Analysis Based on Edge Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Choudhry

    Full Text Available Counting cells and colonies is an integral part of high-throughput screens and quantitative cellular assays. Due to its subjective and time-intensive nature, manual counting has hindered the adoption of cellular assays such as tumor spheroid formation in high-throughput screens. The objective of this study was to develop an automated method for quick and reliable counting of cells and colonies from digital images. For this purpose, I developed an ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge and a CellProfiler Pipeline Cell Colony Counting, and compared them to other open-source digital methods and manual counts. The ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge is valuable in counting cells and colonies, and measuring their area, volume, morphology, and intensity. In this study, I demonstrate that Cell Colony Edge is superior to other open-source methods, in speed, accuracy and applicability to diverse cellular assays. It can fulfill the need to automate colony/cell counting in high-throughput screens, colony forming assays, and cellular assays.

  12. A CRISPR CASe for High-Throughput Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob eHeintze

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of gene expression on a genome-wide level is one of the most important systematic tools in the post-genome era. Such manipulations have largely been enabled by expression cloning approaches using sequence-verified cDNA libraries, large-scale RNA interference libraries (shRNA or siRNA and zinc finger nuclease technologies. More recently, the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and CRISPR-associated (Cas9-mediated gene editing technology has been described that holds great promise for future use of this technology in genomic manipulation. It was suggested that the CRISPR system has the potential to be used in high-throughput, large-scale loss of function screening. Here we discuss some of the challenges in engineering of CRISPR/Cas genomic libraries and some of the aspects that need to be addressed in order to use this technology on a high-throughput scale.

  13. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated...... maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content...... and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers...

  14. Sensitivity study of reliable, high-throughput resolution metricsfor photoresists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2007-07-30

    The resolution of chemically amplified resists is becoming an increasing concern, especially for lithography in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) regime. Large-scale screening and performance-based down-selection is currently underway to identify resist platforms that can support shrinking feature sizes. Resist screening efforts, however, are hampered by the absence of reliable resolution metrics that can objectively quantify resist resolution in a high-throughput fashion. Here we examine two high-throughput metrics for resist resolution determination. After summarizing their details and justifying their utility, we characterize the sensitivity of both metrics to two of the main experimental uncertainties associated with lithographic exposure tools, namely: limited focus control and limited knowledge of optical aberrations. For an implementation at EUV wavelengths, we report aberration and focus limited error bars in extracted resolution of {approx} 1.25 nm RMS for both metrics making them attractive candidates for future screening and down-selection efforts.

  15. A high-throughput label-free nanoparticle analyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraikin, Jean-Luc; Teesalu, Tambet; McKenney, Christopher M.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Cleland, Andrew N.

    2011-05-01

    Synthetic nanoparticles and genetically modified viruses are used in a range of applications, but high-throughput analytical tools for the physical characterization of these objects are needed. Here we present a microfluidic analyser that detects individual nanoparticles and characterizes complex, unlabelled nanoparticle suspensions. We demonstrate the detection, concentration analysis and sizing of individual synthetic nanoparticles in a multicomponent mixture with sufficient throughput to analyse 500,000 particles per second. We also report the rapid size and titre analysis of unlabelled bacteriophage T7 in both salt solution and mouse blood plasma, using just ~1 × 10-6 l of analyte. Unexpectedly, in the native blood plasma we discover a large background of naturally occurring nanoparticles with a power-law size distribution. The high-throughput detection capability, scalable fabrication and simple electronics of this instrument make it well suited for diverse applications.

  16. High-throughput theoretical design of lithium battery materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi-Gang, Ling; Jian, Gao; Rui-Juan, Xiao; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of high-throughput theoretical design schemes to discover new lithium battery materials is reviewed, including high-capacity cathodes, low-strain cathodes, anodes, solid state electrolytes, and electrolyte additives. With the development of efficient theoretical methods and inexpensive computers, high-throughput theoretical calculations have played an increasingly important role in the discovery of new materials. With the help of automatic simulation flow, many types of materials can be screened, optimized and designed from a structural database according to specific search criteria. In advanced cell technology, new materials for next generation lithium batteries are of great significance to achieve performance, and some representative criteria are: higher energy density, better safety, and faster charge/discharge speed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11234013 and 51172274) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201).

  17. Multiple column high-throughput e-beam inspection (EBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, David K.; Monahan, Kevin M.; Liu, Enden D.; Tran, Cong; Prescop, Ted

    2012-03-01

    Single-column e-beam systems are used in production for the detection of electrical defects, but are too slow to be used for the detection of small physical defects, and can't meet future inspection requirements. This paper presents a multiplecolumn e-beam technology for high throughput wafer inspection. Multibeam has developed all-electrostatic columns for high-resolution imaging. The elimination of magnetic coils enables the columns to be small; e-beam deflection is faster in the absence of magnetic hysteresis. Multiple miniaturecolumns are assembled in an array. An array of 100 columns covers the entire surface of a 300mm wafer, affording simultaneous cross-wafer sampling. Column performance simulations and system architecture are presented. Also provided are examples of high throughput, more efficient, multiple-column wafer inspection.

  18. Galaxy High Throughput Genotyping Pipeline for GeneTitan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpenko, Oleksiy; Bahroos, Neil; Chukhman, Morris; Dong, Xiao; Kanabar, Pinal; Arbieva, Zarema; Jackson, Tommie; Hendrickson, William

    2013-01-01

    Latest genotyping solutions allow for rapid testing of more than two million markers in one experiment. Fully automated instruments such as Affymetrix GeneTitan enable processing of large numbers of samples in a truly high-throughput manner. In concert with solutions like Axiom, fully customizable array plates can now utilize automated workflows that can leverage multi-channel instrumentation like the GeneTitan. With the growing size of raw data output, the serial computational architecture of the software, typically distributed by the vendors on turnkey desktop solutions for quality control and genotype calling, becomes legacy rather than an advantage. Advanced software techniques provide power, flexibility, and can be deployed in an HPC environment, but become technically inconvenient for biologists to use. Here we present a pipeline that uses Galaxy as a mechanism to lower the barrier for complex analysis, and increase efficiency by leveraging high-throughput computing.

  19. High-throughput screening in the C. elegans nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Holly E; Pincus, Zachary

    2016-06-03

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used as a model organism in the field of neurobiology. The wiring of the C. elegans nervous system has been entirely mapped, and the animal's optical transparency allows for in vivo observation of neuronal activity. The nematode is also small in size, self-fertilizing, and inexpensive to cultivate and maintain, greatly lending to its utility as a whole-animal model for high-throughput screening (HTS) in the nervous system. However, the use of this organism in large-scale screens presents unique technical challenges, including reversible immobilization of the animal, parallel single-animal culture and containment, automation of laser surgery, and high-throughput image acquisition and phenotyping. These obstacles require significant modification of existing techniques and the creation of new C. elegans-based HTS platforms. In this review, we outline these challenges in detail and survey the novel technologies and methods that have been developed to address them.

  20. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Chan Young; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P; Stamer, W Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2014-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signaling intermediates with poorly defined relationship to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we screened libraries to identify novel drug candidates in the case of human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma, and also in the case of Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery.

  1. Reverse Phase Protein Arrays for High-throughput Toxicity Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marlene Lemvig; Block, Ines; List, Markus

    High-throughput screening is extensively applied for identification of drug targets and drug discovery and recently it found entry into toxicity testing. Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPAs) are used widespread for quantification of protein markers. We reasoned that RPPAs also can be utilized...... beneficially in automated high-throughput toxicity testing. An advantage of using RPPAs is that, in addition to the baseline toxicity readout, they allow testing of multiple markers of toxicity, such as inflammatory responses, which do not necessarily cumulate in cell death. We used transfection of si...... a robotic screening platform. Furthermore, we automated sample tracking and data analysis by developing a bundled bioinformatics tool named “MIRACLE”. Automation and RPPA-based viability/toxicity readouts enable rapid testing of large sample numbers, while granting the possibility for flexible consecutive...

  2. Network-Based Interpretation of Diverse High-Throughput Datasets through the Omics Integrator Software Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gosline, Sara J C; Kedaigle, Amanda; Soltis, Anthony R; Gitter, Anthony; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-04-01

    High-throughput, 'omic' methods provide sensitive measures of biological responses to perturbations. However, inherent biases in high-throughput assays make it difficult to interpret experiments in which more than one type of data is collected. In this work, we introduce Omics Integrator, a software package that takes a variety of 'omic' data as input and identifies putative underlying molecular pathways. The approach applies advanced network optimization algorithms to a network of thousands of molecular interactions to find high-confidence, interpretable subnetworks that best explain the data. These subnetworks connect changes observed in gene expression, protein abundance or other global assays to proteins that may not have been measured in the screens due to inherent bias or noise in measurement. This approach reveals unannotated molecular pathways that would not be detectable by searching pathway databases. Omics Integrator also provides an elegant framework to incorporate not only positive data, but also negative evidence. Incorporating negative evidence allows Omics Integrator to avoid unexpressed genes and avoid being biased toward highly-studied hub proteins, except when they are strongly implicated by the data. The software is comprised of two individual tools, Garnet and Forest, that can be run together or independently to allow a user to perform advanced integration of multiple types of high-throughput data as well as create condition-specific subnetworks of protein interactions that best connect the observed changes in various datasets. It is available at http://fraenkel.mit.edu/omicsintegrator and on GitHub at https://github.com/fraenkel-lab/OmicsIntegrator.

  3. Network-Based Interpretation of Diverse High-Throughput Datasets through the Omics Integrator Software Package.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Tuncbag

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput, 'omic' methods provide sensitive measures of biological responses to perturbations. However, inherent biases in high-throughput assays make it difficult to interpret experiments in which more than one type of data is collected. In this work, we introduce Omics Integrator, a software package that takes a variety of 'omic' data as input and identifies putative underlying molecular pathways. The approach applies advanced network optimization algorithms to a network of thousands of molecular interactions to find high-confidence, interpretable subnetworks that best explain the data. These subnetworks connect changes observed in gene expression, protein abundance or other global assays to proteins that may not have been measured in the screens due to inherent bias or noise in measurement. This approach reveals unannotated molecular pathways that would not be detectable by searching pathway databases. Omics Integrator also provides an elegant framework to incorporate not only positive data, but also negative evidence. Incorporating negative evidence allows Omics Integrator to avoid unexpressed genes and avoid being biased toward highly-studied hub proteins, except when they are strongly implicated by the data. The software is comprised of two individual tools, Garnet and Forest, that can be run together or independently to allow a user to perform advanced integration of multiple types of high-throughput data as well as create condition-specific subnetworks of protein interactions that best connect the observed changes in various datasets. It is available at http://fraenkel.mit.edu/omicsintegrator and on GitHub at https://github.com/fraenkel-lab/OmicsIntegrator.

  4. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Pourmodheji

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS. In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  5. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-06-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  6. Systematic error detection in experimental high-throughput screening

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background High-throughput screening (HTS) is a key part of the drug discovery process during which thousands of chemical compounds are screened and their activity levels measured in order to identify potential drug candidates (i.e., hits). Many technical, procedural or environmental factors can cause systematic measurement error or inequalities in the conditions in which the measurements are taken. Such systematic error has the potential to critically affect the hit selection proces...

  7. Targeted high-throughput sequencing of tagged nucleic acid samples

    OpenAIRE

    M.; Meyer; Stenzel, U.; Myles, S.; Prüfer, K; Hofreiter, M.

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput 454 DNA sequencing technology allows much faster and more cost-effective sequencing than traditional Sanger sequencing. However, the technology imposes inherent limitations on the number of samples that can be processed in parallel. Here we introduce parallel tagged sequencing (PTS), a simple, inexpensive and flexible barcoding technique that can be used for parallel sequencing any number and type of double-stranded nucleic acid samples. We demonstrate that PTS is particularly...

  8. Mass spectrometry for high-throughput metabolomics analysis of urine

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelrazig, Salah M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Direct electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (direct ESI-MS), by omitting the chromatographic step, has great potential for application as a high-throughput approach for untargeted urine metabolomics analysis compared to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The rapid development and technical innovations revealed in the field of ambient ionisation MS such as nanoelectrospray ionisation (nanoESI) chip-based infusion and liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA...

  9. High-throughput sequence alignment using Graphics Processing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapnell Cole

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent availability of new, less expensive high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies has yielded a dramatic increase in the volume of sequence data that must be analyzed. These data are being generated for several purposes, including genotyping, genome resequencing, metagenomics, and de novo genome assembly projects. Sequence alignment programs such as MUMmer have proven essential for analysis of these data, but researchers will need ever faster, high-throughput alignment tools running on inexpensive hardware to keep up with new sequence technologies. Results This paper describes MUMmerGPU, an open-source high-throughput parallel pairwise local sequence alignment program that runs on commodity Graphics Processing Units (GPUs in common workstations. MUMmerGPU uses the new Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA from nVidia to align multiple query sequences against a single reference sequence stored as a suffix tree. By processing the queries in parallel on the highly parallel graphics card, MUMmerGPU achieves more than a 10-fold speedup over a serial CPU version of the sequence alignment kernel, and outperforms the exact alignment component of MUMmer on a high end CPU by 3.5-fold in total application time when aligning reads from recent sequencing projects using Solexa/Illumina, 454, and Sanger sequencing technologies. Conclusion MUMmerGPU is a low cost, ultra-fast sequence alignment program designed to handle the increasing volume of data produced by new, high-throughput sequencing technologies. MUMmerGPU demonstrates that even memory-intensive applications can run significantly faster on the relatively low-cost GPU than on the CPU.

  10. Generating barcoded libraries for multiplex high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Michael; Stiller, Mathias; Meyer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Molecular barcoding is an essential tool to use the high throughput of next generation sequencing platforms optimally in studies involving more than one sample. Various barcoding strategies allow for the incorporation of short recognition sequences (barcodes) into sequencing libraries, either by ligation or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Here, we present two approaches optimized for generating barcoded sequencing libraries from low copy number extracts and amplification products typical of ancient DNA studies.

  11. Condor-COPASI: high-throughput computing for biochemical networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kent Edward; Hoops Stefan; Mendes Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mathematical modelling has become a standard technique to improve our understanding of complex biological systems. As models become larger and more complex, simulations and analyses require increasing amounts of computational power. Clusters of computers in a high-throughput computing environment can help to provide the resources required for computationally expensive model analysis. However, exploiting such a system can be difficult for users without the necessary experti...

  12. Intel: High Throughput Computing Collaboration: A CERN openlab / Intel collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The Intel/CERN High Throughput Computing Collaboration studies the application of upcoming Intel technologies to the very challenging environment of the LHC trigger and data-acquisition systems. These systems will need to transport and process many terabits of data every second, in some cases with tight latency constraints. Parallelisation and tight integration of accelerators and classical CPU via Intel's OmniPath fabric are the key elements in this project.

  13. FLASH assembly of TALENs for high-throughput genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyon, Deepak; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith

    2012-05-01

    Engineered transcription activator–like effector nucleases (TALENs) have shown promise as facile and broadly applicable genome editing tools. However, no publicly available high-throughput method for constructing TALENs has been published, and large-scale assessments of the success rate and targeting range of the technology remain lacking. Here we describe the fast ligation-based automatable solid-phase high-throughput (FLASH) system, a rapid and cost-effective method for large-scale assembly of TALENs. We tested 48 FLASH-assembled TALEN pairs in a human cell–based EGFP reporter system and found that all 48 possessed efficient gene-modification activities. We also used FLASH to assemble TALENs for 96 endogenous human genes implicated in cancer and/or epigenetic regulation and found that 84 pairs were able to efficiently introduce targeted alterations. Our results establish the robustness of TALEN technology and demonstrate that FLASH facilitates high-throughput genome editing at a scale not currently possible with other genome modification technologies.

  14. Condor-COPASI: high-throughput computing for biochemical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Edward

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematical modelling has become a standard technique to improve our understanding of complex biological systems. As models become larger and more complex, simulations and analyses require increasing amounts of computational power. Clusters of computers in a high-throughput computing environment can help to provide the resources required for computationally expensive model analysis. However, exploiting such a system can be difficult for users without the necessary expertise. Results We present Condor-COPASI, a server-based software tool that integrates COPASI, a biological pathway simulation tool, with Condor, a high-throughput computing environment. Condor-COPASI provides a web-based interface, which makes it extremely easy for a user to run a number of model simulation and analysis tasks in parallel. Tasks are transparently split into smaller parts, and submitted for execution on a Condor pool. Result output is presented to the user in a number of formats, including tables and interactive graphical displays. Conclusions Condor-COPASI can effectively use a Condor high-throughput computing environment to provide significant gains in performance for a number of model simulation and analysis tasks. Condor-COPASI is free, open source software, released under the Artistic License 2.0, and is suitable for use by any institution with access to a Condor pool. Source code is freely available for download at http://code.google.com/p/condor-copasi/, along with full instructions on deployment and usage.

  15. High-throughput bioinformatics with the Cyrille2 pipeline system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Groot Joost CW

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern omics research involves the application of high-throughput technologies that generate vast volumes of data. These data need to be pre-processed, analyzed and integrated with existing knowledge through the use of diverse sets of software tools, models and databases. The analyses are often interdependent and chained together to form complex workflows or pipelines. Given the volume of the data used and the multitude of computational resources available, specialized pipeline software is required to make high-throughput analysis of large-scale omics datasets feasible. Results We have developed a generic pipeline system called Cyrille2. The system is modular in design and consists of three functionally distinct parts: 1 a web based, graphical user interface (GUI that enables a pipeline operator to manage the system; 2 the Scheduler, which forms the functional core of the system and which tracks what data enters the system and determines what jobs must be scheduled for execution, and; 3 the Executor, which searches for scheduled jobs and executes these on a compute cluster. Conclusion The Cyrille2 system is an extensible, modular system, implementing the stated requirements. Cyrille2 enables easy creation and execution of high throughput, flexible bioinformatics pipelines.

  16. High throughput biotechnology in traditional fermented food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Xu, Rong-man; Song, Jia; Wang, Wei-min

    2010-11-01

    Traditional fermented food is not only the staple food for most of developing countries but also the key healthy food for developed countries. As the healthy function of these foods are gradually discovered, more and more high throughput biotechnologies are being used to promote the old and new industry. As a result, the microflora, manufacturing processes and product healthy function of these foods were pushed forward either in the respect of profundity or extensiveness nowadays. The application and progress of the high throughput biotechnologies into traditional fermented food industries were different from each other, which was reviewed and detailed by the catalogues of fermented milk products (yogurt, cheese), fermented sausages, fermented vegetables (kimchi, sauerkraut), fermented cereals (sourdough) and fermented beans (tempeh, natto). Given the further promotion by high throughput biotechnologies, the middle and/or down-stream process of traditional fermented foods would be optimized and the process of industrialization of local traditional fermented food having many functional factors but in small quantity would be accelerated. The article presents some promising patents on traditional fermented food industry.

  17. High-throughput screening of cell responses to biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yliperttula, Marjo; Chung, Bong Geun; Navaladi, Akshay; Manbachi, Amir; Urtti, Arto

    2008-10-02

    Biomaterials have emerged as powerful regulators of the cellular microenvironment for drug discovery, tissue engineering research and chemical testing. Although biomaterial-based matrices control the cellular behavior, these matrices are still far from being optimal. In principle, efficacy of biomaterial development for the cell cultures can be improved by using high-throughput techniques that allow screening of a large number of materials and manipulate microenvironments in a controlled manner. Several cell responses such as toxicity, proliferation, and differentiation have been used to evaluate the biomaterials thus providing basis for further selection of the lead biomimetic materials or microenvironments. Although high-throughput techniques provide an initial screening of the desired properties, more detailed follow-up studies of the selected materials are required to understand the true value of a 'positive hit'. High-throughput methods may become important tools in the future development of biomaterials-based cell cultures that will enable more realistic pre-clinical prediction of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicity. This is highly important, because predictive pre-clinical methods are needed to improve the high attrition rate of drug candidates during clinical testing.

  18. NCBI GEO: archive for high-throughput functional genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Tanya; Troup, Dennis B; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Rudnev, Dmitry; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Soboleva, Alexandra; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Marshall, Kimberly A; Phillippy, Katherine H; Sherman, Patti M; Muertter, Rolf N; Edgar, Ron

    2009-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is the largest public repository for high-throughput gene expression data. Additionally, GEO hosts other categories of high-throughput functional genomic data, including those that examine genome copy number variations, chromatin structure, methylation status and transcription factor binding. These data are generated by the research community using high-throughput technologies like microarrays and, more recently, next-generation sequencing. The database has a flexible infrastructure that can capture fully annotated raw and processed data, enabling compliance with major community-derived scientific reporting standards such as 'Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment' (MIAME). In addition to serving as a centralized data storage hub, GEO offers many tools and features that allow users to effectively explore, analyze and download expression data from both gene-centric and experiment-centric perspectives. This article summarizes the GEO repository structure, content and operating procedures, as well as recently introduced data mining features. GEO is freely accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/.

  19. Protein content of antivenoms and relationship with their immunochemical reactivity and neutralization assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roodt, A R; Clement, H; Dolab, J A; Litwin, S; Hajos, S E; Boyer, L; Alagón, A

    2014-07-01

    Therapy for snakebites relies on the application of antivenoms, which may be produced with different immunogenic mixtures of venom and possess different pharmaceutical characteristics. For these reasons, immunological cross-reactivity and heterologous neutralization were analyzed relative to the protein content of three antivenoms used in the Americas. The antivenoms studied were composed of equine F(ab')2 fragments from animals immunized with Crotalinae venoms. The antivenoms were tested against venoms of seven pit viper species from Argentina, seven from Mexico, one from Costa Rica, and one from Colombia. Immunoblotting showed high cross-reactivity of all major protein bands with all the antivenoms tested. ELISA results also showed high cross-reactivity among the different venoms and antivenoms, and a high heterologous neutralization was observed. The results can be interpreted in different ways depending on whether the reactivity is considered in terms of the volume of antivenom used or by the amount of protein contained in this volume of antivenom. The antivenoms with high immunochemical reactivity and neutralizing capacity were those with higher protein content per vial; but when doses were adjusted by protein content, antivenoms of apparently lower neutralizing capacity and immunochemical reactivity showed at least similar potency and reactivity although volumetrically at higher doses. Protein content relative to neutralization potency of different products must be taken into account when antivenoms are compared, in addition to the volume required for therapeutic effect. These results show the importance of obtaining high-affinity and high-avidity antibodies to achieve good neutralization using low protein concentration and low-volume antivenoms.

  20. Quantitative assessment of RNA-protein interactions with high-throughput sequencing-RNA affinity profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Abdullah; Tome, Jacob M; Friedman, Robin C; Gheba, Dan; Schroth, Gary P; Lis, John T

    2015-08-01

    Because RNA-protein interactions have a central role in a wide array of biological processes, methods that enable a quantitative assessment of these interactions in a high-throughput manner are in great demand. Recently, we developed the high-throughput sequencing-RNA affinity profiling (HiTS-RAP) assay that couples sequencing on an Illumina GAIIx genome analyzer with the quantitative assessment of protein-RNA interactions. This assay is able to analyze interactions between one or possibly several proteins with millions of different RNAs in a single experiment. We have successfully used HiTS-RAP to analyze interactions of the EGFP and negative elongation factor subunit E (NELF-E) proteins with their corresponding canonical and mutant RNA aptamers. Here we provide a detailed protocol for HiTS-RAP that can be completed in about a month (8 d hands-on time). This includes the preparation and testing of recombinant proteins and DNA templates, clustering DNA templates on a flowcell, HiTS and protein binding with a GAIIx instrument, and finally data analysis. We also highlight aspects of HiTS-RAP that can be further improved and points of comparison between HiTS-RAP and two other recently developed methods, quantitative analysis of RNA on a massively parallel array (RNA-MaP) and RNA Bind-n-Seq (RBNS), for quantitative analysis of RNA-protein interactions.

  1. Multicenter Evaluation of a New High-Throughput HbA1c Testing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imdahl, R; Roddiger, R; Casis-Saenz, E

    2016-12-01

    This non-interventional, multicenter study with anonymized leftover patient samples was performed to evaluate the reliability and analytical performance of the novel high-throughput HbA1c cobas c 513 analyzer. A performance evaluation was carried out at three sites to validate the overall system functionality, user interaction and analytical performance of the new cobas c 513 analyzer using the Tina-quant® HbA1c Gen. 3 assay. HbA1c applications for both whole blood and hemolysate samples show a high precision using both quality control materials and pools of whole blood or hemolysates. The method comparison of HbA1c Gen. 3 on the cobas c 513 with HbA1c Gen. 2 on the Menarini HA-8180V using 249 whole blood samples shows high concordance. Moreover, analyte concentrations as measured by the cobas c 513 and Tosoh G8 and HbA1c Gen. 2 on COBAS INTEGRA® 800 CTS are comparable. The cobas c 513 has proven to be a reliable system with excellent analytical performance of the Tinaquant® HbA1c Gen. 3 assay in high throughput laboratories.

  2. Whole cell strategies based on lux genes for high throughput applications toward new antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Karp, Matti

    2006-08-01

    The discovery/development of novel drug candidates has witnessed dramatic changes over the last two decades. Old methods to identify lead compounds are not suitable to screen wide libraries generated by combinatorial chemistry techniques. High throughput screening (HTS) has become irreplaceable and hundreds of different approaches have been described. Assays based on purified components are flanked by whole cell-based assays, in which reporter genes are used to monitor, directly or indirectly, the influence of a chemical over the metabolism of living cells. The most convenient and widely used reporters for real-time measurements are luciferases, light emitting enzymes from evolutionarily distant organisms. Autofluorescent proteins have been also extensively employed, but proved to be more suitable for end-point measurements, in situ applications - such as the localization of fusion proteins in specific subcellular compartments - or environmental studies on microbial populations. The trend toward miniaturization and the technical advances in detection and liquid handling systems will allow to reach an ultra high throughput screening (uHTS), with 100,000 of compounds routinely screened each day. Here we show how similar approaches may be applied also to the search for new and potent antimicrobial agents.

  3. MassCode liquid arrays as a tool for multiplexed high-throughput genetic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S Richmond

    Full Text Available Multiplexed detection assays that analyze a modest number of nucleic acid targets over large sample sets are emerging as the preferred testing approach in such applications as routine pathogen typing, outbreak monitoring, and diagnostics. However, very few DNA testing platforms have proven to offer a solution for mid-plexed analysis that is high-throughput, sensitive, and with a low cost per test. In this work, an enhanced genotyping method based on MassCode technology was devised and integrated as part of a high-throughput mid-plexing analytical system that facilitates robust qualitative differential detection of DNA targets. Samples are first analyzed using MassCode PCR (MC-PCR performed with an array of primer sets encoded with unique mass tags. Lambda exonuclease and an array of MassCode probes are then contacted with MC-PCR products for further interrogation and target sequences are specifically identified. Primer and probe hybridizations occur in homogeneous solution, a clear advantage over micro- or nanoparticle suspension arrays. The two cognate tags coupled to resultant MassCode hybrids are detected in an automated process using a benchtop single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The prospective value of using MassCode probe arrays for multiplexed bioanalysis was demonstrated after developing a 14plex proof of concept assay designed to subtype a select panel of Salmonella enterica serogroups and serovars. This MassCode system is very flexible and test panels can be customized to include more, less, or different markers.

  4. Nanoliter homogenous ultra-high throughput screening microarray for lead discoveries and IC50 profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haiching; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y; Wang, Yuan; Kucharewicz, Stefan A; Diamond, Scott L

    2005-04-01

    Microfluidic technologies offer the potential for highly productive and low-cost ultra-high throughput screening and high throughput selectivity profiling. Such technologies need to provide the flexibility of plate-based assays as well as be less expensive to operate. Presented here is a unique microarray system (the Reaction Biology [Malvern, PA] DiscoveryDot), which runs over 6,000 homogeneous reactions per 1" x 3" microarray using chemical libraries or compound dilutions printed in 1-nl volumes. A simple and rapid piezo-activation method delivers from 30 to 300 pl of biochemical targets and detector chemistries to each reaction. The fluorescent signals are detected and analyzed with conventional microarray scanners and software. The DiscoveryDot platform is highly customizable, and reduces consumption of targets and reaction chemistries by >40-fold and the consumption of compounds by >10,000-fold, compared to 384-well plate assay. We demonstrate here that the DiscoveryDot platform is compatible with conventional large-volume well-based reactions, with a Z' factor of >0.6 for many enzymes, such as the caspase family enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase, serine proteases, kinases, and histone deacetylases. The platform is well equipped for 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) profiling studies of enzyme inhibitors, with up to 10 dilution conditions of each test compound printed in duplicate, and each microarray chip can generate over 300 IC50 measurements against a given target.

  5. A high-throughput method for GMO multi-detection using a microfluidic dynamic array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brod, Fábio Cristiano Angonesi; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Voorhuijzen, Marleen M; Dinon, Andréia Zilio; Guimarães, Luis Henrique S; Scholtens, Ingrid M J; Arisi, Ana Carolina Maisonnave; Kok, Esther J

    2014-02-01

    The ever-increasing production of genetically modified crops generates a demand for high-throughput DNA-based methods for the enforcement of genetically modified organisms (GMO) labelling requirements. The application of standard real-time PCR will become increasingly costly with the growth of the number of GMOs that is potentially present in an individual sample. The present work presents the results of an innovative approach in genetically modified crops analysis by DNA based methods, which is the use of a microfluidic dynamic array as a high throughput multi-detection system. In order to evaluate the system, six test samples with an increasing degree of complexity were prepared, preamplified and subsequently analysed in the Fluidigm system. Twenty-eight assays targeting different DNA elements, GM events and species-specific reference genes were used in the experiment. The large majority of the assays tested presented expected results. The power of low level detection was assessed and elements present at concentrations as low as 0.06 % were successfully detected. The approach proposed in this work presents the Fluidigm system as a suitable and promising platform for GMO multi-detection.

  6. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  7. A high throughput screen for RGS proteins using steady state monitoring of free phosphate formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Aaron Monroy

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors are a diverse group that are the target of over 50% of marketed drugs. Activation of these receptors results in the exchange of bound GDP for GTP in the Gα subunit of the heterotrimeric G-protein. The Gα subunit dissociates from the β/γ subunits and both proceed to affect downstream signaling targets. The signal terminates by the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP and is temporally regulated by Regulators of G-protein Signaling (RGS proteins that act as GTPase Activating Proteins (GAPs. This makes RGS proteins potentially desirable targets for "tuning" the effects of current therapies as well as developing novel pharmacotherapies. Current methods for evaluating RGS activity depend on laborious and/or expensive techniques. In this study we developed a simple and inexpensive assay for the steady state analysis of RGS protein GAP activity, using RGS4, RGS8 and RGS17 as models. Additionally, we report the use of RGS4 as a model for high throughput assay development. After initial setup, this assay can be conducted in a highly parallel fashion with a read time of less than 8 minutes for a 1536-well plate. The assay exhibited a robust Z-factor of 0.6 in a 1536-well plate. We conducted a pilot screen for inhibitors using a small, 2320 compound library. From this screen, 13 compounds were identified as compounds for further analysis. The successful development of this assay for high-throughput screening provides a low cost, high speed, simple method for assessing RGS protein activity.

  8. Simultaneous measurements of auto-immune and infectious disease specific antibodies using a high throughput multiplexing tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Asati

    Full Text Available Considering importance of ganglioside antibodies as biomarkers in various immune-mediated neuropathies and neurological disorders, we developed a high throughput multiplexing tool for the assessment of gangliosides-specific antibodies based on Biolpex/Luminex platform. In this report, we demonstrate that the ganglioside high throughput multiplexing tool is robust, highly specific and demonstrating ∼100-fold higher concentration sensitivity for IgG detection than ELISA. In addition to the ganglioside-coated array, the high throughput multiplexing tool contains beads coated with influenza hemagglutinins derived from H1N1 A/Brisbane/59/07 and H1N1 A/California/07/09 strains. Influenza beads provided an added advantage of simultaneous detection of ganglioside- and influenza-specific antibodies, a capacity important for the assay of both infectious antigen-specific and autoimmune antibodies following vaccination or disease. Taken together, these results support the potential adoption of the ganglioside high throughput multiplexing tool for measuring ganglioside antibodies in various neuropathic and neurological disorders.

  9. Comparison of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization for Low and High Throughput HER2 Genetic Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tim S; Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Kofoed, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    results show that the differences between the HER2 genetic assays do not have an effect on the analytic performance and the CISH technology is superior to high throughput HER2 genetic testing due to scanning speed, while the IQ-FISH may still be a choice for fast low throughput HER2 genetic testing.......The purpose was to evaluate and compare 5 different HER2 genetic assays with different characteristics that could affect the performance to analyze the human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) gene copy number under low and high throughput conditions. The study included 108 tissue samples from breast...... cancer patients with HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) results scored as 0/1+, 2+, and 3+. HER2 genetic status was analysed using chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Scoring results were documented through digital image analysis. The cancer region...

  10. Inhibitors of the salicylate synthase (MbtI) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis discovered by high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Mahalakshmi; Neres, João; Williams, Jessica; Wilson, Daniel J; Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Remmel, Rory P; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2010-12-03

    A simple steady-state kinetic high-throughput assay was developed for the salicylate synthase MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis. The mycobactins are small-molecule iron chelators produced by M. tuberculosis, and their biosynthesis has been identified as a promising target for the development of new antitubercular agents. The assay was miniaturized to a 384-well plate format and high-throughput screening was performed at the National Screening Laboratory for the Regional Centers of Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (NSRB). Three classes of compounds were identified comprising the benzisothiazolones (class I), diarylsulfones (class II), and benzimidazole-2-thiones (class III). Each of these compound series was further pursued to investigate their biochemical mechanism and structure-activity relationships. Benzimidazole-2-thione 4 emerged as the most promising inhibitor owing to its potent reversible inhibition.

  11. High-throughput process development of purification alternatives for the protein avidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Patrick; Hoffmann, Marc; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    With an increased number of applications in the field of the avidin-biotin technology, the resulting demand for highly-purified protein avidin has drawn our attention to the purification process of avidin that naturally occurs in chicken egg white. The high-throughput process development (HTPD) methodology was exploited, in order to evaluate purification process alternatives to commonly used ion-exchange chromatography. In a high-throughput format, process parameters for aqueous two-phase extraction, selective precipitation with salts and polyethylene glycol, and hydrophobic interaction and mixed-mode column chromatography experiments were performed. The HTPD strategy was complemented by a high-throughput tandem high-performance liquid chromatography assay for protein quantification. Suitable conditions for the separation of avidin from the major impurities ovalbumin, ovomucoid, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme were identified in the screening experiments. By combination of polyethylene glycol precipitation with subsequent resolubilization and separation in a polyethylene glycol/sulfate/sodium chloride two-phase system an avidin purity of 77% was obtained with a yield >90% while at the same time achieving a significant reduction of the process volume. The two-phase extraction and precipitation results were largely confirmed in larger scale with scale-up factors of 230 and 133, respectively. Seamless processing of the avidin enriched bottom phase was found feasible by using mixed-mode chromatography. By gradient elution a final avidin purity of at least 97% and yield >90% was obtained in the elution pool. The presented identification of a new and beneficial alternative for the purification of the high value protein thus represents a successful implementation of HTPD for an industrially relevant purification task. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  12. 'PACLIMS': a component LIM system for high-throughput functional genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donofrio, Nicole; Rajagopalon, Ravi; Brown, Douglas; Diener, Stephen; Windham, Donald; Nolin, Shelly; Floyd, Anna; Mitchell, Thomas; Galadima, Natalia; Tucker, Sara; Orbach, Marc J; Patel, Gayatri; Farman, Mark; Pampanwar, Vishal; Soderlund, Cari; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Dean, Ralph A

    2005-04-12

    Recent advances in sequencing techniques leading to cost reduction have resulted in the generation of a growing number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. Computational tools greatly assist in defining open reading frames and assigning tentative annotations. However, gene functions cannot be asserted without biological support through, among other things, mutational analysis. In taking a genome-wide approach to functionally annotate an entire organism, in this application the approximately 11,000 predicted genes in the rice blast fungus (Magnaporthe grisea), an effective platform for tracking and storing both the biological materials created and the data produced across several participating institutions was required. The platform designed, named PACLIMS, was built to support our high throughput pipeline for generating 50,000 random insertion mutants of Magnaporthe grisea. To be a useful tool for materials and data tracking and storage, PACLIMS was designed to be simple to use, modifiable to accommodate refinement of research protocols, and cost-efficient. Data entry into PACLIMS was simplified through the use of barcodes and scanners, thus reducing the potential human error, time constraints, and labor. This platform was designed in concert with our experimental protocol so that it leads the researchers through each step of the process from mutant generation through phenotypic assays, thus ensuring that every mutant produced is han