WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-temperature nickel alloys

  1. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  2. The strengthening mechanism of a nickel-based alloy after laser shock processing at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghong Li, Liucheng Zhou, Weifeng He, Guangyu He, Xuede Wang, Xiangfan Nie, Bo Wang, Sihai Luo and Yuqin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the strengthening mechanism of laser shock processing (LSP at high temperatures in the K417 nickel-based alloy. Using a laser-induced shock wave, residual compressive stresses and nanocrystals with a length of 30–200 nm and a thickness of 1 μm are produced on the surface of the nickel-based alloy K417. When the K417 alloy is subjected to heat treatment at 900 °C after LSP, most of the residual compressive stress relaxes while the microhardness retains good thermal stability; the nanocrystalline surface has not obviously grown after the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, which shows a comparatively good thermal stability. There are several reasons for the good thermal stability of the nanocrystalline surface, such as the low value of cold hardening of LSP, extreme high-density defects and the grain boundary pinning of an impure element. The results of the vibration fatigue experiments show that the fatigue strength of K417 alloy is enhanced and improved from 110 to 285 MPa after LSP. After the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, the fatigue strength is 225 MPa; the heat treatment has not significantly reduced the reinforcement effect. The feature of the LSP strengthening mechanism of nickel-based alloy at a high temperature is the co-working effect of the nanocrystalline surface and the residual compressive stress after thermal relaxation.

  3. Kinetics of passivation of a nickel-base alloy in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machet, A. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Surfaces, CNRS-ENSCP (UMR 7045), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France)]|[Framatome ANP, Tour AREVA, F-92084 Paris-la-Defense (France); Galtayries, A.; Zanna, S.; Marcus, P. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Surfaces, CNRS-ENSCP (UMR 7045), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Jolivet, P.; Scott, P. [Framatome ANP, Tour AREVA, F-92084 Paris-la-Defense (France); Foucault, M.; Combrade, P. [Framatome ANP, Centre Technique, F-71205 Le Creusot (France)

    2004-07-01

    The kinetics of passivation and the composition of the surface oxide layer, in high temperature and high pressure water, of a nickel-chromium-iron alloy (Alloy 600) have been investigated by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The samples have been exposed for short (0.4 - 8.2 min) and longer (0 - 400 hours) time periods to high temperature (325 deg. C) and high pressure water (containing boron and lithium) under controlled hydrogen pressure. The experiments were performed in two types of autoclaves: a novel autoclave dedicated to short time periods and a classic static autoclave for the longer exposures. In the initial stage of passivation, a continuous ultra-thin layer of chromium oxide (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is rapidly formed on the surface with an external layer of chromium hydroxide. For longer times of passivation, the oxide layer is in a duplex form with an internal chromium oxide layer and an external layer of nickel hydroxide. The growth of the internal Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide layer has been fitted by three classical models (parabolic, logarithmic and inverse logarithmic laws) for the short passivation times, and the growth curves have been extrapolated to longer passivation periods. The comparison with the experimental results reveals that the kinetics of passivation of Alloy 600 in high temperature and high pressure water, for passivation times up to 400 hours, is well fitted by a logarithmic growth law. (authors)

  4. Heat resistant nickel base alloy excellent in workability and high temperature strength properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susukida, H.; Itoh, H.; Kawai, H.; Kojima, T.; Sahira, K.; Takeiri, T.; Tsuji, I.; Yuge, M.

    1984-10-02

    A heat resistant nickel base alloy which is excellent in not only hot and cold workability but also high temperature strength properties and which also possesses satisfactory oxidation resistance. The nickel base alloy consists essentially of 0.001-0.15 percent carbon, 0.0005-0.05 percent calcium, 20.0-126.0 percent chromium, 4.7-9.4 percent cobalt, 5.0-16.0 percent molybdenum, 0.5-4.0 percent tungsten, with the total of molybdenum plus tungsten being from 9.0 to 16.5 percent, and the balance nickel and inevitable impurities. The alloy may further contain one selected from the group consisting of (1) 0.3-1.5 percent aluminum and 0.1-1.0 percent titanium, (2) 0.001-0.30 percent at least one of yttrium and rare earth elements, and (3) 0.001-1.0 percent at least one of niobium, vanadium and tantalum, whereby the aforementioned characteristics are further enhanced.

  5. Nickel Alloy Catalysts for the Anode of a High Temperature PEM Direct Propane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Vafaeyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature polymer electrode membrane fuel cells that use hydrocarbon as the fuel have many theoretical advantages over those that use hydrogen. For example, nonprecious metal catalysts can replace platinum. In this work, two of the four propane fuel cell reactions, propane dehydrogenation and water dissociation, were examined using nickel alloy catalysts. The adsorption energies of both propane and water decreased as the Fe content of Ni/Fe alloys increased. In contrast, they both increased as the Cu content of Ni/Cu alloys increased. The activation energy for the dehydrogenation of propane (a nonpolar molecule changed very little, even though the adsorption energy changed substantially as a function of alloy composition. In contrast, the activation energy for dissociation of water (a molecule that can be polarized decreased markedly as the energy of adsorption decreased. The different relationship between activation energy and adsorption energy for propane dehydrogenation and water dissociation alloys was attributed to propane being a nonpolar molecule and water being a molecule that can be polarized.

  6. Calculation of the high-temperature strength of complexly alloyed nickel alloys using equations of the system of nonpolarized ionic radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsepyan, S. V.; Lomberg, B. S.; Baburina, E. V.

    1995-06-01

    Modern complexly alloyed high-temperature nickel-base alloys contain up to 14 alloying elements. The complex composition ensures fulfillment of strict and often contradictory requirements imposed on the materials of critical parts of gas turbine engines (GTE). However, multi-component alloying creates considerable difficulties in the development of new compositions with specified characteristics or in the optimization of existing alloys. The present work is devoted to calculating the high-temperature strength of nickel alloys by means of the system of nonpolarized ionic radii (SNIR).

  7. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  8. High-temperature, high-frequency fretting fatigue of a single crystal nickel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlik, John Frederick

    Fretting is a structural damage mechanism arising from a combination of wear, corrosion, and fatigue between two nominally clamped surfaces subjected to an oscillatory loading. A critical location for fretting induced damage has been identified at the blade/disk and blade/damper interfaces of gas turbine engine turbomachinery and space propulsion components. The high-temperature, high-frequency loading environment seen by these components lead to severe stress gradients at the edge-of-contact that could potentially foster crack growth leading to component failure. These contact stresses drive crack nucleation in fretting and are very sensitive to the geometry of the contacting bodies, the contact loads, materials, temperature, and contact surface tribology (friction). To diagnose the threat that small and relatively undetectable fretting fatigue cracks pose to damage tolerance and the ensuing structural integrity of aerospace components, a strong motivation exists to develop a quantitative mechanics based understanding of fretting crack nucleation in advanced aerospace alloys. In response to this need, the objective of this work is to characterize the fretting behavior exhibited by a polycrystalline/single crystal nickel contact subjected to elevated frequency and temperature. The effort to meet this objective is two fold: (1) to develop a well-characterized experimental fretting rig to investigate fretting behavior of advanced aerospace alloys at high frequency and high temperature, and (2) to develop the associated contact modeling tools for calculating contact stresses given in-situ experimentally measured remote contact loads. By coupling the experimental results and stress analysis, this effort aims to correlate the fretting crack nucleation behavior with the local contact stresses calculated from the devised three dimensional, anisotropic, dissimilar material contact model. The experimental effort is first motivated by a survey of recent fretting issues and

  9. Nickel-base alloy forgings for advanced high temperature power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donth, B.; Diwo, A.; Blaes, N.; Bokelmann, D. [Saarschmiede GmbH Freiformschmiede, Voelklingen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The strong efforts to reduce the CO{sub 2} emissions lead to the demand for improved thermal efficiency of coal fired power plants. An increased thermal efficiency can be realised by higher steam temperatures and pressures in the boiler and the turbine. The European development aims for steam temperatures of 700 C which requires the development and use of new materials and also associated process technology for large components. Temperatures of 700 C and above are too high for the application of ferritic steels and therefore only Nickel-Base Alloys can fulfill the required material properties. In particular the Nickel-Base Alloy A617 is the most candidate alloy on which was focused the investigation and development in several German and European programs during the last 10 years. The goal is to verify and improve the attainable material properties and ultrasonic detectability of large Alloy 617 forgings for turbine rotors and boiler parts. For many years Saarschmiede has been manufacturing nickel and cobalt alloys and is participating the research programs by developing the manufacturing routes for large turbine rotor forgings up to a maximum diameter of 1000 mm as well as for forged tubes and valve parts for the boiler side. The experiences in manufacturing and testing of very large forgings made from nickel base alloys for 700 C steam power plants are reported. (orig.)

  10. Influence of Crucible Materials on High-temperature Properties of Vacuum-melted Nickel-chromium-cobalt Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R F; Rowe, John P; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    A study of the effect of induction-vacuum-melting procedure on the high-temperature properties of a titanium-and-aluminum-hardened nickel-base alloy revealed that a major variable was the type of ceramic used as a crucible. Reactions between the melt and magnesia or zirconia crucibles apparently increased high-temperature properties by introducing small amounts of boron or zirconium into the melts. Heats melted in alumina crucibles had relatively low rupture life and ductility at 1,600 F and cracked during hot-working as a result of deriving no boron or zirconium from the crucible.

  11. Braze Alloy Development for Fast Epitaxial High-Temperature Brazing of Single-Crystalline Nickel-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, B.; Piegert, S.; Rösler, J.

    2009-01-01

    For the repair of single-crystalline turbine components, fabricated from nickel-based superalloys, a new high-temperature brazing technology has been developed. Cracks in single-crystalline parts can be repaired by reproducing the single-crystalline microstructure over the complete gap width within very short brazing times. Nickel-manganese-based alloys were identified as systems that provide very high, epitaxial solidification rates. In contrast to commonly used braze alloys, such as nickel-boron or nickel-silicon systems, the process is not completely diffusion controlled but works with consolute systems. For brazing experiments 300- μm-wide parallel gaps as well as V-shaped gaps with a maximum width of 250 μm were used. A complete epitaxial solidification, that is, the absence of large-angle grain boundaries, could be achieved within brazing times, being up to 100 times shorter compared to commonly used transient-liquid-phase bonding technologies. To quantify the misorientation relative to the base material and the composition within and near the filled gaps, the results of the brazing experiments were visualized by means of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses were conducted.

  12. Static and dynamic cyclic oxidation of 12 nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base high-temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, C. A.; Johnston, J. R.; Sanders, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    Twelve typical high-temperature nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base alloys were tested by 1 hr cyclic exposures at 1038, 1093, and 1149 C and 0.05 hr exposures at 1093 C. The alloys were tested in both a dynamic burner rig at Mach 0.3 gas flow and in static air furnace for times up to 100 hr. The alloys were evaluated in terms of specific weight loss as a function of time, and X-ray diffraction analysis and metallographic examination of the posttest specimens. A method previously developed was used to estimate specific metal weight loss from the specific weight change of the sample. The alloys were then ranked on this basis. The burner-rig test was more severe than a comparable furnace test and resulted in an increased tendency for oxide spalling due to volatility of Cr in the protective scale and the more drastic cooling due to the air-blast quench of the samples. Increased cycle frequency also increased the tendency to spall for a given test exposure. The behavior of the alloys in both types of tests was related to their composition and their tendency to form scales. The alloys with the best overall behavior formed alpha-Al2O3 aluminate spinels.

  13. Using the PSCPCSP computer software for optimization of the composition of industrial alloys and development of new high-temperature nickel-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rtishchev, V. V.

    1995-11-01

    Using computer programs some foreign firms have developed new deformable and castable high-temperature nickel-base alloys such as IN, Rene, Mar-M, Udimet, TRW, TM, TMS, TUT, with equiaxial, columnar, and single-crystal structures for manufacturing functional and nozzle blades and other parts of the hot duct of transport and stationary gas-turbine installations (GTI). Similar investigations have been carried out in Russia. This paper presents examples of the use of the PSCPCSP computer software for a quantitative analysis of structural und phase characteristics and properties of industrial alloys with change (within the grade range) in the concentrations of the alloying elements for optimizing the composition of the alloys and regimes of their heat treatment.

  14. High temperature mechanical properties of a zirconium-modified, precipitation- strengthened nickel, 30 percent copper alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A precipitation-strengthened Monel-type alloy has been developed through minor alloying additions of zirconium to a base Ni-30Cu alloy. The results of this exploratory study indicate that thermomechanical processing of a solution-treated Ni-30Cu-0.2Zr alloy produced a dispersion of precipitates. The precipitates have been tentatively identified as a Ni5Zr compound. A comparison of the mechanical properties, as determined by testing in air, of the zirconium-modified alloy to those of a Ni-30Cu alloy reveals that the precipitation-strengthened alloy has improved tensile properties to 1200 K and improved stress-rupture properties to 1100 K. The oxidation characteristics of the modified alloy appeared to be equivalent to those of the base Ni-30Cu alloy.

  15. High temperature corrosion of nickel-base alloys in environments containing alkali sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Rachel; Flyg, Jesper; Caddeo, Sophie [Corrosion and Metals Research Institute, KIMAB, Stockholm (Sweden); Karlsson, Fredrik [Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspong (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    This work is directed towards producing data to assist in lifetime assessment of components in gas turbines run in severely polluted industrial environments where the main corrosive species is SO{sub 2}, which can condense to form alkali sulphates. Corrosion rates have been measured for the base materials, in order to assess the worst-case scenario, in which cracks or other damage has occurred to the protective coating. The information is expected to be of value to manufacturers, owners and inspectors of gas turbines. Six nickel-base superalloys were subject to thermal cycles of 160 hours duration, and 0.8mg/cm{sup 2} of 20 mol % Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 80mol% K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was applied before each cycle. The test temperatures were 850 deg C and 900 deg C, with maximum test durations of 24 cycles and 12 cycles respectively. The metal loss was assessed by metallography of cross sections and the sulphidation attack was found to be very uneven. Mass change data indicated that the corrosion process was largely linear in character, and probability plots and estimations of the propagation rate of corrosion based on the linear growth assumption were produced. The performance of the alloys increased with increasing chromium content. The single crystal materials CMSX4 and MD2 showed such high corrosion rates that their use in severely contaminated industrial environments is considered inadvisable. The best performance was shown by Inconel 939 and Inconel 6203, so that even if cracks occur in the protective coating, a reasonable remaining lifetime can be expected for these materials. Sulphide formation occurred at the reaction front in all cases and mixed sulphides such as Ta-Ni or Ti-Nb sulphides were often present. The work has news value since very little long-term data is currently available for materials performance in severely sulphidising environments. The project goals in terms of exposures and metrology have been fully realised. Contributions have been made to the

  16. Effect of aluminumion implantation on high temperature oxidation of nickel-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsuo, Atsushi (Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Center, 3-13-10 Nishigaoka, Kita-ku, Tokyo 115 (Japan)); Tanaki, Toshiyuki (Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Center, 3-13-10 Nishigaoka, Kita-ku, Tokyo 115 (Japan)); Shinozaki, Teruo (Japan Gas Appliances Inspection Association, 4-1-10 Azusawa, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174 (Japan)); Iwaki, Masaya (Institute of Physics and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 350-01 (Japan))

    1994-08-01

    The thermal oxidation properties of Al-ion-implanted, Ni-based alloys used for thermocouples of Inconel 600, alumel, chromel and constantan have been studied in humid O[sub 2] atmospheres at 970K for 50h. The Al ion implantation was performed with doses ranging from 1x10[sup 16] to 2x10[sup 17] ioncm[sup -2] at an energy of 50keV. The depth profiles measured by Auger electron spectroscopy showed that the concentrations of Al and O were higher near the surface of the alloys after implantation. The implanted alumel and constantan exhibited no effect on the suppression of oxidation. However, implantation above a dose of 1x10[sup 17]Al ioncm[sup -2] significantly slowed the oxidation of the Inconel 600 and chromel alloys containing Cr. The thermoelectric properties of the actual thermocouples modified by Al ion implantation are discussed. ((orig.))

  17. High temperature deformation behavior and processing map for a nickel-titanium shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiang-Qian; Lee, Sang-Won; Li, Yan-Feng; Park, Chan-Hee; Mi, Xu-Jun; Yeom, Jong-Taek

    2017-09-01

    The hot deformation behavior of 49.2Ti-50.8Ni shape memory alloy was studied using hot compressive deformation testing in the temperature range of 1023-1323 K and at strain rates of 0.01-10 s-1. The work-hardening rate was induced to analyze the stress-strain curves, and the critical stress σc and the dynamic recovery saturation stress σsat were measured which can be specified approximately by the expressions: σsat-1.12σp and σc-0.86σp. An Arrhenius model was calculated to describe the relationship between peak stress and the Z parameter. The relationship between deformation activation energy, the deformation conditions and the effect of Ni component in a binary TiNi alloy on the activation energy were discussed in this work. With the help of electron backscattering diffraction, a connected mode dynamic recrystallization microstructure was confirmed in peak efficiency regimes (850 °C & 0.01 s-1 and 1050 °C & 10 s-1) of the processing map.

  18. Vapor phase lubrication of high temperature alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyaloglu, B.F.; Graham, E.E.; Oreskovic, T.; Hajj, C.G. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States)

    1995-06-01

    In a previous study, it was found that when a nickel-based superalloy IN750 was heated to high temperatures, a passive layer of aluminum oxide formed on the surface, preventing vapor phase lubrication. In this study, two nickel-chrome-iron alloys and a nickel-copper alloy were studied for high temperature lubrication to see if these alloys, which contained small amounts of aluminum, would exhibit similar behavior. It was found that under static conditions, all three alloys formed a lubricious nodular coating when exposed to a vapor of aryl phosphate. Under dynamic sliding conditions at 500{degrees}C, these alloys were successfully lubricated with a coefficient of friction of 0.1 and no detectable wear. In order to explain these results, a direct correlation between successful vapor phase lubrication and the composition of the alloys containing aluminum has been proposed. If the ratio of copper/aluminum or iron/aluminum is greater that 100 vapor phase, lubrication will be successful. If the ratio is less than 10, a passive aluminum oxide layer will prevent vapor phase lubrication. By selecting alloys with a high iron or copper content, vapor phase lubrication can provide excellent lubrication at high temperatures. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Peculiar features of boron distribution in high temperature fracture area of rapidly quenched heat-resistant nickel alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulga, A. V., E-mail: avshulga@mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    This article comprises the results of comprehensive study of the structure and distribution in the high temperature fracture area of rapidly quenched heat-resistant superalloy of grade EP741NP after tensile tests. The structure and boron distribution in the fracture area are studied in detail by means of direct track autoradiography in combination with metallography of macro- and microstructure. A rather extensive region of microcracks generation and intensive boron redistribution is detected in the high temperature fracture area of rapidly quenched nickel superalloy of grade EP741NP. A significant decrease in boron content in the fracture area and formation of elliptically arranged boride precipitates are revealed. The mechanism of intense boron migration and stability violation of the structural and phase state in the fracture area of rapidly quenched heat-resistant nickel superalloy of grade EP741NP is proposed on the basis of accounting for deformation occurring in the fracture area and analysis of the stressed state near a crack.

  20. Arrhenius-Type Constitutive Model for High Temperature Flow Stress in a Nickel-Based Corrosion-Resistant Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Liu, F.; Cheng, J. J.; Zuo, Q.; Chen, C. F.

    2016-04-01

    Hot deformation behavior of Nickel-based corrosion-resistant alloy (N08028) was studied in compression tests conducted in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and the strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1. The flow stress behavior and microstructural evolution were observed during the hot deformation process. The results show that the flow stress increases with deformation temperature decreasing and strain rate increasing, and that the deformation activation energy ( Q) is not a constant but increases with strain rate increasing at a given strain, which is closely related with dislocation movement. On this basis, a revised strain-dependent hyperbolic sine constitutive model was established, which considered that the "material constants" in the original model vary as functions of the strain and strain rate. The flow curves of N08028 alloy predicted by the proposed model are in good agreement with the experimental results, which indicates that the revised constitutive model can estimate precisely the flow curves of N08028 alloy.

  1. Analysis of thermoelectric properties of high-temperature complex alloys of nickel-base, iron-base and cobalt-base groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1984-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties alloys of the nickel-base, iron-base, and cobalt-base groups containing from 1% to 25% 106 chromium were compared and correlated with the following material characteristics: atomic percent of the principle alloy constituent; ratio of concentration of two constituents; alloy physical property (electrical resistivity); alloy phase structure (percent precipitate or percent hardener content); alloy electronic structure (electron concentration). For solid-solution-type alloys the most consistent correlation was obtained with electron concentration, for precipitation-hardenable alloys of the nickel-base superalloy group, the thermoelectric potential correlated with hardener content in the alloy structure. For solid-solution-type alloys, no problems were found with thermoelectric stability to 1000; for precipitation-hardenable alloys, thermoelectric stability was dependent on phase stability. The effects of the compositional range of alloy constituents on temperature measurement uncertainty are discussed.

  2. Study of fluoride corrosion of nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, W. H.; Steindler, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report contains the results of an investigation of the corrosion resistance of nickel and nickel alloys exposed to fluorine, uranium hexafluoride, and volatile fission product fluorides at high temperatures. Survey of the unclassified literature on the subject is included.

  3. XPS and STM study of the growth and structure of passive films in high temperature water on a nickel-base alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machet, A.; Galtayries, A.; Zanna, S.; Klein, L.; Maurice, V.; Jolivet, P.; Foucault, M.; Combrade, P.; Scott, P.; Marcus, P

    2004-09-15

    The early stages of passivation in high temperature water of a nickel-chromium-iron alloy (Alloy 600) have been investigated by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). The samples (polycrystal Ni-16Cr-9Fe (wt. %) and single crystal Ni-17Cr-7Fe (1 1 1)) have been exposed for short time periods (0.4-8.2 min) to high temperature (325 deg. C) and high pressure water, under controlled hydrogen pressure, in a microautoclave designed to transfer the samples from and to the XPS spectrometer without air exposure. In the early stages of oxidation of the alloy (0.4-4 min), an ultra-thin oxide layer (about 1 nm) is formed, which consists of chromium oxide (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}), according to the Cr 2p{sub 3/2} core level spectrum. An outer layer of Cr(OH){sub 3} with a very small amount of Ni(OH){sub 2} is also revealed by the Cr 2p{sub 3/2}, Ni 2p{sub 3/2}, and O 1s core level spectra. At this early stage, there is a temporary blocking of the growth of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. For longer exposures (4-8 min), the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} inner layer becomes thicker, at the expense of the outer Cr(OH){sub 3} layer. This implies the transport of Cr and Ni through the oxide layer, and release of Ni{sup 2+} in the solution. The structure of the ultra-thin oxide film formed on a single crystal Ni-17Cr-7Fe(1 1 1) alloy was analysed by STM in the constant current mode; STM images reveal that, in the early stages of oxidation, the oxide is crystalline, and the observed structure is consistent with the hexagonal structure of the oxygen sub-lattice in the basal plane (0 0 0 1) of {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  4. Thermophysical properties of Incoloy 800 and five additional FeNiCr-base high temperature alloys in comparison with the nickel-base alloy Nimonic 86 between 20 and 1000deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, F. (Mannesmann-Forschungsinstitut GmbH, Duisburg (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-05-01

    The most important physical properties of the following high temperature alloys have been determined in the temperature range between 20 and 1000deg C: Incoloy 800, Incoloy 800 H, Incoloy 802, Incoloy 802 Nb, Manaurite 36 X, IN 519 and Nimonic 86. It is shown that these materials differ only a little in some of the properties. These properties include thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. Owing to a substantially higher nickel content, the density of the nickel-base alloy Nimonic 86 differs significantly from that of the other materials investigated. The differences in the elastic properties of the materials are to be attributed to the differences in their crystallographic texture. Incoly 800 was very highly textured compared to other materials. The temperature dependence of the coefficient of linear thermal expansion and electrical resistivity of these materials is different from the normal behaviour of pure metals and alloys. The discrepancies observed are attributable to short range ordering processes in the case of Nimonic 86 and to temperature-induced electron transitons in the case of the other materials investigated, as known for austenitic Cr-Ni steels. (orig.).

  5. Nonequilibrium Phase Chemistry in High Temperature Structure Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.

    1991-01-01

    Titanium and nickel aluminides of nonequilibrium microstructures and in thin gauge thickness were identified, characterized and produced for potential high temperature applications. A high rate sputter deposition technique for rapid surveillance of the microstructures and nonequilibrium phase is demonstrated. Alloys with specific compositions were synthesized with extended solid solutions, stable dispersoids, and specific phase boundaries associated with different heat treatments. Phase stability and mechanical behavior of these nonequilibrium alloys were investigated and compared.

  6. NASA vane alloy boasts high-temperature strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The higher inlet-gas temperatures in new aircraft turbine engines make it necessary to use improved superalloys in engine design. Such superalloys are provided by WAZ alloys. NASA has explored the Ni-W-Al system in an attempt to find higher-strength nickel-based alloys for use as stator vane materials. Critical performance goals have been met with the new alloy WAZ-16. With suitable protective coatings, WAZ-16 appears to have considerable potential for high-temperature stator vane applications.

  7. Grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient in MQL grinding of high-temperature nickel-base alloy by using different vegetable oils as base oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Benkai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oil can be used as a base oil in minimal quantity of lubrication (MQL. This study compared the performances of MQL grinding by using castor oil, soybean oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil, sunflower oil, peanut oil, and palm oil as base oils. A K-P36 numerical-control precision surface grinder was used to perform plain grinding on a workpiece material with a high-temperature nickel base alloy. A YDM–III 99 three-dimensional dynamometer was used to measure grinding force, and a clip-type thermocouple was used to determine grinding temperature. The grinding force, grinding temperature, and energy ratio coefficient of MQL grinding were compared among the seven vegetable oil types. Results revealed that (1 castor oil-based MQL grinding yields the lowest grinding force but exhibits the highest grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient; (2 palm oil-based MQL grinding generates the second lowest grinding force but shows the lowest grinding temperature and energy ratio coefficient; (3 MQL grinding based on the five other vegetable oils produces similar grinding forces, grinding temperatures, and energy ratio coefficients, with values ranging between those of castor oil and palm oil; (4 viscosity significantly influences grinding force and grinding temperature to a greater extent than fatty acid varieties and contents in vegetable oils; (5 although more viscous vegetable oil exhibits greater lubrication and significantly lower grinding force than less viscous vegetable oil, high viscosity reduces the heat exchange capability of vegetable oil and thus yields a high grinding temperature; (6 saturated fatty acid is a more efficient lubricant than unsaturated fatty acid; and (7 a short carbon chain transfers heat more effectively than a long carbon chain. Palm oil is the optimum base oil of MQL grinding, and this base oil yields 26.98 N tangential grinding force, 87.10 N normal grinding force, 119.6 °C grinding temperature, and 42.7% energy

  8. Copper Alloy For High-Temperature Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreshfield, Robert L.; Ellis, David L.; Michal, Gary

    1994-01-01

    Alloy of Cu/8Cr/4Nb (numbers indicate parts by atom percent) improved over older high-temperature copper-based alloys in that it offers enhanced high temperature strength, resistance to creep, and ductility while retaining most of thermal conductivity of pure copper; in addition, alloy does not become embrittled upon exposure to hydrogen at temperatures as high as 705 degrees C. Designed for use in presence of high heat fluxes and active cooling; for example, in heat exchangers in advanced aircraft and spacecraft engines, and other high-temperature applications in which there is need for such material. High conductivity and hardness of alloy exploited in welding electrodes and in high-voltage and high-current switches and other applications in which wear poses design problem.

  9. Nickel alloys and high-alloyed special stainless steels. Properties, manufacturing, applications. 4. compl. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heubner, Ulrich; Kloewer, Jutta; Alves, Helena; Behrens, Rainer; Schindler, Claudius; Wahl, Volker; Wolf, Martin

    2012-07-01

    This book contains the following eight topics: 1. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels - Material overview and metallurgical principles (U. Heubner); 2. Corrosion resistance of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (U. Heubner); 3. Welding of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (T. Hoffmann, M. Wolf); 4. High-temperature materials for industrial plant construction (J. Kloewer); 5. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels as hot roll clad composites-a cost-effective alternative (C. Schindler); 6. Selected examples of the use of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels in chemical plants (H. Alves); 7. The use of nickel alloys and stainless steels in environmental engineering (V. Wahl); 8: Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels for the oil and gas industry (R. Behrens).

  10. Generalized corrosion of nickel base alloys in high temperature aqueous media: a contribution to the comprehension of the mechanisms; Corrosion generalisee des alliages a base nickel en milieu aqueux a haute temperature: apport a la comprehension des mecanismes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti-Sillans, L

    2007-11-15

    In France, nickel base alloys, such as alloy 600 and alloy 690, are the materials constituting steam generators (SG) tubes of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The generalized corrosion resulting from the interaction between these alloys and the PWR primary media leads, on the one hand, to the formation of a thin protective oxide scale ({approx} 10 nm), and on the other hand, to the release of cations in the primary circuit, which entails an increase of the global radioactivity of this circuit. The goal of this work is to supply some new comprehension elements about nickel base alloys corrosion phenomena in PWR primary media, taking up with underlining the effects of metallurgical and physico-chemical parameters on the nature and the growth mechanisms of the protective oxide scale. In this context, the passive film formed during the exposition of alloys 600, 690 and Ni-30Cr, in conditions simulating the PWR primary media, has been analyzed by a set of characterization techniques (SEM, TEM, PEC and MPEC, XPS). The coupling of these methods leads to a fine description, in terms of nature and structure, of the multilayered oxide forming during the exposition of nickel base alloys in primary media. Thus, the protective part of the oxide scale is composed of a continuous layer of iron and nickel mixed chromite, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nodules dispersed at the alloy / mixed chromite interface. The study of protective scale growth mechanisms by tracers and markers experiments reveals that the formation of the mixed chromite is the consequence of an anionic mechanism, resulting from short circuits like grain boundaries diffusion. Besides, the impact of alloy surface defects has also been studied, underlining a double effect of this parameter, which influences the short circuits diffusion density in oxide and the formation rate of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nodules. The sum of these results leads to suggest a description of the nickel base alloys corrosion mechanisms in PWR primary

  11. High temperature alloy chloridation at 850 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier, S.; Bekaddour, A. [Laboratoire de Recherches sur la Reactivite des Solides, UMR 5613 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, 21078 Dijon (France); Ched' Homme, S. [DTM/SRPU/LPPU, CEA Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Amilain-Basset, K.; Buisson, L. [Interface Caracterisation des Materiaux, Universite de Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon (France)

    2007-05-15

    The resistance of eight alloys against chloridation was tested at 850 C in Ar/Cl{sub 2} (2.5% Cl{sub 2}) for 15 min. Pre-oxidation treatments were performed for 1 h and 8 h at 850 C in order to produce a thin, adherent and protective oxide scale able to improve the chloridation behaviour of the tested materials. The chloridised sample morphologies were compared to the morphologies observed on the non pre-oxidised samples. The alloys containing a large amount of iron did not exhibit any chloridation resistance, even after pre-oxidation, and were severely damaged. The nickel based alloys gave interesting results but were also attacked by chloride, probably by the ''active oxidation'' mechanism. The duration of the pre-oxidation treatment plays an important role, since the 8 h pre-oxidation appears more beneficial than the 1 h pre-oxidation, to delay the chloridation, probably because of the best quality of the oxide layer grown during 8 h. For the nickel based materials, the effects of chloride appear less severe than for the iron-based alloys, but are not stopped. The ''active oxidation'' mechanism is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of the tested materials. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Influence of microstructure on the shape memory properties of two titanium-lean, nickel-titanium-platinum high temperature shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudish, Grant A.

    Because of NiTi's superior properties (work output, strength, ductility, recoverable strain, etc.) it is the base system of choice for development of derivative high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs). Ternary additions of Hf, Zr, Pt, Pd, and Au can be made, in quantities greater than ≈ 10 at.%, to increase the transformation temperature of Ni-Ti based SMAs. Pt as an alloying addition is attractive because of (1) its efficiency in raising the martensitic transformation temperature, (2) the relatively stable properties during thermal cycling of Pt-containing Nitinol (NiTi), and (3) the high work outputs of Ni-Ti-Pt alloys relative to other HTSMAs. Platinum containing samples of NiTi were thermally processed to explore the utility of Ti-lean precipitates for matrix strengthening and stabilization of shape memory properties during thermomechanical cycling. Two alloys, Ti48.5Ni30.5Pt 21 and Ti49.5Ni29.5Pt21, were heat treated for 1, 5, 24 and 100h at 500, 550, 600, 650, and 700°C and examined using SEM, EDS, DTA, XRD and TEM techniques. Two relevant precipitate phases, the PL and Ti2(Ni,Pt)3 phases, were identified, characterized and the thermodynamic stability and relevant behavior during thermal processing determined. Samples were then subjected to thermomechanical testing that consisted of two parts, (1) two thermal cycles (75°C to 500°C to 75°C) each at stresses of 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300MPa, and (2) 100 thermal cycles at 200MPa. With this combination of systematic microstructural characterization and isobaric thermal cycling, the link between microstructure and shape memory performance was made. The influence the PL and Ti2(Ni,Pt)3 phases have on properties such as martensitic transformation temperatures, transformation strain, and accumulated irrecoverable strain are explained and discussed. Specifically, it was found that the P L-phase suppresses transformation temperatures and strains through a matrix strengthening effect, but also

  13. Corrosion of Alloy 617 in high-temperature gas environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hao-Ping [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wang, Mei-Ya, E-mail: meywang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Trai [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Kai, Ji-Jung [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with helium gas as the primary coolant have been considered as one type of the Generation IV nuclear power reactor systems. Several nickel-based superalloys, including Alloy 617, are potential structural materials to serve as pressure boundary components, such as the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) in an HTGR. Impurities in a helium coolant, such as H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}, can interact with structural materials at working temperatures of >900 °C, leading to serious degradation on these materials. In addition, defects in IHX surface coatings would allow these species to reach and interact with the external surfaces of these components, leading to similar or even more serious degradation. In this study we investigated the oxidation behavior of Alloy 617 in high-temperature, gaseous environments with various levels of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. A series of general corrosion tests were conducted at test temperatures of 650 °C, 750 °C, 850 °C and 950 °C under various coolant compositions of dry air, 1% O{sub 2}, 10% relative humidity (RH), and 50% RH. Preliminary results showed that the surface morphologies of the Alloy 617 samples exhibited distinct evidence of intergranular corrosion. Compact chromium oxide layers were observed on the sample surfaces. The oxidation mechanisms of this alloy in the designated environments are discussed.

  14. Zirconium modified nickel-copper alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittenberger, J. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved material for use in a catalytic reactor which reduces nitrogen oxide from internal combustion engines is in the form of a zirconium-modified, precipitation-strengthened nickel-copper alloy. This material has a nominal composition of Ni-30 Cu-0.2 Zr and is characterized by improved high temperature mechanical properties.

  15. Grain boundary selective oxidation and intergranular stress corrosion crack growth of high-purity nickel binary alloys in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, S. M.; Olszta, M. J.; Toloczko, M. B.; Schreiber, D. K.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of alloying elements in Ni-5at%X binary alloys on intergranular (IG) corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been assessed in 300-360°C hydrogenated water at the Ni/NiO stability line. Alloys with Cr or Al additions exhibited grain boundary oxidation and IGSCC, while localized degradation was not observed for pure Ni, Ni-Cu or Ni-Fe alloys. Environment-enhanced crack growth was determined by comparing the response in water and N2 gas. Results demonstrate that selective grain boundary oxidation of Cr and Al promoted IGSCC of these Ni alloys in hydrogenated water.

  16. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chain T.; Takeyama, Masao

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250.degree. C. and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr.sub.2 Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements.

  17. Laser Brazing of High Temperature Braze Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y. P.; Seaman, R. F.; McQuillan, T. J.; Martiens, R. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) consists of 1080 conical tubes, which are furnace brazed themselves, manifolds, and surrounding structural jacket making almost four miles of braze joints. Subsequent furnace braze cycles are performed due to localized braze voids between the coolant tubes. SSME nozzle experiences extremely high heat flux (180 mW/sq m) during hot fire. Braze voids between coolant tubes may result in hot combustion gas escape causing jacket bulges. The nozzle can be disqualified for flight or result in mission failure if the braze voids exceed the limits. Localized braze processes were considered to eliminate braze voids, however, damage to the parent materials often prohibited use of such process. Being the only manned flight reusable rocket engine, it has stringent requirement on the braze process. Poor braze quality or damage to the parent materials limits the nozzle service life. The objective of this study was to develop a laser brazing process to provide quality, localized braze joints without adverse affect on the parent materials. Gold (Au-Cu-Ni-Pd-Mn) based high temperature braze alloys were used in both powder and wire form. Thin section iron base superalloy A286 tube was used as substrate materials. Different Laser Systems including CO2 (10.6 micrometers, 1kW), ND:YAG (1.06 micrometers, 4kW). and direct diode laser (808nm. 150W) were investigated for brazing process. The laser process variables including wavelength. laser power, travel speed and angle of inclination were optimized according to bead geometry and braze alloy wetting at minimum heat input level, The properties of laser brazing were compared to that of furnace brazing. Microhardness profiles were used for braze joint property comparison between laser and furnace brazing. The cooling rate of laser brazing was compared to furnace brazing based on secondary dendritic arm spacing, Both optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were used to evaluate the microstructures of

  18. High-temperature ordered intermetallic alloys V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, I. (ed.) (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Thayer School of Engineering); Darolia, R. (ed.) (GE Aircraft Engines, Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Whittenberger, J.D. (ed.) (NASA, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center); Yoo, M.H. (ed.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings represent the written record of the High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys 5 Symposium which was held in conjunction with the 1992 Fall Materials Research Society meeting in Boston, Massachusetts. This symposium, which was the fifth in the series originated by C.C Koch, C.T. Liu and N.S. Stoloff in 1984, was very successful with 86 oral presentations over four days, and approximately 140 posters given during two lively evening sessions. Such a response, in view of the increasing number of conferences being held on intermetallics each year, reveals the continued high regard for this series of symposia. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  19. Spectral emissivity of candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors in high temperature air environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, G., E-mail: gcao@wisc.edu; Weber, S.J.; Martin, S.O.; Sridharan, K.; Anderson, M.H.; Allen, T.R.

    2013-10-15

    Emissivity measurements for candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors were carried out in a custom-built experimental facility, capable of both efficient and reliable measurements of spectral emissivities of multiple samples at high temperatures. The alloys studied include 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, Alloy 617, and SA508 ferritic steel. The oxidation of alloys plays an important role in dictating emissivity values. The higher chromium content of 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 617 results in an oxide layer only of sub-micron thickness even at 700 °C and consequently the emissivity of these alloys remains low. In contrast, the low alloy SA508 ferritic steel which contains no chromium develops a thicker oxide layer, and consequently exhibits higher emissivity values.

  20. Spectral emissivity of candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors in high temperature air environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, G.; Weber, S. J.; Martin, S. O.; Sridharan, K.; Anderson, M. H.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-10-01

    Emissivity measurements for candidate alloys for very high temperature reactors were carried out in a custom-built experimental facility, capable of both efficient and reliable measurements of spectral emissivities of multiple samples at high temperatures. The alloys studied include 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, Alloy 617, and SA508 ferritic steel. The oxidation of alloys plays an important role in dictating emissivity values. The higher chromium content of 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 617 results in an oxide layer only of sub-micron thickness even at 700 °C and consequently the emissivity of these alloys remains low. In contrast, the low alloy SA508 ferritic steel which contains no chromium develops a thicker oxide layer, and consequently exhibits higher emissivity values.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE TITANIUM ALLOY VT9,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper describes work, done in 1957-58, in the course of the development of the high-temperature (HT) Ti alloy currently termed BT9(VT9). The...target requirements for the new alloy specified the development of a Ti alloy for forging billets and stamping blanks which at 500 degrees centigrade

  2. Corrosion of high temperature alloys in solar salt at 400, 500, and 680ÀC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    Corrosion tests at 400, 500, and 680ÀC were performed using four high temperature alloys; 347SS, 321SS In625, and HA230. Molten salt chemistry was monitored over time through analysis of nitrite, carbonate, and dissolved metals. Metallography was performed on alloys at 500 and 680ÀC, due to the relatively thin oxide scale observed at 400ÀC. At 500ÀC, corrosion of iron based alloys took the form of chromium depletion and iron oxides, while nickel based alloys also had chromium depletion and formation of NiO. Chromium was detected in relatively low concentrations at this temperature. At 680ÀC, significant surface corrosion occurred with metal losses greater than 450microns/year after 1025hours of exposure. Iron based alloys formed complex iron, sodium, and chromium oxides. Some data suggests grain boundary chromium depletion of 321SS. Nickel alloys formed NiO and metallic nickel corrosion morphologies, with HA230 displaying significant internal oxidation in the form of chromia. Nickel alloys both exhibited worse corrosion than iron based alloys likely due to preferential dissolution of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten.

  3. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  4. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600ÀC with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  5. Magnesium Diecasting Alloys for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekguleryuz, Mihriban O.; Kaya, A. Arslan

    New growth area for automotive use of magnesium is powertrain applications such as the transmission case and engine block. These applications see service conditions in the temperature range of 150-200C under 50-70 MPa of tensile and compressive loads. In addition, metallurgical stability, fatigue resistance, corrosion resistance and castability requirements need to be met. A decade of research and development has resulted in a number of creep- resistant magnesium alloys that are potential candidates for elevated-temperature automotive applications. These alloys are mostly based on rare-earth and alkaline earth element additions to magnesium. This paper gives an overview of the various magnesium alloy systems for use in elevated-temperature applications.

  6. Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent dimensional stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  7. High strength nickel base alloy, WAZ-16, for applications up to 2200 F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, W. J.; Freche, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Alloy product is high strength, high temperature nickel base material with higher incipient melting temperature than all known nickel base alloys. It is microstructurally stable and has high impact resistance both before and after prolonged thermal exposure. It contains relatively few alloying constitutents and low content of expensive and rare metals.

  8. Nickel-base alloys for severe environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.K.; Flower, H.L. [Inco Alloys International Inc., Huntington, WV (United States); Hack, G.A.J. [Inco Alloys Ltd., Hereford (United Kingdom); Isobe, S. [Daido Steel Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Inconel alloys MA754 and MA758 are nickel-base, oxide dispersion-strengthened superalloys made by mechanical alloying. The simple nickel-chromium matrix, when combined with the strengthening effect of the yttrium oxide dispersoid during mechanical alloys, provides excellent creep properties, resistance to thermal fatigue, and surface stability suitable for operation without protective coatings. Gas turbine engine components are primary applications for alloy MA754, but this aerospace alloy has been applied in many other products that operate in severe conditions, and alloy MA758 was developed specifically for aggressive, elevated temperature industrial environments. Billets for large bar and plate are typically consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), because this technology allows production of forms suitable for a variety of industrial components. Material consolidated by HIP and conventionally worked by extrusion and hot rolling generally exhibits properties that are more isotropic than those of material consolidated by extrusion. However, the degree of anisotropy depends strongly on the specific processing of the consolidated billet. This article describes production of new mill shapes from HIP billets, and reviews current and potential applications such as skid rails for high-temperature walking-beam furnaces, heat treating furnace parts, equipment for handling molten glass, and furnace tubes.

  9. High-temperature alloys for high-power thermionic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang S.; Jacobson, D.L.; D' cruz, L.; Luo, Anhua; Chen, Bor-Ling.

    1990-08-01

    The need for structural materials with useful strength above 1600 k has stimulated interest in refractory-metal alloys. Tungsten possesses an extreme high modulus of elasticity as well as the highest melting temperature among metals, and hence is being considered as one of the most promising candidate materials for high temperature structural applications such as space nuclear power systems. This report is divided into three chapters covering the following: (1) the processing of tungsten base alloys; (2) the tensile properties of tungsten base alloys; and (3) creep behavior of tungsten base alloys. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter. (SC)

  10. Pulse Reversal Plating of Nickel and Nickel Alloys for MEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben

    2001-01-01

    Pulse plating has previously been reported to improve the properties of nickel and nickel alloy deposits. Typically, focus has been on properties such as grain size, hardness and smoothness. When pulse plating is to be utilized for micro electromechanical systems (MEMS), internal stress...... and material distribution is even more important. Using a bath consisting mostly of nickel chloride, pulse reversal plating of both pure nickel and nickel-cobalt alloys has been used to fabricate tools for micro-injection molding. Pulse reversal plating of ternary soft-magnetic alloys, comprising 45-65 percent...

  11. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys. 5 figs.

  12. High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Davies

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The realisation of employing Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM technologies to produce components in the aerospace industry is significantly increasing. This can be attributed to their ability to offer the near-net shape fabrication of fully dense components with a high potential for geometrical optimisation, all of which contribute to subsequent reductions in material wastage and component weight. However, the influence of this manufacturing route on the properties of aerospace alloys must first be fully understood before being actively applied in-service. Specimens from the nickel superalloy C263 have been manufactured using Powder Bed Direct Laser Deposition (PB-DLD, each with unique post-processing conditions. These variables include two build orientations, vertical and horizontal, and two different heat treatments. The effects of build orientation and post-process heat treatments on the materials’ mechanical properties have been assessed with the Small Punch Tensile (SPT test technique, a practical test method given the limited availability of PB-DLD consolidated material. SPT testing was also conducted on a cast C263 variant to compare with PB-DLD derivatives. At both room and elevated temperature conditions, differences in mechanical performances arose between each material variant. This was found to be instigated by microstructural variations exposed through microscopic and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analysis. SPT results were also compared with available uniaxial tensile data in terms of SPT peak and yield load against uniaxial ultimate tensile and yield strength.

  13. High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sean; Jeffs, Spencer; Lancaster, Robert; Baxter, Gavin

    2017-04-26

    The realisation of employing Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) technologies to produce components in the aerospace industry is significantly increasing. This can be attributed to their ability to offer the near-net shape fabrication of fully dense components with a high potential for geometrical optimisation, all of which contribute to subsequent reductions in material wastage and component weight. However, the influence of this manufacturing route on the properties of aerospace alloys must first be fully understood before being actively applied in-service. Specimens from the nickel superalloy C263 have been manufactured using Powder Bed Direct Laser Deposition (PB-DLD), each with unique post-processing conditions. These variables include two build orientations, vertical and horizontal, and two different heat treatments. The effects of build orientation and post-process heat treatments on the materials' mechanical properties have been assessed with the Small Punch Tensile (SPT) test technique, a practical test method given the limited availability of PB-DLD consolidated material. SPT testing was also conducted on a cast C263 variant to compare with PB-DLD derivatives. At both room and elevated temperature conditions, differences in mechanical performances arose between each material variant. This was found to be instigated by microstructural variations exposed through microscopic and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. SPT results were also compared with available uniaxial tensile data in terms of SPT peak and yield load against uniaxial ultimate tensile and yield strength.

  14. High temperature fracture characteristics of a nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, Jeoung Han; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.

    2010-12-01

    The nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have been developed to improve high temperature strength and radiation resistance by refining grains and including nanoclusters. Among the key properties of NFAs needed to be assessed for advanced reactor applications the cracking resistance at high temperatures has not been well known. In this work, therefore, the high temperature fracture behavior has been investigated for the latest nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT (SM10). The fracture toughness of the alloy was above 140 MPa √m at low temperatures, room temperature (RT) and 200 °C, but decreased to a low fracture toughness range of 52-82 MPa √m at higher temperatures up to 700 °C. This behavior was explained by the fractography results indicating that the unique nanostructure of 14YWT alloy produced shallow plasticity layers at high temperatures and a low-ductility grain boundary debonding occurred at 700 °C. The discussion also proposes methods to improve resistance to cracking.

  15. High temperature strain of metals and alloys. Physical fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitin, V. [National Technical Univ., Zaporozhye (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01

    The author shows how new in-situ X-ray investigations and transmission electron microscope studies lead to novel explanations of high-temperature deformation and creep in pure metals, solid solutions and super alloys. This approach is the first to find unequivocal and quantitative expressions for the macroscopic deformation rate by means of three groups of parameters: substructural characteristics, physical material constants and external conditions. Creep strength of the studied uptodate single crystal super alloys is greatly increased over conventional polycrystalline super alloys. The contents of this book include: macroscopic characteristics of strain at high temperatures; experimental equipment and technique of in situ X-ray investigations; experimental data and structural parameters in deformed metals; sub-boundaries as dislocation sources and obstacles; the physical mechanism of creep and the quantitative structural model; simulation of the parameters evolution; system of differential equations; high-temperature deformation of industrial super alloys; single crystals of super alloys; effect of composition, orientation and temperature on properties; and creep of some refractory metals.

  16. AN ELECTROPLATING METHOD OF FORMING PLATINGS OF NICKEL, COBALT, NICKEL ALLOYS OR COBALT ALLOYS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    An electroplating method of forming platings of nickel, cobalt, nickel alloys or cobalt alloys with reduced stresses in an electrodepositing bath of the type: Watt's bath, chloride bath or a combination thereof, by employing pulse plating with periodic reverse pulse and a sulfonated naphthalene...... additive. This method makes it possible to deposit nickel, cobalt, nickel or cobalt platings without internal stresses....

  17. High-temperature performance of a new nickel-based filler metal for power generation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shingledecker, J.; Coleman, K. [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Siefert, J.; Tanzosh, J. [Babcok and Wilcox Research Center, Barberton, OH (United States); Newell, W. [Euroweld, Mooresville, NC (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A new nickel-based weld filler metal, EPRI P87, has been developed as a superior alternative to ERNiCr-3 for use in dissimilar metal welds (DMW) between ferritic and austenitic materials. EPRI P87 has a low coefficient of thermal expansion more closely matching alloys such as Grade 91 and 92 than other available filler metals. Additionally, the size of the carbon denuded region adjacent to the weld in the heat-affected-zone is minimized/eliminated by proper control of weld metal composition. In this work the high-temperature mechanical behavior of DMWs utilizing EPRI P87 (GTAW and GMAW processes) was characterized through tensile and long-term creep-rupture testing. Microstructure analysis was also conducted on tested specimens to evaluate the HAZ regions and failure modes. Performance of the weld metal and welded joints is discussed and compared with ERNiCr-3 and typical 9%Cr-MoV filler metals. (orig.)

  18. Cyclic degradation of titanium-tantalum high-temperature shape memory alloys - The role of dislocation activity and chemical decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Niendorf, T.; Krooß, P.; Somsen, C.; Rynko, R.; Paulsen, A.; Batyrshina, E.; Frenzel, J.; G. Eggeler; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Titanium-tantalum shape memory alloys (SMAs) are promising candidates for actuator applications at elevated temperatures. They may even succeed in substituting ternary nickel-titanium high temperature SMAs, which are either extremely expensive or difficult to form. However, titanium-tantalum alloys show rapid functional and structural degradation under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading. The current work reveals that degradation is not only governed by the evolution of the ω-phase. Dislocation ...

  19. Pulse reversal plating of nickel alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben

    2007-01-01

    Pulse plating has previously been reported to improve the properties of nickel and nickel alloy deposits. Typically, focus has been on properties such as grain size, hardness and smoothness. When pulse plating is to be utilised for microtechnologies such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS......), internal stress and material distribution are even more important. With baths based upon nickel chloride, and nickel and cobalt chlorides, pulse reversal plating of both pure nickel and nickel-cobalt alloys has been used to fabricate tools for microinjection moulding. Pulse reversal plating of ternary soft...

  20. High-temperature performance evaluation of adirectionally solidified nickel-base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, D. A.; Stiles, D.

    1997-08-01

    The application of a new approach, design for performance, for high-temperature alloy development, design analysis, and remaining life assessment, based on short-time high-precision testing, is described in this paper. The material tested was a directionally solidified nickel-base alloy, GTD111. It was found that the creep strength at 850 °C was indeed superior to that of a competitive alloy, IN738, but was not necessarily enhanced by the preferred alignment of grain boundaries and crystal orientation. In contrast, the fracture resistance at 800 °C was improved in the longitudinal direction compared with transverse and diagonal orientations in terms of susceptibility to gas phase embrittlement (GPE) by oxygen. Specimens cut transversely and diagonally to the growth direction were more sensitive to GPE than specimens taken from conventionally cast IN738. The new conceptual framework allows account to be taken of GPE and other embrittling phenomena, which may develop in service, leading to rational life management decisions for gas turbine users. Additionally, straightforward design analysis procedures can be developed from the test data, which for the first time allow separate measurements of creep strength and fracture resistance to be used for performance evaluation.

  1. Dendritic Solidification in a Copper Nickel Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    DÜNDAR, Sacit

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of nickel in dendrite arms and in interdendritic regions of copper-10% nickel alloy solidified under production conditions designed to provide 4 different cooling rates was investigated. The results indicate that at different rates of solidification undercooling, diffusion and convection mechanisms affect the microsegregation of nickel and copper in the cast materials to various extents.

  2. High temperature hardness of steels and iron-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, H., E-mail: torres@ac2t.at; Varga, M.; Ripoll, M. Rodríguez

    2016-08-01

    Hot hardness, related to the mechanical strength and wear resistance of materials at high temperatures, has been measured from room temperature up to 800 °C for a comprehensive set of iron-based alloys having different microstructures and chemical compositions. The results obtained suggest the existence of several softening regimes with increasing temperatures, also with a massive hardness drop observed to begin at temperatures close to 0.5 times the melting temperature for most of the chosen alloys. Austenitic steel grades were also observed to show a significant softening behaviour at moderate temperatures compared to ferritic and martensitic alloys, attributed to the dislocation dynamics of face cubic centred alloys. The exact nature of the temperature dependence shown by hardness has been proposed to adopt the form of an exponential Arrhenius equation. Another model suggested in the available literature is also discussed within this context. Additionally, the role of alloying elements has been correlated to the softening behaviour. Molybdenum or boron were found to slow down the softening behaviour, while carbide-forming elements such as vanadium and tungsten were found to be beneficial for room temperature hardness.

  3. Amorphous Alloy Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, K. [Southwest Research Inst. (SwRI), San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-09-30

    At the beginning of this project, thin film amorphous alloy membranes were considered a nascent but promising new technology for industrial-scale hydrogen gas separations from coal- derived syngas. This project used a combination of theoretical modeling, advanced physical vapor deposition fabricating, and laboratory and gasifier testing to develop amorphous alloy membranes that had the potential to meet Department of Energy (DOE) targets in the testing strategies outlined in the NETL Membrane Test Protocol. The project is complete with Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), and Western Research Institute (WRI) having all operated independently and concurrently. GT studied the hydrogen transport properties of several amorphous alloys and found that ZrCu and ZrCuTi were the most promising candidates. GT also evaluated the hydrogen transport properties of V, Nb and Ta membranes coated with different transition-metal carbides (TMCs) (TM = Ti, Hf, Zr) catalytic layers by employing first-principles calculations together with statistical mechanics methods and determined that TiC was the most promising material to provide catalytic hydrogen dissociation. SwRI developed magnetron coating techniques to deposit a range of amorphous alloys onto both porous discs and tubular substrates. Unfortunately none of the amorphous alloys could be deposited without pinhole defects that undermined the selectivity of the membranes. WRI tested the thermal properties of the ZrCu and ZrNi alloys and found that under reducing environments the upper temperature limit of operation without recrystallization is ~250 °C. There were four publications generated from this project with two additional manuscripts in progress and six presentations were made at national and international technical conferences. The combination of the pinhole defects and the lack of high temperature stability make the theoretically identified most promising candidate amorphous alloys

  4. High temperature oxidation of iron-chromium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, Lars

    2003-06-15

    The high temperature oxidation of the ferritic alloy Fe78Cr22 has been investigated in the present work. The effect of small alloying additions of cerium and/or silicon was also investigated. The alloys were oxidized at 973, 1173 and 1373 K in either air or a hydrogen/argon mixture. The various reaction atmospheres contained between 0.02 and 50% water vapour. The oxide scales formed on the various alloys at 973 K consisted of thin chromia layers. The oxide scales grown on the alloys at 1173 K also consisted of a chromia layer. The microstructure of the chromia scales was found to depend on the reaction atmosphere. The chromia scales grown in hydrogen/argon atmospheres formed oxide whiskers and oxide ridges at the surface of the scales, while the chromia scales grown in air formed larger oxide grains near the surface. This difference in oxide microstructure was due to the vaporization of chromium species from the chromia scales grown in air. Two different growth mechanisms are proposed for the growth of oxide whiskers. The growth rate of the chromia scales was independent of the oxygen activity. This is explained by a growth mechanism of the chromia scales, where the growth is governed by the diffusion of interstitial chromium. The addition of silicon to the iron-chromium alloy resulted in the formation of silica particles beneath the chromia scale. The presence of silicon in the alloy was found to decrease the growth rate of the chromia scale. This is explained by a blocking mechanism, where the silica particles beneath the chromia scale partly block the outwards diffusion of chromium from the alloy to the chromia scale. The addition of cerium to the iron-chromium alloy improved the adhesion of the chromia scale to the alloy and decreased the growth rate of chromia. It was observed that the minimum concentration of cerium in the alloy should be 0.3 at.% in order to observe an effect of the cerium addition. The effect of cerium is explained by the &apos

  5. Processing of Ni30Pt20Ti50 High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloy Into Thin Rod Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Draper, Susan L.; Biles, Tiffany A.; Leonhardt, Todd

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature shape-memory alloys (HTSMAs) based on nickel-titanium (NiTi) with significant ternary additions of palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), gold (Au), or hafnium (Hf) have been identified as potential high-temperature actuator materials for use up to 500 C. These materials provide an enabling technology for the development of "smart structures" used to control the noise, emissions, or efficiency of gas turbine engines. The demand for these high-temperature versions of conventional shape-memory alloys also has been growing in the automotive, process control, and energy industries. However these materials, including the NiPtTi alloys being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, will never find widespread acceptance unless they can be readily processed into useable forms.

  6. Effects of Alloying Elements on Room and High Temperature Tensile Properties of Al-Si Cu-Mg Base Alloys =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyaldin, Loay

    In recent years, aluminum and aluminum alloys have been widely used in automotive and aerospace industries. Among the most commonly used cast aluminum alloys are those belonging to the Al-Si system. Due to their mechanical properties, light weight, excellent castability and corrosion resistance, these alloys are primarily used in engineering and in automotive applications. The more aluminum is used in the production of a vehicle, the less the weight of the vehicle, and the less fuel it consumes, thereby reducing the amount of harmful emissions into the atmosphere. The principal alloying elements in Al-Si alloys, in addition to silicon, are magnesium and copper which, through the formation of Al2Cu and Mg2Si precipitates, improve the alloy strength via precipitation hardening following heat treatment. However, most Al-Si alloys are not suitable for high temperature applications because their tensile and fatigue strengths are not as high as desired in the temperature range 230-350°C, which are the temperatures that are often attained in automotive engine components under actual service conditions. The main challenge lies in the fact that the strength of heat-treatable cast aluminum alloys decreases at temperatures above 200°C. The strength of alloys under high temperature conditions is improved by obtaining a microstructure containing thermally stable and coarsening-resistant intermetallics, which may be achieved with the addition of Ni. Zr and Sc. Nickel leads to the formation of nickel aluminide Al3Ni and Al 9FeNi in the presence of iron, while zirconium forms Al3Zr. These intermetallics improve the high temperature strength of Al-Si alloys. Some interesting improvements have been achieved by modifying the composition of the base alloy with additions of Mn, resulting in an increase in strength and ductility at both room and high temperatures. Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloys such as the 354 (Al-9wt%Si-1.8wt%Cu-0.5wt%Mg) alloys show a greater response to heat treatment as a

  7. High Strength Aluminum Alloy For High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A cast article from an aluminum alloy has improved mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The cast article has the following composition in weight percent: Silicon 6.0-25.0, Copper 5.0-8.0, Iron 0.05-1.2, Magnesium 0.5-1.5, Nickel 0.05-0.9, Manganese 0.05-1.2, Titanium 0.05-1.2, Zirconium 0.05-1.2, Vanadium 0.05-1.2, Zinc 0.05-0.9, Strontium 0.001-0.1, Phosphorus 0.001-0.1, and the balance is Aluminum, wherein the silicon-to-magnesium ratio is 10-25, and the copper-to-magnesium ratio is 4-15. The aluminum alloy contains a simultaneous dispersion of three types of Al3X compound particles (X=Ti, V, Zr) having a LI2 crystal structure, and their lattice parameters are coherent to the aluminum matrix lattice. A process for producing this cast article is also disclosed, as well as a metal matrix composite, which includes the aluminum alloy serving as a matrix containing up to about 60% by volume of a secondary filler material.

  8. Arc fusion of self-fluxed nickel alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Marques,Paulo Villani; Trevisan,Roseana da Exaltação

    2000-01-01

    Self-fluxed nickel alloys are usually flame fused after thermal spraying. However, due to the practical aspects of high temperatures reached during flame fusing, large structures such as the hydraulic turbines for power generation, can not be efficiently coated. An alternative is to fuse the sprayed coating with a gas tungsten electric arc. In this case, heating is much more intensive and substrate temperature during and after the fusing operation is much lower, thus reducing the possibility ...

  9. Study of the high temperature characteristics of hydrogen storage alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Rong, Li; Shaoxiong, Zhou; Yan, Qi; 10.1016/j.jallcom.2004.07.006

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the phase structure of as-cast and melt-spun (MmY)/sub 1/(NiCoMnAl)/sub 5/ alloys (the content of yttrium is 0-2.5wt.%) and their electrochemical properties were studied with regard to discharge capacity at different temperatures (30-80 degrees C) and cycling life at 30 degrees C. It is found that the substitution of yttrium increase the electrochemical capacity of the compounds and decrease the difference in capacity between as-cast and as-quenched compounds at 30 degrees C. When increasing the yttrium concentration from 0 to 2.5wt.%, the cycling life of both the as-cast and the melt- spun compounds deteriorated, although the latter have a slightly longer cycle life than the former. The remarkable feature of the alloys obtained by yttrium substitution is the improvement of the high temperature electrochemical properties. It shows that the stability of the hydrides is increased. Compared with the as-cast alloys, the melt-spun ribbons have higher electrochemical charge /discharge capacity in the ...

  10. Study of the high-temperature corrosion of heat-resisting alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, K.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study is reported of the corrosion resistance of the heat-resistant materials which play such an important role in the development of high-efficiency coal gasification combined-cycle power generation. Specifically, a study was made of the high-temperature and molten salt corrosion of nickel base alloys in coal combustion gas environments. The authors outline various types of high-temperature corrosion which occur: oxidation, sulfidation, decarburization and carburizing, nitridation, hot corrosion and halogenation. The mechanisms involved in molten salt corrosion are explained with reference to various models and currently available data. Finally, a study of electro-chemical measuring methods is reported. The authors conclude that future work on corrosion in coal gasification combined cycle power generation systems should concentrate on the following items: 1) elucidating the conditions under which molten salts form; 2) developing methods for predicting the quantity of molten salts which will form, and for assessing their contribution to corrosion; 3) evaluating the corrosion resistance of specific alloys to molten salts of given composition; 4) clarifying the effect of alloy surface temperature on corrosion resistance and local corrosion; and 5) developing techniques for predicting the amount of corrosion. 24 references, 28 figures, 7 tables.

  11. Structure and properties of deformable nickel alloys for gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, M. A.; Sudakov, V. S.

    1994-12-01

    The construction of high power gas turbine installations necessitates the development and use of new high-strength heat-resistant nickel alloys for large forged turbine blades. The blade material must possess not only superior properties (high temperature strength, ductility, fatigue and thermal fatigue strength, stability in the fuel combustion products) but also the required level of metallurgical and manufacturing producibility. The results of a study of the deformable nickel alloys KhN65KVMYuTB (ÉK78), KhN65KMVYuB (ÉP800), and KhN60KVYuMB (ÉP957), which have substantially better properties than the alloy now used for gas turbine blades (KhN65VMTYu) (ÉI893), are presented in this article.

  12. High temperature oxidation of slurry coated interconnect alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Åsa Helen

    with this interaction mechanism mainly give a geometrical protection against oxidation by blocking oxygen access at the surface of the oxide scale. The protecting effect is gradually reduced as the oxide scale grows thicker than the diameter of the coating particles. Interaction mechanism B entails a chemical reaction.......85Sr0.15)CoO3 + 10% Co3O4, LSC, coatings were found to be relatively successful in decreasing the oxidation rate, the chromium content in the outermost part of ii the dense scale, and the electrical resistance in the growing oxide scales when applied onto Crofer 22APU. But, the positive effects......In this project, high temperature oxidation experiments of slurry coated ferritic alloys in atmospheres similar to the atmosphere found at the cathode in an SOFC were conducted. From the observations possible interaction mechanisms between the slurry coatings and the growing oxide scale...

  13. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  14. Biocompatibility of nickel and cobalt dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaudo, N J

    2001-01-01

    Allergies related to dentistry generally constitute delayed hypersensitivity reactions to specific dental materials. Although true allergic hypersensitivity to dental materials is rare, certain products have definite allergenic properties. This review presents a comparative evaluation of the biocompatibility of nickel-chromium, nickel-chromium-beryllium, and cobalt-chromium alloys.

  15. Evaluation of High-temperature Physicochemical Interactions Between the H282Alloy Melt and Ceramic Material of the Crucible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirowski Z.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nickel alloys belong to the group of most resistant materials when used under the extreme operating conditions, including chemically aggressive environment, high temperature, and high loads applied over a long period of time. Although in the global technology market one can find several standard cast nickel alloys, the vast majority of components operating in machines and equipment are made from alloys processed by the costly metalworking operations. Analysis of the available literature and own studies have shown that the use of casting technology in the manufacture of components from nickel alloys poses a lot of difficulty. This is due to the adverse technological properties of these alloys, like poor fluidity, high casting shrinkage, and above all, high reactivity of liquid metal with the atmospheric air over the bath and with the ceramic material of both the crucible and foundry mold. The scale of these problems increases with the expected growth of performance properties which these alloys should offer to the user.

  16. KCl-induced high temperature corrosion of selected commercial alloys. Part I: chromia-formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Montgomery, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory testing of selected chromia-forming alloys was performed to rank the materials and gain further knowledge on the mechanism of KCl-induced high temperature corrosion. The investigated alloys were stainless steels EN1.4021, EN1.4057, EN1.4521, TP347H (coarse-grained), TP347HFG (fine......-grained), Sanicro 28 and the nickel-based alloys 625, 263 and C276. Exposure was performed at 600 °C for 168 h in flowing N2(g)+5%O2(g)+15% H2O(g) (vol.%). Samples were covered with KCl powder prior to exposure. A salt-free exposure was also performed for comparison. Corrosion morphology and products were studied...... with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). It was observed that in the salt-free exposure, stainless steels TP347H (coarse-grained) and EN1.4521 failed to form a thin protective oxide layer compared to the oxide formed on the other alloys...

  17. Influence of oxidation on the high-temperature mechanical properties of zirconia/nickel cermets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Rodriguez, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, Facultad de Fisica, 41012 Seville (Spain)]. E-mail: amr@us.es; Bravo-Leon, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, Facultad de Fisica, 41012 Seville (Spain); Richter, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Ruehle, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Dominguez-Rodriguez, A. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, Facultad de Fisica, 41012 Seville (Spain); Jimenez-Melendo, M. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, Facultad de Fisica, 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2006-06-15

    influence of an oxidizing atmosphere on the high-temperature plasticity of zirconia/nickel cermets has been studied by conducting creep tests in air. The resulting microstructure has been characterized by scanning, conventional and high-resolution electron microscopy. Despite the large microstructural changes, the composites do not exhibit mechanical degradation.

  18. High temperature seals between ceramic separation membranes and super-alloy housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honea, G.; Sridhar, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    One of the concepts for oxygen production from Martian atmospheric carbon dioxide involves the use of tubular electrochemical membranes for oxygen separation. The tubular configuration offers the advantage of being able to separate the oxygen at pressures of up to 500 psi, thereby eliminating the need for a pre-liquefaction oxygen compressor. A key technology that has to be developed in order for the electrochemical separator to combine as a compressor is a high temperature static seal between the ceramic separation cell and the nickel-based super-alloy tube. Equipment was designed and fabricated to test the seals. Efforts are under way to develop a finite element model to study the thermal stresses at the joints and on the seal, and the optimal shape of the seal. The choice of seal materials and the technique to be used to fabricate the seals are also being investigated.

  19. Studying the effect of Ruthenium on High Temperature Mechanical Properties of Nickel Based Superalloys and Determining the Universal Behavior of Ruthenium at Atomic Scale with respect to alloying elements, Stress and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriswaroop Dasari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Any property of a material is a function of its microstructure and microstructure is a function of material composition. So, to maximize the desired properties of a material, one has to understand the evolution of microstructure which in turn is nothing but the reflection of the role of alloying elements. Research has not been done to understand the universal behavior of a certain base/alloying element. Let’s take the example of Cl- ion in HCl, we all know that in general, chloride ion can only be replaced by Fluoride or oxygen ion and that no other ion can replace it. But when you consider a metal like Ni, Co, Cr, Fe etc. there is no establishment that it behaves only in a certain way. Though I concord to the fact that discovery of universal behavior of Ni is lot complex than chloride ion, I think that future research should be focused in this direction also. Superalloys are the candidate materials required to improve thermal efficiency of a gas turbine by allowing higher turbine inlet gas temperatures. Gas turbines are the heart of local power systems, next generation jet engines and high performance space rockets. Recent research in superalloys showed that addition of some alloying elements in minor quantities can result in drastic change in properties. Such an alloying element is Ruthenium (Ru. Addition of Ruthenium to superalloys has shown improvement in mechanical properties by an order of magnitude. However reasons for such improvement are not known yet. Hence, there is a need to identify its role and discover the universal behavior of ruthenium to utilize it efficiently. In this proposal, we study materials with different compositions that are derived based on one ruthenium containing superalloy, and different thermomechanical history. Based on the evolution of microstructures and results of mechanical testing, we plan to determine the exact role of Ruthenium and prediction of its behavior with respect to other elements in the material

  20. Effect of Nb Doping on High Temperature Oxidation Resistance of Ti-Al Alloyed Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAI Jing-jie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ti-Al alloyed coatings with different Nb doping contents were fabricated on TC4 titanium alloy by laser surface alloying to improve high temperature oxidation resistance of the alloy. Structures and high temperature oxidation behaviors of the alloyed coatings were analyzed and tested by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS and box-type resistance furnace. The results show that the alloyed coatings consist of TiAl and Ti3Al, and no niobium compound are formed in Ti-Al-Nb alloyed coatings. The alloyed coatings are uniform and exhibit excellent metallurgical bonding with the substrates. A large amount of surface cracks and a few penetrating cracks are formed in Ti-Al alloyed coating without Nb doping, while no obvious cracks are formed in Ti-Al alloyed coating with Nb doping. The oxidation mass gains of all the alloyed coatings were significantly lower than those of the substrate. The alloyed coatings with Nb doping exhibit more excellent high temperature oxidation resistance due to the beneficial machanism of Nb doping. The mechanism of Nb doping on improving high temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-Al alloyed coatings includes reducing the defect concentration of TiO2, refining oxide grains and promoting the formation of Al2O3.

  1. The elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloy in molten salt corrosion by using nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qiantao; Liu, Ke; Gao, Jie; Li, Xiaolin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Nickel-based alloys as candidate materials for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR), need to be used under high temperature in molten salt environment. In order to ensure the safety of the reactor running, it is necessary to study the elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloys in the high temperature molten salts. In this work, the scanning nuclear microprobe at Fudan University was applied to study the elemental move. The Nickel-based alloy samples were corroded by molten salt at different temperatures. The element concentrations in the Nickel-based alloys samples were determined by the scanning nuclear microprobe. Micro-PIXE results showed that the element concentrations changed from the interior to the exterior of the alloy samples after the corrosion.

  2. Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xingshuo

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of the leading concepts of the Generation IV nuclear reactor development, which is the core component of Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The major challenge in the research and development of NGNP is the performance and reliability of structure materials at high temperature. Alloy 617, with an exceptional combination of high temperature strength and oxidation resistance, has been selected as a primary candidate material for structural use, particularly in Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) which has an outlet temperature in the range of 850 to 950°C and an inner pressure from 5 to 20MPa. In order to qualify the material to be used at the operation condition for a designed service life of 60 years, a comprehensive scientific understanding of creep behavior at high temperature and low stress regime is necessary. In addition, the creep mechanism and the impact factors such as precipitates, grain size, and grain boundary characters need to be evaluated for the purpose of alloy design and development. In this study, thermomechanically processed specimens of alloy 617 with different grain sizes were fabricated, and creep tests with a systematic test matrix covering the temperatures of 850 to 1050°C and stress levels from 5 to 100MPa were conducted. Creep data was analyzed, and the creep curves were found to be unconventional without a well-defined steady-state creep. Very good linear relationships were determined for minimum creep rate versus stress levels with the stress exponents determined around 3-5 depending on the grain size and test condition. Activation energies were also calculated for different stress levels, and the values are close to 400kJ/mol, which is higher than that for self-diffusion in nickel. Power law dislocation climb-glide mechanism was proposed as the dominant creep mechanism in the test condition regime. Dynamic recrystallization happening at high strain range enhanced dislocation climb and

  3. Nickel alloys development-Inconel alloys development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Soo; Uhm, Tae Sik; Kim, Taek Jun; Jeon, Yu Taek; Chang, Hyun Young [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Sik [Andong National University, Andon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    This report dealt with the evaluation of Alloy 600 and alloy 690 of steam= generator materials. The experimental alloys were divided into two groups. ; Seamless tubings made by different ingot, and Mo-modified alloys. Thermal treatment had no influenced on the anodic polarization resistance in some caustic solution, but improved stress corrosion resistance by CERT. The effect of SO{sub 4}{sup =} ions reduced markedly caustic SCC resistance. The corrosion mode by 70 days and 120 days C-ring tests revealed the intergranular corrosion instead of stress corrosion cracking. Mo addition on the corrosion resistance of Alloy 690M showed beneficial effect in neutral and acidic solutions, but a little effect in caustic solutions. However, the caustic stress corrosion resistance was improved by the addition of molybdenum. 27 refs., 84 figs., 5 tabs. (author)

  4. High Temperature Properties and Recent Research Trend of Mg-RE Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Soo Woo [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    For the applications in automotive, aircraft, aerospace, and electronic industries, the lightest structural Mg alloys have received much attention since 2000. There has been some progress for the improvement of the mechanical properties such as room temperature strength, formability and mechanical anisotropy. However, the high temperature strength of Mg alloys is very low to be used for the parts and structures of high temperature conditions. For the last decade, considerable efforts are concentrated for the development of Mg alloys to be used at high temperature. Newly developing Mg-RE alloys are the good examples for the high temperature use. In this regard, this review paper introduces the recent research trends for the development of Mg-RE alloys strengthened with some precipitates and the long period stacking ordered (LPSO) structures related RE elements.

  5. In situ Raman spectroscopic analysis of surface oxide films on Ni-base alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld interfaces in high-temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongjin; Choi, Kyung Joon; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2014-06-01

    In situ Raman spectroscopy has been applied to analyze the surface oxide films formed on dissimilar metal weld (DMW) interfaces of nickel-base alloy/low alloy steel under hydrogenated high-temperature water condition. For the analysis of the oxide films under high temperature/pressure aqueous conditions, an in situ Raman spectroscopy system was developed by constructing a hydrothermal cell where the entire optics including the excitation laser and the Raman light collection system were located at the nearest position to the specimen by means of immersion optics. In situ Raman spectra of the DMW interfaces were collected in hydrogenated water condition at different temperatures up to 300 °C. The measured in situ Raman spectra showed peaks of Cr2O3, NiCr2O4 and Fe3O4 at the DMW interface. It is considered that differences in the oxide chemistry originated from the chemical element distribution inside of the DMW interface region.

  6. Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloy Tubes for USC and Heat-Exchanger Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bimal Kad

    2011-12-31

    performance compared to the base material creep performance. Similar and dissimilar butt joints were fabricated of MA956, IN740 alloys and using inertia welding techniques. We evaluated joining process details and heat treatments and its overall effect on creep response. Fixed and incrementally accelerated temperature creep tests were performed for similar and dissimilar joints and such incremental creep life data is compiled and reported. Long term MA956-MA556 joint tests indicate a firm 2Ksi creep stress threshold performance at 850{degree}C with a maximum exposure of over 9725 hours recorded in the current program. A Larsen Miller Parameter (LMP) of 48.50 for a 2Ksi test at 850{degree}C was further corroborated with tests at 2Ksi stress at 900{degree}C yielding a LMP=48.80. Despite this threshold the joints exhibit immense temperature sensitivity and fail promptly when test temperature raised above 900{degree}C. In comparison the performance of dissimilar joints was inferior, perhaps dictated by the creep characteristics of the mating nickel-base alloys. We describe a parametric window of joint development, and post weld heat treatment (PWHT) in dissimilar joints with solid solution (IN601, IN617) and precipitate strengthened (IN740) materials. Some concerns are evident regarding the diffusion of aluminum in dissimilar joints during high temperature recrystallization treatments. It is noted that aggressive treatments rapidly deplete the corrosion protecting aluminum reservoir in the vicinity of the joint interface. Subsequently, the impact of varying PWHT has been evaluated in the context on ensuing creep performance.

  7. Applications of high-temperature powder metal aluminum alloys to small gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, P. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A program aimed at the development of advanced powder-metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys for high-temperature applications up to 650 F using the concepts of rapid solidification and mechanical alloying is discussed. In particular, application of rapidly solidified PM aluminum alloys to centrifugal compressor impellers, currently used in auxiliary power units for both military and commercial aircraft and potentially for advanced automotive gas turbine engines, is examined. It is shown that substitution of high-temperature aluminum for titanium alloy impellers operating in the 360-650 F range provides significant savings in material and machining costs and results in reduced component weight, and consequently, reduced rotating group inertia requirements.

  8. Development of high-temperature corrosion-resistant alloys and heat-treatment regimes for components placed in the hot section of stationary gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvezdin, Yu. I.; Kotov, Yu. V.; Kats, E. L.; Lubenets, V. P.; Spiridonov, E. V.; Konter, M. L.

    1991-06-01

    New single-crystal alloys for the blades of gas turbines, highly corrosion-resistant alloys for guide vanes and combustion chambers, and low-cost alloys for the gears of turbine compressors have been developed and implemented. In term sof the set of properties, the new alloys are superior to foreign alloys for stationary turbines. A computer-aided design system for alloys with a given level of properties has been created for the development of a new generation of high-temperature nickel alloys. Special heat-treatment regimes, which make it possible to combine heat treatment with the production cycle involving the application of plasmas protective coatings and to achieve the combination of basic mechanical properties that is optimal for a specific component have been developed as applies to specific operating conditions of turbine components.

  9. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. High Work Output Ni-Ti-Pt High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys and Associated Processing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Draper, Susan L. (Inventor); Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Garg, Anita (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    According to the invention, compositions of Ni-Ti-Pt high temperature, high force, shape memory alloys are disclosed that have transition temperatures above 100 C.; have narrow hysteresis; and produce a high specific work output.

  11. Dynamic mechanical response and a constitutive model of Fe-based high temperature alloy at high temperatures and strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiang; Wang, Gang; Li, Jianfeng; Rong, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    The effects of strain rate and temperature on the dynamic behavior of Fe-based high temperature alloy was studied. The strain rates were 0.001-12,000 s(-1), at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 800 °C. A phenomenological constitutive model (Power-Law constitutive model) was proposed considering adiabatic temperature rise and accurate material thermal physical properties. During which, the effects of the specific heat capacity on the adiabatic temperature rise was studied. The constitutive model was verified to be accurate by comparison between predicted and experimental results.

  12. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Environment Simulation Dept.; Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials Dept.; Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Dept.; Bignell, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural and Thermal Analysis Dept.; Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program; George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  13. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  14. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including Titanium and its alloys. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Various solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature to avoid detrimental changes to the microstructure. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining various titanium alloys using the solid state welding processes of FSW and TSW. Process descriptions and attributes of each weld process will be presented. Weld process set ]up and welding techniques will be discussed leading to the challenges experienced. Mechanical property data will also be presented.

  15. Use of thermogravimetry and thermodynamic calculations for specifying chromium diffusion occurring in alloys containing chromium carbides during high temperature oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthod, Patrice, E-mail: Patrice.Berthod@univ-lorraine.fr; Conrath, Elodie

    2015-09-01

    The chromium diffusion is of great importance for the high temperature oxidation behaviour of the chromium-rich carbides-strengthened superalloys. These ones contain high chromium quantities for allowing them well resisting hot corrosion by constituting and maintaining a continuous external scale of chromia. Knowing how chromium can diffuse in such alloys is thus very useful for predicting the sustainability of their chromia-forming behaviour. Since Cr diffusion occurs through the external part of the alloy already affected by the previous steps of oxidation (decarburized subsurface) it is more judicious to specify this diffusion during the oxidation process itself. This was successfully carried out in this work in the case of a model chromia-forming nickel-based alloy containing chromium carbides, Ni(bal.)–25Cr–0.5C (in wt.%). This was done by specifying, using real-time thermogravimetry, the mass gain kinetic due to oxidation, and by combining it with the post-mortem determination of the Cr concentration profiles in subsurface. The values of D{sub Cr} thus obtained for 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C in the alloy subsurface are consistent with the values obtained in earlier works for similar alloy's chemical compositions. - Highlights: • A Ni25Cr0.50C alloy was oxidized at high temperature in a thermo-balance. • The mass gain files were analysed to specify the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} volatilization constant K{sub v}. • Concentration profiles were acquired to specify the chromium gradient. • The diffusion coefficient of chromium through the subsurface was deduced. • The obtained diffusion coefficient is consistent with values previously obtained.

  16. Nickel-titanium alloys: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo do Amaral Ferreira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A systematic review on nickel-titanium wires was performed. The strategy was focused on Entrez-PubMed-OLDMEDLINE, Scopus and BioMed Central from 1963 to 2008. METHODS: Papers in English and French describing the behavior of these wires and laboratorial methods to identify crystalline transformation were considered. A total of 29 papers were selected. RESULTS: Nickel-titanium wires show exceptional features in terms of elasticity and shape memory effects. However, clinical applications request a deeper knowledge of these properties in order to allow the professional to use them in a rational manner. In addition, the necessary information regarding each alloy often does not correspond to the information given by the manufacturer. Many alloys called "superelastic" do not present this effect; they just behave as less stiff alloys, with a larger springback if compared to the stainless steel wires. CONCLUSIONS: Laboratory tests are the only means to observe the real behavior of these materials, including temperature transition range (TTR and applied tensions. However, it is also possible to determine in which TTR these alloys change the crystalline structure.

  17. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Jin, Helena [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, E. P. [Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Iridium alloys have been utilized as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications, due to their superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties, including failure response at high strain rates and elevated temperatures of the iridium alloys need to be characterized to better understand high-speed impacts at elevated temperatures. A DOP-26 iridium alloy has been dynamically characterized in compression at elevated temperatures with high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques. However, the dynamic high-temperature compression tests were not able to provide sufficient dynamic high-temperature failure information of the iridium alloy. In this study, we modified current room-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques for obtaining dynamic tensile stress-strain curves of the DOP-26 iridium alloy at two different strain rates (~1000 and ~3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750°C and ~1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress-strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. The DOP-26 iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress-strain response that strongly depended on both strain rate and temperature.

  18. Modified ferritic iron alloys with improved high-temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    An alloy modification program was conducted in which the compositions of two existing Fe-Cr-Al alloys (Armco 18SR and GE-1541) were changed to achieve either improved high-temperature strength or improved fabricability. Only modifications of Armco 18SR were successful in achieving increased strength without loss of fabricability or oxidation resistance. The best modified alloy, designated NASA-18T, had twice the rupture strength of Armco 18SR at 800 and 1000 C. The NASA-18T alloy also had better oxidation resistance than Armco 18SR and comparable fabricability. The nominal composition of NASA-18T is Fe-18Cr-2Al-1Si-1.25Ta. All attempted modifications of the GE-1541 alloy were unsuccessful in terms of achieving better fabricability without sacrificing high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance.

  19. An evaluation of mechanical and high-temperature corrosion properties of Ni-Cr alloy with composition of alloying elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sujin; Kim, Dongjin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Helium is used as a coolant in a VHTR owing to its high thermal conductivity, inertness, and low neutron absorption. However, helium inevitably includes impurities that create an imbalance in the surface reactivity at the interface of the coolant and the exposed materials. As the Alloy 617 has been exposed to high temperatures at 950 .deg. C in the impure helium environment of a VHTR, degradation of material is accelerated and mechanical properties decreased. An alloy superior to alloy 617 should be developed. In this study, the mechanical and high-temperature corrosion properties for Ni-Cr alloys fabricated in laboratory were evaluated as a function of the grain boundary strengthening and alloying element composition. The mechanical property and corrosion property for Ni-Cr alloys fabricated in a laboratory were evaluated as a function of the main element composition. The ductility was increased and decreased by increasing the amount of Mo and Cr, respectively. Surface oxide was detached during the corrosion test, because there was not aluminum element in the alloy. Aluminum seems to act as an anti-corrosive role in Ni-based alloy. In conclusion, the addition of Al into the alloy is required to improvement of high temperature corrosion resistance.

  20. Replicated Electro-Formed Nickel Alloy Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century - including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. To reduce the cost of mirror fabrication, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed replication techniques, the machinery, and materials to replicate electro-formed nickel mirrors. The process allows fabricating precisely shaped mandrels to be used and reused as masters for replicating high-quality mirrors. Dr. Joe Ritter examines a replicated electro-formed nickel-alloy mirror which exemplifies the improvements in mirror fabrication techniques, with benefits such as dramtic weight reduction that have been achieved at the Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC).

  1. GRCop-84: A High-Temperature Copper Alloy for High-Heat-Flux Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) is a new high-temperature copper-based alloy. It possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance and low-cycle fatigue up to 700 C (1292 F) along with low thermal expansion and good conductivity. GRCop-84 can be processed and joined by a variety of methods such as extrusion, rolling, bending, stamping, brazing, friction stir welding, and electron beam welding. Considerable mechanical property data has been generated for as-produced material and following simulated braze cycles. The data shows that the alloy is extremely stable during thermal exposures. This paper reviews the major GRCop-84 mechanical and thermophysical properties and compares them to literature values for a variety of other high-temperature copper-based alloys.

  2. Cobalt, nickel and chromium release from dental tools and alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettelarij, Jolinde A B; Lidén, Carola; Axén, Emmy; Julander, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium alloys are used as casting alloys by dental technicians when producing dental prostheses and implants. Skin exposure and metal release from alloys and tools used by the dental technicians have not been studied previously. To study the release of cobalt, nickel and chromium from alloys and tools that come into contact with the skin of dental technicians. Cobalt and nickel release from tools and alloys was tested with the cobalt spot test and the dimethylglyoxime test for nickel. Also, the release of cobalt, nickel and chromium in artificial sweat (EN1811) at different time-points was assessed. Analysis was performed with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Sixty-one tools were spot tested; 20% released nickel and 23% released cobalt. Twenty-one tools and five dental alloys were immersed in artificial sweat. All tools released cobalt, nickel and chromium. The ranges were 0.0047-820, 0.0051-10 and 0.010-160 µg/cm(2) /week for cobalt, nickel and chromium, respectively. All dental alloys released cobalt in artificial sweat, with a range of 0.0010-17 µg/cm(2) /week, and they also released nickel and chromium at low concentrations. Sensitizing metals are released from tools and alloys used by dental technicians. This may cause contact allergy and hand eczema. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  4. High-temperature mechanical properties of aluminium alloys reinforced with boron carbide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoro, J. [Dept. Ingenieria y Ciencia de los Materiales, ETSI Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: javier.onoro@upm.es; Salvador, M.D. [Dept. Ingenieria Mecanica y de Materiales, ETSI Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Cambronero, L.E.G. [Dept. Ingenieria de Materiales, ETSI Minas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Rios Rosas 21, 28003 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    The mechanical properties of particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites based on aluminium alloys (6061 and 7015) at high temperatures were studied. Boron carbide particles were used as reinforcement. All composites were produced by hot extrusion. The tensile properties and fracture analysis of these materials were investigated at room temperature and at high temperature to determine their ultimate strength and strain to failure. The fracture surface was analysed by scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Precipitation in solid solution and structural transformations in single crystals of high rhenium ruthenium-containing nickel superalloys at high-temperature creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, A.A.; Petrushin, N.V.; Zaitsev, D.V.; Treninkov, I.A.; Filonova, E.V. [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Aviation Materials (VIAM), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    The phase composition and structure of single crystals of two superalloys (alloy 1 and alloy 2) were investigated in this work. For alloy 1 (Re - 9 wt%) the kinetics of precipitation in solid solution at heat treatment (HT) was investigated. TEM and X-Ray examinations have revealed that during HT rhombic phase (R-phase) precipitation (Immm class (BCR)) occurs. The TTT diagram is plotted, it contains the time-temperature area of the existence of R-phase particles. The element content of R-phase is identified (at. %): Re- 51.5; Co- 23.5; Cr- 14.8; Mo- 4.2; W- 3.3; Ta- 2.7. For alloy 2 (Re - 6.5 wt %, Ru - 4 wt %) structural transformations at high-temperature creep are investigated. By dark-field TEM methods it is established, that in alloy 2 the additional phase with a rhombic lattice is formed during creep. Particles of this phase precipitate in {gamma}-phase and their quantity increases during high-temperature creep. It is revealed that during creep 3-D dislocation network is formed in {gamma}-phase. At the third stage of creep the process of inversion structure formation is observed in the alloy, i.e. {gamma}'-phase becomes a matrix. Thus during modeling creep the volume fraction of {gamma}'-phase in the samples increases from 30% (at creep duration of 200 hrs) up to 55% (at 500 hrs). The processes of structure formation in Re and Ru-containing nickel superalloys are strongly affected by decomposition of solid solution during high-temperature creep that includes precipitation of additional TCP-phases. (orig.)

  6. A high-temperature shape memory alloy sensor for combustion monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Greg S.; Snyder, Joseph T.; Prince, Troy S.; Willett, Michael C.

    2005-05-01

    Innovations in the use of thin film SMA materials have enabled the development of a harsh environment pressure sensor useful for combustion monitoring and control. Development of such active combustion control has been driven by rising fuel costs and environmental pressures. Active combustion control, whether in diesel, spark ignited or turbine engines requires feedback to the engine control system in order to adjust the quantity, timing, and placement of fuel charges. To be fully effective, sensors must be integrated into each engine in a manner that will allow continuous combustion monitoring (turbine engines) or monitoring of each discrete combustion event (diesel and SI engines). To date, the sensors available for detection of combustion events and processes have suffered from one or more of three problems: 1) Low sensitivity: The sensors are unable to provide and adequate signal-to-noise ratio in the high temperature and electrically noisy environment of the engine compartment. Attempts to overcome this difficulty have focused on heat removal and/or temperature compensation or more challenging high temperature electronics. 2) Low reliability: Sensors and/or sensor packages have been unable to withstand the engine environment for extended periods of time. Issues have included gross degradation and more subtle issues such as migration of dopants in semiconductor sensor materials. 3) High cost: The materials that have been used, the package concepts employed, and the required support electronics have all contributed to the high cost of the few sensor systems available. Prices have remained high due to the limited demand associated with the poor reliability and the high price itself. Ternary titanium nickel alloys, with platinum group metal substitution for the nickel, are deposited as thin films on MEMS-based diaphragms and patterned to form strain gages of a standard metal film configuration. The strain induced phase transformation of the SMA is used as a

  7. Influence of yttria surface modification on high temperature corrosion of porous Ni22Cr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczewski, Jakub; Dunst, Katarzyna; Jasinski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Protective coatings for porous alloys for high temperature use are relatively new materials. Their main drawback is high temperature corrosion. In this work protective coatings based the on Y-precursor infiltrated into the sintered Ni22Cr alloys are studied at 700°C. Effects of the amount...... of the protective phase on the resulting corrosion properties are evaluated in air and humidified hydrogen. Weight gain of the samples, their open porosities and microstructures are analyzed and compared. Results show, that by the addition of even a minor amount of the Y-precursor corrosion rates can be decreased...

  8. Niobium and chromium rich coatings tailored by laser alloying: XRD analysis at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Rodrigues da Costa

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser treatment technologies have been widely used to modify superficial layers of different materials. In this work we prepare Nb and Cr rich coatings according to laser alloying technique using cast iron as substrate material. Nb and Cr are intensive used in order to overcome challenges like good chemical and mechanical performance at high temperatures. Following laser alloying the surface-modified samples were submitted to an "in situ" XRD analysis under controlled high temperature and atmosphere. The phase transitions registered point to transformations that do not implies formation of fragile phases or cracks induced by high volumes modifications.

  9. Thermocouples of tantalum and rhenium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Thermocouples of the present invention provide stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor wherein each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising tantalum and rhenium and alloys containing only those two metals. The tantalum, rhenium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibilities and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys of the present invention result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance. The thermocouples formed of the tantalum, rhenium alloys exhibit reliability and performance stability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums and are adaptable to space propulsion and power systems and nuclear environments.

  10. Effects of prior surface damage on high-temperature oxidation of Fe-, Ni-, and Co-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Lowe, Tracie M [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Multi-component metallic alloys have been developed to withstand high-temperature service in corrosive environments. Some of these applications, like exhaust valve seats in internal combustion engines, must also resist sliding, impact, and abrasion. The conjoint effects of temperature, oxidation, and mechanical contact can result in accelerated wear and the formation of complex surface layers whose properties differ from those of the base metal and the oxide scale that forms in the absence of mechanical contact. The authors have investigated the effects of prior surface damage, produced by scratch tests, on the localized reformation of oxide layers. Three high-performance commercial alloys, based on iron, nickel, and cobalt, were used as model materials. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine their static oxidation rates at elevated temperature (850o C). A micro-abrasion, ball-cratering technique was used to measure oxide layer thickness and to compare it with TGA results. By using taper-sectioning techniques and energy-dispersive elemental mapping, a comparison was made between oxide compositions grown on non-damaged surfaces and oxides that formed on grooves produced by a diamond stylus. Microindentation and scratch hardness data revealed the effects of high temperature exposure on both the substrate hardness and the nature of oxide scale disruption. There were significant differences in elemental distribution between statically-formed oxides and those that formed on scratched regions

  11. Analysis of components depth profile at the interface of Ti6242 alloy and TiNi coatings after high temperature oxidation in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galdikas, A. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Kaunas University of Medicine (Lithuania); Riviere, J.P.; Pichon, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, University of Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Petraitiene, A.; Moskalioviene, T. [Physics Department, Kaunas University of Technology, 50 Studentu st., Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2010-11-15

    We have analyzed the interfacial elemental depth profile evolution after high temperature isothermal oxidation of NiTi coatings deposited by dynamic ion mixing on a Ti6242 alloy (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo). NiTi coatings (thickness 0.4 {mu}m) were deposited at room temperature (RT) by ion beam sputtering. High temperature isothermal oxidation tests in 1 atm flowing synthetic air (80% N{sub 2}, 20% O{sub 2}) have been conducted at 500 C and 600 C during 100 hours. We have observed a non-monotonous depth distribution of nickel in GDOES depth profiles after oxidation of TiNi/Ti6242: nickel segregates to the surface of TiNi coating and to the interface between TiNi coating and Ti6242 alloy. We propose a kinetic model based on rate equations for analyzing the depth profile. This model includes microprocesses taking place during oxidation in air such as: adsorption of nitrogen and oxygen, diffusion of components through the film and interface, formation of chemical compounds. It is shown by modeling that non-monotonous depth profile of nickel occurs because nickel from TiNi coating is forming a nickel oxide compound when oxygen atoms reach the film/alloy interface. XRD analysis confirms the presence of nickel oxide in the TiNi/Ti6242 interface after oxidation at both temperatures 500 C and 600 C (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Creep behavior of alloy 617 in high temperature air and helium environments-effect of oxidation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Chang Heui; Kim, Sung Hwan [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Sah, Injin; Kim, Dae Jong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The creep behavior of a nickel-base superalloy, Alloy 617, which is considered as a candidate material for the very high temperature gas cooled reactor, was studied. Creep rupture tests were carried out at 800°C, 900°C and 1000°C in static and flowing helium environments as well as in air. Creep rupture life in static helium was longer than that in air, while it was shorter in flowing helium environments. Microstructure observation of the creep tested specimens showed that the shorter creep rupture life in flowing helium was associated with the thicker oxide layer, greater decarburization depth, and deeper internal oxidation happened during the creep tests. The degree of such oxidation damage was quantified for the creep tested specimens and correlated with the creep rupture life in different environments.

  13. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Vijay [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Carroll, Laura [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sham, Sam [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  14. Materials Properties Database for Selection of High-Temperature Alloys and Concepts of Alloy Design for SOFC Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z Gary; Paxton, Dean M.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2002-11-24

    To serve as an interconnect / gas separator in an SOFC stack, an alloy should demonstrate the ability to provide (i) bulk and surface stability against oxidation and corrosion during prolonged exposure to the fuel cell environment, (ii) thermal expansion compatibility with the other stack components, (iii) chemical compatibility with adjacent stack components, (iv) high electrical conductivity of the surface reaction products, (v) mechanical reliability and durability at cell exposure conditions, (vii) good manufacturability, processability and fabricability, and (viii) cost effectiveness. As the first step of this approach, a composition and property database was compiled for high temperature alloys in order to assist in determining which alloys offer the most promise for SOFC interconnect applications in terms of oxidation and corrosion resistance. The high temperature alloys of interest included Ni-, Fe-, Co-base superal

  15. Summary of workshop on alloys for very high-temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In current fossil energy systems, the maximum operating temperatures experienced by critical metal structures do not exceed approximately 732{degrees}C and the major limitation on the use of the alloys typically is corrosion resistance. In systems intended for higher performance and higher efficiency, increasingly higher working fluid temperatures will be employed, which will require materials with higher-temperature capabilities, in particular, higher creep strength and greater environmental resistance. There have been significant developments in alloys in recent years, from modifications of currently-used wrought ferritic and austenitic alloys with the intent of improving their high-temperature capabilities, to oxide dispersion-strengthened alloys targeted at extremely high-temperature applications. The aim of this workshop was to examine the temperature capability of these alloys compared to current alloys, and compared to the needs of advanced fossil fuel combustion or conversion systems, with the goals of identifying where modified/new alloys would be expected to find application, their limitations, and the information/actions required or that are being taken to qualify them for such use.

  16. Fatigue Characteristics and Compressive Residual Stress of Shot Preened Alloy 600 Under High Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Cheon; Cheong, Seong Kyun [Seoul Nat' l Univ. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hong Seok [KEPCO Plant Service and Engineering co., Ltd., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    The compressive residual stress and fatigue behavior of shot preened alloy 600 under a high-temperature environment is investigated in this study. Alloy 600 is used in the main parts of nuclear power plants, and the compressive residual stress induced by the shot peening process is considered to prevent Succ (stress corrosion cracking). To obtain practical results, the fatigue characteristics and compressive residual stress are evaluated under the actual operating temperature of a domestic nuclear power plant, as well as a high-temperature environment. The experimental results show that the peening effects are valid at a high temperature lower than approximately 538 .deg. C,, which is the threshold temperature. The fatigue life was maintained at temperatures lower than 538 .deg. C, and the compressive residual stress at 538 .deg. C was 68.2% of that at room temperature. The present results are expected to be used to obtain basic safety and reliability data.

  17. Alloying effects on the high-temperature oxidation resistance of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Alloying effects on the high-temperature oxidation resistance of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb were examined on the basis of isothermal exposures to air at 950 C. Additions of either Re and Al or Fe, Ni, and Al had relatively little effect on weight gains relative to the Cr-6% Nb binary alloy. One alloying element that improved the mechanical behavior of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys substantially increased the oxidation rates and spallation susceptibilities of Cr-6 and -12% Nb alloys. However, the addition of another element completely offset these deleterious effects. The presence of this latter element resulted in the best overall oxidation behavior (in terms of both weight gains and spallation tendencies) of all Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb compositions. Its beneficial effect can be attributed to improvement in the oxidation resistance of the Cr-rich phase.

  18. Commercialization of NASA's High Strength Cast Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the commercialization of a new high strength cast aluminum alloy, invented by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, for high temperature applications will be presented. Originally developed to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low- exhaust emission, the novel NASA aluminum alloy offers dramatic improvement in tensile and fatigue strengths at elevated temperatures (450 F-750 F), which can lead to reducing part weight and cost as well as improving performance for automotive engine applications. It is an ideal low cost material for cast components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. NASA alloy also offers greater wear resistance, dimensional stability, and lower thermal expansion compared to conventional aluminum alloys, and the new alloy can be produced economically from sand, permanent mold and investment casting. Since 2001, this technology was licensed to several companies for automotive and marine internal combustion engines applications.

  19. Considerations of Alloy N for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) are a promising new class of thermal-spectrum nuclear reactors. The reactor structural materials must possess high-temperature strength and chemical compatibility with the liquid fluoride salt as well as with a power cycle fluid such as supercritical water while remaining resistant to residual air within the containment. Alloy N was developed for use with liquid fluoride salts and it possesses adequate strength and chemical compatibility up to about 700 C. A distinctive property of FHRs is that their maximum allowable coolant temperature is restricted by their structural alloy maximum service temperature. As the reactor thermal efficiency directly increases with the maximum coolant temperature, higher temperature resistant alloys are strongly desired. This paper reviews the current status of Alloy N and its relevance to FHRs including its design principles, development history, high temperature strength, environmental resistance, metallurgical stability, component manufacturability, ASME codification status, and reactor service requirements. The review will identify issues and provide guidance for improving the alloy properties or implementing engineering solutions.

  20. Evaluation of flexural bond strength of porcelain to used nickel-chromium alloy in various percentages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNV Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Fresh nickel-chromium alloy shows the greatest porcelain adherence.There is no significant change in bond strength of ceramic to alloy with up to 75% of used nickel-chromium alloy.At least 25%- of new alloy should be added when recycled nickel-chromium alloy is being used for metal ceramic restorations.

  1. Computer simulations of martensitic transformations in iron-nickel and nickel-aluminium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, R J

    1998-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the martensitic transformations in iron-nickel and nickel-aluminum alloys. Molecular-dynamics simulations have been done, employing potentials based on the so-called embedded-atom method (EAM). These potentials were obtained by a fit of parameterized functions to experimental data of the elements iron, nickel, and aluminum as well as the intermetallic compound NiAl. Many aspects of the austenitic transformation in iron-nickel alloys and both, the martensitic and austenitic transformations, in nickel-aluminum alloys were reproduced well by the simulations. The results allow to draw conclusions on the reasons of differences and similarities in the behavior of both alloy systems.

  2. Trimethylsilylcyclopentadiene as a novel electrolyte additive for high temperature application of lithium nickel manganese oxide cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenqiang; Ye, Changchun; Yang, Xuerui; Xing, Lidan; Liao, Youhao; Liu, Xiang; Li, Weishan

    2017-10-01

    Electrolyte additives are necessary for the application of high potential cathode in high energy density lithium ion batteries, especially at elevated temperature. However, the electrolyte additives that can effectively suppress the dissolution of transition metal ions from cathode have seldom been developed up to date. In this work, we propose a novel electrolyte additive, trimethylsilylcyclopentadiene (SE), for high temperature application of a representative high potential cathode, lithium nickel manganese oxide (LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4). It is found that the dissolution of Mn and Ni from LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 can be effectively suppressed by applying SE. With applying 0.25% SE, the dissolved amount of Mn and Ni is decreased by 97.4% and 98%, respectively, after 100 cycles at 55 °C. Correspondingly, the cyclic performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is significantly improved. Physical characterizations and electrochemical measurements show that SE can be preferentially oxidized and generate a protective film on LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4. The resulting film inhibits the electrolyte decomposition and the transition metal ion dissolution.

  3. Improved Mo-Re VPS Alloys for High-Temperature Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Robert; Martin, James; McKechnie, Timothy; O'Dell, John Scott

    2011-01-01

    Dispersion-strengthened molybdenum- rhenium alloys for vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) fabrication of high-temperature-resistant components are undergoing development. In comparison with otherwise equivalent non-dispersion-strengthened Mo-Re alloys, these alloys have improved high-temperature properties. Examples of VPS-fabricated high-temperature-resistant components for which these alloys are expected to be suitable include parts of aircraft and spacecraft engines, furnaces, and nuclear power plants; wear coatings; sputtering targets; x-ray targets; heat pipes in which liquid metals are used as working fluids; and heat exchangers in general. These alloys could also be useful as coating materials in some biomedical applications. The alloys consist of 60 weight percent Mo with 40 weight percent Re made from (1) blends of elemental Mo and Re powders or (2) Re-coated Mo particles that have been subjected to a proprietary powder-alloying-and-spheroidization process. For most of the dispersion- strengthening experiments performed thus far in this development effort, 0.4 volume percent of transition-metal ceramic dispersoids were mixed into the feedstock powders. For one experiment, the proportion of dispersoid was 1 volume percent. In each case, the dispersoid consisted of either ZrN particles having sizes <45 m, ZrO2 particles having sizes of about 1 m, HfO2 particles having sizes <45 m, or HfN particles having sizes <1 m. These materials were chosen for evaluation on the basis of previously published thermodynamic stability data. For comparison, Mo-Re feedstock powders without dispersoids were also prepared.

  4. Effect of sulfur on the protective layers on alloys 600 and 690 in low and high temperature environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combrade, P.; Foucault, M.; Vancon, D. (Unirec, 42 - Firminy (FR)); Marcus, P.; Grimal, J.M. (Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, 75 - Paris (FR)); Gelpi, A. (Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (Framatome), 92 - Courbevoie (FR))

    The effect of the presence of sulfide dissolved in the environment on the dissolution and film repair was studied on alloy 600, alloy 690 and nickel exposed to neutral and caustic deaerated solutions at 290{sup 0}C. Comparison with the effect of adsorbed sulfur on the dissolution and film built up on high purity alloy 600 and nickel in acidic solutions at room temperature shows strong analogies. In both cases the beneficial effect of chromium is clearly shown and this is consistent with the better behaviour of alloy with increased chromium content such as alloy 690.

  5. Towards low-friction and wear-resistant plasma sintering dies via plasma surface co-alloying CM247 nickel alloy with V/Ag and N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhenxue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel based superalloys have good oxidation and creep resistance and hence they can function under high mechanical stress and high temperatures. However, their undesirable tribological behaviour is the major technical barrier to the challenging high-temperature, lubricant-free plasma sintering tool application. In this study, nickel based CM247 superalloy surfaces were co-alloyed using innovative active screen plasma technology with both interstitial element (e.g. N and substitutional alloying elements (e.g. V and Ag to provide a synergy effect to enhance its tribological properties. The tribological behaviour of the plasma co-alloyed CM247 superalloy surfaces were fully evaluated using reciprocal and pin-on-disc tribometers at temperatures from room temperature to 600 ∘C. The experimental results demonstrate that the co-alloyed surface with N, Ag and V can effectively lower the friction coefficient, which is expected to help demoulding during lubricant-free plasma sintering.

  6. Long-Term Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Wrought Commercial Alloys at High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bingtao [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation resistance of a high-temperature alloy is dependent upon sustaining the formation of a protective scale, which is strongly related to the alloying composition and the oxidation condition. The protective oxide scale only provides a finite period of oxidation resistance owing to its eventual breakdown, which is especially accelerated under thermal cycling conditions. This current study focuses on the long-term cyclic oxidation behavior of a number of commercial wrought alloys. The alloys studied were Fe- and Ni-based, containing different levels of minor elements, such as Si, Al, Mn, and Ti. Oxidation testing was conducted at 1000 and 1100 C in still air under both isothermal and thermal cycling conditions (1-day and 7-days). The specific aspects studied were the oxidation behavior of chromia-forming alloys that are used extensively in industry. The current study analyzed the effects of alloying elements, especially the effect of minor element Si, on cyclic oxidation resistance. The behavior of oxide scale growth, scale spallation, subsurface changes, and chromium interdiffusion in the alloy were analyzed in detail. A novel model was developed in the current study to predict the life-time during cyclic oxidation by simulating oxidation kinetics and chromium interdiffusion in the subsurface of chromia-forming alloys.

  7. Transition in Deformation Mechanism of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy during High-Temperature Tensile Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Noda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys can be used for reducing the weight of various structural products, because of their high specific strength. They have attracted considerable attention as materials with a reduced environmental load, since they help to save both resources and energy. In order to use Mg alloys for manufacturing vehicles, it is important to investigate the deformation mechanism and transition point for optimizing the material and vehicle design. In this study, we investigated the transition of the deformation mechanism during the high-temperature uniaxial tensile deformation of the AZ31 Mg alloy. At a test temperature of 523 K and an initial strain rate of 3×10−3 s-1, the AZ31 Mg alloy (mean grain size: ~5 μm exhibited stable deformation behavior and the deformation mechanism changed to one dominated by grain boundary sliding.

  8. Microstructure and high temperature stability of age hardenable AA2219 aluminium alloy modified by Sc, Mg and Zr additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naga Raju, P. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, IIT-Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)], E-mail: puvvala_nagaraju@yahoo.com; Srinivasa Rao, K. [Metallurgical Engineering Department, Andhra University, Visakapatnam 530003 (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500258 (India); Kamaraj, M.; Prasad Rao, K. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, IIT-Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2007-08-25

    The present work pertains to the improvement of high temperature stability of age hardenable AA2219 aluminium-copper (6.3%) alloy. Addition of scandium, magnesium and zirconium to the base metal AA2219 was adopted to improve this high temperature stability. These additions were systematically varied by preparing alloys of different composition using gas tungsten arc melting. Long time ageing studies and impression creep technique were used to study the high temperature stability of the alloys. These modified compositions of the alloy resulted in fine equiaxed grains, refined eutectics, large number of high temperature stable and finer precipitates. Among all the compositions, 0.8% Sc + 0.45% Mg + 0.2% Zr addition was found to be significant in improving the high temperature stability of AA2219 alloy. This may be attributed to the possible microstructural changes, solute enrichment of the matrix and pinning of the grain boundaries by the finer precipitates.

  9. In situ Raman spectroscopic analysis of surface oxide films on Ni-base alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld interfaces in high-temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongjin; Choi, Kyung Joon [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Bahn, Chi Bum [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University 2, 63-gil, Geumjeong-Gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    In situ Raman spectroscopy has been applied to analyze the surface oxide films formed on dissimilar metal weld (DMW) interfaces of nickel-base alloy/low alloy steel under hydrogenated high-temperature water condition. For the analysis of the oxide films under high temperature/pressure aqueous conditions, an in situ Raman spectroscopy system was developed by constructing a hydrothermal cell where the entire optics including the excitation laser and the Raman light collection system were located at the nearest position to the specimen by means of immersion optics. In situ Raman spectra of the DMW interfaces were collected in hydrogenated water condition at different temperatures up to 300 °C. The measured in situ Raman spectra showed peaks of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} at the DMW interface. It is considered that differences in the oxide chemistry originated from the chemical element distribution inside of the DMW interface region.

  10. Thermogravimetric study of oxidation of a PdCr alloy used for high-temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Darwin L.; Zeller, Mary V.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the oxidation of Pd-13 weight percent Cr, a candidate alloy for high-temperature strain gages, was investigated by thermogravimetry. Although the bulk alloy exhibits linear electrical resistivity versus temperature and stable resistivity at elevated temperatures, problems attributed to oxidation occur when this material is fabricated into strain gages. In this work, isothermal thermogravimetry (TG) was used to study the oxidation kinetics. Results indicate that the oxidation of Pd-13 weight percent Cr was approximately parabolic in time at 600 C but exhibited greater passivation from 700 to 900 C. At 1100 C, the oxidation rate again increased.

  11. Pulse reversal plating of nickel-cobalt alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Jaskula, M.; Kubiczek, M.

    2009-01-01

    extreme demands, in terms of tool accuracy, process temperature and tool wear, are requested. In order to meet these demands, electroforming of hard nickel alloys is an obvious way forward. This paper presents several electrolytes from which it is possible to deposit nickel-cobalt alloys with high...... hardness (>550 HV), low internal stress and easy maintenance. Moreover, different organic complexing agents - as well as alternatives to boric acid - have been investigated....

  12. Functional and structural fatigue of titanium tantalum high temperature shape memory alloys (HT SMAs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niendorf, T., E-mail: Thomas.Niendorf@iwt.tu-freiberg.de [Institute of Materials Engineering, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Krooß, P. [Lehrstuhl für Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), University of Paderborn, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Batyrsina, E. [Institut für Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Paulsen, A.; Motemani, Y.; Ludwig, A.; Buenconsejo, P.; Frenzel, J.; Eggeler, G. [Institut für Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Maier, H.J. [Institut für Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30823 Garbsen (Germany)

    2015-01-03

    Due to their high work output and good mechanical properties, actuators made from shape memory alloys (SMAs) are used in numerous applications. Unfortunately, SMAs such as nickel–titanium (Ni–Ti) can only be employed at temperatures up to about 100 °C. Lately, high-temperature shape memory alloys (HT SMAs) have been introduced to overcome this limitation. Ternary systems based on Ni–Ti have been intensively characterized and alloys are available that can operate at elevated temperatures. However, these alloys either contain substantial amounts of expensive noble elements like platinum and palladium, or the materials are brittle. The titanium–tantalum (Ti–Ta) system has been developed to overcome these issues. Binary Ti–Ta provides relatively high M{sub S} temperature combined with excellent workability, but it suffers from fast cyclic degradation. By alloying with third elements this drawback can be overcome: The ternary Ti–Ta–Al alloy shows overall promising properties as will be shown in the present work. In-situ thermo-mechanical cycling experiments were conducted and allowed for evaluation of the factors affecting the functional and structural fatigue of this alloy. Functional fatigue is dominated by ω-phase evolution, while structural fatigue is triggered by an interplay of ω-phase induced embrittlement and deformation constraints imposed by unsuitable texture. In addition, a concept for fatigue life extension proposed very recently for binary Ti–Ta, is demonstrated to be also applicable for the ternary Ti–Ta–Al.

  13. High-temperature oxidation of advanced FeCrNi alloy in steam environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed S.; Gill, Simerjeet K.; Rumaiz, Abdul K.; Bai, Jianming; Ghose, Sanjit; Rebak, Raul B.; Ecker, Lynne E.

    2017-12-01

    Alloys of iron-chromium-nickel are being explored as alternative cladding materials to improve safety margins under severe accident conditions. Our research focuses on non-destructively investigating the oxidation behavior of the FeCrNi alloy ;Alloy 33; using synchrotron-based methods. The evolution and structure of oxide layer formed in steam environments were characterized using X-ray diffraction, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence methods and scanning electron microscopy. Our results demonstrate that a compact and continuous oxide scale was formed consisting of two layers, chromium oxide and spinel phase (FeCr2O4) oxides, wherein the concentration of the FeCr2O4 phase decreased from the surface to the bulk-oxide interface.

  14. Literature Survey on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low-Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P

    2002-02-01

    The present report is a summary of a literature survey on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour/ mechanisms in low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature water with special emphasis to primary-pressure-boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWR). A brief overview on the current state of knowledge concerning SCC of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under BWR conditions is given. After a short introduction on general aspects of SCC, the main influence parameter and available quantitative literature data concerning SCC of LAS in high-temperature water are discussed on a phenomenological basis followed by a summary of the most popular SCC models for this corrosion system. The BWR operating experience and service cracking incidents are discussed with respect to the existing laboratory data and background knowledge. Finally, the most important open questions and topics for further experimental investigations are outlined. (author)

  15. Corrosion behavior of nickel-containing alloys in artificial sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randin, J P

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of various nickel-containing alloys was measured in artificial sweat (perspiration) using the Tafel extrapolation method. It was found that Ni, CuNi 25 (coin alloy), NiAl (colored intermetallic compounds), WC + Ni (hard metal), white gold (jewelry alloy), FN42 and Nilo Alby K (controlled expansion alloys), and NiP (electroless nickel coating) are in an active state and dissolve readily in oxygenated artificial sweat. By contrast, austenitic stainless steels, TiC + Mo2C + Ni (hard metal), NiTi (shape-memory alloy), Hastelloy X (superalloy), Phydur (precipitation hardening alloy), PdNi and SnNi (nickel-containing coatings) are in a passive state but may pit under certain conditions. Cobalt, Cr, Ti, and some of their alloys were also investigated for the purpose of comparison. Cobalt and its alloys have poor corrosion resistance except for Stellite 20. Chromium and high-chromium ferritic stainless steels have a high pitting potential but the latter are susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti has a pitting potential greater than 3 V. Comparison between the in vitro measurements of the corrosion rate of nickel-based alloys and the clinical observation of the occurrence of contact dermatitis is discussed.

  16. The Role of Surface Protection for High-Temperature Performance of TiAl Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Michael

    2017-09-01

    In the temperature range where TiAl alloys are currently being used in jet engine and automotive industries, surface reaction with the operating environment is not yet a critical issue. Surface treatment may, however, be needed in order to provide improved abrasion resistance. Development routes currently aim at a further increase in operation temperatures in gas turbines up to 800°C and higher, and in automotive applications for turbocharger rotors, even up to 1050°C. In this case, oxidation rates may reach levels where significant metal consumption of the load-bearing cross-section can occur. Another possibly even more critical issue can be high-temperature-induced oxygen and nitrogen up-take into the metal subsurface zone with subsequent massive ambient temperature embrittlement. Solutions for these problems are based on a deliberate phase change of the metal subsurface zone by diffusion treatments and by using effects such as the halogen effect to change the oxidation mechanism at high temperatures. Other topics of relevance for the use of TiAl alloys in high-temperature applications can be high-temperature abrasion resistance, thermal barrier coatings on TiAl and surface quality in additive manufacturing, in all these cases-focusing on the role of the operation environment. This paper addresses the recent developments in these areas and the requirements for future work.

  17. The Role of Surface Protection for High-Temperature Performance of TiAl Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Michael

    2017-12-01

    In the temperature range where TiAl alloys are currently being used in jet engine and automotive industries, surface reaction with the operating environment is not yet a critical issue. Surface treatment may, however, be needed in order to provide improved abrasion resistance. Development routes currently aim at a further increase in operation temperatures in gas turbines up to 800°C and higher, and in automotive applications for turbocharger rotors, even up to 1050°C. In this case, oxidation rates may reach levels where significant metal consumption of the load-bearing cross-section can occur. Another possibly even more critical issue can be high-temperature-induced oxygen and nitrogen up-take into the metal subsurface zone with subsequent massive ambient temperature embrittlement. Solutions for these problems are based on a deliberate phase change of the metal subsurface zone by diffusion treatments and by using effects such as the halogen effect to change the oxidation mechanism at high temperatures. Other topics of relevance for the use of TiAl alloys in high-temperature applications can be high-temperature abrasion resistance, thermal barrier coatings on TiAl and surface quality in additive manufacturing, in all these cases-focusing on the role of the operation environment. This paper addresses the recent developments in these areas and the requirements for future work.

  18. Nb-Based Nb-Al-Fe Alloys: Solidification Behavior and High-Temperature Phase Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Frank; Philips, Noah

    2017-09-01

    High-melting Nb-based alloys hold significant promise for the development of novel high-temperature materials for structural applications. In order to understand the effect of alloying elements Al and Fe, the Nb-rich part of the ternary Nb-Al-Fe system was investigated. A series of Nb-rich ternary alloys were synthesized from high-purity Nb, Al, and Fe metals by arc melting. Solidification paths were identified and the liquidus surface of the Nb corner of the ternary system was established by analysis of the as-melted microstructures and thermal analysis. Complementary analysis of heat-treated samples yielded isothermal sections at 1723 K and 1873 K (1450 °C and 1600 °C).

  19. Au-Ge based Candidate Alloys for High-Temperature Lead-Free Solder Alternatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chidambaram, Vivek; Hald, John; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2009-01-01

    Au-Ge based candidate alloys have been proposed as an alternative to high-lead content solders that are currently being used for high-temperature applications. The influence of the low melting point metals namely In, Sb and Sn to the Au-Ge eutectic with respect to the microstructure...... was primarily strengthened by the refined (Ge) dispersed phase. The distribution of phases played a relatively more crucial role in determining the ductility of the bulk solder alloy. In the present work it was found that among the low melting point metals, the addition of Sb to the Au-Ge eutectic would...... and microhardness has been extensively reported. Furthermore, the effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and its corresponding microhardness of these promising candidate alloys have been investigated in this work. After thermal aging at 200°C for different durations ranging from 1 day to 3 weeks...

  20. Characterization of zinc–nickel alloy electrodeposits obtained from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zinc alloy offers superior sacrificial protection to steel as the alloy dissolves more slowly than pure zinc. ... characterization of zinc-nickel electrodeposits obtained from sulphamate bath containing substituted aldehydes was carried out using hardness testing, X-ray diffraction, and corrosion resistance measurements.

  1. Electrochemical and surface characterization of a nickel-titanium alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, Dirk; Veldhuizen, AG; de Vries, J; Busscher, HJ; Uges, DRA; van Horn, James

    1998-01-01

    For clinical implantation purposes of shape memory metals the nearly equiatomic nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy is generally used. In this study, the corrosion properties and surface characteristics of this alloy were investigated and compared with two reference controls, AISI 316 LVM stainless steel

  2. TA [B] Predicting Microstructure-Creep Resistance Correlation in High Temperature Alloys over Multiple Time Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Vikas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-03-06

    DoE-NETL partnered with Purdue University to predict the creep and associated microstructure evolution of tungsten-based refractory alloys. Researchers use grain boundary (GB) diagrams, a new concept, to establish time-dependent creep resistance and associated microstructure evolution of grain boundaries/intergranular films GB/IGF controlled creep as a function of load, environment, and temperature. The goal was to conduct a systematic study that includes the development of a theoretical framework, multiscale modeling, and experimental validation using W-based body-centered-cubic alloys, doped/alloyed with one or two of the following elements: nickel, palladium, cobalt, iron, and copper—typical refractory alloys. Prior work has already established and validated a basic theory for W-based binary and ternary alloys; the study conducted under this project extended this proven work. Based on interface diagrams phase field models were developed to predict long term microstructural evolution. In order to validate the models nanoindentation creep data was used to elucidate the role played by the interface properties in predicting long term creep strength and microstructure evolution.

  3. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COBALT AND PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-NICKEL ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-08-25

    >New plutonium-base teroary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuels are described. The alloys consist of 10 to 20 atomic percent cobalt with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 88 atomic percent; or, of from 10 to 25 atomic percent nickel (or mixture of nickel and cobalt) with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 86 atomic percent. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are a lower melting point and a wide range of permissible plutonium dilution.

  4. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Heuser, Brent [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Robertson, Ian [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Sehitoglu, Huseyin [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Sofronis, Petros [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Gewirth, Andrew [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  5. High-temperature deformation of dispersion-strengthened Cu-Zr-Ti-C alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, Rodrigo H. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad de Chile, Beauchef 850, 4 deg. Piso, Santiago 6511261 (Chile)]. E-mail: rhpalma@ing.uchile.ct; Sepulveda, Aquiles [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad de Chile, Beauchef 850, 4 deg. Piso, Santiago 6511261 (Chile); Espinoza, Rodrigo [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad de Chile, Beauchef 850, 4 deg. Piso, Santiago 6511261 (Chile); Dianez, M. Jesus [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Americo Vespucio s/n, Isla de La Cartuja, Sevilla (Spain); Criado, Jose M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Americo Vespucio s/n, Isla de La Cartuja, Sevilla (Spain); Sayagues, M. Jesus [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Americo Vespucio s/n, Isla de La Cartuja, Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-01-25

    The hot mechanical behaviour and microstructure of Cu-5 vol.% TiC, Cu-5 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} and Cu-2.5 vol.% TiC-2.5 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} alloys prepared by reaction milling were studied. After a test of 1 h annealing at 1173 K, the Cu-5 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} alloy presented the lower softening resistance to annealing, while the other two ones kept their initial room-temperature hardness (about 2 GPa). Hot-compression tests at 773 and 1123 K, at initial true strain rates of 0.85 x 10{sup -3} and 0.85 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1} were performed. The Cu-2.5 vol.% TiC-2.5 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} and the Cu-5 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} alloys were the strongest and softest materials, respectively. Moreover, by electron microscopy, nanometric TiC and micrometric particles were detected in the Cu-5 vol.% TiC and Cu-5 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} alloys, respectively. A possible explanation for the observed behaviour of these materials is proposed. In the compression tests, it was also found that strain rate has a low effect on flow stress, as it has been previously observed by various authors in dispersion-strengthened alloys deformed at high temperatures.

  6. High temperature deformation behavior and microstructural evolutions of a high Zr containing WE magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asqardoust, Sh.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A. [School of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatemi, S.M., E-mail: mfatemi@ut.ac.ir [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradjoy-Hamedani, M. [School of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-05

    Magnesium alloys containing RE elements (WE grade) are considered as potential materials for high temperature structural applications. To this end, it is crucial to study the flow behavior and the microstructural evolution of these alloys at high temperatures. In present work, the hot compression testing was employed to investigate the deformation behavior of a rolled WE54 magnesium alloy at elevated temperatures. The experimental material failed to deform to target strain of 0.6 at 250 and 300 °C, while the straining was successfully performed at 350 °C. A flow softening was observed at 350 °C, which was related to the depletion of RE strengthener elements, particularly Y atoms, from the solid solution and dynamic precipitation of β phases. It was suggested that the Zener pinning effect of the latter precipitates might retard the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. As the temperature increased to 450 and 500 °C, the RE elements dissolved in the matrix and thus dynamic recrystallization could considerably progress in the microstructure. The comparative study of specimens cut along transverse ad normal direction (TD and ND specimens) implied that the presence of RE elements might effectively reduce the yield anisotropy in WE54 rolled alloy. Microstructural observations indicated a higher fraction of dynamically-recrystallized grains for the ND specimens. This was discussed relying on the different shares of deformation mechanism during compressing the TD and ND specimens. - Highlights: • Deformation behavior of a high Zr WE alloy was addressed at low strain rate. • Dynamic precipitation was realized at 350 °C. • The occurrence of DRX was retarded due to Zener pinning effect. • A higher DRX fraction was obtained in ND specimens comparing with TD ones.

  7. 10 000-hr Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of 68 High-Temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni- Base Alloys Evaluated at 982 deg. C (1800 deg. F)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    Power systems with operating temperatures in the range of 815 to 982 C (1500 to 1800 F) frequently require alloys that can operate for long times at these temperatures. A critical requirement is that these alloys have adequate oxidation resistance. The alloys used in these power systems require thousands of hours of operating life with intermittent shutdown to room temperature. Intermittent power plant shutdowns, however, offer the possibility that the protective scale will tend to spall (i.e., crack and flake off) upon cooling, increasing the rate of oxidative attack in subsequent heating cycles. Thus, it is critical that candidate alloys be evaluated for cyclic oxidation behavior. It was determined that exposing test alloys to ten 1000-hr cycles in static air at 982 10 000-hr Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of 68 High-Temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni-Base Alloys Evaluated at 982 C (1800 F) could give a reasonable simulation of long-time power plant operation. Iron- (Fe-), nickel- (Ni-), and cobalt- (Co-) based high-temperature alloys with sufficient chromium (Cr) and/or aluminum (Al) content can exhibit excellent oxidation resistance. The protective oxides formed by these classes of alloys are typically Cr2O3 and/or Al2O3, and are usually influenced by their Cr, or Cr and Al, content. Sixty-eight Co-, Fe-, and Ni-base high-temperature alloys, typical of those used at this temperature or higher, were used in this study. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, the alloys were tested and compared on the basis of their weight change as a function of time, x-ray diffraction of the protective scale composition, and the physical appearance of the exposed samples. Although final appearance and x-ray diffraction of the final scale products were two factors used to evaluate the oxidation resistance of each alloy, the main criterion was the oxidation kinetics inferred from the specific weight change versus time data. These data indicated a range of oxidation behavior including parabolic

  8. Experimental Analysis of the Behaviour of Aluminium Alloy EN 6082AW T6 at High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neno Torić

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents test results for the mechanical and creep properties of European aluminium alloy EN 6082AW T6 at high temperatures. Mechanical properties of the aluminium alloy were determined by means of two types of test: constant stress-rate and stationary creep tests. Mechanical properties were determined up to a temperature of 350 °C, while the creep tests were conducted within the temperature interval 150–300 °C. The creep tests conducted identified the critical temperature interval for creep development, which represents an important factor when analysing creep behaviour of aluminium structures. This temperature interval was found to be within the range 200–300 °C. Test results for stress at 0.2% strain and modulus of elasticity at different temperatures showed good agreement with the codified values from Eurocode 9 and with other comparable studies.

  9. High strain rate behavior of alloy 800H at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafiei, E., E-mail: shafiei.ehsan.mse@gmail.com

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, a new model using linear estimation of strain hardening rate vs. stress, has been developed to predict dynamic behavior of alloy 800H at high temperatures. In order to prove the accuracy and competency of the presented model, Johnson–Cook model pertaining modeling of flow stress curves was used. Evaluation of mean error of flow stress at deformation temperatures from 850 °C to 1050 °C and at strain rates of 5 S{sup −1} to 20 S{sup −1} indicates that the predicted results are in a good agreement with experimentally measured ones. This analysis has been done for the stress–strain curves under hot working condition for alloy 800H. However, this model is not dependent on the type of material and can be extended for any similar conditions.

  10. High-temperature grain size stabilization of nanocrystalline Fe–Cr alloys with Hf additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lulu, E-mail: lli18@ncsu.edu; Saber, Mostafa; Xu, Weizong; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2014-09-08

    The influence of 1–4 at% Hf additions on the thermal stability of mechanically alloyed nanocrystalline Fe–14Cr alloys was studied in this work. XRD-calculated grain size and microhardness results were reported versus isochronal annealing treatments up to 1100 °C. Microstructural evolution was investigated using channeling contrast FIB imaging and TEM. Grain size of samples with 4 at% Hf was found to be maintained in the nanoscale range at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Zener pinning was considered as a major source of high temperature grain size stabilization. By comparing the Orowan strengthening contribution to the total hardness, the deviation of grain size predictions from the actual grain size in Fe–14Cr–4Hf suggests the presence of thermodynamic stabilization by the solute segregation to grain boundaries (GBs). A predictive thermodynamic model indicates that the thermodynamic stabilization can be expected.

  11. Nanophase Nickel-Zirconium Alloys for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Whitacre, jay; Valdez, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Nanophase nickel-zirconium alloys have been investigated for use as electrically conductive coatings and catalyst supports in fuel cells. Heretofore, noble metals have been used because they resist corrosion in the harsh, acidic fuel cell interior environments. However, the high cost of noble metals has prompted a search for less-costly substitutes. Nickel-zirconium alloys belong to a class of base metal alloys formed from transition elements of widely different d-electron configurations. These alloys generally exhibit unique physical, chemical, and metallurgical properties that can include corrosion resistance. Inasmuch as corrosion is accelerated by free-energy differences between bulk material and grain boundaries, it was conjectured that amorphous (glassy) and nanophase forms of these alloys could offer the desired corrosion resistance. For experiments to test the conjecture, thin alloy films containing various proportions of nickel and zirconium were deposited by magnetron and radiofrequency co-sputtering of nickel and zirconium. The results of x-ray diffraction studies of the deposited films suggested that the films had a nanophase and nearly amorphous character.

  12. On massive carbide precipitation during high temperature low cycle fatigue in alloy 800H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Halford, G.R. (National Aeronautics Space Agency, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center); Schuster, H. (KFA, Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Reactor Materials)

    1994-08-15

    Alloys engineered for high-temperature application are frequently put into use in a thermodynamically unstable condition. Subsequent exposure to service temperatures may promote many thermally-assisted reactions such as formation, coarsening, and/or coalescence of precipitates. Superposition of cyclic straining may accelerate the kinetics of these reactions but also may cause reaction products having specific features not observed under simple thermal exposure. The influence of cyclic strain-induced microstructural changes on the fatigue behavior has to be considered in terms of their effects on both cyclic strength and life. The occurrence of massive (cellular) precipitation of M[sub 23]C[sub 6] on grain boundaries during elevated temperature low cycle fatigue testing has been reported in Type 304 stainless steel, Type 316 stainless steel, and Inconel 617 superalloy, and its presence has already been linked with reduction in high temperature ductility, an important engineering property on which low cycle fatigue (LCF) life depends to a large extent. Massive precipitation may render the austenitic engineering alloys susceptible to corrosion, which would have important bearing on the performance of these alloys in the oxidizing environments. Furthermore, the long term stability of massive M[sub 23]C[sub 6] particles is particularly important since the transformation of such a large structure into a brittle intermetallic phase (such as sigma) could produce a detrimental effect on the mechanical properties. The conditions and the mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of massive precipitation during LCF have not yet been established. This investigation is specifically aimed at understanding the influence of strain rate on massive precipitation and the mechanism responsible for the occurrence of massive M[sub 23]C[sub 6] precipitation in Alloy 800H during elevated temperature LCF testing.

  13. Corrosion Behavior of NiCrFe Alloy 600 in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SE Ziemniak; ME Hanson

    2004-11-02

    The corrosion behavior of Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) is investigated in hydrogenated water at 260 C. The corrosion kinetics are observed to be parabolic, the parabolic rate constant being determined by chemical descaling to be 0.055 mg dm{sup -2} hr{sup -1/2}. A combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, supplemented by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, are used to identify the oxide phases present (i.e., spinel) and to characterize their morphology and thickness. Two oxide layers are identified: an outer, ferrite-rich layer and an inner, chromite-rich layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with argon ion milling and target factor analysis is applied to determine spinel stoichiometry; the inner layer is (Ni{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.3}Cr{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 4}, while the outer layer is (Ni{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})(Fe{sub 0.85}Cr{sub 0.15}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. The distribution of trivalent iron and chromium cations in the inner and outer oxide layers is essentially the same as that found previously in stainless steel corrosion oxides, thus confirming their invariant nature as solvi in the immiscible spinel binary Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} (or NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Although oxidation occurred non-selectively, excess quantities of nickel(II) oxide were not found. Instead, the excess nickel was accounted for as recrystallized nickel metal in the inner layer, as additional nickel ferrite in the outer layer, formed by pickup of iron ions from the aqueous phase, and by selective release to the aqueous phase.

  14. High-temperature corrosion and applications of nickel and iron aluminides in coal-conversion power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Tortorelli, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Nickel and iron aluminide intermetallics are being developed for use as structural materials and/or as cladding for conventional engineering alloys. In addition to strength advantages, these materials exhibit excellent resistance to corrosion in single- and multioxidant environments at elevated temperatures by the formation of slow-growing, adherent alumina scales. Corrosion resistance in a given environment is strongly dependent on the composition of the alloy and on the nature of the corrosive species prevalent in the service environment. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of these intermetallics in oxidizing, sulfidizing, and multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized.

  15. High Bismuth Alloys as Lead-Free Alternatives for Interconnects in High-Temperature Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallampati, Sandeep

    Predominant high melting point solders for high-temperature electronics (operating temperatures from 200 to 250°C) are Pb-based which are being banned from usage due to their toxic nature. In this study, high bismuth alloy compositions (Bi-14Cu-8Sn, Bi-20Sb-10Cu, Bi-15Sb-10Cu and Bi-10Sb-10Cu) were designed, cast, and characterized to understand their potential as replacements. The desirable aspect of Bi is its high melting temperature, which is 271°C. Alloying elements Sn, Sb and Cu were added to improve some of its properties such as thermal conductivity, plasticity, and reactivity with Cu and Ni surface. Metallographic sectioning and microstructure analysis were performed on the bulk alloys to compare the evolution of phases predicted from equilibrium phase diagrams. Reflow processes were developed to make die-attach samples out of the proposed alloys and die-shear testing was carried out to characterize mechanical integrity of the joint. Thermal shock between -55°C to 200°C and high temperature storage at 200°C were performed on the assembled die-attach samples to study microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior of the reflowed alloys under accelerated testing conditions. In addition, heat dissipation capabilities, using flash diffusivity, were measured on the bulk alloys and also on the die-attach assembly. Finally, tensile testing was performed on the dogbone specimens to identify the potential for plastic deformation and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis was used to study the grain orientations on the fracture surfaces and their influence on the crack propagation. Bi-14Cu-8Sn has formed BiNi by on the die backside metallization and the reaction with Cu was poor. This has resulted in weaker substrate side interface. It was observed that Bi-Sb alloys have strong reactivity with Ni (forming Bi3Ni, BiNi and NiSb intermetallic phases), and with Cu (forming Cu2Sb, Cu4Sb). Spallation was observed in NiSb interfacial intermetallic layer and

  16. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni3Al Alloys and Coatings Modified with Pt and Reactive Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Nan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000 C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455 C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain β-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used {beta}-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt + Hf-modified γ-Ni + γ-Ni3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase γ-Ni and γ'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both γ-Ni and γ'Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at

  17. High-Temperature Oxidation of Alpha Nickel-Silicon. I. Reaction Kinetics - Thermogravimetry,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    the factor for metal comsumption as nickel is converted to nickel oxide is 4.1 um of metal per mg cm-2 of weight gain (1). Pure silicon, on oxidation...structure and electrical conductivity. NiO is a p-type electronic semiconductor, and it is the diffusion of reactant ions through the scale, and not the...Ronstoichiometzy, Diffusion and Electrical Conductivity in Binary Metal Oxides, Wiley-Zntercience, New York, pp. 22-46. 19. Kel, G.J. and Gellings

  18. Temperature effects on the chemical composition of nickel-phosphorus alloy thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguocha, I.N.A., E-mail: iko340@mail.usask.c [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Building, 57 Campus Drive, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Taheri, R.; Yannacopoulos, S. [School of Engineering, University of British Columbia Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, B.C. V1V 1V7 (Canada); Uju, W.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Building, 57 Campus Drive, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Sammynaiken, R., E-mail: r.sammynaiken@usask.c [Saskatchewan Structural Science Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9 (Canada); Wettig, S. [School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Hu, Y.-F. [Canadian Light Source Inc., 101 Perimeter Road, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 0X4 (Canada)

    2010-02-01

    Electroless Ni-P (EN) alloys are widely used as coating materials. Their properties depend on the level of phosphorus present and the extent of thermal treatment. We report the results of two complimentary electronic structure techniques, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the site-specific surface chemistry in EN alloys of different phosphorus compositions and thermal treatments. In XANES experiment, absorption at the Ni L{sub 3,2} edge and the P K edge were measured and the P 2p, Ni 2p, and Ni 3p bands were measured by XPS. Heating EN alloys to high temperatures result in a competitive reaction between phosphorus and nickel on the surface for oxygen. There is an increase in the level of phosphates and other forms of phosphorus oxides and a decrease in the oxidized nickel on the surface of the EN alloy thin film. Changes in the electronic structure and chemical composition in the bulk of the EN alloy are not obvious.

  19. Intermetallic Nickel-Titanium Alloys for Oil-Lubricated Bearing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, C.; Pepper, S. V.; Noebe, R.; Hull, D. R.; Glennon, G.

    2009-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, NITINOL 60 (60NiTi), containing 60 wt% nickel and 40 wt% titanium, is shown to be a promising candidate material for oil-lubricated rolling and sliding contact applications such as bearings and gears. NiTi alloys are well known and normally exploited for their shape memory behavior. When properly processed, however, NITINOL 60 exhibits excellent dimensional stability and useful structural properties. Processed via high temperature, high-pressure powder metallurgy techniques or other means, NITINOL 60 offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. NITINOL 60 is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, less dense than steel, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, nongalling and nonmagnetic. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic encompasses all of these attributes. Further, NITINOL 60 has shown remarkable tribological performance when compared to other aerospace bearing alloys under oil-lubricated conditions. Spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) tests were conducted in vacuum using NITINOL 60 balls loaded between rotating 440C stainless steel disks, lubricated with synthetic hydrocarbon oil. Under conditions considered representative of precision bearings, the performance (life and friction) equaled or exceeded that observed with silicon nitride or titanium carbide coated 440C bearing balls. Based upon this preliminary data, it appears that NITINOL 60, despite its high titanium content, is a promising candidate alloy for advanced mechanical systems requiring superior and intrinsic corrosion resistance, electrical conductivity and nonmagnetic behavior under lubricated contacting conditions.

  20. GRCop-84: A High Temperature Copper-based Alloy For High Heat Flux Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2005-01-01

    While designed for rocket engine main combustion chamber liners, GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) offers potential for high heat flux applications in industrial applications requiring a temperature capability up to approximately 700 C (1292 F). GRCop-84 is a copper-based alloy with excellent elevated temperature strength, good creep resistance, long LCF lives and enhanced oxidation resistance. It also has a lower thermal expansion than copper and many other low alloy copper-based alloys. GRCop-84 can be manufactured into a variety of shapes such as tubing, bar, plate and sheet using standard production techniques and requires no special production techniques. GRCop-84 forms well, so conventional fabrication methods including stamping and bending can be used. GRCop-84 has demonstrated an ability to be friction stir welded, brazed, inertia welded, diffusion bonded and electron beam welded for joining to itself and other materials. Potential applications include plastic injection molds, resistance welding electrodes and holders, permanent metal casting molds, vacuum plasma spray nozzles and high temperature heat exchanger applications.

  1. Microstructural investigations of pure nickel exposed to KCl induced high temperature corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, T.; Slomian, A.; Lomholt, Trine Nybo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation of 99?99% pure nickel was studied with and without 0?10 mg cm22 KCl(s) in an environment containing 5 vol.-%O2, 40 vol.-%H2O and 55 vol.-%N2 at 600uC for up to 168 h. Oxide microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), focused ion beam (FIB), broad ion beam (BIB) and SEM....../EDX. Oxidised nickel shows an approximately parabolic oxide growth rate. The oxide scale is dense with some pores at the oxide/metal interface. Adding small amounts of KCl does not result in a faster corrosion rate of nickel. However, the surface morphology changes and small oxide crusts were observed...... in the vicinity of former KCl particles. This is proposed to be the result of a NiCl2–KCl eutectic on top of the oxide scale formed above 514uC. The oxide scale formed in the presence of KCl contains more and differently distributed voids than the scale formed without KCl....

  2. Microfissuring in Electron-Beam-Welded Nickel Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical model developed for microfissuring of commercial nickel alloy during electron-beam welding. Number of measured microfissures per unit length of weld plotted against excess power calculated by computer model. Excess power that above level likely to produce microfissures. In agreement with model, measured microfissures increase at rate of 4.5 per inch (1.8 per centimeter) per excess kilowatt.

  3. Determination of elastic modulus in nickel alloy from ultrasonic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the behaviour of elastic constants and the variation on heat treatment in a nickel base super alloy Nimonic 263 by ultrasonic velocity measurements. From the present study it is evident that the elastic moduli of the material are very sensitive to any minor compositional changes, ...

  4. Combined thermodynamic study of nickel-base alloys. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, C. R.; Meschter, P. J.

    1981-02-15

    Achievements during this period are the following: (1) initiation of a high-temperature study of the Ni-Ta system using the galvanic cell technique, (2) emf study of high-temperature thermodynamics in the Ni-Mo system, (3) measured heat capacity data on ordered and disordered Ni/sub 4/Mo, (4) heat capacities of Ni and disordered Ni/sub 3/Fe, and (5) computer correlation of thermodynamic and phase diagram data in binary Ni-base alloys. (MOW)

  5. Additive Manufacturing of NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benafan, Othmane; Bigelow, Glen S.; Elahinia, Mohammad; Moghaddam, Narges Shayesteh; Amerinatanzi, Amirhesam; Saedi, Soheil; Toker, Guher Pelin; Karaca, Haluk

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing of a NiTi-20Hf high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) was investigated. A selective laser melting (SLM) process by Phenix3D Systems was used to develop components from NiTiHf powder (of approximately 25-75 m particle fractions), and the thermomechanical response was compared to the conventionally vacuum induction skull melted counterpart. Transformation temperatures of the SLM material were found to be slightly lower due to the additional oxygen pick up from the gas atomization and melting process. The shape memory response in compression was measured for stresses up to 500 MPa, and transformation strains were found to be very comparable (Up to 1.26 for the as-extruded; up to 1.52 for SLM).

  6. Grain boundary sliding mechanism during high temperature deformation of AZ31 Magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roodposhti, Peiman Shahbeigi, E-mail: pshahbe@ncsu.edu [North Carolina State University (United States); University of Connecticut (United States); Sarkar, Apu; Murty, Korukonda Linga [North Carolina State University (United States); Brody, Harold [University of Connecticut (United States); Scattergood, Ronald [North Carolina State University (United States)

    2016-07-04

    High temperature tensile creep tests were conducted on AZ31 Magnesium alloy at low stress range of 1–13 MPa to clarify the existence of grain boundary sliding (GBS) mechanism during creep deformation. Experimental data within the GBS regime shows the stress exponent is ~2 and the activation energy value is close to that for grain boundary diffusion. Analyses of the fracture surface of the sample revealed that the GBS provides many stress concentrated sites for diffusional cavities formation and leads to premature failure. Scanning electron microscopy images show the appearances of both ductile and brittle type fracture mechanism. X-ray diffraction line profile analysis (based on Williamson-Hall technique) shows a reduction in dislocation density due to dynamic recovery (DRV). A correlation between experimental data and Langdon's model for GBS was also demonstrated.

  7. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-06-01

    Iron aluminides containing greater than about 20-25 @ % Al have oxidation/sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. In addition to alloying modifications for improved creep resistance of wrought material, this strength limitation is being addressed by development of oxide-dispersion- strengthened (ODS) iron aluminides and by evaluation of Fe{sub 3}Al alloy compositions as coatings or claddings on higher-strength, less corrosion-resistant materials. As part of these efforts, the high-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide weld overlays and ODS alloys is being characterized and compared to previous results for ingot-processed material.

  8. Solid particle erosion of steels and nickel based alloys candidates for USC steam turbine blading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernuschi, Federico; Guardamagna, Cristina; Lorenzoni, Lorenzo [ERSE SpA, Milan (Italy); Robba, Davide [CESI, Milan (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    The main objective of COST536 Action is to develop highly efficient steam power plant with low emissions, from innovative alloy development to validation of component integrity. In this perspective, to improve the operating efficiency, materials capable of withstanding higher operating temperatures are required. For the manufacturing of components for steam power plants with higher efficiency steels and nickel-based alloys with improved oxidation resistance and creep strength at temperature as high as 650 C - 700 C have to be developed. Candidate alloys for manufacturing high pressure steam turbine diaphragms, buckets, radial seals and control valves should exhibit, among other properties, a good resistance at the erosion phenomena induced by hard solid particles. Ferric oxide (magnetite) scales cause SPE by exfoliating from boiler tubes and steam pipes (mainly super-heaters and re-heaters) and being transported within the steam flow to the turbine. In order to comparatively study the erosion behaviour of different materials in relatively short times, an accelerated experimental simulation of the erosion phenomena must be carried out. Among different techniques to induce erosion on material targets, the use of an air jet tester is well recognised to be one of the most valid and reliable. In this work the results of SPE comparative tests performed at high temperatures (550 C, 600 C and 650 C) at different impaction angles on some steels and nickel based alloys samples are reported. (orig.)

  9. Development of a Brazing Alloy for the Mechanically Alloyed High Temperature Sheet Material INCOLOY Alloy MA 956.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    OF CONTENTS Section Pge 1. INTRODUCTION AND PW)GRAM E OBJECTIVE 7 2. ALLOYING APROACH AND RATIONALE 9 2.1 Approach 9 2.2 Selection of Suitable Alloy...At the time of writing this final summary report only limited success has been achieved by Allied Chemicals but it is reported as follows so that the

  10. High Temperature Low Cycle Fatigue Data for Three High Strength Nickel-Base Superalloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    The tensile and creep properties of Rene 95 are summarized in Table 6. 14 TABLE 5 CRDMICAL COMPOSITION OF RENE 95* Nickel 61 Chromium 14 Cobalt 8... Stent , Mar-Test Inc. Cincinnati, Ohio June 1980 TECHNICAL REPORT AFWAL-TR-80-4077 Final Report for Period May 1976 - September 1978 Approved for...tantalum, and hafnium; and depleted in chromium , a M23C6 carbide former. The grain size of the as-HIP AF-115 was ASTM #7.0 (30p diameter), while the HIP

  11. Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    High temperature oxidation resistant iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are candidate alloys for nuclear applications due to their exceptional performance during off-normal conditions such as a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) compared to currently deployed zirconium-based claddings [1]. A series of studies have been completed to determine the weldability of the FeCrAl alloy class and investigate the weldment performance in the as-received (non-irradiated) state [2,3]. These initial studies have shown the general effects of composition and microstructure on the weldability of FeCrAl alloys. Given this, limited details on the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys and their weldments exist. Here, the highest priority candidate FeCrAl alloys and their weldments have been investigated after irradiation to enable a better understanding of FeCrAl alloy weldment performance within a high-intensity neutron field. The alloys examined include C35M (Fe-13%Cr-5% Al) and variants with aluminum (+2%) or titanium carbide (+1%) additions. Two different sub-sized tensile geometries, SS-J type and SS-2E (or SS-mini), were neutron irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor to 1.8-1.9 displacements per atom (dpa) in the temperature range of 195°C to 559°C. Post irradiation examination of the candidate alloys was completed and included uniaxial tensile tests coupled with digital image correlation (DIC), scanning electron microscopy-electron back scattered diffraction analysis (SEM-EBSD), and SEM-based fractography. In addition to weldment testing, non-welded parent material was examined as a direct comparison between welded and non-welded specimen performance. Both welded and non-welded specimens showed a high degree of radiation-induced hardening near irradiation temperatures of 200°C, moderate radiation-induced hardening near temperatures of 360°C, and almost no radiation-induced hardening at elevated temperatures near 550°C. Additionally, low-temperature irradiations showed

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel rapidly solidified, high-temperature Al-alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overman, N.R., E-mail: Nicole.Overman@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Mathaudhu, S.N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); University of California, Riverside, 3401 Watkins Dr., Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Choi, J.P.; Roosendaal, T.J.; Pitman, S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Rapid solidification (RS) processing, as a production method, offers a variety of unique properties based on far-from-equilibrium microstructures obtained through rapid cooling rates. In this study, we seek to investigate the microstructures and properties of a novel Al-alloy specifically designed for high temperature mechanical stability. Synthesis of, AlFe{sub 11.4}Si{sub 1.8}V{sub 1.6}Mn{sub 0.9} (wt.%), was performed by two approaches: rotating cup atomization (“shot”) and melt spinning (“flake”). These methods were chosen because of their ability to produce alloys with tailored microstructures due to their inherent differences in cooling rate. The as-solidified precursor materials were microstructurally characterized with electron microscopy. The results show that the higher cooling rate flake material exhibited the formation of nanocrystalline regions as well additional phase morphologies not seen in the shot material. Secondary dendritic branching in the flake material was on the order of 0.1–0.25 μm whereas branching in the shot material was 0.5–1.0 μm. Consolidated and extruded material from both precursor materials was mechanically evaluated at both ambient and high (300 °C) temperature. The consolidated RS flake material is shown to exhibit higher strengths than the shot material. The ultimate tensile strength of the melt spun flake was reported as 544.2 MPa at room temperature and 298.0 MPa at 300 °C. These results forecast the ability to design alloys and processing approaches with unique non-equilibrium microstructures with robust mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. - Highlights: • A novel alloy, AlFe{sub 11.4}Si{sub 1.8}V{sub 1.6}Mn{sub 0.9} was fabricated by rapid solidification. • Room temperature yield strength exceeded 500 MPa. • Elevated temperature (300 °C) yield strength exceeded 275 MPa. • Forging, after extrusion of the alloy resulted in microstructural coarsening. • Decreased strength and ductility was

  13. Low temperature magnetic transition and high temperature oxidation in INCONEL alloy 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seehra, M.S.; Babu, V.S. [Physics Department, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

    1996-05-01

    X-ray diffraction and temperature dependent (5 K{endash}380 K) magnetic measurements have been carried out in INCONEL 718 superalloy before and after high temperature aging treatments (INCONEL is a trademark of the INCO family of companies). The nominal composition of this alloy is Ni (52.5{percent}), Cr (19.0{percent}), Fe (18.5{percent}), Nb (5.1{percent}), Mo (3.0{percent}), Ti (0.9{percent}), Al (0.5{percent}), Cu (0.15{percent}) and C (0.08{percent}) and it yields an x-ray diffraction pattern consisting of a fcc phase with {ital a}=3.5987 (3) A and an orthorhombic phase associated with {delta}{minus}Ni{sub 3}Nb. It is concluded that the fcc pattern is due to both the {gamma} austenitic phase and {gamma}{prime} Ni{sub 3}(Al,Ti) phase of alloy 718. The standard annealing and aging treatment carried out in air at temperatures between 621 and 982{degree}C produces surface oxides (Cr,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 3} and FeNbO{sub 4} (which are easily removed by etching and polishing) and contracts the lattice. Magnetic measurements show a distinct phase transition at {ital T}{sub {ital c}}=14 K, which has been attributed to the {gamma}{prime}{minus}Ni{sub 3}(Al,Ti) phase by the process of elimination and by observing that it has most of the characteristics of the weak itinerant ferromagnet Ni{sub 74.5}Al{sub 25.5}. This transition may have some effects on the cryogenic applications of this alloy. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  14. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Novel Rapidly Solidified, High-Temperature Al-Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Mathaudhu, Suveen; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2016-02-12

    Rapid solidification (RS) processing, as a production method, offers a variety of unique properties based on far-from-equilibrium microstructures obtained through rapid cooling rates. In this study, we seek to investigate the microstructures and properties of a novel Al-alloy specifically designed for high temperature mechanical stability. Synthesis of, AlFe11.4Si1.8V1.6Mn0.9 (wt. %), was performed by two approaches: rotating cup atomization (“shot”) and melt spinning (“flake”). These methods were chosen because of their ability to produce alloys with tailored microstructures due to their inherent differences in cooling rate. The as-solidified precursor materials were microstructurally characterized with electron microscopy. The results show that the higher cooling rate flake material exhibited the formation of nanocrystalline regions as well additional phase morphologies not seen in the shot material. Secondary dendritic branching in the flake material was on the order of 0.1-0.25µm whereas branching in the shot material was 0.5-1.0µm. Consolidated and extruded material from both precursor materials was mechanically evaluated at both ambient and high (300°C) temperature. The consolidated RS flake material is shown to exhibit higher strengths than the shot material. The ultimate tensile strength of the melt spun flake was reported as 544.2MPa at room temperature and 298.0MPa at 300°C. These results forecast the ability to design alloys and processing approaches with unique non-equilibrium microstructures with robust mechanical properties at elevated temperatures.

  15. Creep-Fatigue Damage Investigation and Modeling of Alloy 617 at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Fraaz

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of six conceptual designs proposed for Generation IV nuclear reactors. Alloy 617, a solid solution strengthened Ni-base superalloy, is currently the primary candidate material for the tubing of the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) in the VHTR design. Steady-state operation of the nuclear power plant at elevated temperatures leads to creep deformation, whereas loading transients including startup and shutdown generate fatigue. A detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue interaction in Alloy 617 is necessary before it can be considered as a material for nuclear construction in ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Current design codes for components undergoing creep-fatigue interaction at elevated temperatures require creep-fatigue testing data covering the entire range from fatigue-dominant to creep-dominant loading. Classical strain-controlled tests, which produce stress relaxation during the hold period, show a saturation in cycle life with increasing hold periods due to the rapid stress-relaxation of Alloy 617 at high temperatures. Therefore, applying longer hold time in these tests cannot generate creep-dominated failure. In this study, uniaxial isothermal creep-fatigue tests with non-traditional loading waveforms were designed and performed at 850 and 950°C, with an objective of generating test data in the creep-dominant regime. The new loading waveforms are hybrid strain-controlled and force-controlled testing which avoid stress relaxation during the creep hold. The experimental data showed varying proportions of creep and fatigue damage, and provided evidence for the inadequacy of the widely-used time fraction rule for estimating creep damage under creep-fatigue conditions. Micro-scale damage features in failed test specimens, such as fatigue cracks and creep voids, were quantified using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to find a correlation between creep and fatigue damage. Quantitative statistical

  16. Creep Testing of High-Temperature Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb Alloy Completed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb (Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb) alloy is under development for high-temperature, high heatflux applications, such as actively cooled, hypersonic vehicle heat exchangers and rocket engine combustion chambers. Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb offers a superior combination of strength and conductivity. It has also shown exceptional low-cycle fatigue properties. Following preliminary testing to determine the best processing route, a more detailed testing program was initiated to determine the creep lives and creep rates of Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy specimens produced by extrusion. Testing was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center with constant-load vacuum creep units. Considering expected operating temperatures and mission lives, we developed a test matrix to accurately determine the creep properties of Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb between 500 and 800 C. Six bars of Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb were extruded. From these bars, 54 creep samples were machined and tested. The figure on the left shows the steady-state, or second-stage, creep rates for the samples. Comparison data for NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt % Ag-0.5 wt % Zr), the alloy currently used in combustion chamber liners, were not unavailable. Therefore the steady-state creep rates for Cu at similar temperatures are presented. As expected, in comparison to pure Cu, the creep rates for Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb are much lower. The lives of the samples are presented in the figure on the right. As shown, Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb at 800 C is comparable to NARloy-Z at 648 C. At equivalent temperatures, Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb enjoys a 20 to 50 percent advantage in stress for a given life and 1 to 3 orders of magnitude greater life at a given stress. The improved properties allow for design tradeoffs and improvements in new and existing heat exchangers such as the next generation of combustion chamber liners. Average creep rates for Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb and pure Cu are shown. Average creep lives for Cu-8 Cr- 4 Nb and NARloy-Z are also shown. Currently, two companies are interested in the commercial usage of the Cu

  17. Na2SO4 induced corrosion of nickel at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    Sodium sulfate-induced corrosion of nickel was studied at 900 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure. For high O2 partial pressures, accelerated corrosion during the first few minutes occurred by rapid penetration of the melt along the metal grain boundaries. A mechanism is proposed to explain this phenomenon. Repetitive scale metal detachment was observed for corrosion in lower O2 partial pressures and during the later period of corrosion in higher O2 partial pressures. The effect of preoxidation on the hot corrosion has also been studied. An induction period is observed before the onset of rapid corrosion for the preoxidized samples; the onset of rapid corrosion is associated with sudden cracking of the scale. The length of the induction period for the preoxidized samples is a function of the length of preoxidation, and appears to be related to the structure of the oxide scale after the preoxidation treatment.

  18. Application of neutron diffraction in characterization of texture evolution during high-temperature creep in magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Sven C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sediako, Dimitry [CANADIAN NEUTRON BEAM; Shook, S [APPLIED MAGNESIUM INTERNATIONAL; Sediako, A [MCGILL UNIV

    2010-01-01

    A good combination of room-temperature and elevated temperature strength and ductility, good salt-spray corrosion resistance and exceUent diecastability are frequently among the main considerations in development of a new alloy. Unfortunately, there has been much lesser effort in development of wrought-stock alloys for high temperature applications. Extrudability and high temperature performance of wrought material becomes an important factor in an effort to develop new wrought alloys and processing technologies. This paper shows some results received in creep testing and studies of in-creep texture evolution for several wrought magnesium alloys developed for use in elevated-temperature applications. These studies were performed using E3 neutron spectrometer of the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre in Chalk River, ON, and HIPPO time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, NM.

  19. Effect of pre-oxidation on high temperature sulfidation behavior of FeCr and FeCrAl alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillis Marina Fuser

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature corrosion of structural alloys in sulfur bearing environments is many orders of magnitude higher than in oxidizing environments. Efforts to increase sulfidation resistance of these alloys include addition of alloying elements. Aluminum additions to iron-chromium alloys bring about increase in sulfidation resistance. This paper reports the effect of pre-oxidation on the sulfidation behavior of Fe-20Cr and Fe-20Cr-5Al alloys in H2-2% H2S environment at 800 °C. The surfaces of sulfidized specimens were also examined. Pre-oxidation of the two alloys results in an incubation period during subsequent sulfidation. After this incubation period, the Fe-20Cr alloy showed sulfidation behavior similar to that when the alloy was not pre-oxidized. The incubation period during sulfidation of the Fe-20Cr-5Al alloy was significantly longer, over 45 h, compared to 2 h for the Al free alloy. Based on the microscopic and gravimetric data a mechanism for sulfidation of these alloys with pre-oxidation has been proposed.

  20. Comparison of joining processes for Haynes 230 nickel based super alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williston, David Hugh

    Haynes 230 is a nickel based, solid-solution strengthened alloy that is used for high-temperature applications in the aero-engine and power generation industries. The alloy composition is balanced to avoid precipitation of undesirable topologically closed-packed (TCP) intermetallic phases, such as Sigma, Mu, or Laves-type, that are detrimental to mechanical and corrosion properties. This material is currently being used for the NASA's J2X upper stage rocket nozzle extension. Current fabrication procedures use fusion welding processes to join blanks that are subsequently formed. Cracks have been noted to occur in the fusion welded region during the forming operations. Use of solid state joining processes, such as friction stir welding are being proposed to eliminate the fusion weld cracks. Of interest is a modified friction stir welding process called thermal stir welding. Three welding process: Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Thermal Stir Welding (TSWing) are compared in this study.

  1. Magnetic properties of the binary Nickel/Bismuth alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Şarlı, Numan, E-mail: numansarli82@gmail.com

    2017-09-01

    Highlights: • We model and investigate the magnetic properties of the Ni/Bi alloy within the EFT. • Magnetizations of the Ni/Bi alloy are observed as Bi1 > Bi2 > Ni/Bi > Ni at T < Tc. • Magnetization of the Bi1 is dominant and Ni is at least dominant T < Tc. • Total magnetization of the Ni/Bi alloy is close to those of Ni at T < Tc. • Hysteresis curves are overlap at T < 0.1 and they behave separately at T > 0.1. - Abstract: Magnetic properties of the binary Nickel/Bismuth alloy (Ni/Bi) are investigated within the effective field theory. The Ni/Bi alloy has been modeled that the rhombohedral Bi lattice is surrounded by the hexagonal Ni lattice. According to lattice locations, Bi atoms have two different magnetic properties. Bi1 atoms are in the center of the hexagonal Ni atoms (Ni/Bi1 single layer) and Bi2 atoms are between two Ni/Bi1 bilayers. The Ni, Bi1, Bi2 and Ni/Bi undergo a second-order phase transition from the ferromagnetic phase to paramagnetic phase at Tc = 1.14. The magnetizations of the Ni/Bi alloy are observed as Bi1 > Bi2 > Ni/Bi > Ni at T < Tc; hence the magnetization of the Bi1 is dominant and Ni is at least dominant. However, the total magnetization of the Ni/Bi alloy is close to magnetization of the Ni at T < Tc. The corcivities of the Ni, Bi1, Bi2 and Ni/Bi alloy are the same with each others, but the remanence magnetizations are different. Our theoretical results of M(T) and M(H) of the Ni/Bi alloy are in quantitatively good agreement with the some experimental results of binary Nickel/Bismuth systems.

  2. Creep Crack Growth Behavior of Alloys 617 and 800H in Air and Impure Helium Environments at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, D. S.; Cao, G.; Brooks, P.; Pezzi, P.; Glaudell, A.; Kuettel, D.; Fischer, G.; Allen, T.; Sridharan, K.; Crone, W. C.

    2017-03-01

    The environmental degradation of intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) materials in impure helium has been identified as an area with major ramifications on the design of very high-temperature reactors (VHTR). It has been reported that in some helium environments, non-ductile failure is a significant failure mode for Alloy 617 with long-term elevated-temperature service. Non-ductile failure of intermediate exchangers can result in catastrophic consequences; unfortunately, the knowledge of creep crack initiation and creep crack growth (CCG) in candidate alloys is limited. Current codes and code cases for the candidate alloys do not provide specific guidelines for effects of impure helium on the high-temperature behavior. The work reported here explores creep crack growth characterization of Alloy 617 and Alloy 800H at elevated temperatures in air and in impure helium environments, providing information on the reliability of these alloys in VHTR for long-term service. Alloy 617 was found to exhibit superior CCG resistance compared to Alloy 800H. For Alloy 617 tested at 973 K (700 °C), a notable increase in the resistance to crack growth was measured in air compared to that measured in the helium environment; CCG results for Alloy 800H suggest that air and helium environments produce similar behavior. Testing of grain boundary-engineered (GBE) Alloy 617 samples revealed that, although the technique produces superior mechanical properties in many respects, the GBE samples exhibited inferior resistance to creep crack growth compared to the other Alloy 617 samples tested under similar conditions. Grain size is noted as a confounding factor in creep crack growth resistance.

  3. Nickel/metal hydride batteries using rate-earth hydrogen storage alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1994-07-01

    Fine particles of a hydrogen storage alloy (LaNi3.8Co0.5Mn0.4Al0.3) were microencapsulated with a thin film of nickel of about 0.6 micron thickness. The microencapsulated alloy powders were used as an anode material in a sealed nickel/metal hydride battery. The battery characteristics were compared with those of a battery with a bare (uncoated) alloy anode. The battery using the bare alloy was less stable compared to the coated alloy due to the role of the coated nickel as an oxygen barrier for protecting the alloy surface from oxidation. In addition, charge- discharge characteristics were improved greatly by the nickel coating, especially at high rates and at low temperatures due to the role of nickel as a microcurrent collector. So the microencapsulation of the alloy powders improves the performances of the alloy electrode.

  4. Lightweight High-Temperature Thermal Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, W. R.; Fasheh, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    Fine Ni/Cr fibers sintered into corrosion-resistant, fireproof batt. Possible applications include stoves, furnaces, safes, fire clothing, draperies in public buildings, wall firebreaks, airplane walls, and jetengine components. New insulation takes advantage of some of same properties of nickel/chromium alloy useful in heating elements in toasters, namely, corrosion and oxidation resistance even at high temperatures.

  5. Effective and Environmentally Friendly Nickel Coating on the Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Škugor Rončević

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The low density and good mechanical properties make magnesium and its alloys attractive construction materials in the electronics, automotive, and aerospace industry, together with application in medicine due to their biocompatibility. Magnesium AZ91D alloy is an alloy with a high content of aluminum, whose mechanical properties overshadow the low corrosion resistance caused by the composition of the alloy and the existence of two phases: α magnesium matrix and β magnesium aluminum intermetallic compound. To improve the corrosion resistance, it is necessary to find an effective protection method for the alloy surface. Knowing and predicting electrochemical processes is an essential for the design and optimization of protective coatings on magnesium and its alloys. In this work, the formations of nickel protective coatings on the magnesium AZ91D alloy surface by electrodeposition and chemical deposition, are presented. For this purpose, environmentally friendly electrolytes were used. The corrosion resistance of the protected alloy was determined in chloride medium using appropriate electrochemical techniques. Characterization of the surface was performed with highly sophisticated surface-analytical methods.

  6. In situ Growth of NixCu1-x Alloy Nanocatalysts on Redox-reversible Rutile (Nb,Ti)O4 Towards High-Temperature Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Haoshan; Xie, Kui; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yan; Qin, Yongqiang; Cui, Jiewu; Yan, Jian; Wu, Yucheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report the in situ growth of NixCu1-x (x = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0) alloy catalysts to anchor and decorate a redox-reversible Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 ceramic substrate with the aim of tailoring the electrocatalytic activity of the composite materials through direct exsolution of metal particles from the crystal lattice of a ceramic oxide in a reducing atmosphere at high temperatures. Combined analysis using XRD, SEM, EDS, TGA, TEM and XPS confirmed the completely reversible exsolution/dissolution of the NixCu1-x alloy particles during the redox cycling treatments. TEM results revealed that the alloy particles were exsolved to anchor onto the surface of highly electronically conducting Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 in the form of heterojunctions. The electrical properties of the nanosized NixCu1-x/Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 were systematically investigated and correlated to the electrochemical performance of the composite electrodes. A strong dependence of the improved electrode activity on the alloy compositions was observed in reducing atmospheres at high temperatures. Direct electrolysis of CO2 at the NixCu1-x/Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 composite cathodes was investigated in solid-oxide electrolysers. The CO2 splitting rates were observed to be positively correlated with the Ni composition; however, the Ni0.75Cu0.25 combined the advantages of metallic nickel and copper and therefore maximised the current efficiencies. PMID:24889679

  7. Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

  8. Nickel and platinum in high-temperature H2O + HCl fluids: Implications for hydrothermal mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Lea; Watenphul, Anke; Beermann, Oliver; Testemale, Denis; Ames, Doreen; Schmidt, Christian

    2018-03-01

    The dissolution of NiS and NiAs (nickeline) in 0.1 and 1 molal HCl at 400 °C, 80 MPa, and of PtAs2 (sperrylite) and Pt metal in 1 and 6.86 molal HCl at 500 °C, 80 MPa was studied in-situ using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The Pt concentration in the fluid averaged 8 · 10-5 molal (12.8 ppm) during dissolution of Pt metal in 6.86 molal HCl, and was below the minimum detection limit (mdl; 2.6 · 10-5 molal) in all other experiments. Dissolution of NiS was congruent or nearly congruent. Equilibrium was attained rapidly in about 250 min at an initial HCl concentration of 1 molal HCl, and in about 500 min at 0.1 molal HCl. Addition of HCl resulted in a large increase in the Ni solubility from 7.2 · 10-3 molal Ni (423 ppm) at 0.1 molal HCl to 8.72 · 10-2 molal Ni (4959 ppm) at 1 molal HCl. Dissolution of NiAs in 0.1 and 1 molal HCl was incongruent. A steady state was not reached even at a run duration of more than 16 h, and the maximum recorded Ni concentrations in the fluid were much lower than the Ni solubility in the corresponding experiments with NiS at the same HCl molality. Measured K-edge XANES spectra in comparison with literature data indicated that arsenic in the fluid was present as As(V) and that nickel complexed with Cl and H2O as tetrahedral [NiCl2(H2O)2]0 and [NiCl3(H2O)]- and octahedral [NiCl2(H2O)4]0 species. In addition, Raman spectra of H2O + NiCl2 and H2O + NiCl2 + HCl solutions and of H2O + HCl fluids reacted with NiS crystals were acquired at temperatures (T) up to 600 °C and pressures (P) up to 1.15 GPa. All spectra at T ≥ 300 °C and P Based on calculated vibrational frequencies available in the literature, it may stem from the species [NiCl4]2- or [NiCl2(H2O)4]0, although particularly the first assignment is in conflict with the information from published XAS data. The results of this study demonstrate that nickel is readily mobilized by acidic chloridic hydrothermal fluids, but platinum remains

  9. The Effect of Increasing Sn Content on High-Temperature Mechanical Deformation of an Mg-3%Cu-1%Ca Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S.E. Antipas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Chill casting of magnesium alloy samples with secondary alloying elements of Cu, Ca and Sn at % w.t. concentrations in the range 1–5, 0.1–5 and 0.1–3 respectively, gave rise to appreciably enhanced resistance to high-temperature creep, while maintaining good heat conductivity. The latter was considered to be driven by Cu and Mg-Cu intermetallics while it was clear that Sn mediated the high-temperature performance, mainly via networks of Mg2Sn and MgCaSn precipitates along the Mg matrix grain boundaries. It was postulated that Sn formed intermetallics by preferential substitution of Ca atoms and, thus, did not degrade the heat conductivity by retaining Cu. The % w.t. stoichiometry with the optimum combination of heat conductivity and resistance to high-temperature creep was found to be Mg-3Cu-1Ca-0.1Sn.

  10. Resistance to High-Temperature Oxidation and Wear of Various Ferrous Alloys Used in Rolling Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunois, Fabienne; Stanciu, Victor Ioan; Sinnaeve, Mario

    2018-01-01

    Various materials are commonly used to manufacture work rolls for hot rolling mills, such as ICDP (Indefinite Chill Double Pour) cast irons, high-chromium white cast irons, and high speed steels (HSS). Various chemical compositions and microstructures are studied in order to optimize the in-use behavior of those grades of rolls. In this paper, six grades of ferrous alloys (an ICDP cast iron; an ICDP cast iron enriched in vanadium, niobium, and molybdenum; a HSS; a graphitic HSS; a high-chromium white cast iron (Hi-Cr); and a niobium-molybdenum-doped high-chromium white cast iron) were investigated. High-temperature oxidation tests with gravimetric means at 575 °C in water vapor atmosphere and sliding wear tests were carried out. The oxidation kinetics was followed during oxidation test. The microstructure was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopies. The oxides formed on the surface of the samples were analyzed by XRD and EDS. The thickness of the oxide scales and the mass gain were measured after oxidation test. The results showed that the behavior of all the grades differed. The oxide scale of HSS and HSS-G grades was fine and their friction coefficient was low. The weight gain after oxidation test of HSS was high. Hi-Cr and M-Hi-Cr grades presented highly porous oxide layer and an important increase of the friction coefficient during wear test. ICDP and M-ICDP had intermediate behavior.

  11. Modification of Low-Alloy Steel Surface by High-Temperature Gas Nitriding Plus Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Dongling; Li, Minsong; Ding, Hongzhen; Qiu, Wanqi; Luo, Chengping

    2018-01-01

    The low-alloy steel was nitrided in a pure NH3 gas atmosphere at 640 660 °C for 2 h, i.e., high-temperature gas nitriding (HTGN), followed by tempering at 225 °C, which can produce a high property surface coating without brittle compound (white) layer. The steel was also plasma nitriding for comparison. The composition, microstructure and microhardness of the nitrided and tempered specimens were examined, and their tribological behavior investigated. The results showed that the as-gas-nitrided layer consisted of a white layer composed of FeN0.095 phase (nitrided austenite) and a diffusional zone underneath the white layer. After tempering, the white layer was decomposed to a nano-sized (α-Fe + γ'-Fe4N + retained austenite) bainitic microstructure with a high hardness of 1150HV/25 g. Wear test results showed that the wear resistance and wear coefficient yielded by the complex HTGN plus tempering were considerably higher and lower, respectively, than those produced by the conventional plasma nitriding.

  12. Petascale supercomputing to accelerate the design of high-temperature alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongwon; Lee, Sangkeun; Shyam, Amit; Haynes, J Allen

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in high-performance computing and data informatics has opened up numerous opportunities to aid the design of advanced materials. Herein, we demonstrate a computational workflow that includes rapid population of high-fidelity materials datasets via petascale computing and subsequent analyses with modern data science techniques. We use a first-principles approach based on density functional theory to derive the segregation energies of 34 microalloying elements at the coherent and semi-coherent interfaces between the aluminium matrix and the θ'-Al2Cu precipitate, which requires several hundred supercell calculations. We also perform extensive correlation analyses to identify materials descriptors that affect the segregation behaviour of solutes at the interfaces. Finally, we show an example of leveraging machine learning techniques to predict segregation energies without performing computationally expensive physics-based simulations. The approach demonstrated in the present work can be applied to any high-temperature alloy system for which key materials data can be obtained using high-performance computing.

  13. Reviewing the class of Al-rich Ti-Al alloys: modeling high temperature plastic anisotropy and asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Helal; Altenbach, Holm; Krüger, Manja; Naumenko, Konstantin

    2017-12-01

    In the last decades, the class of Ti-rich TiAl-based intermetallic materials has replaced many contemporary alloys till 900 °C. Due to higher oxidation resistance, 20% lower density and higher (about 150 °C more) operating temperature possibility of Al-rich TiAl alloys over Ti-rich side, phases from the Al-rich region of this alloy system are considered to be highly potential candidates for high temperature structural applications. Although there are a lot of works about Ti-rich alloys, however, investigation from the Al-rich side is very limited. This work reviews the class of Al-rich TiAl alloys in terms of phases, microstructures, morphology, deformation mechanisms, mechanical behaviors along with a possible micromechanical modeling approach. Single crystal like Ti-61.8at.%Al alloy from the Al-rich family has been chosen as an example for modeling high temperature anisotropy and tension-compression asymmetry. A possible comparison with Ti-rich side is also presented.

  14. Chill block melt spinning of nickel-molybdenum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemker, Kevin J.; Glasgow, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of Ni-Mo alloys ranging in composition from pure nickel to Ni-40 at. pct molybdenum were cast by the chill block melt-spinning rapid solidification technique and examined by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and microhardness testing. Casting difficulties were encountered with lean alloys, but richer alloys spread more readily on the casting wheel. Alloy microstructures for 5 to 37.5 at. pct molybdenum ribbons were primarily cellular/dendritic; microstructure feature size decreased with increasing molybdenum content. Extended solubility of molybdenum in gamma-nickel, with fcc lattice parameter increasing with composition to the 1.05 power, was observed up to 37/5 at. pct molybdenum. Substoichiometric Ni-Mo (delta) nucleated on the wheel side of the ribbons of compositions 35, 37.5, and 40 at. pct molybdenum. The amount of partitionless delta-phase thus formed increased with increasing molybdenum content and quench rate. This substoichiometric delta transformed readily to a fine structure gamma-delta mixture.

  15. A new composite material-low-carbon Stellite alloy reinforced with nickel-coated carbon fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khoddamzadeh, A; Liu, R; Liang, M; Yang, Q

    2014-01-01

    .... The focus of this research is on obviating the problems related to the presence of carbides in Stellite alloys by substituting carbides as the main strengthening agent in Stellite alloys with nickel...

  16. Evaluation of powder metallurgical processing routes for multi-component niobium silicide-based high-temperature alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemueller, Hans Christoph Maximilian

    2016-03-22

    Niobium silicide-based composites are potential candidates to replace nickel-base superalloys for turbine applications. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and differences in ensuing properties of various powder metallurgical processing techniques that are capable of manufacturing net-shape turbine components. Two routes for powder production, mechanical alloying and gas atomization were combined with compaction via hot isostatic pressing and powder injection molding.

  17. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Denis [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Dajie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  18. Modeling of High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of FeCrAl Alloy by using Artificial Neural Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Joon; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Refractory alloys are candidate materials for replacing current zirconium-base cladding of light water reactors and they retain significant creep resistance and mechanical strength at high temperatures up to 1500 ℃ due to their high melting temperature. Thermal neutron cross sections of refractory metals are higher than that of zirconium, however the loss of neutron can be overcome by reducing cladding thickness which can be facilitated with enhanced mechanical properties. However, most refractory metals show the poor oxidation resistance at a high temperature. Oxidation behaviors of the various compositions of FeCrAl alloys in high temperature conditions were modeled by using Bayesian neural network. The automatic relevance determination (ARD) technique represented the influence of the composition of alloying elements on the oxidation resistance of FeCrAl alloys. This model can be utilized to understand the tendency of oxidation behavior along the composition of each element and prove the applicability of neural network modeling for the development of new cladding material of light water reactors.

  19. Corrosion of nickel-based dental casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Christopher M; Shelton, Richard M; Fleming, Garry J P; Davenport, Alison J

    2007-06-01

    To study the microstructure, corrosion behaviour and cell culture response of two nickel-based dental casting alloys before and after a heat treatment to simulate porcelain firing. The microstructure was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical measurements in artificial saliva at different values of pH in the presence of a crevice. 3T3 mouse fibroblasts were exposed indirectly to alloy specimens and the number of viable cells counted after 3 and 6 days compared to a control culture. Small changes in microstructure were observed after heat treatment but had a negligible effect on the corrosion properties in the conditions tested. The alloy with a lower bulk level of Cr (12.6 wt.%) showed lower corrosion resistance, indicated by an increased passive current density and this stability was greatly reduced at pH 2.5, where crevice corrosion was observed. Selective dissolution occurred at regions within the microstructure containing lower levels of Cr and Mo. Furthermore, the proliferation of 3T3 mouse fibroblasts was reduced (pcorrosion resistance, which was associated with a more uniform distribution of Cr in the alloy microstructure. The presence of crevices combined with an inhomogeneous distribution of Cr in the microstructure can lead to accelerated corrosion of Ni-based alloys with lower Cr contents. This effect can be avoided by increasing the Cr content of the alloy.

  20. DEFORMATION TEXTURES IN A COPPER NICKEL ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacit DÜNDAR

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-random distribution of orientations between the neigbouring grains of polycrystalline aggregates leads to preferred orientations or textures. Texture analysis of a Cu-10 % Ni alloy carried out on three types of cast materials after varying amounts of deformation led to clearly defined copper type texture due to the dominance of high stacking fault energy SFE regions in the structure. (123 [41 2 ] is the strongest orientation observed with (123 as the plane lying paralel to the rolling plane and [41 2 ] as the direction paralel to the rolling direction.

  1. As-cast microstructures and behavior at high temperature of chromium-rich cobalt-based alloys containing hafnium carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthod, Patrice, E-mail: Patrice.Berthod@univ-lorraine.fr; Conrath, Elodie

    2014-02-14

    Hafnium is often used to improve the high temperature oxidation resistance of superalloys but not to form carbides for strengthen them against creep. In this work hafnium was added in cobalt-based alloys for verifying that HfC can be obtained in cobalt-based alloys and for characterizing their behavior at a very temperature. Three Co–25Cr–0.25 and 0.50C alloys containing 3.7 and 7.4 Hf to promote HfC carbides, and four Co–25Cr– 0 to 1C alloys for comparison (all contents in wt.%), were cast and exposed at 1200 °C for 50 h in synthetic air. The HfC carbides formed instead chromium carbides during solidification, in eutectic with matrix and as dispersed compact particles. During the stage at 1200 °C the HfC carbides did not significantly evolve, even near the oxidation front despite oxidation early become very fast and generalized. At the same time the chromium carbides present in the Co–Cr–C alloys totally disappeared in the same conditions. Such HfC-alloys potentially bring efficient and sustainable mechanical strengthening at high temperature, but their hot oxidation resistance must be significantly improved. - Highlights: • Co-based alloys containing HfC carbides were successfully obtained by foundry. • HfC are pro-eutectic or form an interdendritic eutectic compound with matrix. • The HfC carbides appear very stable on long time at 1200 °C. • The hot oxidation of the alloys is fast and they require higher Cr contents. • The high stability of HfC may allow Cr-enrichment by pack-cementation.

  2. Thresholds of time dependent intergranular crack growth in a nickel disc alloy Alloy 720Li

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hangyue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At high temperatures in air, introducing a dwell period at the peak stress of fatigue cycles promotes time dependent intergranular crack growth which can increase crack growth rates by upto a few orders of magnitude from the rates of transgranular fatigue crack growth in superalloys. It is expected that time dependent intergranular crack growth in nickel-based superalloys may not occur below a critical mechanical driving force, ΔKth−IG, analogous to a fatigue threshold (ΔKth and a critical temperature, Tth. In this study, dwell fatigue crack growth tests have been carefully designed and conducted on Alloy 720Li to examine such thresholds. Unlike a fatigue threshold, the threshold stress intensity factor range for intergranular crack growth is observed to be highly sensitive to microstructure, dwell time and test procedure. The near threshold crack growth behaviour is made complex by the interactions between grain boundary oxidation embrittlement and crack tip stress relaxation. In general, lower ΔKth−IG values are associated with finer grain size and/or shorter dwell times. Often a load increasing procedure promotes stress relaxation and tends to lead to higher ΔKth−IG. When there is limited stress relaxation at the crack tip, similar ΔKth−IG values are measured with load increasing and load shedding procedures. They are generally higher than the fatigue threshold (ΔKth despite faster crack growth rates (da/dN in the stable crack growth regime. Time dependent intergranular crack growth cannot be activated below a temperature of 500 ∘C.

  3. Plastic strain characterization in austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Maderuelo, A.; Castro, L.; de Diego, G.

    2011-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by cold work and causes many problems in components of the nuclear power plants. Besides, during manufacturing, installation, welding and service of the material, residual strains can be produced increasing the susceptibility to SCC. For this reason, it is important to characterize the degree of plastic strain due to dislocation accumulation in each crystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM), has been a great advance in this field because it enables to estimate the plastic strain in a quick and easy way. Nevertheless, over the last few years, a lot of different mathematical expressions to estimate the plastic strain have appeared in the literature. This situation hinders the election of one of them by a novel scientist in this field. Therefore, in this paper some of the more common expressions used in the calculation of the angular misorientation have been presented and discussed in order to clarify their more important aspects. Then, using one of these expressions (average local misorientation), curves relating misorientation density with known levels of strain will be obtained for an austenitic stainless steel 304L and nickel base alloy 690, which have shown a linear behaviour that is in good agreement with results found in the literature. Finally, using curves obtained in previous steps, levels of plastic strain in a plate of nickel base alloy 600 welded with weld metal 182 were estimated between 8 and 10% for a high temperature mill annealing sample.

  4. Microstructure of Cast Ni-Cr-Al-C Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Cios G.; Bała P.; Stępień M.; Górecki K.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel based alloys, especially nickel based superalloys have gained the advantage over other alloys in the field of high temperature applications, and thus become irreplaceable at high temperature creep and aggressive corrosion environments, such as jet engines and steam turbines. However, the wear resistance of these alloys is insufficient at high temperatures. This work describes a microstructure of a new cast alloy. The microstructure consists of γ matrix strengthened by γ’ fine precipita...

  5. High temperature measurements of martensitic transformations using digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesing, Benjamin P; Mann, Christopher J; Dryepondt, Sebastien

    2013-07-01

    During thermal cycling of nickel-aluminum-platinum (NiAlPt) and single crystal iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) alloys, the structural changes associated with the martensite to austenite phase transformation were measured using dual-wavelength digital holography. Real-time in situ measurements reveal the formation of striations within the NiAlPt alloy at 70°C and the FeCrNi alloy at 520°C. The results demonstrate that digital holography is an effective technique for acquiring noncontact, high precision information of the surface evolution of alloys at high temperatures.

  6. Thermal Analysis in the Technological “Step” Test of H282 Nickel Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirowski Z.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Superalloys show a good combination of mechanical strength and resistance to surface degradation under the influence of chemically active environments at high temperature. They are characterized by very high heat and creep resistance. Their main application is in gas turbines, chemical industry, and in all those cases where resistance to creep and the aggressive corrosion environment is required. Modern jet engines could never come into use if not for progress in the development of superalloys. Superalloys are based on iron, nickel and cobalt. The most common and the most interesting group includes superalloys based on nickel. They carry loads at temperatures well in excess of the eighty percent of the melting point. This group includes the H282 alloy, whose nominal chemical composition is as follows (wt%: Ni - base, Fe - max. 1.5%, Al - 1.5% Ti - 2.1%, C - 0.06% Co - 10% Cr - 20% Mo - 8.5%. This study shows the results of thermal analysis of the H282 alloy performed on a cast step block with different wall thickness. Using the results of measurements, changes in the temperature of H282 alloy during its solidification were determined, and the relationship dT / dt = f (t was derived. The results of the measurements taken at different points in the cast step block allowed identifying a number of thermal characteristics of the investigated alloy and linking the size of the dendrites formed in a metal matrix (DAS with the thermal effect of solidification. It was found that the time of solidification prolonged from less than ome minute at 10 mm wall thickness to over seven minutes at the wall thickness of 44 mm doubled the value of DAS.

  7. Inconel 718 and UNSM Treated Alloy Study on the Rotary Bending High Temperature Fatigue Characteristics under a Light Concentrating System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Chang Min [Kyungpook Nat’l Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Nahm, Seung Hoon [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Young Han; Hur, Kwang Ho; Hong, Sang Hwui [Gyeongbuk Hybrid Technology Institute, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Hyong; Pyun, Young Sik [Sun Moon Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    This study investigated the influence of high temperature and UNSM on the fatigue behavior of Inconel 718 alloy at RT, 300, 500, and 600℃. Fatigue properties of Inconel 718 were reduced at high temperatures compared to those at room temperature. However, the endurance limit was similar to that of the room temperature sample at the design stress level. High-temperature fatigue characteristics of the UNSM-treated specimen were significantly improved at the design stress level as compared to the untreated specimens. Specifically, the influence of temperature on the S-N curves at the design stress level of the UNSM-treated specimen showed the tendency of longer fatigue lives than those of untreated ones. Researchers can obtain rotary fatigue test results simply by heating specimens with a halogen lamp to precise temperatures during specific operations.

  8. Process for the electrodeposition of low stress nickel-manganese alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, James John; Goods, Steven Howard; Yang, Nancy Yuan-Chi; Cadden, Charles Henry

    2005-06-07

    A process for electrodepositing a low stress nickel-manganese multilayer alloy on an electrically conductive substrate is provided. The process includes the steps of immersing the substrate in an electrodeposition solution containing a nickel salt and a manganese salt and repeatedly passing an electric current through an immersed surface of the substrate. The electric current is alternately pulsed for predetermined durations between a first electrical current that is effective to electrodeposit nickel and a second electrical current that is effective to electrodeposit nickel and manganese. A multilayered alloy having adjacent layers of nickel and a nickel-manganese alloy on the immersed surface of the substrate is thereby produced. The resulting multilayered alloy exhibits low internal stress, high strength and ductility, and high strength retention upon exposure to heat.

  9. High-temperature steam oxidation testing of select advanced replacement alloys for potential core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-19

    Coupons from a total of fourteen commercial and custom fabricated alloys were exposed to 1 bar full steam with ~10 ppb oxygen content at 600 and 650°C. The coupons were weighed at 500-h intervals with a total exposure time of 5,000 h. The fourteen alloys are candidate alloys selected under the ARRM program, which include three ferritic steels (Grade 92, 439, and 14YWT), three austenitic stainless steels (316L, 310, and 800), seven Ni-base superalloys (X750, 725, C22, 690, 625, 625 direct-aging, and 625- plus), and one Zr-alloy (Zr–2.5Nb). Among the alloys, 316L and X750 are served as reference alloys for low- and high-strength alloys, respectively. The candidate Ni-base superalloy 718 was procured too late to be included in the tests. The corrosion rates of the candidate alloys can be approximately interpreted by their Cr, Ni and Fe content. The corrosion rate was significantly reduced with increasing Cr content and when Ni content is above ~15 wt%, but not much further reduced when Fe content is less than ~55 wt%. Simplified thermodynamics analyses of the alloy oxidation provided reasonable indications for the constituents of oxide scales formed on the alloys and explanations for the porosity and exfoliation phenomena because of the nature of specific types of oxides.

  10. Development and research of a rhenium-free high-temperature nickel superalloy for the turbine rotor blades in aviation GTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmotin, Yu. N.; Logunov, A. V.; Leshchenko, I. A.; Danilov, D. V.

    2016-12-01

    The studies directed on designing an advanced rhenium-free nickel superalloy, which is an analog of ZhS32VI alloy, are performed. The chemical composition of the alloy has been found and an experimental alloy batch has been melted (10 kg). Microstructural and metallographic studies and strength tests are carried out. The new single-crystal superalloy has a long-term strength σ1000 100= 238-248 MPa at a density of 8.87 g/cm3.

  11. Shape memory behavior of single crystal and polycrystalline Ni-rich NiTiHf high temperature shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaian, Sayed M.

    NiTiHf shape memory alloys have been receiving considerable attention for high temperature and high strength applications since they could have transformation temperatures above 100 °C, shape memory effect under high stress (above 500 MPa) and superelasticity at high temperatures. Moreover, their shape memory properties can be tailored by microstructural engineering. However, NiTiHf alloys have some drawbacks such as low ductility and high work hardening in stress induced martensite transformation region. In order to overcome these limitations, studies have been focused on microstructural engineering by aging, alloying and processing. Shape memory properties and microstructure of four Ni-rich NiTiHf alloys (Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20, Ni50.7Ti 29.3Hf20, Ni51.2Ti28.8Hf20, and Ni52Ti28Hf20 (at. %)) were systematically characterized in the furnace cooled condition. H-phase precipitates were formed during furnace cooling in compositions with greater than 50.3Ni and the driving force for nucleation increased with Ni content. Alloy strength increased while recoverable strain decreased with increasing Ni content due to changes in precipitate characteristics. The effects of the heat treatments on the transformation characteristics and microstructure of the Ni-rich NiTiHf shape memory alloys have been investigated. Transformation temperatures are found to be highly annealing temperature dependent. Generation of nanosize precipitates (˜20 nm in size) after three hours aging at 450 °C and 550 °C improved the strength of the material, resulting in a near perfect dimensional stability under high stress levels (> 1500 MPa) with a work output of 20-30 J cm- 3. Superelastic behavior with 4% recoverable strain was demonstrated at low and high temperatures where stress could reach to a maximum value of more than 2 GPa after three hours aging at 450 and 550 °C for alloys with Ni great than 50.3 at. %. Shape memory properties of polycrystalline Ni50.3Ti29.7 Hf20 alloys were studied via

  12. Hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.; Barret, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The hot corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys was examined by cyclically oxidizing sodium sulfate-coated specimens in still air at 900, 1000, and 1100 C. The compositions tested were within the ternary region: Ni, Ni-50 at.% Cr, and Ni-50 at.% Al. At each temperature the corrosion data were statistically fitted to a third order regression equation as a function of chromium and aluminum contents. From these equations corrosion isopleths were prepared. Compositional regions with the best hot corrosion resistance were identified.

  13. Preparation of Copper (Cu)-Nickel (Ni) Alloy Thin Films for Bilayer Graphene Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    ARL-TR-7593 ● FEB 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Preparation of Copper (Cu)-Nickel (Ni) Thin Films for Bilayer Graphene Growth...Laboratory Preparation of Copper (Cu)-Nickel (Ni) Alloy Thin Films for Bilayer Graphene Growth by Andrew Chen and Eugene Zakar Sensors and Electron...COVERED (From - To) June–August 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Preparation of Copper (Cu)-Nickel (Ni) Alloy Thin Films for Bilayer Graphene Growth 5a

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Amorphous Nickel-Base Alloys in a Boiling Concentrated Sodium Hydroxide Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuo, SHIMAMURA; Kimikado, MIURA; Asahi, Kawashima; Katsuhiko, Asami; Koji, Hashimoto; Institute for Materials Research:Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding Co., Ltd.; Institute for Materials Research

    1988-01-01

    Polarization curves were measured in a boiling 50% NaOH solution, and the specimen surface was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A combined addition of chromium and molybdenum to amorphous nickel-phosphorus alloys significantly enhances the corrosion resistance. Addition of copper and lead are also effective in improving the corrosion resistance. The surface film formed on amorphous nickel-base alloys consists mainly of hydrated nickel oxyhydroxide. Chromium is concentrated in the...

  15. Development of powder metallurgy Al alloys for high temperature aircraft structural applications, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellman, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    In this continuing study, the development of mechanically alloyed heat resistant aluminum alloys for aircraft were studied to develop higher strength targets and higher service temperatures. The use of higher alloy additions to MA Al-Fe-Co alloys, employment of prealloyed starting materials, and higher extrusion temperatures were investigated. While the MA Al-Fe-Co alloys exhibited good retention of strength and ductility properties at elevated temperatures and excellent stability of properties after 1000 hour exposure at elevated temperatures, a sensitivity of this system to low extrusion strain rates adversely affected the level of strength achieved. MA alloys in the Al-Li family showed excellent notched toughness and property stability after long time exposures at elevated temperatures. A loss of Li during processing and the higher extrusion temperature 482 K (900 F) resulted in low mechanical strengths. Subsequent hot and cold working of the MA Al-Li had only a mild influence on properties.

  16. New concept of composite strengthening in Co-Re based alloys for high temperature applications in gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherji, D.; Roesler, J.; Fricke, T.; Schmitz, F. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (DE). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde (IfW); Piegert, S. [Siemens AG, Berlin (DE). Energy Sector (F PR GT EN)

    2010-07-01

    High temperature material development is mainly driven by gas turbine needs. Today, Ni-based superalloys are the dominant material class in the hot section of turbines. Material development will continue to push the maximum service temperature of Ni-superalloys upwards. However, this approach has a fundamental limit and can not be sustained indefinitely, as the Ni-superalloys are already used very close to their melting point. Within the frame work of a DFG Forschergruppe program (FOR 727) - ''Beyond Ni-base Superalloys'' - Co-Re based alloys are being developed as a new generation of high temperature materials that can be used at +100 C above single crystal Ni-superalloys. Along with other strengthening concepts, hardening by second phase is explored to develop a two phase composite alloy. With quaternary Co-Re-Cr-Ni alloys we demonstrate this development concept, where Co{sub 2}Re{sub 3}-type {sigma} phase is used in a novel way as the hardening phase. Thermodynamic calculation was used for designing model alloy compositions. (orig.)

  17. Correlation between Mechanical Behavior and Actuator-type Performance of Ni-Ti-Pd High-temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A., II; Garg, Anita; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature shape memory alloys in the NiTiPd system are being investigated as lower cost alternatives to NiTiPt alloys for use in compact solid-state actuators for the aerospace, automotive, and power generation industries. A range of ternary NiTiPd alloys containing 15 to 46 at.% Pd has been processed and actuator mimicking tests (thermal cycling under load) were used to measure transformation temperatures, work behavior, and dimensional stability. With increasing Pd content, the work output of the material decreased, while the amount of permanent strain resulting from each load-biased thermal cycle increased. Monotonic isothermal tension testing of the high-temperature austenite and low temperature martensite phases was used to partially explain these behaviors, where a mismatch in yield strength between the austenite and martensite phases was observed at high Pd levels. Moreover, to further understand the source of the permanent strain at lower Pd levels, strain recovery tests were conducted to determine the onset of plastic deformation in the martensite phase. Consequently, the work behavior and dimensional stability during thermal cycling under load of the various NiTiPd alloys is discussed in relation to the deformation behavior of the materials as revealed by the strain recovery and monotonic tension tests.

  18. Constitutive Modeling of High Temperature Uniaxial Creep-Fatigue and Creep-Ratcheting Responses of Alloy 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.G. Pritchard; L.J. Carroll; T. Hassan

    2013-07-01

    Inconel Alloy 617 is a high temperature creep and corrosion resistant alloy and is a leading candidate for use in Intermediate Heat Exchangers (IHX) of the Next Generation Nuclear Plants (NGNP). The IHX of the NGNP is expected to experience operating temperatures in the range of 800 degrees - 950 degrees C, which is in the creep regime of Alloy 617. A broad set of uniaxial, low-cycle fatigue, fatigue-creep, ratcheting, and ratcheting-creep experiments are conducted in order to study the fatigue and ratcheting responses, and their interactions with the creep response at high temperatures. A unified constitutive model developed at North Carolina State University is used to simulate these experimental responses. The model is developed based on the Chaboche viscoplastic model framework. It includes cyclic hardening/softening, strain rate dependence, strain range dependence, static and dynamic recovery modeling features. For simulation of the alloy 617 responses, new techniques of model parameter determination are developed for optimized simulations. This paper compares the experimental responses and model simulations for demonstrating the strengths and shortcomings of the model.

  19. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

  20. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

  1. Development of Cast Alumina-forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys for use in High Temperature Process Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Pankiw, Roman [Duraloy Technologies Inc; Voke, Don [Duraloy Technologies Inc

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in the development of alumina-forming, creep resistant alloys for use in various industrial process environments. It is expected that these alloys can be fabricated into components for use in these environments through centrifugal casting and welding. Based on the successful earlier studies on the development of wrought versions of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) alloys, new alloy compositions have been developed for cast products. These alloys achieve good high-temperature oxidation resistance due to the formation of protective Al2O3 scales while multiple second-phase precipitation strengthening contributes to excellent creep resistance. This work will summarize the results on the development and properties of a centrifugally cast AFA alloy. This paper highlights the strength, oxidation resistance in air and water vapor containing environments, and creep properties in the as-cast condition over the temperature range of 750°C to 900°C in a centrifugally cast heat. Preliminary results for a laboratory cast AFA composition with good oxidation resistance at 1100°C are also presented.

  2. Auger electron spectroscopy study of oxidation of a PdCr alloy used for high-temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Darwin L.; Zeller, Mary V.; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1993-01-01

    A Pd-13 wt. percent Cr solid solution is a promising high-temperature strain gage alloy. In bulk form it has a number of properties that are desirable in a resistance strain gage material, such as a linear electrical resistance versus temperature curve to 1000 C and stable electrical resistance in air at 1000 C. However, unprotected fine wire gages fabricated from this alloy perform well only to 600 C. At higher temperatures severe oxidation degrades their electrical performance. In this work Auger electron spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation chemistry of the alloy wires and ribbons. Results indicate that the oxidation is caused by a complex mechanism that is not yet fully understood. As expected, during oxidation, a layer of chromium oxide is formed. This layer, however, forms beneath a layer of metallic palladium. The results of this study have increased the understanding of the oxidation mechanism of Pd-13 wt. percent Cr.

  3. Lightweight High Temperature Beta Gamma Alloy/Process Development for Disk and Blade Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary material and manufacturing limitations of gamma TiAl alloys include processing difficulties, requiring costly non-conventional processing requirements,...

  4. Interaction mechanisms between slurry coatings and solid oxide fuel cell interconnect alloys during high temperature oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Åsa Helen; Mikkelsen, L.; Hendriksen, P.V.

    2012-01-01

    oxidation rate constant was reduced with 50–90% of that for uncoated alloy. One coating consisting of MnCo2O4 did not significantly affect the oxidation rate of the alloy, and just as for uncoated samples break-away oxidation occurred for MnCo2O4 coated samples. The interaction mechanisms between...

  5. High temperature oxidation of Ti–48Al–8Cr–2Ag alloy with sputtered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Magnetron-sputter deposition was used to produce a Ti–48Al–8Cr–2Ag (at.%) coating on a cast alloy substrate with the same composition. The oxidation behaviour of the cast Ti–48Al–8Cr–2Ag alloy and its sputtered coating was investigated in air at 1000°C. The resulting scale structures were analyzed in great.

  6. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  7. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Chen, Xiang [ORNL

    2016-09-16

    Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  8. Basic research for alloy design of Nb-base alloys as ultra high temperature structural materials; Chokoon kozoyo niobuki gokin no gokin sekkei no tame no kisoteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, E. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yoshimi, K.; Hanada, S. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Iron, Steel and Other Metals

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes an influence of additional elements on the high temperature deformation behavior of Nb-base solid solution alloys. Highly concentrated solid solution single crystals of Nb-Ta and Nb-Mo alloys were prepared. Compression test and strain rate sudden change test were conducted in the vacuum at temperatures ranging from 77 to 1773 K, to determine the strain rate sensitivity index. Yield stress of the Nb-Ta alloy was similar to that of Nb alloy at temperatures over 0.3{times}T{sub M}, where T{sub M} is fusing point of Nb. While, the yield stress increased with increasing the impurity oxygen concentration at temperatures below 0.3{times}T{sub M}. The yield stress became much higher than that of Nb alloy. The strain rate sensitivity index showed positive values in the whole temperature range. On the other hand, the yield stress of Nb-Mo alloy was higher than that of Nb alloy in the whole temperature range, and increased with increasing the Mo concentration. The strain rate sensitivity index showed negative values at the temperature range from 0.3{times}T{sub M} to 0.4{times}T{sub M}. It was found that serration occurred often for Nb-40Mo alloys. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Assessment of corrosion resistance of cast cobalt- and nickel-chromium dental alloys in acidic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercieca, Sven; Caligari Conti, Malcolm; Buhagiar, Joseph; Camilleri, Josette

    2017-10-26

    The aim of this study was to compare the degradation resistance of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys used as a base material for partial dentures in contact with saliva. Wiron® 99 and Wironit Extra-Hard® were selected as representative casting alloys for Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys, respectively. The alloys were tested in contact with deionized water, artificial saliva and acidified artificial saliva. Material characterization was performed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and microhardness and nanohardness testing. The corrosion properties of the materials were then analyzed using open circuit potential analysis and potentiodynamic analysis. Alloy leaching in solution was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. Co-Cr alloy was more stable than the Ni-Cr alloy in all solutions tested. Leaching of nickel and corrosion attack was higher in Ni-Cr alloy in artificial saliva compared with the acidified saliva. The corrosion resistance of the Co-Cr alloy was seen to be superior to that of the Ni-Cr alloy, with the former exhibiting a lower corrosion current in all test solutions. Microstructural topographical changes were observed for Ni-Cr alloy in contact with artificial saliva. The Ni-Cr alloy exhibited microstructural changes and lower corrosion resistance in artificial saliva. The acidic changes did not enhance the alloy degradation. Ni-Cr alloys are unstable in solution and leach nickel. Co-Cr alloys should be preferred for clinical use.

  10. Fracture behavior of nickel-based alloys in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, W.J.; Brown, C.M.

    1999-08-01

    The cracking resistance of Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and their welds, EN82H and EN52, was characterized by conducting J{sub IC} tests in air and hydrogenated water. All test materials displayed excellent toughness in air and high temperature water, but Alloy 690 and the two welds were severely embrittled in low temperature water. In 54 C water with 150 cc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O, J{sub IC} values were typically 70% to 95% lower than their air counterparts. The toughness degradation was associated with a fracture mechanism transition from microvoid coalescence to intergranular fracture. Comparison of the cracking response in water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that susceptibility to low temperature cracking is due to hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries. The effects of water temperature, hydrogen content and loading rate on low temperature crack propagation were studied. In addition, testing of specimens containing natural weld defects and as-machined notches was performed to determine if low temperature cracking can initiate at these features. Unlike the other materials, Alloy 600 is not susceptible to low temperature cracking as the toughness in 54 C water remained high and a microvoid coalescence mechanism was operative in both air and water.

  11. Influence of scandium addition on the high-temperature grain size stabilization of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lulu, E-mail: lli18@ncsu.edu; Xu, Weizong; Saber, Mostafa; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2015-06-11

    The influence of 1–4 at% Sc addition on the thermal stability of mechanically alloyed ODS ferritic alloy was studied in this work. Sc addition was found to significantly stabilize grain size and microhardness at high temperatures. Grain sizes of samples with 1 and 4 at% Sc was found maintained in the nanoscale range at temperatures up to 1000 °C with hardness maintained at 5.6 and 6.7 GPa, respectively. The detailed microstructure was also investigated from EDS elemental mapping, where nanofeatures [ScTiO] were observed, while nanosized [YTiO] particles were rarely seen. This is probably due to the concentration difference between Sc and Y, leading to the formation of [ScTiO] favoring that of [YTiO]. Precipitation was considered as the major source for the observed high temperature stabilization. In addition, 14YT–Sc alloys without large second phases such as Ti-oxide can exhibit better performance compared to conventional ODS materials.

  12. Thermal Stir Welding of High Strength and High Temperature Alloys for Aerospace Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Keystone and MSU team propose to demonstrate the feasibility of solid-state joining high strength and temperature alloys utilizing the Thermal Stir Welding...

  13. A new Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, D. L.; Michal, G. M.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    Various applications exist where a high conductivity alloy with good strength and creep resistance are required. NASA LeRC has developed a Cu-8 at. percent Cr-4 at. percent Nb (Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb) alloy for these applications. The alloy is designed for use up to 700 C and shows exceptional strength, low cycle fatigue (LCF) resistance, and creep resistance. Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb also has a thermal conductivity of at least 72 percent that of pure Cu. Furthermore, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the alloy are very stable. In addition to the original application in combustion chambers, Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb shows promise for welding electrodes, brazing fixtures, and other applications requiring high conductivity and strength at elevated temperatures.

  14. Corrosion of high temperature resisting alloys exposed to heavy fuel ash; Corrosion de aleaciones resistentes a altas temperaturas expuestas a ceniza de combustoleo pesado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong Moreno, Adriana del Carmen

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the performed research was to study the degradation process by high temperature corrosion of alloys exposed to heavy fuel oil ashes through a comparative experimental evaluation of its performance that allowed to establish the mechanisms involved in the phenomenon. The experimentation carried out involved the determination of the resistance to the corrosion of 14 alloys of different type (low and medium alloy steels, ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, nickel base alloys and a FeCrAl alloy of type ODS) exposed to high temperatures (580 Celsius degrees - 900 Celsius degrees) in 15 ash deposits with different corrosive potential, which were collected in the high temperature zone of boilers of thermoelectric power stations. The later studies to the corrosion tests consisted of the analysis by sweeping electron microscopy supported by microanalysis of the corroded probes, with the purpose of determining the effect of Na, V and S on the corrosivity of the ash deposits and the effect of the main alloying elements on the corrosion resistance of the alloys. Such effects are widely documented to support the proposed mechanisms of degradation that are occurring. The global analysis of the generated results has allowed to propose a model to explain the global mechanism of corrosion of alloys exposed to the high temperatures of ash deposits. The proposed model, complements the processed one by Wilson, widely accepted for fused vanadates, as far as on one hand, it considers the effect of the sodium sulfate presence (in addition to the vanadium compounds) in the deposits, and on the other hand, it extends it to temperatures higher than the point of fusion of constituent vanadium compounds of the deposits. Both aspects involve considering the roll that the process of diffusion of species has on the degradation and the capacity of protection of the alloy. The research performed allowed to confirm what the Wilson model had established for deposits with high

  15. High-temperature tribological behaviors of a Cr-Si co-alloyed layer on TA15 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Lu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A Cr-Si co-alloyed layer was successfully deposited on TA15 alloy by the double glow plasma surface technology to improve its poor wear resistance at elevated temperature. The microstructure, composition, and phase structure of the layer were investigated by SEM, EDS, and XRD. The tribological behaviors of the Cr-Si co-alloyed layer at 20 °C and 500 °C were analyzed in details. The results indicated that the friction coefficient and wear rate of the Cr-Si co-alloyed layer at 20 °C and 500 °C were much lower than those of the substrate, which was due to higher hardness and superior elastic modulus. This layer may become an approach to effectively improving the wear resistance of TA15 alloy at elevated temperature.

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of a eutectic high-temperature Nb-Si alloy grown by directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, M. I.; Vnukov, V. I.; Korzhov, V. P.; Stroganova, T. S.; Zheltyakova, I. S.; Prokhorov, D. V.; Gnesin, I. B.; Kiiko, V. M.; Kolobov, Yu. R.; Golosov, E. V.; Nekrasov, A. N.

    2014-04-01

    The structure and the short-term high-temperature strength of Ni-18.7 at % Si (Nb-Nb3Si eutectic) alloys fabricated by vacuum electron-beam zone melting and induction melting in an argon atmosphere are studied. The structure of the samples prepared by vacuum electron-beam zone melting is characterized by the presence of primary Nb5Si3 intermetallic precipitates and the absence of its secondary precipitates. The structure of the samples prepared by induction melting in an argon atmosphere has two characteristic zones, namely, eutectic and eutectoid ones.

  17. Subgrain and dislocation structure changes in hot-deformed high-temperature Fe-Ni austenitic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducki, K.J.; Rodak, K.; Hetmanczyk, M.; Kuc, D

    2003-08-28

    The influence of plastic deformation on the substructure of a high-temperature austenitic Fe-Ni alloy has been presented. Hot-torsion tests were executed at constant strain rates of 0.1 and 1.0 s{sup -1}, at testing temperatures in the range 900-1150 deg. C. The examination of the microstructure was carried out, using transmission electron microscopy. Direct measurements on the micrographs allowed the calculation of structural parameters: the average subgrain area, and the mean dislocation density. A detailed investigation has shown that the microstructure is inhomogeneous, consisting of dense dislocation walls, subgrains and recrystallized regions.

  18. High Strength and Wear Resistant Aluminum Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Chen, Po Shou

    2003-01-01

    Originally developed by NASA as high performance piston alloys to meet U.S. automotive legislation requiring low exhaust emission, the novel NASA alloys now offer dramatic increase in tensile strength for many other applications at elevated temperatures from 450 F (232 C) to about 750 F (400 C). It is an ideal low cost material for cast automotive components such as pistons, cylinder heads, cylinder liners, connecting rods, turbo chargers, impellers, actuators, brake calipers and rotors. It can be very economically produced from conventional permanent mold, sand casting or investment casting, with silicon content ranging from 6% to 18%. At high silicon levels, the alloy exhibits excellent thermal growth stability, surface hardness and wear resistant properties.

  19. Metals Technology for Aerospace Applications in 2020: Development of High Temperature Aluminum Alloys For Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicus, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The role of trace additions on the nucleation and stability of the primary strengthening phase, omega, is of paramount importance for the enhancement of mechanical properties for moderate temperature application of Al-Cu-Mg-(Ag) alloys. In order to better understand the competition for solute, which governs the microstructural evolution of these alloys, a series of Al-Cu-Mg-Si quaternary alloys were prepared to investigate the role of trace Si additions on the nucleation of the omega phase. Si additions were found to quell omega nucleation in conjunction with the enhanced matrix precipitation of competing phases. These initial results indicate that it is necessary to overcome a critical Mg/Si ratio for omega precipitation, rather than a particular Si content.

  20. Nickel-Titanium Alloys: Corrosion "Proof" Alloys for Space Bearing, Components and Mechanism Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, 60NiTi (60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti), is shown to be a promising candidate tribological material for space mechanisms. 60NiTi offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. 60NiTi is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, and is non-magnetic. Despite its high Ti content, 60NiTi is non-galling even under dry sliding. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic, encompasses all of these attributes. Since 60NiTi contains such a high proportion of Ti and possesses many metallic properties, it was expected to exhibit poor tribological performance typical of Ti alloys, namely galling type behavior and rapid lubricant degradation. In this poster-paper, the oil-lubricated behavior of 60NiTi is presented.

  1. Effects of lead on oxidation behavior of Alloy 690TT within a high temperature aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qiang; Liu, Zhiyong; Li, Chengtao; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-12-01

    The chemical compositions, phases and structures of two oxide films on Alloy 690TT following exposure for 4400 h in pure water with and without lead at 320 °C were studied by surface analysis techniques. The analysis of a lead-doped oxide film prepared by a focused ion beam (FIB) demonstrated that both Cr-rich and Ni-rich oxides were alternatively distributed within the outer layer, whereas the inner layer was porous and poorly protected, causing severe corrosion of the alloy and a thicker film was formed. A duplex film model was proposed for the effects discussion of lead on the oxidation mechanism.

  2. KCl-induced high temperature corrosion of selected commercial alloys. Part II: alumina and silica-formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiamehr, Saeed; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Montgomery, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    -chromium-silicon-oxygen containing layer forms as the innermost corrosion product. The layer was uniformly distributed over the surface and appears to render some protection as this alloy exhibited the best performance among the investigated alloys. To reveal further aspects of the corrosion mechanism, Nimonic 80A was exposed......Laboratory testing on selected alumina and silica-forming alloys was performed to evaluate their performance against high temperature corrosion induced by potassium chloride (KCl). The alloys studied were FeCrAlY, Kanthal APM, Nimonic 80A, 214, 153MA and HR160. Exposure was conducted at 600 °C...... for 168 h in flowing N2(g)+5%O2(g)+15%H2O(g) (vol.%) with samples covered under KCl powder. A KCl-free exposure was also performed for comparison.Corrosion morphology and products were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD...

  3. First principles calculations of thermodynamic and mechanical properties of high temperature bcc Ta-W and Mo-Ta alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda-Jindo, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)], E-mail: kmjindo@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Vu Van Hung; Hoa, N.T. [Department of Physics, Hanoi National Pedagogic University, km8 Hanoi-Sontay Highway, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Turchi, P.E.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-353 LLNL, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2008-03-06

    The thermodynamic quantities of high temperature metals and alloys are studied using the statistical moment method, going beyond the quasi-harmonic approximations. Including the power moments of the atomic displacements up to the fourth order, the Helmholtz free energies and the related thermodynamic quantities are derived explicitly in closed analytic forms. The configurational entropy term is taken into account by using the tetrahedron cluster approximation of the cluster variation method (CVM). The energetics of the binary (Ta-W and Mo-Ta) alloys are treated within the framework of the first-principles TB-LMTO (tight-binding linear muffin tin orbital) method coupled to CPA (coherent potential approximation) and GPM (generalized perturbation method). The equilibrium phase diagrams are calculated for the refractory Ta-W and Mo-Ta bcc alloys. In addition, the mechanical properties, i.e., temperature dependence of the elastic moduli C{sub 11}, C{sub 12} and C{sub 44} and those of the ideal tensile and shear strengths of the bcc Ta-W and Ta-Mo alloys have been also studied.

  4. Microstructures and shape memory characteristics of dual-phase Co-Ni-Ga high-temperature shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yan, E-mail: liyan@buaa.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100091 (China)] [Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Materials and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, Beijing 100091 (China); Xin Yan [School of Energy and Power Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Chai Liang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100091 (China)] [Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Materials and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, Beijing 100091 (China); Ma Yunqing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Xu Huibin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100091 (China)] [Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Materials and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, Beijing 100091 (China)

    2010-06-15

    The influence of microstructure on mechanical properties and shape memory characteristics of Co-Ni-Ga high-temperature shape memory alloys were investigated in this study. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to detect the microstructures. We found that these alloys were composed of dual phases, a non-modulated tetragonal L1{sub 0} martensite and a face-centered cubic (fcc) {gamma} phase. The martensite was twinned and well self-accommodated. The {gamma} phase was a Co-based solid solution with 30% lower hardness than martensite. Although the fracture mode was intergranular, the strength and plasticity of the alloys increased markedly with the increasing volume fraction of the {gamma} phase. The presence of the {gamma} phase in grain boundaries rather than in the martensite is favorable to shape memory recovery. This was revealed by the maximum shape recovery strain over 5.0% that was obtained in the Co{sub 46}Ni{sub 25}Ga{sub 29} alloy, with the {gamma} phase formed mainly in grain boundaries.

  5. Alloy development and mechanical properties of nickel aluminide (Ni sub 3 Al) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.T.; Sikka, V.K.; Horton, J.A.; Lee, E.H.

    1988-08-01

    This report summarizes recent alloy development of nickel aluminides for structural applications. Boron-doped Ni{sub 3}Al showed severe embrittlement when tested in oxidizing environments above 300{degrees}C. The embrittlement is due to a dynamic effect, which can be alleviated by alloying with 8 at. % Cr. The chromium-modified aluminide alloys possess a good combination of strength and ductility for use at temperatures to 1000{degrees}C. The hot ductility and fabricability of the aluminide alloys can be substantially improved by reducing the zirconium content to below 0.35 at. %. Material processing of large aluminide heats has been demonstrated by both conventional and innovative techniques. Mechanical properties of the aluminide alloys were characterized at temperatures to 1200{degrees}C. Grain size, which is the main difference between the materials produced by the various processing techniques, is the major metallurgical parameter that strongly influences the mechanical properties of the aluminide alloys. 35 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Aluminium Alloy AA6060 surface treatment with high temperature steam containing chemical additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Tabrizian, Naja; Jellesen, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    The steam treatment process was employed to produce a conversion coating on aluminium alloy AA6060. The changes in microstructure and its effect on corrosion resistance properties were investigated. Various concentrations of KMnO4 containing Ce(NO3)3 was injected into the steam and its effect...

  7. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  8. A Research Status on High-Temperature Creep of Alloy 617 for Use in VHTR System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo-Gon; Park, Jae-Young; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Yong-Wan; Kim, Min-Hwan [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon-Jin [Pukyong National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, a research status on creep works of Alloy 617 conducting at KAERI was introduced and summarized. Various experimental creep data and creep constants obtained in the air/helium environments and base/weld metals were presented and discussed using various creep equations and parameters. The draft Code Case is a modification from ASME Section III Subsection NH that was put forth by a special task force of the ASME subgroup that deals with elevated temperature design. The primary intended application of the draft Code Case is a VHTR. Presently, various creep data for Alloy 617 are being accumulated through Generation-IV forum (GIF) Material Handbook Database of a next-generation nuclear plant research and development. As per this, a new Alloy 617 Code Case is planned to be approved by 2017. However, to do so, various creep data and creep constants in air/helium environments, and base/weld metals etc. should be obtained to help draft the new Code Case, and creep behavior should be investigated through systematic analysis of a wide range of creep temperature and stress conditions. Using various creep equations and parameters, the creep constants were determined for design use of Alloy 617. The stress of the He environment was more reduced than that of the air one. As the stress increases, the creep rate of WM was significantly lower than that of BM. The reason for this was that the rupture elongation of WM was largely reduced compared with that of BM.

  9. High temperature corrosion performance of FeAl intermetallic alloys in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, M.; Espinosa-Medina, M.A.; Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Martinez, L.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G

    2003-05-25

    The corrosion performance of FeAl base intermetallic alloys fabricated by spray-atomization and deposition during their immersion in molten sodium metavanadate (NaVO{sub 3}), 80% (wt.%) sodium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) +20% sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and pure Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the temperature range of 600-1000 deg. C during 200 h was investigated. The experiments were realized by the weight loss method in the intermetallic alloys of composition FeAl40(at.%), FeAl40+0.1B and FeAl40+0.1B+10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In all cases, the FeAl40+0.1B+10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy showed the best corrosion resistance in the temperatures interval studied here. This behavior was discussed in terms of the formation of a protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer and its dissolution by vanadate phases and internal sulfidation in the case of experiments carried out in pure Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The morphology of the external layers and the corrosion products formed during the tests revealed that the corrosion rate of this type alloy depends on the corrosion compounds that are formed and the development of protective alumina scales.

  10. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimenta...

  11. High-temperature nitridation of Nb-Ti alloys in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscaglia, V.; Martinelli, A. [Nat. Res. Council, Genoa (Italy). Inst. of Phys. Chem. of Mater.; Musenich, R. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genoa (Italy); Mayr, W.; Lengauer, W. [Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/161, A-1060 Vienna (Austria)

    1999-02-01

    Microstructure evolution, phase composition, weight gain and layer growth kinetics of Nb-Ti alloys (10, 47, 63 and 90 at.% Ti) annealed in high-purity nitrogen atmosphere (0.3, 3 and 30 bar) were studied in the temperature range 1300-1600 C. After nitridation, the formation of an external compact nitride layer as well as extensive internal nitride precipitation was observed. The overall nitridation kinetics (weight gain) is invariably parabolic; a deviation from the initial rate law is observed at 1450 and 1600 C for the longer reaction times when the alloy core approaches nitrogen saturation and internal precipitation slows down. The parabolic rate constant is strongly affected by the Nb content in the alloy. The phases detected in the reacted samples are isostructural with those of the Nb-Ti, Nb-N and Ti-N systems. The surface nitride was {delta}-(Ti,Nb)N in any case. The morphology of the internal nitridation zone corresponds to the growth of large, oriented, nitride needles for the three alloys richer in titanium. The needles are composed of {alpha}-(Ti,Nb)(N) in the case of Ti{sub 90}Nb{sub 10} alloy and of {delta}-(Ti,Nb)N{sub 1-x} in the case of Ti{sub 63}Nb{sub 37} and Ti{sub 47}Nb{sub 53}. Such a microstructure is evidence for nucleation difficulty; coarsening of the existing particles is favoured in comparison to the formation of new precipitates. Homogeneous nucleation is hindered by the small chemical Gibbs free energy available and the elastic strain energy related to volume misfit. After initial reaction, microstructure evolution is mainly determined by the fast inward diffusion of nitrogen and the slow Nb-Ti interdiffusion in the {beta}-(Ti,Nb) alloy. Internal nitridation of Ti{sub 10}Nb{sub 90} at 1450 and 1600 C leads to the formation of fine and numerous precipitates of {beta}-(Nb,Ti){sub 2}N. (orig.) 58 refs.

  12. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metalceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C, according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. Results. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p < 0.01 and elastic modulus (p < 0.001 of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Conclusion. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  13. Evaluation and comparison of shear bond strength of porcelain to a beryllium-free alloy of nickel-chromium, nickel and beryllium free alloy of cobalt-chromium, and titanium: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Singh

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: It could be concluded that newer nickel and beryllium free Co-Cr alloys and titanium alloys with improved strength to weight ratio could prove to be good alternatives to the conventional nickel-based alloys when biocompatibility was a concern.

  14. MODELING HIGH TEMPERATURE FLOW BEHAVIOR OF AN AL 6061 ALUMINIUM ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Badami

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hot deformation behavior of a medium Cr/Mn Al6061 aluminum alloy was studied by isothermal compression test at temperatures range of 320 to 480 °C and strain rates range of 0.001 to 0.1 s −1. The true stresstrue strain curves were analyzed to characterize the flow stress of Al6061. Plastic behavior, as a function of both temperature and strain rate for Al6061, was also modeled using a hyperbolic sinusoidal type equation. For different values of material constant α in the range of 0.001 to 0.4, values of A, n and Q were calculated based on mathematical relationships. The best data fit with minimum error was applied to define constitutive equation for the alloy. The predicted results of the proposed model were found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results, which could be used to predict the required deformation forces in hot deformation processes

  15. Intermediate strength alloys for high temperature service in liquid-salt cooled energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane Francis; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2017-06-20

    An alloy consists essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6 to 8.5 Cr, 5.5 to 13.5 Mo, 0.4 to 7.5 W, 1 to 2 Ti, 0.7 to 0.85 Mn, 0.05 to 0.3 Al, up to to 0.1 Co, 0.08 to 0.5 C, 1 to 5 Ta, 1 to 4 Nab, 1 to 3 Hf, balance Ni. The alloy is characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 36 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 40 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 72.1 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm2sec)].times.10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 8 to 25.

  16. Intermediate strength alloys for high temperature service in liquid-salt cooled energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane Francis; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2017-06-20

    An alloy is composed essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6 to 8.5 Cr, 5.5 to 13.5 Mo, 0.4 to 7.5 W, 1 to 2 Ti, 0.7 to 0.85 Mn, 0.05 to 0.3 Al, 0.08 to 0.5 C, 0 to 1 Nb, with the balance Ni, the alloy being characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 25 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 30 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 45 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm.sup.2 sec)]10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 6 to 39.

  17. Corrosion and Creep of Candidate Alloys in High Temperature Helium and Steam Environments for the NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, Gary; Jones, J. W.

    2013-06-21

    This project aims to understand the processes by which candidate materials degrade in He and supercritical water/steam environments characteristic of the current NGNP design. We will focus on understanding the roles of temperature, and carbon and oxygen potential in the 750-850 degree C range on both uniform oxidation and selective internal oxidation along grain boundaries in alloys 617 and 800H in supercritical water in the temperature range 500-600 degree C; and examining the application of static and cyclic stresses in combination with impure He environments in the temperature rang 750-850 degree C; and examining the application of static and cyclic stresses in combination with impure He environments in the temperature range 750-850 degree C over a range of oxygen and carbon potentials in helium. Combined, these studies wil elucidate the potential high damage rate processes in environments and alloys relevant to the NGNP.

  18. Anti-corrosive Conversion Coating on Aluminium Alloys Using High Temperature Steam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    and heterogeneity of native oxide layer does not provide long time corrosion resistance and adhesion of organic coating for a particular function in different environments. In order to enhance the corrosion resistance and adhesion of organic coating, the aluminium native oxide layer is treated to transform...... or convert to a functional conversion coating. In the last several decades chromate conversion coating (CrCCs) have been the most common conversion coatings used for aluminium alloys. Due to the toxicity of the hexavalent chrome, however, environmental friendly alternatives to CrCCs have been investigated...... extensively. Despite the intense research no equivalent substitute for (CrCCs) has been found. For these reasons, alternative conversion coatings are sought for substituting existing ones. Aluminium alloys AA 1090, Peraluman 706, and AA 6060 were subjected to high pressure steam treatment and various...

  19. Low-cost Fe--Ni--Cr alloys for high temperature valve applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan

    2017-03-28

    An Fe--Ni--Cr alloy is composed essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 1 to 3.5 Al, up to 2 Co, 15 to 19.5 Cr, up to 2 Cu, 23 to 40 Fe, up to 0.3 Hf, up to 4 Mn, 0.15 to 2 Mo, up to 0.15 Si, up to 1.05 Ta, 2.8 to 4.3 Ti, up to 0.5 W, up to 0.06 Zr, 0.02 to 0.15 C, 0.0001 to 0.007 N, balance Ni, wherein, in terms of atomic percent: 6.5.ltoreq.Al+Ti+Zr+Hf+Ta.ltoreq.10, 0.33.ltoreq.Al/(Al+Ti+Zr+Hf+Ta).ltoreq.0.065, 4.ltoreq.(Fe+Cr)/(Al+Ti+Zr+Hf+Ta).ltoreq.10, the alloy being essentially free of Nb and V.

  20. Alloying-Element Loss during High-Temperature Processing of a Nickel-Base Superalloy (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    precipitates, and the fine white/gray particles are carbides and borides . ............................................. 23 Figure 2. Aluminum...diameter billet with a measured composition in weight percent of 20.4 cobalt, 12.3 chromium, 3.5 aluminum, 3.5 titanium, 2.7 molybdenum , 4.3 tungsten...comparable size, and submicron carbides and borides . A fifteen-minute heat treatment at the subsolvus temperature used in the present work (i.e

  1. An Integrated Study of a Novel Thermal Coating for Nb-Based High Temperature Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shizhong [Southern Univ. and A & M College, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on the interfaces between niobium substrate and coatings at atomic level. Potential oxidation barrier bond coat, Nb₂AlC and high entropy alloys, and top coat candidates were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in our labs. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students and postdoc training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  2. High strength alloys for high temperature service in liquid-salt cooled energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2017-01-10

    An essentially cobalt-free alloy consists essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6.3 to 7.2 Cr, 0.5 to 2 Al, 0 to 5 Fe, 0.7 to 0.8 Mn, 9 to 12.5 Mo, 0 to 6 Ta, 0.75 to 3.5 Ti, 0.01 to 0.25 Nb, 0.2 to 0.6 W, 0.02 to 0.04 C, 0 to 0.001 B, 0.0001 to 0.002 N, balance Ni. The alloy is characterized by a .gamma.' microstructural component in the range of 3 to 17.6 weight percent of the total composition. The alloy is further characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 60 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 70 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 700 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm.sup.2sec)]10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 5.5 to 17.

  3. High strength alloys for high temperature service in liquid-salt cooled energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2017-01-10

    An essentially cobalt-free alloy consists essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6.3 to 7.2 Cr, 0.5 to 2 Al, 0 to 5 Fe, 0.7 to 0.8 Mn, 9 to 12.5 Mo, 0 to 6 Ta, 0.75 to 3.5 Ti, 0.01 to 0.25 Nb, 0.2 to 0.6 W, 0.02 to 0.04 C, 0 to 0.001 B, 0.0001 to 0.002 N, balance Ni. The alloy is characterized by a .gamma.' microstructural component in the range of 3 to 17.6 weight percent of the total composition. The alloy is further characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 60 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 70 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 700 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm.sup.2sec)]10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 5.5 to 17.

  4. Transient deformational properties of high temperature alloys used in solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Kwok, Kawai; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2017-01-01

    Stresses and probability of failure during operation of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is affected by the deformational properties of the different components of the SOFC stack. Though the overall stress relaxes with time during steady state operation, large stresses would normally appear through...... transients in operation including temporary shut downs. These stresses are highly affected by the transient creep behavior of metallic components in the SOFC stack. This study investigates whether a variation of the so-called Chaboche's unified power law together with isotropic hardening can represent...... to describe the high temperature inelastic deformational behaviors of Crofer 22 APU used for metallic interconnects in SOFC stacks....

  5. Refining a complex ZhS32-VI nickel alloy from silicon and phosphorus by unidirectional solidification of the melt at low solidification front velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, V. V.; Kablov, D. E.; Min, P. G.; Vadeev, V. E.

    2016-12-01

    The possibility of decreasing the silicon and phosphorus contents in a high-temperature ZhS32-VI nickel alloy by directional movement of solidification front at a velocity V = 6 mm/h has been studied. As a result, the contents of the impurities have decreased as compared to those in the starting alloy; the decrease in the silicon and phosphorus contents is from 2 to 4 and from 14 to 20 times, respectively. Thus, nonmetallic inclusions, in particular, those containing silicon and phosphorus, are moved to the top of the ingot.

  6. Microstructure of Cast Ni-Cr-Al-C Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cios G.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nickel based alloys, especially nickel based superalloys have gained the advantage over other alloys in the field of high temperature applications, and thus become irreplaceable at high temperature creep and aggressive corrosion environments, such as jet engines and steam turbines. However, the wear resistance of these alloys is insufficient at high temperatures. This work describes a microstructure of a new cast alloy. The microstructure consists of γ matrix strengthened by γ’ fine precipitates (dendrites improving the high temperature strength and of Chromium Cr7C3 primary carbides (in interdendritic eutectics which are designed to improve wear resistance as well as the high temperature strength.

  7. Simulation of Low Nickel Content Alloys For Industrial Ground Fault Circuit-Breaker Relays

    OpenAIRE

    Messal, Oualid; Sixdenier, Fabien; Morel, Laurent; Burais, Noël; Waeckerle, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this paper is to simulate the performances of a ground fault circuit-breaker (GFCB) relay with new low nickel content alloys. Indeed, in the construction industry, the materials become more expensive as their nickel content increases. Moreover, the demand for nickel is particularly sensitive to the economic conjuncture. Therefore, an original electromagnetic relay model has been developed and validated in different working conditions (current amplitude, freq...

  8. The electrochemical deposition of tin-nickel alloys and the corrosion properties of the coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Møller, Per

    2005-01-01

    electrodeposition. The alloy has unique corrosion properties and exhibits surface passivation like stainless steel. The coating is decorative and non-allergic to the skin, can replace decorative nickel and nickel-chromium coatings in many cases and decreases the risk for allergic contact dermatitis. A number...

  9. Structure and Properties of High-Temperature Multilayer Hybrid Material Based on Vanadium Alloy and Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaykina, Tatyana A.; Nikulin, Sergey A.; Rozhnov, Andrey B.; Khatkevich, Vladimir M.; Rogachev, Stanislav O.

    2017-03-01

    The present work is devoted to the development of new structural composite material having the unique complex of properties for operating in ultrahard conditions that combine high temperatures, radiation, and aggressive environments. A new three-layer composite tube material based on vanadium alloy (V-4Ti-4Cr) protected by stainless steel (Fe-0.2C-13Cr) has been obtained by co-extrusion. Mechanism and kinetics of formation as well as structure, composition, and mechanical properties of "transition" area between vanadium alloy and stainless steel have been studied. The transition area (13- to 22- µm thick) of the diffusion interaction between vanadium alloy and steel was formed after co-extrusion. The microstructure in the transition area was rather complicated comprising different grain sizes in components, but having no defects or brittle phases. Tensile strength of the composite was an average 493 ± 22 MPa, and the elongation was 26 ± 3 pct. Annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) increased the thickness of transition area up to 1.2 times, homogenized microstructure, and slightly changed mechanical properties. Annealing at 1273 K (1000 °C) further increased the thickness of transition area and also lead to intensive grain growth in steel and sometimes to separation between composite components during tensile tests. Annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) is proposed as appropriate heat treatment after co-extrusion of composite providing balance between diffusion interaction thickness and microstructure and monolithic-like behavior of composite during tensile tests.

  10. Vacuum-arc chromium-based coatings for protection of zirconium alloys from the high-temperature oxidation in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuprin, A.S.; Belous, V.A.; Voyevodin, V.N., E-mail: voyev@kipt.kharkov.ua; Bryk, V.V.; Vasilenko, R.L.; Ovcharenko, V.D.; Reshetnyak, E.N.; Tolmachova, G.N.; V' yugov, P.N.

    2015-10-15

    Multilayer Cr–Zr/Cr/Cr–N coatings for protection of zirconium alloys from the high-temperature oxidation in air have been obtained by the vacuum-arc evaporation technique with application of filters for plasma cleaning from macroparticles. The effect of the coatings on the corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys at test temperatures between 660 and 1100 °C for 3600 s has been investigated. The thickness, structure, phase composition, mechanical properties of the coatings and oxide layers before and after oxidation tests were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and nanoindentation technique. It is shown that the hard multilayer coating effectively protects zirconium from the oxidation in air for 1 h at test temperatures. As a result of the oxidation in the coating the CrO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxides are formed which reduce the oxygen penetration through the coating. At maximum test temperature of 1100 °C the oxide layer thickness in the coating is about 5 μm. The tube shape remains unchanged independent of alloy type. It has been found that uncoated zirconium oxidizes rapidly throughout the temperature range under study. At 1100 °C a porous monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} oxide layer of ≥120 μm is formed that leads to the deformation of the samples, cracking and spalling of the oxide layer.

  11. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys under Load-Biased Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Garg, Anita; Gaydosh, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    While NiTiPd alloys have been extensively studied for proposed use in high-temperature shape-memory applications, little is known about the shape-memory response of these materials under stress. Consequently, the isobaric thermal cyclic responses of five (Ni,Pd)49.5Ti50.5 alloys with constant stoichiometry and Pd contents ranging from 15 to 46 at. pct were investigated. From these tests, transformation temperatures, transformation strain (which is proportional to work output), and unrecovered strain per cycle (a measure of dimensional instability) were determined as a function of stress for each alloy. It was found that increasing the Pd content over this range resulted in a linear increase in transformation temperature, as expected. At a given stress level, work output decreased while the amount of unrecovered strain produced during each load-biased thermal cycle increased with increasing Pd content, during the initial thermal cycles. However, continued thermal cycling at constant stress resulted in a saturation of the work output and nearly eliminated further unrecovered strain under certain conditions, resulting in stable behavior amenable to many actuator applications.

  12. Process for Forming a High Temperature Single Crystal Canted Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J (Inventor); Ritzert, Frank J (Inventor); Nathal, Michael V (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H (Inventor); Steinetz, Bruce M (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A process for forming a high temperature single crystal canted spring is provided. In one embodiment, the process includes fabricating configurations of a rapid prototype spring to fabricate a sacrificial mold pattern to create a ceramic mold and casting a canted coiled spring to form at least one canted coil spring configuration based on the ceramic mold. The high temperature single crystal canted spring is formed from a nickel-based alloy containing rhenium using the at least one coil spring configuration.

  13. Processing, Microstructure and Creep Behavior of Mo-Si-B-Based Intermetallic Alloys for Very High Temperature Structural Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijay Vasudevan

    2008-03-31

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. In the first part of this project, the compression creep behavior of a Mo-8.9Si-7.71B (in at.%) alloy, at 1100 and 1200 C was studied, whereas in the second part of the project, the constant strain rate compression behavior at 1200, 1300 and 1400 C of a nominally Mo-20Si-10B (in at.%) alloy, processed such as to yield five different {alpha}-Mo volume fractions ranging from 5 to 46%, was studied. In order to determine the deformation and damage mechanisms and rationalize the creep/high temperature deformation data and parameters, the microstructure of both undeformed and deformed samples was characterized in detail using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with back scattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD)/orientation electron microscopy in the SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructure of both alloys was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. The values of stress exponents and activation energies, and their dependence on microstructure were determined. The data suggested the operation of both dislocation as well as diffusional mechanisms, depending on alloy, test temperature, stress level and microstructure. Microstructural observations of post-crept/deformed samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. TEM observations revealed the presence of recrystallized {alpha}-Mo grains and sub-grain boundaries composed of dislocation arrays within the grains (in Mo-8.9Si-7.71B) or fine sub-grains with a high density of b = 1/2<111> dislocations (in Mo-20Si-10B), which

  14. TEM Study of High-Temperature Precipitation of Delta Phase in Inconel 718 Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Moukrane Dehmas; Jacques Lacaze; Aliou Niang; Bernard Viguier

    2011-01-01

    Inconel 718 is widely used because of its ability to retain strength at up to 650∘C for long periods of time through coherent metastable   Ni3Nb precipitation associated with a smaller volume fraction of  Ni3Al precipitates. At very long ageing times at service temperature,   decomposes to the stable Ni3Nb phase. This latter phase is also present above the   solvus and is used for grain control during forging of alloy 718. While most works available on precipitation have be...

  15. Solubility study of nickel ferrite in boric acid using a flow-through autoclave system under high temperature and high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Joon; Choi, Ke Chon; Ha, Yeong Keong [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The solubility of nickel ferrite in an aqueous solution of boric acid was studied by varying the pH at the temperatures ranging from 25 .deg. C to 320 .deg. C. A flow-through autoclave system was specially designed and fabricated to measure the solubility of Fe in hydrothermal solutions under high temperature and pressure. The performance of this flow-through system was directly compared with the conventional static state technique using a batch-type autoclave system. The stability of fluid velocity for the flow-through autoclave system was verified prior to the solubility measurement. The influence of chemical additives, such as boric acid and H2, on the solubility of nickel ferrite was also evaluated.

  16. Creep-resistant, cobalt-free alloys for high temperature, liquid-salt heat exchanger systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David E; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-09-06

    An essentially Fe- and Co-free alloy is composed essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6.0 to 7.5 Cr, 0 to 0.15 Al, 0.5 to 0.85 Mn, 11 to 19.5 Mo, 0.03 to 4.5 Ta, 0.01 to 9 W, 0.03 to 0.08 C, 0 to 1 Re, 0 to 1 Ru, 0 to 0.001 B, 0.0005 to 0.005 N, balance Ni, the alloy being characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 25 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 38 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 25 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm.sup.2 sec)]10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 3 to 10.

  17. Corrosion behavior in high-temperature pressurized water of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed with Zr-Cu-based amorphous filler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Gu; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Park, Jin-Ju; Lee, Min-Ku

    2017-05-01

    The compositional effects of ternary Zr-Cu-X (X: Al, Fe) amorphous filler alloys on galvanic corrosion susceptibility in high-temperature pressurized water were investigated for Zircaloy-4 brazed joints. Through an Al-induced microgalvanic reaction that deteriorated the overall nobility of the joint, application of the Zr-Cu-Al filler alloy caused galvanic coupling to develop readily between the Al-bearing joint and the Al-free base metal, finally leading to massive localized corrosion of the joint. Contrastingly, joints prepared with a Zr-Cu-Fe filler alloy showed excellent corrosion resistance comparable to that of the Zircaloy-4 base metal, since the Cu and Fe elements forming fine intermetallic particles with Zr did not influence the electrochemical stability of the resultant joints. The present results demonstrate that Fe is a more suitable alloying element than Al for brazing filler alloys subjected to high-temperature corrosive environments.

  18. Long-term stability and corrosion of high temperature alloys in HTR test helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, J.P.; Glaze, F.J.; Ali-Khan, I.

    1977-02-15

    Since the first test station was started up, about 60 long-time experiments have been completed within 2 years. Their running times lay between 100 and 9,000 hours. With these relatively short experimental times, the effect of strongly contaminated helium (simulation of the start-up phase of an HTR) on the long-time strength of the test materials could not be ascertained. Several results are graphically plotted. The micrographs below show several results from metallographic studies on long-time specimens in lengthwise section. The type and depth of corrosion attack by the HTR helium atmosphere varies considerably with the materials being studied. Specimens which were exposed to various helium contaminations in long-time test stations were subjected to metallographic study (KFA Juelich--CIIR Oslo). These studies showed that the corrosion behavior of the materials is more strongly influenced by the composition of the alloy than by the concentration of the helium contaminants.

  19. High temperature grain growth and oxidation of Fe-29Ni-17Co (Kovar{trademark}) alloy leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, J.J.; Greulich, F.A.; Beavis, L.C.

    1993-12-31

    One important application for the Fe-29Ni-17Co (Kovar{trademark}) alloy in wire form is in brazed feed through assemblies which are integral parts of vacuum electronic devices. Since Cu metal brazes are performed at process temperatures of about 1100{degrees}C, there is opportunity for significant grain growth to occur during the brazing operation. Additional high temperature exposure includes decarburization of the Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy wire in wet hydrogen for 30 min. at 1000{degrees}C prior to the Cu brazing operation. Two approaches have been used to characterize grain growth in two lots of Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy: (1) a once-through processing study to study the effect of one-time-only device thermal processing on the resulting grain size, and (2) an isothermal grain growth study involving various times at 800--1100{degrees}C. The results of the once-through processing study indicate that acceptable grain sizes are obtained from both cold worked and mill-annealed wire lots following Cu brazing. The isothermal grain growth study indicates that the linear intercept distance for Fe-29Ni-17Co can be described with a power law function of time, and that thermal exposure must be controlled at temperatures in excess of 900{degrees}C in order to avoid excessive grain growth. A second study has characterized the oxidation kinetics of Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy wire in air at temperatures ranging from 550--700{degrees}C. This study indicates the parabolic growth law applies for this material, and between 550 and 700{degrees}C, oxidation in this alloy occurs at an activation energy of 27.9 kcal/mole. Other oxidation studies at higher temperatures ({ge}750{degrees}C) indicate an activation energy of 52.2 kcal/mole for oxidation of Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy at temperatures greater than 790{degrees}C. Quantitative point analyses of the oxide scale formed at 600{degrees}C suggest that a significant fraction of the scale is close to the stoichiometry of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-type oxide.

  20. Dynamical simulation of surface compositional changes in ni-cu alloys during high-temperature ion sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.

    Using the ACAT-DIFFUSE code, we tried to follow Lam's experimental compositional changes near the surface of Ni-40 at% Cu alloys at various temperatures (25-550°C), where the experiments were performed with a normally incident beam of 3 keV Ne+ ions. The ACAT-DIFFUSE code include both kinetic processes and thermal processes which take place during ion bombardment. If we assume that the segregation energy is a decreasing function of ion-fluence, the experimental ion-fluence dependence of the Cu/Ni ratios at the first layer can be reproduced by the ACAT-DIFFUSE code. The simulated depth profiles at the steady state are in good agreement with the measured depth profiles for T ≤ 300°C. The contribution of atoms at the second layer to the sputtered flux is much less than Lam's value even at high temperature.

  1. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Flow Behavior of Alloy 800H at Intermediate Strain Rates and High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokry, Abdallah

    2017-12-01

    A modified Johnson-Cook model for the flow behavior of alloy 800H at intermediate strain rates and high temperatures is presented. The modification is based on a study of the relation between strain hardening and both strain rate and softening parameters. The predicted stresses obtained using the modified model are compared to those obtained using the original Johnson-Cook model. The parameters constitute the two models are determined using the inverse method, Kalman filter. The results show that the modified model fits the experimental data very well for different combinations of strain rates and temperatures, with a mean value of R-squared regression of 0.90 for the modified model and 0.74 for the original Johnson-Cook model.

  2. Mechanistic insights into the oxidation behavior of Ni alloys in high-temperature CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleksak, Richard P.; Baltrus, John P.; Nakano, Jinichiro; Nakano, Anna; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Dogan, Omer N.

    2017-06-01

    We present results of a Ni superalloy oxidized for short times in high purity CO2 and similarly in Ar containing ≤ 1 ppb O2. A detailed analysis of the oxidized surfaces reveals striking similarities for the two exposure environments, suggesting O2 impurities control the oxidation process in high-temperature CO2. Selective oxidation results in Cr-rich oxide layers grown by 2 outward diffusion, while Cr vacancies left in the metal contribute to significant void formation at the oxide/metal interface. Unlike for most of the alloy surface, the oxidation behavior of secondary phase metal carbides is considerably different in the two environments.

  3. Method for inhibiting alkali metal corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVan, Jackson H.; Selle, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Structural components of nickel-containing alloys within molten alkali metal systems are protected against corrosion during the course of service by dissolving therein sufficient aluminum, silicon, or manganese to cause the formation and maintenance of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic reaction layer created by the interaction of the molten metal, selected metal, and alloy.

  4. [Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirković, Nemanja

    2007-04-01

    Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strenght and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metal-ceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99) and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C), according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464), with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  5. Nickel-silver alloy electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and oxidation in an alkaline electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Maureen H; Hahn, Christopher; Klobuchar, Aidan J; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Wellendorff, Jess; Bligaard, Thomas; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2014-09-28

    The development of improved catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in basic electrolytes remains a major technical obstacle to improved fuel cells, water electrolyzers, and other devices for electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Based on the free energy of adsorbed hydrogen intermediates, theory predicts that alloys of nickel and silver are active for these reactions. In this work, we synthesize binary nickel-silver bulk alloys across a range of compositions and show that nickel-silver alloys are indeed more active than pure nickel for hydrogen evolution and, possibly, hydrogen oxidation. To overcome the mutual insolubility of silver and nickel, we employ electron-beam physical vapor codeposition, a low-temperature synthetic route to metastable alloys. This method also produces flat and uniform films that facilitate the measurement of intrinsic catalytic activity with minimal variations in the surface area, ohmic contact, and pore transport. Rotating-disk-electrode measurements demonstrate that the hydrogen evolution activity per geometric area of the most active catalyst in this study, Ni0.75Ag0.25, is approximately twice that of pure nickel and has comparable stability and hydrogen oxidation activity. Our experimental results are supported by density functional theory calculations, which show that bulk alloying of Ni and Ag creates a variety of adsorption sites, some of which have near-optimal hydrogen binding energy.

  6. Electrochemical studies of copper, nickel and a Cu55/Ni45 alloy in aqueous sodium acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves Reinaldo Simões

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the electrochemical behavior of copper, nickel and a copper/nickel alloy in aerated aqueous 0.10 and 1.0 mol L-1 sodium acetate. The data obtained from different electrochemical techniques were analyzed to determine the influence of Ni and Cu on the electrochemical processes of the alloy electrode. The shapes of the potentiodynamic I(E curves of the alloy were found to be quite similar to those of the Ni voltamograms. Although the anodic current densities of Ni and the alloy increased with greater concentrations of acetate, the opposite effect occurred in Cu. The impedance measurements taken at the open circuit potential revealed that the polarization resistance (R P of the electrodes decreased in the following order: Ni > Alloy > Cu. With increasing concentrations of acetate, the R P of the alloy and the Cu increased while that of the Ni electrode decreased.

  7. TEM Study of High-Temperature Precipitation of Delta Phase in Inconel 718 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moukrane Dehmas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 is widely used because of its ability to retain strength at up to 650∘C for long periods of time through coherent metastable  Ni3Nb precipitation associated with a smaller volume fraction of  Ni3Al precipitates. At very long ageing times at service temperature,  decomposes to the stable Ni3Nb phase. This latter phase is also present above the  solvus and is used for grain control during forging of alloy 718. While most works available on precipitation have been performed at temperatures below the  solvus, it appeared of interest to also investigate the case where phase precipitates directly from the fcc matrix free of  precipitates. This was studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. TEM observations confirmed the presence of rotation-ordered domains in plates, and some unexpected contrast could be explained by double diffraction due to overlapping phases.

  8. High-Temperature Tensile Flow Behavior of Caliber-Rolled Mg-3Al-1Zn Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiphode, R. L.; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.; Prabhu, N.; Kashyap, B. P.

    2015-07-01

    Mg-3Al-1Zn (AZ31) alloy was caliber rolled isothermally in the temperature range of 523 K to 723 K (250 °C to 450 °C) to develop fine grains of 3 to 13 µm. Tensile tests by constant initial strain rate as well as differential strain rate test techniques were conducted over the temperature range of 493 K to 723 K (220 °C to 450 °C) and strain rate range of 10-5 to 10-1 s-1. Maximum tensile elongation of 182 pct was obtained at test temperature of 723 K (450 °C) and strain rate of 10-3 s-1 in the sample obtained from caliber rolling at 723 K (450 °C), in spite of its large grain size of 13 µm. The strain rate sensitivity index ` m' was found to vary from 0.08 to 0.33 and activation energy for deformation ` Q' varied from 30 to 185 kJ mol-1 depending on test condition and caliber-rolling condition. These variations in m and Q values are explained by the difference in prior grain size, texture, and twins developed as a function of caliber-rolling temperature, and further by the concomitant microstructural change occurring during tensile test itself. The presence of twins and orientation of grains influences the parameters of the constitutive relation to varying extent.

  9. Study of the microstructure evolution of zirconium alloy during deuterium absorption at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Yin; Liu, Jingru; You, Li; Song, Xiping

    2017-09-01

    In the exploration of fusion power, zirconium alloy has been viewed as a potential deuterium storage material to store and deliver deuterium fuel into fusion reactors, due to its large deuterium storage capacity, low deuterium desorption pressure and fast deuterium absorption kinetics. But it often cracks after deuterium absorption. In this study, the microstructure and deuterium absorption kinetic of β-Zr in various deuteriding conditions (pressure, time and temperature) were investigated. The results showed that, with the increase of deuteriding pressures from 1 bar to 3 bar at 1173 K, the deuteride content and the deuteride morphology changed significantly. During deuterium absorption at 3 bar, the surface deuteride layer was formed first, and then the inner deuteride network was gradually developed with the time. There existed an apparent deuterium concentration gradient from surface to center. With the increase of deuteriding temperatures from 973 K to 1173 K, the deuteride content decreased. The kinetic of deuterium absorption at 1173 K was found to be affected by the deuteriding pressures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results showed that ε deuterides nucleated and grew at the interface of δ deuterides, and small bands with different crystal orientation were found within the ε deuterides. The γ deuterides were found at 3 bar, within which twins and tweed structure were observed. An orientation relationship of δ//ε, {111}δ//{111}ε between δ and ε deuterides was also determined by TEM analysis.

  10. Phase Transformation and Shape Memory Effect of Ti-Pd-Pt-Zr High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko; Takebe, Wataru; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2017-11-01

    To understand the potential of high-temperature shape memory alloys, we have investigated the phase transformation and shape memory effect of Ti-(50 - x)Pt-xPd-5Zr alloys (x = 0, 5, and 15 at.%), which present the B2 structure in the austenite phase and B19 structure in the martensite phase. Their phase transformation temperatures are very high; A f and M f of Ti-50Pt are 1066 and 1012 °C, respectively. By adding Zr and Pd, the phase transition temperatures decrease, ranging between 804 and 994 °C for A f and 590 and 865 °C for M f. Even at the high phase transformation temperature, a maximum recovery ratio of 70% was obtained for one cycle in a thermal cyclic test. A work output of 1.2 J/cm3 was also obtained. The recovery ratio obtained by the thermal cyclic test was less than 70% because the recovery strain was < 1% and a large irrecoverable strain was obtained. The shape recovery was explained by the austenite strength. The training effect was also investigated.

  11. Transformation Temperatures, Shape Memory and Magnetic Properties of Hafnium Modified Ti-Ta Based High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, W. Q.; Wang, Q.; Jin, X.

    2017-02-01

    In this study the modification effect of Hf content on the shape memory properties and magnetic permeability of a 75.5-77Ti-20Ta-3-4.5Hf alloy system has been systematically studied by DSC, three-point bend test, vector network analyzer and XRD. The martensitic transformation temperature, heat of reaction and recovery strain increases with the increase of hafnium and tantalum content. A stable high temperature shape memory effect was observed (Ms = 385-390 °C) during the two thermal cycles between 20 °C and 725 °C. Transformation temperatures and heats of reaction were determined by DSC measurements. Recovery strain was determined by three-point bend testing. Also an alloy, 70Ti-26Ta-4Hf, with higher tantalum content was produced to observe the effect of Ta on the shape memory properties. Permeability increases gradually from 1.671 to 1.919 with increasing content of hafnium modification and remains stable in the frequency range of 450 MHz to 1 GHz.

  12. Phase Transformation and Shape Memory Effect of Ti-Pd-Pt-Zr High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko; Takebe, Wataru; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2017-12-01

    To understand the potential of high-temperature shape memory alloys, we have investigated the phase transformation and shape memory effect of Ti-(50 - x)Pt- xPd-5Zr alloys ( x = 0, 5, and 15 at.%), which present the B2 structure in the austenite phase and B19 structure in the martensite phase. Their phase transformation temperatures are very high; A f and M f of Ti-50Pt are 1066 and 1012 °C, respectively. By adding Zr and Pd, the phase transition temperatures decrease, ranging between 804 and 994 °C for A f and 590 and 865 °C for M f. Even at the high phase transformation temperature, a maximum recovery ratio of 70% was obtained for one cycle in a thermal cyclic test. A work output of 1.2 J/cm3 was also obtained. The recovery ratio obtained by the thermal cyclic test was less than 70% because the recovery strain was < 1% and a large irrecoverable strain was obtained. The shape recovery was explained by the austenite strength. The training effect was also investigated.

  13. Deformation and Phase Transformation Processes in Polycrystalline NiTi and NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benafan, Othmane

    2012-01-01

    The deformation and transformation mechanisms of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 and Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (in at.%) shape memory alloys were investigated by combined experimental and modeling efforts aided by an in situ neutron diffraction technique at stress and temperature. The thermomechanical response of the low temperature martensite, the high temperature austenite phases, and changes between these two states during thermomechanical cycling were probed and reported. In the cubic austenite phase, stress-induced martensite, deformation twinning and slip processes were observed which helped in constructing a deformation map that contained the limits over which each of the identified mechanisms was dominant. Deformation of the monoclinic martensitic phase was also investigated where the microstructural changes (texture, lattice strains, and phase fractions) during room-temperature deformation and subsequent thermal cycling were compared to the bulk macroscopic response. When cycling between these two phases, the evolution of inelastic strains, along with the shape setting procedures were examined and used for the optimization of the transformation properties as a function of deformation levels and temperatures. Finally, this work was extended to the development of multiaxial capabilities at elevated temperatures for the in situ neutron diffraction measurements of shape memory alloys on the VULCAN Diffractometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. Corrosion resistance of nickel-based alloys in salt and metal melts containing REE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A. V.; Karpov, V. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2017-09-01

    The corrosion resistance of Hastelloy G-35 and VDM® Alloy 625 nickel alloys was studied in a wide temperature range (750-1100 °C) in fused LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl-KCl, LiF mixtures containing REE. The rates and the mechanisms of the corrosion of the materials studied were determined. The processes taking place during the interaction between alloys and melts were investigated.

  15. A study on high temperature oxidation behavior of double glow plasma surface metallurgy Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer on Q235 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi-Xi; Yao, Zheng-Jun; Zhang, Ping-Ze; Miao, Qiang; Liang, Wen-Ping; Wei, Dong-Bo; Chen, Yu

    2014-06-01

    The high-temperature oxidation behavior of Q235 steel coated with Fe-Al-Cr by using double glow plasma surface metallurgy method was studied in air at different temperatures of 500, 600 and 700 °C, respectively. The Q235 and the 304 stainless steels were produced as the control samples. Electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry were carried out to investigate the surface morphologies, microstructures and phases of alloyed layer before and after oxidation. It showed that the structure of the Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer was compact without any microstructure defects. This alloyed layer connected with the substrate metal by metallurgical bonding. At the temperatures of 500 and 600 °C, the high temperature oxidation resistance of the Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer was similar to that of the 304 steel, but 2-3 times higher than that of the Q235 steel. While at 700 °C, the Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer exhibited much better oxidation resistance than that of the 304 steel (2.5 times) and the Q235 steel (5.5 times). And this was because the special Al distribution (approximate Gaussian distribution) in the Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer, which displayed the self-healing ability for the oxidation film on the surface of the Fe-Al-Cr alloyed layer in the high temperature oxidation conditions.

  16. MACHINING OF NICKEL BASED ALLOYS USING DIFFERENT CEMENTED CARBIDE TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BASIM A. KHIDHIR

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of experimental work in dry turning of nickel based alloys (Haynes – 276 using Deferent tool geometer of cemented carbide tools. The turning tests were conducted at three different cutting speeds (112, 152, 201and 269 m/min while feed rate and depth of cut were kept constant at 0.2 mm/rev and 1.5 mm, respectively. The tool holders used were SCLCR with insert CCMT-12 and CCLNR – M12-4 with insert CNGN-12. The influence of cutting speed, tool inserts type and workpiece material was investigated on the machined surface roughness. The worn parts of the cutting tools were also examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results showed that cutting speed significantly affected the machined surface finish values in related with the tool insert geometry. Insert type CCMT-12 showed better surface finish for cutting speed to 201 m/min, while insert type CNGN-12 surface roughness increased dramatically with increasing of speed to a limit completely damage of insert geometer beyond 152 m/min.

  17. High Temperature Dynamic Response of a Ti-6Al-4V Alloy: A Modified Constitutive Model for Gradual Phase Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangireddy, S.; Mates, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic deformation behavior of a commercial Ti-6Al-4V alloy is measured between room temperature and beyond the β-transus temperature with high thermal resolution using a rapid-heating Kolsky bar technique. The high thermal resolution allows for a thorough investigation of the dynamic thermal softening behavior of this alloy including effects related to the transformation from the initial hcp α/bcc β dual phase structure to a full β structure for improved modeling of high temperature dynamic manufacturing processes such as high-speed machining. Data are obtained at an average strain rate of 1800 s-1 from room temperature to 1177 °C, with total heating times limited to 3.5 s for all tests. Short heating times prevent thermal distortion of the Kolsky bar loading waves and can allow an investigation of non-equilibrium mechanical behavior, although no such behavior was identified in this study. Between 800 °C and 1000 °C, a progressive change in the thermal softening rate was observed that corresponded well with the equilibrium phase diagram for this alloy. The dynamic thermal softening behavior in the transformation region is incorporated via a new modification of the Johnson-Cook (J-C) viscoplastic constitutive equation. Rate sensitivity is determined at room temperature by combining Kolsky bar data with quasi-static measurements at strain rates from 7.5 × 10-5 s-1 to 0.16 s-1 and the data are fit using multi-parameter optimization to arrive at a full modified J-C model for Ti-6Al-4V to nearly 1200 °C. In its generic form, the modification factor we propose, G( T), is applicable to any material system undergoing gradual phase transformation over a range of temperatures.

  18. Development and Processing of Nickel Aluminide-Carbide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newport, Timothy Scott

    1996-01-01

    With the upper temperature limit of the Ni-based superalloys attained, a new class of materials is required. Intermetallics appear as likely candidates because of their attractive physical properties. With a relatively low density, high thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance, high melting point, and simple crystal structure, nickel aluminide (NiAl) appears to be a potential candidate. However, NiAl is limited in structural applications due to its low room temperature fracture toughness and poor elevated temperature strength. One approach to improving these properties has been through the application of eutectic composites. Researchers have shown that containerless directional solidification of NiAl-based eutectic alloys can provide improvement in both the creep strength and fracture toughness. Although these systems have shown improvements in the mechanical properties, the presence of refractory metals increases the density significantly in some alloys. Lower density systems, such as the carbides, nitrides, and borides, may provide NiAl-based eutectic structure. With little or no information available on these systems, experimental investigation is required. The objective of this research was to locate and develop NiAl-carbide eutectic alloys. Exploratory arc-melts were performed in NiAl-refractory metal-C systems. Refractory metal systems investigated included Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, and Zr. Systems containing carbides with excellent stability (i.e.,HfC, NbC, TaC, TiC, and ZrC) produced large blocky cubic carbides in an NiAl matrix. The carbides appeared to have formed in the liquid state and were randomly distributed throughout the polycrystalline NiAl. The Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, and W systems contained NiAl dendrites with a two-phase interdendritic microconstituent present. Of these systems, the NiAl-Mo-C system had the most promising microstructure for in-situ composites. Three processing techniques were used to evaluate the NiAl-Mo-C system

  19. Construction of a high-temperature viscosimeter and measurement of the viscosity of melts of the system aluminium-nickel; Aufbau eines Hochtemperaturviskosimeters und Messung der Viskositaet von Schmelzen des Systems Aluminium-Nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehr, Mirko

    2009-10-29

    The system aluminium-nickel is of importance as a model-system in materials science as well as a basic system for superalloys in technical applications. The knowledge of the thermophysical properties of the system aluminium-nickel has been limited to the areas close to the pure elements mainly related to the high melting temperatures of up to 1638 C. The viscosity, which is one of these thermophysical properties, depends on alloy composition as well as on temperature. The viscosity is of importance as an input parameter in computer simulations and for improving casting processes of metallic alloys. The viscosity of aluminium-nickel melts has been measured only once so far. However, not the whole concentration range of the aluminium-nickel system was covered by these data. In particular the viscosity values of the high melting alloys, which are of technological interest, were unknown. The measurement of the missing values was not possible due to the high melting temperatures using existing viscometers. A new oscillating cup viscometer has been constructed within this work. The viscometer has been tested measuring the viscosity values of pure metals, which are well known in literature. The test measurements have been done at temperatures up to 1800 C. A temperature of 2300 C is achievable with slight modifications. A new software for controlling the device and evaluation of the measured data has been developed. Several working equations for calculating the viscosity have been implemented. Furthermore a new approach has been used for detecting the damping of the oscillation of the pendulum containing the liquid sample. The viscosity of aluminium-nickel melts have been measured successfully. The measured values are in good agreement with the little number of known values. A good agreement with values calculated from diffusion experiments and computer simulations was observed as well. Several models for calculating the viscosity of liquid alloys have been tested and

  20. Cast Aluminum Alloys for High Temperature Applications Using Nanoparticles Al2O3 and Al3-X Compounds (X = Ti, V, Zr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of nanoparticles Al2O3 and Al3-X compounds (X = Ti, V, Zr) on the improvement of mechanical properties of aluminum alloys for elevated temperature applications is presented. These nanoparticles were selected based on their low cost, chemical stability and low diffusions rates in aluminum at high temperatures. The strengthening mechanism at high temperature for aluminum alloy is based on the mechanical blocking of dislocation movements by these nanoparticles. For Al2O3 nanoparticles, the test samples were prepared from special Al2O3 preforms, which were produced using ceramic injection molding process and then pressure infiltrated by molten aluminum. In another method, Al2O3 nanoparticles can also be homogeneously mixed with fine aluminum powder and consolidated into test samples through hot pressing and sintering. With the Al3-X nanoparticles, the test samples are produced as precipitates from in-situ reactions with molten aluminum using conventional permanent mold or die casting techniques. It is found that cast aluminum alloy using nanoparticles Al3-X is the most cost effective method to produce high strength aluminum alloys for high temperature applications in comparison to nanoparticles Al2O3. Furthermore, significant mechanical properties retention in high temperature environment could be achieved with Al3-X nanoparticles, resulting in tensile strength of nearly 3 times higher than most 300- series conventional cast aluminum alloys tested at 600 F.

  1. Brushing-induced surface roughness of nickel-, palladium-, and gold-based dental casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataha, John C; Lockwood, Petra E; Messer, Regina L W; Lewis, Jill B; Mettenburg, Donald J

    2008-06-01

    Alloys with high nickel content have been increasingly used for dental prostheses. These alloys have excellent hardness, elastic modulus, and strength, yet have high corrosion rates when exposed to chemical or physical forces that are common intraorally. The purpose of the current study was to measure the susceptibility of several types of nickel-based alloys to brushing abrasion relative to gold- and palladium-based alloys. Au-Pt, Au-Pd, Pd-Ag, Ni-Cr, and Ni-Cr-Be dental alloys were brushed with a toothbrush (Oral-B Soft) and toothpaste (Ultrabrite) in a linear brushing machine, then the surface roughness was measured by profilometry (R(a), R(v), R(p)). Specimens (n=4) were brushed for 48 hours in a saline solution (pH 7). The effect of brushing was determined using 2-sided t tests (alpha=.05), and roughness among alloys postbrushing was compared using 1-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc analyses (alpha=.05). All polished alloy surfaces (before brushing) had roughnesses of 1 microm (R(a)). Ni-Cr alloys without Be had a postbrushing surface roughness of 0.25 microm (R(a)). Postbrushing roughness of all other alloys ranged from 0.1-0.25 microm (R(a)). R(v) and R(p) values behaved similarly to R(a) values for all alloys. Although they have many excellent mechanical properties, Ni-Cr-Be alloys may be prone to degradation from brushing.

  2. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2004-01-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 degrees C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 degrees C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 degrees C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics.

  3. Effects of Electromagnetic Stirring on the Microstructure and High-Temperature Mechanical Properties of a Hyper-eutectic Al-Si-Cu-Ni Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Youngsoo; Choi, Byounghee; Kang, Byungkeun; Hong, Chun Pyo

    2015-02-01

    A liquid treatment method by electromagnetic stirring was applied to a hyper-eutectic Al-15wt pctSi-4wt pctCu-3wt pctNi alloy for the piston manufacturing with diecasting process in order to improve high-temperature mechanical properties of the piston heads. The mechanical properties, such as hardness, high-temperature tensile stress, thermal expansion, and high-temperature relative wear resistance, were estimated using the specimens taken from the liquid-treated diecast products, and the results were compared with those of a conventional metal-mold-cast piston.

  4. Effects of composite scale on high temperature oxidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni heat resistant alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Haitao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Fe-Cr-Ni heat resistant alloys with aluminum and silicon addition, alone and in combination, were melted using an intermediate frequency induction furnace with a non-oxidation method. By the oxidation weight gain method, the oxidation resistances of the test alloys were determined at 1,200 ìC for 500 hours. According to the oxidation weight gains, the oxidation kinetic curves were plotted and the functions were regressed by the least squares method. The results show that the oxidation kinetic curves follow the power function of y = axb (a>0, 0nickel. The protection of the composite scale is analyzed essentially by electrical conductivity and strength properties.

  5. Effects of Stoichiometry on Transformation Temperatures and Actuator-Type Performance of NiTiPd and NiTiPdX High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garg, Anita; Padula, Santo A., II; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature shape memory NiTiPd and NiTiPdX (X=Au, Pt, Hf) alloys were produced with titanium equivalent (Ti+Hf) compositions of 50.5, 50.0, 49.5, and 49.0 at.%. Thermo-mechanical testing in compression was used to evaluate the transformation temperatures, transformation strain, work output, and permanent deformation behavior of each alloy to study the effects of quaternary alloying and stoichiometry on high-temperature shape memory alloy behavior. Microstructural evaluation showed the presence of second phases for all alloy compositions. No load transformation temperatures in the stoichiometric alloys were relatively unchanged by Au and Pt substitutions, while the substitution of Hf for Ti causes a drop in transformation temperatures. The NiTiPd, NiTiPdAu and NiTiPdHf alloys exhibited transformation temperatures that were highest in the Ti-rich compositions, slightly lower at stoichiometry, and significantly reduced when the Ti equivalent composition was less than 50 at.%. For the NiTiPdPt alloy, transformation temperatures were highest for the Ti-rich compositions, lowest at stoichiometry, and slightly higher in the Ni-rich composition. When thermally cycled under constant stresses of up to 300 MPa, all of the alloys had transformation strains, and therefore work outputs, which increased with increasing stress. In each series of alloys, the transformation strain and thus work output was highest for stoichiometric or Ti-rich compositions while permanent strain associated with the constant-load thermal cycling was lowest for alloys with Ni-equivalent-rich compositions. Based on these results, basic rules for optimizing the composition of NiTiPd alloys for actuator performance will be discussed.

  6. Influence of Chromium and Molybdenum on the Corrosion of Nickel Based Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, J R; Gray, J; Szmodis, A W; Orme, C A

    2005-08-02

    The addition of chromium and molybdenum to nickel creates alloys with exceptional corrosion resistance in a diverse range of environments. This study examines the complementary roles of Cr and Mo in Ni alloy passivation. Four nickel alloys with varying amounts of chromium and molybdenum were studied in 1 molar salt solutions over a broad pH range. The passive corrosion and breakdown behavior of the alloys suggests that chromium is the primary element influencing general corrosion resistance. The breakdown potential was nearly independent of molybdenum content, while the repassivation potential is strongly dependant on the molybdenum content. This indicates that chromium plays a strong role in maintaining the passivity of the alloy, while molybdenum acts to stabilize the passive film after a localized breakdown event.

  7. Effect of alloying elements on the corrosion behaviour of copper-nickel alloys in a marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Abulmaali M. Y.

    Copper-nickel alloys have been used in many applications in marine environments, because of excellent corrosion and biofouling resistance. In this study, the effect of alloying elements (including iron, aluminum, chromium, cobalt, titanium, molybdenum, indium, and vanadium) on the corrosion behaviour of 90 w% copper-10 w% nickel alloys in sea water are investigated. Experiments were performed at 298 K on a commercial copper-nickel alloy C70600 to serve as a reference point for the synthetic alloys. New copper-nickel alloys were prepared in an induction furnace, in an argon/7% vol. hydrogen atmosphere in cylindrical boron nitride crucibles. They were then homogenized at 950°C for 10 hours in the same protective atmosphere. The electrochemical behaviour was investigated by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), cyclic polarization (CP), cyclic voltammetry (CV), Tafel extrapolation (TE) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion product that formed on the surface was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The electrochemical behaviour of commercial alloy C70600 depends on the amount of sulphate in the solution. Increasing the amount of sulphate to more than 400 ppm in the electrolyte limits the ability of the passive film to protect the alloy. The behaviour of the commercial alloy in sea water was similar to that in a 2260 ppm sulphate artificial saline solution but was not exactly the same. The passive film formed on the surface was uniform in thickness and consisted of more than one layer. The passive film consisted mainly of chlorides in solutions with no sulphate. The presence of sulphate in the corrosive solutions produces a passive layer containing mainly chlorides with some sulphides (FeS, NiS, and CuS). The electrochemical behaviour of the synthetic Cu-Ni-Fe alloys

  8. Study of the oxidation of Fe-Cr alloys at high temperatures; Estudo da oxidacao de ligas Fe-Cr a altas temperaturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, J.F.; Sabioni, A.C.S. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (LDM/DF/UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Difusao em Materiais; Trindade, V.B. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (DEMM/UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais; Ji, V. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Materiaux Hors-Equilibre (LEMHE), Orsay (France)

    2010-07-01

    The high temperature oxidation behavior of Fe-1.5%Cr, Fe-5.0%Cr, Fe-10%Cr and Fe- 15%Cr model alloys were investigated from 700 to 850 deg C, in air atmosphere. The oxidation treatments were performed in a thermobalance with a sensitivity of 1{mu}g. The oxide films grown by oxidation of the alloys were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The oxide films are Fe-Cr spinels with variable composition depending on the alloy composition. For all conditions studied, the oxidation kinetics of these alloys follow a parabolic law. The comparison of the oxidation rates of the four alloys, at 700 deg C, shows that the parabolic oxidation constants decrease from 1.96x10{sup -9}g{sup 2}.cm{sup -4}.s{sup -1}, for the alloy Fe-1.5% Cr, to 1.18 x 10-14g{sup 2}.cm{sup -4}.s{sup -1} for the alloy Fe-15% Cr. Comparative analysis of the oxidation behavior of the Fe-10%Cr and Fe-15%Cr alloys, between 700 and 850 deg C, shows that the oxidation rates of these alloys are comparable to 800 deg C, above this temperature the Fe-10%Cr alloy shows lower resistance to oxidation. (author)

  9. [Effects of Sol-Gel coating on the corrosion resistance of nickel-chronium alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhu, Zhi-Min; Liao, Yun-Mao

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effects of Sol-Gel coating on the corrosion resistance of nickel-chronium alloys in vitro. The bond strength of coating-substrate interface sintered at different temperatures (300, 400, 500, 600 degrees C) was tested by scratching method. The Sol-Gel coating was analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and its corrosion resistance was assessed by a static immersion method. The bond strength of coating-substrate interface reaches the peak at 400 degrees C. The Sol -Gel coating can apparently inhibit the release of metal ions and improve the corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium alloy. Sol-Gel coating can evidently improve corrosion resistance of the nickel-chromium alloy, which has great potential in prospective clinical practice.

  10. Spectrophotometric studies and applications for the determination of Ni²+ in zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xiaoping; Li, Helin; Zhao, Wenzhen; Li, Dejun

    2012-09-01

    The absorption properties of zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte were studied by visible spectrophotometer. The results show that the relationship between the absorbance of the zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte and Ni(2+) concentration in the electrolyte obeys Beer's law at 660 nm. In addition, other components except Ni(2+) in the zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte such as zinc chloride, ammonium chloride, potassium chloride and boric acid have no obvious effect on the absorbance of zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte. Based on these properties, a new method is developed to determine Ni(2+) concentration in zinc-nickel alloy electrolyte. Comparing with other methods, this method is simple, direct and accurate. Moreover, the whole testing process does not consume any reagent and dilution, and after testing, the electrolyte samples can be reused without any pollution to the environment. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An Investigation of the Mechanical Properties of a Weldment of 7% Nickel Alloy Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Yeol Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the demand for natural gas has steadily increased for the prevention of environmental pollution. For this reason, many liquefied natural gas (LNG carriers have been manufactured. Since one of the most important issues in the design of LNG carriers is to guarantee structural safety, the use of low-temperature materials is increasing. Among commonly employed low-temperature materials, nickel steel has many benefits such as good strength and outstanding corrosion resistance. Accordingly, nickel steels are one of the most commonly used low-temperature steels for LNG storage tanks. However, the study of fracture toughness with various welding consumables of 7% nickel alloy steel is insufficient for ensuring the structural safety of LNG storage tanks. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate fracture toughness of several different weldments for 7% nickel alloy steels. The weldment of 7% nickel alloy steel was fabricated by tungsten inert gas (TIG, flux cored arc welding (FCAW, and gas metal arc welding (GMAW. In order to assess the material performance of the weldments at low temperature, fracture toughness such as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD and the absorbed impact energy of weldments were compared with those of 9% nickel steel weldments.

  12. Regenerability of hydrotalcite-derived nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles for syngas production from biomass tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dalin; Koike, Mitsuru; Wang, Lei; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Xu, Ya; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2014-02-01

    Nickel-iron/magnesium/aluminum bimetallic catalysts were prepared by the calcination and reduction of nickel-magnesium-iron-aluminum hydrotalcite-like compounds. Characterization suggests that, at iron/nickel≤0.5, both nickel and iron species are homogeneously distributed in the hydrotalcite precursor and incorporated into the Mg(Ni, Fe, Al)O periclase after calcination, giving rise to uniform nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles after reduction. Ni-Fe/Mg/Al (Fe/Ni=0.25) exhibits the best catalytic performance for the steam reforming of tar derived from the pyrolysis of biomass. It is suggested that the uniform nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles and the synergy between nickel and iron are responsible for the high catalytic performance. Moreover, the Ni-Fe/Mg/Al catalyst exhibits much better regenerability toward oxidation-reduction treatment for the removal of deposited coke than that of conventional Ni-Fe/α-Al2 O3 . This property can be attributed to the better regeneration of Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles through the formation and reduction of Mg(Ni, Fe, Al)O. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. In vivo aging of orthodontic alloys: implications for corrosion potential, nickel release, and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliades, Theodore; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2002-06-01

    Despite the large number of studies investigating nickel release from orthodontic stainless steel and nickel-titanium alloys, there is a lack of conclusive evidence with respect to the composition and kinetics of the corrosive products released. The objective of this review is to address the critical issues of corrosion potential and nickel leaching from alloys by investigating the effect of intraoral conditions on the surface reactivity of the materials. After an overview of fundamentals of metallurgical structure of orthodontic alloys, we provide an analysis of corrosion processes occurring in vivo. We present recent evidence suggesting the formation of a proteinaceous biofilm on retrieved orthodontic materials that later undergoes calcification. We illustrate the vastly irrelevant surface structure of in vivo- vs in vitro-aged alloys and discuss the potential implications of this pattern in the reactivity of the materials. Finally, we present a comprehensive review of the issue of nickel release, based on three perspectives: its biologic effects, the methods used for studying its release, and nickel-induced hypersensitivity in orthodontic patients.

  14. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyutina, Yu. N.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Anisimov, A. G.; Shevtsova, L. I.

    2015-10-01

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  15. Initial deposition mechanism of electroless nickel plating on AZ91D magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y.; Shan, D.; Han, E. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Environmental Corrosion Center, Inst. of Metal Research, Shenyang (China)

    2006-04-15

    The pretreatment processes and initial deposition mechanism of electroless nickel plating on AZ91D magnesium alloy were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The results showed that alkaline cleaning could remove the greases and oils from the substrate surface. Acid etching could wipe off the metal chippings and oxides. The hydrofluoric acid activating process which could improve the adhesion of coating to substrate played a key role in the subsequent process of electroless nickel plating. The nickel coating was deposited preferentially on the primary {alpha} phase and then spread to the eutectic {alpha} phase and {beta} phase. The nickel initially nucleated on the primary {alpha} phase by a replacement reaction, then grew depending on the autocatalysis function of nickel. The coating on the {beta} phase displayed better adhesion than that on the {alpha} phase due to the nails fixing effect. (author)

  16. Formation of alloys in Ti-V system in hydride cycle and synthesis of their hydrides in self-propagating high-temperature synthesis regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksanyan, A.G., E-mail: a.g.aleks_yan@mail.ru [A.B. Nalbandyan Institute of Chemical Physics of Armenian NAS, 5/2 P.Sevak Str., Yerevan 0014 (Armenia); Dolukhanyan, S.K. [A.B. Nalbandyan Institute of Chemical Physics of Armenian NAS, 5/2 P.Sevak Str., Yerevan 0014 (Armenia); Shekhtman, V.Sh. [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow District 142432 (Russian Federation); Huot, J., E-mail: jacques_huot@uqtr.ca [Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres (Canada); Ter-Galstyan, O.P.; Mnatsakanyan, N.L. [A.B. Nalbandyan Institute of Chemical Physics of Armenian NAS, 5/2 P.Sevak Str., Yerevan 0014 (Armenia)

    2011-09-15

    Research highlights: > We synthesize Ti-V alloys by new 'hydride cycle' method. Structural characteristics of formed alloys we investigate by X-ray diffraction. > We show that the alloys contain mainly BCC crystal structure. > We investigate the interaction of the synthesized alloys with hydrogen in combustion regime. > We study the properties of hydrides by X-ray, DTA and DSC analyses. - Abstract: In the present work, the possibility of formation of titanium and vanadium based alloys of BCC structure using hydride cycle was investigated. The mechanism of formation of alloys in Ti-V system from the powders of hydrides TiH{sub 2} and VH{sub 0.9} (or of V) by compaction followed by dehydrogenation was studied. Then, the interaction of the synthesized alloys with hydrogen in combustion regime (self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, SHS) resulting in hydrides of these alloys was investigated. DTA and DSC analyses of some alloys and their hydrides were performed and their thermal characteristics were measured.

  17. Nickel, cobalt and titanium-based alloys – from aircraft vehicles to medical applications - REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Milan Jovanović

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of nickel, cobalt and titanium-based alloys in the early 1950s, these materials in a relatively short time became backbone materials for the aerospace, energy, chemical industry and even medicine. The combination of excellent mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and bio-compatibility renders these alloys the best material choice for many critical applications. This review describes the results realized through the research in the Department of Materials Science i...

  18. Properties of experimental copper-aluminium-nickel alloys for dental post-and-core applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittapai, Apiwat; Urapepon, Somchai; Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep; Harniratisai, Choltacha

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to develop a copper-aluminium-nickel alloy which has properties comparable to that of dental alloys used for dental post and core applications with the reasonable cost. Sixteen groups of experimental copper alloys with variants of 3, 6, 9, 12 wt% Al and 0, 2, 4, 6 wt% Ni were prepared and casted. Their properties were tested and evaluated. The data of thermal, physical, and mechanical properties were analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The alloy toxicity was evaluated according to the ISO standard. The solidus and liquidus points of experimental alloys ranged from 1023℃ to 1113℃ and increased as the nickel content increased. The highest ultimate tensile strength (595.9 ± 14.2 MPa) was shown in the Cu-12Al-4Ni alloy. The tensile strength was increased as the both elements increased. Alloys with 3-6 wt% Al exhibited a small amount of 0.2% proof strength. Accordingly, the Cu-9Al-2Ni and Cu-9Al-4Ni alloys not only demonstrated an appropriate modulus of elasticity (113.9 ± 8.0 and 122.8 ± 11.3 GPa, respectively), but also had a value of 0.2% proof strength (190.8 ± 4.8 and 198.2 ± 3.4 MPa, respectively), which complied with the ISO standard requirement (>180 MPa). Alloys with the highest contents of nickel (6 wt% Ni) revealed a widespread decolourisation zone (5.0-5.9 mm), which correspondingly produced the largest cell response, equating positive control. The copper alloys fused with 9 wt% Al and 2-4 wt% Ni can be considered for a potential use as dental post and core applications.

  19. Effective and Environmentally Friendly Nickel Coating on the Magnesium Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana Škugor Rončević; Mirjana Metikoš-Huković; Marijo Buzuk; Nives Vladislavić

    2016-01-01

    The low density and good mechanical properties make magnesium and its alloys attractive construction materials in the electronics, automotive, and aerospace industry, together with application in medicine due to their biocompatibility. Magnesium AZ91D alloy is an alloy with a high content of aluminum, whose mechanical properties overshadow the low corrosion resistance caused by the composition of the alloy and the existence of two phases: α magnesium matrix and β magnesium aluminum intermetal...

  20. Effect of Nickel Content on the Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Nickel Alloys in Concentrated Hydrochloric Acid Pickling Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel Alharthi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Ni content on the resistance against corrosion of Fe-36% Ni and Fe-45% Ni alloys in 1 M hydrochloric acid pickling solution was reported. Various electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques such as potentiodynamic cyclic polarization (CPP, open-circuit potential (OCP, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, potentiostatic current-time (PCT, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS have been employed. CPP measurements indicated that the corrosion current and corrosion rate recorded lower values for the alloy that had higher nickel content. OCP curves proved that the presence of high Ni content shifts the absolute potential to the positive potential direction. EIS results revealed that the surface and polarization resistances were much higher for the alloy with higher Ni content. PCT curves also showed that the absolute currents were lower for Fe-45% Ni alloy. All results were in good agreement with others and confirmed clearly that the corrosion resistance in HCl solutions for Fe-45% Ni alloy was higher than that obtained for Fe-45% Ni alloy.

  1. DC Electric Arc Furnace Application for Production of Nickel-Boron Master Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Murat; Tasyürek, Kerem Can; Bugdayci, Mehmet; Turan, Ahmet; Yücel, Onuralp

    2017-09-01

    In this study, nickel-boron (Ni-B) alloys were produced via a carbothermic reduction starting from boric acid (H3BO3) with high-purity nickel oxide (NiO), charcoal, and wood chips in a direct current arc furnace. In electric arc furnace experiments, different starting mixtures were used, and their effects on the chemical compositions of the final Ni-B alloys were investigated. After the reduction and melting stages, Ni-B alloys were obtained by tapping from the bottom of the furnace. The samples from the designated areas were also taken and analyzed. The chemical composition of the final alloys and selected samples were measured with wet chemical analysis. The Ni-B alloys had a composition of up to 14.82 mass% B. The phase contents of the final alloys and selected samples were measured using x-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD data helped predict possible reactions and reaction mechanisms. The material and energy balance calculations were made via the XRD Rietveld and chemical compositions. Nickel boride phases started to form 600 mm below the surface. The targeted NiB phase was detected at the tapping zone of the crucible (850-900 mm depth). The energy consumption was 1.84-4.29 kWh/kg, and the electrode consumption was 10-12 g/kg of raw material charged.

  2. Assessment of special stainless steels and nickel-base alloys for use under offshore conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasner, M.R. [Krupp VDM GmbH, Duisburg (Germany); Herda, W.R. [Krupp VDM GmbH, Werdohl (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    Major offshore installations are designed for a 25-years` life span and more. To predict the corrosion behavior of various alloys for such a long period results from accelerated laboratory tests have to be verified by suitable field tests. The results from laboratory tests and exposure to natural seawater show that nickel-based alloys such as alloy 59 (UNS N06059) and alloy 31 (UNS N08031) can be employed to most severe conditions. For general applications 6Mo stainless steels with 25% Ni such as alloy 926 (UNS N08926) may be used. If higher strength is required alloy 24 (18 Ni-24.5 Cr-6.2 Mn-4.3 Mo-0.6 Cu-0.45 Mn) is the preferred material.

  3. High gas velocity oxidation and hot corrosion testing of oxide dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) nickel-base alloys were tested in high velocity gases for cyclic oxidation resistance at temperatures to 1200 C and times to 500 hours and for hot corrosion resistance at 900 C for 200 hours. Nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS alloys were found to have superior resistance to oxidation and hot corrosion when compared to bare and coated nickel-chromium ODS alloys. The best of the alloys tested had compositions of nickel - 15.5 to 16 weight percent chromium with aluminum weight percents between 4.5 and 5.0. All of the nickel-chromium-aluminum ODS materials experienced small weight losses (less than 16 mg/sq cm).

  4. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  5. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, copper, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  6. Microstructure evolution and its influence on deformation mechanisms during high temperature creep of a nickel base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Javad [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Shahid Chamran University, Ahwaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: javadsafari@yahoo.com; Nategh, Saeed [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: nategh@sharif.edu

    2009-01-15

    The interaction of dislocation with strengthening particles, including primary and secondary {gamma}', during different stages of creep of Rene-80 was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). During creep of the alloy at 871 deg. C under stress of 290 MPa, the dislocation network was formed during the early stages of creep, and the dislocation glide and climb process were the predominant mechanism of deformation. The density of dislocation network became more populated during the later stages of the creep, and at the latest stage of the creep, primary particles shearing were observed alongside with the dislocation glide and climb. Shearing of {gamma}' particles in creep at 871 deg. C under stress of 475 MPa was commenced at the earlier creep times and governed the creep deformation mechanism. In two levels of examined stresses, as far as the creep deformation was controlled by glide and climb, creep curves were found to be at the second stage of creep and commence of the tertiary creep, with increasing creep rate, were found to be in coincidence with the particles shearing. Microstructure evolution, with regard to {gamma}' strengthening particles, led to particles growth and promoted activation of other deformation mechanisms such as dislocation bypassing by orowan loop formation. Dislocation-secondary {gamma}' particles interaction was detected to be the glide and climb at the early stages of creep, while at the later stages, the dislocation bypassed the secondary precipitation by means of orowan loops formation, as the secondary particle were grown and the mean inter-particle distance increased.

  7. Mechanodynamical analysis of nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application; Analise mecanodinamica de ligas de niquel-titanio para aplicacao ortodontica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda, Carlos do Canto

    2002-07-01

    Nickel-titanium alloys may coexist in more than one crystalline structure. There is a high temperature phase, austenite, and a low temperature phase, martensite. The metallurgical basis for the superelasticity and the shape memory effect relies in the ability of these alloys to transform easily from one phase to another. There are three essential factors for the orthodontist to understand nickel-titanium alloys behaviour: stress; deflection; and temperature. These three factors are related to each other by the stress-deflection, stress-temperature and deflection-temperature diagrams. This work was undertaken with the objective to analyse commercial nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application, using the dynamical mechanical analyser - DMA. Four NiTi 0,017 X 0,025'' archwires were studied. The archwires were Copper NiTi 35 deg C (Ormco), Neo Sentalloy F200 (GAC), Nitinol Superelastic (Unitek) and NiTi (GAC). The different mechanodynamical properties such as elasticity and damping moduli were evaluated. Each commercial material was evaluated with and without a 1 N static force, aiming to evaluate phase transition temperature variation with stress. The austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, for the experiments without static force, was in the range of 1.59 to 1.85. For the 1 N static force tests the austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, ranged from 1.28 to 1.57 due to the higher martensite elasticity modulus. With elastic modulus variation with temperature behaviour, the orthodontist has the knowledge of the force variation applied in the tooth in relation to the oral cavity temperature change, for nickel-titanium alloys that undergo phase transformation. The damping capacity of the studied alloys depends on the materials state: martensitic phase; austenitic phase or during phase transformation. The martensitic phase shows higher dumping capacity. During phase transformation, an internal friction peak may be observed for the CuNiTi 35 deg C and Neo

  8. Cytotoxic, allergic and genotoxic activity of a nickel-titanium alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, AG; Sanders, MM; Schakenraad, JM; vanHorn, [No Value

    The nearly equiatomic nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy is known for its shape memory properties. These properties can be put to excellent use in various biomedical applications, such as wires for orthodontic tooth alignment and osteosynthesis staples. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term

  9. Determination of Trace Elements in Nickel Base Alloys by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An investigation is described to ascertain whether or not atomic absorption spectrophotometry could be used to determine the concentration of trace ... elements such as silver (Ag), bismuth (Bi), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), phosphorus (P), and arsenic (As) in nickel alloys such as Udimet 500 without interference of other constituent elements. (Author)

  10. Effects of surface finishing conditions on the biocompatibility of a nickel-chromium dental casting alloy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, Emma Louise

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effects of surface finishing condition (polished or alumina particle air abraded) on the biocompatibility of direct and indirect exposure to a nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) d.Sign®10 dental casting alloy on oral keratinocytes. Biocompatibility was performed by assessing cellular viability and morphology, metabolic activity, cellular toxicity and presence of inflammatory cytokine markers.

  11. Nickel-free Fe-12Mn-0.2Ti alloy steel for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S.; Jin, S.; Morris, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A nickel-free Fe-12Mn-0.2Ti alloy steel was investigated for cryogenic applications. The systematic control of the grain size and the microstructural distribution of the retained gamma phase was made through alpha plus gamma heat treatments in combination with mechanical working. Substantial improvements of important low temperature mechanical properties were obtained by these processings.

  12. Separating the strengthening phase in nickel-cobalt alloys doped with tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaipov, R. Kh.; Kerimov, E. Yu.; Slyusarenko, E. M.

    2017-02-01

    The hardness values of monophasic (fcc solid solution) and biphasic (fcc solid solution and separated phase) nickel-cobalt alloys doped with tantalum are determined using the Vickers method. Based on the resulting data, a composition-structure-hardness diagram is devised for the Co-Ni-Ta system.

  13. Study made of corrosion resistance of stainless steel and nickel alloys in nuclear reactor superheaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, S.; Hart, R. K.; Lee, R. H.; Ruther, W. E.; Schlueter, R. R.

    1967-01-01

    Experiments performed under conditions found in nuclear reactor superheaters determine the corrosion rate of stainless steel and nickel alloys used in them. Electropolishing was the primary surface treatment before the corrosion test. Corrosion is determined by weight loss of specimens after defilming.

  14. Carbon induced metal dusting of iron-nickel-chromium alloy surfaces : a scanning auger microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G; DeHosson, JTM

    2004-01-01

    In this work, we present an investigation on metal dusting of iron-nickel-chromium (Fe-Ni-Cr) alloy surfaces using scanning auger microscopy. It is shown that the formation of surface Cr-oxide and the surface finish condition can strongly influence and interrupt this catastrophic phenomenon. The

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Amorphous Nickel-Valve Metal Alloys in Boiling Concentrated Nitric and Hydrochloric Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuo, SHIMAMURA; Asahi, Kawashima; Katsuhiko, Asami; Koji, Hashimoto; Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding Co., Ltd.; The Research Institute for Iron, Steel and Other Metals

    1986-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of amorphous nickel-base alloys containing titanium, zirconium, niobium, tantalum and/or phosphorus in boiling 9 N HNO_3 solutions with and without Cr^ ion and in a boiling 6 N HCl solution was investigated. In boiling 9 N HNO_3 solutions alloys containing 20 at% or more tantalum were immune to corrosion, maintaining the metallic luster, and Ni-40~60Nb alloys showed low corrosion rates of the order of μm/year. In the boiling 6 N HCl solution only tantalum-containing all...

  16. Corrosion Behavior of Amorphous Nickel-Valve Metal Alloys in Boiling Concentrated Nitric and Hydrochloric Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Shimamura, Kazuo; Kawashima, Asahi; ASAMI, Katsuhiko; Hashimoto, Koji

    1986-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of amorphous nickel-base alloys containing titanium, zirconium, niobium, tantalum and/or phosphorus in boiling 9 N HNO_3 solutions with and without Cr^ ion and in a boiling 6 N HCl solution was investigated. In boiling 9 N HNO_3 solutions alloys containing 20 at% or more tantalum were immune to corrosion, maintaining the metallic luster, and Ni-40?60Nb alloys showed low corrosion rates of the order of μm/year. In the boiling 6 N HCl solution only tantalum-containing all...

  17. Crystallographic Orientation Dependence of Corrosion Behavior of a Single Crystal Nickel-Based Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L. N.; Ojo, O. A.

    2018-01-01

    Crystallographic orientation dependence of corrosion behavior of a nickel-based single crystal alloy IN738 was studied. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy show that corrosion performance of the single crystal alloy varies with crystallographic orientation. The dependence of passivation behavior on crystallographic orientation is influenced by environmental concentration. Potentiostatic polarization, scanning probe microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were performed to understand the variation in passivation of different crystallographic orientations. The crystallographic orientation dependence of corrosion performance of the alloy can be explained by the difference of passive films in terms of chemical compositions, compactness, and porosity properties, as well as surface roughness.

  18. Alloy by design : A materials genome approach to advanced high strength stainless steels for low and high temperature applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Q.; Xu, W.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report a computational 'alloy by design' approach which can significantly accelerate the design process and substantially reduce the development costs. This approach allows simultaneously optimization of alloy composition and heat treatment parameters based on the integration of thermodynamic,

  19. Structural evaluation of a nickel base super alloy metal foam via NDE and finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Abumeri, G.; Garg, Mohit; Young, P. G.

    2008-03-01

    Cellular materials are known to be useful in the application of designing light but stiff structures. This applies to various components used in various industries such as rotorcraft blades, car bodies or portable electronic devices. Structural application of the metal foam is typically confined to light weight sandwich panels, made up of thin solid face sheets and a metallic foam core. The resulting high-stiffness structure is lighter than that constructed only out of the solid metal material. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads and the role of the foam core is separate the face sheets to carry some of the shear stresses, while remaining integral with the face sheet. Many challenges relating to the fabrication and testing of these metal foam panels continue to exist due to some mechanical properties falling short of their theoretical potential. Hence in this study, a detailed three dimensional foam structure is generated using series of 2D Computer Tomography (CT) scans, on Haynes 25 metal foam. Series of the 2D images are utilized to construct a high precision solid model including all the fine details within the metal foam as detected by the CT scanning technique. Subsequently, a finite element analysis is then performed on an as fabricated metal foam microstructures to evaluate the foam structural durability and behavior under tensile and compressive loading conditions. The analysis includes a progressive failure analysis (PFA) using GENOA code to further assess the damage initiation, propagation, and failure. The open cell metal foam material is a cobalt-nickel-chromium-tungsten alloy that combines excellent high-temperature strength with good resistance to oxidizing environments up to 1800 °F (980 °C) for prolonged exposures. The foam is formed by a powder metallurgy process with an approximate 100 pores per inch (PPI).

  20. An invitro analysis of elemental release and cytotoxicity of recast nickel-chromium dental casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Nagam Raja; Abraham, Anandapandian Ponsekar; Murugesan, Krishnan; Matsa, Vasanthakumar

    2011-06-01

    Recasting of the casting alloys affects the composition and elemental release which may have cytotoxic effect different from the pure alloy in the surrounding tissues. An Invitro study was conducted to investigate the elemental release and their cytotoxic effects from commercially available Ni-Cr dental casting alloys, commonly used for fabricating fixed partial dentures. Three Ni-Cr alloys [Wiron 99(A), Ceramet (B), and Hi Nickel CB (C)] were tested. Alloy specimens (disks 3 × 5 mm) were casted and grouped as follows: Group I (A(1)/B(1)/C(1)): 100% pure alloy; Group II (A(2)/B(2)/C(2)): 50% new with 50% recast; and Group III (A(3)/B(3)/C(3)): 100% recast. Disks of each alloy type from each group were transferred to Dulbecco's modified eagle medium and left for 3 days at 37°C in an atmosphere of 5% CO(2). Ni, Cr, Co, Cu and Mo elemental release from metal alloys into culture medium was investigated using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Cytotoxicity was tested using mouse fibroblast cells and MTT Assay. Controls consisted of 6 wells containing cells with no alloy specimens. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance followed by t-test. The total amount of elements released in parts per billion for various casting groups were Group I, A(1)-6.572, B(1)-6.732, C(1)-8.407; Group II, A(2)-22.046, B(2)-26.450, C(2)-29.189; Group III, A(3)-84.554, B(3)-88.359, C(3)-92.264. More amounts of elements were released in Hi Nickel CB than Ceramet and Wiron 99 in all the three test groups. Percentage of viable cells from MTT analysis were Group I, A(1)-62.342, B(1)-61.322 C(1)-60.593, Group II, A(2)-58.699, B(2)-56.494, C(2)-52.688, Group III, A(3)-53.101, B(3)-52.195, C(3)-47.586. The viable cells present in the culture media were more in Wiron 99 than Ceramet and Hi Nickel CB. Elemental release increased with amount of recast alloy. Amongst the three alloys tested Hi Nickel CB had significantly higher elements released compared to Ceramet and Wiron 99

  1. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

  2. In situ corrosion testing of various nickel alloys at Måbjerg waste incineration plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Hansson, A. N.; Jensen, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of waste in Denmark is disposed via waste to energy (WTE) incineration plants which are fabricated from carbon steel. However, due to the increasing corrosiveness of waste over the years, more corrosion resistant alloys are required. In Denmark, Inconel 625 (UNSN06625) is the weld...... overlay material currently being used to give improved corrosion resistance. In order to assess the use of alternative nickel alloys, test panels have been manufactured and inserted into Måbjerg waste incineration plant. Inconel 625 as a 50% weld overlay, two layered weld overlay and as a spiral weld....... The composition of the deposits from the exposed waterwall panels was also analysed each time sections were removed. This paper will compare the various nickel alloys in the two areas and assess the results of the long‐term testing project....

  3. The effect of nickel addition on antimicrobial, physical, and mechanical properties of copper-nickel alloy against suspensions of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhayani, Dinni; Korda, Akhmad A.

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection can cause serious illness. Humans can be infected by E. coli via contact with the contaminated food and water. Copper and copper alloys were known for their antimicrobial properties and were applied in several healthcare setting as antimicrobial material. However, the people preference in the appearance of stainless steel and aluminum contribute to the low application of copper and its alloy. In this study, the mechanical, physical, and antibacterial properties of copper and copper-nickel alloy compared with stainless steel 304 were tested. The antibacterial activity of stainless steel, copper, and copper-nickel alloy was evaluated by inoculating 7.5 × 106 - 2.5 × 107 CFU/ml suspensions of E. coli. The bacterial colonies were investigated after 0-4 hour incubation at 37°C. The result showed that on the observation time, copper and copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloys have antibacterial activity while the bacteria in stainless steel remain existed. The appearance (color / shade) of Cu-Ni alloys in some composition is silvery which is stainless steel-like. For the mechanical properties, copper-nickel alloys have lower hardness than stainless steel (SS 304). This research proved that copper-nickel alloys have the ability to reduce the amount of E. col colonies. The copper content may affect the antibacterial activity but not directly linked. Cu-Ni alloys also have the appearance and mechanical properties that quite similar compared to SS304. Therefore, Cu-Ni alloys have the potential to be applied as substitution or complementary material of SS304 in various applications for preventing the bacterial contamination especially E. coli.

  4. Characterization of stress corrosion cracks in Ni-based weld alloys 52, 52M and 152 grown in high-temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yi [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wu, Yaqiao; Burns, Jatuporn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Zhang, Jinsuo, E-mail: zhang.3558@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Ni-based weld alloys 52, 52M and 152 are extensively used in repair and mitigation of primary water stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nuclear power plants. In the present study, a series of microstructure and microchemistry at the SCC tips of these alloys were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). The specimens have similar chemical compositions and testing conditions. Intergranular (IG) and transgranular (TG) SCC was observed in all of them. The cracks were filled with nickel-oxides and partial precipitations of chrome carbides (CrCs), niobium carbides (NbCs), titanium nitrides (TiNs) and silicon carbides (SiCs), while iron (Fe) was largely dissolved into the solution. However, the crack densities, lengths and distributions were different for all three specimens. - Highlights: • Microstructure and microchemistry at the SCC tips of Ni-based weld alloys 52, 52M and 152 were examined. • The crack densities, lengths and distributions were found to be different for different alloys. • IGSCC and TGSCC were observed on alloy 52, only TGSCC was observed on alloy 52M and 152. • The cracks were filled by Ni-oxides and precipitated CrCs, NbCs, TiNs and SiCs.

  5. Noncontact measurement of high-temperature surface tension and viscosity of bulk metallic glass-forming alloys using the drop oscillation technique

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, S.; Johnson, W. L.; Rhim, W. K.

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature surface tension and viscosities for five bulk metallic glass-forming alloys with widely different glass-forming abilities are measured. The measurements are carried out in a high-vacuum electrostatic levitator using the drop oscillation technique. The surface tension follows proportional mathematical addition of pure components' surface tension except when some of the constituent elements have much lower surface tension. In such cases, there is surface segregation of the low ...

  6. The properties and transport phenomena in oxide films on iron, nickel, chromium and their alloys in aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, T.; Bojinov, M.; Betova, I.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-01-01

    The construction materials used in coolant systems in nuclear power plants become covered with oxide films as a result of exposure to the aqueous environment. The susceptibility of the materials to different forms of corrosion, as well as the extent of the incorporation of radioactive species on the surfaces of the primary circuit, are greatly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of these oxide films. The composition and characteristics of the oxide films in turn depend on the applied water chemistry. This work was undertaken in order to collect and evaluate the present views on the structure and behaviour of oxide films formed on iron- and nickel-based materials in aqueous environments. This survey should serve to recognise the areas in which more understanding and research effort is needed. The review begins with a discussion on the bulk oxides of iron, nickel and chromium, as well as their mixed oxides. In addition to bulk oxides, the structure and properties of oxide films forming on pure iron, nickel and chromium and on iron- and nickel-based engineering alloys are considered. General approaches to model the structure and growth of oxide films on metals are discussed in detail. The specific features of the oxide structures, properties and growth at high temperatures are presented with special focus on the relevance of existing models. Finally, the role of oxide films in localised corrosion, oxide breakdown pitting. Stress corrosion cracking and related phenomena is considered. The films formed on the surfaces of iron- and nickel-based alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments generally comprise two layers, i.e. the so-called duplex structure. The inner part is normally enriched in chromium and has a more compact structure, while the outer part is enriched in iron and has a cracked or porous structure. The information collected clearly indicates the effect of the chemical environment on the properties of oxide films growing on metal surfaces

  7. Specification and qualification of welding procedures for metallic materials : welding procedure test : part 1 : arc and gas welding of steels and arc welding of nickel and nickel alloys : technical corrigendum 1

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    Specification and qualification of welding procedures for metallic materials : welding procedure test : part 1 : arc and gas welding of steels and arc welding of nickel and nickel alloys : technical corrigendum 1

  8. The Effect of Sb Addition on Sn-Based Alloys for High-Temperature Lead-Free Solders: an Investigation of the Ag-Sb-Sn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Delsante, S.; Watson, A.; Borzone, G.

    2012-01-01

    Today there is renewed interest in alloys belonging to the Sb-Sn-X (X = Cu, Ag, Bi) ternary systems and their phase equilibria, phase transformations, and thermodynamic properties because of their possible use as high-temperature lead-free solders in the electronics industry. The integral mixing enthalpy of Ag-Sb-Sn liquid alloys has been measured along five different sections (Ag0.25Sn0.75, Ag0.50Sn0.50, Sb0.30Sn0.70, Sb0.50Sn0.50, and Sb0.70Sn0.30) at 530°C, 600°C, and 630°C, using a high-temperature Calvet calorimeter by dropping pure elements (Ag or Sb) in the binary alloy liquid bath. The ternary extrapolation models of Muggianu and Toop were used to calculate the integral enthalpy of mixing and to compare measured and extrapolated values. Selected ternary alloys have been prepared for thermal investigation by using a differential scanning calorimeter at different heating/cooling rates in order to clarify the temperature of the invariant reactions and the crystallization path.

  9. Effect of dry cryogenic treatment on Vickers hardness and wear resistance of new martensitic shape memory nickel-titanium alloy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vinothkumar, Thilla Sekar; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Prabhakaran, Gopalakrishnan; Rajadurai, Arunachalam

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of dry cryogenic treatment (CT) temperature and time on the Vickers hardness and wear resistance of new martensitic shape memory (SM) nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy...

  10. Influence of Chemical Composition on Rupture Properties at 1200 Degrees F. of Forged Chromium-Cobalt-Nickel-Iron Base Alloys in Solution-Treated and Aged Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, E E; Freeman, J W; White, A E

    1951-01-01

    The influence of systematic variations of chemical composition on rupture properties at 1200 degrees F. was determined for 62 modifications of a basic alloy containing 20 percent chromium, 20 percent nickel, 20 percent cobalt, 3 percent molybdenum, 2 percent tungsten, 1 percent columbium, 0.15 percent carbon, 1.7 percent manganese, 0.5 percent silicon, 0.12 percent nitrogen and the balance iron. These modifications included individual variations of each of 10 elements present and simultaneous variations of molybdenum, tungsten, and columbium. Laboratory induction furnace heats were hot-forged to round bar stock, solution-treated at 2200 degrees F., and aged at 1400 degrees F. The melting and fabrication conditions were carefully controlled in order to minimize all variable effects on properties except chemical composition. Information is presented which indicates that melting and hot-working conditions play an important role in high-temperature properties of alloys of the type investigated.

  11. Thermodynamic Considerations of Contamination by Alloying Elements of Remelted End-of-Life Nickel- and Cobalt-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2016-06-01

    Cobalt and nickel are high-value commodity metals and are mostly used in the form of highly alloyed materials. The alloying elements used may cause contamination problems during recycling. To ensure maximum resource efficiency, an understanding of the removability of these alloying elements and the controllability of some of the primary alloying elements is essential with respect to the recycling of end-of-life (EoL) nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys by remelting. In this study, the distribution behaviors of approximately 30 elements that are usually present in EoL nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys in the solvent metal (nickel, cobalt, or nickel-cobalt alloy), oxide slag, and gas phases during the remelting were quantitatively evaluated using a thermodynamic approach. The results showed that most of the alloying elements can be removed either in the slag phase or into the gas phase. However, the removal of copper, tin, arsenic, and antimony by remelting is difficult, and they remain as tramp elements during the recycling. On the other hand, the distribution tendencies of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten can be controlled by changing the remelting conditions. To increase the resource efficiency of recycling, preventing contamination by the tramp elements and identifying the alloying compositions of EoL superalloys are significantly essential, which will require the development of efficient prior alloy-sorting systems and advanced separation technologies.

  12. Nickel Alloy Primary Water Bulk Surface and SCC Corrosion Film Analytical Characterization and SCC Mechanistic Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Hanson, M.; Rice, S.; Sanders, P.

    2007-04-18

    Alloy 600 corrosion coupon tests were performed: (1) to quantify the temperature dependency of general corrosion and (2) to characterize the composition and structure of bulk surface corrosion films for comparison with ongoing primary water SCC (PWSCC) crack tip corrosion film analyses. Results suggest that the thermal activation energy of Alloy 600 corrosion is consistent with the thermal activation energy of nickel alloy PWSCC. Analytical investigations of the structure and composition of Alloy 600 bulk surface corrosion oxides revealed a duplex (inner and outer) oxide layer structure. The outer layer is discontinuous and comprised of relatively large (1 to 3 {micro}m) nickel ferrite crystals and smaller ({approx}0.1 {micro}m) chromium containing nickel ferrite crystals. The inner layer consists of a relatively continuous chromite spinel (major phase) and chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} minor phase) which formed through non-selective oxidation. Chromia and dealloyed Alloy 600 (highly Ni enriched metal) were only observed at 337 C (640 F) and only along the boundaries of deformation induced fine grains and subcells. Specimens having deformation free surfaces exhibited continuous uniform inner chromite spinel oxide layers. Specimens with machining induced surface deformation produced non-uniform inner layer oxides (chromite spinel, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and unoxidized material). PWSCC crack tip oxides, in contrast, were fine grain (no duplex structure) and consisted of both chromium rich spinels and ''NiO'' structure oxides. Generally, nickel rich oxides were more abundant under more oxidized conditions (reduced coolant hydrogen) and spinel rich crack tip oxides were favored under more reducing conditions (increased coolant hydrogen). Bulk surface corrosion film thickness did not correlate with observed SCC growth rates. These results suggest that corrosion is not the rate controlling step of PWSCC but rather that PWSCC and corrosion have a common rate

  13. Bending properties of a new nickel-titanium alloy with a lower percent by weight of nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testarelli, Luca; Plotino, Gianluca; Al-Sudani, Dina; Vincenzi, Valentina; Giansiracusa, Alessio; Grande, Nicola M; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bending properties of Hyflex instruments, which exhibit a lower percent in weight of nickel (52 Ni %wt) and compare them with other commercially available nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments. Ten instruments with tip size 25, 0.06 taper of each of the following NiTi rotary instrumentation techniques were selected for the study: Hyflex, EndoSequence, ProFile, Hero, and Flexmasters. All instruments from each group were tested for stiffness by comparing their bending moment when they attained a 45-degree bend. Experimental procedures strictly followed testing methodology described in ISO 3630-1. All data were recorded and subjected to statistical evaluation by using analysis of variance test. Statistical significance was set at P Hyflex files were found to be the most flexible instruments, with a significant difference (P .05). Results of the present study have illustrated an increased flexibility of the new NiTi alloy over conventional NiTi alloy, and they highlight the potential of the new manufacturing process. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Alloys for hydrogen storage in nickel/hydrogen and nickel/metal hydride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anani, Anaba; Visintin, Arnaldo; Petrov, Konstantin; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Reilly, James J.; Johnson, John R.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Desch, Paul B.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors in the three laboratories to (1) prepare alloys of the AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) types, using arc-melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques; (2) examine their physico-chemical characteristics (morphology, composition); (3) determine the hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior (pressure-composition isotherms as a function of temperature); and (4) evaluate their performance characteristics as hydride electrodes (charge/discharge, capacity retention, cycle life, high rate capability). The work carried out on representative AB(sub 5) and AB(sub 2) type modified alloys (by partial substitution or with small additives of other elements) is presented. The purpose of the modification was to optimize the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydriding/dehydriding reactions and enhance the stabilities of the alloys for the desired battery applications. The results of our collaboration, to date, demonstrate that (1) alloys prepared by arc melting/annealing and mechanical alloying/annealing techniques exhibit similar morphology, composition and hydriding/dehydriding characteristics; (2) alloys with the appropriate small amounts of substituent or additive elements: (1) retain the single phase structure, (2) improve the hydriding/dehydriding reactions for the battery applications, and (3) enhance the stability in the battery environment; and (3) the AB(sub 2) type alloys exhibit higher energy densities than the AB(sub 5) type alloys but the state-of-the-art, commercialized batteries are predominantly manufactured using Ab(sub 5) type alloys.

  15. Evaluation and comparison of shear bond strength of porcelain to a beryllium-free alloy of nickel-chromium, nickel and beryllium free alloy of cobalt-chromium, and titanium: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ananya; Ramachandra, Keerthi; Devarhubli, Achut R

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of porcelain to the alloys of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr), cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr), and titanium. A total of 40 samples (25 mm × 3 mm × 0.5 mm) were fabricated using smooth casting wax and cast using Ni-Cr, Co-Cr, and titanium alloys followed by porcelain buildup. The samples were divided into four groups with each group containing 10 samples (Group A1-10: sandblasted Ni-Cr alloy, Group B1-10: sandblasted Co-Cr alloy, Group C1-10: nonsandblasted titanium alloy, and Group D1-10: sandblasted titanium alloy). Shear bond strength was measured using a Universal Testing Machine. ANOVA test and Tukey's honestly significance difference post hoc test for multiple comparisons. The mean shear bond strength values for these groups were 22.8960, 27.4400, 13.2560, and 25.3440 MPa, respectively, with sandblasted Co-Cr alloy having the highest and nonsandblasted titanium alloy having the lowest value. It could be concluded that newer nickel and beryllium free Co-Cr alloys and titanium alloys with improved strength to weight ratio could prove to be good alternatives to the conventional nickel-based alloys when biocompatibility was a concern.

  16. Production of High-Purity Anhydrous Nickel(II) Perrhenate for Tungsten-Based Sintered Heavy Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczyńska-Sejda, Katarzyna; Benke, Grzegorz; Kopyto, Dorota; Majewski, Tomasz; Drzazga, Michał

    2017-04-24

    This paper presents a method for the production of high-purity anhydrous nickel(II) perrhenate. The method comprises sorption of nickel(II) ions from aqueous nickel(II) nitrate solutions, using strongly acidic C160 cation exchange resin, and subsequent elution of sorbed nickel(II) ions using concentrated perrhenic acid solutions. After the neutralization of the resulting rhenium-nickel solutions, hydrated nickel(II) perrhenate is then separated and then dried at 160 °C to obtain the anhydrous form. The resulting compound is reduced in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia in order to produce a Re-Ni alloy powder. This study provides information on the selected properties of the resulting Re-Ni powder. This powder was used as a starting material for the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni heavy alloys. Microstructure examination results and selected properties of the produced sintered heavy alloys were compared to sintered alloys produced using elemental W, Re, and Ni powders. This study showed that the application of anhydrous nickel(II) perrhenate in the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni results in better properties of the sintered alloys compared to those made from elemental powders.

  17. Production of High-Purity Anhydrous Nickel(II Perrhenate for Tungsten-Based Sintered Heavy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Leszczyńska-Sejda

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for the production of high-purity anhydrous nickel(II perrhenate. The method comprises sorption of nickel(II ions from aqueous nickel(II nitrate solutions, using strongly acidic C160 cation exchange resin, and subsequent elution of sorbed nickel(II ions using concentrated perrhenic acid solutions. After the neutralization of the resulting rhenium-nickel solutions, hydrated nickel(II perrhenate is then separated and then dried at 160 °C to obtain the anhydrous form. The resulting compound is reduced in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia in order to produce a Re-Ni alloy powder. This study provides information on the selected properties of the resulting Re-Ni powder. This powder was used as a starting material for the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni heavy alloys. Microstructure examination results and selected properties of the produced sintered heavy alloys were compared to sintered alloys produced using elemental W, Re, and Ni powders. This study showed that the application of anhydrous nickel(II perrhenate in the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni results in better properties of the sintered alloys compared to those made from elemental powders.

  18. Design of lead-free candidate alloys for high-temperature soldering based on the Au–Sn system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chidambaram, Vivek; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hald, John

    2010-01-01

    of the Au–Sn binary system were explored in this work. Furthermore, the effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and microhardness of these promising Au–Sn based ternary alloys were investigated. For this purpose, the candidate alloys were aged at a lower temperature, 150°C for up to 1week...

  19. [The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electrochemical corrosion properties and metal ions release of nickel-chromium dental alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Qiao, Guang-yan

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electrochemical corrosion and metal ions release of nickel-chromium dental alloys. The corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium dental alloys was compared by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curve (PD) methods in artificial saliva after immersed in different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for 112 h. The metal ions released from nickel-chromium dental alloys to the artificial saliva were detected after electrochemical measurements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The data was statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) using SPSS 13.0 software package. The electrochemical experiment showed that the sequence of polarization resistance in equivalent circuit (Rct), corrosion potential (Ecorr), pitting breakdown potential (Eb), and the difference between Ecorr and Eb representing the "pseudo-passivation" (δE) of nickel-chromium alloys in artificial saliva was 30% corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium dental alloys decrease after immersed in different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for 112 h. Nickel-chromium dental alloys are more prone to corrosion in the artificial saliva with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased, and more metal ions are released in the artificial saliva.

  20. Localized corrosion of molybdenum-bearing nickel alloys in chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postlethwaite, J.; Scoular, R.J.; Dobbin, M.H.

    1988-04-01

    Electrochemical and immersion tests have been applied to a study of the localized corrosion resistance of two molybdenum-bearing nickel alloys. Alloys C-276 and 6y25, in neutral chloride solutions in the temperature range of 25 to 200 C as part of the container materials evaluation screening tests for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Cyclic polarization studies show that the passivation breakdown potentials move rapidly to more active values with increasing temperatures, indicating a reduced resistance to localized corrosion. The results of immersion tests show that both alloys do suffer crevice corrosion in neutral aerated sodium chloride solutions at elevated temperatures, but that in both cases there is a limiting temperature > 100C, below which, the alloys are not attacked, regardless of the chloride concentration.

  1. UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS CONTROLLING ENVIRONMENTALLY-ASSISTED INTERGRANULAR CRACKING OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary S. Was

    2004-02-13

    Creep and IG cracking of nickel-base alloys depend principally on two factors--the deformation behavior and the effect of the environment. We have shown that both contribute to the observed degradation in primary water. The understanding of cracking does not lie wholly within the environmental effects arena, nor can it be explained only by intrinsic mechanical behavior. Rather, both processes contribute to the observed behavior in primary water. In this project, we had three objectives: (1) to verify that grain boundaries control deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C, (2) to identify the environmental effect on IGSCC, and (3) to combine CSLBs and GBCs to maximize IGSCC resistance in Ni-Cr-Fe in 360 C primary water. Experiments performed in hydrogen gas at 360 C confirm an increase in the primary creep rate in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C due to hydrogen. The creep strain transients caused by hydrogen are proposed to be due to the collapse of dislocation pile-ups, as confirmed by observations in HVEM. The observations only partially support the hydrogen-enhanced plasticity model, but also suggest a potential role of vacancies in the accelerate creep behavior in primary water. In high temperature oxidation experiments designed to examine the potential for selective internal oxidation in the IGSCC process, cracking is greatest in the more oxidizing environments compared to the low oxygen potential environments where nickel metal is stable. In Ni-Cr-Fe alloys, chromium oxides form preferentially along the grain boundaries, even at low oxygen potential, supporting a potential role in grain boundary embrittlement due to preferential oxidation. Experiments designed to determine the role of grain boundary deformation on intergranular cracking have established, for the first time, a cause-and-effect relationship between grain boundary deformation and IGSCC. That is, grain boundary deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe in 360 C primary water leads to IGSCC of the deformed boundaries. As well

  2. Oxidation-induced phase transformations and lifetime limits of chromia-forming nickel-base alloy 625

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyrkin, Anton

    2011-12-05

    For its high creep resistance the commercial nickel-base alloy 625 relies on solid solution strengthening in combination with precipitation hardening by formation of δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb and (Ni,Mo,Si){sub 6}C precipitates during high-temperature service. In oxidizing environments the alloy forms a slow growing, continuous chromia layer on the material surface which protects the alloy against rapid oxidation attack. The growth of the chromia base oxide scale results during exposure at 900-1000 C in oxidation-induced chromium depletion in the subsurface zone of the alloy. Microstructural analyses of the cross-sectioned specimens revealed that this process results in formation of a wide subsurface zone in which the mentioned strengthening phases are dissolved, in spite of the fact that both phases do not contain substantial amounts of the scale-forming element chromium. The cross-sectional analyses revealed that, in parallel to the formation of a precipitate depleted zone, a thin, continuous layer of niobium-rich intermetallic precipitates formed in the immediate vicinity of the scale/alloy interface. The Subsurface Phase Enrichment (abbreviated as SPE) was shown to be the result of an uphill-diffusion of niobium, i.e. the element stabilizing the strengthening precipitates δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb, in the chromium activity gradient and is thus a natural consequence of the oxidation-induced chromium depletion beneath the chromia scale. The thermodynamic calculations carried out using the Thermo-Calc/DICTRA software packages revealed that in alloy 625 the chemical activity of niobium decreases with decreasing chromium content. As chromium is being continuously removed from the alloy as the result of the chromia scale growth, the zone of lowest Nb-activity is formed in the location with the lowest chromium concentration, i.e. the scale/alloy interface. This creates a driving force for Nb to diffuse towards the scale/alloy interface against its own concentration gradient, which is known

  3. The applications and research progresses of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy in reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Zeng, Yanjun; Tang, Xiaoying

    2010-06-01

    In spite of some good successes and excellent researches of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy (NiTi-SMA) in reconstructive surgery, there are still serious limitations to the clinical applications of NiTi alloy today. The potential leakage of elements and ions could be toxic to cells, tissues and organs. This review discussed the properties, clinical applications, corrosion performance, biocompatibility, the possible preventive measures to improve corrosion resistance by surface/structure modifications and the long-term challenges of using SMAs.

  4. The Solidification Velocity of Undercooled Nickel and Titanium Alloys with Dilute Solute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algoso, Paul R.; Altgilbers, A. S.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The study of solidification velocity is important for two reasons. First, understanding the manner in which the degree of undercooling of the liquid and solidification velocity affect the microstructure of the solid is fundamental. Second, there is disagreement between theoretical predictions of the relationship between undercooling and solidification velocity and experimental results. Thus, the objective of this research is to accurately and systematically quantify the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling for dilute nickel-and titanium-based alloys. The alloys chosen for study cover a wide range of equilibrium partition coefficients, and the results are compared to current theory.

  5. Crack growth rates of nickel alloy welds in a PWR environment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-05-31

    In light water reactors (LWRs), vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. A program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the resistance of Ni alloys and their welds to environmentally assisted cracking in simulated LWR coolant environments. This report presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for Alloy 182 shielded-metal-arc weld metal in a simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment at 320 C. Crack growth tests were conducted on 1-T compact tension specimens with different weld orientations from both double-J and deep-groove welds. The results indicate little or no environmental enhancement of fatigue CGRs of Alloy 182 weld metal in the PWR environment. The CGRs of Alloy 182 in the PWR environment are a factor of {approx}5 higher than those of Alloy 600 in air under the same loading conditions. The stress corrosion cracking for the Alloy 182 weld is close to the average behavior of Alloy 600 in the PWR environment. The weld orientation was found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of crack growth: cracking was found to propagate faster along the dendrites than across them. The existing CGR data for Ni-alloy weld metals have been compiled and evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on CGRs in PWR environments. The results from the present study are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of the specific Ni-alloy weld to environmentally enhanced cracking.

  6. Microstructure and high-temperature wear properties of in situ TiC composite coatings by plasma transferred arc surface alloying on gray cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Li, Jian-jun; Zheng, Zhi-zhen; Wang, Ai-hua; Huang, Qi-wen; Zeng, Da-wen

    2015-12-01

    In this work, an in situ synthesized TiC-reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) coating of approximately 350-400 µm thickness was fabricated on a gray cast iron (GCI) substrate by plasma transferred arc (PTA) surface alloying of Ti-Fe alloy powder. Microhardness tests showed that the surface hardness increased approximately four-fold after the alloying treatment. The microstructure of the MMC coating was mainly composed of residual austenite, acicular martensite, and eutectic ledeburite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analyzes revealed that the in situ TiC particles, which were formed by direct reaction of Ti with carbon originally contained in the GCI, was uniformly distributed at the boundary of residual austenite in the alloying zone. Pin-on-disc high-temperature wear tests were performed on samples both with and without the MMC coating at room temperature and at elevated temperatures (473 K and 623 K), and the wear behavior and mechanism were investigated. The results showed that, after the PTA alloying treatment, the wear resistance of the samples improved significantly. On the basis of our analysis of the composite coatings by optical microscopy, SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and microhardness measurements, we attributed this improvement of wear resistance to the transformation of the microstructure and to the presence of TiC particles.

  7. Antibacterial effect of nickel-titanium alloy owing to nickel ion release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Naofumi; Suginishi, Sachie; Hirano, Mitsuhiro

    2017-05-01

    This paper demonstrates that a NiTi shape memory alloy demonstrates antibacterial effect owing to the release of Ni ions from the alloy itself. Moreover, non-cytotoxic NiTi alloy with antibacterial properties can be prepared by simple post-heat treatment. We demonstrated that applying Escherichia coli to a NiTi surface resulted in 40% reduction in the number of cells following a 4 h incubation in an ambient atmosphere. When the alloy was heated at 450 °C in air, the antibacterial effect was slightly reduced but the cytotoxicity was drastically reduced. This result indicates that the production of an antibacterial NiTi alloy (without cytotoxic effects) is feasible with an appropriate surface modification. We further revealed that the appropriate Ni ion concentration for both antibacterial effect and biosafety was in the range from 0.05 mg L-1 to 3 mg L-1. Our novel finding represents a new and unique strategy for improving the antibacterial performance of NiTi alloy.

  8. Static and dynamic crack toughness of brazed joints of Inconel 718 nickel-base alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.Z. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa); Steffens, H.D.; Englehart, A.H.; Wielage, B.

    1979-10-01

    The crack toughness of brazed joints of Inconel 718 nickel-base alloy was investigated at different strain rates. The brazing filler metal used was BNi5. The results were compared with those obtained on specimens made of the base material. The brazed joints were heat-treated after the brazing process in order to achieve a desirable distribution of the brittle phases in the joint.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  10. Microstructure and High Temperature Plastic Deformation Behavior of Al-12Si Based Alloy Fabricated by an Electromagnetic Casting and Stirring Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Kyung-Soo; Roh, Heung-Ryeol; Kim, Mok-Soon [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Ho; Park, Joon-Pyo [Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    An as-received EMC/S (electromagnetic casting and stirring)-processed Al-12Si based alloy billet was homogenized to examine its microstructure and high temperature plastic deformation behavior, using compressive tests over the temperature range from 623 to 743 K and a strain rate range from 1.0×10{sup -3} to 1.0×10{sup 0}s{sup -1}. The results were compared with samples processed by the direct chill casting (DC) method. The fraction of equiaxed structure for the as-received EMC/S billet(41%) was much higher than that of the as-received DC billet(6 %). All true stress – true strain curves acquired from the compressive tests exhibited a peak stress at the initial stage of plastic deformation. Flow stress showed a steady state region after the appearance of peak stress with increasing strain. The peak stress decreased with increasing temperature at a given strain rate and a decreasing strain rate at a given temperature. A constitutive equation was made for each alloy, which could be used to predict the peak stress. A recrystallized grain structure was observed in all the deformed specimens, indicating that dynamic recrystallization is the predominant mechanism during high temperature plastic deformation of both the homogenized EMC/S and DC-processed Al-12Si based alloys.

  11. High specialty stainless steels and nickel alloys for FGD dampers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herda, W.R.; Rockel, M.B.; Grossmann, G.K. [Krupp VDM GmbH, Werdohl (Germany); Starke, K. [Mannesmann-Seiffert GmbH, Beckum (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Because of process design and construction, FGD installations normally have bypass ducts, which necessitates use of dampers. Due to corrosion from acid dew resulting from interaction of hot acidic flue gases and colder outside environments, carbon steel cannot be used as construction material under these specific conditions. In the past, commercial stainless steels have suffered by pitting and crevice corrosion and occasionally failed by stress corrosion cracking. Only high alloy specialty super-austenitic stainless steels with 6.5% Mo should be used and considered for this application. Experience in Germany and Europe has shown that with regard to safety and life cycle cost analysis as well as providing a long time warranty, a new specialty stainless steel, alloy 31--UNS N08031--(31 Ni, 27 Cr, 6.5 Mo, 0.2 N) has proven to be the best and most economical choice. Hundreds of tons in forms of sheet, rod and bar, as well as strip (for damper seals) have been used and installed in many FGD installations throughout Europe. Under extremely corrosive conditions, the new advanced Ni-Cr-Mo alloy 59--UNS N06059--(59 Ni, 23 Cr, 16 Mo) should be used. This paper describes qualification and workability of these alloys as pertains to damper applications. Some case histories are also provided.

  12. Corrosion investigation of multilayered ceramics and experimental nickel alloys in SCWO process environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, K.M.; Mizia, R.

    1995-02-01

    A corrosion investigation was done at MODAR, Inc., using a supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) vessel reactor. Several types of multilayered ceramic rings and experimental nickel alloy coupons were exposed to a chlorinated cutting oil TrimSol, in the SCWO process. A corrosion casing was designed and mounted in the vessel reactor with precautions to minimize chances of degrading the integrity of the pressure vessel. Fifteen of the ceramic coated rings were stacked vertically in the casing at one time for each test. There was a total of 36 rings. The rings were in groupings of three rings that formed five sections. Each section saw a different SCWO environment, ranging from 650 to 300{degrees}C. The metal coupons were mounted on horizontal threaded holders welded to a vertical rod attached to the casing cover in order to hang down the middle of the casing. The experimental nickel alloys performed better than the baseline nickel alloys. A titania multilayered ceramic system sprayed onto a titanium ring remained intact after 120-180 hours of exposure. This is the longest time any coating system has withstood such an environment without significant loss.

  13. [Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metal-ceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface thickness. The research was performed as an experimental study. Per six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron99) and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C) were made each. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Analysis Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) (Oxford Instruments) and Scanning Electon Microscop (SEM) analysis (JEOL) were used to determine thickness of metal-ceramic interface together with PC Software for quantification of visual informations (KVI POPOVAC). Results of this research introduced significant differences between thickness of metal-ceramic interface in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on thickness of metal-ceramic interface of the examined alloys. This research showed almost linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 12th generation of recycling. Recasting of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys is not recommended because of reduced thickness of metal-ceramic interface of these alloys. Instead of recycling, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturers.

  14. Nickel based alloys as electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution from alkaline solutions. [Metal--air batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, P.W.T.; Srinivasan, S.

    1977-01-01

    The slowness of the oxygen evolution reaction is one of the main reasons for significant energy losses in water electrolysis cells and secondary air--metal batteries. To date, data on the kinetics of this reaction on alloys and intermetallic compounds are sparse. In this work, mechanically polished alloys of nickel with Ir, Ru or W and Ni--Ti intermetallic compounds were studied as oxygen electrodes. Since the oxygen evolution reaction always takes place on oxide-film covered surfaces, the nature of oxide films formed on these alloys were investigated using cyclic voltametric techniques. Steady-state potentiostatic and slow potentiodynamic (at 0.1 mV/s) methods were employed to obtain the electrode kinetic parameters for the oxygen evolution reaction in 30 wt. percent KOH at 80/sup 0/C, the conditions normally used in water electrolysis cells. The peaks for the formation or reduction of oxygen-containing layers appearing on the pure metals are not always found on the alloys. The maximum decreases in oxygen overpotential at an apparent current density of 20 mA cm/sup -2/ (as compared with that on Ni) were found for the alloys of 50Ni--50Ir and 75Ni--25Ru and the intermetallic compound Ni/sub 3/Ti, these decreases being about 40, 30, and 20 mV, respectively. On the long-term polarization in the potential region of oxygen evolution, the oxygen-containing layers on Ni--Ir or Ni--Ru alloys are essentially composed of nickel oxides instead of true mixed oxide films of two components. The present work confirms that, possibly because of coverage by oxide films, there is no direct dependence of the electrocatalytic activities of the alloys on their electronic properties. 11 figures, 1 table.

  15. Electrochemical preparation of aluminium-nickel alloys by under-potential deposition in molten fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibilaro, M. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Massot, L. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: massot@chimie.ups-tlse.fr; Chamelot, P.; Taxil, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique UMR 5503, Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-03-05

    The electrochemical behaviour of AlF{sub 3} was investigated in LiF-CaF{sub 2} medium first with inert tungsten and then with reactive nickel electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry, square-wave voltammetry and chronopotentiometry indicated that the reduction of Al(III) in Al(0) is a single-step process exchanging three electrons: Al(III) + 3e{sup -} = Al The electrochemical reduction is controlled by the diffusion of AlF{sub 3} in the solution. On a nickel electrode, a depolarisation effect for Al(III) reduction was observed in cyclic voltammetry due to the formation of Al-Ni alloys when aluminium ions react with the nickel substrate. Galvanostatic and potentiostatic electrolyses on a nickel electrode led to the formation of four nickel aluminides characterised by SEM: AlNi{sub 3}, AlNi, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and Al{sub 3}Ni. Layers with a uniform composition of AlNi{sub 3}, AlNi and Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} were prepared by varying the electrolysis potential, the current density and duration of intermetallic diffusion.

  16. HIGH-TEMPERATURE EXAFS EXPERIMENTS ON LIQUID KPB ALLOYS ANALYZED WITH THE REVERSE MONTE-CARLO METHOD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRAS, W; XU, R; WICKS, JD; VANDERHORST, F; OVERSLUIZEN, M; MCGREEVY, RL; VANDERLUGT, W

    1994-01-01

    A new sample chamber has been designed which allows high temperature Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) experiments on metallic melts which offer a number of special experimental problems: they are highly corrosive, have high vapour pressures and strongly absorb X-rays. The EXAFS

  17. Development of high temperature mechanical rig for characterizing the viscoplastic properties of alloys used in solid oxide cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Greco, Fabio; Kwok, Kawai

    2017-01-01

    temperature and in controlled atmosphere. The methodology uses a mechanical loading rig designed to apply variable as well as constant loads on samples within a gas-tight high temperature furnace. In addition, a unique remotely installed length measuring setup involving laser micrometer is used to monitor...

  18. High-temperature short-term creep of the Grade 2 and Ti-5Al titanium alloys under heating in air and helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamaraev, L. M.; Smirnov, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    Short-term creep of Grade 2 commercially pure titanium and the Ti-5Al alloy in air and helium are comparatively studied at test temperatures ranging between 673 K and 1323 K. Empirical coefficients are determined in the dependence v = Aσnexp(-ΔH/RT) relating creep rate v to temperature T, nominal stress σ and creep activation energy ΔH. It has been found that heating in a helium environment, as compared to heating in air, decreases the rate of high-temperature short-term creep and increases creep strength at identical nominal stresses in the entire range of test temperatures.

  19. Dendritic growth and structure of undercooled nickel base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, M. C.; Shiohara, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The principal objectives of this overall investigation are to: study means for obtaining high undercooling in levitation melted droplets, and study structures produced upon the solidification of these undercooled specimens. Thermal measurements are made of the undercooling, and of the rapid recalescence, to develop an understanding of the solidification mechanism. Comparison of results is made with the modeling studies. Characterization and metallographic work is done to gain an understanding of the relationship between rapid solidification variables and the structures so produced. In ground based work to date, solidification of undercooled Ni-25 wt percent Sn alloy was observed by high-speed cinematography and the results compared with optical temperature measurements. Also in ground based work, high-speed optical temperature measurements were made of the solidification behavior of levitated metal samples within a transparent glass medium. Two undercooled Ni-Sn alloys were examined. Measurements were carried out on samples at undercoolings up to 330 K. Microstructures of samples produced in ground based work were determined by optical metallography and by SEM, and microsegregation by electron microprobe measurements. A series of flight tests were planned to conduct experiments similar to the ground based experiments. The Space Shuttle Columbia carried an alloy undercooled experiment in the STS 61-C mission in January 1986. A sample of Ni-32.5 wt percent Sn eutectic was melted and solidified under microgravity conditions.

  20. High temperature oxidation resistance of rare earth chromite coated Fe-20Cr and Fe-20Cr-4Al alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Fuser Pillis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Doped lanthanum chromite has been used in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC interconnects. The high costs involved in obtaining dense lanthanum chromite have increased efforts to find suitable metallic materials for interconnects. In this context, the oxidation behavior of lanthanum chromite coated Fe-20Cr and Fe-20Cr-4Al alloys at SOFC operation temperature was studied. Isothermal oxidation tests were carried out at 1000 °C for 20, 50 and 200 hours. Cyclic oxidation tests were also carried out and each oxidation cycle consisted of 7 hours at 1000/°C followed by cooling to room temperature. The oxidation measurements and the results of SEM/EDS as well as XRD analyses indicated that lanthanum chromite coated Fe-20Cr and Fe-20Cr-4Al alloys were significantly more resistant to oxidation compared with the uncoated alloys.

  1. Modeling of self-controlling hyperthermia based on nickel alloy ferrofluids: Proposition of new nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delavari, H. Hamid, E-mail: Hamid.delavari@gmail.com [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, 145888-9694 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Madaah Hosseini, Hamid R. [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, 145888-9694 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, 145888-9694 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Wolff, Max, E-mail: Max.wolff@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-06-15

    In order to provide sufficient heat without overheating healthy tissue in magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH), a careful design of the magnetic properties of nanoparticles is essential. We perform a systematic calculation of magnetic properties of Ni-alloy nanoparticles. Stoner–Wohlfarth model based theories (SWMBTs) are considered and the linear response theory (LRT) is used to extract the hysteresis loop of nickel alloy nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields. It is demonstrated that in the safe range of magnetic field intensity and frequency the LRT cannot be used for the calculation of the area in the hysteresis for magnetic fields relevant for hyperthermia. The best composition and particle size for self-controlling hyperthermia with nickel alloys is determined based on SWMBTs. It is concluded that Ni–V and Ni–Zn are good candidates for self-controlling hyperthermia. - Highlights: ► Systematic calculation of magnetic properties of Ni-alloy NPs with composition has been performed. ► Optimum composition and particle size for self-controlling hyperthermia (SCH) have been determined. ► Ni–V and Ni–Zn nanoparticles are more appropriate candidates for SCH.

  2. Optical modeling of nickel-base alloys oxidized in pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clair, A. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Foucault, M.; Calonne, O. [Areva ANP, Centre Technique Departement Corrosion-Chimie, 30 Bd de l' industrie, BP 181, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Finot, E., E-mail: Eric.Finot@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France)

    2012-10-01

    The knowledge of the aging process involved in the primary water of pressurized water reactor entails investigating a mixed growth mechanism in the corrosion of nickel-base alloys. A mixed growth induces an anionic inner oxide and a cationic diffusion parallel to a dissolution-precipitation process forms the outer zone. The in situ monitoring of the oxidation kinetics requires the modeling of the oxide layer stratification with the full knowledge of the optical constants related to each component. Here, we report the dielectric constants of the alloys 600 and 690 measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and fitted to a Drude-Lorentz model. A robust optical stratification model was determined using focused ion beam cross-section of thin foils examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric constants of the inner oxide layer depleted in chromium were assimilated to those of the nickel thin film. The optical constants of both the spinels and extern layer were determined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Ni-base alloy oxidation in pressurized water reactor Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements of the dielectric constants of the alloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical simulation of the mixed oxidation process using a three stack model Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattered crystallites cationic outer layer; linear Ni-gradient bottom layer Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the refractive index of the spinel and the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers.

  3. Effects of composite scale on high temperature oxidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni heat resistant alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Haitao; Wang Yuqing; Yu Huashun

    2009-01-01

    Fe-Cr-Ni heat resistant alloys with aluminum and silicon addition, alone and in combination, were melted using an intermediate frequency induction furnace with a non-oxidation method. By the oxidation weight gain method, the oxidation resistances of the test alloys were determined at 1,200 ìC for 500 hours. According to the oxidation weight gains, the oxidation kinetic curves were plotted and the functions were regressed by the least squares method. The results show that the oxidation kinetic...

  4. Assessing mechanical properties of the dissimilar metal welding between P92 steels and alloy 617 at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Hwang, J. H.; Park, Y. S.; Kim, T. M.; Bae, D. H. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, W. B. [Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Han, J. W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hoseo University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, a new welding technology of dissimilar materials, Cr-based P92 steels and Ni-based Alloy 617 is introduced and demonstrated to investigate its reliability. Firstly, multi-pass dissimilar metal welding between P92 steel and Alloy 617 was performed using DCEN TIG welding technology, buttering welding technique and a narrow gap groove. After welding, in order to understand characteristics of the dissimilar metal welds, metallurgical micro-structures analysis by optical observation and static tensile strength assessment of the dissimilar welded joints were conducted at 700°C.

  5. Strengthening Aluminum Alloys for High Temperature Applications Using Nanoparticles of Al203 and Al3-X Compounds (X= Ti, V, Zr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the effect of nanoparticles A12O3 and A13-X compounds (X= Ti, V, Zr) on the improvement of mechanical properties of aluminum alloys for elevated temperature applications is presented. These nanoparticles were selected based on their chemical stability and low diffusions rates in aluminum matrix at high temperatures. The strengthening mechanism for aluminum alloy is based on the mechanical blocking of dislocation movements by these nanoparticles. Samples were prepared from A12O3 nanoparticle preforms, which were produced using ceramic injection molding process and pressure infiltrated by molten aluminum. A12O3 nanoparticles can also be homogeneously mixed with aluminum powder and consolidated into samples through hot pressing and sintering. On the other hand, the Al3-X nanoparticles are produced as precipitates via in situ reactions with molten aluminum alloys using conventional casting techniques. The degree of alloy strengthening using nanoparticles will depend on the materials, particle size, shape, volume fraction, and mean inter-particle spacing.

  6. Tensile properties of a nickel-base alloy subjected to surface severe plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, J.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dai, K. [Quality Engineering and Software Technology, East Hartford, CT 06108 (United States); Villegas, J.C. [Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ (United States); Shaw, L. [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)], E-mail: leon.shaw@uconn.edu; Liaw, P.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Klarstrom, D.L. [Haynes International, Inc., Kokomo, IN (United States); Ortiz, A.L. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Energetica y de los Materiales, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    A surface severe plastic deformation (S{sup 2}PD) method has been applied to bulk specimens of HASTELLOY C-2000 alloy, a nickel-base alloy. The mechanical properties of the processed C-2000 alloy were determined via tensile tests and Vickers hardness measurements, whereas the microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. The improved tensile strength was related to the nanostructure at the surface region, the residual compressive stresses, and the work-hardened surface layer, all of which resulted from the S{sup 2}PD process. To understand the contributions of these three factors, finite element modeling was performed. It was found that the improved tensile strength could be interpreted based on the contributions of nano-grains, residual stresses, and work hardening.

  7. High temperature materials and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-temperature materials in current and future applications, including silicone materials for handling hot foods and metal alloys for developing high-speed aircraft and spacecraft systems, has generated a growing interest in high-temperature technologies. High Temperature Materials and Mechanisms explores a broad range of issues related to high-temperature materials and mechanisms that operate in harsh conditions. While some applications involve the use of materials at high temperatures, others require materials processed at high temperatures for use at room temperature. High-temperature materials must also be resistant to related causes of damage, such as oxidation and corrosion, which are accelerated with increased temperatures. This book examines high-temperature materials and mechanisms from many angles. It covers the topics of processes, materials characterization methods, and the nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring of high-temperature materials and structures. It describes the ...

  8. High temperature materials; Materiaux a hautes temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  9. Quantitative in vivo biocompatibility of new ultralow-nickel cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonofuchi, Kazuaki; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Chiba, Akihiko; Kawano, Mitsuko; Nakayama, Masafumi; Ogasawara, Kouetsu; Yabe, Yutaka; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Nickel (Ni) eluted from metallic biomaterials is widely accepted as a major cause of allergies and inflammation. To improve the safety of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (Co-Cr-Mo) alloy implants, new ultralow-Ni Co-Cr-Mo alloys with and without zirconium (Zr) have been developed, with Ni contents of less than 0.01%. In the present study, we investigated the biocompatibility of these new alloys in vivo by subcutaneously implanting pure Ni, conventional Co-Cr-Mo, ultralow-Ni Co-Cr-Mo, and ultralow-Ni Co-Cr-Mo with Zr wires into the dorsal sides of mice. After 3 and 7 days, tissues around the wire were excised, and inflammation; the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α; and Ni, Co, Cr, and Mo ion release were analyzed using histological analyses, qRT-PCR, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. Significantly larger amounts of Ni eluted from pure Ni wires than from the other wires, and the degree of inflammation depended on the amount of eluted Ni. Although no significant differences in inflammatory reactions were identified among new alloys and conventional Co-Cr-Mo alloys in histological and qRT-PCR analyses, ICP-MS analysis revealed that Ni ion elution from ultralow-Ni Co-Cr-Mo alloys with and without Zr was significantly lower than from conventional Co-Cr-Mo alloys. Our study, suggests that the present ultralow-Ni Co-Cr-Mo alloys with and without Zr have greater safety and utility than conventional Co-Cr-Mo alloys. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1505-1513, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. [The effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on the surface properties of nickel-chromium dental casting alloys after electrochemical corrosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Guang-yan; Zhang, Li-xia; Wang, Jue; Shen, Qing-ping; Su, Jian-sheng

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on the surface properties of nickel-chromium dental alloys after electrochemical corrosion. The surface morphology and surface structure of nickel-chromium dental alloys were examined by stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy before and after electrochemical tests in 0 g/L and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva. The surface element component and chemical states of nickel-chromium dental alloys were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectrograph after electrochemical tests in 0 g/L and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva. More serious corrosion happened on the surface of nickel-chromium alloy in 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva than in 0 g/L EGCG. The diameters of corrosion pits were smaller, and the dendrite structure of the alloy surface was not affected in 0 g/L EGCG. While the diameters of corrosion pits were larger, the dendritic interval of the alloy surface began to merge, and the dendrite structure was fuzzy in 1.0 g/L EGCG. In addition, the O, Ni, Cr, Be, C and Mo elements were detected on the surface of nickel-chromium alloys after sputtered for 120 s in 0 g/L EGCG and 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva after electrochemical corrosion, and the surface oxides were mainly NiO and Cr(2)O(3). Compared with 0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva, the content of O, NiO and Cr(2)O(3) were lower in 1.0 g/L EGCG. The results of surface morphology and the corrosion products both show that the corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium alloys become worse and the oxide content of corrosion products on the surface reduce in 1.0 g/L EGCG artificial saliva.

  11. The Study of the Impact of Surface Preparation Methods of Inconel 625 and 718 Nickel-Base Alloys on Wettability by BNi-2 and BNi-3 Brazing Filler Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lankiewicz K.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the impact of surface preparation method of Inconel 625 and 718 nickel-base alloys in the form of sheets on wettability of the surface. The results of the investigations of surface preparation method (such as nicro-blasting, nickel plating, etching, degreasing, abrasive blasting with grit 120 and 220 and manually grinding with grit 120 and 240 on spreading of BNi-2 and BNi-3 brazing filler metals, widely used in the aerospace industry in high temperature vacuum brazing processes, are presented. Technological parameters of vacuum brazing process are shown. The macro- and microscopic analysis have shown that nicro-blasting does not bring any benefits of wettability of the alloys investigated.

  12. The Study Of The Impact Of Surface Preparation Methods Of Inconel 625 And 718 Nickel-Base Alloys On Wettability By BNi-2 And BNi-3 Brazing Filler Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lankiewicz K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the impact of surface preparation method of Inconel 625 and 718 nickel-base alloys in the form of sheets on wettability of the surface. The results of the investigations of surface preparation method (such as nicro-blasting, nickel plating, etching, degreasing, abrasive blasting with grit 120 and 220 and manually grinding with grit 120 and 240 on spreading of BNi-2 and BNi-3 brazing filler metals, widely used in the aerospace industry in high temperature vacuum brazing processes, are presented. Technological parameters of vacuum brazing process are shown. The macro- and microscopic analysis have shown that nicro-blasting does not bring any benefits of wettability of the alloys investigated.

  13. The Influence of Chemical Alloying on the High Temperature Wear Resistance of H-Free DLC Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galvan, D.; Pei, Y.T.; Hosson, J.T.M. De; Cavaleiro, A.; Chandra, T; Tsuzaki, K; Militzer, M; Ravindran, C

    2007-01-01

    A commercial RF-sputtering deposition rig was employed to deposit H-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings. The influence of alloying elements such as Ti and Si on the structure, mechanical and tribological properties of the coatings was investigated. The coating was observed in cross section and

  14. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. All the weld overlays showed good oxidation/sulfidation behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc deposit with only 21 at.% Al. A rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initially grown scales spalled and the subsequent rate of reaction was not controlled by the formation of slowly growing aluminum oxides. Higher starting aluminum concentrations (>{approximately}25 at.%) are needed to assure adequate oxidation/sulfidation lifetimes of the weld overlays. A variety of stable oxides was added to a base Fe-28 at.% Al-2 % Cr alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior at 1200{degrees}C. A Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion improved the scale adhesion relative to a Zr alloy addition, but wasn`t as effective as it is in other alumina-forming alloys. Preliminary data for powder-processed Fe-28 at.% Al-2% Cr exposed to the H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar gas at 800{degrees}C showed that the oxidation/sulfidation rate was similar to that of many Fe{sub 3}Al alloys produced by ingot metallurgy routes.

  15. Erosion-Corrosion of Iron and Nickel Alloys at Elevated Temperature in a Combustion Gas Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tylczak, Joseph [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2014-05-02

    This paper reports on the results of a study that compares the erosion-corrosion behavior of a variety of alloys (Fe- 2¼Cr 1Mo, 304 SS, 310 SS, Incoloy 800, Haynes 230 and a Fe3Al) in a combustion environment. Advanced coal combustion environments, with higher temperatures, are driving re-examination of traditional and examination of new alloys in these hostile environments. In order to simulate conditions in advanced coal combustion boilers, a special erosion apparatus was used to allow for impingement of particles under a low abrasive flux in a gaseous environment comprised of 20 % CO2, 0.05 % HCl, 77 % N2, 3 % O2, and 0.1 % SO2. Tests were conducted at room temperature and 700 °C with ~ 270 μm silica, using an impact velocity of 20 m/s in both air and the simulated combustion gas environment. The erosion-corrosion behavior was characterized by gravimetric measurements and by examination of the degraded surfaces optically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At room temperature most of the alloys had similar loss rates. Not surprisingly, at 700 °C the lower chrome-iron alloy had a very high loss rate. The nickel alloys tended to have higher loss rates than the high chrome austenitic alloys.

  16. High Temperature Strength and Hot Working Technology for As-Cast Mg–1Zn–1Ca (ZX11 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamineni Pitcheswara Rao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cast Mg–1Zn–1Ca alloy (ZX11 has been tested to evaluate its compressive strength between 25 °C and 250 °C, and workability in the range of 260–500 °C. The ultimate compressive strength of this alloy is about 30% higher than that of creep-resistant alloy Mg–3Sn–2Ca (TX32 between 25 °C and 200 °C, and exhibits a plateau between 100 °C and 175 °C, similar to TX32. This is attributed to Mg2Ca particles present at grain boundaries that reduce their sliding. The processing map, developed between 260 and 420 °C in the strain rate limits of 0.0003 s−1 to 1 s−1, exhibited two domains in the ranges: (1 280–330 °C and 0.0003–0.01 s−1 and (2 330–400 °C and 0.0003–0.1 s−1. In these domains, dynamic recrystallization occurs, with basal slip dominating in the first domain and prismatic slip in the second, while the recovery mechanism being climb of edge dislocations in both. The activation energy estimated using standard kinetic rate equation is 191 kJ/mol, which is higher than the value for lattice self-diffusion in magnesium indicating that a large back stress is created by the presence of Ca2Mg6Zn3 intermetallic particles in the matrix. It is recommended that the alloy be best processed at 380 °C and 0.1 s−1 at which prismatic slip is favored due to Zn addition. At higher strain rates, the alloy exhibits flow instability and adiabatic shear band formation at <340 °C while flow localization and cracking at grain boundaries occurs at temperatures >400 °C.

  17. Hall-Petch relationship in a nanotwinned nickel alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Leon L. [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)], E-mail: leon.shaw@uconn.edu; Ortiz, Angel L. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Energetica y de los Materiales Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Villegas, Juan C. [Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ 85226 (United States)

    2008-06-15

    The Hall-Petch relationship in a nanotwinned alloy with absence of dislocation pile-ups is investigated for the first time. It is shown that, when the twin spacing is large (d > 150 nm), the hardness exhibits a d{sup -1/2} dependence. However, when the twin spacing is small (d < 100 nm), a d{sup -1} dependence results. These phenomena are interpreted based on dislocation-mediated mechanisms corroborated by the analysis of electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry.

  18. Effect of thermal exposure, forming, and welding on high-temperature, dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy: Al-8Fe-1V-2Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J. R.; Gilman, P. S.; Zedalis, M. S.; Skinner, D. J.; Peltier, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of applying conventional hot forming and welding methods to high temperature aluminum alloy, Al-8Fe-1V-2Si (FVS812), for structural applications and the effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties were determined. FVS812 (AA8009) sheet exhibited good hot forming and resistance welding characteristics. It was brake formed to 90 deg bends (0.5T bend radius) at temperatures greater than or equal to 390 C (730 F), indicating the feasibility of fabricating basic shapes, such as angles and zees. Hot forming of simple contoured-flanged parts was demonstrated. Resistance spot welds with good static and fatigue strength at room and elevated temperatures were readily produced. Extended vacuum degassing during billet fabrication reduced porosity in fusion and resistance welds. However, electron beam welding was not possible because of extreme degassing during welding, and gas-tungsten-arc welds were not acceptable because of severely degraded mechanical properties. The FVS812 alloy exhibited excellent high temperature strength stability after thermal exposures up to 315 C (600 F) for 1000 h. Extended billet degassing appeared to generally improve tensile ductility, fatigue strength, and notch toughness. But the effects of billet degassing and thermal exposure on properties need to be further clarified. The manufacture of zee-stiffened, riveted, and resistance-spot-welded compression panels was demonstrated.

  19. Microstructure Evolution and High-Temperature Compressibility of Modified Two-Step Strain-Induced Melt Activation-Processed Al-Mg-Si Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei Lin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A two-step strain-induced melt activation (TS-SIMA process that omits the cold working step of the traditional strain-induced melt activation (SIMA process is proposed for 6066 Al-Mg-Si alloy to obtain fine, globular, and uniform grains with a short-duration salt bath. The results show that increasing the salt bath temperature and duration leads to a high liquid phase fraction and a high degree of spheroidization. However, an excessive salt bath temperature leads to rapid grain growth and generates melting voids. The initial degree of dynamic recrystallization, which depends on the extrusion ratio, affects the globular grain size. With an increasing extrusion ratio, the dynamic recrystallization becomes more severe and the dynamic recrystallized grain size becomes smaller. It results in the globular grains becomes smaller. The major growth mechanism of globular grains is Ostwald ripening. Furthermore, high-temperature compressibility can be improved by the TS-SIMA process. After a 4 min salt bath at 620 °C, the high-temperature compression ratio become higher than that of a fully annealed alloy. The results show that the proposed TS-SIMA process has great potential.

  20. Influence of preoxidation on high temperature corrosion of a Ni-based alloy under conditions relevant to biomass firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    . Complementary characterization methods were employed to study samples after preoxidation as well as after corrosion exposure. The oxides obtained by the preoxidation treatments protected the alloy during corrosion exposure at 560 °C for a period of 168 h. In contrast, non-preoxidized samples suffered corrosion...... attack and formed porous non-protective oxides containing the alloying elements, Ni, Cr, Ti and Al. The influence of the preoxidation layers on the corrosion mechanism is discussed.......Development of corrosion resistant materials in biomass fired power plants demands specific attention since the condensation of deposits rich in KCl on heat exchanger surfaces induces severe corrosion attack, which is different from corrosion in traditional coal fired plants. Therefore, the ability...

  1. High Temperature Silicides and Refractory Alloys Symposium Held in Boston, Massachusetts on November 29 -December 2, 1993. Volume 322

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-02

    MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF Nb-Ti BASE BETA + SILICIDE ALLOYS . ................................... 491 P.R. Subramanian, M.G. Mendiratta, and D.M. Dimiduk...above -1300°C, the amorphous silica can transform to a- cristobalite . The oxygen diffusivity will change as the structure of the silica changes, and...first 10 to 40 hours. After 100 hours of oxidation, the XRD analysis shows that the oxide layer is cristobalite , the stable crystalline phase of silica

  2. Experimental study on dieless drawing of Nickel-Titanium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, E; Tiernan, P; Tofail, S A M

    2012-04-01

    The effect of a dieless drawing process on commercial grade Nickel-Titanium rods, of 5 mm diameter, was investigated by varying the established critical process parameters of temperature, cooling rate, drawing velocity, and heating/cooling velocity. The rods were successfully dieless drawn with a maximum steady state reduction in cross-sectional area of 54%. The thermal and mechanical loading profiles of the rod during processing, and the resulting changes in microstructure and hardness, have been investigated. Uniform levels of stress and strain resulted in uniform reduction of the rod cross-sectional area. The grain structure was highly deformed in the drawing direction and increased porosity was observed as a result of the process. The longitudinal section hardness of the rod was significantly reduced as a result of the dieless drawing process. Any failures that arose were due to discontinuities within the material microstructure caused by a high necking rate, shorter exposure time to the process temperature and low heating and cooling rates. A uniform oxidation layer was observed on the surface of the processed rods as a result of processing in atmospheric conditions. This oxidation layer has the potential to aid in the lubrication of subsequent cold working operations of the dieless drawn rods. Coupling the thermomechanical effects of the dieless drawing process with a cold drawing processing step has the potential to produce a NiTi wire in fewer passes, and therefore at a reduced cost. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement: the game changing factor in the applicability of nickel alloys in oilfield technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento Klapper, Helmuth; Klöwer, Jutta; Gosheva, Olesya

    2017-06-01

    Precipitation hardenable (PH) nickel (Ni) alloys are often the most reliable engineering materials for demanding oilfield upstream and subsea applications especially in deep sour wells. Despite their superior corrosion resistance and mechanical properties over a broad range of temperatures, the applicability of PH Ni alloys has been questioned due to their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement (HE), as confirmed in documented failures of components in upstream applications. While extensive work has been done in recent years to develop testing methodologies for benchmarking PH Ni alloys in terms of their HE susceptibility, limited scientific research has been conducted to achieve improved foundational knowledge about the role of microstructural particularities in these alloys on their mechanical behaviour in environments promoting hydrogen uptake. Precipitates such as the γ', γ'' and δ-phase are well known for defining the mechanical and chemical properties of these alloys. To elucidate the effect of precipitates in the microstructure of the oil-patch PH Ni alloy 718 on its HE susceptibility, slow strain rate tests under continuous hydrogen charging were conducted on material after several different age-hardening treatments. By correlating the obtained results with those from the microstructural and fractographic characterization, it was concluded that HE susceptibility of oil-patch alloy 718 is strongly influenced by the amount and size of precipitates such as the γ' and γ'' as well as the δ-phase rather than by the strength level only. In addition, several HE mechanisms including hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and hydrogen-enhanced local plasticity were observed taking place on oil-patch alloy 718, depending upon the characteristics of these phases when present in the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  4. Characterization of Ni19.5Ti50.5Pd25Pt5 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy Springs and their Potential Application in Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebner, Aaron; Padula, Santo A.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2008-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been used as actuators in many different industries since the discovery of the shape memory effect, but the use of SMAs as actuation devices in aeronautics has been limited due to the temperature constraints of commercially available materials. Consequently, work is being done at NASA's Glenn Research Center to develop new SMAs capable of being used in high temperature environments. One of the more promising high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) is Ni19.5Ti50.5Pd25Pt5. Recent work has shown that this material is capable of being used in operating environments of up to 250 C. This material has been shown to have very useful actuation capabilities, demonstrating repeatable strain recoveries up to 2.5% in the presence of an externally applied load. Based on these findings, further work has been initiated to explore potential applications and alternative forms of this alloy, such as springs. Thus, characterization of Ni19.5Ti50.5Pd25Pt5 springs, including their mechanical response and how variations in this response correlate to changes in geometric parameters, are discussed. The effects of loading history, or training, on spring behavior were also investigated. A comparison of the springs with wire actuators is made and the benefits of using one actuator form as opposed to the other discussed. These findings are used to discuss design considerations for a surge-control mechanism that could be used in the centrifugal compressor of a T-700 helicopter engine.

  5. Radiation damage buildup by athermal defect reactions in nickel and concentrated nickel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, People' s Republic of China; Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow, Russia; Djurabekova, F. [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow, Russia; Granberg, F. [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Zhang, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Wang, T. S. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, People' s Republic of China

    2017-03-09

    We develop a new method using binary collision approximation simulating the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling conditions (RBS/C) from molecular dynamics atom coordinates of irradiated cells. The approach allows comparing experimental and simulated RBS/C signals as a function of depth without fitting parameters. The simulated RBS/C spectra of irradiated Ni and concentrated solid solution alloys (CSAs, NiFe and NiCoCr) show a good agreement with the experimental results. The good agreement indicates the damage evolution under damage overlap conditions in Ni and CSAs at room temperature is dominated by defect recombination and migration induced by irradiation rather than activated thermally.

  6. Auricle reconstruction with a nickel-titanium shape memory alloy as the framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Fang-Lu; Wang, Shen-Jun; Liu, Hong-Jian

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the biocompatibility and implantability of a nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy in auricle reconstruction. Twelve New Zealand rabbits underwent subcutaneous implantation with a NiTi alloy framework shaped like the human auricle under general anesthesia. The implant was inserted after skin expansion. Implant vascularization was evaluated at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 after implantation by histologic analysis. Immunohistochemical methods were used to examine expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in tissue around the implant. The fibrovascular ingrowth rate of implants was determined by bone scanning using (99m)Tc-PYP. The surface of the NiTi alloy implant was examined microscopically with scanning electron microscopy. The implant harvested showed only partial vascularization at 1 month and completely vascularized at 3 months. The amount of vascular endothelial growth factor-positive cells was markedly increased at 6 months and reached the highest number at 3 months. The fibrovascular ingrowth rate of implant was assessed by (99m)Tc-PYP bone scan using ratios of (99m)Tc-PYP activity in placement regions versus the contralateral normal region. One rabbit had exposure of the NiTi alloy framework as a result of overlying skin flap necrosis. It was rescued with animal skin without the complete removal of the framework. All the other rabbits tolerated the implant well, and there were no complications. The NiTi alloy implant represents an alternative implant for auricular reconstruction.

  7. Synthesis of carbon nanofibers by catalytic CVD of chlorobenzene over bulk nickel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzhin, Roman M.; Bauman, Yuri I.; Volodin, Alexander M.; Mishakov, Ilya V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A.

    2018-01-01

    Catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of chlorobenzene over bulk nickel alloy (nichrome) was studied. The bulk Ni-containing samples being exposed to a contact with aggressive reaction medium undergo self-disintegration followed by growth of carbon nanofibers. This process, also known as a metal dusting, requires the simultaneous presence of chlorine and hydrogen sources in the reaction mixture. Molecule of chlorobenzene complies with these requirements. The experiments on CCVD were performed in a flow-through reactor system. The initial stages of nickel disintegration process were investigated in a closed system under Autogenic Pressure at Elevated Temperature (RAPET) conditions. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies and ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy were applied to examine the samples after their interaction with chlorobenzene. Introduction of additional hydrogen into the flow-through system was shown to affect the morphology of grown carbon nanofibers.

  8. Standard practice for evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in high-pressure, high-temperature refinery hydrogen service

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for the evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in refinery high-pressure/high-temperature (HP/HT) gaseous hydrogen service. It includes procedures to (1) produce suitable laboratory test specimens, (2) obtain hydrogen charging conditions in the laboratory that are similar to those found in refinery HP/HT hydrogen gas service for evaluation of bimetallic specimens exposed to these environments, and (3) perform analysis of the test data. The purpose of this practice is to allow for comparison of data among test laboratories on the resistance of bimetallic stainless alloy/steels to hydrogen-induced disbonding (HID). 1.2 This practice applies primarily to bimetallic products fabricated by weld overlay of stainless alloy onto a steel substrate. Most of the information developed using this practice has been obtained for such materials. The procedures described herein, may also be appropriate for evaluation of hot roll bonded, explosive bonded...

  9. Nickel and its alloys as perspective materials for intermediate temperature steam electrolysers operating on proton conducting solid acids as electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey; Petrushina, Irina; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2012-01-01

    Several stainless steels, nickel-based alloys, Ta-coated stainless steel, niobium, nickel, platinum and gold were evaluated as possible materials for use in the intermediate temperature water electrolysers. The corrosion resistance was measured in molten KH2PO4 as simulated conditions corresponding...... plates and cell housing. It was shown, that nickel, high-nickel alloys and austenitic stainless steels containing small amounts of Ti have high corrosion resistance in this media. © The Electrochemical Society....... to protonconducting solid acids or transition metal phosphates as electrolytes. It was shown that Au is subject to corrosion in molten KH 2PO4 during polarisation. However, Ni and Ta-coated stainless steel (AISI 316L) demonstrated high corrosion stability and can be recommended as a construction material for bipolar...

  10. Phase transformations in the Zn-Al eutectoid alloy after quenching from the high temperature triclinic beta phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval-Jimenez, A., E-mail: asandovalj@correo.unam.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Dpto. de Aceleradores, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Mexico, C.P. 52750, ESIME, Unidad Culhuacan, Dpto. Ing. Mecanica, IPN (Mexico); Negrete, J. [Instituto de Metalurgia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, SLP 78210 (Mexico); Torres-Villasenor, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-360, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    Ribbons of the Zn-Al eutectoid alloy obtained by melt-spinning, were heat treated at 350 deg. C during 30 min in a free atmosphere furnace, and then quenched in liquid nitrogen. The temperature correspond to {beta} phase zone, which has a triclinic crystalline structure [1, 2]. Some evidence, obtained by X-ray diffraction, show that the structures present in the just quenched material are both close-packed hexagonal ({eta}-phase) and rhombohedral (R-phase). X-ray diffractograms taken in the same ribbons after annealed 500 h at room temperature, show that the R phase its transform to {alpha} and {eta} phases.

  11. Mechanisms of wetting and brazing of silicon carbide by Cu-Si non reactive alloys for high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasse, A.; Chaumat, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Rado, C.; Eustathopoulos, N. [Institut National Polytechnique, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1995-12-31

    Sessile drop experiments were carried out with a non reactive Cu 24 at % Si alloy on {alpha}-SiC single crystals and polycrystalline substrates under high vacuum or a commercial argon atmosphere. Experiments led to contact angles as low as 30 deg. and to a non reactive and strong interface. Wetting kinetics observed in this system has been identified to depend greatly on temperature and atmosphere. Brazing experiments were then performed using informations from sessile drop experiments. Influence of the brazing configuration is discussed. (author) 11 refs.

  12. Influence of roughness and composition on the total emissivity of tungsten, rhenium and tungsten–25% rhenium alloy at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodu, E. [Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire, PROMES-CNRS, 7 rue du Four Solaire, 66120 Font-Romeu Odeillo (France); Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Balat-Pichelin, M., E-mail: marianne.balat@promes.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire, PROMES-CNRS, 7 rue du Four Solaire, 66120 Font-Romeu Odeillo (France); Sans, J.-L. [Laboratoire Procédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire, PROMES-CNRS, 7 rue du Four Solaire, 66120 Font-Romeu Odeillo (France); Kasper, J.C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-02-05

    Graphical abstract: Picture of the MEDIASE facility at the focus of the 1 MW solar furnace in Odeillo, France. Highlights: • Measurement of the emissivity of W, Re and W–25% Re up to 2500 K is performed. • A natural smoothing of the surfaces at high temperature reduces the emissivity. • The α/ε ratio is function of the roughness and decreases with increasing roughness. • A sharp surface structure provides an additional decrease of the α/ε ratio. • Finally, the α/ε ratio of Re is found to be lower than the W one. -- Abstract: Measurements of the total directional and hemispherical emissivity of tungsten, rhenium and tungsten with 25% rhenium samples of various surface states was carried out in two wavelength ranges, 0.6–2.8 and 0.6–40 μm, from 1300 up to 2500 K in high vacuum. A clear trend was identified for the ratio of the 0.6–2.8 μm to the 0.6–40 μm hemispherical emissivity (assumed to be close to the true α/ε ratio, which is the ratio of the solar absorptivity α to the total emissivity ε) as a function of the RMS roughness. This ratio is decreasing with increasing RMS roughness rapidly up to around 1 μm and then tends to stabilize for higher roughness. It suggests that increasing the roughness, starting from a flat surface, will progressively give more weight to the long wavelength range emissivities in comparison to the short wavelength ones. Beside the RMS roughness, a sharp surface structure on a finer scale found on some samples also led to an additional decrease of the α/ε ratio, but these structures are not stable at high temperature and disappear due to a natural high temperature smoothing. Finally our results also show that the α/ε ratio of rhenium is lower than the one of tungsten.

  13. Late complications of nickel-titanium alloy stent in tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenxian; Ruan, Yanyan

    2012-04-01

    To investigate and treat the late complications of using nickel-titanium alloy stents in laryngotracheal, bronchial, and esophageal stenosis patients who developed severe laryngotracheal stenosis (SLS). Retrospective clinical study. Thirteen patients with SLS or tracheoesophageal fistula secondary to insertion of a nickel-titanium alloy stent for treatment of laryngotracheal, bronchial, or esophageal stenosis treated between May 2004 and March 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 13 total patients, nine had one stent placed, and four had two stents placed. The late complications observed were glottic and/or subglottic extension of cervical tracheal stenosis (n = 6), new stricture of the thoracic trachea (n = 4), severe left bronchial stricture with massive left pulmonary collapse (n = 1), and cervical tracheoesophageal fistula (n = 2). Six patients with glottic and/or subglottic to cervical tracheal stenosis underwent successful laryngotracheal reconstruction. Two patients with subglottic and upper thoracic tracheal stenosis were successfully treated by staged operation for the stenosis. Two patients with subglottic and distal thoracic tracheal stenosis are still undergoing treatment. One patient with severe left bronchial stricture and massive left pulmonary collapse has been treated but has not achieved full recovery. One patient with cervical tracheoesophageal fistula underwent successful repair but died later from metastatic disease. One patient with tracheoesophageal fistula died from massive hemorrhage and asphyxiation induced by the stent, which had not been removed. The nickel-titanium alloy stents should be used with extreme caution in patients with laryngotracheal, bronchial, or esophageal stenosis treatment that can be corrected by surgical therapy. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Structural modification and twinning stress reduction in a high-temperature Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagounis, E.; Chulist, R.; Lippmann, T.; Laufenberg, M.; Skrotzki, W.

    2013-09-01

    Mechanical and synchrotron diffraction experiments were performed to investigate the temperature dependent structural changes in a Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal. The initial sample exhibits a mixture of seven-layered (7M) and non-modulated (NM) martensites at room temperature. Compression along ⟨100⟩ resulted in a strain of 18%, indicating a stress-induced intermartensitic transformation from the 7M to the NM phase. The thermally induced intermartensitic transformation follows the sequence 5M→7M→NM during cooling from the austenite phase. The structural changes are quantitatively reflected in the mechanical response. A twinning stress of 3.8 MPa is measured at 90 °C, which is the lowest reported in high-temperature Ni-Mn-Ga structures.

  15. Low-cost, high-strength Fe--Ni--Cr alloys for high temperature exhaust valve application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan

    2017-09-05

    An Fe--Ni--Cr alloy is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. %: 2.4 to 3.7 Al, up to 1.05 Co, 14.8 to 15.9 Cr, 25 to 36 Fe, up to 1.2 Hf, up to 4 Mn, up to 0.6 Mo, up to 2.2 Nb, up to 1.05 Ta, 1.9 to 3.6 Ti, up to 0.08 W, up to 0.03 Zr, 0.18 to 0.27 C, up to 0.0015 N, balance Ni, wherein, in terms of atomic percent: 8.5.ltoreq.Al+Ti+Zr+Hf+Ta.ltoreq.11.5, 0.53.ltoreq.Al/(Al+Ti+Zr+Hf+Ta).ltoreq.0.65, and 0.16.ltoreq.Cr/(Fe+Ni+Cr+Mn).ltoreq.0.21, the alloy being essentially free of Cu, Si, and V.

  16. The machinability of nickel-based alloys in high-pressure jet assisted (HPJA turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kramar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to their mechanical, thermal and chemical properties, nickel-based alloys are generally included among materials that are hard to machine. An experimental study has been performed to investigate the capabilities of conventional and high-pressure jet assisted (HPJA turning of hard-to-machine materials, namely Inconel 718. The capabilities of different hard turning procedures are compared by means of chip breakability. The obtained results show that HPJA method offers a significant increase in chip breakability, under the same cutting conditions (cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut.

  17. Microstructure characterization of alloy 625 deposited on nickel foam using air plasma spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarmi, F.; Saaedi, J.; Coyle, T.W.; Mostaghimi, J. [Center for Advanced Coating Technologies, University of Toronto (Canada)

    2008-05-15

    Ni-based superalloy 625 has been deposited on nickel foam by air plasma spraying (APS) using an optimized set of spraying parameters under two different substrate conditions. For condition (i) the substrate was not cooled during spraying and for condition (ii) the substrate constantly cooled using air jets during spraying. Microstructural characteristics of the as-sprayed coating microstructure were examined by a combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), image analysis, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and compared to those of the alloy 625 powder used for spraying. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE AND CREEP BEHAVIOR OF Mo-Si-B-BASED INTERMETALLIC ALLOYS FOR VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijay K. Vasudevan

    2005-12-21

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. During this year, the compressive creep behavior of a Mo-3Si-1B (in wt.%) alloy at 1100 and 1200 C were studied and related to the deformation mechanisms through electron microscopy observations of microstructural changes and deformation structures. The microstructure of this alloy was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. Results of compressive creep tests at 1200 and 1100 C showed that the creep rates were quite high at stress levels between 250 and 500 MPa, Two minima in the creep strain rate versus strain data were noted, one at small strain values and the second at much larger strains. A stress exponent of 4.26 was obtained upon plotting the strain rate corresponding to the first minima versus stress, which suggests that dislocation climb and glide dominate the creep process in the early stages. On the other hand, the large strain, minimum creep rate versus stress data gave a stress exponent of {approx}1.18, which indicates diffusional mechanisms and recrystallization dominate the later stages of the creep process. At 1100 C, a stress exponent of 2.26 was obtained, which suggests that both diffusional and dislocation mechanisms contribute to the creep strain. Based on the minimum creep rate data at 1100 C and 1200 C, the activation energy for creep was determined to be 525 kJ/mole, which is somewhat higher than that reported for self diffusion in {alpha}-Mo. Microstructural observations of post-crept samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. In addition, TEM observations revealed the presence of recrystallized grains and sub-grain boundaries composed of dislocation arrays

  19. Segregation-induced ordered superstructures at general grain boundaries in a nickel-bismuth alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyang; Cantwell, Patrick R.; Gao, Qin; Yin, Denise; Zhang, Yuanyao; Zhou, Naixie; Rohrer, Gregory S.; Widom, Michael; Luo, Jian; Harmer, Martin P.

    2017-10-01

    The properties of materials change, sometimes catastrophically, as alloying elements and impurities accumulate preferentially at grain boundaries. Studies of bicrystals show that regular atomic patterns often arise as a result of this solute segregation at high-symmetry boundaries, but it is not known whether superstructures exist at general grain boundaries in polycrystals. In bismuth-doped polycrystalline nickel, we found that ordered, segregation-induced grain boundary superstructures occur at randomly selected general grain boundaries, and that these reconstructions are driven by the orientation of the terminating grain surfaces rather than by lattice matching between grains. This discovery shows that adsorbate-induced superstructures are not limited to special grain boundaries but may exist at a variety of general grain boundaries, and hence they can affect the performance of polycrystalline engineering alloys.

  20. Probability of Occurrence of Life-Limiting Fatigue Mechanism in P/M Nickel-Based Alloys (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Microstructures 8 and 9 in Figure 3(b) can be considered to correspond to the " Small " and "Large" seeded specimens under no peening with volumetric...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0146 PROBABILITY OF OCCURRENCE OF LIFE-LIMITING FATIGUE MECHANISM IN P/M NICKEL-BASED ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) M.J...February 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PROBABILITY OF OCCURRENCE OF LIFE-LIMITING FATIGUE MECHANISM IN P/M NICKEL-BASED ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) 5a

  1. Simulation of high-temperature superlocalization of plastic deformation in single-crystals of alloys with an L12 superstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solov'eva, Yu. V.; Fakhrutdinova, Ya. D.; Starenchenko, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The processes of the superlocalization of plastic deformation in L12 alloys have been studied numerically based on a combination of the model of the dislocation kinetics of the deformation-induced and heat-treatment-induced strengthening of an element of a deformable medium with the model of the mechanics of microplastic deformation described in terms of elastoplastic medium. It has been shown that the superlocalization of plastic deformation is determined by the presence of stress concentrators and by the nonmonotonic strengthening of the elements of the deformable medium. The multiple nonmonotonicity of the process of strengthening of the elementary volume of the medium can be responsible for the multiplicity of bands of microplastic localization of deformation.

  2. Constitutive Modeling of High-Temperature Flow Behavior of an Nb Micro-alloyed Hot Stamping Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiqi; Feng, Ding; Huang, Yunhua; Wei, Shizhong; Mohrbacher, Hardy; Zhang, Yue

    2016-03-01

    The thermal deformation behavior and constitutive models of an Nb micro-alloyed 22MnB5 steel were investigated by conducting isothermal uniaxial tensile tests at the temperature range of 873-1223 K with strain rates of 0.1-10 s-1. The results indicated that the investigated steel showed typical work hardening and dynamic recovery behavior during hot deformation, and the flow stress decreased with a decrease in strain rate and/or an increase in temperature. On the basis of the experimental data, the modified Johnson-Cook (modified JC), modified Norton-Hoff (modified NH), and Arrhenius-type (AT) constitutive models were established for the subject steel. However, the flow stress values predicted by these three models revealed some remarkable deviations from the experimental values for certain experimental conditions. Therefore, a new combined modified Norton-Hoff and Arrhenius-type constitutive model (combined modified NH-AT model), which accurately reflected both the work hardening and dynamic recovery behavior of the subject steel, was developed by introducing the modified parameter k ɛ. Furthermore, the accuracy of these constitutive models was assessed by the correlation coefficient, the average absolute relative error, and the root mean square error, which indicated that the flow stress values computed by the combined modified NH-AT model were highly consistent with the experimental values (R = 0.998, AARE = 1.63%, RMSE = 3.85 MPa). The result confirmed that the combined modified NH-AT model was suitable for the studied Nb micro-alloyed hot stamping steel. Additionally, the practicability of the new model was also verified using finite element simulations in ANSYS/LS-DYNA, and the results confirmed that the new model was practical and highly accurate.

  3. Internal nitridation of nickel-base alloys; Innere Nitrierung von Nickelbasis-Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupp, U.; Christ, H.J. [Siegen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik

    1998-12-31

    The chromuim concentration is the crucial variable in nitridation processes in nickel-base alloys. Extensive nitridation experiments with various specimen alloys of the system Ni-Cr-Al-Ti have shown that the Cr itself starts to form nitrides as from elevated initial concentrations of about 10 to 20 weight%, (depending on temperature), but that lower concentrations have an earlier effect in that they induce a considerable increase in the N-solubility of the nickel-base alloys. This causes an accelerated nitridation attack on the alloying elements Ti and Al. Apart from experimental detection and analysis, the phenomenon of internal nitridation could be described as well by means of a mathematical model calculating the diffusion with the finite-differences method and determining the precipitation thermodynamics by way of integrated equilibrium calculations. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Im Verlauf der Hochtemperaturkorrosion von Nickelbasis-Superlegierungen kann durch beanspruchungsbedingte Schaedigungen der Oxiddeckschicht ein Verlust der Schutzwirkung erfolgen und als Konsequenz Stickstoff aus der Atmosphaere in den Werkstoff eindringen. Der eindiffundierende Stickstoff bildet vor allem mit den Legierungselementen Al, Cr und Ti Nitridausscheidungen, die zu einer relativ rasch fortschreitenden Schaedigung fuehren koennen. Eine bedeutende Rolle bei diesen Nitrierungsprozessen in Nickelbasislegierungen spielt die Cr-Konzentration in der Legierung. So ergaben umfangreiche Nitrierungsexperimente an verschiedenen Modellegierungen des Systems Ni-Cr-Al-Ti, dass Cr zwar selbst erst ab Ausgangskonzentrationen von ca. 10-20 Gew.% (abhaengig von der Temperatur) Nitride bildet, allerdings bereits bei geringen Konzentrationen die N-Loeslichkeit von Nickelbasis-Legierungen entscheidend erhoeht. Dies hat zur Folge, dass es zu einem beschleunigten Nitrierungsangriff auf die Legierungselemente Ti und Al kommt. Neben den experimentellen Untersuchungen konnte das Phaenomen der inneren

  4. Simultaneous material flow analysis of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum used in alloy steel by means of input-output analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Ohno, Hajime; Kondo, Yasushi; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Takeda, Osamu; Miki, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2013-05-07

    Steel is not elemental iron but rather a group of iron-based alloys containing many elements, especially chromium, nickel, and molybdenum. Steel recycling is expected to promote efficient resource use. However, open-loop recycling of steel could result in quality loss of nickel and molybdenum and/or material loss of chromium. Knowledge about alloying element substance flow is needed to avoid such losses. Material flow analyses (MFAs) indicate the importance of steel recycling to recovery of alloying elements. Flows of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum are interconnected, but MFAs have paid little attention to the interconnected flow of materials/substances in supply chains. This study combined a waste input-output material flow model and physical unit input-output analysis to perform a simultaneous MFA for nickel, chromium, and molybdenum in the Japanese economy in 2000. Results indicated the importance of recovery of these elements in recycling policies for end-of-life (EoL) vehicles and constructions. Improvement in EoL sorting technologies and implementation of designs for recycling/disassembly at the manufacturing phase are needed. Possible solutions include development of sorting processes for steel scrap and introduction of easier methods for identifying the composition of secondary resources. Recovery of steel scrap with a high alloy content will reduce primary inputs of alloying elements and contribute to more efficient resource use.

  5. Structure and phase transformations in copper-alloyed rapidly melt-quenched Ni50Ti32Hf18-based alloys with high-temperature shape memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushin, A. V.; Pushin, V. G.; Kuranova, N. N.; Kourov, N. I.; Kuntsevich, T. E.; Makarov, V. V.; Uksusnikov, A. N.

    2017-10-01

    Methods of transmission and scanning electron microscopy, chemical microanalysis, electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction have been used to carry out the comparative study of the structure and chemical and phase composition of thin ribbons of four quasi-binary alloys (Ni50Ti32Hf18, Ni45Ti32Hf18Cu5, Ni35Ti32Hf18Cu15, and Ni25Ti32Hf18Cu25) obtained in the amorphous state by rapid quenching from the melt by jet spinning. The critical temperatures of the devitrification and B2 ↔ B19' martensitic transformation of the alloys have been determined based on the data of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity. The specific features of the formation of the ultrafine-grained structure upon the devitrification and of the phase transformations have been studied depending on the heat-treatment regimes and chemical composition of the alloys (concentration of copper atoms).

  6. The use of new PHACOMP in understanding the solidification microstructure of nickel base alloy weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, M. J.; Knorovsky, G. A.; Headley, T. J.; Romig, A. D.

    1986-12-01

    The weld metal microstructures of five commercial nickel base alloys (HASTELLOYS* C-4, C-22, and C-276, and INCONELS* 625 and 718) have been examined by electron probe microanalysis and analytical electron microscopy. It has been found that solidification terminates in many of these alloys with the formation of a constituent containing a topologically-close-packed (TCP) intermetallic phase (i.e., σ, P, Laves). Electron microprobe examination of gas-tungsten-arc welds revealed a solidification segregation pattern of Ni depletion and solute enrichment in interdendritic volumes. New PHACOMP calculations performed on these segregation profiles revealed a pattern of increasing M d (metal- d levels) in traversing from a dendrite core to an adjacent interdendritic volume. In alloys forming a terminal solidification TCP constituent, the calculated M d values in interdendritic regions were greater than the critical M d values for formation of σ as stated by Morinaga et al. Implications of the correlation between TCP phase formation and M d in the prediction of weld metal solidification microstructure, prediction of potential hot-cracking behavior, and applications in future alloy design endeavors are discussed.

  7. Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković Nemanja; Draganjac Miroslav; Stamenković Dragoslav; Ristić Ljubiša

    2008-01-01

    Introduction/Aim. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metalceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface...

  8. Metallic ions released from stainless steel, nickel-free, and titanium orthodontic alloys: toxicity and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Antonio José; Fernández, Esther; Vicente, Ascensión; Calvo, José L; Ortiz, Clara

    2011-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the amounts of metallic ions that stainless steel, nickel-free, and titanium alloys release to a culture medium, and to evaluate the cellular viability and DNA damage of cultivated human fibroblasts with those mediums. The metals were extracted from 10 samples (each consisting of 4 buccal tubes and 20 brackets) of the 3 orthodontic alloys that were submerged for 30 days in minimum essential medium. Next, the determination of metals was performed by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, cellular viability was assessed by using the tetrazolium reduction assay (MTT assay) (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide), and DNA damage was determined with the Comet assay. The metals measured in all the samples were Ti(47), Cr(52), Mn(55), Co(59), Ni(60), Mo(92), Fe(56), Cu(63), Zn(66), As(75), Se(78), Cd(111), and Pb(208). The cellular viability of the cultured fibroblasts incubated for 7 days with minimum essential medium, with the stainless steel alloy submerged, was close to 0%. Moreover, high concentrations of titanium, chromium, manganese, cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, iron, copper, and zinc were detected. The nickel-free alloy released lower amounts of ions to the medium. The greatest damage in the cellular DNA, measured as the olive moment, was also produced by the stainless steel alloy followed by the nickel-free alloy. Conversely, the titanium alloy had an increased cellular viability and did not damage the cellular DNA, as compared with the control values. The titanium brackets and tubes are the most biocompatible of the 3 alloys studied. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metalceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface thickness. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Per six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C were made each. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Analysis Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX (Oxford Instruments and Scanning Electon Microscop (SEM analysis (JEOL were used to determine thickness of metal-ceramic interface together with PC Software for quantification of visual information's (KVI POPOVAC. Results. Results of this research introduced significant differences between thickness of metal-ceramic interface in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on thickness of metal-ceramic interface of the examined alloys. This research showed almost linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 12th generation of recycling. Conclusion. Recasting of nickel-chromium and cobaltchromium alloys is not recommended because of reduced thickness of metal-ceramic interface of these alloys. Instead of recycling, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturers.

  10. Effect of alloy grain size on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of the austenitic steel TP 347

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Braz Trindade

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Generally, oxide scales formed on high Cr steels are multi-layered and the kinetics are strongly influenced by the alloy grain boundaries. In the present study, the oxidation behaviour of an austenite steel TP347 with different grain sizes was studied to identify the role of grain-boundaries in the oxidation process. Heat treatment in an inert gas atmosphere at 1050 °C was applied to modify the grain size of the steel TP347. The mass gain during subsequent oxidation was measured using a microbalance with a resolution of 10-5 g. The scale morphology was examined using SEM in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Oxidation of TP347 with a grain size of 4 µm at 750 °C in air follows a parabolic rate law. For a larger grain size (65 µm, complex kinetics is observed with a fast initial oxidation followed by several different parabolic oxidation stages. SEM examinations indicated that the scale formed on specimens with smaller grain size was predominantly Cr2O3, with some FeCr2O4 at localized sites. For specimens with larger grain size the main oxide is iron oxide. It can be concluded that protective Cr2O3 formation is promoted by a high density of fast grain-boundary diffusion paths which is the case for fine-grained materials.

  11. Effect of High Temperature Hot Corrosion on the Compression Creep Behavior of 12Cr1MoV Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianjun; Xiong, Weizhou

    2017-10-01

    This paper highlights the effect of 70 %NaCl-30 %KCl salt mixture on compression creep properties of 12Cr1MoV alloys at 100 MPa (948.15 K, 973.15 K and 998.15 K) in air using bare specimens and specimens in corrosive environment. The corrosive specimens were also tested at 923.15 K (150 MPa, 175 MPa and 200 MPa). Experimental results showed that the specimen in chloride mixture showed relatively high compression creep strain and steady-state creep rates compared with the bare specimen, and this effect accelerated with the increased temperature, especially when it was above 973.15 K. The creep mechanisms of the specimen in chloride mixture were inferred from gliding and climbing of dislocations of the stress exponent. Damage of hot corrosion in creep deformation was found to be associated with the layer fracture attributing to the initiation and propagation from the intergranular cracks and reduction of the bare area caused by the internal transgranular attack of chloride mixture.

  12. Interactions at the mould – modifying coating – molten nickel alloy interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michalska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The study describes thermal-chemical interactions that take place in the molten nickel alloy-ceramic mould system, where the mould is either coated with a modifying coating („blue” mould or is not („white” mould. The ceramic mould based on zirconium silicate was made by investment process at the WSK Rzeszów Foundry. The main component of the modifying coating was cobalt aluminate CoAl2O4 added in an amount of 10%. Thermodynamic calculations indicated the possibility of chemical reactions taking place between the chemically active nickel alloy constituents (Al, Ti, Hf, Ta and Nb and the components of a ceramic mould and modifying coating. The result of such interactions is the risk of the formation of cracks on the surface of mould and molten metal penetration into these cracks, combined with the formation of casting defects, like burns-on, pitting, etc., as proved by extensive X-ray microanalysis. Changes of chemical composition in the surface layer of castings were also reported.

  13. Research on high-temperature compression and creep behavior of porous Cu–Ni–Cr alloy for molten carbonate fuel cell anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li W.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of porosity on high temperature compression and creep behavior of porous Cu alloy for the new molten carbonate fuel cell anodes was examined. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate and analyze the details of the microstructure and surface deformation. Compression creep tests were utilized to evaluate the mechanical properties of the alloy at 650 °C. The compression strength, elastic modulus, and yield stress all increased with the decrease in porosity. Under the same creep stress, the materials with higher porosity exhibited inferior creep resistance and higher steadystate creep rate. The creep behavior has been classified in terms of two stages. The first stage relates to grain rearrangement which results from the destruction of large pores by the applied load. In the second stage, small pores are collapsed by a subsequent sintering process under the load. The main deformation mechanism consists in that several deformation bands generate sequentially under the perpendicular loading, and in these deformation bands the pores are deformed by flattering and collapsing sequentially. On the other hand, the shape of a pore has a severe influence on the creep resistance of the material, i.e. every increase of pore size corresponds to a decrease in creep resistance.

  14. Evaluation of effect of recasting of nickel-chromium alloy on its castability using different investment materials: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, it was concluded that there was no significant difference found in castability of different percentage combinations of new and once casted alloy using two investment materials. The addition of new alloy during recasting to maintain the castability of nickel-chromium alloy may therefore not be required.

  15. Studies on the Codeposition of SiC Nanopowder with Nickel, Cobalt, and Co-Ni Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Rudnik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of SiC nanopowder (approximately 120 nm with nickel, cobalt, and Co-Ni alloy matrix was studied. It was found that particles suspended in the bath affect slightly the reduction of metallic ions. Incorporation of the ceramic particles was governed mainly by the morphology of the matrix surface, while no strict correlation between the amount of cobalt ions adsorbed on the powder and the SiC content in the composites was found. Microhardness of nickel deposits was 585±5 HV, while for cobalt-rich coatings (84–95 wt.% Co the values were in the range of 260–290 HV, independently of the SiC content in the coatings. Fine-grained nickel deposits were characterized by good corrosion resistance, while cobalt and Co-Ni alloys showed high corrosion current densities.

  16. Titanium-nickel shape memory alloy foams for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, J Y; Li, Y C; Wang, X J; Hodgson, P D; Wen, C E

    2008-07-01

    Titanium-nickel (TiNi) shape memory alloy (SMA) foams with an open-cell porous structure were fabricated by space-holder sintering process and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The mechanical properties and shape memory properties of the TiNi foam samples were investigated using compressive test. Results indicate that the plateau stresses and elastic moduli of the foams under compression decrease with the increase of their porosities. The plateau stresses and elastic moduli are measured to be from 1.9 to 38.3 MPa and from 30 to 860 MPa for the TiNi foam samples with porosities ranged from 71% to 87%, respectively. The mechanical properties of the TiNi alloy foams can be tailored to match those of bone. The TiNi alloy foams exhibit shape memory effect (SME), and it is found that the recoverable strain due to SME decreases with the increase of foam porosity.

  17. Evaluation of Metallurgical Quality of Master Heat IN-713C Nickel Alloy Ingots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of evaluation of the metallurgical quality of master heat ingots and of the identification of non-metallic inclusions (oxides of Al., Zr, Hf, Cr, etc., which have been found in the shrinkage cavities formed in these ingots. The inclusions penetrate into the liquid alloy, and on pouring of mould are transferred to the casting, especially when the filtering system is not sufficiently effective. The specific nature of the melting process of nickel and cobalt alloys, carried out in vacuum induction furnaces,excludes the possibility of alloy refining and slag removal from the melt surface. Therefore, to improve the quality of castings (parts of aircraft engines, it is so important to evaluate the quality of ingots before charging them into the crucible of an induction furnace. It has been proved that one of the methods for rapid quality evaluation is an ATD analysis of the sample solidification process, where samples are taken from different areas of the master heat ingot. The evaluation is based on a set of parameters plotted on the graph of the dT/dt derivative curve during the last stage of the solidification process in a range from TEut to Tsol.

  18. Hydrogen induced cracking tests of high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the bolt-loaded specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigilante, G.N.; Underwood, J.H.; Crayon, D.; Tauscher, S.; Sage, T.; Troiano, E. [Army Armament RD and E Center, Watervliet, NY (United States). Benet Labs.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760--1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.

  19. Creep and stress rupture of a mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion and precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Mervyn, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture behavior of a mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and gamma-prime precipitation strengthened nickel-base alloy (alloy MA 6000E) was studied at intermediate and elevated temperatures. At 760 C, MA 6000E exhibits the high creep strength characteristic of nickel-base superalloys and at 1093 C the creep strength is superior to other ODS nickel-base alloys. The stress dependence of the creep rate is very sharp at both test temperatures and the apparent creep activation energy measured around 760 C is high, much larger in magnitude than the self-diffusion energy. Stress rupture in this large grain size material is transgranular and crystallographic cracking is observed. The rupture ductility is dependent on creep strain rate, but usually is low. These and accompanying microstructural results are discussed with respect to other ODS alloys and superalloys and the creep behavior is rationalized by invoking a recently-developed resisting stress model of creep in materials strengthened by second phase particles.

  20. Microstructure, nickel suppression and mechanical characteristics of electropolished and photoelectrocatalytically oxidized biomedical nickel titanium shape memory alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C L; Guo, C; Sheng, X B; Dong, Y S; Lin, P H; Yeung, K W K; Chu, Paul K

    2009-07-01

    A new surface modification protocol encompassing an electropolishing pretreatment (EP) and subsequent photoelectrocatalytic oxidation (PEO) has been developed to improve the surface properties of biomedical nickel titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA). Electropolishing is a good way to improve the resistance to localized breakdown of NiTi SMA whereas PEO offers the synergistic effects of advanced oxidation and electrochemical oxidation. Our results indicate that PEO leads to the formation of a sturdy titania film on the EP NiTi substrate. There is an Ni-free zone near the top surface and a graded interface between the titania layer and NiTi substrate, which bodes well for both biocompatibility and mechanical stability. In addition, Ni ion release from the NiTi substrate is suppressed, as confirmed by the 10-week immersion test. The modulus and hardness of the modified NiTi surface increase with larger indentation depths, finally reaching plateau values of about 69 and 3.1GPa, respectively, which are slightly higher than those of the NiTi substrate but much lower than those of a dense amorphous titania film. In comparison, after undergoing only EP, the mechanical properties of NiTi exhibit an inverse change with depth. The deformation mechanism is proposed and discussed. Our results indicate that surface modification by dual EP and PEO can notably suppress Ni ion release and improve the biocompatibility of NiTi SMA while the surface mechanical properties are not compromised, making the treated materials suitable for hard tissue replacements.

  1. Influence of Nickel Addition on Properties of Secondary AlSi7Mg0.3 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richtárech L.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with influence on segregation of iron based phases on the secondary alloy AlSi7Mg0.3 microstructure by nickel. Iron is the most common and harmful impurity in aluminum casting alloys and has long been associated with an increase of casting defects. In generally, iron is associated with the formation of Fe-rich intermetallic phases. It is impossible to remove iron from melt by standard operations. Some elements eliminates iron by changing iron intermetallic phase morphology, decreasing its extent and by improving alloy properties. Realization of experiments and results of analysis show new view on solubility of iron based phases during melt preparation with higher iron content and influence of nickel as iron corrector of iron based phases.

  2. On the Recovery Stress of a Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S. A., II; Bigelow, G. S.; Gaydosh, D. J.; Garg, A.; Halsmer, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recovery stress in shape memory alloys (SMAs), also known as blocking stress, is an important property generally obtained during heating under a dimensional constraint as the material undergoes the martensitic phase transformation. This property has been instinctively utilized in most SMA shape-setting procedures, and has been used in numerous applications such as fastening and joining, rock splitting, safety release mechanisms, reinforced composites, medical devices, and many other applications. The stress generation is also relevant to actuator applications where jamming loads (e.g., in case the actuator gets stuck and is impeded from moving) need to be determined for proper hardware sizing. Recovery stresses in many SMA systems have been shown to reach stresses in the order of 800 MPa, achieved via thermo-mechanical training such as pre-straining, heat treatments or other factors. With the advent of high strength, high temperature SMAs, recovery stress data has been rarely probed, and there is no information pertinent to the magnitudes of these stresses. Thus, the purpose of this work is to investigate the recovery stress capability of a precipitation strengthened, Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (at.) high temperature SMA in uniaxial tension and compression. This material has been shown to exhibit outstanding strength and stability during constant-stress, thermal cycling, but no data exists on constant-strain thermal cycling. Several training routines were implemented as part of this work including isothermal pre-straining, isobaric thermal cycling, and isothermal cyclic training routines. Regardless of the training method used, the recovery stress was characterized using constant-strain (strain-controlled condition) thermal cycling between the upper and lower cycle temperatures. Preliminary results indicate recovery stresses in excess of 1.5 GPa were obtained after a specific training routine. This stress magnitude is significantly higher than conventional NiTi stress

  3. Passivation and corrosion of the high performance materials alloy 33, alloy 31 and nickel in LiBr solution at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igual Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Guinon, J.L.; Perez Herranz, V. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S. Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of Lithium Bromide are employed as absorbent solutions for almost all types of heating and refrigerating absorption systems that use natural gas or steam as energy sources. LiBr solutions can cause serious corrosion problems in common metallic components. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of new high alloyed materials in commercial LiBr heavy brine solution (which contains chromate as inhibitor), at different temperatures (25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 deg. C). The materials tested were stainless steels Alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new corrosion resistant austenitic material alloyed with nominally (wt%) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni; Nicrofer 3127 hMo-alloy 31 (UNS N08031), an iron-nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with nitrogen; and pure Nickel. Corrosion resistance was estimated from the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves, comparing OCP values, calculating corrosion potentials and current rates from Tafel analysis; in order to characterize the passivating behaviour of the alloys the study was completed with the analysis of the pitting potentials, passivating current and re-passivating properties at the temperatures under study. Passivating properties are well observed in all the samples in commercial LiBr solution at all temperatures. In these cases, passivation properties decrease with temperature. (authors)

  4. Analytical and electrochemical evaluation of the in vitro corrosion behavior of nickel-chrome and cobalt-chrome casting alloys for metal-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yfantis, Constaninos; Yfantis, Dimitrios; Anastassopoulou, Jane; Theophanides, Theophilos

    2007-03-01

    In this study we examined the hypothesis based on relevant literature survey that the in vitro corrosion behavior of a Cobalt-chrome dental casting alloy for metal-ceramic restorations is better than that of a Nickel-chrome dental casting alloy. The corrosion released metal ions were analysed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. Moreover, the specimens were electrochemically tested by linear polarization. The statistical analysis of the results showed statistically significant differences in corrosion rates of Nickel-chrome alloy and Cobalt-chrome alloy calculated by analytical and electrochemical measurements. The hypothesis was confirmed and the results showed that the corrosion rates of the Cobalt-chrome alloy were lower than that of the Nickel-chrome alloy.

  5. Application of cast nickel alloys for parts of electronics characterised by special magnetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. UhI

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Thc thcorctical part of the study highlights thc origin of thc idca 10 start investigations on alloys of high ~nngnctic pcrmcability.manufactured mainly by cornpanics in ~ h Uc S A and Japan.'Phc said materials arc applicd for various pans of ctcctronics uscd by thc military industry. c.g. sntctlitc antcnnas Tor globalcommunication with suhmarincs. and for rcscarch instmrncnts, c,g. fcrromagnctic corcs. Thcy arc chnr:~clcriscd by vcry high lnnpncticpcrrncability. resistivity and corrosion rcsistancc which makc thcm suitablc for opcrat ion undcr cxtrn-~ryingc onditions.Nickel alloys of high magnctic propcrtics arc usuall y manufactured as roZlcd products. The amhition of t hc authors or this srlldy is Inmanufacture !hem as cast prnducts.Thc pmgram of rcscarch incIudcd characteristic of nickcl alloys wirh ddi t i ons of molybdcnum slid iron sn~isryingt hc ahnvc mc~iito ncdrcquircmcnu. with attcn~ionf ocusscd on thcir application for magnctic parts of satcllitc antcnnns and fcrromngnctic corcs.Moulding and casting tcchnologics wcrc proposcd to bcst suit ~ h pcr occss OF maaufacturc of r hcsc clcmcnrs.Thc rangc of chcmicaI cornpostion was sclcctcd 20 cnsurc thc rcquircd magnctic. mcchnnicnl and anti-corrosive pmpcrtics.A scrics of melts was prcparcd and castings of thc abovc mcnlioncd clclncn1s wcrc mndc. Thc chclnicnl composi~ioii of IEIC alloys wasanalyscd along with thc stnlcturc cxarninations nnd quality asscssmcnt rnadc by ~ h cno n-dcsrructi vc rncthods, Casrings wcrc sitbjcctcd tothc finishing trcatmcnt, followed by tests and cxamina~ionsto cnablc thcir practical application.

  6. Co-reduction of Copper Smelting Slag and Nickel Laterite to Prepare Fe-Ni-Cu Alloy for Weathering Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Pan, Jian; Zhu, Deqing; Zhang, Feng

    2018-02-01

    In this study, a new technique was proposed for the economical and environmentally friendly recovery of valuable metals from copper smelting slag while simultaneously upgrading nickel laterite through a co-reduction followed by wet magnetic separation process. Copper slag with a high FeO content can decrease the liquidus temperature of the SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO system and facilitate formation of liquid phase in a co-reduction process with nickel laterite, which is beneficial for metallic particle growth. As a result, the recovery of Ni, Cu, and Fe was notably increased. A crude Fe-Ni-Cu alloy with 2.5% Ni, 1.1% Cu, and 87.9% Fe was produced, which can replace part of scrap steel, electrolytic copper, and nickel as the burden in the production of weathering steel by an electric arc furnace. The study further found that an appropriate proportion of copper slag and nickel laterite in the mixture is essential to enhance the reduction, acquire appropriate amounts of the liquid phase, and improve the growth of the metallic alloy grains. As a result, the liberation of alloy particles in the grinding process was effectively promoted and the metal recovery was increased significantly in the subsequent magnetic separation process.

  7. Co-reduction of Copper Smelting Slag and Nickel Laterite to Prepare Fe-Ni-Cu Alloy for Weathering Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Pan, Jian; Zhu, Deqing; Zhang, Feng

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a new technique was proposed for the economical and environmentally friendly recovery of valuable metals from copper smelting slag while simultaneously upgrading nickel laterite through a co-reduction followed by wet magnetic separation process. Copper slag with a high FeO content can decrease the liquidus temperature of the SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgO system and facilitate formation of liquid phase in a co-reduction process with nickel laterite, which is beneficial for metallic particle growth. As a result, the recovery of Ni, Cu, and Fe was notably increased. A crude Fe-Ni-Cu alloy with 2.5% Ni, 1.1% Cu, and 87.9% Fe was produced, which can replace part of scrap steel, electrolytic copper, and nickel as the burden in the production of weathering steel by an electric arc furnace. The study further found that an appropriate proportion of copper slag and nickel laterite in the mixture is essential to enhance the reduction, acquire appropriate amounts of the liquid phase, and improve the growth of the metallic alloy grains. As a result, the liberation of alloy particles in the grinding process was effectively promoted and the metal recovery was increased significantly in the subsequent magnetic separation process.

  8. Computational Thermodynamic Modeling of Hot Corrosion of Alloys Haynes 242 and HastelloyTM N for Molten Salt Service in Advanced High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Glazoff, Michael; Charit, Indrajt; Sabharwall, Piyush

    2014-09-17

    An evaluation of thermodynamic aspects of hot corrosion of the superalloys Haynes 242 and HastelloyTM N in the eutectic mixtures of KF and ZrF4 is carried out for development of Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR). This work models the behavior of several superalloys, potential candidates for the AHTR, using computational thermodynamics tool (ThermoCalc), leading to the development of thermodynamic description of the molten salt eutectic mixtures, and on that basis, mechanistic prediction of hot corrosion. The results from these studies indicated that the principal mechanism of hot corrosion was associated with chromium leaching for all of the superalloys described above. However, HastelloyTM N displayed the best hot corrosion performance. This was not surprising given it was developed originally to withstand the harsh conditions of molten salt environment. However, the results obtained in this study provided confidence in the employed methods of computational thermodynamics and could be further used for future alloy design efforts. Finally, several potential solutions to mitigate hot corrosion were proposed for further exploration, including coating development and controlled scaling of intermediate compounds in the KF-ZrF4 system.

  9. Synthesis of High-Temperature Self-lubricating Wear Resistant Composite Coating on Ti6Al4V Alloy by Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Xiang, Zhan-Feng; Shi, Shi-Hong; Chen, Yao; Shi, Gao-Lian; Wu, Shao-Hua; Wu, Yu-Nan

    2015-05-01

    Laser deposition was adopted to prepare novel Ni-based solid solution (γ-NiCrAlTi)/ TiC/α-Ti/CaF2 high-temperature self-lubricating wear resistant composite coating on Ti6Al4V alloy. Microstructure, micro-hardness, wear behavior, and counter-body effect of the coating were investigated systematically. It can be seen that the coating mainly consists of γ-NiCrAlTi, TiC, α-Ti, and small fine CaF2 particles. Average micro-hardness of the coating is 1023 HV0.3, which is about three-factor higher than that of Ti6Al4V substrate (380 HV0.3). The friction coefficient and wear rate of the coating decrease at all test temperatures to different extents with respect to the substrate. The improvement in wear resistance is believed to be the combined effects of the γ-NiCrAlTi solid solution, the dominating anti-wear capabilities of the reinforced TiC carbides, and the self-lubricating property of CaF2.

  10. Modeling the Effects of Cu Content and Deformation Variables on the High-Temperature Flow Behavior of Dilute Al-Fe-Si Alloys Using an Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, Mohammad; Parson, Nick; Chen, X-Grant

    2016-06-30

    The hot deformation behavior of Al-0.12Fe-0.1Si alloys with varied amounts of Cu (0.002-0.31 wt %) was investigated by uniaxial compression tests conducted at different temperatures (400 °C-550 °C) and strain rates (0.01-10 s-1). The results demonstrated that flow stress decreased with increasing deformation temperature and decreasing strain rate, while flow stress increased with increasing Cu content for all deformation conditions studied due to the solute drag effect. Based on the experimental data, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to study the relationship between chemical composition, deformation variables and high-temperature flow behavior. A three-layer feed-forward back-propagation artificial neural network with 20 neurons in a hidden layer was established in this study. The input parameters were Cu content, temperature, strain rate and strain, while the flow stress was the output. The performance of the proposed model was evaluated using the K-fold cross-validation method. The results showed excellent generalization capability of the developed model. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the strain rate is the most important parameter, while the Cu content exhibited a modest but significant influence on the flow stress.

  11. Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on the Microstructure, Properties, and Work Behavior of a Ti50.5 Ni29.5 Pt20 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebe, Ronald; Draper, Susan; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garga, Anita; Lerch, Brad; Penney, Nicholas; Begelow, Glen; Padula, Santo, II; Brown, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    TiNiPt shape memory alloys are particularly promising for use as solid state actuators in environments up to 300 C, due to a reasonable balance of properties, including acceptable work output. However, one of the challenges to commercializing a viable high-temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) is to establish the appropriate primary and secondary processing techniques for fabrication of the material in a required product form such as rod and wire. Consequently, a Ti(50.5)Ni(29.5)Pt20 alloy was processed using several techniques including single-pass high-temperature extrusion, multiple-pass high-temperature extrusion, and cold drawing to produce bar stock, thin rod, and fine wire, respectively. The effects of heat treatment on the hardness, grain size, room temperature tensile properties, and transformation temperatures of hot- and cold-worked material were examined. Basic tensile properties as a function of temperature and the strain-temperature response of the alloy under constant load, for the determination of work output, were also investigated for various forms of the Ti(50.5)Ni(29.5)Pt20 alloy, including fine wire.

  12. Studies on the Codeposition of SiC Nanopowder with Nickel, Cobalt, and Co-Ni Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Rudnik; Sławomir Syrek

    2014-01-01

    Electrodeposition of SiC nanopowder (approximately 120 nm) with nickel, cobalt, and Co-Ni alloy matrix was studied. It was found that particles suspended in the bath affect slightly the reduction of metallic ions. Incorporation of the ceramic particles was governed mainly by the morphology of the matrix surface, while no strict correlation between the amount of cobalt ions adsorbed on the powder and the SiC content in the composites was found. Microhardness of nickel deposits was 585±5 HV, wh...

  13. Electrical, Chemical, And Microstructural Analysis of the Thermal Stability of Nickel-based Ohmic Contacts to Silicon Carbide for High-Temperature Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virshup, Ariel R.

    With increasing attention on curbing the emission of pollutants into the atmosphere, chemical sensors that can be used to monitor and control these unwanted emissions are in great demand. Examples include monitoring of hydrocarbons from automobile engines and monitoring of flue gases such as CO emitted from power plants. One of the critical limitations in high-temperature SiC gas sensors, however, is the degradation of the metal-SiC contacts over time. In this dissertation, we investigated the high-temperature stability of Pt/TaSix/Ni/SiC ohmic contacts, which have been implemented in SiC-based gas sensors developed for applications in diesel engines and power plants. The high-temperature stability of a Pt/TaSi2/Ni/SiC ohmic contact metallization scheme was characterized using a combination of current-voltage measurements, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscope imaging and associated analytical techniques. Increasing the thicknesses of the Pt and TaSi2 layers promoted electrical stability of the contacts, which remained ohmic at 600°C in air for over 300 h; the specific contact resistance showed only a gradual increase from an initial value of 5.2 x 10-5 O-cm 2. We observed a continuous silicon-oxide layer in the thinner contact structures, which failed after 36 h of heating. It was found that the interface between TaSix and NiySi was weakened by the accumulation of free carbon (produced by the reaction of Ni and SiC), which in turn facilitated oxygen diffusion from the contact edges. Additional oxygen diffusion occurred along grain boundaries in the Pt overlayer. Meanwhile, thicker contacts, with less interfacial free carbon and enhanced electrical stability contained a much lower oxygen concentration that was distributed across the contact layers, precluding the formation of an electrically insulating contact structure.

  14. [LONG-SEGMENTAL TRACHEA REPLACEMENT USING NICKEL-TITANIUM ALLOY STENT WRAPPED WITH AUTOLOGOUS PERICARDIUM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuekui; Guo, Pengming; Li, Bin; Song, Tieniu; Yu, Lixin; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    To perfect the surgical process that trachea could be reconstructed by nickel-titanium (Ni- Ti) alloy stent wrapped with autologous pericardium, and to evaluate the effectiveness and observe the complications. In the experiment, twelve healthy Bama suckling pigs with weight of 18-25 kg were selected. The pericardium was harvested to cover the Ni-Ti alloy stent. The compound artificial trachea was used to reconstruct long-segmental (6 cm) trachea defect. The effectiveness, complications, the properties, and growth rate of the new mucosa of the artificial trachea lumen were observed. Of 12 pigs, 2 died soon because of hemorrhage and infection, respectively; 7 died at 2-4 months after operation because of hyperplasia at the middle section and blockage of phlegm plug; 3 survived after 42 weeks postoperatively, but accompanied with dyspnea symptom. At 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 months after operation, the average crawl length of the new trachea mucosa was 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 mm, respectively; the occurrence rates of anastomotic stenosis were 0 (0/10), 0 (0/9), 0 (0/4), 33.3% (1/3), and 33.3% (1/3) respectively; and the occurrence rates of scar hyperplasia in the middle of lumen were 20% (2/10), 66.7% (6/9), 75.0% (3/4), 66.7% (2/3), and 100% (3/3), respectively. At 7 months postoperatively, the bronchoscopy examination showed that the scar in central part of artificial trachea had the trends of stagnation, softening, and narrowing, and respiratory symptom had the trend of slight ease. Hyperplasia tissue could be found in central part of artificial trachea by autopsy and was verified to be fiber cells and necrotic tissue by pathology examination. Ni-Ti alloy stent with autologous pericardium can insure that the reconstructed tracheal lumen is unobstructed, and support the trachea epithelium regeneration; the main factors of the death of the

  15. Platinum-nickel alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon for 3-pentanone hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Lihua, E-mail: lihuazhu@stu.xmu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zheng, Tuo; Yu, Changlin [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Zheng, Jinbao [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Tang, Zhenbiao [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Zhang, Nuowei [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Shu, Qing [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Chen, Bing H., E-mail: chenbh@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C catalyst was successfully synthesized at room temperature. • PtNi alloy/C was obtained after PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C reduced in hydrogen at 300 °C. • Nanostructures of the PtNi catalysts were characterized by numerous techniques. • PtNi alloy/C exhibited high catalytic activity for 3-pentanone hydrogenation. - Abstract: In this work, we prepared the Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C sample at room temperature by hydrazine hydrate reducing method. The galvanic replacement reaction method was applied to deposit platinum on the Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles, to prepare the PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C catalyst. The catalyst of platinum-nickel alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon (signed as PtNi/C) was obtained by the thermal treatment of PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C in flowing hydrogen at 300 °C for 2 h. The size, nanostructure, surface properties, Pt and Ni chemical states of the PtNi/C catalyst were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), high-angle annular dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) and elemental energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) line scanning, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-sensitivity low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy (HS-LEIS) techniques. The as-synthesized PtNi/C catalyst showed enhanced catalytic performance relative to the Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C, Ni/C, Pt/C and PtNi/Ni(OH){sub 2}/C catalysts for 3-pentanone hydrogenation due to electron synergistic effect between Pt and Ni species in the PtNi/C catalyst. The PtNi/C catalyst also had exceling stability, with industrial application value.

  16. Characterization of a New Phase and Its Effect on the Work Characteristics of a Near-Stoichiometric Ni30Pt20Ti50 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy (HTSMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, A.; Gaydosh, D.; Noebe, R.D.; Padula II, Santo; Bigelow, G.S.; Kaufman, M.; Kovarik, L.; Mills, M.J.; Diercks, D.; McMurray, S.

    2008-01-01

    A new phase observed in a nominal Ni30Pt20Ti50 (at.%) high temperature shape memory alloy has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy and 3-D atom probe tomography. This phase forms homogeneously in the B2 austenite matrix by a nucleation and growth mechanism and results in a concomitant increase in the martensitic transformation temperature of the base alloy. Although the structure of this phase typically contains a high density of faults making characterization difficult, it appears to be trigonal (-3m point group) with a(sub o) approx. 1.28 nm and c(sub o) approx. 1.4 nm. Precipitation of this phase increases the microhardness of the alloy substantially over that of the solution treated and quenched single-phase material. The effect of precipitation strengthening on the work characteristics of the alloy has been explored through load-biased strain-temperature testing in the solution-treated condition and after aging at 500 C for times ranging from 1 to 256 hours. Work output was found to increase in the aged alloy as a result of an increase in transformation strain, but was not very sensitive to aging time. The amount of permanent deformation that occurred during thermal cycling under load was small but increased with increasing aging time and stress. Nevertheless, the dimensional stability of the alloy at short aging times (1-4 hours) was still very good making it a potentially useful material for high-temperature actuator applications.

  17. The effect of chloride on general corrosion and crack initiation of low-alloy steels in oxygenated high-temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Matthias; Roth, Armin [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Widera, Martin [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany); Kuester, Karin; Huettner, Frank [Vattenfall Europe Nuclear Energy GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Nowak, Erika [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The effect of chloride on the general corrosion and its potential impact on EAC crack initiation of low-alloy steel (German reactor pressure vessel steel 22 NiMoCr 3 7) in oxygenated high-temperature water were investigated. The general corrosion behavior was analyzed by exposure tests with either permanently increased chloride concentration levels or temporary chloride transients. The potential effect on EAC crack initiation was analyzed with pre-strained C-ring specimens and in SSRT (CERT) tests with slowly rising strain. Both kinds of tests were performed under simulated BWR conditions and with different chloride levels. The chloride concentrations of 5 to 50 ppb were chosen according to the action levels of the German water chemistry guideline for the reactor coolant of BWRs (VGB R401J, 2006). In all exposure tests, none of the pre-strained C-ring specimens showed crack initiation during up to 1000 hours of exposure time with up to 50 ppb chloride. Investigations of the oxide layer thickness after immersion testing revealed a decrease with increasing chloride concentration. As shown by post-test chemical analysis of the oxide layer composition by TOF-SIMS, this effect is most likely primarily due to adsorption of chloride on the oxide layer surface, since only very limited penetration of chloride into the oxide was detected. In contrast to the tests with C-ring specimens, where no crack initiation occurred, slightly accelerated crack initiation at lower elongation levels was observed at increasing chloride concentrations in SSRT tests under simulated BWR conditions using actively loaded specimens. In addition, SSRT specimens that were cyclically loaded at the oxide fracture elongation level were used to generate a continuous, exposure of bare metal to the environment by repeated fracture of the oxide. This loading pattern did not cause crack initiation at all chloride concentrations applied (up to 50 ppb). From these results, it may be concluded that at least

  18. Structure and phases in nickel-base self-fluxing alloy coating containing high chromium and boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, F.; Era, H.; Kishitake, K.

    2000-03-01

    The structure of a nickel-base, self-fluxing alloy coating, containing chromium and boron thermal sprayed and fused, was investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A lumpy M6C carbide, a rodlike M3B2 boride of tetragonal structure, a rodlike M7C3 carbide of hexagonal structure, and a Ni-Ni3B eutectic phase formed in the coating after fusing. Metals of M6C, M3B2, and M7C3 phases are composed of chromium, molybdenum, and nickel; chromium and molybdenum; and mainly chromium, respectively. The nickel phase in the coating has the L12 type superlattice structure.

  19. Effect of high-temperature water and hydrogen on the fracture behavior of a low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roychowdhury, S., E-mail: sroy27@gmail.com [Paul Scherrer Institut, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen, PSI (Switzerland); Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Mod-Lab, D-Block, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Seifert, H.-P.; Spätig, P.; Que, Z. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen, PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-09-15

    Structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is critical for safety and lifetime. Possible degradation of fracture resistance of RPV steel due to exposure to coolant and hydrogen is a concern. In this study tensile and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) tests in air (hydrogen pre-charged) and EFPM tests in hydrogenated/oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) was done, using a low-alloy RPV steel. 2–5 wppm hydrogen caused embrittlement in air tensile tests at room temperature (25 °C) and at 288 °C, effects being more significant at 25 °C and in simulated weld coarse grain heat affected zone material. Embrittlement at 288 °C is strain rate dependent and is due to localized plastic deformation. Hydrogen pre-charging/HTW exposure did not deteriorate the fracture resistance at 288 °C in base metal, for investigated loading rate range. Clear change in fracture morphology and deformation structures was observed, similar to that after air tests with hydrogen. - Highlights: • Hydrogen content, microstructure of LAS, and strain rate affects tensile properties at 288 °C. • Strength affects hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility to a greater extent than grain size. • Hydrogen in LAS leads to strain localization and restricts cross-slip at 288 °C. • Possible hydrogen pickup due to exposure to 288 °C water alters fracture surface appearance without affecting fracture toughness in bainitic base material. • Simulated weld heat affected zone microstructure shows unstable crack propagation in 288 °C water.

  20. Accelerated Degradation Test and Predictive Failure Analysis of B10 Copper-Nickel Alloy under Marine Environmental Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Sun; Tianyuan Ye; Qiang Feng; Jinghua Yao; Mumeng Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the corrosion behavior of B10 copper-nickel alloy in marine environment. Accelerated degradation test under marine environmental conditions was designed and performed based on the accelerated testing principle and the corrosion degradation mechanism. With the prolongation of marine corrosion time, the thickness of Cu2O film increased gradually. Its corrosion product was Cu2(OH)3Cl, which increased in quantity over time. Cl− was the major factor responsible for the marine c...

  1. Brushing-induced surface roughness of two nickel based alloys and a titanium based alloy: a comparative study - in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, B L Guruprasanna; Nadiger, Ramesh; Shetty, Bharathraj; Gururaj, G; Kumar, K Naveen; Darshan, D D

    2014-06-01

    Alloys with high nickel content have been increasingly used in dentistry. Alloys have high corrosion rates when exposed to chemical or physical forces that are common intra orally. Titanium is the most biocompatible materials for crowns, fixed partial dentures and implants in the present use, but paradoxically the self-protective oxide film on the titanium can be affected by excessive use of the most common preventive agents in dentistry. Therefore, this study is undertaken in order to draw attention toward the potential effect of prophylactic brushing in a saline medium. Forty-five wax patterns in equal dimensions of 10 mm × 10 mm × 2 mm were cast in titanium (Grade II) and nickel-chromium. Of the 45 wax patterns, 15 wax patterns were used for preparing cast titanium samples and 30 wax patterns were used for preparing cast nickel-chromium samples and polished. These samples were divided into three groups of 15 samples each. They are brushed for 48 h each clinically simulating 2 years of brushing in a saline tooth paste medium. The surface roughnesses of the samples were evaluated using profilometer, scanning electron microscopes and energy dispersive spectroscopy. RESULTS were subjected to statistical analysis. The statistical analysis of the Rz and Ra surface roughness values were calculated. Significant difference of surface roughness was present in the titanium samples compared to that of the machine-readable cataloguing and Wirolloy (nickel-chromium) samples after the study. To know the difference in the values of all samples before and after, Student's paired t-test was carried out. RESULTS showed that there is a significant change in the Rz and Ra values of titanium samples. The present findings suggest that, prophylactic brushing with the fluoridated toothpaste have an effect on the surface roughness of titanium and also to a certain extent, on nickel-chromium. Therefore, careful consideration must be given to the selection of the toothbrushes and

  2. Characteristics of nickel and iron diffusion in molten lead–17lithium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yun, E-mail: gao.y.ad@m.titech.ac.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-18, Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Takahashi, Minoru; Nomura, Masao [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-18, Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Nozawa, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Oaza-Obuchi-Aza-Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The characteristics of nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) diffusion in molten lead–17lithium (Pb–17Li) alloy were investigated experimentally with the long capillary method. • The chromatography was adopted to measure the concentration distributions of Ni and Fe in the diffusing specimens by ICP-MS. • Arrhenius correlations of diffusion coefficient of both impurities in Pb–17Li were obtained. - Abstract: Diffusion characteristics of transition metals – nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) diffusion in the molten lead–17lithium (Pb–17Li) were investigated experimentally under the argon atmosphere in the temperature range from 300 °C to 600 °C by using the long capillary method. The axial concentration distributions of Ni and Fe in Pb–17Li specimens were measured by ICP-MS, and the diffusion coefficients of Ni and Fe were determined based on the Fick's second law. The Arrhenius correlations of diffusion coefficient of Ni and Fe were obtained as D{sub Ni} =7.37 × 10{sup −5}exp (−4.66 × 10{sup 3}/RT) (300 °C ≤ T ≤ 450 °C) [cm{sup 2}/s], D{sub Fe} =3.21 × 10{sup −4}exp (−2.64 × 10{sup 4}/RT) (450 °C ≤ T ≤ 600 °C) [cm{sup 2}/s]. It is found that the diffusion coefficient of Ni is one order magnitude bigger than that of Fe in Pb–17Li. The diffusion coefficient of Fe in Pb–17Li was approximately in the same order as that in lead–bismuth eutectic reported by authors.

  3. A novel stress-associated protein 'AtSAP10' from Arabidopsis thaliana confers tolerance to nickel, manganese, zinc, and high temperature stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirudha R Dixit

    Full Text Available We describe here the functional characterization of a novel AtSAP10, a member of the Stress Associated Protein (SAP gene family, from Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia. AtSAP10 contains an A20 and AN1 zinc-finger domain at the N- and C-terminal, respectively. Arabidopsis SAP10 showed differential regulation by various abiotic stresses such as heavy metals and metalloids (Ni, Cd, Mn, Zn, and As, high and low temperatures, cold, and ABA. Overexpression of AtSAP10 in Arabidopsis conferred strong tolerance to heavy metals such as Ni, Mn, and Zn and to high temperature stress. AtSAP10 transgenic plants under these stress conditions grew green and healthy, attained several-fold more biomass, and had longer roots as compared to wild type plants. Further, while these transgenic plants accumulated significantly greater amounts of Ni and Mn in both shoots and root tissues, there was no significant difference in the accumulation of Zn. AtSAP10 promoter-GUS fusion studies revealed a root and floral organ-specific expression of AtSAP10. Overexpression of AtSAP10-GFP fusion protein showed the localization in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Taken together, these results showed that AtSAP10 is a potentially useful candidate gene for engineering tolerance to heavy metals and to abiotic stress in cultivated plants.

  4. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel, nickel-base alloy and its weldments in aqueous LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S.I.Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012 E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    With the advances in materials production new alloys have been developed, such as High- Alloy Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-base alloys, with high corrosion resistance. These new alloys are finding applications in Lithium Bromide absorption refrigeration systems, because LiBr is a corrosive medium which can cause serious corrosion problems, in spite of its favourable properties as absorbent. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) used as its corresponding filler metal, and the weld metal obtained by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) procedure. The materials have been tested in different LiBr solutions (400 g/l, 700 g/l, 850 g/l and a commercial 850 g/l LiBr heavy brine containing Lithium Chromate as corrosion inhibitor), at 25 deg. C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the general electrochemical behaviour of the materials. The polarization curves of all the alloys tested were typical of passivable materials. Pitting corrosion susceptibility has been evaluated by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves, which provide parameters to analyse re-passivation properties. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded and the base material has been estimated from the polarization diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Method. Samples have been etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the pitting resistance of all these materials increases as the LiBr concentration decreases. In general, the presence of chromate tended to shift the pitting potential to more positive values than those obtained in the 850 g/l LiBr solution. (authors)

  5. The use of stainless steel and nickel alloys as low-cost cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.

    2009-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are used to produce hydrogen gas from the current generated by bacteria, but low-cost alternatives are needed to typical cathode materials (carbon cloth, platinum and Nafion™). Stainless steel A286 was superior to platinum sheet metal in terms of cathodic hydrogen recovery (61% vs. 47%), overall energy recovery (46% vs. 35%), and maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate (1.5 m3 m-3 day-1 vs. 0.68 m3 m-3 day-1) at an applied voltage of 0.9 V. Nickel 625 was better than other nickel alloys, but it did not perform as well as SS A625. The relative ranking of these materials in MEC tests was in agreement with cyclic voltammetry studies. Performance of the stainless steel and nickel cathodes was further increased, even at a lower applied voltage (0.6 V), by electrodepositing a nickel oxide layer onto the sheet metal (cathodic hydrogen recovery, 52%, overall energy recovery, 48%; maximum volumetric hydrogen production rate, 0.76 m3 m-3 day-1). However, performance of the nickel oxide cathodes decreased over time due to a reduction in mechanical stability of the oxides (based on SEM-EDS analysis). These results demonstrate that non-precious metal cathodes can be used in MECs to achieve hydrogen gas production rates better than those obtained with platinum. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Method for producing evaporation inhibiting coating for protection of silicon--germanium and silicon--molybdenum alloys at high temperatures in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    A method is given for protecting Si--Ge and Si-- Mo alloys for use in thermocouples. The alloys are coated with silicon to inhibit the evaporation of the alloys at high tempenatures in a vacuum. Specific means and methods are provided. (5 fig) (Official Gazette)

  7. The French regulatory experience and views on nickel-base alloy PWSCC prevention and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turluer, G.; Cattiaux, G.; Monnot, B. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Emond, D.; Reuchet, J.; Chartier, Ph. [Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-10-01

    This paper presents the experience feedback and views of the French Regulatory Authority (ASN) and of the technical support institute (IRSN) on PWSCC prevention since the initiation in 1989 of the 'Inconel Zones Review' requested by ASN to Electricite de France (EDF), the national operator of a fleet of 58 PWRs. This proactive requirement, launched before the discovery, in September 1991, of the only CRDM nozzle leak in France, on Bugey unit 3, was then triggered by the recurrence of many alloy 600 rapid degradations and leaks, world wide, and also in France in the late 1980's, particularly on steam generator tubes and on some pressurizer penetrations. Thus, the ASN requested that EDF, perform a comprehensive (generic) proactive assessment on all the nickel-base alloy components and parts of the main primary circuits, which of course included vessel head penetrations and bottom vessel head penetrations, and some other zones as a first priority. This proactive 'review' did, a minima, include the following tasks and actions: - Update and complete, by an extensive R and D program, the understanding and characterization of the Ni base alloys prone to PWSCC, - Analyze the various materials, metallurgical features, mechanical stresses, and physicochemical conditions of the parts exposed to primary water, in order to predict the occurrence of PWSCC initiation and propagation, - Provide a prioritization of the zones to be inspected, - Implement by improved NDE techniques a practical inspection program on the 58 PWRs, - Prepare and implement any needed mitigation actions as a result of the components conditions assessment. The present paper relates the main features of the French regulatory experience over more than 13 years and recalls the main principles of the assessment, which were applied by ASN. These principles, which are formalized in the current regulation rules revised in 1999, are briefly listed hereunder: - It is based on avoiding and

  8. The environmentally-assisted cracking behaviour in the transition region of nickel-base alloy/low-alloy steel dissimilar weld joints under simulated BWR conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.; Leber, H.J. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Lab for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour perpendicular to the fusion line in the transition region between the Alloy 182 nickel-base weld metal and the adjacent low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel of simulated dissimilar metal weld joints was investigated under boiling water reactor normal water chemistry conditions at different stress intensities and chloride concentrations. A special emphasis was placed to the question whether a fast growing inter-dendritic SCC crack in the highly susceptible Alloy 182 weld metal can easily cross the fusion line and significantly propagate into the adjacent low-alloy RPV steel. Cessation of inter-dendritic stress corrosion crack growth was observed in high-purity or sulphate-containing oxygenated water under periodical partial unloading or constant loading conditions with stress intensity factors below 60 MPa-m{sup 1/2} for those parts of the crack front, which reached the fusion line. In chloride containing water, on the other hand, the inter-dendritic stress corrosion crack in the Alloy 182 weld metal very easily crossed the fusion line and further propagated with a very high growth rate as a transgranular crack into the heat-affected zone and base material of the adjacent low-alloy steel. (authors)

  9. Statistical analysis and optimization of direct metal laser deposition of 227-F Colmonoy nickel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelastro, A.; Campanelli, S. L.; Casalino, G.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a study on process parameters and building strategy for the deposition of Colmonoy 227-F powder by CO2 laser with a focal spot diameter of 0.3 mm. Colmonoy 227-F is a nickel alloy especially designed for mold manufacturing. The substrate material is a 10 mm thick plate of AISI 304 steel. A commercial CO2 laser welding machine was equipped with a low-cost powder feeding system. In this work, following another one in which laser power, scanning speed and powder flow rate had been studied, the effects of two important process parameters, i.e. hatch spacing and step height, on the properties of the built parts were analysed. The explored ranges of hatch spacing and step height were respectively 150-300 μm and 100-200 μm, whose dimensions were comparable with that of the laser spot. The roughness, adhesion, microstructure, microhardness and density of the manufactured specimens were studied for multi-layer samples, which were made of 30 layers. The statistical significance of the studied process parameters was assessed by the analysis of the variance. The process parameters used allowed to obtain both first layer-to-substrate and layer-to-layer good adhesions. The microstructure was fine and almost defect-free. The microhardness of the deposited material was about 100 HV higher than that of the starting powder. The density as high as 98% of that of the same bulk alloy was more than satisfactory. Finally, simultaneous optimization of density and roughness was performed using the contour plots.

  10. Lifetime assessment of thick-walled components made of nickel-base alloys under near-service loading conditions; Lebensdauerbewertung dickwandiger Bauteile aus Nickelbasislegierungen unter betriebsnahen Beanspruchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueggenberg, Daniel

    2015-11-06

    Until 2050 the renewable energies should provide 80% of the power in Germany according to Renewable Energy law. Due to that reason the conventional power plants are not used for base load, but rather for the supply of average and peak load. The change of the operating mode leads to shorter times at stationary temperatures and the number of faster start-ups/shut-downs of the power plants will increase. As a result of this the components are exposed to an interacting load of creep and fatigue which reduces the lifetimes. The aim of this thesis is the development and verification of a lifetime assessment procedure for components made of the nickel-base alloys Alloy 617 mod. and Alloy 263 under creep fatigue loading conditions based on numerical phenomenological models and on the approaches of different standards/recommendations. The focus lies on two components of the high temperature material test rig II (HWT II), a header made of Alloy 617 mod. and Alloy 263 as well as a formed part made of Alloy 617 mod. For the basis characterization of the HWT II melts, specimens of the Alloy 617 mod. and Alloy 263 are tested in uniaxial tensile tests, (creep-)fatigue tests, creep tests and charpy tests in a temperature range between 20 C and 725 C. From the comparisons of the test results and the material specifications respectively the results of the projects COORETEC DE4, MARCKO DE2 and MARCKO700 no deviations were obvious for both materials with the exception of the creep test results with Alloy 617 mod. material. The creep tests with Alloy 617 mod. material of the HWT II melt show differences regarding the deformation and damage behavior. In addition to the basis characterization tests some complex lab tests for the characterization of the material behavior under creep-fatigue and multiaxial loading conditions were conducted. The developments of the microstructure, the precipitations as well as the structure of dislocations are investigated in the light optical microscope

  11. Standard Test Methods for Detecting Susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion in Wrought, Nickel-Rich, Chromium-Bearing Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover two tests as follows: 1.1.1 Method A, Ferric Sulfate-Sulfuric Acid Test (Sections 3-10, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting the boiling ferric sulfate—50 % sulfuric acid test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to intergranular corrosion (see Terminology G 15), which may be encountered in certain service environments. The uniform corrosion rate obtained by this test method, which is a function of minor variations in alloy composition, may easily mask the intergranular corrosion components of the overall corrosion rate on alloys N10276, N06022, N06059, and N06455. 1.1.2 Method B, Mixed Acid-Oxidizing Salt Test (Sections 11-18, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting a boiling 23 % sulfuric + 1.2 % hydrochloric + 1 % ferric chloride + 1 % cupric chloride test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to display a step function increa...

  12. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Severe Plastic Deformation and Thermomechanical Training on the Functional Stability of Ti50.5Ni24.5Pd25 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atli, K. C.; Karaman, I.; Noebe, R. D.; Maier, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    We compare the effectiveness of a conventional thermomechanical training procedure and severe plastic deformation via equal channel angular extrusion to achieve improved functional stability in a Ti50.5Ni24.5Pd25 high-temperature shape memory alloy. Thermomechanical testing indicates that both methods result in enhanced shape memory characteristics, such as reduced irrecoverable strain and thermal hysteresis. The mechanisms responsible for the improvements are discussed in light of microstructural findings from transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Transient liquid phase bonding of titanium-, iron- and nickel-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A. H. M. Esfakur

    The operating temperature of land-based gas turbines and jet engines are ever-increasing to increase the efficiency, decrease the emissions and minimize the cost. Within the engines, complex-shaped parts experience extreme temperature, fatigue and corrosion conditions. Ti-based, Ni-based and Fe-based alloys are commonly used in gas turbines and jet engines depending on the temperatures of different sections. Although those alloys have superior mechanical, high temperature and corrosion properties, severe operating conditions cause fast degradation and failure of the components. Repair of these components could reduce lifecycle costs. Unfortunately, conventional fusion welding is not very attractive, because Ti reacts very easily with oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures, Ni-based superalloys show heat affected zone (HAZ) cracking, and stainless steels show intergranular corrosion and knife-line attack. On the other hand, transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding method has been considered as preferred joining method for those types of alloys. During the initial phase of the current work commercially pure Ti, Fe and Ni were diffusion bonded using commercially available interlayer materials. Commercially pure Ti (Ti-grade 2) has been diffusion bonded using silver and copper interlayers and without any interlayer. With a silver (Ag) interlayer, different intermetallics (AgTi, AgTi2) appeared in the joint centerline microstructure. While with a Cu interlayer eutectic mixtures and Ti-Cu solid solutions appeared in the joint centerline. The maximum tensile strengths achieved were 160 MPa, 502 MPa, and 382 MPa when Ag, Cu and no interlayers were used, respectively. Commercially pure Fe (cp-Fe) was diffusion bonded using Cu (25 m) and Au-12Ge eutectic interlayer (100 microm). Cu diffused predominantly along austenite grain boundaries in all bonding conditions. Residual interlayers appeared at lower bonding temperature and time, however, voids were observed in the joint

  14. Analysis of the ductility dip cracking in the nickel-base alloy 617mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, A.; Nellesen, J.; Zielke, R.; Tillmann, W.

    2017-03-01

    While testing steam leading power plant components made of the nickel-base alloy A617mod at elevated temperatures (700 °C), ductility dip cracking (DDC) was observed in welding seams and their surroundings. In order to clarify the mechanism of crack formation, investigations were carried out on welded specimens made of A617mod. Interrupted tensile tests were performed on tensile specimens taken from the area of the welding seam. To simulate the conditions, the tensile tests were conducted at a temperature of 700 °C and with a low strain rate. Local strain fields at grain boundaries and inside single grains were determined at different deformation states by means of two-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC). Besides the strain fields, local hardnesses (nanoindentation), energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were performed. Besides information concerning the grain orientation, the EBSD measurement provides information on the coincidence site lattice (CSL) at grain boundaries as well as the Schmid factor of single grains. All results of the analysis methods mentioned above were correlated and compared to each other and related to the crack formation. Among other things, correlations between strain fields and Schmid factors were determined. The investigations show that the following influences affect the crack formation: orientation of the grain boundaries to the direction of the loading, the orientation of the grains to each other (CSL), and grain boundary sliding.

  15. Mechanisms of dwell fatigue crack growth in an advanced nickel disc alloy RR1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RR1000 is one of an advanced class of nickel-based superalloys developed for disc applications. Under one hour dwell fatigue loading, complex crack growth behaviour has been observed especially in a coarse grained version of this alloy. At a temperature of 700 ∘C in air an increase of nearly two orders of magnitude in crack growth rates compared to baseline fatigue crack growth rates may be seen. However for certain microstructural conditions, cracks can also demonstrate retardation following initial acceleration. When using a direct current potential difference (d.c.p.d technique for monitoring crack growth, a damage zone of a few hundred microns is often measured ahead of a fast growing crack. Advanced characterisation techniques including SEM, ECCI and X-ray tomography have been adopted in the current study to understand the observed damage zone and retardation phenomenon. It is found that damage zones measured by d.c.p.d reflect brittle and non-uniform advance of the crack resulting from continuous dynamic or quasi-dynamic fracture of an oxide intrusion ahead of the crack tip during the dwell period. In contrast, cracking of the oxide intrusion is less frequent or even prevented during dwell periods associated with a retarded and slow growing crack. Crack tip stress relaxation plays an important role in dictating whether or not dynamic cracking of the oxide intrusion can be avoided.

  16. Analytic estimation and numerical modeling of actively cooled thermal protection systems with nickel alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xinzhi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Actively cooled thermal protection system has great influence on the engine of a hypersonic vehicle, and it is significant to obtain the thermal and stress distribution in the system. So an analytic estimation and numerical modeling are performed in this paper to investigate the behavior of an actively cooled thermal protection system. The analytic estimation is based on the electric analogy method and finite element analysis (FEA is applied to the numerical simulation. Temperature and stress distributions are obtained for the actively cooled channel walls with three kinds of nickel alloys with or with no thermal barrier coating (TBC. The temperature of the channel wall with coating has no obvious difference from the one with no coating, but the stress with coating on the channel wall is much smaller than that with no coating. Inconel X-750 has the best characteristics among the three Ni-based materials due to its higher thermal conductivity, lower elasticity module and greater allowable stress. Analytic estimation and numerical modeling results are compared with each other and a reasonable agreement is obtained.

  17. Fatigue resistance of rotary instruments manufactured using different nickel-titanium alloys: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Testarelli, Luca; Al-Sudani, Dina; Pongione, Gianlcarlo; Grande, Nicola M; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether cyclic fatigue resistance is increased for Controlled Memory (CM) Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) instruments, compared to instruments produced using traditional NiTi and instruments produced using M-Wire alloy. Two groups of NiTi endodontic instruments consisting of identical instrument sizes (constant 0.06 taper and 0.25 tip diameter and constant 0.04 taper and 0.40 tip diameter) were tested: group A compared Hyflex™ CM, Vortex ™ and ProFile ™ size 25 and 0.06 taper and group B compared Hyflex™ CM, Vortex™ and ProFile™ size 40 and 0.04 taper. 10 files from each different subgroup were tested for cyclic fatigue resistance. Mean and standard deviations of the Number of Cycles to Failure (NCF) were calculated for each group and data were statistically analysed (p 0.05) was noted between Vortex™ and ProFile™ in the tested sizes. The new manufacturing process involving memory shape heat treatment produced new NiTi rotary files (Hyflex™ CM) significantly more resistant to fatigue than instruments produced with other proprietary methods of treatment (Vortex™) and with the traditional NiTi grinding process (ProFile™).

  18. Torsional fatigue resistance of pathfinding instruments manufactured from several nickel-titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, M P; Duarte, M A H; Bramante, C M; Tanomaru-Filho, M; Vasconcelos, B C; Só, M V R; Vivan, R R

    2017-11-24

    To evaluate the torsional properties of pathfinding nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments manufactured from several NiTi alloys, ProGlider (M-wire), Hyflex GPF (conventional NiTi Wire and controlled memory wire), Logic (conventional NiTi wire and controlled memory wire) and Mtwo (conventional NiTi wire). A total of 56 NiTi instruments from Glidepath rotary systems (n = 8) were used: Logic (size 25, .01 taper), Logic CM (size 25, .01 taper), ProGlider (size 16, .02 taper), Hyflex GPF (size 15, .01 taper), Hyflex GPF CM (size 15, .02 taper; size 20, .02 taper) and Mtwo (size 10, .04 taper). The torsion tests were performed based on ISO 3630-1 (1992). Three millimetres of each instrument tip was clamped to a small load cell by a lever arm linked to the torsion axis. Data were analysed using a one-way analysis of variance (anova) and Tukey test with a significance level at a = 5%. The Logic size 25, .01 taper had significantly higher torsional strength values (P Hyflex GPF size 15, .01 taper and size 15, .02 taper (P Hyflex GPF size 15, .01 taper and size 15, .02 taper (P Hyflex GPF groups (size 15, .01 taper; size 15, .02 taper; size 20, .02 taper). In relation to the angle of rotation, Logic CM size 25, .01 taper and Hyflex GPF size 15, .01 taper had the highest angle values (P < 0.05). The ProGlider had the lowest angle values in comparison with all the groups (P < 0.05) followed by Mtwo size 10, .04 taper. The Logic size 25, .01 taper had significantly higher angle of rotation values than ProGlider and Mtwo size 10, .04 taper (P < 0.05). The Logic size 25, .01 taper instrument made of conventional NiTi alloy had the highest torsional strength of all instruments tested. In addition, the ProGlider instrument manufactured from M-Wire alloy had the lowest angle of rotation to fracture in comparison with the other instruments. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Effect of Load-Line Displacement Rate on the SCC Growth Rate of Nickel Alloys and Mechanistic Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Morton

    2005-10-19

    A key set of SCC growth experiments was designed to test the hypothesis that deformation/creep is the rate controlling step in LPSCC. These tests were performed on Alloy X-750 AH compact tension specimens at a various constant displacement rates. The deformation/creep rate within the crack tip zone is proportional to the test displacement rate. If crack growth rates were observed to increase with the load-line displacement rate, then this would indicate that deformation/creep is a critical SCC mechanism process. However, results obtained from the load-line displacement tests did not find X-750 AH SCC growth rate to be dependent on the position rate and therefore do not support the assumption that deformation/creep is the rate controlling process in LPSCC. The similarities between the SCC response of X-750, Alloy 600 and EN82H suggests that it is likely that the same SCC process is occurring for all these alloys (i.e., the same rate controlling step) and that deformation based models are also inappropriate for Alloy 600 and EN82H. The strong temperature and coolant hydrogen dependencies exhibited by these alloys make it more likely that nickel alloy LPSCC is controlled by an environmental or corrosion driven process.

  20. Nickel and cobalt release from metal alloys of tools--a current analysis in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickinger-Lörsch, Anja; Bruckner, Thomas; Mahler, Vera

    2015-11-01

    The former 'EU Nickel Directive' and, since 2009, the REACH Regulation (item 27 of Annex XVII) do not include all metallic objects. The nickel content of tools is not regulated by the REACH Regulation, even if they may come into in prolonged contact with the skin. Tools might be possible sources of nickel and cobalt sensitization, and may contribute to elicitation and maintenance of hand eczema. To perform a current analysis of the frequency of nickel or cobalt release from new handheld tools purchased in Germany. Six hundred unused handheld tools from the German market were investigated with the dimethylglyoxime test for nickel release and with disodium-1-nitroso-2-naphthol-3,6-disulfonate solution for cobalt release. Nickel release was detected in 195 of 600 (32.5%) items, and cobalt in only six (1%) of them. Positive nickel results were nearly twice as frequent in tools 'made in Germany' than in tools without a mark of origin. Tools made in other European countries did not release nickel. Cobalt release was only found in pliers and a saw. A correlation was found between price level and nickel release. Among toolkits, 34.2% were inhomogeneous concerning nickel release. The German market currently provides a large number of handheld tools that release nickel, especially tools 'made in Germany'. For consumer protection, it seems appropriate to include handheld tools in the REACH Regulation on nickel. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Study of the structure and development of the set of reference materials of composition and structure of heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Chabina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of research: There are two sizes (several microns and nanodimensional of strengthening j'-phase in single-crystal heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys, used for making blades of modern gas turbine engines (GTD. For in-depth study of structural and phase condition of such alloys not only qualitative description of created structure is necessary, but quantitative analysis of alloy components geometrical characteristics. Purpose of the work: Development of reference material sets of heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloy composition and structure. Research methods: To address the measurement problem of control of structural and geometrical characteristics of single-crystal heat resisting and intermetallic alloys by analytical microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis the research was carried out using certified measurement techniques on facilities, entered in the Register of Measurement Means of the Russian Federation. The research was carried out on microsections, foils and plates, cut in the plane {100}. Results: It is established that key parameters, defining the properties of these alloys are particle size of strengthening j' -phase, the layer thickness of j-phase between them and parameters of phases lattice. Metrological requirements for reference materials of composition and structure of heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys are formulated. The necessary and sufficient reference material set providing the possibility to determine the composition and structure parameters of single-crystal heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys is defined. The developed RM sets are certified as in-plant reference materials. Conclusion: The reference materials can be used for graduation of spectral equipment when conducting element analysis of specified class alloys; for calibration of means of measuring alloy structure parameters; for measurement of alloys phases lattice parameters; for structure reference pictures

  2. High-Strength Aluminum Casting Alloy for High-Temperature Applications (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Project No. 97-10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon alloy has been successfully developed at Marshall Space Flight Center that has a significant improvement in tensile strength at elevated temperatures (550 to 700 F). For instance, the new alloy shows in average tensile strength of at least 90 percent higher than the current 390 aluminum piston alloy tested at 500 F. Compared to conventional aluminum alloys, automotive engines using the new piston alloy will have improved gas mileage, and may produce less air pollution in order to meet the future U.S. automotive legislative requirements for low hydrocarbon emissions. The projected cost for this alloy is less than $0.95/lb, and it readily allows the automotive components to be cast at a high production volume with a low, fully accounted cost. It is economically produced by pouring molten metal directly into conventional permanent steel molds or die casting.

  3. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wate Bakker

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  4. Standard practice for determining the susceptibility of stainless steels and related Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in polythionic acids

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for preparing and conducting the polythionic acid test at room temperature, 22 to 25°C (72 to 77°F), to determine the relative susceptibility of stainless steels or other related materials (nickel-chromiumiron alloys) to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. 1.2 This practice can be used to evaluate stainless steels or other materials in the “as received” condition or after being subjected to high-temperature service, 482 to 815°C (900 to 1500°F), for prolonged periods of time. 1.3 This practice can be applied to wrought products, castings, and weld metal of stainless steels or other related materials to be used in environments containing sulfur or sulfides. Other materials capable of being sensitized can also be tested in accordance with this test. 1.4 This practice may be used with a variety of stress corrosion test specimens, surface finishes, and methods of applying stress. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ...

  5. Effect of cleanser solutions on the color of acrylic resins associated with titanium and nickel-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas Oliveira Paranhos, Helena de; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Davi, Letícia Resende; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato da; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cleanser solutions on the color of heat-polymerized acrylic resin (HPAR) and on the brightness of dental alloys with 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were made with I) commercially pure titanium, II) nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium, III) nickel-chromium molybdenum, and IV) nickel-chromium-molybdenum beryllium. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk into the HPAR. The specimens (n=5) were then immersed in solutions containing: 0.05% sodium hypochlorite, 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate, 0.500 mg cetylpyridinium chloride, a citric acid tablet, one of two different sodium perborate/enzyme tablets, and water. The color measurements (∆E) of the HPAR were determined by a colorimeter in accordance with the National Bureau of Standards. The surface brightness of the metal was visually examined for the presence of tarnish. The results (ANOVA; Tukey test-α=0.05) show that there was a significant difference between the groups (psodium hypochlorite caused metallic brightness changes in groups II and IV. It can be concluded that the agents had the same effect on the color of the resin and that the metallic alloys are not resistant to the action of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite.

  6. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  7. Development of High-Strength High-Temperature Cast Al-Ni-Cr Alloys Through Evolution of a Novel Composite Eutectic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, P.; Kashyap, S.; Tiwary, C. S.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2017-12-01

    Aiming to develop high-strength Al-based alloys with high material index (strength/density) for structural application, this article reports a new class of multiphase Al alloys in the Al-Ni-Cr system that possess impressive room temperature and elevated temperature (≥ 200 °C) mechanical properties. The ternary eutectic and near eutectic alloys display a complex microstructure containing intermetallic phases displaying hierarchically arranged plate and rod morphologies that exhibit extraordinary mechanical properties. The yield strengths achieved at room temperatures are in excess of 350 MPa with compressive plastic strains of more than 30 pct (without fracturing) for these alloys. The stability of the complex microstructure also leads to a yield stress of 191 ± 8 to 232 ± 5 MPa at 250 °C. It is argued that the alloys derive their high strength and impressive plasticity through synergic effects of refined nanoeutectics of two different morphologies forming a core shell type of architecture.

  8. Corrosion resistance, surface mechanical properties, and cytocompatibility of plasma immersion ion implantation-treated nickel-titanium shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, K W K; Poon, R W Y; Liu, X Y; Ho, J P Y; Chung, C Y; Chu, P K; Lu, W W; Chan, D; Cheung, K M C

    2005-11-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys are promising materials in orthopedic applications because of their unique properties. However, for prolonged use in a human body, deterioration of the corrosion resistance of the materials becomes a critical issue because of the increasing possibility of deleterious ions released from the substrate to living tissues. We have investigated the use of nitrogen, acetylene, and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) to improve the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of the materials. Our results reveal that the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus are significantly enhanced after surface treatment. The release of nickel is drastically reduced as compared with the untreated control. In addition, our in vitro tests show that the plasma-treated surfaces are well tolerated by osteoblasts. Among the three types of samples, the best biological effects are observed on the nitrogen PIII samples.

  9. Phase transformation strengthening of high-temperature superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T. M.; Esser, B. D.; Antolin, N.; Carlsson, A.; Williams, R. E. A.; Wessman, A.; Hanlon, T.; Fraser, H. L.; Windl, W.; McComb, D. W.; Mills, M. J.

    2016-11-01

    Decades of research has been focused on improving the high-temperature properties of nickel-based superalloys, an essential class of materials used in the hot section of jet turbine engines, allowing increased engine efficiency and reduced CO2 emissions. Here we introduce a new `phase-transformation strengthening' mechanism that resists high-temperature creep deformation in nickel-based superalloys, where specific alloying elements inhibit the deleterious deformation mode of nanotwinning at temperatures above 700 °C. Ultra-high-resolution structure and composition analysis via scanning transmission electron microscopy, combined with density functional theory calculations, reveals that a superalloy with higher concentrations of the elements titanium, tantalum and niobium encourage a shear-induced solid-state transformation from the γ' to η phase along stacking faults in γ' precipitates, which would normally be the precursors of deformation twins. This nanoscale η phase creates a low-energy structure that inhibits thickening of stacking faults into twins, leading to significant improvement in creep properties.

  10. Metal foam sandwich structure as a high temperature heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimijazi, H.R.; Pershin, L.; Coyle, T.W.; Mostaghimi, J.; Chandra, S. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Nickel-based superalloys can be used at temperatures up to 1050 C in air. Superalloy open cell foam sheets with skin layers plasma sprayed on both sides can be used as high temperature heat exchangers provided that the two deposited skins are dense and well adhered to the open cell foam. In this study alloy 625 skins were deposited on each side of a sheet of metal foam by APS and HVOF to form a sandwich structure. Two densities of open cell foams, 20 and 10 pores per linear inch (ppi), were used in this study as the core. The initial Ni foam was converted to an alloy composition by plasma spraying aluminum and chromium on the foam's struts with subsequent diffusion/solutionizing heat treatments before the alloy 625 skins were deposited. The microstructure of the coatings and the interface between the struts and skins was investigated. A layer of Ni-Al alloy was formed near the surface of the struts as a result of the heat treatment. The foam struts were imbedded more deeply into the coatings deposited by HVOF than the coatings deposited by APS. (orig.)

  11. Research and Service Experience with Environmentally-Assisted Cracking in Carbon and Low-Alloy Steels in High-Temperature Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, Hans-Peter; Ritter, Stefan [Paul Scherrer Inst., Laboratory for Materials Behaviour, Villigen (Switzerland). Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Dept.

    2005-11-15

    The most relevant aspects of research and service experience with environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of carbon (C) and low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature (HT) water are reviewed, with special emphasis on the primary pressure boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWRs). The main factors controlling the susceptibility to EAC under light water reactor (LWR) conditions are discussed with respect to crack initiation and crack growth. The adequacy and conservatism of the current BWRVIP-60 stress corrosion cracking (SCC) disposition lines (DLs), ASME III fatigue design curves, and ASME XI reference fatigue crack growth curves, as well as of the GE EAC crack growth model are evaluated in the context of recent research results. The operating experience is summarized and compared to the experimental/mechanistic background knowledge. Finally, open questions and possible topics for further research are identified. Laboratory investigations revealed significant effects of simulated reactor environments on fatigue crack initiation/growth, as well as the possibility of SCC crack growth for certain specific critical combinations of environmental, material and loading parameters. During the last three decades, the major factors of influence and EAC susceptibility conditions have been readily identified. Most parameter effects on EAC initiation and growth are adequately known with acceptable reproducibility and reasonably understood by mechanistic models. Tools for incorporating environmental effects in ASME III fatigue design curves have been developed/qualified and should be applied in spite of the high degree of conservatism in fatigue evaluation procedures. The BWRVIP-60 SCC DLs and ASME XI reference fatigue crack growth curves are usually conservative and adequate under most BWR operation circumstances. The operating experience of C and LAS primary pressure-boundary components in LWRs is very good worldwide. However, isolated instances of EAC have occurred

  12. Surface mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and cytocompatibility of nitrogen plasma-implanted nickel-titanium alloys: a comparative study with commonly used medical grade materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, K W K; Poon, R W Y; Chu, P K; Chung, C Y; Liu, X Y; Lu, W W; Chan, D; Chan, S C W; Luk, K D K; Cheung, K M C

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel and titanium alloys are the most common metallic orthopedic materials. Recently, nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloys have attracted much attention due to their shape memory effect and super-elasticity. However, this alloy consists of equal amounts of nickel and titanium, and nickel is a well known sensitizer to cause allergy or other deleterious effects in living tissues. Nickel ion leaching is correspondingly worse if the surface corrosion resistance deteriorates. We have therefore modified the NiTi surface by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The surface chemistry and corrosion resistance of the implanted samples were studied and compared with those of the untreated NiTi alloys, stainless steel, and Ti-6Al-4V alloy serving as controls. Immersion tests were carried out to investigate the extent of nickel leaching under simulated human body conditions and cytocompatibility tests were conducted using enhanced green fluorescent protein mice osteoblasts. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results reveal that a thin titanium nitride (TiN) layer with higher hardness is formed on the surface after nitrogen PIII. The corrosion resistance of the implanted sample is also superior to that of the untreated NiTi and stainless steel and comparable to that of titanium alloy. The release of nickel ions is significantly reduced compared with the untreated NiTi. The sample with surface TiN exhibits the highest amount of cell proliferation whereas stainless steel fares the worst. Compared with coatings, the plasma-implanted structure does not delaminate as easily and nitrogen PIII is a viable way to improve the properties of NiTi orthopedic implants.

  13. High-pressure high-temperature stability of hcp-IrxOs1-x (x = 0.50 and 0.55) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusenko, Kirill V.; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Gromilov, Sergey A.; Kurnosov, Alexander V.; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Crichton, Wilson A.; Hanfland, Michael; Margadonna, Serena; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S.

    2016-12-23

    Hcp-Ir0.55Os0.45 and hcp-Ir0.50Os0.50 alloys were synthesised by thermal decomposition of single-source precursors in hydrogen atmosphere. Both alloys correspond to a miscibility gap in the Ir–Os binary phase diagram and therefore are metastable at ambient conditions. An in situ powder X-ray diffraction has been used for a monitoring a formation of hcp-Ir0.55Os0.45 alloy from (NH4)2[Ir0.55Os0.45Cl6] precursor. A crystalline intermediate compound and nanodimentional metallic particles with a large concentration of defects has been found as key intermediates in the thermal decomposition process in hydrogen flow. High-temperature stability of titled hcp-structured alloys has been investigated upon compression up to 11 GPa using a multi-anvil press and up to 80 GPa using laser-heated diamond-anvil cells to obtain a phase separation into fcc + hcp mixture. Compressibility curves at room temperature as well as thermal expansion at ambient pressure and under compression up to 80 GPa were collected to obtain thermal expansion coefficients and bulk moduli. hcp-Ir0.55Os0.45 alloy shows bulk moduli B0 = 395 GPa. Thermal expansion coefficients were estimated as α = 1.6·10-5 K-1 at ambient pressure and α = 0.3·10-5 K-1 at 80 GPa. Obtained high-pressure high-temperature data allowed us to construct the first model for pressure-dependent Ir–Os phase diagram.

  14. Electrodeposition mechanism and corrosion behavior of multilayer nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allahyarzadeh, M.H.; Aliofkhazraei, M.; Rouhaghdam, A. Sabour

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer nickel-tungsten coatings were deposited on carbon steel using the pulse reverse current technique. Nickel-tungsten layered structure coatings were developed using the continuous and alternative variation of pulse duty cycle at two specific and fixed values. In these coatings, the multi......Multilayer nickel-tungsten coatings were deposited on carbon steel using the pulse reverse current technique. Nickel-tungsten layered structure coatings were developed using the continuous and alternative variation of pulse duty cycle at two specific and fixed values. In these coatings...

  15. High Temperature Resistant Exhaust Valve Spindle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe Ditlev

    of the engine, new high temperature alloys are required for a specific engine component, the exhaust valve spindle. Two alloys are used for an exhaust valve spindle; one for the bottom of the spindle, and one for the spindle seat. Being placed in the exhaust gas stream, combustion products such as V2O5 and Na2...

  16. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures; Desenvolvimento de um combustivel de alta densidade a base das ligas uranio-molibdenio com alta compatibilidade em altas temperaturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de

    2008-07-01

    This work has as its objective the development of a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on the gamma-UMo alloys, for utilization where it is necessary satisfactory behavior in high temperatures, considering its utilization as dispersion. For its accomplishment, it was started from the analysis of the RERTR ('Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors') results and some theoretical works involving the fabrication of gamma-uranium metastable alloys. A ternary addition is proposed, supported by the properties of binary and ternary uranium alloys studied, having the objectives of the gamma stability enhancement and an ease to its powder fabrication. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum were prepared with 5 to 10% Mo addition, and 1 and 3% of ternary, over a gamma U7Mo binary base alloy. In all the steps of its preparation, the alloys were characterized with the traditional techniques, to the determination of its mechanical and structural properties. To provide a process for the alloys powder obtention, its behavior under hydrogen atmosphere were studied, in thermo analyser-thermo gravimeter equipment. Temperatures varied from the ambient up to 1000 deg C, and times from 15 minutes to 16 hours. The results validation were made in a semi-pilot scale, where 10 to 50 g of powders of some of the alloys studied were prepared, under static hydrogen atmosphere. Compatibility studies were conducted by the exposure of the alloys under oxygen and aluminum, to the verification of possible reactions by means of differential thermal analysis. The alloys were exposed to a constant heat up to 1000 deg C, and their performances were evaluated in terms of their reaction resistance. On the basis of the results, it was observed that ternary additions increases the temperatures of the reaction with aluminum and oxidation, in comparison with the gamma UMo binaries. A set of conditions to the hydration of the alloys were defined, more restrictive in terms of temperature

  17. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium compatibility studies: results of 10,000-hour exposure of selected alloys in simulated reactor helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechtenberg, T.A.; Stevenson, R.D.; Johnson, W.R.

    1980-05-01

    Work on the HTGR Helium Compatibility Task accomplished during the period March 31, 1977 through September 30, 1979, is documented in this report. Emphasis is on the results and analyses of creep data to 10,000 h and the detailed metallurgical evaluations performed on candidate alloy specimens tested for up to 10,000 h. Long-term creep and unstressed aging data in controlled-impurity helium and in air at 800, 900, and 1000/sup 0/C are reported for alloys included in the program in FY-76, including the wrought solid-solution-strengthened alloys, Hastelloy X, Hastelloy S, RA 333, and HD 556, and the centrifugally cast austenitic alloys, HK 40, Supertherm, Manaurite 36X, Manaurite 36XS, and Manaurite 900.

  18. (Fe, Cr)3O4 Spinel Layer as the Key to Solving the Accelerated Oxidation of High Cr Iron Alloy in High-temperature Steam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murata, Yoshinori; Minai, Hideyuki; Nagai, Kensuke; Shiraki, Atsuhiro; Morinaga, Masahiko

    2008-01-01

    ...)3O4 spinel layer formed on the alloy surface. This result is related closely to the fact that oxidation of high Cr ferritic steels is accelerated remarkably by the existence of steam at elevated temperatures...

  19. Chemical and structural changes in Ln{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (Ln=La, Pr or Nd) lanthanide nickelates as a function of oxygen partial pressure at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flura, Aurélien; Dru, Sophie; Nicollet, Clément; Vibhu, Vaibhav; Fourcade, Sébastien; Lebraud, Eric; Rougier, Aline; Bassat, Jean-Marc; Grenier, Jean-Claude, E-mail: grenier@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr

    2015-08-15

    The chemical stability of lanthanide nickelates Ln{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} (Ln=La, Pr or Nd) has been studied in the temperature range 25–1300 °C, either in air or at low pO{sub 2} (down to 10{sup −4} atm). Thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA) measurements coupled with X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization have shown that all compounds retain their K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}-type structure in these conditions, while remaining over-stoichiometric in oxygen up to 1000 °C. Only Nd{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} starts to decompose into Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO above 1000 °C, at pO{sub 2}=10{sup −4} atm. In addition, a careful analysis of the lanthanide nickelates structural features has been performed by in situ XRD, as a function of temperature and pO{sub 2}. For all compounds, a structural transition has been always observed in the temperature range 200–400 °C, in air or at pO{sub 2}=10{sup −4} atm. In addition, their cell volume did not vary upon the variation of the oxygen partial pressure. Therefore, these materials do not exhibit a chemical expansion in these conditions, which is beneficial for a fuel cell application as cathode layers. Additional dilatometry measurements have revealed that a temperature as high as 950 °C for Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} or 1100 °C for La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} and Nd{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+δ} has to be reached in order to begin the sintering of the material particles, which is of primary importance to obtain an efficient electronic/ionic conduction in the corresponding designed cathode layers. Besides, excellent matching was found between the thermal expansion coefficients of lanthanide nickelates and SOFC electrolytes such as 8wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) or Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ} (GDC), at least from 400 °C up to 1400 °C in air or up to 1200 °C at pO{sub 2}=10{sup −4} atm. - Graphical abstract: This study reports the good chemical stability of oxygen overstoichiometric Ln2NiO4+δ(Ln = La, Pr or Nd) at high temperatures

  20. [Effect of recasting on the elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirković, Nemanja

    2007-07-01

    Elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems determines their flexural strenght and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Recycling of basic alloys is often a clinical practice, despite the possible effects on the quality of the future metal-ceramic dentures. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the elastic modulus of metal-ceramic systems in making fixed partial dentures. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99) and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C) were made. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Three- point bending test was used to determine elastic modulus, recommended by the standard ISO 9693:1999. Fracture load for damaging ceramic layer was recorded on the universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464), with the speed of 0,05 mm/min. The results of this research revealed significant differences between elasticity modules of metal-ceramic samples in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on the elastic modulus of the examined alloys. This research showed the slight linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 6th generation of recycling. After the 6th recycling there was a sudden fall of elastic modulus. Recasting of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys is not recommended because of the reduced elastic modulus of these alloys. Instead of reusing previously recasted alloys, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturer.