WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-resolution electron collision

  1. High-resolution electron collision spectroscopy with multicharged ions in merged beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestinsky, M.

    2007-04-18

    The Heidelberg ion storage ring Tsr is currently the only ring equipped with two independent devices for the collinear merging of a cold electron beam with stored ions. This greatly improves the potential of electron-ion collision experiments, as the ion beam can be cooled with one electron beam, while the other one is used as a dedicated target for energy-resolved electron collision processes, such as recombination. The work describes the implementation of this system for rst electron collision spectroscopy experiments. A detection system has been realized including an ion detector and specroscopic beam-control software and instrumentation. Moreover, in order to improve the spectroscopic resolution systematical studies of intrinsic relaxation processes in the electron beam have been carried out. These include the dependence on the electron beam density, the magnetic guiding eld strength, and the acceleration geometry. The recombination measurements on low-lying resonances in lithiumlike Sc{sup 18+} yield a high-precision measurement of the 2s-2p{sub 3/2} transition energy in this system. Operation of the two-electron-beam setup at high collision energy ({approx}1000 eV) is established using resonances of hydrogenlike Mg{sup 11+}, while the unique possibility of modifying the beam-merging geometry con rms its importance for the electron-ion recombination rate at lowest relative energy, as demonstrated on F{sup 6+}. (orig.)

  2. A high resolution X-ray crystal spectrometer to study electron and heavy-ion impact atomic collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ajay Kumar; D Misra; A H Kelkar; U R Kadhane; K V Thulasiram; Lokesh C Tribedi

    2007-06-01

    We have studied fast ion–atom and electron–atom collision processes using a reconditioned high resolution X-ray spectrometer. The X-rays, generated by the collisions, are dispersed by a curved ADP crystal (Johansson geometry) and detected by a gas proportional counter. A self-written LabVIEW based program has been used to give precise and controlled movement to the crystal and for data acquisition. The performance was tested by detecting the K diagram and satellite lines of several elements. The K satellite lines of Al have been studied in collision with 3–12 keV electrons and 40 MeV C4+ ions. In ion collisions as large as four L-vacancies are created simultaneously with the K-vacancy, compared to two satellites in case of the e-impact. In addition, we have measured the X-rays from H-, He- and Li-like Si ions which arise due to the electron loss/capture process in highly charged 80 MeV Si7+ ions in collision with thin carbon foil. Approximate charge state distribution has been obtained using this new technique.

  3. High-resolution electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, John C H

    2013-01-01

    This new fourth edition of the standard text on atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) retains previous material on the fundamentals of electron optics and aberration correction, linear imaging theory (including wave aberrations to fifth order) with partial coherence, and multiple-scattering theory. Also preserved are updated earlier sections on practical methods, with detailed step-by-step accounts of the procedures needed to obtain the highest quality images of atoms and molecules using a modern TEM or STEM electron microscope. Applications sections have been updated - these include the semiconductor industry, superconductor research, solid state chemistry and nanoscience, and metallurgy, mineralogy, condensed matter physics, materials science and material on cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology. New or expanded sections have been added on electron holography, aberration correction, field-emission guns, imaging filters, super-resolution methods, Ptychography, Ronchigrams, tomogr...

  4. The future of high resolution electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D Van Dyck

    2000-01-01

    The state of the art and the future in quantitative high resolution electron microscopy are discussed in the framework of parameter estimation. Reconstruction methods are then to be considered as direct methods to yield a starting structure for further refinement. With the increasing flexibility of the instruments, computer aided experimental strategy will become important.

  5. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Investigation by high resolution electron spectroscopy of the helium-like 3lnl' Rydberg series in double capture processes at low collision velocity: auto transfer to Rydberg states and electron stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Benhenni, M. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France)); Bachau, H.; Sanchez, I. (Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Talence (France). Lab. des Collisions Atomiques)

    1994-09-28

    A high resolution electron spectrometry of the (3lnl') Ryberg series populated in N[sup 7+] + He and Ne[sup 10+] + He collisions at 10 q keV, 10[sup o] allows us to observe, for the first time by this method, two post-collisional effects. First, it is found with nitrogen ions that, when n increases from n = 4 to 9, the L-distribution peaks more and more on the high angular momentum states. This is qualitatively understood as a Stark deformation of the Rydberg orbit by the Coulomb field of the receding ion. Also, in the n range where the double capture process populates symmetrical 4l4l' states (n>9), an enhancement of the intensities of the 3lnl' Rydberg lines is observed for both collisonal systems. This is thought to be a signature of the so-called auto transfer to Rydberg states effect. The transfer of population from the 3l4l' to the 3lnl' states is found to be favoured against a direct autoionization of these 4l4l' states into the n = 2 continuum. These experimental findings together with preliminary spectroscopic calculations concerning the configuration interaction of the Ne[sup 8+] (4l4l') states with the Ne[sup 8+](3lnl') Rydberg series are also discussed within the context of the electron stabilization which follows a double capture. (Author).

  7. Ultra-high resolution electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Mark P.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2017-02-01

    The last two decades have seen dramatic advances in the resolution of the electron microscope brought about by the successful correction of lens aberrations that previously limited resolution for most of its history. We briefly review these advances, the achievement of sub-Ångstrom resolution and the ability to identify individual atoms, their bonding configurations and even their dynamics and diffusion pathways. We then present a review of the basic physics of electron scattering, lens aberrations and their correction, and an approximate imaging theory for thin crystals which provides physical insight into the various different imaging modes. Then we proceed to describe a more exact imaging theory starting from Yoshioka’s formulation and covering full image simulation methods using Bloch waves, the multislice formulation and the frozen phonon/quantum excitation of phonons models. Delocalization of inelastic scattering has become an important limiting factor at atomic resolution. We therefore discuss this issue extensively, showing how the full-width-half-maximum is the appropriate measure for predicting image contrast, but the diameter containing 50% of the excitation is an important measure of the range of the interaction. These two measures can differ by a factor of 5, are not a simple function of binding energy, and full image simulations are required to match to experiment. The Z-dependence of annular dark field images is also discussed extensively, both for single atoms and for crystals, and we show that temporal incoherence must be included accurately if atomic species are to be identified through matching experimental intensities to simulations. Finally we mention a few promising directions for future investigation.

  8. High-resolution spectroscopic probes of collisions and half-collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G.E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program explores the dynamics of gas phase collisions and photodissociation by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. Simultaneous state and velocity detection frequently permits a determination of scalar or vector correlations among products. The correlated product distributions are always more informative, and often easier to interpret than the uncorrelated product state distributions. The authors have recently built an apparatus to record transient absorption spectra with 50 nS time resolution and 20 MHz frequency resolution using a single frequency Ti:sapphire laser. The photodissociation of NCCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SCN at 193 nm is discussed.

  9. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  10. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    A connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties is expected for almost all material systems. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is a technique offering insight into the atomic structure, but the analysis of large image series can be time consuming. The present ...

  11. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  12. Quantitative high resolution electron microscopy of grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, G.H., King, W.E., Cohen, D., Carter, C.B.

    1996-12-12

    The {Sigma}11 (113)/[1{bar 1}0] symmetric tilt grain boundary has been characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The method by which the images are prepared for analysis is described. The statistics of the image data have been found to follow a normal distribution. The electron-optical imaging parameters used to acquire the image have been determined by nonlinear least-square image simulation optimization within the perfect crystal region of the micrograph. A similar image simulation optimization procedure is used to determine the atom positions which provide the best match between the experimental image and the image simulation.

  13. High-resolution AMLCD for the electronic library system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Russel A.; Middo, Kathy; Turner, William D.; Lewis, Alan; Thompson, Malcolm J.; Silverstein, Louis D.

    1994-06-01

    The Electronic Library System (ELS), is a proposed data resource for the cockpit which can provide the aircrew with a vast array of technical information on their aircraft and flight plan. This information includes, but is not limited to, approach plates, Jeppeson Charts, and aircraft technical manuals. Most of these data are appropriate for digitization at high resolution (300 spi). Xerox Corporation has developed a flat panel active matrix liquid crystal display, AMLCD, that is an excellent match to the ELS, due to its innovative and aggressive design.

  14. Microstrain in Nanocrystalline Copper by High Resolution Electron Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Changping; RUAN Xuefeng; ZOU Huamin

    2009-01-01

    The elastic microstrains in a crystallite of electrodeposited nanocrystalline copper were investigated by analyzing the high resolution electron microscopy(HRTEM)image.The mi-crostrain was considered as consisting of two parts,in which the uniform part was determined with fast Fourier transformation of the HRTEM image,while the non-uniform part of the microstrain in the crystallite was measured by means of peak finding.Atomic column spacing measurements show that the crystal lattice is contracted in the longitudinal direction,while expanded in the transverse direction of the elliptical crystallite,indicating that the variation of microstrain exists mainly near the grain boundary.

  15. High resolution X-ray CT for advanced electronics packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppermann, M.; Zerna, T.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced electronics packaging is a challenge for non-destructive Testing (NDT). More, smaller and mostly hidden interconnects dominate modern electronics components and systems. To solve the demands of customers to get products with a high functionality by low volume, weight and price (e.g. mobile phones, personal medical monitoring systems) often the designers use System-in-Package solutions (SiP). The non-destructive testing of such devices is a big challenge. So our paper will impart fundamentals and applications for non-destructive evaluation of inner structures of electronics packaging for quality assurance and reliability investigations with a focus on X-ray methods, especially on high resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  16. Comparison of High Resolution Negative Electron Beam Resists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Schøler, Mikkel; Shi, Peixiong

    2006-01-01

    Four high resolution negative electron beam resists are compared: TEBN-1 from Tokuyama Corp. Japan, ma-N 2401XP and mr-L 6000AXP from microresist technology GmbH Germany, and SU-8 2000 series from MicroChem Corp., USA. Narrow linewidth high density patterns are defined by 100 kV electron beam...... lithography, and the pattern is transferred into silicon by a highly anisotropic SF6/O-2/CHF3 based reactive ion etch process with a selectivity between silicon and the investigated resists of approximately 2.20 nm half-pitch lines and 10 nm lines with a pitch down to 60 nm are written and transferred...

  17. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  18. Polystyrene negative resist for high-resolution electron beam lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Siqi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We studied the exposure behavior of low molecular weight polystyrene as a negative tone electron beam lithography (EBL resist, with the goal of finding the ultimate achievable resolution. It demonstrated fairly well-defined patterning of a 20-nm period line array and a 15-nm period dot array, which are the densest patterns ever achieved using organic EBL resists. Such dense patterns can be achieved both at 20 and 5 keV beam energies using different developers. In addition to its ultra-high resolution capability, polystyrene is a simple and low-cost resist with easy process control and practically unlimited shelf life. It is also considerably more resistant to dry etching than PMMA. With a low sensitivity, it would find applications where negative resist is desired and throughput is not a major concern.

  19. High resolution electron scattering on {sup 96}Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Christoph; Bassauer, Sergej; Krugmann, Andreas; Krumbholz, Anna Maria; Pietralla, Norbert; Singer, Maxim; Neumann-Cosel, Peter von [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The low-energy structure of the nucleus {sup 96}Zr is interesting for numerous reasons - especially the strong octupole correlation leading to an excitation of the prominent 3{sup -}{sub 1} state with the largest known ground-state transition strength (B(E3, 3{sup +}{sub 1} → 0{sup +}{sub 1}) = 57(4) W.u.) of all nuclei. Even though this nucleus is a good testing ground for nuclear structure theories some low-energy observables are known with insufficient precision. Especially the transition strength of low-lying 2{sup +} states, which are important for the identification of mixed-symmetry states, have large uncertainties. Electron scattering at low impulse transfer has been shown to be capable of obtaining these B(E2) values with high precision. A {sup 96}Zr(e,e{sup '}) experiment has recently been performed at the superconducting electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC at Darmstadt using the high-resolution LINTOTT spectrometer. The experiment and preliminary results are presented.

  20. High resolution simulations of the head-on collision of white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    García-Senz, D; Arcones, A; Relaño, A; Thielemann, F K

    2013-01-01

    The direct impact of white dwarfs has been suggested as a plausible channel for type Ia supernovae. In spite of their (a priori) rareness, in highly populated globular clusters and in galactic centers, where the amount of white dwarfs is considerable, the rate of violent collisions between two of them might be non-negligible. Even more, there are indications that binary white dwarf systems orbited by a third stellar-mass body have an important chance to induce a clean head-on collision. Therefore, this scenario represents a source of contamination for the supernova light-curves sample that it is used as standard candles in cosmology, and it deserves further investigation. Some groups have conducted numerical simulations of this scenario, but their results show several differences. In this paper we address some of the possible sources of these differences, presenting the results of high resolution hydrodynamical simulations jointly with a detailed nuclear post-processing of the nuclear abundances, to check the...

  1. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  2. High-Resolution Conversion Electron Spectroscopy of Valence Electron Configurations (CESVEC) in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    First measurements with the Zurich $\\beta$-spectrometer on sources from ISOLDE have demonstrated that high resolution spectroscopy of conversion electrons from valence shells is feasible.\\\\ \\\\ This makes possible a novel type of electron spectroscopy (CESVEC) on valence-electron configurations of tracer elements in solids. Thus the density of occupied electron states of impurities in solids has been measured for the first time. Such data constitute a stringent test of state-of-the-art calculations of impurity properties. Based on these results, we are conducting a systematic investigation of impurities in group IV and III-V semiconductors.

  3. High resolution inelastic electron scattering and nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, H. B.; Heisenberg, J. H.

    Thanks to the improved characteristics of the experimental set-up electron scattering has become an excellent tool to study the structure of the nucleus. After describing globally how the nuclear structure enters in the formalism of (e,e') reactions and how the high experimental resolution is obtained, several examples of the use of electron scattering for the study of specific nuclear structure questions are discussed.

  4. Investigation of slow collisions for (quasi) symmetric heavy systems: what can be extracted from high resolution X-ray spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Trassinelli, Martino; Lamour, Emily; Mezdari, Férid; Merot, Jacques; Reuschl, Regina; Rozet, Jean-Pierre; Steydli, S; Vernhet, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    We present a new experiment on (quasi) symmetric collision systems at low-velocity, namely Ar$^{17+}$ ions ($v=0.53$ a.u.) on gaseous Ar and N$_2$ targets, using low- and high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. Thanks to an accurate efficiency calibration of the spectrometers, we extract absolute X-ray emission cross sections combining low-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and a complete determination of the ion beam - gas jet target overlap. Values with improved uncertainty are found in agreement with previous results \\cite{Tawara2001}. Resolving the whole He-like Ar$^{16+}$ Lyman series from $n=2$ to 10 with our crystal spectrometer enables to determine precisely the distribution ${\\mathcal{P}_n}$ of the electron capture probability and the preferential $n_{pref}$ level of the selective single-electron capture. Evaluation of cross sections for this process as well as for the contribution of multiple-capture is carried out. Their sensitivity to the $\\ell$-distribution of $n$ levels populated by single-electron captu...

  5. Microfluidic chip for high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A Microfluidic chip (100) for transmission electron microscopy has a monolithic body (101) with a front side (102) and a back side (103). The monolithic body (101) comprises an opening (104) on the back side (103) extending in a vertical direction from the back side (103) to a membrane (107...

  6. Metals on BN Studied by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, U.; Zan, R.; Ramasse, Q.; Jalil, Rashid; Riaz, Ibstam; Novoselov, K. S.

    2012-07-01

    Metal impurities, gold and nickel, have been deliberately introduced into boron-nitride (BN) sheets. The structural and topographic properties of doped BN have been studied by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Analysis revealed that metal atoms cluster preferentially in/on contaminated areas. The metal coverage on BN is almost the same for the same evaporated amount of 1 Å.

  7. Copper Decoration of Carbon Nanotubes and High Resolution Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Camille

    A new process of decorating carbon nanotubes with copper was developed for the fabrication of nanocomposite aluminum-nanotubes. The process consists of three stages: oxidation, activation and electroless copper plating on the nanotubes. The oxidation step was required to create chemical function on the nanotubes, essential for the activation step. Then, catalytic nanoparticles of tin-palladium were deposited on the tubes. Finally, during the electroless copper plating, copper particles with a size between 20 and 60 nm were uniformly deposited on the nanotubes surface. The reproducibility of the process was shown by using another type of carbon nanotube. The fabrication of nanocomposites aluminum-nanotubes was tested by aluminum vacuum infiltration. Although the infiltration of carbon nanotubes did not produce the expected results, an interesting electron microscopy sample was discovered during the process development: the activated carbon nanotubes. Secondly, scanning transmitted electron microscopy (STEM) imaging in SEM was analysed. The images were obtained with a new detector on the field emission scanning electron microscope (Hitachi S-4700). Various parameters were analysed with the use of two different samples: the activated carbon nanotubes (previously obtained) and gold-palladium nanodeposits. Influences of working distance, accelerating voltage or sample used on the spatial resolution of images obtained with SMART (Scanning Microscope Assessment and Resolution Testing) were analysed. An optimum working distance for the best spatial resolution related to the sample analysed was found for the imaging in STEM mode. Finally, relation between probe size and spatial resolution of backscattered electrons (BSE) images was studied. An image synthesis method was developed to generate the BSE images from backscattered electrons coefficients obtained with CASINO software. Spatial resolution of images was determined using SMART. The analysis shown that using a probe

  8. High resolution fluorescent bio-imaging with electron beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshimasa; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru

    2014-11-01

    We have developed electron beam excitation assisted (EXA) optical microscope[1-3], and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.Figure 1(a) shows schematic diagram of the proposed EXA microscope. An electron beam is focused on a luminescent film. A specimen is put on the luminescent film directly. The inset in Fig. 1(a) shows magnified image of the luminescent film and the specimen. Nanometric light source is excited in the luminescent film by the focused electron beam. The nanometric light source illuminates the specimen, and the scattered or transmitted radiation is detected with a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The light source is scanned by scanning of the focused electron beam in order to construct on image. Figure 1(b) shows a luminescence image of the cells acquired with the EXA microscope, and Fig. 1(c) shows a phase contrast microscope image. Cells were observed in culture solution without any treatments, such as fixation and drying. The shape of each cell was clearly recognized and some bright spots were observed in cells. We believe that the bright spots indicated with arrows were auto-fluorescence of intracellular granules and light- grey regions were auto-fluorescence of cell membranes. It is clearly demonstrated that the EXA microscope is useful tool for observation of living biological cells in physiological conditions.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i

  9. High-Resolution Measurements of Low-Energy Conversion Electrons

    CERN Multimedia

    Gizon, A; Putaux, J

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of low-energy internal conversion electrons have been performed with high energy resolution in some N = 105 odd and odd-odd nuclei using a semi-circular spectrograph associated to a specific tape transport system. These experiments aimed to answer the following questions~: \\begin{itemize} \\item Do M3 isomeric transitions exist in $^{183}$Pt and $^{181}$Os, isotones of $^{184}$Au~? \\item Are the neutron configurations proposed to describe the isomeric and ground states of $^{184}$Au right or wrong~? \\item Does it exist an isomeric state in $^{182}$Ir, isotone of $^{181}$Os, $^{183}$Pt and $^{184}$Au~? \\item What are the spin and parity values of the excited states of $^{182}$Ir~? \\end{itemize} In $^{183}$Pt, the 35.0 keV M3 isomeric transition has been clearly observed and the reduced transition probability has been determined. The deduced hindrance factor is close to that observed in the neighbouring odd-odd $^{184}$Au nucleus. This confirms the neutron configurations previously proposed for the ...

  10. High-resolution XAS/XES analyzing electronic structures of catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    Photon-in-photon-out core level spectroscopy is an emerging approach to characterize the electronic structure of catalysts and enzymes, and it is either installed or planned for intense synchrotron beam lines and X-ray free electron lasers. This type of spectroscopy requires high-energy resolution spectroscopy not only for the incoming X-ray beam but also, in most applications, for the detection of the outgoing photons. Thus, the use of high-resolution X-ray crystal spectrometers whose resolving power ?E/E is typically about 10-4, is mandatory.High-Resolution XAS/XES: Analyzing Electronic Stru

  11. High resolution measurements of the electron scattering for applications in electron microscopy and Monte-Carlo simulations of electron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, D

    2000-01-01

    scanning electron microscope is examined. By means of the scattering at mono-crystalline samples the influence of channeling (anomalous absorption and transmission) on backscattered electron spectra is shown. Captions are given in English language. This work presents high resolution measurements of the energy and complete angular distribution of the scattering of 20 keV electrons (energy resolution 0.55%). The examinations include take-off angles close to the target surface and non-perpendicular incidences of electrons partly for the first time. The results are of interest for the understanding of fundamental scattering processes, the interpretation of signals and new detector systems in electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy. Furthermore, they are used for the verification of electron scattering models and simulations. The applied compact electrostatic spectrometers with spherical and toroidal geometries are characterized and compared. High resolution spectra are obtained by deconvolution of the measu...

  12. A magnetic-free high-resolution parabolic mirror time-of-flight electron energy spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张戈; 沈鸿元; 曾瑞荣; 黄呈辉; 林文雄; 黄见洪

    2001-01-01

    The principle and structure of a magnetic-free high-resolution high-efficiency parabolic mirror time-offligght electron energy spectrometer are presented. The electron energy spectrum of Nz in a flight tube is measured using a 105 fs Ti:sappbire laser under different gas pressures.

  13. High resolution 100 kV electron beam lithography in SU-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Jakobsen, S.; Schmidt, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    High resolution 100 kV electron beam lithography in thin layers of the negative resist SU-8 is demonstrated. Sub-30 nm lines with a pitch down to 300 nm are written in 100 nm thick SU-8. Two reactive ion etch processes are developed in order to transfer the SU-8 structures into a silicon substrat...

  14. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Colloidal Nanocrystal Growth Mechanisms using Graphene Liquid Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuk, Jong Min; Park, Jungwon; Ercius, Peter; Kim, Kwanpyo; Hellebusch, Danny J.; Crommie, Michael F.; Lee, Jeong Yong; Zettl, A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-12-12

    We introduce a new type of liquid cell for in-situ electron microscopy based upon entrapment of a liquid film between layers of graphene. We employ this cell to achieve high-resolution imaging of colloidal platinum nanocrystal growth. The ability to directly image and resolve critical steps at atomic resolution provides new insights into nanocrystal coalescence and reshaping during growth.

  15. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  16. High-resolution simulations of clump-clump collisions using SPH with Particle Splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Kitsionas, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate, by means of numerical simulations, the phenomenology of star formation triggered by low-velocity collisions between low-mass molecular clumps. The simulations are performed using an SPH code which satisfies the Jeans condition by invoking On-the-Fly Particle Splitting. Clumps are modelled as stable truncated (non-singular) isothermal, i.e. Bonnor-Ebert, spheres. Collisions are characterised by M_0 (clump mass), b (offset parameter, i.e. ratio of impact parameter to clump radius), and M (Mach Number, i.e. ratio of collision velocity to effective post-shock sound speed). The gas subscribes to a barotropic equation of state, which is intended to capture (i) the scaling of pre-collision internal velocity dispersion with clump mass, (ii) post-shock radiative cooling, and (iii) adiabatic heating in optically thick protostellar fragments. The efficiency of star formation is found to vary between 10% and 30% in the different collisions studied and it appears to increase with decreasing M_0, and/or dec...

  17. High-resolution simulations of clump-clump collisions using SPH with particle splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsionas, S.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2007-06-01

    We investigate, by means of numerical simulations, the phenomenology of star formation triggered by low-velocity collisions between low-mass molecular clumps. The simulations are performed using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code which satisfies the Jeans condition by invoking on-the-fly particle splitting. Clumps are modelled as stable truncated (non-singular) isothermal, i.e. Bonnor-Ebert, spheres. Collisions are characterized by M0 (clump mass), b (offset parameter, i.e. ratio of impact parameter to clump radius) and (Mach number, i.e. ratio of collision velocity to effective post-shock sound speed). The gas subscribes to a barotropic equation of state, which is intended to capture (i) the scaling of pre-collision internal velocity dispersion with clump mass, (ii) post-shock radiative cooling and (iii) adiabatic heating in optically thick protostellar fragments. The efficiency of star formation is found to vary between 10 and 30 per cent in the different collisions studied and it appears to increase with decreasing M0, and/or decreasing b, and/or increasing . For b compressed layers which fragment into filaments. Protostellar objects then condense out of the filaments and accrete from them. The resulting accretion rates are high, , for the first . The densities in the filaments, , are sufficient that they could be mapped in NH3 or CS line radiation, in nearby star formation regions.

  18. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, J; Thust, A

    2013-11-01

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state.

  19. Step-by-step chemical purification of carbon nanotubes analyzed by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosolen, Jose Mauricio; Montoro, Luciano Andrey; Matsubara, Elaine Yoshiko; Marchesin, Marcel Silva; Nascimento, Leandro Fontanetti do; Tronto, Simone [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Quimica

    2006-07-01

    Nanotechnology can be defined as the science of nanoscale materials. One of the most important nanotechnological materials is the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a nanomaterial that, to the naked eye, looks like black powder, but which is visible microscopically as shown in Figure 1. Using high resolution transmission electron microscopes, CNTs can be seen as single-walled (SWNTs), multi-walled (MWNTs), and cup-stacked nanotube (CSNTs) structures. (author)

  20. Exploring semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, S I [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ing Metalurgica y Q. Inorganica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro. 11510 Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Galindo, P L [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro. 11510 Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Gonzalez, L; Ripalda, J M [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Varela, M; Pennycook, S J, E-mail: sergio.molina@uca.e [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We review in this communication our contribution to the structural characterisation of semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy, both in phase-contrast and Z-contrast modes. We show how these techniques contribute to predict the preferential sites of nucleation of these nanostructures, and also determine the compositional distribution in 1D and 0D nanostructures. The results presented here were produced in the framework of the European Network of Excellence entitled {sup S}elf-Assembled semiconductor Nanostructures for new Devices in photonics and Electronics (SANDiE){sup .}

  1. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9/Jupiter collision observed with a high resolution speckle imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravel, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    During the week of July 16, 1994, comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, broken into 20 plus pieces by tidal forces on its last orbit, smashed into the planet Jupiter, releasing the explosive energy of 500 thousand megatons. A team of observers from LLNL used the LLNL Speckle Imaging Camera mounted on the University of California`s Lick Observatory 3 Meter Telescope to capture continuous sequences of planet images during the comet encounter. Post processing with the bispectral phase reconstruction algorithm improves the resolution by removing much of the blurring due to atmospheric turbulence. High resolution images of the planet surface showing the aftermath of the impact are probably the best that were obtained from any ground-based telescope. We have been looking at the regions of the fragment impacts to try to discern any dynamic behavior of the spots left on Jupiter`s cloud tops. Such information can lead to conclusions about the nature of the comet and of Jupiter`s atmosphere. So far, the Hubble Space Telescope has observed expanding waves from the G impact whose mechanism is enigmatic since they appear to be too slow to be sound waves and too fast to be gravity waves, given the present knowledge of Jupiter`s atmosphere. Some of our data on the G and L impact region complements the Hubble observations but, so far, is inconclusive about spot dynamics.

  2. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of narrow gap III-V semiconductor surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Veal, T D

    2002-01-01

    The electronic properties of n-type narrow gap III-V semiconductor surfaces and interfaces are investigated using high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Changing the incident electron energy, alters the wave-vector transfer parallel to the surface, allowing the probing depth to be varied over typical space-charge layer widths (100 - 2000 A). Semi-classical dielectric theory simulations of the HREEL spectra are performed to extract quantitative information from the probing energy-dependence of the surface plasmon and phonon peaks. The plasma frequency used in the simulations is related to the electron concentration and effective mass using the Kane model of the non-parabolic conduction band. Space-charge layer parameters are obtained by comparing calculated smooth charge profiles with the histogram profiles that are used in the simulations. Complementary experimental techniques are employed to correlate the reconstruction, chemical composition and morphology of the surface with the electro...

  3. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energetics of flattened carbon nonoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A

    1998-09-01

    When examined under a high-resolution transmission electron microscope, carbon soot produced alongside buckytubes in an arc-discharge is found to contain a small percentage of flattened carbon shells. These objects are shown to be small graphite flakes which eliminated their dangling bonds by terminating their edges with highly curved junctions. Ideal models for these structures are presented, and their energy estimated. The calculations show that the establishment of highly curved junctions is energetically favourable for a graphite flake in an inert atmosphere. Flattened shells also appear more stable than their `inflated` counterparts (fullerene `onions` and buckytubes) when the shell dimensions obey specific criteria.(authors) 29 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Soot Nanostructure: Using Fringe Analysis Software on High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Carbon Soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Using high resolution transmission electron images of carbon nanotubes and carbon particles, we are able to use image analysis program to determine several carbon fringe properties, including length, separation, curvature and orientation. Results are shown in the form of histograms for each of those quantities. The combination of those measurements can give a better indication of the graphic structure within nanotubes and particles of carbon and can distinguish carbons based upon fringe properties. Carbon with longer, straighter and closer spaced fringes are considered graphite, while amorphous carbon contain shorter, less structured fringes.

  5. Crack tip shielding observed with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhika, Damar Rastri; Tanaka, Masaki; Daio, Takeshi; Higashida, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    The dislocation shielding field at a crack tip was experimentally proven at the atomic scale by measuring the local strain in front of the crack tip using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and geometric phase analysis (GPA). Single crystalline (110) silicon wafers were employed. Cracks were introduced using a Vickers indenter at room temperature. The crack tip region was observed using HRTEM followed by strain measurements using GPA. The measured strain field at the crack tip was compressive owing to dislocation shielding, which is in good agreement with the strain field calculated from elastic theory.

  6. Practical Approaches to Mitigation of Specimen Charging in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Min Kim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Specimen charging that is associated with the electron bombardment on the sample is a practical hindrance to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM analysis because it causes a severe loss of resolution in either diffraction or image data. Conductive thin film deposition on an insulating specimen has been proposed as an effective approach to the mitigation of the specimen charging; however, this method is generally not useful in HRTEM imaging of materials because the deposited film induces another artifact in the HRTEM image contrast. In this study, we propose practical methods to mitigate the specimen charging that takes place during the HRTEM of materials. For bulk-type specimens prepared by either an ion-thinning or focused-ion beam (FIB process, a plasma cleaning treatment is significantly effective in eliminating the charging phenomenon. In the case of low-dimensional nanomaterials such as nanowires and nanoparticles, the plasma cleaning is not feasible; however, the charging effect can be effectively eliminated by adjusting the electron illumination condition. The proposed methods facilitate a decrease in the buildup of specimen charging, thereby enhancing the quality of high-resolution images significantly.

  7. High-resolution infrared detector and its electronic unit for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, M.; Montmessin, F.; Korablev, O.; Trokhimovsky, A.; Poiet, G.; Bel, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution infrared detector is used extensively for military and civilian purposes. Military applications include target acquisition, surveillance, night vision, and tracking. Civilian applications include, among others, scientific observations. For our space systems, we want to use the products developed by SOFRADIR Company. Thus, we have developed a space electronic unit that is used to control the high-resolution SCORPIO-MW infrared detector, which has a format of 640×512 pixels with 15μm×15μm pixel pitch. The detector within microelectronics based on infrared mid-wave (MW) complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) uses a micro-cooler in order to keep its temperature around 100 K. The standard wavelength range (3 to 5μm) is adapted to the 2.2 to 4.3μm wavelength range thanks to adaptation of the optical interface of the detector and with an antireflection coating. With our electronic system, we can acquire 3 images per second. To increase the signal to noise ratio, we have the opportunity to make a summation of 15 frames per image. Through this article, we will describe the space electronic system that we have developed in order to achieve space observations (e.g. Atmospheric Chemistry Suite package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter).

  8. Novel method of simultaneous multiple immunogold localization on resin sections in high resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebesarova, Jana; Wandrol, Petr; Vancova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of multiple immunolabeling that is suitable for a broad spectrum of biomedical applications. The general concept is to label both sides of the ultrathin section with the thickness of 70-80 nm with different antibodies conjugated to gold nanoparticles and to distinguish the labeled side by advanced imaging methods with high resolution scanning electron microscopy, such as by correlating images acquired at different energies of primary electrons using different signals. From the Clinical Editor: The use of transmission electron microscopy has become an indispensible tool in the detection of cellular proteins. In this short but interesting article, the authors described their new method of labeling and the identification of four different proteins simultaneously, which represents another advance in imaging technique.

  9. High resolution EUV spectroscopy of xenon ions with a compact electron beam ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Safdar; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-01

    We performed high resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy measurements of highly charged xenon ions with a compact electron beam ion trap. The spectra were recorded with a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer while varying the electron beam energy between 200 and 890 eV. We measured the wavelengths for several lines of Rh-like Xe9+ - Cd-like Xe6+ and Cu-like Xe25+- Se-like Xe20+ in the range of 150-200 Å with an uncertainty of 0.05 Å. Previously, most of these lines have been reported from EBITs with a wavelength uncertainty of 0.2 Å. Additionally, based on the electron beam energy dependence of the observed spectra we tentatively identified three new lines, which were reported as unidentified lines in the previous studies.

  10. Characterization of silver vanadium oxide cathode material by high-resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, A.M. [Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Skarstad, P.M. [Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Zandbergen, H.W. [National Centre for HREM, Lab. of Materials Science, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1995-03-01

    The nature of the discharge reaction of lithium/silver vanadium oxide batteries was investigated. The lithiation of silver vanadium oxide, which has the formula Ag{sub 2-y}V{sub 4}O{sub 11}, proceeds by a multistep reaction, as indicated by the open-circuit voltage curve. The first step in the discharge reaction involves reduction of silver and separation of the oxide into two phases of differing composition. Electron diffraction of lithiated materials of various compositions suggests that the layered structure of the oxide is maintained, but with an increased amount of stacking disorder. High-resolution electron micrographs of lithiated Ag{sub 2-y}V{sub 4}O{sub 11} at atomic resolution could not be obtained because of sample decomposition in the electron beam. (orig.)

  11. Random vs realistic amorphous carbon models for high resolution microscopy and electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricolleau, C., E-mail: Christian.Ricolleau@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Alloyeau, D. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Phénomènes Quantiques, CNRS-UMR 7162, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, Case 7021, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Le Bouar, Y.; Amara, H.; Landon-Cardinal, O. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures, UMR CNRS/Onera, 29, avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Châtillon (France)

    2013-12-07

    Amorphous carbon and amorphous materials in general are of particular importance for high resolution electron microscopy, either for bulk materials, generally covered with an amorphous layer when prepared by ion milling techniques, or for nanoscale objects deposited on amorphous substrates. In order to quantify the information of the high resolution images at the atomic scale, a structural modeling of the sample is necessary prior to the calculation of the electron wave function propagation. It is thus essential to be able to reproduce the carbon structure as close as possible to the real one. The approach we propose here is to simulate a realistic carbon from an energetic model based on the tight-binding approximation in order to reproduce the important structural properties of amorphous carbon. At first, we compare this carbon with the carbon obtained by randomly generating the carbon atom positions. In both cases, we discuss the limit thickness of the phase object approximation. In a second step, we show the influence of both carbons models on (i) the contrast of Cu, Ag, and Au single atoms deposited on carbon and (ii) the determination of the long-range order parameter in CoPt bimetallic nanoalloys.

  12. Nanocrystal Phase Identification by Lattice Fringe Fingerprinting from High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorge, Ruben; Seipel, Bjoern; Moeck, Peter; Fraundorf, Philip

    2006-05-01

    Lattice fringe fingerprinting is a novel and powerful method of identifying and characterizing nanocrystalline structures or materials based on images from direct space high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We examine Fourier transformed HRTEM images of nanocrystals in certain orientations (i.e. lattice fringes and cross fringes) in order to obtain a lattice fringe fingerprint plot. Such plots are used to identify a crystalline nanoparticle by comparing the experimental data with data that are derived from a comprehensive database. A lattice fringe fingerprint plot is similar to a classical X-ray powder diffractogram, but an important advantage is that the intersection angles of lattice fringes give us additional information. When transmission electron microscope image acquisition and data interpretation are automated and connected to a comprehensive database (such as our Nano-Crystallography Database, http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/), fringe fingerprinting will be able to compete with powder X-ray diffraction in identifying unknown nanocrystals on a routine basis.

  13. The High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy: A Powerful Tool for Studying the Organization of Terrestrial and Extra-Terrestrial Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzaud, J.-N.; Skrzypczak, A.; Bonal, L.; Derenne, S.; Quirico, E.; Robert, F.

    2005-03-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) makes possible the imaging of the profile of the polyaromatic layers, allowing a knowledge of carbons, such as disordered natural carbons from meteorites and from Precambrian metasediments

  14. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  15. High-Resolution Transfer Printing of Graphene Lines for Fully Printed, Flexible Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Donghoon; Mahajan, Ankit; Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C; Francis, Lorraine F; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2017-07-25

    Pristine graphene inks show great promise for flexible printed electronics due to their high electrical conductivity and robust mechanical, chemical, and environmental stability. While traditional liquid-phase printing methods can produce graphene patterns with a resolution of ∼30 μm, more precise techniques are required for improved device performance and integration density. A high-resolution transfer printing method is developed here capable of printing conductive graphene patterns on plastic with line width and spacing as small as 3.2 and 1 μm, respectively. The core of this method lies in the design of a graphene ink and its integration with a thermally robust mold that enables annealing at up to ∼250 °C for precise, high-performance graphene patterns. These patterns exhibit excellent electrical and mechanical properties, enabling favorable operation as electrodes in fully printed electrolyte-gated transistors and inverters with stable performance even following cyclic bending to a strain of 1%. The high resolution coupled with excellent control over the line edge roughness to below 25 nm enables aggressive scaling of transistor dimensions, offering a compelling route for the scalable manufacturing of flexible nanoelectronic devices.

  16. A High-resolution 3D Geodynamical Model of the Present-day India-Asia Collision System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, B.; Baumann, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-resolution, 3D geodynamic model of the present-day India-Asia collision system. The model is separated into multiple tectonic blocks, for which we estimate the first order rheological properties and the impact on the dynamics of the collision system. This is done by performing systematic simulations with different rheologies to minimize the misfit to observational constraints such as the GPS-velocity field. The simulations are performed with the parallel staggered grid FD code LaMEM using a numerical resolution of at least 512x512x256 cells to resolve dynamically important shear zones reasonably well. A fundamental part of this study is the reconstruction of the 3D present-day geometry of Tibet and the adjacent regions. Our interpretations of crust and mantle lithosphere geometry are jointly based on a globally available shear wave tomography (Schaeffer and Lebedev, 2013) and the Crust 1.0 model (Laske et al. http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust1.html). We regionally refined and modified our interpretations based on seismicity distributions and focal mechanisms and incorporated regional receiver function studies to improve the accuracy of the Moho in particular. Results suggest that we can identify at least one "best-fit" solution in terms of rheological model properties that reproduces the observed velocity field reasonably well, including the strong rotation of the GPS velocity around the eastern syntax of the Himalaya. We also present model co-variances to illustrate the trade-offs between the rheological model parameters, their respective uncertainties, and the model fit. Schaeffer, A.J., Lebedev, S., 2013. Global shear speed structure of the upper mantle and transition zone. Geophysical Journal International 194, 417-449. doi:10.1093/gji/ggt095

  17. Detecting non-maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, K V; Prunty, S L; Scannell, R; Beurskens, M N; Walsh, M J; de la Luna, E

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6–7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%–20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV.

  18. Detecting non-Maxwellian electron velocity distributions at JET by high resolution Thomson scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, K. V.; Prunty, S. L.; Scannell, R.; Beurskens, M. N.; Walsh, M. J.; de La Luna, E.; Jet Efda Contributors

    2011-03-01

    The present work is motivated by a long standing discrepancy between the electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering (TS) and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics for plasmas with strong auxiliary heating observed at both JET and TFTR above 6-7 keV, where in some cases the ECE electron temperature measurements can be 15%-20% higher than the TS measurements. Recent analysis based on ECE results at JET has shown evidence of distortions to the Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a correlation with the TS and ECE discrepancies has been suggested. In this paper, a technique to determine the presence of non-Maxwellian behavior using TS diagnostics is outlined. The difficulties and limitations of modern TS system designs to determine the electron velocity distribution are also discussed. It is demonstrated that small deviations such as those suggested by previous ECE analysis could be potentially detected, depending on the spectral layout of the TS polychromators. The spectral layout of the JET high resolution Thomson scattering system is such that it could be used to determine these deviations between 1 and 6 keV, and the results presented here indicate that no evidence of non-Maxwellian behavior is observed in this range. In this paper, a modification to the current polychromator design is proposed, allowing non-Maxwellian distortions to be detected up to at least 10 keV

  19. THE HIGH-RESOLUTION EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM OF N{sub 2} BY ELECTRON IMPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heays, A. N. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ajello, J. M.; Aguilar, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T., E-mail: heays@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    We have analyzed high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by an electron impact at 20 and 100 eV under (mostly) optically thin, single-scattering experimental conditions. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N{sub 2} electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets and their emission cross sections were measured. Molecular emission was observed at vibrationally excited ground-state levels as high as v'' = 17, from the a {sup 1}Π {sub g} , b {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and b'{sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +} excited valence states and the Rydberg series c'{sub n} {sub +1} {sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +}, c{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and o{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} for n between 3 and 9. The frequently blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a sophisticated and predictive quantum-mechanical model of excited states that includes the strong coupling between valence and Rydberg electronic states and the effects of predissociation. Improved model parameters describing electronic transition moments were obtained from the experiment and allowed for a reliable prediction of the vibrationally summed electronic emission cross section, including an extrapolation to unobserved emission bands and those that are optically thick in the experimental spectra. Vibrationally dependent electronic excitation functions were inferred from a comparison of emission features following 20 and 100 eV electron-impact collisional excitation. The electron-impact-induced fluorescence measurements are compared with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations of emissions from Titan's upper atmosphere.

  20. High-resolution electron microscopy in spin pumping NiFe/Pt interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley Domínguez, D., E-mail: david.ley@cimav.edu.mx; Sáenz-Hernández, R. J.; Faudoa Arzate, A.; Arteaga Duran, A. I.; Ornelas Gutiérrez, C. E.; Solís Canto, O.; Botello-Zubiate, M. E.; Rivera-Gómez, F. J.; Matutes-Aquino, J. A. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31109 (Mexico); Azevedo, A.; Silva, G. L. da; Rezende, S. M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-05-07

    In order to understand the effect of the interface on the spin pumping and magnetic proximity effects, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to analyze Py/Pt bilayer and Pt/Py/Pt trilayer systems. The samples were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering at room temperature on Si (001) substrates. The Py layer thickness was fixed at 12 nm in all the samples and the Pt thickness was varied in a range of 0–23 nm. A diffusion zone of approximately 8 nm was found in the Py/Pt interfaces and confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The FMR measurements show an increase in the linewidth and a shift in the ferromagnetic resonance field, which reach saturation.

  1. High resolution 100 kV electron beam lithography in SU-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Jakobsen, S.; Schmidt, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    High resolution 100 kV electron beam lithography in thin layers of the negative resist SU-8 is demonstrated. Sub-30 nm lines with a pitch down to 300 nm are written in 100 nm thick SU-8. Two reactive ion etch processes are developed in order to transfer the SU-8 structures into a silicon substrate......, a Soft O-2-Plasma process to remove SU-8 residues on the silicon surface after development and a highly anisotropic SF6/O-2/CHF3 based process to transfer the pattern into a silicon substrate, with selectivity between silicon and SU-8 of approximately 2. 30 nm lines patterned in SU-8 are successfully...

  2. Pattern recognition in high-resolution electron microscopy of complex materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermann, Tore; Thiel, Karsten; Seibt, Michael

    2006-12-01

    Structural features like defects or heterointerfaces in crystals or amorphous phases give rise to different local patterns in high-resolution electron micrographs or object wave functions. Pattern recognition techniques can be used to identify these typical patterns that constitute the image itself, as was already demonstrated for compositional changes in isostructural heterostructures, where the patterns within unit cells of the lattice were analyzed. To extend such analyses to more complex materials, we examined patterns in small circular areas centered on intensity maxima of the image. Nonsupervised clustering, namely, Ward's clustering method, was applied to these patterns. In two examples, a highly defective ZnMnTe layer on GaAs and a tunnel magneto resistance device, we demonstrate how typical patterns are identified by this method and how these results can be used for a further investigation of the microstructural properties of the sample.

  3. High resolution transmission electron microscope observation of zero-strain deformation twinning mechanisms in Ag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Wang, J; Gong, S K; Mao, S X

    2011-04-29

    We have observed a new deformation-twinning mechanism using the high resolution transmission electron microscope in polycrystalline Ag films, zero-strain twinning via nucleation, and the migration of a Σ3{112} incoherent twin boundary (ITB). This twinning mechanism produces a near zero macroscopic strain because the net Burgers vectors either equal zero or are equivalent to a Shockley partial dislocation. This observation provides new insight into the understanding of deformation twinning and confirms a previous hypothesis: detwinning could be accomplished via the nucleation and migration of Σ3{112} ITBs. The zero-strain twinning mechanism may be unique to low staking fault energy metals with implications for their deformation behavior.

  4. Grids for Applications in High-Temperature High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucheng Lan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New TEM grids coated with ultrathin amorphous Al2O3 films have been developed using atomic layer deposition technique. The amorphous Al2O3 films can withstand temperatures over 600∘C in air and 900∘C in vacuum when the thickness of the Al2O3 film is 2 nm, and up to 1000∘C in air when the thickness is 25 nm, which makes heating TEM grids with nanoparticles up to 1000∘C in air and immediate TEM observation without interrupting the nanoparticles possible. Such coated TEM grids are very much desired for applications in high-temperature high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  5. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu, Linfan [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70808 (United States); Guo, Jiandong, E-mail: jdguo@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  6. Sub-NM Beam Motion Analysis using a Standard BPM with High Resolution Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Gasior, M; Kuzmin, A; Pfingstner, J; Schmickler, H; Sylte, M; Billing, M; Böge, M; Dehler, M

    2010-01-01

    In the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) project high luminosity will be achieved by generating and preserving ultra low beam emittances. It will require a mechanical stability of the quadrupole magnets down to the level of 1 nmrms for frequencies above 1 Hz throughout the 24 km of linac structures. Studies are presently being undertaken to stabilize each quadrupole by means of an active feedback system based on motion sensors and piezoelectric actuators. Since it will be very difficult to prove the stability of the magnetic field down to that level of precision, an attempt was made to use a synchrotron electron beam as a sensor. The beam motion was observed with a standard button Beam Position Monitor (BPM) equipped with high resolution electronics. Beam experiments were carried out to qualify such a measurement at CesrTA (Cornell University) and at SLS (PSI, Villingen), where the residual motion of the circulating electron beams was measured in the frequency range of 5 – 700 Hz. This paper describes the resu...

  7. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. High-resolution electron beam length measuring equipment; Kobunkaino denshisen sokucho sochi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otaka, T.; Sasada, K.; Ezumi, M.; Maeda, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Regarding the manufacture of semiconductor devices, the 16-megabit DRAM mass production system has been established, 64-megabit DRAM mass production has begun, and research and assessment are under way for the mass production of 256-megabit to 1-gigabit DRAMs. For the handling of devices so advanced in their microstructural feature and integration, sophisticated evaluation technologies are indispensable for the high-resolution observation of product geometry and for the high-precision management of product dimensions. Hitachi, Ltd., aiming to satisfy such needs, has introduced commercially its S-8820 series electron beam length measuring equipment based on the scanning electron microscope technology. This time, the corporation has developed S-8840 electron beam length measuring equipment, which can deal with the next-generation manufacturing processes. This equipment incorporates into itself an innovative signal detecting function for observing the bottom of, for example, a contact hole whose aspect ratio is quite high. The S-8840 type, furthermore, can process wafers at a rate approximately 50% higher than the conventional equipment for enhanced cost/performance. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm structure

  10. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy on graphene/SiC(0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Roland J.; Endlich, Michael; Haensel, Thomas; Ahmed, Syed Imad U. [Institut fuer Physik und Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanotechnologien, TU Ilmenau (Germany); Seyller, Thomas [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Physik, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Schaefer, Juergen A. [Institut fuer Physik und Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanotechnologien, TU Ilmenau (Germany); Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The recent experimental realization of single-layer graphene sheets has led to intense efforts to understand its electronic and vibrational properties in the context of solid state materials physics. In this contribution we investigate the interaction of epitaxial graphene with SiC(0001) using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The focus in this contribution is on the coupling of charge carriers in semi-metallic graphene with the optical phonons of SiC(0001). Due to this coupling the surface optical phonons, the so called Fuchs-Kliewer phonons, completely vanish and two new modes {omega}{sub -} and {omega}{sub +} are observed instead. The energetic position and intensity of these modes depend strongly upon the momentum transferred parallel to the interface (q {sub parallel}), which we investigated in the regime of 0.005 A{sup -1} to 0.03A{sup -1}. Simulating our HREELS-data using dielectric theory and solving the Poisson- and Schroedinger equations self consistently allows us to determine the carrier density distribution and the conduction band edge normal to the plane of the graphene/SiC heterostructure.

  11. High resolution transmission electron microscopic study of nanoporous carbon consisting of curved single graphite sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-12-31

    A high resolution transmission electron microscopic study of a nanoporous carbon rich in curved graphite monolayers is presented. Observations of very thin regions. including the effect of tilting the specimen with respect to the electron beam, are reported. The initiation of single sheet material on an oriented graphite substrate is also observed. When combined with image simulations and independent measurements of the density (1.37g cm {sup -3}) and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2}+sp{sup 2} bonding fraction (0.16), these observations suggest that this material is a two phase mixture containing a relatively low density aggregation of essentially capped single shells like squat nanotubes and polyhedra, plus a relatively dense `amorphous` carbon structure which may be described using a random-Schwarzite model. Some negatively-curved sheets were also identified in the low density phase. Finally, some discussion is offered regarding the growth mechanisms responsible for this nanoporous carbon and its relationship with the structures of amorphous carbons across a broad range of densities, porosities and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2}+sp{sup 3} bonding fractions. 29 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Molecular potentials and wave function mapping by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberg, Victor, E-mail: victor.kimberg@pks.mpi.de [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Nöthnitzer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Miron, Catalin, E-mail: miron@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, FR-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Some studies related to the vibrational wave functions mapping phenomenon are reviewed. • The core-excited vibrational wave functions were mapped using dissociative and bound final states. • High-resolution experimental data is accompanied by ab initio calculations. • The mapping phenomenon allows one to extract constants of the molecular potentials. • The mapping techniques are general and can be applied for the study of many systems. - Abstract: The recent development of high brightness 3{sup rd} generation soft X-ray sources and high energy resolution electron spectrometers made it possible to accurately trace quantum phenomena associated to the vibrational dynamics in core-excited molecules. The present paper reviews the recent results on mapping of vibrational wave functions and molecular potentials based on electron spectroscopy. We discuss and compare the mapping phenomena in various systems, stressing the advantages of the resonant X-ray scattering for studying of the nuclear dynamics and spectroscopic constants of small molecules. The experimental results discussed in the paper are most often accompanied by state-of-the-art ab initio calculations allowing for a deeper understanding of the quantum effects. Besides its fundamental interest, the vibrational wave function mapping is shown to be useful for the analysis of core- and valence-excited molecular states based on the reflection principle.

  13. Atom-counting in High Resolution Electron Microscopy:TEM or STEM - That's the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-10-27

    In this work, a recently developed quantitative approach based on the principles of detection theory is used in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of High Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR STEM) and HR TEM for atom-counting. So far, HR STEM has been shown to be an appropriate imaging mode to count the number of atoms in a projected atomic column. Recently, it has been demonstrated that HR TEM, when using negative spherical aberration imaging, is suitable for atom-counting as well. The capabilities of both imaging techniques are investigated and compared using the probability of error as a criterion. It is shown that for the same incoming electron dose, HR STEM outperforms HR TEM under common practice standards, i.e. when the decision is based on the probability function of the peak intensities in HR TEM and of the scattering cross-sections in HR STEM. If the atom-counting decision is based on the joint probability function of the image pixel values, the dependence of all image pixel intensities as a function of thickness should be known accurately. Under this assumption, the probability of error may decrease significantly for atom-counting in HR TEM and may, in theory, become lower as compared to HR STEM under the predicted optimal experimental settings. However, the commonly used standard for atom-counting in HR STEM leads to a high performance and has been shown to work in practice.

  14. Fluid mechanical proximity effects in high-resolution gravure printing for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Gerd; Scheideler, William J.; Subramanian, Vivek

    2016-11-01

    Gravure printing is a very promising method for printed electronics because it combines high throughput with high resolution. Recently, printed lines with 2 micrometer resolution have been demonstrated at printing speeds on the order of 1m/s. In order to build realistic circuits, the fluid dynamics of complex pattern formation needs to be studied. Recently, we showed that highly-scaled lines printed in close succession exhibit proximity effects that can either improve or deteriorate print quality depending on a number of parameters. It was found that this effect occurs if cells are connected by a thin fluid film. Here, we present further experimental and modeling results explaining the mechanism by which this thin fluid film affects pattern formation. During the transfer of ink from the roll to the substrate, ink can flow in between connected cells. Asymmetry in the fluid distribution created by the preceding doctor blade wiping process results in net fluid flow from cells that transfer first to cells that transfer subsequently. The proximity of these cells thus affects the final ink distribution on the substrate, which is critically important to understand and design optimally when printing highly-scaled patterns of electronic materials. This work is based upon work supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement No. EEC-1160494.

  15. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm structures after 2013, as described by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), or can be used for rapid prototyping in research applications. The key point is to combine the throughp...

  16. High-resolution x-ray scattering studies of charge ordering in highly correlated electron systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ghazi, M E

    2002-01-01

    addition, another very weak satellites with wavevector (1/2, 1, 1/2) were observed possibly due to spin ordering. two-dimensional in nature both by measurements of their correlation lengths and by measurement of the critical exponents of the charge stripe melting transition with an anomaly at x = 0.25. The results show by decreasing the hole concentration from the x = 0.33 to 0.2, the well-correlated charge stripes change to a glassy state at x = 0.25. The electronic transition into the charge stripe phase is second-order without any corresponding structural transition. Above the second-order transition critical scattering was observed due to fluctuations into the charge stripe phase. In a single-crystal of Nd sub 1 sub / sub 2 Sr sub 1 sub / sub 2 MnO sub 3 a series of phase transitions were observed using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray scattering. Above the charge ordering transition temperature, T sub C sub O , by measuring the peak profiles of Bragg reflections as a function of temperature, it was foun...

  17. In-Situ High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Overheating of Cu Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Hu, Ziyu; Li, Yanfen; Liu, Limin; Mori, Hirotaro; Wang, Zhangchang

    2016-01-01

    Synthesizing and functionalizing metal nanoparticles supported on substrates is currently the subject of intensive study owing to their outstanding catalytic performances for heterogeneous catalysis. Revealing the fundamental effect of the substrates on metal nanoparticles represents a key step in clarifying mechanisms of stability and catalytic properties of these heterogeneous systems. However, direct identification of these effects still poses a significant challenge due to the complicacy of interactions between substrates and nanoparticles and also for the technical difficulty, restraining our understanding of these heterogeneous systems. Here, we combine in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Cu nanoparticles supported on graphite and Cu2O substrates, and demonstrate that melting behavior and thermal stability of Cu nanoparticles can be markedly influenced by substrates. The graphite-supported Cu nanoparticles do not melt during annealing at 1073 K until they vanish completely, i.e. only the sublimation occurs, while the Cu2O-supported Cu nanoparticles suffer melting during annealing at 973 K. Such selective superheating of the Cu nanoparticles can be attributed to the adsorption of a thin carbon layer on the surface of the Cu nanoparticles, which helps guide further stability enhancement of functional nanoparticles for realistic applications.

  18. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Vivian, E-mail: v.tong13@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Britton, T. Ben [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4.

  19. Magnetic dynamics studied by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and time-resolved electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Rajeswari

    Future information technology requires an increased magnetically encoded data density and novel electromagnetic modes of data transfer. While to date magnetic properties are observed and characterized mostly statically, the need emerges to monitor and capture their fast dynamics. In this talk, I will focus on the spin dynamics i.e. spin wave excitations and the dynamics of a new topological distribution of spins termed ``skyrmions''. Wave packets of spin waves offer the unique capability to transport a quantum bit, the spin, without the transport of charge or mass. Here, large wave-vector spin waves are of particular interest as they admit spin localization within a few nanometers. By using our recently developed electron energy loss spectrometer, we could study such spin waves in ultrathin films with an unprecedented energy resolution of 4 meV. By virtue of the finite penetration depth of low energy electrons, spin waves localized at interfaces between a substrate and a thin capping layer can be been studied yielding information about the exchange coupling between atoms at the interface. The quantization of spin waves with wave vectors perpendicular to the film gives rise to standing modes to which EELS has likewise access. Such studies when carried out as function of the film thickness again yield information on the layer dependence of the exchange coupling. Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers in logic or storage devices. Currently, little is known about the influence of disorder, defects, or external stimuli on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the skyrmion lattice. In this talk, I will describe the dynamical role of disorder in a large and flat thin film of Cu2OSeO3, exhibiting a skyrmion phase in an insulating material. We image up to 70,000 skyrmions by means of cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the skyrmion phase, dislocations are shown to cause the

  20. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Hans G.J.; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS

  1. The Application of High-Resolution Electron Microscopy to Problems in Solid State Chemistry: The Exploits of a Peeping TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyring, LeRoy

    1980-01-01

    Describes methods for using the high-resolution electron microscope in conjunction with other tools to reveal the identity and environment of atoms. Problems discussed include the ultimate structure of real crystalline solids including defect structure and the mechanisms of chemical reactions. (CS)

  2. Linear versus non-linear structural information limit in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aert, S; Chen, J H; Van Dyck, D

    2010-10-01

    A widely used performance criterion in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is the information limit. It corresponds to the inverse of the maximum spatial object frequency that is linearly transmitted with sufficient intensity from the exit plane of the object to the image plane and is limited due to partial temporal coherence. In practice, the information limit is often measured from a diffractogram or from Young's fringes assuming a weak phase object scattering beyond the inverse of the information limit. However, for an aberration corrected electron microscope, with an information limit in the sub-angstrom range, weak phase objects are no longer applicable since they do not scatter sufficiently in this range. Therefore, one relies on more strongly scattering objects such as crystals of heavy atoms observed along a low index zone axis. In that case, dynamical scattering becomes important such that the non-linear and linear interaction may be equally important. The non-linear interaction may then set the experimental cut-off frequency observed in a diffractogram. The goal of this paper is to quantify both the linear and the non-linear information transfer in terms of closed form analytical expressions. Whereas the cut-off frequency set by the linear transfer can be directly related with the attainable resolution, information from the non-linear transfer can only be extracted using quantitative, model-based methods. In contrast to the historic definition of the information limit depending on microscope parameters only, the expressions derived in this paper explicitly incorporate their dependence on the structure parameters as well. In order to emphasize this dependence and to distinguish from the usual information limit, the expressions derived for the inverse cut-off frequencies will be referred to as the linear and non-linear structural information limit. The present findings confirm the well-known result that partial temporal coherence has

  3. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  4. High Resolution Crossed Molecular Beams Study on the F+HD→HF+D Reaction at Collision Energy of 5.43-18.73 kJ/mol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-rui Dong; Chun-lei Xiao; Tao Wang; Dong-xu Dai; Xiu-yan Wang; Xue-ming Yang

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of F+HD→HF+D reaction has been studied at ten collision energies ranging from 5.43 kJ/mol to 18.73 kJ/mol using high-resolution H/D atom Rydberg tagging time-of-flight method.Product vibrational and rotational state-resolved differential cross sections have been determined.The intensity of the HF(v'=2) forward products decreases as the collision energy increases,suggesting that the resonance contribution is reduced as the collision energy increases.The forward peak of HF(v'=3) product has also been observed above the threshold of this product channel.Product energy disposals in different degrees of freedom have been analyzed.The collision energy dependence of the HF vibrational product branching was also determined.This work presents a comprehensive dynamic picture of this resonance mediated reaction in a wide collision energy regime,providing a good test ground for theoretical understandings of this interesting reaction at higher collision energies.

  5. High-resolution far ultraviolet emission spectra of electron-excited molecular deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abgrall, H.; Roueff, E. [Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon, DAEC and CNRS UMR 8631, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Xianming Liu; Shemansky, D.E. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); James, G.K. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    1999-08-14

    The high-resolution (full width at half maximum {delta} {lambda} = 0.11 A) emission spectrum of the deuterium molecule produced by electron-impact excitation at 100 eV has been measured in the wavelength range 1200-1660 A. In conjunction with the experimental measurement, transition probabilities of B{sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}-X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}, C{sup 1}{pi}{sub u}-X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}, B'{sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}-X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} and D{sup 1}{pi}{sub u}-X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup -} band systems are calculated. Synthetic spectra based on the calculated transition probabilities are in very good agreement with the optically thin experimental spectra. While centrifugal effects on the overall Lyman band emission intensity in D{sub 2} and H{sub 2} are similar, the effect of rotation-vibrational perturbations between the B{sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} and C{sup 1}{pi}{sub u}{sup +} states on spectral intensities is found to be less significant in D{sub 2}. Excitations via isotropic ({delta} J = 0) and anisotropic ({delta}J = {+-} 2, and 0) interactions for the dipole forbidden E, F{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}-X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} transition are inferred from the measured spectra. Excitation cross sections of the B{sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}-X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} and C{sup 1}{pi}{sub u}-X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} bands, along with the estimated E, F{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}-B{sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} cascade cross section, for D{sub 2} are obtained. (author)

  6. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 μm wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  7. NbN superconducting nanonetwork fabricated using porous silicon templates and high-resolution electron beam lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, Matteo; Baghdadi, Reza; Cirillo, Carla; Prischepa, Serghej L; Dolgiy, Alexey; Bondarenko, Vitaly; Lombardi, Floriana; Attanasio, Carmine

    2017-08-07

    Superconducting NbN nanonetworks with a very small number of interconnected nanowires, with diameter of the order of 4 nm, are fabricated combining a bottom-up (use of porous silicon nanotemplates) with a top-down technique (high-resolution electron beam lithography). The method is easy to control and allows to fabricate, on a robust support, devices with electrical properties close to a one-dimensional superconductor that can be fruitfully used for novel applications. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. High-resolution patterning of graphene by screen printing with a silicon stencil for highly flexible printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel; Francis, Lorraine F

    2015-01-07

    High-resolution screen printing of pristine graphene is introduced for the rapid fabrication of conductive lines on flexible substrates. Well-defined silicon stencils and viscosity-controlled inks facilitate the preparation of high-quality graphene patterns as narrow as 40 μm. This strategy provides an efficient method to produce highly flexible graphene electrodes for printed electronics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  10. Triggered O Star Formation in M20 via Cloud–Cloud Collision: Comparisons between High-resolution CO Observations and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, K.; Hattori, Y.; Hasegawa, K.; Ohama, A.; Haworth, T. J.; Shima, K.; Habe, A.; Tachihara, K.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.; Fukui, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding high-mass star formation is one of the top-priority issues in astrophysics. Recent observational studies have revealed that cloud–cloud collisions may play a role in high-mass star formation in several places in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud. The Trifid Nebula M20 is a well-known Galactic H ii region ionized by a single O7.5 star. In 2011, based on the CO observations with NANTEN2, we reported that the O star was formed by the collision between two molecular clouds ∼0.3 Myr ago. Those observations identified two molecular clouds toward M20, traveling at a relative velocity of 7.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1. This velocity separation implies that the clouds cannot be gravitationally bound to M20, but since the clouds show signs of heating by the stars there they must be spatially coincident with it. A collision is therefore highly possible. In this paper we present the new CO J = 1–0 and J = 3–2 observations of the colliding clouds in M20 performed with the Mopra and ASTE telescopes. The high-resolution observations revealed that the two molecular clouds have peculiar spatial and velocity structures, i.e., a spatially complementary distribution between the two clouds and a bridge feature that connects the two clouds in velocity space. Based on a new comparison with numerical models, we find that this complementary distribution is an expected outcome of cloud–cloud collisions, and that the bridge feature can be interpreted as the turbulent gas excited at the interface of the collision. Our results reinforce the cloud–cloud collision scenario in M20.

  11. High-resolution, label-free imaging of living cells with direct electron-beam-excitation-assisted optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-06-01

    High spatial resolution microscope is desired for deep understanding of cellular functions, in order to develop medical technologies. We demonstrate high-resolution imaging of un-labelled organelles in living cells, in which live cells on a 50 nm thick silicon nitride membrane are imaged by autofluorescence excited with a focused electron beam through the membrane. Electron beam excitation enables ultrahigh spatial resolution imaging of organelles, such as mitochondria, nuclei, and various granules. Since the autofluorescence spectra represent molecular species, this microscopy allows fast and detailed investigations of cellular status in living cells.

  12. High Resolution Electron Microbeam Examination and 3D Reconstruction of Alligator Gar Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-27

    exterior and interior of the gar scales were examined by the electron microscopy methods: transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning ... scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA), and by X-ray micro computed tomography (µCT). Each of these methods...Exhibition, Orlando, FL, Abstract and Presentation: Symposium: Biological Materials Science Symposium Abstract Title: Experimental Characterization of

  13. Elemental analysis of aerosol organic nitrates with electron ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Rollins

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Four hydroxynitrates (R(OHR'ONO2 representative of atmospheric volatile organic compound (VOC oxidation products were synthesized, nebulized and sampled into an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS. The resulting mass spectrum was used to evaluate calibration factors for elemental analysis of organic nitrates by AMS, and to determine the distribution of nitrogen in the detected fragments in a search for an AMS signature of organic nitrates. We find that 30% of the detected nitrogen mass is in the NO+ and NO2+ fragments, 12% at NHx+ fragments, 5% at CxHyOzN+ fragments, and 53% at various CxHyN+ fragments. Elemental analysis indicated that nitrogen was detected with higher efficiency than carbon and hydrogen, but oxygen was detected with reduced efficiency compared to previously reported results for a suite of organics which did not include organic nitrates. The results are used to suggest the maximum corrections to ambient O:C and N:C ratios based on AMS measurements.

  14. Crystal interface and high-resolution electron microscopy—the best partner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ichinose

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Several contributions of HRTEM on the interface science are reviewed in chronological order. The first contribution of HRTEM is the observation of gold (113Σ°11 boundary, giving experimental proof of the CSL model. An observation of the asymmetric (112Σ°3 boundary follows. A SiC grain boundary is effectively assessed not by the density of CSL point but the number of dangling bonds in the boundary. A ZnO/Pd interface provides an example that a misfit dislocation does not necessarily accommodate the lattice mismatch. Segregated interface shows characteristic HRTEM image contrast, suggesting change in atomic bonding. An atomic height step in the semiconductor hetero interface is observed by the Chemical Lattice Image technique. In the diamond grain boundary a dangling bond may not elevate the boundary energy, being contradictory of the least dangling bond rule. Super-high resolution of the HVHRTEM enable us to determine atomic species in the grain boundary. Combined use of HRTEM and EELSE allows us to discuss the correlation between atomic structure and nature of the corresponding interface. It is not exaggeration to say that modern interface science does not exist witout HRTEM. On the other hand, many complicated interfaces found by HRTEM remained as unaswered questions. An innovative structural model is requested to appear on the scene.

  15. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  16. Structural characterization of the {eta} = 5 layered perovskite neodymium titanate using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayagues, M. [Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC c/ Americo Vespucio, Sevilla (Spain); Titmuss, K.; Meyer, R.; Kirkland, A.; Hutchison, J. [Dept. of Materials, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sloan, J. [Inorganic Chemistry Lab., Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Tilley, R. [Div. of Materials and Minerals, School of Engineering, Univ. of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2003-08-01

    The structure of Nd{sub 5}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 17} has been refined from a reconstruction of the specimen exit-plane wave restored from a series of incrementally defocused high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) images. The phase of the exit-plane wave shows contrast attributable to the oxygen anion sublattice and coupled with simulations provides confirmation of the composition of the cation sites as a function of sample thickness. The enhanced resolution in the exit-plane wave additionally allows a direct measurement of the 'skewing' of the perovskite slabs. (orig.)

  17. Discovery of a 6/sup -/, T=1 resonance in /sup 24/Mg via high-resolution inelastic electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarek, H.; Pich, B.O.; Drake, T.E.; Rowe, D.J.; Bertozzi, W.; Creswell, C.; Hirsch, A.; Hynes, M.V.; Kowalski, S.; Norum, B.; Rad, F.N.; Sargent, C.P.; Williamson, C.F.; Lindgren, R.A.

    1977-04-04

    The unique high-resolution and high-energy features of the electron-scattering facility at the MIT-Bates Accelerator were used to locate a dominant narrow resonance at 15.045 +- 0.035 MeV in /sup 24/Mg. A spin-parity assignment of 6/sup -/ and an isospin T=1 assignment were made. The M6 form factor was measured and compared to the prediction of a theoretical calculation which uses the open-shell random-phase approximation on a shell-model ground state for /sup 24/Mg.

  18. Three-dimensional architecture of rat glomerular basement membrane by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamasaki,Yasushi

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated the ultrastructure of rat glomerular basement membrane (GBM by ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy. GBM prepared by sonication methods and conductive-staining could be observed without metal coating at magnifications as high as 400,000 times. The GBM showed an irregular meshwork structure composed of various strands and pores. The width of the strands ranged from 6 to 15 nm, and the diameter of pores ranged from 6 to 50 nm. The present study confirmed our molecular sieve theory of the basement membrane.

  19. Preparation of 2D crystals of membrane proteins for high-resolution electron crystallography data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyrathne, Priyanka D; Chami, Mohamed; Pantelic, Radosav S; Goldie, Kenneth N; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Electron crystallography is a powerful technique for the structure determination of membrane proteins as well as soluble proteins. Sample preparation for 2D membrane protein crystals is a crucial step, as proteins have to be prepared for electron microscopy at close to native conditions. In this review, we discuss the factors of sample preparation that are key to elucidating the atomic structure of membrane proteins using electron crystallography.

  20. The potential for Bayesian compressive sensing to significantly reduce electron dose in high-resolution STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-02-01

    The use of high-resolution imaging methods in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example, in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high-resolution STEM images. These computational algorithms have been applied to a set of images with a reduced number of sampled pixels in the image. For a reduction in the number of pixels down to 5% of the original image, the algorithms can recover the original image from the reduced data set. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic-resolution images and nanometer-resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these postacquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or the alignment of the microscope itself.

  1. Electron beam fabrication and characterization of high- resolution magnetic force microscopy tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rührig, M.; Porthun, S.; Lodder, J.C.; McVitie, S.; Heyderman, L.J.; Johnston, A.B.; Chapman, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    The stray field, magnetic microstructure, and switching behavior of high‐resolution electron beam fabricated thin film tips for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) are investigated with different imaging modes in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). As the tiny smooth carbon needles covered with a

  2. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of clean and hydrogen covered Si(001) surfaces: first principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C H

    2012-09-07

    Surface phonons, conductivities, and loss functions are calculated for reconstructed (2×1), p(2×2) and c(4×2) clean Si(001) surfaces, and (2×1) H and D covered Si(001) surfaces. Surface conductivities perpendicular to the surface are significantly smaller than conductivities parallel to the surface. The surface loss function is compared to high resolution electron energy loss measurements. There is good agreement between calculated loss functions and experiment for H and D covered surfaces. However, agreement between experimental data from different groups and between theory and experiment is poor for clean Si(001) surfaces. Formalisms for calculating electron energy loss spectra are reviewed and the mechanism of electron energy losses to surface vibrations is discussed.

  3. High resolution study of the H+D 2 → HD+D reaction dynamics at a collision energy of 2.2 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, E.; Schnieder, L.; Welge, K. H.; Aoiz, F. J.; Bañares, L.; Herrero, V. J.

    1997-01-01

    The reactivity of H + D 2( v = 0, j = 0) → HD( v', j') + D has been investigated in a high resolution crossed molecular beam experiment at a collision energy of 2.2 eV. Time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of D atoms at different laboratory (LAB) scattering angles and their total angular distribution were measured using the technique of Rydberg atom TOF spectroscopy. The resolution of this technique allows the identification of individual rovibrational states of the corresponding HD product molecule at the different LAB angles. A detailed simulation of the experimental measurements has been performed by using state resolved differential cross sections from quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations on the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) and on the double-many-body-expansion (DMBE) potential energy surfaces (PES). A general good agreement between experiment and theory is found, although there are some discrepancies which are discussed.

  4. High-resolution imaging by scanning electron microscopy of semithin sections in correlation with light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Shodo, Ryusuke; Dan, Yukari; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we introduce scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of semithin resin sections. In this technique, semithin sections were adhered on glass slides, stained with both uranyl acetate and lead citrate, and observed with a backscattered electron detector at a low accelerating voltage. As the specimens are stained in the same manner as conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the contrast of SEM images of semithin sections was similar to TEM images of ultrathin sections. Using this technique, wide areas of semithin sections were also observed by SEM, without the obstruction of grids, which was inevitable for traditional TEM. This study also applied semithin section SEM to correlative light and electron microscopy. Correlative immunofluorescence microscopy and immune-SEM were performed in semithin sections of LR white resin-embedded specimens using a FluoroNanogold-labeled secondary antibody. Because LR white resin is hydrophilic and electron stable, this resin is suitable for immunostaining and SEM observation. Using correlative microscopy, the precise localization of the primary antibody was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and SEM. This method has great potential for studies examining the precise localization of molecules, including Golgi- and ER-associated proteins, in correlation with LM and SEM.

  5. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Electron Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salewski, M.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Yugova, I. A.; Karczewski, G.; Wiater, M.; Wojtowicz, T.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Akimov, I. A.; Meier, T.; Bayer, M.

    2017-07-01

    Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for investigating complex quantum mechanical systems. While it was conceived decades ago in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using microwaves and radio waves, it has recently been extended into the visible and UV spectral range. However, resolving MHz energy splittings with ultrashort laser pulses still remains a challenge. Here, we analyze two-dimensional Fourier spectra for resonant optical excitation of resident electrons to localized trions or donor-bound excitons in semiconductor nanostructures subject to a transverse magnetic field. Particular attention is devoted to Raman coherence spectra, which allow one to accurately evaluate tiny splittings of the electron ground state and to determine the relaxation times in the electron spin ensemble. A stimulated steplike Raman process induced by a sequence of two laser pulses creates a coherent superposition of the ground-state doublet which can be retrieved only optically because of selective excitation of the same subensemble with a third pulse. This provides the unique opportunity to distinguish between different complexes that are closely spaced in energy in an ensemble. The related experimental demonstration is based on photon-echo measurements in an n -type CdTe /(Cd ,Mg )Te quantum-well structure detected by a heterodyne technique. The difference in the sub-μ eV range between the Zeeman splittings of donor-bound electrons and electrons localized at potential fluctuations can be resolved even though the homogeneous linewidth of the optical transitions is larger by 2 orders of magnitude.

  6. High-resolution x-ray photoemission electron microscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stammler, T.; Anders, S.; Padmore, H.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Stoehr, J. [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA (United States); Scheinfein, M. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1998-12-31

    X-ray Photoemission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) is a full-field imaging technique where the sample is illuminated by an x-ray beam and the photoemitted electrons are imaged on a screen by means of an electron optics. It therefore combines two well-established materials analysis techniques--photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) and x-ray spectroscopy such as near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination opens a wide field of new applications in materials research and has proven to be a powerful tool to investigate simultaneously topological, elemental, chemical state, and magnetic properties of surfaces, thin films, and multilayers at high spatial resolution. A new X-PEEM installed at the bend magnet beamline 7.3.1.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is designed for a spatial resolution of 20 nm and is currently under commissioning. An overview of the ongoing experimental program using X-PEEM in the field of materials research at the ALS is given by elemental and chemical bonding contrast imaging of hard disk coatings and sliders, field emission studies on diamond films as possible candidates for field-emission flat-panel displays, and the study of dewetting and decomposition phenomena of thin polymer blends and bilayers.

  7. Efficient creation of electron vortex beams for high resolution STEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béché, A; Juchtmans, R; Verbeeck, J

    2016-05-10

    The recent discovery of electron vortex beams carrying quantised angular momentum in the TEM has led to an active field of research, exploring a variety of potential applications including the possibility of mapping magnetic states at the atomic scale. A prerequisite for this is the availability of atomic sized electron vortex beams at high beam current and mode purity. In this paper we present recent progress showing that by making use of the Aharonov-Bohm effect near the tip of a long single domain ferromagnetic Nickel needle, a very efficient aperture for the production of electron vortex beams can be realised. The aperture transmits more than 99% of all electrons and provides a vortex mode purity of up to 92%. Placing this aperture in the condenser plane of a state of the art Cs corrected microscope allows us to demonstrate atomic resolution HAADF STEM images with spatial resolution better than 1 Angström, in agreement with theoretical expectations and only slightly inferior to the performance of a non-vortex probe on the same instrument.

  8. High-resolution electron microscopical study of cyst walls of Entamoeba spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the fine structural organization, molecular composition and permeability properties of the cell surface of intestinal protozoan cysts is important to understand the biologic basis of their resistance. Recent studies on the biology of the cyst walls of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba invadens have considerably advanced knowledge on the cellular processes involved in the transport and surface deposition of the main cyst wall components. Using transmission electron microscopy, cytochemistry, scanning electron microscopy and freeze-fracture techniques, we have obtained new information. In mature cysts the permeability of Entamoeba cysts is limited to small molecules not by the cyst wall, but by the plasma membrane, as demonstrated with the use of ruthenium red as an electron-dense tracer. Cell walls of E. histolytica cysts are made up of five to seven layers of unordered fibrils 7-8 nm thick. Alcian blue stains a regular mesh of fibrils approximately 4 nm thick, running perpendicularly to the cyst wall. In addition, abundant ionogenic groups are seen in cyst walls treated with cationized ferritin. In the mature cysts of E. histolytica and E. invadens small cytoplasmic vesicles with granular material were in close contact with the plasma membrane, suggesting a process of fusion and deposition of granular material to the cell wall. The plasma membrane of mature cysts is devoid of intramembrane particles when analyzed with the freeze-fracture technique. When viewed with scanning electron microscopy the surface of E. histolytica cysts clearly differs from that of Entamoeba coli and E. invadens.

  9. Understanding the structure of nanocatalysts with high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, L. D.; Rivas, J.; José-Yacamán, M.

    2014-03-01

    Nanomaterials including nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. Thanks to the rapid improvement of the electron microscopic techniques and with the advent of aberration corrected electron microscopy as well as theoretical methodologies, the potential effects induced by nanocatalysts are better understood than before by unravelling their atomic structure. A brief introduction to advanced electron microscopic techniques namely aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) is presented and subsequently two examples of nanocatalysts are considered in the present review. The first example will focus on the study of bimetallic/core-shell nanoalloys. In heterogeneous catalysis, catalysts containing two or more metals might show significantly different catalytic properties compared to the parent metals and thus are widely utilized in several catalytic reactions. Atom-by-atom insights of the nanoalloy based catalysts ex: Au-Pd will be described in the present review using a combination of advanced electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. A related example on the understanding of bimetallic clusters by HAADF-STEM will also be presented in addition to nanoparticles. In the second case understanding the structure of transition metal chalcogenide based nanocatalysts by HRTEM and aberration corrected STEM, for the case of MoS2 will be discussed. MoS2-based catalysts serve as model catalysts and are employed in the hydrodesulphurisations (HDS) reactions in the removal of sulphur from gasoline and related petrochemical products. They have been studied in various forms including nanowires, nanotubes and nanoplates. Their structure, atomic insights and as a consequence elucidation of their corresponding catalytic activity are thus important.

  10. High-Resolution Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Electron Spins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salewski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for investigating complex quantum mechanical systems. While it was conceived decades ago in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using microwaves and radio waves, it has recently been extended into the visible and UV spectral range. However, resolving MHz energy splittings with ultrashort laser pulses still remains a challenge. Here, we analyze two-dimensional Fourier spectra for resonant optical excitation of resident electrons to localized trions or donor-bound excitons in semiconductor nanostructures subject to a transverse magnetic field. Particular attention is devoted to Raman coherence spectra, which allow one to accurately evaluate tiny splittings of the electron ground state and to determine the relaxation times in the electron spin ensemble. A stimulated steplike Raman process induced by a sequence of two laser pulses creates a coherent superposition of the ground-state doublet which can be retrieved only optically because of selective excitation of the same subensemble with a third pulse. This provides the unique opportunity to distinguish between different complexes that are closely spaced in energy in an ensemble. The related experimental demonstration is based on photon-echo measurements in an n-type CdTe/(Cd,MgTe quantum-well structure detected by a heterodyne technique. The difference in the sub-μeV range between the Zeeman splittings of donor-bound electrons and electrons localized at potential fluctuations can be resolved even though the homogeneous linewidth of the optical transitions is larger by 2 orders of magnitude.

  11. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  12. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  13. Fragmentation of molecular ions in slow electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, Steffen

    2008-06-25

    The fragmentation of positively charged hydrogen molecular ions by the capture of slow electrons, the so called dissociative recombination (DR), has been investigated in storage ring experiments at the TSR, Heidelberg, where an unique twin-electron-beam arrangement was combined with high resolution fragment imaging detection. Provided with well directed cold electrons the fragmentation kinematics were measured down to meV collision energies where pronounced rovibrational Feshbach resonances appear in the DR cross section. For thermally excited HD{sup +} the fragmentation angle and the kinetic energy release were studied at variable precisely controlled electron collision energies on a dense energy grid from 10 to 80 meV. The anisotropy described for the first time by Legendre polynomials higher 2{sup nd} order and the extracted rotational state contributions were found to vary on a likewise narrow energy scale as the rotationally averaged DR rate coefficient. Ro-vibrationally resolved DR experiments were performed on H{sub 2}{sup +} produced in distinct internal excitations by a novel ion source. Both the low-energy DR rate as well as the fragmentation dynamics at selected resonances were measured individually in the lowest two vibrational and first three excited rotational states. State-specific DR rates and angular dependences are reported. (orig.)

  14. High-resolution monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy of organic photovoltaic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jessica A; Scheltens, Frank J; Drummy, Lawrence F; Durstock, Michael F; Hage, Fredrik S; Ramasse, Quentin M; McComb, David W

    2017-09-01

    Advances in electron monochromator technology are providing opportunities for high energy resolution (10 - 200meV) electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to be performed in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The energy-loss near-edge structure in core-loss spectroscopy is often limited by core-hole lifetimes rather than the energy spread of the incident illumination. However, in the valence-loss region, the reduced width of the zero loss peak makes it possible to resolve clearly and unambiguously spectral features at very low energy-losses (photovoltaics (OPVs): poly(3-hexlythiophene) (P3HT), [6,6] phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), and fullerene (C60). Data was collected on two different monochromated instruments - a Nion UltraSTEM 100 MC 'HERMES' and a FEI Titan(3) 60-300 Image-Corrected S/TEM - using energy resolutions (as defined by the zero loss peak full-width at half-maximum) of 35meV and 175meV, respectively. The data was acquired to allow deconvolution of plural scattering, and Kramers-Kronig analysis was utilized to extract the complex dielectric functions. The real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric functions obtained from the two instruments were compared to evaluate if the enhanced resolution in the Nion provides new opto-electronic information for these organic materials. The differences between the spectra are discussed, and the implications for STEM-EELS studies of advanced materials are considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurement...

  16. High resolution electron momentum spectroscopy of the valence orbitals of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, C.G. [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular NanoSciences of MOE, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Hajgato, B. [Research Group of Theoretical Chemistry, Department SBG, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Huang, Y.R. [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular NanoSciences of MOE, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Research Group of Theoretical Chemistry, Department SBG, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Zhang, S.F.; Liu, K.; Luo, Z.H. [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular NanoSciences of MOE, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Knippenberg, S. [Research Group of Theoretical Chemistry, Department SBG, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Deng, J.K. [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular NanoSciences of MOE, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: djk-dmp@tsinghua.edu.cn; Deleuze, M.S. [Research Group of Theoretical Chemistry, Department SBG, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)], E-mail: michael.deleuze@uhasselt.be

    2008-01-22

    The development of a third-generation electron momentum spectrometer with significantly improved energy and momentum resolutions at Tsinghua University ({delta}E = 0.45-0.68 eV, {delta}{theta} = {+-}0.53{sup o} and {delta}{phi} = {+-}0.84{sup o}) has enabled a reinvestigation of the valence orbital electron momentum distributions of H{sub 2}O with improved statistical accuracy. The measurements have been conducted at impact energies of 1200 eV and 2400 eV in order to check the validity of the plane wave impulse approximation. The obtained ionization spectra and electron momentum distributions have been compared with the results of computations carried out with Hartree Fock [HF] theory, density functional theory in conjunction with the standard B3LYP functional, one-particle Green's function [1p-GF] theory along with the third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme [ADC(3)], symmetry adapted cluster configuration interaction [SAC-CI] theory, and a variety of multi-reference [MR-SDCI, MR-RSPT2, MR-RSPT3] theories. The influence of the basis set on the computed momentum distributions has been investigated further, using a variety of basis sets ranging from 6-31G to the almost complete d-aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. A main issue in the present work pertains to a shake-up band of very weak intensity at 27.1 eV, of which the related momentum distribution was analyzed for the first time. The experimental evidences and the most thorough theoretical calculations demonstrate that this band borrows its ionization intensity from the 2a{sub 1} orbital.

  17. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.; Hull, David R.

    2003-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e., soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  18. Recent Developments of an Opto-Electronic THz Spectrometer for High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Ducournau

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A review is provided of sources and detectors that can be employed in the THz range before the description of an opto-electronic source of monochromatic THz radiation. The realized spectrometer has been applied to gas phase spectroscopy. Air-broadening coefficients of HCN are determined and the insensitivity of this technique to aerosols is demonstrated by the analysis of cigarette smoke. A multiple pass sample cell has been used to obtain a sensitivity improvement allowing transitions of the volatile organic compounds to be observed. A solution to the frequency metrology is presented and promises to yield accurate molecular line center measurements.

  19. Study and simulation of the read-out electronics design for a high-resolution plastic scintillating fiber based hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco, José María, E-mail: jose.maria.blasco@uv.es [Universitat de València, Calle Gascó Oliag n" o5, 46010, Valencia (Spain); Sanchis, E. [Universitat de València, Calle Gascó Oliag n" o5, 46010, Valencia (Spain); Granero, D. [Eresa Grupo Médico (Spain); Martín, J.D.; González, V.; Sanchis-Sánchez, E. [Universitat de València, Calle Gascó Oliag n" o5, 46010, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-06-01

    Highlights: • Plastic Scintillating Fibers for high-resolution hodoscopy. • Silicon photodiode read-out electronics design. • Plastic scintillating fibers coupled to Silicon photodiodes read-out. • Charged particle detection with plastic scintillating fibers. - Abstract: This work presents the study and simulation of a high-resolution charged particle detection device for beam positioning, monitoring and calibration, together with its read-out proposal. To provide the precise positional information of the beam, the detection system has been based on Plastic Scintillating Fibers (PSF), while the read-out on a Silicon-PhotoDiode (Si-PD) array. To carry out the study, a PSF prototype with one detection plane has been experimentally tested with a β particle source. Besides, Monte Carlo simulations of the complete system have also been conducted. Both simulations and experimental tests give consistency to the results obtained. The work presented in this article show the usefulness of this proposal for high-precision charged particle positioning, achieving resolutions up to 100 µm.

  20. High-resolution patterning electronic polymers using dopant induced solubility control (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, Adam J.; Jacobs, Ian E.; Li, Jun; Burg, Stephanie L.; Bilsky, David J.; Rotondo, Brandon T.; Stroeve, Pieter

    2015-08-01

    Organic electronics promise to provide flexible, large-area circuitry such as photovoltaics, displays, and light emitting diodes that can be fabricated inexpensively from solutions. A major obstacle to this vision is that most conjugated organic materials are miscible, making solution-based fabrication of multilayer or micro- to nanoscale patterned films problematic. Here we demonstrate that the solubility of prototypical conductive polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) can be reversibly "switched off" using high electron affinity molecular dopants, then later recovered with light or a suitable dedoping solution. Using this technique, we are able to stack mutually soluble materials and laterally pattern polymer films using evaporation of dopants through a shadow mask or with light, achieving sub-micrometer, optically limited feature sizes. After forming these structures, the films can be dedoped without disrupting the patterned features; dedoped films have identical optical characteristics, charge carrier mobilities, and NMR spectra as as-cast P3HT films. This method greatly simplifies solution-based device fabrication, is easily adaptable to current manufacturing workflows, and is potentially generalizable to other classes of materials.

  1. Electron Temperatures in W51 Complex from High Resolution, Low Frequency Radio Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. K. Srivastava; A. Pramesh Rao

    2010-03-01

    W51 is a giant radio complex lying along the tangent to the Sagitarius arm at a distance of about 7 kpc from the Sun, with an extension of about 1° in the sky. It is divided into three components A, B, C where W51A and W51B consist of many compact HII regions while W51C is a supernova remnant. We have made continuum radio observations of these HII regions of the W51 complex at 240, 610, 1060 and 1400 MHz using GMRT with lower resolution (20'' × 15'') at the lowest frequency. The observed spectra of the prominent thermal subcomponents of W51 have been fitted to a free-free emission spectrum and their physical properties like electron temperatures and emission measures have been estimated. The electron temperatures from continuum spectra are found to be lower than the temperatures reported from radio recombination line (RRL) studies of these HII regions indicating the need for a filling factor even at this resolution. Also, the observed brightness at 240 MHz is found to be higher than expected from the best fits suggesting the need for a multicomponent model for the region.

  2. High-resolution electronic spectroscopy of the BODIPY chromophore in supersonic beam and superfluid helium droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromeck-Faderl, Anja; Pentlehner, Dominik; Kensy, Uwe; Dick, Bernhard

    2011-07-11

    We present the fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra of the parent compound of the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dye class measured in a supersonic beam and isolated in superfluid helium nanodroplets. The gas-phase spectrum of the isolated molecules displays many low-frequency transitions that are assigned to a symmetry-breaking mode with a strongly nonharmonic potential, presumably the out-of-plane wagging mode of the BF(2) group. The data are in good agreement with transition energies and Franck-Condon factors calculated for a double minimum potential in the upper electronic state. The corresponding transitions do not appear in the helium droplet. This is explained with the quasi-rigid first layer of helium atoms attached to the dopant molecule by van der Waals forces. The spectral characteristics are those of a cyanine dye rather than that of an aromatic chromophore. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Electronic Wave Packet Interferometry of Gas Phase Samples: High Resolution Spectra and Collective Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienkemeier, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved coherent spectroscopy has opened many new directions to study ultrafast dynamics in complex quantum systems. While most applications have been achieved in the condensed phase, we are focusing on dilute gas phase samples, in particular, on doped helium droplet beams. Isolation in such droplets at millikelvin temperatures provides unique opportunities to synthesize well-defined complexes, to prepare specific ro-vibronic states, and study their dynamics. To account for the small densities in our samples, we apply a phase modulation technique in order to reach enough sensitivity and a high spectral resolution in electronic wave packet interferometry experiments. The combination with mass-resolved ion detection enabled us e.g. to characterize vibrational structures of excimer molecules. By extending this technique we have observed collective resonances in samples of very low density (10^8 cm^{-3}). With a variant of this method, we are currently elaborating the implementation of nonlinear all-XUV spectroscopy.

  4. HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY PINHOLE CAMERA FOR HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON BEAM SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Morgan, J.; Lee, S.H.; Shang, H.

    2017-03-25

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is developing a multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice based storage ring as the next major upgrade, featuring a 20-fold reduction in emittance. Combining the reduction of beta functions, the electron beam sizes at bend magnet sources may be reduced to reach 5 – 10 µm for 10% vertical coupling. The x-ray pinhole camera currently used for beam size monitoring will not be adequate for the new task. By increasing the operating photon energy to 120 – 200 keV, the pinhole camera’s resolution is expected to reach below 4 µm. The peak height of the pinhole image will be used to monitor relative changes of the beam sizes and enable the feedback control of the emittance. We present the simulation and the design of a beam size monitor for the APS storage ring.

  5. Hot-Electron Tunneling sensors for high-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mears, C.A.; Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; Netel, H.

    1997-02-07

    Over the past 2 years, we have been studying the use of Hot Electron Tunneling sensors for use in high-energy-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers. These sensors promise several advantages over existing cryogenic sensors, including simultaneous high count rate and high resolution capability, and relative ease of use. Using simple shadow mask lithography, we verified the basic principles of operation of these devices and discovered new physics in their thermal behavior as a function applied voltage bias. We also began to develop ways to use this new sensor in practical x-ray and gamma-ray detectors based on superconducting absorbers. This requires the use of quasiparticle trapping to concentrate the signal in the sensing elements.

  6. Interface structure of niobium carbide-encapsulating carbon nanocapsules studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Tokushi; Koizumi, Haruki

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanocapsules (CNCs) encapsulating niobium carbide (NbC) crystals with a sodium chloride structure were synthesized via a gas-evaporation method by arc-discharge heating. CNCs were observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and the atomic configurations at the graphene/NbC interfaces were investigated. The NbC crystals within the nanospaces of CNCs were truncated by the {100}, {110}, and (111} facets and were coated with several graphene layers. It was found that the interlayer spacings for the graphene{0001}/NbC{100} and graphene{0001}/NbC{110} interfaces were 0.33 +/- 0.05 nm, whereas those for the graphene{0001}/{111}NbC interfaces were 0.28 +/- 0.05 nm.

  7. Investigation of bacterial spore structure by high resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuschner, R G; Lillford, P J

    2001-01-22

    High resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) in combination with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of spores of Bacillus cereus, an outer coatless mutant B. subtilis 322, an inner coatless mutant B. subtilis 325 and of germinated spores of B. subtilis CMCC 604 were carried out. Structural differences in the coats, mainly protein of spores were reflected by NMR spectra which indicated also differences in molecular mobility of carbohydrates which was partially attributed to the cortex. Dipicolinic acid (DPA) of spores of B. cereus displayed a high degree of solid state order and may be crystalline. Heat activation was studied on spores of B. subtilis 357 lux + and revealed a structural change when analysed by TEM but this was not associated with increases in molecular mobility since no effects were measured by NMR.

  8. Microstructural characterization of electron beam-physical vapor deposition thermal barrier coatings through high-resolution computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand; Herman, Herbert; Decarlo, Francesco; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2004-07-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), deposited using the electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process, comprise a unique architecture of porosity capable of bridging the technological gap between insulation/life extension and prime reliance. The TBC microstructures consist of columnar structure, nucleated via vapor condensation, along with a high degree of intercolumnar porosity, thus providing enhanced stress relief on thermomechanical loading and also accommodating misfit stresses resulting from CTE mismatch. In this article, we report the characterization of these coatings using high-resolution synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography (XMT) at 1.3- µm resolution. Experiments focused on quantitative characterization/visualization of imperfections in these coatings and on the relative changes in microstructural features upon isothermal annealing. The influence of time/temperature of exposure was investigated and the results were correlated with elastic modulus.

  9. High resolution electron diffraction analysis of structural changes associated with the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, B. -G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Biophysics

    1994-04-01

    Changes in protein structure that occur during the formation of the M photointermediate of bacteriorhodopsin can be directly visualized by electron diffraction techniques. Samples containing a high percentage of the M intermediate were trapped by rapidly cooling the crystals with liquid nitrogen following illumination with filtered green light at 240K and 260K respectively. Difference Fourier projection maps for M minus bR at two temperatures and for M{sub 260K} minus M{sub 240K} are presented. While it is likely that a unique M-substate is trapped when illuminated at 260K produces a mixture of the M{sub 240K} substate and a second M-substate which may have a protein structure similar to the N-intermediate. The diffraction data clearly show that statistically significant structural changes occur upon formation of the M{sub 240K} specimen and then further upon formation of the second substate which is present in the mixture that is produced at 260K. A preliminary 3-D difference map, based on data collected with samples tilted up to 30{degree}, has been constructed at a resolution of 3.5{angstrom} parallel to the membrane plane and a resolution of 8.5{angstrom} perpendicular to the membrane. The data have been analyzed by a number of different criteria to ensure that the differences seen reflect real conformation changes at a level which is significantly above the noise in the map. Furthermore, a comparison of the positions of specific backbone and side-chain groups relative to significant difference peaks suggests that it will be necessary to further refine the atomic resolution model before it will be possible to interpret the changes in chemical structure that occur in the protein at this stage of the photocycle.

  10. Electron acceleration during streamer collisions in air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhn, Christoph; Chanrion, Olivier; Neubert, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    during collisions of negative and a positive streamers. To explore this process, we have conducted the first self-consistent particle simulations of streamer encounters. Our simulation model is a 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, particle-in-cell code tracing the electron dynamics and solving the space...

  11. Molecular Dissociation Induced by Electron Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    Free electrons can efficiently break molecules or molecular ions in low-energy collisions by the processes of dissociative recombination or attachment. These processes make slow electrons efficient chemical agents in many environments. For dissociative recombination, in particular, studies of the underlying reaction paths and mechanisms have become possible on a uniquely elementary level in recent years both for theory and experiment. On the experimental side, collisions can be prepared at resolved collision energies down to the meV (10 Kelvin) level, increasingly gaining control also over the initial molecular quantum level, and individual events are detected and kinematically analyzed by fast-beam coincidence fragment imaging. Experiments are reported from the ion cooler ring TSR in Heidelberg. Stored beams of molecular ions cooled in their external and internal degrees of freedom are collinearly merged with intense and cold electron beams from cryogenic GaAs photocathodes, recently shown to yield fast cooling of the center-of-mass motion also for heavy and correspondingly slow molecular ion beams. To reconstruct the molecular fragmentation events multiparticle imaging can now be used systematically with collision energies set a wide range, especially aiming at specific electron capture resonances. Thus, for CF^+ it is found that the electronic state of the C fragment (^3P or ^1D) switches resonantly when the collision energy is changed by only a small fraction. As a new powerful tool, an energy-sensitive multi-strip surface-barrier detector (EMU) has been set up to measure with near-unity efficiency the masses of all fragments together with their hit positions in high-multiplicity events. Among many uses, this device allows internal molecular excitations to be derived for individual chemical channels in polyatomic fragmentation. New results will be presented in particular on the breakup of the hydronium ion (D3O^+).

  12. Conformational ordering of biomolecules in the gas phase: nitrogen collision cross sections measured on a prototype high resolution drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jody C; Goodwin, Cody R; Lareau, Nichole M; Leaptrot, Katrina L; Morris, Caleb B; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Mordehai, Alex; Klein, Christian; Barry, William; Darland, Ed; Overney, Gregor; Imatani, Kenneth; Stafford, George C; Fjeldsted, John C; McLean, John A

    2014-02-18

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid "omni-omic" characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field.

  13. Effect of Surface Hydrogen Coverage on Field Emission Properties of DiamondFilms Investigated by High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-Guang; XIONG Yan-Yun; LIN Zhang-Da; FENG Ke-An; GU Chang-Zhi; JIN Zeng-Sun

    2000-01-01

    The influence of surface hydrogen coverage on the electron field emission of diamond films was investigated by high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. It was found that hydrogen plasma treatment increased the surface hydrogen coverage while annealing caused hydrogen desorption and induced surface reconstruction. Field electron emission measurements manifested that increase of surface hydrogen coverage could improve the field emission properties, due to the decrease of electron affinity of the diamond .surface hy hvdrogen adsorption.

  14. High resolution electron microscopy of Ag-clusters in crystalline and non-crystalline morphologies grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Fisslthaler, Evelin [Graz Centre for Electron Microscopy, Steyrergasse 17, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Grogger, Werner [Institute for Electron Microscopy and Nanoanalysis, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2013-06-07

    We present a first investigation of structural properties of Ag clusters with a diameter of up to 5.5 nm grown inside superfluid helium nanodroplets (He{sub N}) and deposited on an amorphous C surface. With high resolution transmission electron microscope images we are able to show that in addition to the crystalline face centered cubic (fcc) structure, noncrystalline icosahedral (Ih), and decahedral (Dh) morphologies are grown. Relative abundances (56% fcc, 31% Dh, and 13% Ih) as well as the size distribution of each morphology (mean diameters d{sub fcc}=2.62(5) nm, d{sub Dh}=3.34(7) nm, and d{sub Ih}=3.93(2) nm) do not reflect the situation expected from pure energetic considerations, where small Ihs should be followed by medium sized Dhs and large fccs. Instead, kinetic factors seem to play an important role in the formation of these structures, as it appears to be the case for clusters formed by inert gas aggregation. Considering the low temperatures (0.37 K) and extremely high cooling rates, we discuss basic ideas that might lead to a qualitative picture of the cluster formation process inside He{sub N}.

  15. High resolution transmission electron microscope Imaging and first-principles simulations of atomic-scale features in graphene membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Bhandari, Sagar; Yi, Wei; Bell, David; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-thin membranes such as graphene[1] are of great importance for basic science and technology applications. Graphene sets the ultimate limit of thinness, demonstrating that a free-standing single atomic layer not only exists but can be extremely stable and strong [2--4]. However, both theory [5, 6] and experiments [3, 7] suggest that the existence of graphene relies on intrinsic ripples that suppress the long-wavelength thermal fluctuations which otherwise spontaneously destroy long range order in a two dimensional system. Here we show direct imaging of the atomic features in graphene including the ripples resolved using monochromatic aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We compare the images observed in TEM with simulated images based on an accurate first-principles total potential. We show that these atomic scale features can be mapped through accurate first-principles simulations into high resolution TEM contrast. [1] Geim, A. K. & Novoselov, K. S. Nat. Mater. 6, 183-191, (2007). [2] Novoselov, K. S.et al. Science 306, 666-669, (2004). [3] Meyer, J. C. et al. Nature 446, 60-63, (2007). [4] Lee, C., Wei, X. D., Kysar, J. W. & Hone, J. Science 321, 385-388, (2008). [5] Nelson, D. R. & Peliti, L. J Phys-Paris 48, 1085-1092, (1987). [6] Fasolino, A., Los, J. H. & Katsnelson, M. I. Nat. Mater. 6, 858-861, (2007). [7] Meyer, J. C. et al. Solid State Commun. 143, 101-109, (2007).

  16. Automated analysis of heterogeneous carbon nanostructures by high-resolution electron microscopy and on-line image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, P., E-mail: toth.pal@uni-miskolc.hu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9203 (United States); Farrer, J.K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, N283 ESC, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Palotas, A.B. [Department of Combustion Technology and Thermal Energy, University of Miskolc, H3515, Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary); Lighty, J.S.; Eddings, E.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-9203 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    High-resolution electron microscopy is an efficient tool for characterizing heterogeneous nanostructures; however, currently the analysis is a laborious and time-consuming manual process. In order to be able to accurately and robustly quantify heterostructures, one must obtain a statistically high number of micrographs showing images of the appropriate sub-structures. The second step of analysis is usually the application of digital image processing techniques in order to extract meaningful structural descriptors from the acquired images. In this paper it will be shown that by applying on-line image processing and basic machine vision algorithms, it is possible to fully automate the image acquisition step; therefore, the number of acquired images in a given time can be increased drastically without the need for additional human labor. The proposed automation technique works by computing fields of structural descriptors in situ and thus outputs sets of the desired structural descriptors in real-time. The merits of the method are demonstrated by using combustion-generated black carbon samples. - Highlights: ► The HRTEM analysis of heterogeneous nanostructures is a tedious manual process. ► Automatic HRTEM image acquisition and analysis can improve data quantity and quality. ► We propose a method based on on-line image analysis for the automation of HRTEM image acquisition. ► The proposed method is demonstrated using HRTEM images of soot particles.

  17. Electron collisions with coherently prepared atomic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trajmar, S.; Kanik, I.; LeClair, L.R.; Khakoo, M.S. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Adelaide (Australia). Electronics Structure of Materials Centre; Csanak, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The subject of electron scattering by laser-excited atoms is briefly reviewed. To demonstrate some aspects of these electron collision processes, the authors describe the procedures and the results of a joint experimental and theoretical study concerning elastic scattering by coherently excited {sup 138}Ba (...6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1}) atoms. Examples of experimental and theoretical collision parameters and magnetic sublevel differential cross sections for elastic scattering are given and compared. The convergent close coupling calculations (with the neglect of spin-orbit interaction) are in good agreement with experiment at 20 eV impact energy and 10, 15 and 20{degree} scattering angles and can be expected to yield reliable integral magnetic sublevel and alignment creation cross sections. The role of these quantities in plasma polarization spectroscopy is pointed out.

  18. Theory of Electron-Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Donald C

    2009-10-02

    Collisions of electrons with atoms and ions play a crucial role in the modeling and diagnostics of fusion plasmas. In the edge and divertor regions of magnetically confined plasmas, data for the collisions of electrons with neutral atoms and low charge-state ions are of particular importance, while in the inner region, data on highly ionized species are needed. Since experimental measurements for these collisional processes remain very limited, data for such processes depend primarily on the results of theoretical calculations. Over the period of the present grant (January 2006 - August 2009), we have made additional improvements in our parallel scattering programs, generated data of direct fusion interest and made these data available on The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center Web site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, we have employed these data to do collsional-radiative modeling studies in support of a variety of experiments with magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  19. Nanoscale electron tomography and atomic scale high-resolution electron microscopy of nanoparticles and nanoclusters:A short survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Meurig Thomasn; Paul A. Midgley; Caterina Ducati; Rowan K. Leary

    2013-01-01

    The outstanding merits of scanning transmission electron tomography as a technique for the investigation of the internal structure and morphology of nanoparticle and nanocluster materials are summarized with the aid of numerous typical illustrations. Reference is made also to the significant advances that have arisen in probing ultrastructural characteristics of nanoscale solids using aberration-corrected (AC) electron microscopy (EM). Information of a unique kind may be retrieved by combining the imaging and analytical power of ACEM.

  20. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  1. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mi-Young, E-mail: mysong@nfri.re.kr; Yoon, Jung-Sik [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Osikdo-dong, Gunsan, Jeollabuk-do 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyuck [Department of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Itikawa, Yukikazu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Karwasz, Grzegorz P. [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Informatics, University Nicolaus Copernicus, Grudziadzka 5, 87100 Toruń (Poland); Kokoouline, Viatcheslav [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Nakamura, Yoshiharu [6-1-5-201 Miyazaki, Miyamae, Kawasaki 216-0033 (Japan); Tennyson, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  2. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy of manganese oxides: Application to Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laffont, L., E-mail: Lydia.laffont@ensiacet.fr [Institut Carnot, Laboratoire CIRIMAT (equipe MEMO), CNRS UMR 5085, ENSIACET, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 74233, 31432 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Gibot, P. [Laboratoire de Reactivite et Chimie des Solides CNRS UMR 6007, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens cedex 9 (France)

    2010-11-15

    Manganese oxides particularly Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} Hausmannite are currently used in many industrial applications such as catalysis, magnetism, electrochemistry or air contamination. The downsizing of the particle size of such material permits an improvement of its intrinsic properties and a consequent increase in its performances compared to a classical micron-sized material. Here, we report a novel synthesis of hydrophilic nano-sized Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, a bivalent oxide, for which a precise characterization is necessary and for which the determination of the valency proves to be essential. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and particularly High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) allow us to perform these measurements on the nanometer scale. Well crystallized 10-20 nm sized Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles with sphere-shaped morphology were thus successfully synthesized. Meticulous EELS investigations allowed the determination of a Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 2+} ratio of 1.5, i.e. slightly lower than the theoretical value of 2 for the bulk Hausmannite manganese oxide. This result emphasizes the presence of vacancies on the tetrahedral sites in the structure of the as-synthesized nanomaterial. - Research Highlights: {yields}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} bulk and nano were studied by XRD, TEM and EELS. {yields}XRD and TEM determine the degree of crystallinity and the narrow grain size. {yields}HREELS gave access to the Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 2+} ratio. {yields}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nano have vacancies on the tetrahedral sites.

  3. Direct Observation of the Outermost Surfaces of Mesoporous Silica Thin Films by High Resolution Ultralow Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Maho; Susuki, Kyoka; Otsuji, Haruo; Sakuda, Yusuke; Asahina, Shunsuke; Kikuchi, Naoki; Kanazawa, Toshiyuki; Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Wada, Hiroaki; Shimojima, Atsushi; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2017-02-20

    The properties of the outermost surfaces of mesoporous silica thin films are critical in determining their functions. Obtaining information on the presence or absence of silica layers on the film surfaces and on the degree of mesopore opening is essential for applications of surface mesopores. In this study, the outermost surfaces of mesoporous silica thin films with 3-dimensional orthorhombic and 2-dimensional hexagonal structures were observed using ultralow voltage high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) with decelerating optics. SEM images of the surfaces before and after etching with NH4F were taken at various landing voltages. Comparing the images taken under different conditions indicated that the outermost surfaces of the nonetched mesoporous silica thin films are coated with a thin layer of silica. The images taken at an ultralow landing voltage (i.e., 80 V) showed that the presence or absence of surface silica layers depends on whether the film was etched with an aqueous solution of NH4F. The mesostructures of both the etched and nonetched films were visible in images taken at a conventional landing voltage (2 kV); hence, the ultralow landing voltage was more suitable for analyzing the outermost surfaces. The SEM observations provided detailed information about the surfaces of mesoporous silica thin films, such as the degree of pore opening and their homogeneities. AFM images of nonetched 2-dimensional hexagonal mesoporous silica thin films show that the shape of the silica layer on the surface of the films reflects the curvature of the top surface of the cylindrical mesochannels. SEM images taken at various landing voltages are discussed, with respect to the electron penetration range at each voltage. This study increases our understanding of the surfaces of mesoporous silica thin films, which may lead to potential applications utilizing the periodically arranged mesopores on these surfaces.

  4. Inner-Shell Excitations of 2p Electrons of Argon Investigated by Fast Electron Impact with High Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Lin-Mao; WANG You-Yan; LI Dong-Dong; YUAN Zhen-Sheng; ZHU Lin-Fan

    2011-01-01

    @@ Electron energy loss spectra of inner-shell excitations of 2p electrons of argon are measured at an incident electron energy of 2500eV and scattering angles of 0° and 4°.The dipole-forbidden transitions of 2p3/2-14p and 2p3/2-15p are observed in the measured spectra and assigned based on the calculations of the Cowan code.The positions and line widths for the excitations of 2p3/2-1nl and 2p1/2-1nl(n ≤ 5) of argon are determined.The present results show that the line widths of the electric quadrupole transitions of 2p3/2-14p[5/2 + 3/2]2 and the electric monopole one of 2p3/2-14p[1/2]0 are less than those of the dipole-allowed transitions.%Electron energy loss spectra of inner-shell excitations of 2p electrons of argon are measured at an incident electron energy of 2500eV and scattering angles of 0° and 4°. The dipole-forbidden transitions of 2p-13/24p and 2p-13/25p are observed in the measured spectra and assigned based on the calculations of the Cowan code. The positions and line widths for the excitations of 2p-13/2nl and 2p-11/2nl(n ≤ 5) of argon are determined. The present results show that the line widths of the electric quadrupole transitions of 2p-13/24p[5/2 + 3/2]2 and the electric monopole one of 2p-13/2 4p[1/2]o are less than those of the dipole-allowed transitions.

  5. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, Université de Liège, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: maplima@ifi.unicamp.br [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); and others

    2015-10-14

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5–10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  6. Electronic excitation of furfural as probed by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Lange, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J.; Brunger, M. J.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; de Oliveira, E. M.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Lima, M. A. P.; Jones, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic spectroscopy of isolated furfural (2-furaldehyde) in the gas phase has been investigated using high-resolution photoabsorption spectroscopy in the 3.5-10.8 eV energy-range, with absolute cross section measurements derived. Electron energy loss spectra are also measured over a range of kinematical conditions. Those energy loss spectra are used to derive differential cross sections and in turn generalised oscillator strengths. These experiments are supported by ab initio calculations in order to assign the excited states of the neutral molecule. The good agreement between the theoretical results and the measurements allows us to provide the first quantitative assignment of the electronic state spectroscopy of furfural over an extended energy range.

  7. Electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy in the characterization of calcium phosphate precipitation from aqueous solutions under biomineralization conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvorova E. I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate precipitation obtained from aqueous solutions at room and body temperature and pH 5.5-7.5 were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, transmission electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Supersaturated solutions of calcium phosphates were prepared by different methods of mixing of the stock solutions: diffusion-controlled mixing in space, convection-controlled mixing on earth and forced mixing on earth and with typical physiological parameters (pH and temperature. Concentrations of the stock solutions, rate of solution mixing and duration of precipitation influence very strongly the chemical composition of the precipitation, the phase composition of individual crystals, their sizes, morphology and structure. Microdiffraction and HRTEM techniques showed an incontestable advantage on other techniques like SEM and XRD in the investigation of small particles and mixtures of calcium phosphates (hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate with different proportions.

  8. Calibration of the OHREX high-resolution imaging crystal spectrometer at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, N.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    We report the calibration of the Orion High-Resolution X-ray (OHREX) imaging crystal spectrometer at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Livermore. Two such instruments, dubbed OHREX-1 and OHREX-2, are fielded for plasma diagnostics at the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. The OHREX spectrometer can simultaneously house two spherically bent crystals with a radius of curvature of r = 67.2 cm. The focusing properties of the spectrometer allow both for larger distance to the source due to the increase in collected light and for observation of extended sources. OHREX is designed to cover a 2.5°-3° spectral range at Bragg angles around 51.3°. The typically high resolving powers at these large Bragg angles are ideally suited for line shape diagnostics. For instance, the nominal resolving power of the instrument (>10 000) is much higher than the effective resolving power associated with the Doppler broadening due to the temperature of the trapped ions in EBIT-I. The effective resolving power is only around 3000 at typical EBIT-I conditions, which nevertheless is sufficient to set up and test the instrument's spectral characteristics. We have calibrated the spectral range for a number of crystals using well known reference lines in the first and second order and derived the ion temperatures from these lines. We have also made use of the 50 μm size of the EBIT-I source width to characterize the spatial focusing of the spectrometer.

  9. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Jones, A.N., E-mail: Abbie.Jones@manchester.ac.uk [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite

  10. Calibration of the OHREX high-resolution imaging crystal spectrometer at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg 96049 (Germany); Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We report the calibration of the Orion High-Resolution X-ray (OHREX) imaging crystal spectrometer at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Livermore. Two such instruments, dubbed OHREX-1 and OHREX-2, are fielded for plasma diagnostics at the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. The OHREX spectrometer can simultaneously house two spherically bent crystals with a radius of curvature of r = 67.2 cm. The focusing properties of the spectrometer allow both for larger distance to the source due to the increase in collected light and for observation of extended sources. OHREX is designed to cover a 2.5°–3° spectral range at Bragg angles around 51.3°. The typically high resolving powers at these large Bragg angles are ideally suited for line shape diagnostics. For instance, the nominal resolving power of the instrument (>10 000) is much higher than the effective resolving power associated with the Doppler broadening due to the temperature of the trapped ions in EBIT-I. The effective resolving power is only around 3000 at typical EBIT-I conditions, which nevertheless is sufficient to set up and test the instrument’s spectral characteristics. We have calibrated the spectral range for a number of crystals using well known reference lines in the first and second order and derived the ion temperatures from these lines. We have also made use of the 50 μm size of the EBIT-I source width to characterize the spatial focusing of the spectrometer.

  11. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  12. Identifying the crystallinity, phase, and arsenic uptake of the nanomineral schwertmannite using analytical high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. A.; Kim, B.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    Schwertmannite, an iron oxyhydroxide sulfate nanomineral, plays a significant role in the geochemistry of acid mine drainage (AMD) as a metastable phase with respect to goethite and by retaining toxic metals, e.g. arsenic [1]. Schwertmannite’s characteristic morphology is needles 100-300 nm long and only 5-10 nm in diameter extending from a dense aggregate. The poorly-and nano-crystalline nature of this mineral requires using high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM) to be fully characterized. We used HRTEM to identify the polyphasic nature of natural samples of schwertmannite collected from the Iberian Pyrite Belt in Spain. In order to analyze the dense core, samples were prepared in thin section using an ultramicrotome. Data on a sample identified as pure schwertmannite through powder XRD shows the presence of 5-10 nm goethite nanocrystals making up a significant portion of one of the nanoneedle tips (Figure 1). These nanocrystals exhibit lattice fringes and faceted surfaces, both of which match that expected for goethite. The great majority of the nanoneedles are poorly-crystalline (no lattice fringes) with atomically rough surfaces which may be highly active in the uptake of As. The presence of a range of phases and crystallinities in this sample demonstrate incipient stages of the mechanism that results in transformation of schwertmannite to goethite. Further analytical TEM analyses will help us track sorption/desorption, as well as the specific locations of As within these materials upon initial formation, as well as during transformation. [1] Acero et al. (2006) GCA 70, 4130-4139. Figure 1. HRTEM image of 'schwertmannite' nanoneedle with FFT data (inset).

  13. Studies of electron correlation effects in multicharged ion atom collisions involving double capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Sommer, K.; Griffin, D.C.; Havener, C.C.; Huq, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Swenson, J.K.; Meyer, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    We review measurements of L-Coster Kronig and Auger electron production in slow, multicharged collision systems to study electron correlation effects in the process of double electron capture. The n/sup /minus/3/ law was confirmed for the production of the Coster-Kronig configurations 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ (n greater than or equal to 6) in O/sup 6 +/ + He collisions. Enhancement of high angular momentum /ell/ in specific 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ configurations was observed by means of high-resolution measurements of the Coster-Kronig lines. The importance of electron correlation effects in couplings of potential energy curves leading to the 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ configurations is verified by means of Landau-Zener model calculations. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  14. IRAS high resolution studies and modeling of closely interacting galaxies. Galaxy collisions: Infrared observations and analysis of numerical models. UV spectroscopy of massive young stellar populations in interacting galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Susan A.

    1993-01-01

    The Final Technical Report covering the period from 15 Aug. 1989 to 14 Aug. 1991 is presented. Areas of research included Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) high resolution studies and modeling of closely interacting galaxies; galaxy collisions: infrared observations and analysis of numerical models; and UV spectroscopy of massive young stellar populations in interacting galaxies. Both observational studies and theoretical modelling of interacting galaxies are covered. As a consequence the report is divided into two parts, one on each aspect of the overall project.

  15. High-resolution spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation for surface structure determination and the study of correlated electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    The surface structure of three molecular adsorbate systems on transition metal surfaces, ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} CO adsorbed on Cu(111), and c(2x2) N2/Ni(100), have been determined using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS). The adsorption site and bond lengths are reported for the adsorbate-metal bond and the first two substrate layers. The ARPEFS diffraction pattern of the shake-up peak for c(2x2) N2/Ni(100) is also discussed. A unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level satellites is presented. We show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. Specifically, we present data for the C 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110), N is from c(2x2) N2/Ni(100), and Ni 3p from clean nickel(111). The satellite peaks in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature. A Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FF-SX) has been designed and is under construction for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The spectrometer is designed for ultra-high resolution theoretical resolving power E/{Delta}E{approx}-10{sup 6} in the photon energy region of 60-120 eV. This instrument is expected to provide experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  16. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2016-09-01

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.

  17. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential.

  18. Characterization of basal-prismatic interface of ? twin in deformed titanium by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Tu, J.; Ren, Y.; Qin, H.; Liu, Q.

    2015-03-01

    Disconnections in the basal-prismatic (BP) interfaces of ? twin have been investigated by many computer simulations. In this paper, we report experimentally that the disconnection in the BP interface of ? twin in deformed titanium can be observed by high-resolution TEM (HRTEM). This disconnection can be characterized as ? using a coherent dichromatic complex. Correspondingly, the migration process of the basal-prismatic plane resulting from ? glide is described.

  19. Electronic transitions in α-oligothiophene thin films. Comparison of ultraviolet/visible absorption spectroscopy and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeter, D.; Egelhaaf, H.-J.; Ziegler, Ch.; Oelkrug, D.; Göpel, W.

    1994-10-01

    Vapor deposited thin films of a series of α-oligothiophenes are investigated comparatively with polarized ultraviolet/visible absorption spectroscopy (UV/VIS) and by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) in specular reflection geometry. The complementary selection rules of these methods allow an assignment of the observed absorption and loss bands according to a Hückel molecular orbital model. By plotting the transition energies of corresponding bands of different members of the homologous series vs the reciprocal of the number of rings, the development of the one-dimensional ``π-band-structure'' with an increasing number of rings could be followed. The extrapolation to infinite chain length leads to the electronic properties of an ideal (defect free) polythiophene. Furthermore, characteristic differences were observed in the results obtained from the two methods. The orientation of the molecules in thin films is only detectable with UV/VIS spectroscopy. It is most pronounced for α-quinquethiophene. On the other hand, HREELS gives information about the position of optical parity forbidden electronic transitions.

  20. Experimental electronic structure and Fermi-surface instability of the correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 : High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, S.; Fazekas, P.; Søndergaard, C.; Ariosa, D.; Barišić, N.; Berger, H.; Cloëtta, D.; Forró, L.; Höchst, H.; Kupčić, I.; Pavuna, D.; Margaritondo, G.

    2007-04-01

    The correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 exhibits an interesting coexistence of one-dimensional and three-dimensional properties. Our experiments determine the electronic band structure and shed light on this puzzle. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements in a 4-eV -wide range below the Fermi energy level uncover and investigate the coexistence of a1g wide-band and eg narrow-band d electrons, which lead to the complicated electronic properties of this material. We explore the effects of strong correlations and the Fermi surface instability associated with the metal-insulator transition.

  1. NORMA: a tool for flexible fitting of high-resolution protein structures into low-resolution electron-microscopy-derived density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhre, Karsten; Navaza, Jorge; Sanejouand, Yves Henri

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a freely available software suite that allows the modelling of large conformational changes of high-resolution three-dimensional protein structures under the constraint of a low-resolution electron-density map. Typical applications are the interpretation of electron-microscopy data using atomic scale X-ray structural models. The software package provided should enable the interested user to perform flexible fitting on new cases without encountering major technical difficulties. The NORMA software suite including three fully executable reference cases and extensive user instructions are available at http://www.elnemo.org/NORMA/.

  2. Study and simulation of the read-out electronics design for a high-resolution plastic scintillating fiber based hodoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, José María; Sanchis, E.; Granero, D.; Martín, J. D.; González, V.; Sanchis-Sánchez, E.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents the study and simulation of a high-resolution charged particle detection device for beam positioning, monitoring and calibration, together with its read-out proposal. To provide the precise positional information of the beam, the detection system has been based on Plastic Scintillating Fibers (PSF), while the read-out on a Silicon-PhotoDiode (Si-PD) array. To carry out the study, a PSF prototype with one detection plane has been experimentally tested with a β particle source. Besides, Monte Carlo simulations of the complete system have also been conducted. Both simulations and experimental tests give consistency to the results obtained. The work presented in this article show the usefulness of this proposal for high-precision charged particle positioning, achieving resolutions up to 100 μm.

  3. High resolution resonant recombination measurements using evaporative cooling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beilmann, C; Lopez-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Mokler, P H; Ullrich, J, E-mail: christian.beilmann@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    We report on a method significantly improving the energy resolution of dielectronic recombination (DR) measurements in electron beam ion traps (EBITs). The line width of DR resonances can be reduced to values distinctly smaller than the corresponding space charge width of the uncompensated electron beam. The experimental technique based on forced evaporative cooling is presented together with test measurements demonstrating its high efficiency. The principle for resolution improvement is elucidated and the limiting factors are discussed. This method opens access to high resolution DR measurements at high ion-electron collision energies required for innermost shell DR in highly charged ions (HCI).

  4. Wavelet-based analysis and power law classification of C/NOFS high-resolution electron density data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rino, C. L.; Carrano, C. S.; Roddy, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    This paper applies new wavelet-based analysis procedures to low Earth-orbiting satellite measurements of equatorial ionospheric structure. The analysis was applied to high-resolution data from 285 Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite orbits sampling the postsunset period at geomagnetic equatorial latitudes. The data were acquired during a period of progressively intensifying equatorial structure. The sampled altitude range varied from 400 to 800 km. The varying scan velocity remained within 20° of the cross-field direction. Time-to-space interpolation generated uniform samples at approximately 8 m. A maximum segmentation length that supports stochastic structure characterization was identified. A two-component inverse power law model was fit to scale spectra derived from each segment together with a goodness-of-fit measure. Inverse power law parameters derived from the scale spectra were used to classify the scale spectra by type. The largest category was characterized by a single inverse power law with a mean spectral index somewhat larger than 2. No systematic departure from the inverse power law was observed to scales greater than 100 km. A small subset of the most highly disturbed passes at the lowest sampled altitudes could be categorized by two-component power law spectra with a range of break scales from less than 100 m to several kilometers. The results are discussed within the context of other analyses of in situ data and spectral characteristics used for scintillation analyses.

  5. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and bulk magnetometry study of LaFe_(11.5)Si_(1.5) compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zou Jun-Ding; Li Wei; Shen Bao-Gen

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the microstructural and magnetic properties of LaFe_(11.5)Si_(1.5) compound by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscope and bulk magnetometry measurements. The crystalline structure is accompanied with the noncrystalline and nanocrystalline structures. This characteristic is the reflection of the crystalline process held by quenching. The inverse susceptibilities diverge and deviate from Curie-Weiss law under low applied magnetic fields. This paper proposes the possible mechanism between the anomalous susceptibilities and microstructtire, and offers a perspective on the magnetic properties of metastable intermetallic compounds.

  6. Localization of Post-Translational Modifications in Peptide Mixtures via High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Followed by Electron Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Matthew A.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-12-01

    Precise localization of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on proteins and peptides is an outstanding challenge in proteomics. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has dramatically advanced PTM analyses, mixtures of localization variants that commonly coexist in cells often require prior separation. Although differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) achieves broad variant resolution, the need for standards to identify the features has limited the utility of approach. Here we demonstrate full a priori characterization of variant mixtures by high-resolution FAIMS coupled to ETD and the procedures to systematically extract the FAIMS spectra for all variants from such data.

  7. The use of high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy for refining the infrared optical constants of GaS, GaSe, and InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Ming; Thiry, P. A.; Degiovanni, A.; Conard, Th.; Leclerc, G.; Caudano, R.; Lambin, Ph.; Debever, J.-M.

    1994-06-01

    Cleaved surfaces of III-VI lamellar semiconducting compounds GaS, GaSe, and InSe have been studied by high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The infrared optical constants of the materials were retrieved by using the dielectric theory taking account of the resonance frequencies published from infrared reflectivity (IRS) data. The limitations of the HREELS and IRS measurements in the case of these materials are discussed in detail. However, it is shown that, by combining the informations from both spectroscopies, it is possible to refine some of the oscillator strengths of these materials.

  8. Localization of Post-Translational Modifications in Peptide Mixtures via High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Followed by Electron Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Matthew A.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-09-01

    Precise localization of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on proteins and peptides is an outstanding challenge in proteomics. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has dramatically advanced PTM analyses, mixtures of localization variants that commonly coexist in cells often require prior separation. Although differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) achieves broad variant resolution, the need for standards to identify the features has limited the utility of approach. Here we demonstrate full a priori characterization of variant mixtures by high-resolution FAIMS coupled to ETD and the procedures to systematically extract the FAIMS spectra for all variants from such data.

  9. All-inkjet-printed flexible electronics fabrication on a polymer substrate by low-temperature high-resolution selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan, Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Luscombe, Christine K.; Fréchet, Jean M. J.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-08-01

    All-printed electronics is the key technology to ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. As a critical step in this direction, we demonstrate that laser sintering of inkjet-printed metal nanoparticles enables low-temperature metal deposition as well as high-resolution patterning to overcome the resolution limitation of the current inkjet direct writing processes. To demonstrate this process combined with the implementation of air-stable carboxylate-functionalized polythiophenes, high-resolution organic transistors were fabricated in ambient pressure and room temperature without utilizing any photolithographic steps or requiring a vacuum deposition process. Local thermal control of the laser sintering process could minimize the heat-affected zone and the thermal damage to the substrate and further enhance the resolution of the process. This local nanoparticle deposition and energy coupling enable an environmentally friendly and cost-effective process as well as a low-temperature manufacturing sequence to realize large-area, flexible electronics on polymer substrates.

  10. All-inkjet-printed flexible electronics fabrication on a polymer substrate by low-temperature high-resolution selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seung H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, 6177 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Pan Heng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, 6177 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Grigoropoulos, Costas P [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, 6177 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Luscombe, Christine K [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Frechet, Jean M J [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Poulikakos, Dimos [Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-08-29

    All-printed electronics is the key technology to ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. As a critical step in this direction, we demonstrate that laser sintering of inkjet-printed metal nanoparticles enables low-temperature metal deposition as well as high-resolution patterning to overcome the resolution limitation of the current inkjet direct writing processes. To demonstrate this process combined with the implementation of air-stable carboxylate-functionalized polythiophenes, high-resolution organic transistors were fabricated in ambient pressure and room temperature without utilizing any photolithographic steps or requiring a vacuum deposition process. Local thermal control of the laser sintering process could minimize the heat-affected zone and the thermal damage to the substrate and further enhance the resolution of the process. This local nanoparticle deposition and energy coupling enable an environmentally friendly and cost-effective process as well as a low-temperature manufacturing sequence to realize large-area, flexible electronics on polymer substrates.

  11. Electronic band structure of ReS2 by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, James L.; Hart, Lewis S.; Wolverson, Daniel; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-09-01

    The rhenium-based transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are atypical of the TMD family due to their highly anisotropic crystalline structure and are recognized as promising materials for two-dimensional heterostructure devices. The nature of the band gap (direct or indirect) for bulk, few-, and single-layer forms of ReS2 is of particular interest, due to its comparatively weak interplanar interaction. However, the degree of interlayer interaction and the question of whether a transition from indirect to direct gap is observed on reducing thickness (as in other TMDs) are controversial. We present a direct determination of the valence band structure of bulk ReS2 using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find a clear in-plane anisotropy due to the presence of chains of Re atoms, with a strongly directional effective mass which is larger in the direction orthogonal to the Re chains (2.2 me ) than along them (1.6 me ). An appreciable interplane interaction results in an experimentally measured difference of ≈100 -200 meV between the valence band maxima at the Z point (0,0,1/2 ) and the Γ point (0,0,0) of the three-dimensional Brillouin zone. This leads to a direct gap at Z and a close-lying but larger gap at Γ , implying that bulk ReS2 is marginally indirect. This may account for recent conflicting transport and photoluminescence measurements and the resulting uncertainty about the nature of the band gap in this material.

  12. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  13. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-28

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  14. A high-resolution time-of-flight energy analyzer for femtosecond electron pulses at 30 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliserin, Alexander; Walbran, Matthew; Baum, Peter

    2016-03-01

    We report a time-of-flight spectrometer for electron pulses at up to 30 keV, which is a suitable energy for atomic-resolution femtosecond investigations via time-resolved electron diffraction, microscopy, and energy loss spectroscopy. For realistic femtosecond beams without apertures, the instrument's energy resolution is ˜0.5 eV (full width at half maximum) or 2 × 10-5 at a throughput of 50%-90%. We demonstrate the analyzer's versatility by three first applications, namely, femtosecond electron pulse metrology via optical streaking, in situ drift correction in laser-microwave synchronization for electron pulse compression, and time-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy of aluminum, showing the instrument's capability of tracking plasmonic loss peak positions with few-meV accuracy.

  15. An accurate test of calculated positions and lifetimes for Ne{sup 6+}(1s{sup 2}3lnl{sup '}) {sup 1}L states (n=3 and 4) using a high-resolution electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A. E-mail: abm@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D

    2003-05-01

    An accurate test of available calculations for the autoionizing doubly excited states belonging to the Be-like 1s{sup 2}3lnl{sup '} Rydberg series of neon (positions and lifetimes) is presented in this short communication. These theoretical data are used to calculate electron line shapes which are compared, through a fitting procedure, with a high-resolution electron spectrum measured in Ne{sup 8+}(1s{sup 2}) + He collisional system, at 80 keV collision energy and 13.1 deg. observation angle. Present tests concern the n=3 and n=4 singlet states. It is found that some of these calculations suffer from large discrepancies with experiment and do not allow a description of the electron spectrum. A quantitative comparison of measured and calculated post-collisional Coulomb interaction-shifted line positions is also given and briefly discussed; for one theoretical data set, the agreement with experiment is found to be generally within {+-}50 meV; in contrast agreement with other data often considerably scatters within {+-}500 meV and sometimes more.

  16. Multiple electron capture in close ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlachter, A.S.; Stearns, J.W.; Berkner, K.H.; Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.; DuBois, R.D.; Graham, W.G.; Morgan, T.J.; Mueller, D.W.; Stockli, M.P.; Tanis, J.A.; Woodland, W.T. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (USA); Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (UK); Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (USA); University of North Tex

    1989-07-24

    Collisions in which a fast highly charged ion passes within the orbit of K electron of a target gas atom are selected by emission of a K x-ray from the projectile or target. Measurement of the projectile charge state after the collision, in coincidence with the K x-ray, allows measurement of the charge-transfer probability during these close collisions. When the projectile velocity is approximately the same as that of target electrons, a large number of electrons can be transferred to the projectile in a single collision. The electron-capture probability is found to be a linear function of the number of vacancies in the projectile L shell for 47-MeV calcium ions in an Ar target. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Electron loss of fast projectiles in the collisions with molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Matveev, V I; Rakhimov, Kh Yu

    2011-01-01

    The single and multiple electron loss of fast highly charged projectiles in the collisions with neutral molecules are studied within the framework of a nonperturbative approach. The cross sections for single, double, and triple electron losses are calculated for the collision system $Fe^{q+}\\to N_2$ ($q$=24, 25, 26) at the collision energies 10, 100, and 1000 MeV/u. The effects caused by the collision multiplicity and the orientation of the axis of target molecule are treated. It is shown that collision multiplicity effect leads to considerable differences for the cases of perpendicular and parallel orientations of the molecular axes with respect to the direction of the projectile motion, while for chaotic orientation such effect is negligible.

  18. High-resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in biocompatible graphene liquid cells and graphene sandwiches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert F

    2014-06-04

    Atomic and electronic structures of hydrated ferritin are characterized using electron microscopy and spectroscopy through encapsulation in single layer graphene in a biocompatible manner. Graphene's ability to reduce radiation damage levels to hydrogen bond breakage is demonstrated. A reduction of iron valence from 3+ to 2+ is measured at nanometer-resolution in ferritin, showing initial stages of iron release by ferritin. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites.

  20. Experimental positions and lifetimes of Be-like 1s{sup 2}3lnl'(n=3 to 5) states of O{sup 4+} and Ne{sup 6+} ions investigated by high resolution electron spectroscopy: test of calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D. [Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. Collisions - Agregats - Reactivite

    1999-07-01

    Using high resolution electron spectroscopy, positions and lifetimes of many Be-like singlet states of the 1s{sup 2}3lnl' Rydberg series (n = 3 to 5) of oxygen and neon have been measured for the first time. This was achieved by a fitting procedure which takes into account an accurate definition of the post-collisional electron lineshapes. These states are produced after a double electron capture by multicharged ions has occurred in O{sup 6+}(1s{sup 2})+He, H{sub 2} and Ne{sup 8+}(1s{sup 2})+He collisions at about 4 keV/amu collision energy. (orig.)

  1. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Den Dekker, A.J.; Martinez, G.T.; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage

  2. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  3. High resolution scanning electron microscopy of rabbit corneal endothelium to show effects of UV-visible irradiation in the presence of chlorpromazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, P.J.; Hollenberg, M.J.; Menon, I.A.; Temkin, R.J.; Persad, S.D.; Basu, P.K. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of rabbit cornea endothelial cells was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in freeze-cleaved corneas using a Hitachi S-570 scanning electron microscope in the high resolution mode (HRSEM). In order to study phototoxic effects in vitro, rabbit corneas (experimental) were cultured as organ culture in the presence of 5 micrograms/ml chlorpromazine (CPZ) and irradiated. For comparison, control 1 corneas were not irradiated but incubated in the dark without CPZ in the medium; control 2 corneas were also kept in the dark but in the presence of CPZ; control 3 corneas were irradiated with no CPZ in the medium. Cellular damage was not seen in the three types of control corneas, but in the experimental corneas the endothelial cells showed extensive disruption of the cell membrane and some deterioration of the intracellular components. Our study confirmed that HRSEM is a satisfactory new technique for visualizing damage of the intracellular organelles of corneal endothelium.

  4. Electron correlation energy of La sub x Sr sub 1 sub - sub x TiO sub 3 by high-resolution soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Higuchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Harada, Y; Taguchi, Y; Tokura, Y; Shin, S

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of La sub x Sr sub 1 sub - sub x TiO sub 3 (x<=0.10) has been investigated by high-resolution soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES) spectra in the Ti 2p energy region. At the t sub 2 sub g -resonance SXES spectra, the d-d transition whose Raman shift is about 2.2 eV corresponds to the magnitude of the half intra-atomic Coulomb energy (U sub d sub d /2). The magnitude does not change in x<=0.10. This fact is consistent with the results obtained from the effective mass and the electronic specific heat.

  5. Spin Effects in Collisions of Electrons with Atoms and Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical work on spin-dependent electron-atom and electron-molecule collisions is reviewed. The spin is involved in such collisions by explicit spin-dependent interactions such as the spin-orbit interaction of the continuum electron (Mott scattering) but also by exchange, which, in conjunction with the Pauli principle, gives rise to observable spin exchange effects. We present results for Mn and Na atoms and experiments in which electron dichroism with chiral molecules has been studied.

  6. Study by atomistic theory and high-resolution electron microscopies of Cu atoms at an Al grain boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plitzko, Jurgen M.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; King, Wayne E.; Foiles, Stephen M.; Kisielowski, Christian; Duscher, Gerd

    2003-02-02

    New insight into the atomic segregation of copper to an aluminum grain boundary has been obtained using atomic resolution electron microscopy techniques coupled with ab-initio electronic structure calculations. We find the copper segregation to be site specific, changing the structure of the boundary by unexpectedly occupying interstitial sites. The calculated energy for segregation was found to be sufficient for essentially all of the interstitial sites to be filled. Minor elemental constituents in materials can have profound effects on their engineering performance, often through segregation to grain boundaries in the host material. One important example is the great resistance to electromigration damage in microelectronics imparted by small additions of copper to aluminum interconnects.

  7. Specific, sensitive, high-resolution detection of protein molecules in eukaryotic cells using metal-tagging transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risco, Cristina; Sanmartín-Conesa, Eva; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Frey, Teryl K.; Seybold, Volker; de Groot, Raoul J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary More than any other methodology, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has contributed to our understanding of the architecture and organization of cells. With current detection limits approaching atomic resolution, it will ultimately become possible to ultrastructurally image intracellular macromolecular assemblies in situ. Presently, however, methods to unambiguously identify proteins within the crowded environment of the cell’s interior are lagging behind. We describe a novel approach, metal-tagging TEM (METTEM) that allows detection of intracellular proteins in mammalian cells with high specificity, exceptional sensitivity and at molecular scale resolution. In live cells treated with gold salts, proteins bearing a small metal-binding tag will form 1-nm gold nanoclusters, readily detectable in electron micrographs. The applicability and strength of METTEM is demonstrated by a study of Rubella virus replicase and capsid proteins, which revealed virus-induced cell structures not seen before. PMID:22579245

  8. High-resolution electron-beam-induced-current study of the defect structure in GaN epilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Shmidt, N M; Usikov, A S; Yakimov, E B; Zavarin, E E

    2002-01-01

    Electron-beam-induced-current (EBIC) investigations of GaN structures grown by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition on (0001) sapphire substrates have been carried out. It is shown that the widths of the EBIC profiles for individual extended defects can be as small as about 100 nm. This width is observed to decrease with decreasing diffusion length and/or with increasing electron beam energy. The high spatial resolution is explained by the small diffusion length in the samples under study. The diffusion length is small even in structures with dislocation densities of about 10 sup 8 cm sup - sup 3 and carrier mobilities of about 600 cm sup 2 V sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1 at 300 K and 1800 cm sup 2 V sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1 at 125 K.

  9. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Den Dekker, A.J.; Martinez, G. T.; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage applications, much effort has been made to optimize the STEM technique in order to detect light elements. Therefore, classical performance criteria, such as contrast or signal-to-noise ratio, a...

  10. 2dx_automator: implementation of a semiautomatic high-throughput high-resolution cryo-electron crystallography pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Sebastian; Kowal, Julia; Chami, Mohamed; Dandey, Venkata; Arheit, Marcel; Ringler, Philippe; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of direct electron detectors (DED) to cryo-electron microscopy has tremendously increased the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and quality of the recorded images. We discuss the optimal use of DEDs for cryo-electron crystallography, introduce a new automatic image processing pipeline, and demonstrate the vast improvement in the resolution achieved by the use of both together, especially for highly tilted samples. The new processing pipeline (now included in the software package 2dx) exploits the high SNR and frame readout frequency of DEDs to automatically correct for beam-induced sample movement, and reliably processes individual crystal images without human interaction as data are being acquired. A new graphical user interface (GUI) condenses all information required for quality assessment in one window, allowing the imaging conditions to be verified and adjusted during the data collection session. With this new pipeline an automatically generated unit cell projection map of each recorded 2D crystal is available less than 5 min after the image was recorded. The entire processing procedure yielded a three-dimensional reconstruction of the 2D-crystallized ion-channel membrane protein MloK1 with a much-improved resolution of 5Å in-plane and 7Å in the z-direction, within 2 days of data acquisition and simultaneous processing. The results obtained are superior to those delivered by conventional photographic film-based methodology of the same sample, and demonstrate the importance of drift-correction.

  11. High Resolution Elevation Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset contains contours generated from high resolution data sources such as LiDAR. Generally speaking this data is 2 foot or less contour interval.

  12. Optimization of metallic magnetic calorimeters for high resolution measurement of the {sup 163}Ho electron capture spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnle, Sebastian [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University (Germany); Collaboration: ECHo-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The absolute scale of the neutrino mass eigenstates is one of the puzzles in modern particle physics. One method to investigate the value of the electron neutrino mass is to analyse the high energy region of the {sup 163}Ho electron capture spectrum. In the ECHo experiment low temperature metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are used for the calorimetric measurements of the EC spectrum of {sup 163}Ho. To ensure 100% quantum efficiency, the {sup 163}Ho ions are implanted into the gold absorber. Experiments carried out with a first detector prototype have demonstrated that MMC-based detectors fulfill the requirements in terms of energy resolution, rise-time and energy calibration. We discuss methods to further optimize the performance of MMCs with implanted {sup 163}Ho. Our aim is to achieve an energy resolution Δ E{sub FWHM} < 5 eV and a signal rise-time τ < 100 ns. An important aspect of this optimization is to define the maximum activity per pixel. This will result from a compromise between allowed unresolved pile-up fraction, additional heat capacity in the absorber due to Ho ions in the absorber material and minimization of the pixel number. We discuss experimental approaches for the determination of the optimal activity per pixel.

  13. High-resolution electron tomography study of an industrial Ni-Mo/gamma-Al2O3 hydrotreating catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Krijn P; van den Oetelaar, Leon C A; Vogt, Eelco T C; Eijsbouts, Sonja; Koster, Abraham J; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jongh, Petra E

    2006-06-01

    The growing demand for high-quality transportation fuels requires their cost-effective production by hydrodesulfurization of crude oils using heterogeneous catalysts. To study the three-dimensional (3D) structure of such a commercial, sulfided Ni-Mo/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst, electron tomography was applied. The MoS2 particles form an interconnected complex structure within the mesopores of the alumina support. Spatial organization, morphology, and orientation of the MoS2 particles in the pores were resolved with sufficient accuracy to display the 6-A-spaced MoS2 crystal planes. The proximity of the MoS2 edge planes and more loosely interacting MoS2 basal planes to the alumina support showed the presence of pores smaller than 3 nm, which was confirmed by physisorption experiments. The actual shape of the MoS2 particles cannot be described by simple models as derived from studies on model catalysts. Electron tomography is a unique tool to study the actual 3D structure of complex industrial catalysts with sub-nanometer resolution.

  14. Imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution x-ray measurements on electron beam ion traps and tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Hell, N.; Brown, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    We describe a crystal spectrometer implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps that employ two spherically bent quartz crystals and a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector to measure x rays with a nominal resolving power of λ/Δλ ≥ 10 000. Its focusing properties allow us to record x rays either with the plane of dispersion perpendicular or parallel to the electron beam and, thus, to preferentially select one of the two linear x-ray polarization components. Moreover, by choice of dispersion plane and focussing conditions, we use the instrument either to image the distribution of the ions within the 2 cm long trap region, or to concentrate x rays of a given energy to a point on the detector, which optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio. We demonstrate the operation and utility of the new instrument by presenting spectra of Mo34+, which prepares the instrument for use as a core impurity diagnostic on the NSTX-U spherical torus and other magnetic fusion devices that employ molybdenum as plasma facing components.

  15. High-resolution imaging X-ray detector. [using microchannel plates and electronic readout for spaceborne telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, E.; Henry, P.; Murray, S.; Van Speybroeck, L.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an X-ray detector using microchannel plates as a photocathode surface and imaging photoelectron multiplier, and a crossed wire grid as a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. The position resolution is 10 microns. The crossed wire grid consists of 100-micron-diam wires on 200-micron centers. Position sensing is accomplished by electronic interpolation to 1/20 of the wire spacing. The quantum efficiency of the microchannel plates varies from 29% at 0.28 keV to 5% at 3 keV. This detector will provide second-of-arc X-ray imaging in the focal plane of the 342.9-cm focal length grazing-incidence telescope being prepared for the HEAO-B observatory. By addition of suitable photocathodes, it can be used for single-photon imaging light detection in the UV, visible, and near-IR-ranges. In all cases, it gives a very low dark counting rate, allows timing of individual events to 1 microsec or less, and can handle counting rates up to 10,000 per sec.

  16. The Development of the High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) Combined with AFM for Simultaneous Observation of Structure and Force of the Nanocontact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Sakiko; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Kondo, Yukihito; Minoda, Hiroki; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2004-03-01

    A high-resolution transmission electron microscope combined with an atomic force microscope (HRTEM-AFM) has been developed. It enables us to observe mechanical force and atomic structure of nanowires formed at the nanocontact simultaneously. And the self-sensing piezoresistive cantilever is used as an AFM probe in the HRTEM-AFM. It has high spatial resolution of 0.2nm and high force sensitivity of sub-nN. The HRTEM has also ability to work on ultra high vacuum(UHV) which is necessary to keep the nanocontact clean. The present system could never be developed without total redesigning of the goniometer stage of UHV-TEM which operates at 10-8 Pa.

  17. A Physically-Intuitive Method for Calculation of the Local Lattice Constant from a High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Image by Fourier Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Teherani, James T

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a physically-intuitive method to calculate the local lattice constant as a function of position in a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image by performing a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. We apply a Gaussian filter with appropriate spatial full-width-half-max (FWHM) bandwidth to the image centered at the desired location to calculate the local lattice constant (as opposed to the average lattice constant). Fourier analysis of the filtered image yields the vertical and horizontal lattice constants at this location. The process is repeated by stepping the Gaussian filter across the image to produce a set of local lattice constants in the vertical and horizontal direction as a function of position in the image. The method has been implemented in a freely available tool on nanoHUB.

  18. Absence of an energy gap in measurements of Cu-O superconductors with high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, R. B.; Akavoor, P.; Kesmodel, L. L.; Barr, A. L.; Markert, J. T.; Ma, J.; Kelley, R. J.; Onellion, M.

    1994-09-01

    We report extensive measurements of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 (Bi 2:2:1:2) and YBa2Cu3O7 (Y 1:2:3) single crystals with high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Both as-grown and oxygen-annealed Bi 2:2:1:2 samples were studied. In all cases, peaks due to surface optical phonons were observed at loss energies from 24 to 80 meV. We see no evidence for the weak feature near 60 meV which has been previously reported and attributed to the superconducting energy gap. Our results demonstrate that the optical conductivity of high-temperature superconductors deduced from HREELS, like that deduced from infrared spectroscopy, does not exhibit the gaplike structure expected for a BCS superconductor.

  19. Absence of an energy gap in measurements of Cu-O superconductors with high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, R.B.; Akavoor, P.; Kesmodel, L.L. (Physics Department and Materials Research Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)); Barr, A.L.; Markert, J.T. (Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)); Ma, J.; Kelley, R.J.; Onellion, M. (Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States))

    1994-09-01

    We report extensive measurements of Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8] (Bi 2:2:1:2) and YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] (Y 1:2:3) single crystals with high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Both as-grown and oxygen-annealed Bi 2:2:1:2 samples were studied. In all cases, peaks due to surface optical phonons were observed at loss energies from 24 to 80 meV. We see no evidence for the weak feature near 60 meV which has been previously reported and attributed to the superconducting energy gap. Our results demonstrate that the optical conductivity of high-temperature superconductors deduced from HREELS, like that deduced from infrared spectroscopy, does not exhibit the gaplike structure expected for a BCS superconductor.

  20. Analysis of Ordering Process in an Al-Li Alloy by a Newly Developed Method of Degree of Order Determination Using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Micrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Sengo; Nakai, Kiyomichi; Ohmori, Yasuya

    2012-12-01

    Ordering processes of an Al-11.7 at. pct Li alloy in the early stage of aging have been investigated quantitatively by means of a newly proposed technique to determine the degree of order in a nanoscale area by using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After solid solution treatment at 833 K (560 °C) for 1.8 ks, the specimen was quenched into iced brine. The specimen exhibited congruent ordering. It was continuously heated at a rate of 0.17 Ks-1 (0.17 °C s-1). During heating to 673 K (400 °C), the reactions occurred in the following sequences: progress of the congruent ordering, partition of Li atoms around the antiphase domain boundaries, phase separation into Li-rich and Li-lean regions toward equilibria, and dissolution of δ' phase.

  1. Adsorption and decomposition of nickelocene on Ag(1 0 0): a high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugmire, D. L.; Woodbridge, C. M.; Boag, N. M.; Langell, M. A.

    2001-02-01

    Nickelocene adsorption and decomposition on the Ag(1 0 0) surface were studied with temperature programmed desorption and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. At monolayer coverages on the relatively inert Ag(1 0 0) surface at 175 K, nickelocene physisorbs molecularly, with its molecular axis perpendicular to the surface plane. Nickelocene begins decomposing to adsorbed cyclopentadienyl and nickel at 225 K. Molecular desorption is only observed from multilayer material, at 210 K, or from the first monolayer if adjacent surface sites for decomposition are not available. The cyclopentadienyl decomposes through disproportionation to cyclopentadiene, which desorbs, and adsorbed nickel and carbon fragments on the Ag(1 0 0) surface with a maximum at 525 K.

  2. Single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanocrystalline graphene reduce beam-induced movements in high-resolution electron cryo-microscopy of ice-embedded biological samples

    CERN Document Server

    Rhinow, Daniel; Turchanin, Andrey; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Kühlbrandt, Werner; 10.1063/1.3645010

    2011-01-01

    For single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), contrast loss due to beam-induced charging and specimen movement is a serious problem, as the thin films of vitreous ice spanning the holes of a holey carbon film are particularly susceptible to beam-induced movement. We demonstrate that the problem is at least partially solved by carbon nanotechnology. Doping ice-embedded samples with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in aqueous suspension or adding nanocrystalline graphene supports, obtained by thermal conversion of cross-linked self-assembled biphenyl precursors, significantly reduces contrast loss in high-resolution cryoEM due to the excellent electrical and mechanical properties of SWNTs and graphene.

  3. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Golberg, D., E-mail: xuzhi@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3058577 (Japan); Xu, Z., E-mail: xuzhi@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Kvashnin, D. G. [National University of Science and Technology, MISIS, Leninskiy Prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y. [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Sorokin, P. B. [National University of Science and Technology, MISIS, Leninskiy Prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutsky Lane 9, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-31

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  4. First collision at renovated electron-positron accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ On late afternoon July 19,2008,researchers at the CAS Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP)in Beijing produced the first collisions in the upgraded Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPCII).The feat was observed in the brand-new associated detector,Beijing Electron Spectrometer,III(BESIII).

  5. High-Resolution and Time-Resolved Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Studies of Adsorbate Bonding and Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lee James

    1988-12-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of the quantized vibrations of atoms and molecules adsorbed on single crystal surfaces has emerged as one of the most powerful probes of the structure, adsorption sites and reaction paths of adsorbates. This thesis explores EELS as a probe of the structure of adsorbed hydrogen on Pt(111) and Rh(100), and the structure of both CO and H coadsorbed on Rh(100). It also describes aspects of the development of a custom time-resolved EEL (TREEL) spectrometer and the application of the spectrometer to the study of the kinetics of the decomposition of methanol (CH_3 OH) and formaldehyde (H_2CO) on Ni(110) and Rh(100). In studies of H/Pt(111) and H/Rh(100) it was determined that the extended nature of the single crystal surface complicates quantitative analysis of the vibrational spectra. The nearest-neighbor central force constant model, commonly used to estimate bonding geometries, is qualitatively incorrect for both surfaces. The study of H/Rh(100) also established that local models of the potential anharmonicity are of limited utility due to the different dispersion of the fundamental and overtone losses. Adsorbate-adsorbate interactions can significantly affect adsorbate structure and reactivity. For the system of CO adsorbed on H precovered Rh(100), a strong CO-H repulsion results in a series of ordered H and CO lattices, each associated with a distinct H desorption behavior. One of the structures consists of bridge bound H and CO, each species binding to a site different from that preferred when adsorbed alone. Time-resolved EELS studies of the decomposition of methanol on Ni(110) and Rh(100) found the reaction follows the same pathway: a metastable methoxy species is formed, by cleavage of the OH bond, which subsequently decomposes to CO and H. The removal of the first methoxy hydrogen is the rate limiting step in the decomposition. The high reactivity of the 'CH_2O' product of the methoxy CH bond scission is supported by the

  6. Direct Observation of the Layer-by-Layer Growth of ZnO Nanopillar by In situ High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Cheng, Shaobo; Deng, Shiqing; Wei, Xianlong; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Catalyst-free methods are important for the fabrication of pure nanowires (NWs). However, the growth mechanism remains elusive due to the lack of crucial information on the growth dynamics at atomic level. Here, the noncatalytic growth process of ZnO NWs is studied through in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy. We observe the layer-by-layer growth of ZnO nanopillars along the polar [0001] direction under electron beam irradiation, while no growth is observed along the radial directions, indicating an anisotropic growth mechanism. The source atoms are mainly from the electron beam induced damage of the sample and the growth is assisted by subsequent absorption and then diffusion of atoms along the side surface to the top (0002) surface. The different binding energy on different ZnO surface is the main origin for the anisotropic growth. Additionally, the coalescence of ZnO nanocrystals related to the nucleation stage is uncovered to realize through the rotational motions and recrystallization. Our in situ results provide atomic-level detailed information about the dynamic growth and coalescence processes in the noncatalytic synthesis of ZnO NW and are helpful for understanding the vapor-solid mechanism of catalyst-free NW growth. PMID:28098261

  7. M-shell resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic study of transient matter evolution driven by hot electrons in kJ-laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condamine, F. P.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.; Dozières, M.; Thais, F.; Angelo, P.; Rosmej, F. B.

    2017-03-01

    Hot electrons represent a key subject for high intensity laser produced plasmas and atomic physics. Simulations of the radiative properties indicate a high sensitivity to hot electrons, that in turn provides the possibility for their detailed characterization by high-resolution spectroscopic methods. Of particular interest is X-ray spectroscopy due to reduced photo-absorption in dense matter and their efficient generation by hot electrons (inner-shell ionization/excitation). Here, we report on an experimental campaign conducted at the ns, kJ laser facility PALS at Prague in Czech Republic. Thin copper foils have been irradiated with 1ω pulses. Two spherically bent quartz Bragg crystal spectrometers with high spectral (λ/Δλ > 5000) and spatial resolutions (Δx = 30µm) have been set up simultaneously to achieve a high level of confidence for the complex Kα emission group. In particular, this group, which shows a strong overlap between lines, can be resolved in several substructures. Furthermore, an emission on the red wing of the Kα2 transition (λ = 1.5444A) could be identified with Hartree-Fock atomic structure calculations. We discuss possible implications for the analysis of non-equilibrium phenomena and present first simulations.

  8. Direct Observation of the Layer-by-Layer Growth of ZnO Nanopillar by In situ High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Cheng, Shaobo; Deng, Shiqing; Wei, Xianlong; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Catalyst-free methods are important for the fabrication of pure nanowires (NWs). However, the growth mechanism remains elusive due to the lack of crucial information on the growth dynamics at atomic level. Here, the noncatalytic growth process of ZnO NWs is studied through in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy. We observe the layer-by-layer growth of ZnO nanopillars along the polar [0001] direction under electron beam irradiation, while no growth is observed along the radial directions, indicating an anisotropic growth mechanism. The source atoms are mainly from the electron beam induced damage of the sample and the growth is assisted by subsequent absorption and then diffusion of atoms along the side surface to the top (0002) surface. The different binding energy on different ZnO surface is the main origin for the anisotropic growth. Additionally, the coalescence of ZnO nanocrystals related to the nucleation stage is uncovered to realize through the rotational motions and recrystallization. Our in situ results provide atomic-level detailed information about the dynamic growth and coalescence processes in the noncatalytic synthesis of ZnO NW and are helpful for understanding the vapor-solid mechanism of catalyst-free NW growth.

  9. Cross sections for electron collisions with dimethyl ether

    OpenAIRE

    Sugohara, RT; Homem, MGP; Iga, I; de Souza, GLC; MACHADO, LE; Ferraz, JR; dos Santos, AS; Brescansin, LM; Lucchese, RR; Lee, MT

    2013-01-01

    We report a joint theoretical-experimental investigation of electron collision with dimethyl ether (DME) in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. Experimental absolute differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic e(-)-DME scattering are reported in the 100-1000 eV energy range. Our measurements were performed using a crossed electron-beam-molecular-beam geometry. The angular distribution of the scattered electrons was converted to absolute cross section using th...

  10. Electron-electron collision dynamics of the four-electron escape in Be close to threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanouilidou, A.; Price, H.

    2013-04-01

    We explore the escape geometry of four electrons a few eV above threshold following single-photon absorption from the ground state of Be. We find that the four electrons leave the atom on the vertices of a triangular pyramid instead of a previously predicted regular tetrahedron. To illustrate the physical mechanisms of quadruple ionization we use a momentum transferring attosecond collision scheme which we show to be in accord with the triangular pyramid breakup pattern.

  11. High-resolution headlamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  12. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1,1'-diphenylethylene: electronically excited and ionic states of a prototypical cross-conjugated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarek, Szymon; Vdovin, Alexander; Rijs, Anouk; van Walree, Cornelis A; Zgierski, Marek Z; Buma, Wybren J

    2011-09-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated π-system, 1,1'-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio calculations. We find that the excitation spectrum of S(1) displays extensive vibrational progressions that we identify to arise from large changes in the torsional angles of the phenyl rings upon electronic excitation. The extensive activity of the antisymmetric inter-ring torsional vibration provides conclusive evidence for a loss of symmetry upon excitation, leading to an inequivalence of the two phenyl rings. Nonresonant zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy from the ground state of the neutral molecule to the ground state of the radical cation, on the other hand, demonstrates that upon ionization symmetry is retained, and that the geometry changes are considerably smaller. Apart from elucidating how removal of an electron affects the structure of the molecule, these measurements provide an accurate value for the adiabatic ionization energy (65274 ± 1 cm(-1) (8.093 eV)). Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectra obtained after excitation of vibronic levels in S(1) confirm these conclusions and provide us with an extensive atlas of ionic vibronic energy levels. For higher excitation energies the excitation spectrum of S(1) becomes quite congested and shows unexpected large intensities. Ab initio calculations strongly suggest that this is caused by a conical intersection between S(1) and S(2). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. The neural elements in the lining of the ventricular-subventricular zone: making an old story new by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Dos Santos Haemmerle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical description of the neural elements that compose the lining of brain ventricles introduces us to the single layer of ependymal cells. However, new findings, especially in the lateral ventricle - the major niche for the generation of new neurons in the adult brain - have provided information about additional cell elements that influence the organization of this part of the ventricular system and produce important contributions to neurogenesis. To complement the cell neurochemistry findings, we present a three-dimensional in situ description that demonstrates the anatomical details of the different types of ciliated cells and the innervation of these elements. After processing adult rat brains for ultrastructural analysis by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we observed a heterogeneous pattern of cilia distribution at the different poles of the lateral ventricle surface. Furthermore, we describe the particular three-dimensional aspects of the ciliated cells of the lateral ventricle, in addition the fiber bundles and varicose axons surrounding these cells. Therefore, we provide a unique ultrastructural description of the three-dimensional in situ organization of the lateral ventricle surface, highlighting its innervation, to corroborate the available neurochemical and functional findings regarding the factors that regulate this neurogenic niche.

  14. STUDIES ON PRIMARY CRYSTALLIZATION OF RAPIDLY QUENCHED Al-Ni-Cu-Nd METALLIC GLASS BY USING HIGH RESOLUTION TRASMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.D. Xiao; W.X. Li; D. Jacovkis; N. Clavaguera; M.T. Clavaguera-Mora; J. Rodriguez- Viejo

    2003-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Al87Ni7Cu3Nd3 metallic glasses, prepared by using melt spinning,were treated under both isothermal and non-isothermal regime. The amorphous ribbon and the annealed samples were closely examined by means of differential scanning calorimetric, conventional X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy with selected-area electron diffraction, with special interest in primary crystallization into α-Al nanocrystalline particles, in order to understand structural characteristics of Al-based amorphous/nanocrystalline alloys, and nucleation and grain growth mechanism on the nanometer scale during primary crystallization.The results show that, the as-prepared ribbons are fully amorphous and homogeneous in the micron scale, but contain high density of quenched-in clusters or crystallite embryos. Primary crystallization mainly leads to formation of two-phase mixture of α-Al crystal and residual amorphous phase. The annealed ribbons exposed isothermally at 110℃f or 5, 130 minutes and heated continuously up to less than 310℃ at 40℃/min consist of large amount of α-Al fcc crystal nanoparticles dispersed uniformly in an amorphous matrix. However, a very little amount of finer orthorhombie Al3Ni intermetalics particles exist in the annealed ribbons heated up to 310℃. During primary crystallization, the leading kinetic mechanics to impede growth of the α-Al crystal is soft impingement, instead of geometrie impingement.

  15. The neural elements in the lining of the ventricular-subventricular zone: making an old story new by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerle, Carlos Alexandre Dos Santos; Nogueira, Maria Inês; Watanabe, Ii-Sei

    2015-01-01

    The classical description of the neural elements that compose the lining of brain ventricles introduces us to the single layer of ependymal cells. However, new findings, especially in the lateral ventricle (LV)-the major niche for the generation of new neurons in the adult brain-have provided information about additional cell elements that influence the organization of this part of the ventricular system and produce important contributions to neurogenesis. To complement the cell neurochemistry findings, we present a three-dimensional in situ description that demonstrates the anatomical details of the different types of ciliated cells and the innervation of these elements. After processing adult rat brains for ultrastructural analysis by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) and transmission electron microscopy, we observed a heterogeneous pattern of cilia distribution at the different poles of the LV surface. Furthermore, we describe the particular three-dimensional aspects of the ciliated cells of the LV, in addition the fiber bundles and varicose axons surrounding these cells. Therefore, we provide a unique ultrastructural description of the three-dimensional in situ organization of the LV surface, highlighting its innervation, to corroborate the available neurochemical and functional findings regarding the factors that regulate this neurogenic niche.

  16. An Examination of the Surface and Sub-Surface of Modern and Historical Platinum Photographic Prints Using Low Vacuum High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravines, Patrick; Erdman, Natasha; McElroy, Rob

    2016-08-01

    Photographic prints of platinum metal on paper supports are some of the most exquisite and expressive in the world of fine art photography. Platinum prints were produced from about 1890 to 1920 in the USA and Europe. The chemical and material nature of these valuable prints is of great interest to many who are interested in their long-term preservation, in the intersection of science and art, and in the scientific and technical study of cultural heritage. This paper presents the results of a characterization study using newer electron microscopy techniques. In this study, a low vacuum high-resolution scanning electron microscope was used to study the surface and sub-surface of historic and modern platinum and/or palladium print samples. Using environmental SEM pressures allowed us to investigate the actual top surface and sub-surface with cross-sections without any preparation; no coatings of carbon or other material. Cross-sections were prepared using an argon plasma cross-polishing system. This study shows that the photographic image of platinum prints is composed of platinum nanoparticles embedded in the upper layers of the paper's cellulosic fibers.

  17. Electron collisions by metal atom vapours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, B.P. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia)]. E-mail: bratislav.marinkovic@phy.bg.ac.yu; Pejcev, V. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Kragujevac (Serbia); Filipovic, D.M. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Sevic, D. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia); Milisavljevic, S. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia); Predojevic, B. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 68, 11080, Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Banja Luka, Republic of Srpska (Bosnia and Herzegowina)

    2007-03-15

    Differential cross sections (DCS) for the elastic electron scattering and electron excitation of metal atom vapours are presented and discussed. Absolute scale was obtained by normalization procedure where generalized oscillator strengths were fitted to terminate at forward scattering function which leads to optical oscillator strength at zero momentum transfer. DCSs are compared with other available experimental and theoretical results and their importance for our understanding of basic electron atom interactions is pointed out.

  18. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of the 1s{sup 2}3lnl' Be-like series in oxygen and neon. Test of theoretical data: II. Experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A; Moretto-Capelle, P; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D [Laboratoire CAR-IRSAMC, UMR 5589 CNRS - Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2003-01-14

    A complete and accurate experimental test of theoretical spectroscopic data sets (state positions, lifetimes) available for the n=3-5 terms of the 1s{sup 2}3lnl' Rydberg series of oxygen and neon ions is presented in a series of two papers. This result was achieved by fitting our high-resolution electron spectra with post-collisional lineshapes calculated with the help of these spectroscopic data. In this second paper we apply the fitting procedure described in the preceding companion paper (I) to the analysis of high-resolution electron spectra measured in O{sup 6+} (1s{sup 2}) + He, H{sub 2} and Ne{sup 8+} (1s{sup 2}) + He collisional systems at 10 qkeV collision energy (q is the ion charge). Singlet states alone are found to be excited in oxygen; they also explain most of the neon lines; in the latter case a possible contribution of triplet states is discussed. Many 1s{sup 2}3lnl' {sup 1}L transitions are identified for the first time. A quantitative comparison between measured and calculated positions clearly points to the best theoretical data currently available. Finally, a first identification of some 4l4l' {sup 1}L transitions observed in the neon spectrum is also proposed. From this huge spectroscopic work, we extract the first experimental partial branching ratios for autoionization into the 1s{sup 2}2l ionization continua for a large number of 1s{sup 2}3lnl' {sup 1}L states, which are compared with the total ones calculated by other authors; we deduce that populations of |M{sub L} vertical bar = 0 and 1 magnetic sublevels are nearly identical. The double-capture process is also briefly characterized by comparing relative populations of many n=3-5 states; it is found that the same states are populated in O{sup 6+} +H{sub 2} and Ne{sup 8+} +He collisional systems with the same relative populations.

  19. Determination of Electron Collision Cross Sections Set for Tetramethysilane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-Claude BORDAGE

    2007-01-01

    A swarm analysis technique based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation is used to derive low energy electron collision cross sections for tetramethylsilane (TMS).The calculated swarm parameters with this first available cross sections set is consistent with measured values of the swarm parameters.Calculations of transport parameters in mixtures of TMS with argon are also presented.

  20. Single ionization and electron capture in He2++Na collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, S; Olson, RE; Ott, H; Hasan, VG; Morgenstern, R; Hoekstra, R

    2005-01-01

    Single-electron capture and ionization in He2+ + Na collisions at energies around the matching velocity (2-13 keV amu(-1)) have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. State-selective cross section for capture into the n = 2, 3, 4 and n >= 5, and the ionization cross section as well as d

  1. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND EXCITATION IN HE-2+-NA COLLISIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHLATMANN, AR; HOEKSTRA, R; FOLKERTS, HO; MORGENSTERN, R

    1992-01-01

    State-selective charge transfer and target excitation in collisions of He2+ ions with Na has been studied by means of far ultraviolet and visible light spectroscopy. Generally, the experimental results confirm the theoretical predictions by Shingal, Noble and Bransden for electron capture and for

  2. Ultra high resolution tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  3. High Resolution Acoustical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    1028 (September 1982). 26 G. Arfken , Mathematical Methods for Physicists (Academic Press, New York, 1971), 2nd printing, pp.662-666. 27 W. R. Hahn...difference in the approach used by the two methods , as noted in the previous paragraph, forming a direct mathematical com- parison may be impossible...examines high resolution methods which use a linear array to locate stationary objects which have scattered the fressure waves. Several;- new methods

  4. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of nanostructures in SnO 2 thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. W.; Lai, J. K. L.; Shek, C. H.

    2005-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to grow nanocrystalline SnO 2 thin films onto glass substrates. The nanocrystallites and microstructures in SnO 2 thin films grown by PLD techniques have been investigated in detail by using X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The PLD process was carried out at room temperature under a working pressure of about 2×10 -6 mbar. Experimental results indicate that thin films are composed of a polycrystalline SnO 2 and an amorphous SnO phase. In particular, the presence of such an amorphous SnO phase in the thin films greatly limits their practical use as gas-sensing devices. HRTEM observations revealed that SnO 2 nanocrystallites with tetragonal rutile structure embed in an amorphous SnO matrix, which are approximatively equiaxed. These approximatively equiaxed SnO 2 nanocrystallites contain a high density of defects, such as twin boundaries and edge dislocations. The grain growth of SnO 2 thin films may be discussed in terms of the coalescent particle growth mechanism.

  5. Evaluation of stacking faults and associated partial dislocations in AlSb/GaAs (001 interface by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The stacking faults (SFs in an AlSb/GaAs (001 interface were investigated using a 300 kV spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. The structure and strain distribution of the single and intersecting (V-shaped SFs associated with partial dislocations (PDs were characterized by the [110] HRTEM images and geometric phase analysis, respectively. In the biaxial strain maps εxx and εyy, a SF can be divided into several sections under different strain states (positive or negative strain values. Furthermore, the strain state for the same section of a SF is in contrast to each other in εxx and εyy strain maps. The modification in the strain states was attributed to the variation in the local atomic displacements for the SF in the AlSb film on the GaAs substrate recorded in the lattice image. Finally, the single SF was found to be bounded by two 30° PDs. A pair of 30° PDs near the heteroepitaxial interface reacted to form a Lomer-Cottrell sessile dislocation located at the vertices of V-shaped SFs with opposite screw components. The roles of misfit dislocations, such as the PDs, in strain relaxation were also discussed.

  6. Effect of hydrogenation, low energy ion irradiation and annealing on hydrogen bonding to polycrystalline diamond surface studied by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelson, S.; Ternyak, O.; Akhvlediani, R.; Hoffman, A. [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Technion, Israeli Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Lafosse, A.; Bertin, M.; Azria, R. [Paris-Sud Univ. et CNRS, Lab. des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2007-09-15

    The effects of different processes of hydrogenation, thermal treatment and ion irradiation of hydrogenated polycrystalline diamond surface have been investigated by means of high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS). Analysis of the different contributions in the CH stretching, overtones and combination modes, as well as changes in relative intensities of the diamond CC and CH{sub x} related vibrations allowed us to identify the CH{sub x} adsorbed species on the diamond surface following the different treatments. Ex-situ hydrogenation of diamond surface by means of exposure to H-MW plasma results in a fully hydrogenated well-ordered diamond surface and etching of the amorphous phase located on the grain boundaries present on the sample after CVD-deposition. Annealing this surface to 600 C results in some subtle changes in the HR-EELS, probably associated with decomposition of CH{sub x} (x=2,3) adsorbed species. Ion irradiation on the surface induces partial desorption of hydrogen from the diamond phase and a large amount of amorphous defects, some of them of sp and the most of them of sp{sup 2} character. Annealing to 600-700 C of the irradiated surface leads to hydrogen desorption. In-situ hydrogenation of the irradiated and annealed sample does not restore the diamond structure, and results in hydrogenated amorphous surface, unstable with thermal annealing above 600-700 C. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Ion formation upon electron collisions with valine embedded in helium nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Nikolaus; Ralser, Stefan; Renzler, Michael; Harnisch, Martina; Kaiser, Alexander; Denifl, Stefan; Böhme, Diethard K.; Scheier, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We report here experimental results for the electron ionization of large superfluid helium nanodroplets with sizes of about 105 atoms that are doped with valine and clusters of valine. Spectra of both cations and anions were monitored with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (mass resolution >4000). Clear series of peaks with valine cluster sizes up to at least 40 and spaced by the mass of a valine molecule are visible in both the cation and anion spectra. Ion efficiency curves are presented for selected cations and anions at electron energies up to about 40 eV and these provide insight into the mode of ion formation. The measured onset of 24.59 eV for cations is indicative of valine ionization by He+ whereas broad resonances at 2, 10 and 22 eV (and beyond) in the formation of anions speak to the occurrence of various modes of dissociative electron attachment by collisions with electrons or He*- and the influence of droplet size on the relative importance of these processes. Comparisons are also made with gas phase results and these provide insight into a matrix effect within the superfluid helium nanodroplet. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  8. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C D

    1979-01-01

    Recent theoretical development in the understanding of electron transfer processes is reviewed. K-K electron transfer processes are studied for projectiles (nuclear charge Z/sub B/) and targets (nuclear charge Z/sub A/) in which Z/sub A/ and Z/sub B/ range from Z/sub A/ much greater than Z/sub B/ to Z/sub A/ approx. = Z/sub B/, over the energy range 0.1 < v/v/sub e/ < 2. (GHT)

  9. High-resolution electron attachment to the molecules CCl{sub 4} and SF{sub 6} over extended energy ranges with the (EX)LPA method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, M; Marienfeld, S; Ruf, M-W; Hotop, H [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universitaet, D-67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany)], E-mail: hotop@physik.uni-kl.de

    2009-06-28

    Using a variant of the laser photoelectron attachment (LPA) method with an extended energy range (EXLPA), we have studied low-energy electron attachment to the molecules CCl{sub 4} (Cl{sup -} and Cl{sup -}{sub 2} formation) and SF{sub 6} (SF{sup -}{sub 6} and SF{sup -}{sub 5} formation) in a diffuse gas target (T{sub G} = 300 K) from 0 eV up to 2 eV at energy widths down to 14 meV. In the EXLPA method, pulses of near-zero energy photoelectrons are produced in a guiding magnetic field, accelerated by a weak electric field, brought to the energy of interest prior to their traversal through the target region and subsequently accelerated and deflected onto a detecting plate. Anions due to electron attachment are extracted by a pulsed electric field, during which the photoelectron current is interrupted, and detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The EXLPA anion yields are combined with absolute cross sections, obtained at very high resolution ({approx}1 meV) with the LPA method over the range 0-0.17 eV, to yield new recommended absolute partial and total attachment cross sections over the range 0-2 eV at the well-defined gas temperature T{sub G} = 300 K. Our cross sections show characteristic deviations from previously reported results. At least in part, these differences can be attributed to the fact that in the earlier electron beam experiments the gas temperature was higher than 300 K. For SF{sub 6}, the branching fractions for SF{sup -}{sub 5} formation at electron energies 0.002-0.43 eV and for different initial rovibrational distributions are compared with those recently predicted from kinetic modelling within the framework of statistical unimolecular rate theory. Satisfactory agreement is observed, but our data provide evidence that an additional path for producing SF{sup -}{sub 6} and SF{sup -}{sub 5} ions is available at electron energies above about 0.3 eV.

  10. Unconventional Specimen Preparation Techniques Using High Resolution Low Voltage Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy to Study Cell Motility, Host Cell Invasion, and Internal Cell Structures in Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Heide; Ris, Hans

    2002-04-01

    Apicomplexan parasites employ complex and unconventional mechanisms for cell locomotion, host cell invasion, and cell division that are only poorly understood. While immunofluorescence and conventional transmission electron microscopy have been used to answer questions about the localization of some cytoskeletal proteins and cell organelles, many questions remain unanswered, partly because new methods are needed to study the complex interactions of cytoskeletal proteins and organelles that play a role in cell locomotion, host cell invasion, and cell division. The choice of fixation and preparation methods has proven critical for the analysis of cytoskeletal proteins because of the rapid turnover of actin filaments and the dense spatial organization of the cytoskeleton and its association with the complex membrane system. Here we introduce new methods to study structural aspects of cytoskeletal motility, host cell invasion, and cell division of Toxoplasma gondii, a most suitable laboratory model that is representative of apicomplexan parasites. The novel approach in our experiments is the use of high resolution low voltage field emission scanning electron microscopy (LVFESEM) combined with two new specimen preparation techniques. The first method uses LVFESEM after membrane extraction and stabilization of the cytoskeleton. This method allows viewing of actin filaments which had not been possible with any other method available so far. The second approach of imaging the parasite's ultrastructure and interactions with host cells uses semithick sections (200 nm) that are resin de-embedded (Ris and Malecki, 1993) and imaged with LVFESEM. This method allows analysis of structural detail in the parasite before and after host cell invasion and interactions with the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole as well as parasite cell division.

  11. Local symmetry breaking of a thin crystal structure of β-Si3N4 as revealed by spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwang Su; Zhang, Zaoli; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-06-01

    This report is an extension of the study for structural imaging of 5-6 nm thick β-Si(3)N(4) [0001] crystal with a spherical aberration corrected transmission electron microscope by Zhang and Kaiser [2009. Structure imaging of β-Si(3)N(4) by spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Ultramicroscopy 109, 1114-1120]. In this work, a local symmetry breaking with an uneven resolution of dumbbells in the six-membered rings revealed in the reported images in the study of Zhang and Kaiser has been analyzed in detail. It is found that this local asymmetry in the image basically is not relevant to a slight mistilt of the specimen and/or a beam tilt (coma). Rather the certain variation of the tetrahedral bond length of Si-N(4) in the crystal structure is found to be responsible for the uneven resolution with a local structural variation from region to region. This characteristic of the variation is also supposed to give a distorted lattice of apparently 2°-2.5° deviations from the perfect hexagonal unit cell as observed in the reported image in the work of Zhang and Kaiser. It is discussed that this variation may prevail only in a thin specimen with a thickness ranging ~≤ 5-6 nm. At the same time, it is noted that the average of the bond length variation is close to the fixed length known in a bulk crystal of β-Si(3)N(4).

  12. High-Resolution Faraday Rotation and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Surface States of the Bulk-Insulating Topological Insulator Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Tse, Wang-Kong; Brahlek, M; Morris, C M; Aguilar, R Valdés; Koirala, N; Oh, S; Armitage, N P

    2015-11-20

    We have utilized time-domain magnetoterahertz spectroscopy to investigate the low-frequency optical response of the topological insulator Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} and Bi_{2}Se_{3} films. With both field and frequency dependence, such experiments give sufficient information to measure the mobility and carrier density of multiple conduction channels simultaneously. We observe sharp cyclotron resonances (CRs) in both materials. The small amount of Cu incorporated into the Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} induces a true bulk insulator with only a single type of conduction with a total sheet carrier density of ~4.9×10^{12}/cm^{2} and mobility as high as 4000 cm^{2}/V·s. This is consistent with conduction from two virtually identical topological surface states (TSSs) on the top and bottom of the film with a chemical potential ~145 meV above the Dirac point and in the bulk gap. The CR broadens at high fields, an effect that we attribute to an electron-phonon interaction. This assignment is supported by an extended Drude model analysis of the zero-field Drude conductance. In contrast, in normal Bi_{2}Se_{3} films, two conduction channels were observed, and we developed a self-consistent analysis method to distinguish the dominant TSSs and coexisting trivial bulk or two-dimensional electron gas states. Our high-resolution Faraday rotation spectroscopy on Cu_{0.02}Bi_{2}Se_{3} paves the way for the observation of quantized Faraday rotation under experimentally achievable conditions to push the chemical potential in the lowest Landau level.

  13. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described.

  14. Saturn's rings - high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 2 obtained this high-resolution picture of Saturn's rings Aug. 22, when the spacecraft was 4 million kilometers (2.5 million miles) away. Evident here are the numerous 'spoke' features, in the B-ring; their very sharp, narrow appearance suggests short formation times. Scientists think electromagnetic forces are responsible in some way for these features, but no detailed theory has been worked out. Pictures such as this and analyses of Voyager 2's spoke movies may reveal more clues about the origins of these complex structures. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  15. Relativistic collision rate calculations for electron-air interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, G. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roussel-Dupre, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Space Science and Technologies

    1992-12-16

    The most recent data available on differential cross sections for electron-air interactions are used to calculate the avalanche, momentum transfer, and energy loss rates that enter into the fluid equations. Data for the important elastic, inelastic, and ionizing processes are generally available out to electron energies of 1--10 kev. Prescriptions for extending these cross sections to the relativistic regime are presented. The angular dependence of the cross sections is included where data is available as is the doubly differential cross section for ionizing collisions. The collision rates are computed by taking moments of the Boltzmann collision integrals with the assumption that the electron momentum distribution function is given by the Juettner distribution function which satisfies the relativistic H- theorem and which reduces to the familiar Maxwellian velocity distribution in the nonrelativistic regime. The distribution function is parameterized in terms of the electron density, mean momentum, and thermal energy and the rates are therefore computed on a two-dimensional grid as a function of mean kinetic energy and thermal energy.

  16. Collisions between low-energy electrons and small polyatomic targets of biological relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Leigh

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, cross section measurements and calculations for DNA prototype molecules have received significant attention from the collisions community, due to the potential applications of this data in modelling electron transport through biological matter with a view to improving radiation dosimetry. Such data are additionally interesting from a fundamental aspect, as small carbon-based molecules are ideal targets for considering effects including target conformation, long-range dynamical interactions and coupling effects between the various degrees of freedom on the scattering properties of the target. At the California State University Fullerton, we have made a series of measurements of the elastic, vibrationally inelastic and electronically inelastic cross sections for a variety of small polyatomic targets, including water and the basic alcohols, ethylene, toluene and several fluorinated alkanes. These processes are important in a range of applications, primarily for modelling electron transport and thermalization, and energy deposition to a biological media. The data were obtained using a high resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer, operating in a crossed beam configuration with a moveable aperture gas source. The gas source design facilitates both an expedient and highly accurate method of removing background signal, and removes uncertainties from the data due to uncertainties in the beam profile. We have also performed scattering calculations employing the Schwinger Multichannel method, in collaboration with the California institute of technology, to compare with our measurements. In this talk, I will present an overview of our recent data and future research plans.

  17. Medical high-resolution image sharing and electronic whiteboard system: A pure-web-based system for accessing and discussing lossless original images in telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Ying; Chen, Xin; Yang, Sheng; Gao, Peng; Liu, Hongjun; Feng, Zhengquan; Nian, Yongjian; Qiu, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    There are various medical image sharing and electronic whiteboard systems available for diagnosis and discussion purposes. However, most of these systems ask clients to install special software tools or web plug-ins to support whiteboard discussion, special medical image format, and customized decoding algorithm of data transmission of HRIs (high-resolution images). This limits the accessibility of the software running on different devices and operating systems. In this paper, we propose a solution based on pure web pages for medical HRIs lossless sharing and e-whiteboard discussion, and have set up a medical HRI sharing and e-whiteboard system, which has four-layered design: (1) HRIs access layer: we improved an tile-pyramid model named unbalanced ratio pyramid structure (URPS), to rapidly share lossless HRIs and to adapt to the reading habits of users; (2) format conversion layer: we designed a format conversion engine (FCE) on server side to real time convert and cache DICOM tiles which clients requesting with window-level parameters, to make browsers compatible and keep response efficiency to server-client; (3) business logic layer: we built a XML behavior relationship storage structure to store and share users' behavior, to keep real time co-browsing and discussion between clients; (4) web-user-interface layer: AJAX technology and Raphael toolkit were used to combine HTML and JavaScript to build client RIA (rich Internet application), to meet clients' desktop-like interaction on any pure webpage. This system can be used to quickly browse lossless HRIs, and support discussing and co-browsing smoothly on any web browser in a diversified network environment. The proposal methods can provide a way to share HRIs safely, and may be used in the field of regional health, telemedicine and remote education at a low cost.

  18. Influence of electron-ion collisions on Buneman instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    Buneman instability (BI) [1] has been found to play a role in many scenarios in space physics and geophysics. It has also been invoked to explain many phenomena in the earth ionosphere [2] and in the solar chromosphere [3]. In double-layer and collisionless shock physics the same instability has been found responsible in formation of nonlinear structures [4]. In situations where an electron beam enters plasma, like in the fast ignition scenario for inertial fusion [5], Buneman modes are excited and play essential role [6]. BI is caused by motion of plasma electrons against ions. However, up to now investigations on BI did not take into account influence collisions in plasma (for quantum case a paper has recently appeared [7]). Influence of collisions may be very important especially in dense fully ionized plasma with long distance character of interaction. Particularly collisions lead to energy dissipation with an array of ensuing effects e.g. change of the instability physical nature to that of dissipative type [8]. Due to role of BI in various processes in space (and laboratory) plasma necessity of the consideration is long overdue. Absence of investigations on a problem along with its importance may be explained by its complexity only. For given case correct consideration should be based on solution of transport equation with collisional term. In fully ionized plasma correct description of collisions is given by Landau collision integral (LCI) [9]. This is very complex formation. It greatly complicates transport equation and actually makes it intractable. Since its formulation in 1936, there is very little literature on solution of the transport equation with LCI. Almost all successful attempts to accommodate influence of collisions on various processes in plasma are based on BGK model [10]. This model is much simpler. However in fully ionized plasma usage LCI is more appropriate as it is designed for system with long distance character of particle interaction

  19. Results from Electron-Positron Collisions at BESIII

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, R E

    2016-01-01

    A selection of results from electron-positron collisions at BESIII are reviewed. The results presented here illustrate the wide range of physics topics that can be studied using the Beijing Electron Positron Collider~(BEPC). At low collision energies, the cross section for $e^+e^-\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ provides much-needed input into theoretical calculations of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the reaction $e^+e^-\\to p\\bar{p}$ provides access to the electromagnetic form factors of the proton. In the charmonium region, a large sample of $\\psi^\\prime$ decays can be used to measure new decay modes of charmonium states. And at higher energies, BESIII is uniquely situated to explore questions concerning the still-unexplained $XYZ$ states.

  20. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brünken, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limita...

  1. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC PROBES OF CHEMICAL DYNAMICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HALL, G.E.

    2006-05-30

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics group program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopic tools are developed and applied to problems in chemical dynamics. Recent topics have included the state-resolved studies of collision-induced electronic energy transfer, dynamics of barrierless unimolecular reactions, and the kinetics and spectroscopy of transient species.

  2. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Jiang, Jun; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-05-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270-1480 MPa.

  3. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO{sub 2}: The effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M.; Powell, Amber L.; Mitchell, Deborah G.; Sevy, Eric T., E-mail: esevy@byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States)

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO{sub 2} and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm{sup −1}) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E′ = ∼41 000 cm{sup −1} was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S{sub 1}→S{sub 0}*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO{sub 2} via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO{sub 2} using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO{sub 2} were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E′), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E′) was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E′) and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E′) and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E′). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  4. Convergent Close-Coupling Approach to Electron-Atom Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Igor; Stelbovics, Andris

    2007-01-01

    It was with great pleasure and honour to accept the invitation to make a presentation at the symposium celebrating the life-long work of Aaron Temkin and Richard Drachman. The work of Aaron Temkin was particularly influential on our own during the development of the CCC method for electron-atom collisions. There are a number of key problems that need to be dealt with when developing a general computational approach to such collisions. Traditionally, the electron energy range was subdivided into the low, intermediate, and high energies. At the low energies only a finite number of channels are open and variational or close-coupling techniques could be used to obtain accurate results. At high energies an infinite number of discrete channels and the target continuum are open, but perturbative techniques are able to yield accurate results. However, at the intermediate energies perturbative techniques fail and computational approaches need to be found for treating the infinite number of open channels. In addition, there are also problems associated with the identical nature of electrons and the difficulty of implementing the boundary conditions for ionization processes. The beauty of the Temkin-Poet model of electron-hydrogen scattering is that it simplifies the full computational problem by neglecting any non-zero orbital angular momenta in the partial-wave expansion, without loosing the complexity associated with the above-mentioned problems. The unique nature of the problem allowed for accurate solution leading to benchmark results which could then be used to test the much more general approaches to electron-atom collision problems. The immense value of the Temkin-Poet model is readily summarised by the fact that the initial papers of Temkin and Poet have been collectively cited around 250 times to date and are still being cited in present times. Many of the citations came from our own work during the course of the development of the CCC method, which we now describe.

  5. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled 1,1 '-Diphenylethylene: Electronically Excited and Ionic States of a Prototypical Cross-Conjugated System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolarek, S.; Vdovin, A.; Rijs, A.; van Walree, C. A.; Zgierski, M. Z.; Buma, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated pi-system, 1,1'-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio calculations

  6. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1,1 '-diphenylethylene: electronically excited and ionic states of a prototypical cross-conjugated system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolarek, S.; Vdovin, A.; Rijs, A.; van Walree, C.A.; Zgierski, M.Z.; Buma, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated π-system, 1,1′-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio calculations. We f

  7. Single electron capture in fast ion-atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojević, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Single-electron capture cross sections in collisions between fast bare projectiles and heliumlike atomic systems are investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born (CB1-4B) approximation. The prior and post transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of twodimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. The dielectronic interaction V12 = 1/r12 = 1/|r1 - r2| explicitly appears in the complete perturbation potential Vf of the post transition probability amplitude T+if. An illustrative computation is performed involving state-selective and total single capture cross sections for the p - He (prior and post form) and He2+, Li3+Be4+B5+C6+ - He (prior form) collisions at intermediate and high impact energies. We have also studied differential cross sections in prior and post form for single electron transfer from helium by protons. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. Detailed comparisons with the measurements are carried out and the obtained theoretical cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  8. Stacking disorder in silicon carbide supported cobalt crystallites: an X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, H E; de Villiers, J P R; Tuling, A; Olivier, E J

    2016-11-21

    Supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts are characteristically nanoparticulate and the reduced SiC supported catalyst was found to contain both HCP and FCC polymorphs. This is reflected in the powder XRD patterns and generally there is a poor fit between the experimental and calculated diffractograms. This was ascribed to small crystallite sizes and the occurrence of disorder, manifested as peak broadening and peak shifts. Selected area electron diffraction data of suitably oriented cobalt catalyst grains on silicon carbide supports show non-periodic disorder in the zone axis orientations that contain the common (001) (HCP) and (111) (FCC) reciprocal lattice planes. Both FCC and HCP polymorphs are present in the same grains and these show disorder mainly in the HCP component. The disorder is further examined using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution and the stacking sequences elucidated. Random sequences of mainly FCC are interrupted by HCP sequences and twin surfaces with reverse stacking sequences are also present. This study highlights the presence of significant disorder in cobalt catalyst grains confirmed by HAADF microscopy.

  9. Search for excited electrons in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania)]|[Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full e{sup {+-}}p data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb{sup -1}. The electroweak decays of excited electrons e{sup *} {yields}e{gamma}, e{sup *} {yields}eZ and e{sup *} {yields}{nu}W with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for excited electron production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on e{sup *} production cross sections and on the ratio f/{lambda} of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited electron searches. The e{sup *} production via contact interactions is also addressed for the first time in ep collisions. (orig.)

  10. Propagation and oblique collision of electron-acoustic solitons in two-electron-populated quantum plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Akbari-Moghanjoughi; N Ahmadzadeh-Khosroshahi

    2011-08-01

    Oblique interaction of small- but finite-amplitude KdV-type electron-acoustic solitary excitations is examined in an unmagnetized two-electron-populated degenerate quantum electron–ion plasma in the framework of quantum hydrodynamics model using the extended Poincaré–Lighthill–Kuo (PLK) perturbation method. Critical plasma parameter is found to distinguish the types of solitons and their interaction phase-shifts. It is shown that, depending on the critical quantum diffraction parameter cr, both compressive and rarefactive solitary excitations may exist in this plasma and their collision phase-shifts can be either positive or negative for the whole range of collision angles 0 < θ < .

  11. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  12. Will Allis Prize Talk: Electron Collisions - Experiment, Theory and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, and molecules represent one of the very early topics of quantum mechanics. In spite of the field's maturity, a number of recent developments in detector technology (e.g., the ``reaction microscope'' or the ``magnetic-angle changer'') and the rapid increase in computational resources have resulted in significant progress in the measurement, understanding, and theoretical/computational description of few-body Coulomb problems. Close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists worldwide continue to produce high-quality benchmark data, which allow for thoroughly testing and further developing a variety of theoretical approaches. As a result, it has now become possible to reliably calculate the vast amount of atomic data needed for detailed modelling of the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres, the interpretation of astrophysical data, optimizing the energy transport in reactive plasmas, and many other topics - including light-driven processes, in which electrons are produced by continuous or short-pulse ultra-intense electromagnetic radiation. In this talk, I will highlight some of the recent developments that have had a major impact on the field. This will be followed by showcasing examples, in which accurate electron collision data enabled applications in fields beyond traditional AMO physics. Finally, open problems and challenges for the future will be outlined. I am very grateful for fruitful scientific collaborations with many colleagues, and the long-term financial support by the NSF through the Theoretical AMO and Computational Physics programs, as well as supercomputer resources through TeraGrid and XSEDE.

  13. Electronic transitions in highly charged ion-atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Ullrich, J.; Schuch, R.; Olson, R. E.; Dörner, R.

    1989-09-01

    Three different aspects of electronic transitions in fast, highly charged ion-atom collisions are discussed. First, experimental data and n-CTMC calculations for differential multiple ionization cross sections of 1.4 {MeV}/{u} U 32+on rare gas atoms are presented. It is shown that the electronic motion has a dramatic influence on the kinematics of the emitted particles (in particular the nuclei). The possibility is discussed to measure in fast ionizing processes by a recoil ion-projectile coincidence technique the internal sum momentum of "electron clusters" in atoms. This new "technique" opens a new field of atomic structure research at high-energy heavy-ion accelerators. Second, the use of the H-like heavy ions as projectiles is discussed to measure, through observable interference structures, static and dynamic properties of transiently formed superheavy quasimolecular systems. Third, the "ancient" gas target-solid target difference in the impact-parameter dependence of K-shell ionization in nearly symmetric ion-atom collisions is presented. This severe discrepancy between gas and solid still remains an unsolved fundamental problem in the field of inner-shell ionization in the MO regime.

  14. Elliptic flow of inclusive electrons in Pb-Pb collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheid, Sebastian; Bailhache, Raphaelle; Rascanu, Theodor; Appelshaeuser, Harald [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The main purpose of ALICE at the LHC is to investigate the properties of the deconfined state of strongly-interacting matter produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Since heavy quarks, i.e. charm and beauty, are produced on a shorter time scale with respect to the hot fireball, they are suited to probe the interaction dynamics inside the medium. Heavy-flavour hadrons can be measured via their semi-electronic decays at mid-rapidity with ALICE. The heavy-flavour elliptic flow, the second harmonic in the Fourier expansion of the particle azimuthal distribution, is an observable sensitive to the degree of thermalization of charm and beauty quarks in the medium at low p{sub T}, as well as to the path length dependence of the energy loss of heavy quarks at high p{sub T}. In this poster, I will show how the elliptic flow of inclusive electrons is measured with the event-plane method in 20-40% central Pb-Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV. Electrons are identified with the Time-Projection-Chamber and the Time-Of-Flight in the central barrel in the p{sub T} range 1.5-6 GeV/c. The estimation of the remaining hadron contamination will be presented as well as a possible way to subtract this contribution to the elliptic flow.

  15. Dipolar dissociation dynamics in electron collisions with carbon monoxide

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Dipayan; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2016-01-01

    Dipolar dissociation processes in the electron collisions with carbon monoxide have been studied using time of flight (TOF) mass spectroscopy in combination with the highly differential velocity slice imaging (VSI) technique. Probing ion-pair states both positive and/or negative ions may be detected. The ion yield curve of negative ions provides the threshold energy for the ion-pair production. On the other hand, the kinetic energy distributions and angular distributions of the fragment anion provide detailed dynamics of the dipolar dissociation process. Two ion-pair states have been identified based on angular distribution measurements using VSI technique.

  16. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  17. Development of a new experimental setup for studying collisions of keV-electrons with thick and thin targets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Singh; R K Mohanta; R Hippler; R Shanker

    2002-03-01

    Development of a new electron-recoil ion/photon coincidence setup for investigating some of the electron induced collision processes, such as electron bremsstrahlung, electron backscattering, innershell excitation and multiple ionization of target atoms/molecules in bombardment of electrons having energies from 2.0 keV to 30.0 keV with solid and gaseous targets is described. The new features include the use of a compact multipurpose scattering chamber, a time-of-flight spectrometer for detection of multiply charged target ions, a 45°-parallel plate electrostatic analyzer for measuring energy and angle of the ejected electrons, a room temperature high resolution Si-PIN photo diode X-ray detector for counting the collisionally induced photons, a coincidence data acquisition system consisting of a 200 MHz Pentium based 8K-multichannel analyzer and a standard network of a fast/slow coincidence electronics. In particular, the details of design, fabrication and assembly of indigenous components employed in the setup are presented. Selected experiments planned with the setup are mentioned and briefly discussed. A report on performance, optimization, efficiency, time resolution etc. of the time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer and that of the 45°-parallel plate electrostatic analyzer (PPEA) is presented. Test spectra of electron-recoil ion coincidences, energy distribution of ejected electrons and characteristic plus non-characteristic X-ray spectrum are illustrated to exhibit the satisfactory performance of the developed setup.

  18. Multiple Electron Capture Processes in Slow Collisions of Ar9+ Ions with Na Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuXiaolong; ShaShan; LiuHuiping; WeiBaoren; MaXinwen; WangZhengling; CaoShiping; QianDongbing; YangZhihu

    2003-01-01

    Slow collisions of highly charged ions with neutral atoms and molecules are of great importance in basic atomic collision physics, Recently, we built a new research facility for atomic physics at the Institute of Modern Physics. We report here the multiple electron transfer processes in collisions of Ar9+ with Na gas target at energy of 180 keV.

  19. Evidence for anisotropic dielectric properties of monoclinic hafnia using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedj, C. [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Hung, L.; Sottile, F. [LSI, CNRS, CEA, École Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) (France); Zobelli, A. [LPS, CNRS and University Paris Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Blaise, P. [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) (France); Olevano, V. [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanocrystal orientation on the energy loss spectra of monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO{sub 2}) is measured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and valence energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) on high quality samples. For the same momentum-transfer directions, the dielectric properties are also calculated ab initio by time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Experiments and simulations evidence anisotropy in the dielectric properties of m-HfO{sub 2}, most notably with the direction-dependent oscillator strength of the main bulk plasmon. The anisotropic nature of m-HfO{sub 2} may contribute to the differences among VEELS spectra reported in literature. The good agreement between the complex dielectric permittivity extracted from VEELS with nanometer spatial resolution, TDDFT modeling, and past literature demonstrates that the present HRTEM-VEELS device-oriented methodology is a possible solution to the difficult nanocharacterization challenges given in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  20. Evidence for anisotropic dielectric properties of monoclinic hafnia using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedj, C.; Hung, L.; Zobelli, A.; Blaise, P.; Sottile, F.; Olevano, V.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanocrystal orientation on the energy loss spectra of monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO2) is measured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and valence energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) on high quality samples. For the same momentum-transfer directions, the dielectric properties are also calculated ab initio by time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Experiments and simulations evidence anisotropy in the dielectric properties of m-HfO2, most notably with the direction-dependent oscillator strength of the main bulk plasmon. The anisotropic nature of m-HfO2 may contribute to the differences among VEELS spectra reported in literature. The good agreement between the complex dielectric permittivity extracted from VEELS with nanometer spatial resolution, TDDFT modeling, and past literature demonstrates that the present HRTEM-VEELS device-oriented methodology is a possible solution to the difficult nanocharacterization challenges given in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  1. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]. [Pennsylvania State Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He[sup +] collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential.

  2. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Geloni, Gianluca [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Madsen, Anders [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Shvyd’ko, Yuri, E-mail: shvydko@aps.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sutter, John [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-12

    This article explores novel opportunities for ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) at high-repetition-rate self-seeded XFELs. These next-generation light sources are promising a more than three orders of magnitude increase in average spectral flux compared with what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. In combination with the advanced IXS spectrometer described here, this may become a real game-changer for ultra-high-resolution X-ray spectroscopies, and hence for the studies of dynamics in condensed matter systems. Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm{sup −1} spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm{sup −1} are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10{sup 12} photons s{sup −1} in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  3. Search for excited charged leptons in electron positron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Vachon, Brigitte Marie Christine; Sobie, Randall

    2002-01-01

    A search for evidence that fundamental particles are made of smaller subconstituents is performed. The existence of excited states of fundamental particles would be an unambiguous indication of their composite nature. Experimental signatures compatible with the production of excited states of charged leptons in electron-positron collisions are studied. The data analysed were collected by the OPAL detector at the LEP collider. No evidence for the existence of excited states of charged leptons was found. Upper limits on the product of the cross-section and the electromagnetic branching fraction are inferred. Using results from the search for singly produced excited leptons, upper limits on the ratio of the excited lepton coupling constant to the compositeness scale are calculated. From pair production searches, 95% confidence level lower limits on the masses of excited electrons, muons and taus are determined to be 103.2 GeV.

  4. Vlasov simulations of electron-ion collision effects on damping of electron plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, J. W., E-mail: banksj3@rpi.edu [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Brunner, S.; Tran, T. M. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Swiss Plasma Center (SPC), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Collisional effects can play an essential role in the dynamics of plasma waves by setting a minimum damping rate and by interfering with wave-particle resonances. Kinetic simulations of the effects of electron-ion pitch angle scattering on Electron Plasma Waves (EPWs) are presented here. In particular, the effects of such collisions on the frequency and damping of small-amplitude EPWs for a range of collision rates and wave phase velocities are computed and compared with theory. Both the Vlasov simulations and linear kinetic theory find the direct contribution of electron-ion collisions to wave damping significantly reduced from that obtained through linearized fluid theory. To our knowledge, this simple result has not been published before. Simulations have been carried out using a grid-based (Vlasov) approach, based on a high-order conservative finite difference method for discretizing the Fokker-Planck equation describing the evolution of the electron distribution function. Details of the implementation of the collision operator within this framework are presented. Such a grid-based approach, which is not subject to numerical noise, is of particular interest for the accurate measurements of the wave damping rates.

  5. A method to determine fault vectors in 4H-SiC from stacking sequences observed on high resolution transmission electron microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Fangzhen; Wang, Huanhuan; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael, E-mail: michael.dudley@stonybrook.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11790 (United States); Mueller, Stephan G.; Chung, Gil; Sanchez, Edward K.; Hansen, Darren; Loboda, Mark J. [Dow Corning Compound Semiconductor Solutions, Midland, Michigan 48686 (United States); Zhang, Lihua; Su, Dong; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric [Center for Functional Materials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-09-14

    A new method has been developed to determine the fault vectors associated with stacking faults in 4H-SiC from their stacking sequences observed on high resolution TEM images. This method, analogous to the Burgers circuit technique for determination of dislocation Burgers vector, involves determination of the vectors required in the projection of the perfect lattice to correct the deviated path constructed in the faulted material. Results for several different stacking faults were compared with fault vectors determined from X-ray topographic contrast analysis and were found to be consistent. This technique is expected to applicable to all structures comprising corner shared tetrahedra.

  6. Diagnosis of Unmagnetized Plasma Electron Number Density and Electron-neutral Collision Frequency by Using Microwave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Zhongcai; Shi Jiaming; Xu Bo

    2005-01-01

    The plasma diagnostic method using the transmission attenuation of microwaves at double frequencies (PDMUTAMDF) indicates that the frequency and the electron-neutral collision frequency of the plasma can be deduced by utilizing the transmission attenuation of microwaves at two neighboring frequencies in a non-magnetized plasma. Then the electron density can be obtained from the plasma frequency. The PDMUTAMDF is a simple method to diagnose the plasma indirectly. In this paper, the interaction of electromagnetic waves and the plasma is analyzed. Then, based on the attenuation and the phase shift of a microwave in the plasma, the principle of the PDMUTAMDF is presented. With the diagnostic method, the spatially mean electron density and electron collision frequency of the plasma can be obtained. This method is suitable for the elementary diagnosis of the atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  7. Failure of single electron descriptions of molecular orbital collision processes. [Electron promotion mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    Inner-shell excitation occurring in low and moderate (keV range) energy collisions between light atomic and ionic systems is frequently describable in terms of molecular promotion mechanisms, which were extensively explored both theoretically and experimentally. The bulk of such studies have concentrated on processes understandable through the use of single- and independent-electron models. Nonetheless, it is possible to find cases of inner-shell excitation in relatively simple collision systems which involve nearly simultaneous multiple-electron transitions and transitions induced by inherently two-electron interactions. Evidence for these many- and nonindependent-electron phenomena in inner-shell excitation processes and the importance of considering such effects in the interpretation of collisionally induced excitation spectra is discussed. 13 references.

  8. Ionic fragmentation channels in electron collisions of small molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Jens

    2009-01-28

    Dissociative Recombination (DR) is one of the most important loss processes of molecular ions in the interstellar medium (IM). Ion storage rings allow to investigate these processes under realistic conditions. At the Heidelberg test storage ring TSR a new detector system was installed within the present work in order to study the DR sub-process of ion pair formation (IPF). The new detector expands the existing electron target setup by the possibility to measure strongly deflected negative ionic fragments. At the TSR such measurements can be performed with a uniquely high energy resolution by independently merging two electron beams with the ion beam. In this work IPF of HD{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +} and HF{sup +} has been studied. In the case of HD{sup +} the result of the high resolution experiment shows quantum interferences. Analysis of the quantum oscillations leads to a new understanding of the reaction dynamics. For H{sub 3}{sup +} it was for the first time possible to distinguish different IPF channels and to detect quantum interferences in the data. Finally the IPF of HF{sup +} was investigated in an energy range, where in previous experiments no conclusive results could be obtained. (orig.)

  9. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Ferreira da Silva, F.; Almeida, D. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Mogi, D. [Development and Marketing Department, New Products Development Division, Kanto Denka, Kogyo Co., Ltd., Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0063 (Japan); Tanioka, T. [Shibukawa Development Research Laboratory, New Products Development Division, Kanto Denka Kogyo Co., Ltd., Shibukawa City, Gunma 377-8513 (Japan); Mason, N. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, allée de la Chimie 3, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0–10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ({sup 1}Δ←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ({sup 1}Σ{sup −}←{sup 1}Σ{sup +}) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to {sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ({sup 1}Σ{sup +} and {sup 1}Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f{sub 0} value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  10. Electronic excitation of carbonyl sulphide (COS) by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption and electron-impact spectroscopy in the energy region from 4 to 11 eV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limão-Vieira, P; Ferreira da Silva, F; Almeida, D; Hoshino, M; Tanaka, H; Mogi, D; Tanioka, T; Mason, N J; Hoffmann, S V; Hubin-Franskin, M-J; Delwiche, J

    2015-02-14

    The electronic state spectroscopy of carbonyl sulphide, COS, has been investigated using high resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy in the energy range of 4.0-10.8 eV. The spectrum reveals several new features not previously reported in the literature. Vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption dipole forbidden band assigned to the (4π←3π) ((1)Δ←(1)Σ(+)) transition, with a new weak transition assigned to ((1)Σ(-)←(1)Σ(+)) reported here for the first time. The absolute optical oscillator strengths are determined for ground state to (1)Σ(+) and (1)Π transitions. Based on our recent measurements of differential cross sections for the optically allowed ((1)Σ(+) and (1)Π) transitions of COS by electron impact, the optical oscillator strength f0 value and integral cross sections (ICSs) are derived by applying a generalized oscillator strength analysis. Subsequently, ICSs predicted by the scaling are confirmed down to 60 eV in the intermediate energy region. The measured absolute photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of carbonyl sulphide in the upper stratosphere (20-50 km).

  11. Metastable-metastable collisions in the Orsay polarized electron source by helium afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, I.

    1995-01-01

    At Orsay the current of polarized electrons produced by the optically pumped helium afterglow does not vary as the metastable density, but as the density squared. That shows that spurious electrons are mixed to the electrons emitted by chemi-ionization reaction of the polarized metastables with CO 2 gas. In this paper it is suggested that these spurious electrons are produced by metastable-metastable collisions. The contribution of these collisions to the electron current and polarization is evaluated.

  12. Computer simulation of electronic excitation in atomic collision cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvenbeck, A.

    2007-04-05

    The impact of an keV atomic particle onto a solid surface initiates a complex sequence of collisions among target atoms in a near-surface region. The temporal and spatial evolution of this atomic collision cascade leads to the emission of particles from the surface - a process usually called sputtering. In modern surface analysis the so called SIMS technology uses the flux of sputtered particles as a source of information on the microscopical stoichiometric structure in the proximity of the bombarded surface spots. By laterally varying the bombarding spot on the surface, the entire target can be scanned and chemically analyzed. However, the particle detection, which bases upon deflection in electric fields, is limited to those species that leave the surface in an ionized state. Due to the fact that the ionized fraction of the total flux of sputtered atoms often only amounts to a few percent or even less, the detection is often hampered by rather low signals. Moreover, it is well known, that the ionization probability of emitted particles does not only depend on the elementary species, but also on the local environment from which a particle leaves the surface. Therefore, the measured signals for different sputtered species do not necessarily represent the stoichiometric composition of the sample. In the literature, this phenomenon is known as the Matrix Effect in SIMS. In order to circumvent this principal shortcoming of SIMS, the present thesis develops an alternative computer simulation concept, which treats the electronic energy losses of all moving atoms as excitation sources feeding energy into the electronic sub-system of the solid. The particle kinetics determining the excitation sources are delivered by classical molecular dynamics. The excitation energy calculations are combined with a diffusive transport model to describe the spread of excitation energy from the initial point of generation. Calculation results yield a space- and time-resolved excitation

  13. Local atomic and electronic structure of oxide/GaAs and SiO2/Si interfaces using high-resolution XPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Maserjian, J.; Madhukar, A.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical structures of thin SiO2 films, thin native oxides of GaAs (20-30 A), and the respective oxide-semiconductor interfaces, have been investigated using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Depth profiles of these structures have been obtained using argon ion bombardment and wet chemical etching techniques. The chemical destruction induced by the ion profiling method is shown by direct comparison of these methods for identical samples. Fourier transform data-reduction methods based on linear prediction with maximum entropy constraints are used to analyze the discrete structure in oxides and substrates. This discrete structure is interpreted by means of a structure-induced charge-transfer model.

  14. Mutual neutralization in H+ - H- collisions by electron capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad; Belkić, Dževad

    2013-07-01

    State-selective and total cross-sections for single-electron capture from H- by H+ covering the incident energy range from 10 to 3000 keV are computed by means of the four-body boundary corrected first Born (CB1-4B) approximation. A crucial connection between the Coulomb-distorted asymptotic state in the entrance channel and the pertinent perturbation, which causes the transition in the H+ - H- collisions, is consistently used in our computations of the “prior” version of cross-sections. The obtained results from the CB1-4B method clearly outperform the earlier findings by the close-coupling methods for the same problem. Comparisons with the available measurements are carried out and excellent agreement with the CB1 method is recorded down to impact energies as low as 10 keV.

  15. Indirect Relativistic Effect in Electron-Alkali-Atom Collision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-Bao; PANG Wen-Ning; DING Hai-Bing; SHANG Ren-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present detailed studies on the differential cross section (DCS) and total cross section (TCS) in electronalkali-atom collision processes by using two types of distorted wave methods, the ordinary distorted wave method and the indirect-relativistic distorted wave method. We find that the indirect relativistic effect in the target atom can be neglected in the TCS calculation in the processes; however, with an increase of the atomic number, this effect becomes significant in the DCS calculation. Then, based on the density matrix theory, the orientation and alignment parameters of excited caesium P states scattered by electrons at low incident energy are calculated,and comparisons are made for the two series between the two methods. The results show that accordance is reached at scattering angles smaller than 45°, but considerable difference appears at angles larger than 45° due to the relativistic effect.

  16. X(16.7) Production in Electron-Positon Collision

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Long-Bin; Qiao, Cong-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The anomaly found in a recent study of excited $^8$Be decay to ground state is attributed to an unusual vector gauge boson, the X(16.7). A 17 MeV gauge boson is obviously unexpected and hard to be embedded into the particle zoo of the standard model(SM). To confirm this finding, further experimental study are necessary. In this work, the production of this yet-not-verified new boson in electron-positron collision, for instance at BaBar is evaluated, and the results are encouraging. The data collected at BESIII and BaBar turn out to be enough to perform a decisive analysis and hence give a definite answer to the existence of X(16.7).

  17. TARGET EXCITATION IN BARE ION XE/AR COLLISIONS STUDIED BY ELECTRON TARGET ION COINCIDENCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENIJS, G; HOEKSTRA, R; MORGENSTERN, R

    We present electron spectra resulting from collisions of bare ions N-15(7+) and C-13(6+) on Ar and the charge state distribution of target ions resulting from C-13(6+)-Xe collisions. From both type of experiments we find evidence that electron capture accompanied by target excitation is an important

  18. Vlasov Simulations of Electron-Ion Collision Effects on Damping of Electron Plasma Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, J W; Berger, R L; Tran, T M

    2016-01-01

    Collisional effects can play an essential role in the dynamics of plasma waves by setting a minimum damping rate and by interfering with wave-particle resonances. Kinetic simulations of the effects of electron-ion pitch angle scattering on Electron Plasma Waves (EPWs) are presented here. In particular, the effects of such collisions on the frequency and damping of small-amplitude EPWs for a range of collision rates and wave phase velocities are computed and compared with theory. Both the Vlasov simulations and linear kinetic theory find the direct contribution of electron-ion collisions to wave damping is about a factor of two smaller than is obtained from linearized fluid theory. To our knowledge, this simple result has not been published before. Simulations have been carried out using a grid-based (Vlasov) approach, based on a high-order conservative finite difference method for discretizing the Fokker-Planck equation describing the evolution of the electron distribution function. Details of the implementat...

  19. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm(-1) spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm(-1) are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10(12) photons s(-1) in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  20. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd' ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-02-12

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm-1spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm-1 are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s-1 in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  1. Two structures of Ag[sub 2[minus]x]V[sub 4]O[sub 11], determined by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zandbergen, H.W. (Delft Univ. of Technology, Rotterdamseweg (Netherlands)); Crespi, A.M.; Skarstad, P.M. (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN (United States)); Vente, J.F. (Univ. of Leiden (Netherlands))

    1994-05-01

    High resolution microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction have been applied to determine the structure and microstructure of Ag[sub 2[minus]x]V[sub 4]O[sub 11]. This compound adopts two structures. Both structures consist of V[sub 4]O[sub 11] slabs, but they differ in the way these slabs are stacked. One stacking leads to a C-centered monoclinic unit cell (C2/m) with dimensions a = 1.451(1), b = 0.35766(3), c = 0.9564(8) nm, [beta] = 128.74(1)[degrees] (Phase I) which is dominant and the other stacking to a C-centered monoclinic unit cell with dimensions a = 1.53, b = 0.360, c = 0.76 nm, [beta] = 102[degrees] (Phase II). Ion milling leads to a change in the c axis and [beta], which is suggested to be caused by a loss of Ag. Frequent stacking defects occur in the C[sup *] direction due to switching from the Phase I to the Phase II structure and due to (001) twinning.

  2. The extraction of gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using sodium citrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendariz, Veronica; Parsons, Jason G.; Lopez, Martha L.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2009-03-01

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles can be produced through the interaction of Au(III) ions with oat and wheat biomasses. This paper describes a procedure to recover gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or sodium citrate. Extracts were analyzed using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The HRTEM data demonstrated that smaller nanoparticles are extracted first, followed by larger nanoparticles. In the fourth extraction, coating of chelating agents is visible on the extracted nanoparticles.

  3. The extraction of gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using sodium citrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendariz, Veronica; Parsons, Jason G; Lopez, Martha L; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-03-11

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles can be produced through the interaction of Au(III) ions with oat and wheat biomasses. This paper describes a procedure to recover gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or sodium citrate. Extracts were analyzed using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The HRTEM data demonstrated that smaller nanoparticles are extracted first, followed by larger nanoparticles. In the fourth extraction, coating of chelating agents is visible on the extracted nanoparticles.

  4. GREECE -- Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment: High resolution rocket and ground-based investigations of small-scale auroral structure and dynamics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Methodology The methodology is based on making comparisons between downward electron flux, DC electric fields, electromagnetic waves, and auroral morphology. The...

  5. Attosecond electron-electron collision dynamics of the four-electron escape in Be close to threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Emmanouilidou, A

    2012-01-01

    We explore the escape geometry of four electrons a few eV above threshold following single-photon absorption from the ground state of Be. We find that the four electrons leave the atom on the vertices of a pyramid instead of a previously-predicted tetrahedron. To illustrate the physical mechanisms of quadruple ionization we use a momentum transferring attosecond collision scheme which we show to be in accord with the pyramid break-up pattern.

  6. Progress in electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) based high-resolution high-sensitivity x-ray detector for fluoroscopy and radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhls, Andrew T.; Yadava, Girijesh; Patel, Vikas; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2007-03-01

    A new high-resolution, high-sensitivity, low-noise x-ray detector based on EMCCDs has been developed. The EMCCD detector module consists of a 1kx1k, 8μm pixel EMCCD camera coupled to a CsI(Tl) scintillating phosphor via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Multiple modules can be used to provide the desired field-of-view (FOV). The detector is capable of acquisitions over 30fps. The EMCCD's variable gain of up to 2000x for the pixel signal enables high sensitivity for fluoroscopic applications. With a 3:1 FOT, the detector can operate with a 144μm effective pixel size, comparable to current flat-panel detectors. Higher resolutions of 96 and 48μm pixel size can also be achieved with various binning modes. The detector MTFs and DQEs were calculated using a linear-systems analysis. The zero frequency DQE was calculated to be 59% at 74 kVp. The DQE for the 144μm pixel size was shown to exhibit quantum-noise limited behavior down to ~0.1μR using a conservative 30x gain. At this low exposure, gains above 30x showed limited improvements in DQE suggesting such increased gains may not be necessary. For operation down to 48µm pixel sizes, the detector instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE), defined as the exposure where the instrumentation noise equals the quantum-noise, was flat-panel detectors for applications such as fluoroscopy and angiography requiring high frame rates, resolution, dynamic range and sensitivity while maintaining essentially no lag and very low INEE. Initial images from a prototype detector are also presented.

  7. Non-targeted analysis of electronics waste by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry: Using accurate mass information and mass defect analysis to explore the data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubukata, Masaaki; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Tao, Qingping; Hang, Jiliang; Wu, Zhanpin; Dane, A John; Cody, Robert B

    2015-05-22

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) offer the best possible separation of their respective techniques. Recent commercialization of combined GC×GC-HRMS systems offers new possibilities for the analysis of complex mixtures. However, such experiments yield enormous data sets that require new informatics tools to facilitate the interpretation of the rich information content. This study reports on the analysis of dust obtained from an electronics recycling facility by using GC×GC in combination with a new high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. New software tools for (non-traditional) Kendrick mass defect analysis were developed in this research and greatly aided in the identification of compounds containing chlorine and bromine, elements that feature in most persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In essence, the mass defect plot serves as a visual aid from which halogenated compounds are recognizable on the basis of their mass defect and isotope patterns. Mass chromatograms were generated based on specific ions identified in the plots as well as region of the plot predominantly occupied by halogenated contaminants. Tentative identification was aided by database searches, complementary electron-capture negative ionization experiments and elemental composition determinations from the exact mass data. These included known and emerging flame retardants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromobenzene, tetrabromo bisphenol A and tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), as well as other legacy contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs).

  8. Quantum-mechanical calculations of cross sections for electron collisions with atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bartschat, Klaus; Zatsarinny, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    An overview of quantum-mechanical methods to generate cross-section data for electron collisions with atoms and molecules is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on the time-independent close-coupling approach, since it is particularly suitable for low-energy collisions and also allows for systematic improvements as well as uncertainty estimates. The basic ideas are illustrated with examples for electron collisions with argon atoms and methane. For many atomic systems, such as e-Ar collisions, highly reliable cross sections can now be computed with quantified uncertainties. On the other hand, while electron collision calculations with molecules do provide key input data for plasma models, the methods and computer codes presently used require further development to make these inputs robust.

  9. Electron transport simulation in the range 1 keV-4 MeV for the purpose of high-resolution dosimetric application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobut, V. [Univ. de Cergy-Pontoise, Neuville/Oise (France). Lab. Pharmacophores Redox, Phytochimie et Radiobiologie; Cirioni, L.; Patau, J.P. [Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Faculte de Pharmacie

    2001-07-01

    Experimental spectrometry and dosimetry can offer some reliable answers. However, they are not easy to implement in some specific situations. Furthermore, information on dose distributions cannot always be obtained with the desirable geometrical resolution. A way to get rid of these disadvantages consist in simulating every successive individual interactions suffered by electrons and photons along their path. We applied this principle to simulate the response of a detector placed in the field of beta-gamma sources, which maximum energy does not exceed 4 MeV. A part of this work is presented here, which concerns Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in materials encountered in experimental dosimetric devices. Electrons were followed down to a cutoff energy of 1 keV. (orig.)

  10. HE2+-HE COLLISIONS - ONE-ELECTRON CAPTURE AND TARGET-ION EXCITATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FOLKERTS, HO; BLIEK, FW; MENG, L; OLSON, RE; MORGENSTERN, R; VONHELLERMANN, M; SUMMERS, HP; HOEKSTRA, R

    1994-01-01

    By means of photon emission spectroscopy we have studied state selective one-electron capture and target-ion excitation in collisions of He-2+ with He. The collision energy has been varied from 1 to 75 keV amu-1 Four-body classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations have been performed in the energ

  11. Universality of multiplicity distribution in proton-proton and electron-positron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bzdak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    It is argued that the multiplicity distribution in proton-proton ($pp$) collisions, which is often parameterized by the negative binomial distribution, results from the multiplicity distribution measured in electron-positron ($e^{+}e^{-}$) collisions, once the fluctuating energy carried by two leading protons in $pp$ is taken into account.

  12. High resolution digital delay timer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  13. High Resolution Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    carbon distribution as it relates to the presence of Bainite phase (with small tetragonality) interspersed among the cubic ferrite. An example of the...preferentially segregate. The view offered by these high resolution methods differs from what has been considered before: grains thought to be Bainite

  14. High-Resolution Instrumentation Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-30

    30 September 1986 Los Angeles Air Force Station 13. NUMBER OF PAGES Los Angeles, Calif. 90009-2960 36 74. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(If...TREE PLMUT ",-20 -CUTLIASS DumpER SED AN... TREE TRUNK, -0 - MERC BUMPER f - 40 H!-I -50 iI Fig. 7. High-Resolution Instrumentation Radar View of

  15. Separating spin torque and heating effects in current-induced domain wall motion probed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, F.; Klaeui, M.; Backes, D.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of domain wall motion and transformations due to injected current pulses in permalloy zigzag structures using off-axis electron holography and Lorentz microscopy are reported. Heating on membranes leads to thermally activated random behavior at low current densities and by backcoating...

  16. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of the 1s{sup 2}3lnl' Be-like series in oxygen and neon. Test of theoretical data: I. Experimental method and theoretical background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A; Moretto-Capelle, P; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D [Laboratoire CAR-IRSAMC, UMR 5589 CNRS - Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2003-01-14

    A complete and accurate experimental test of theoretical spectroscopic data sets (state positions, lifetimes) available for the n = 3-5 terms of the 1s{sup 2}3lnl' Rydberg series of oxygen and neon ions is presented in a series of two papers. This result was achieved by fitting our high resolution electron spectra with post-collisional lineshapes calculated with the help of these spectroscopic data. In this paper the method which has been developed for this fitting procedure is explained. In addition, as a first test, a comparison of all the available calculated spectroscopic data is presented and discussed. Strong deviations of transition energies and decay lifetimes are observed in many cases. Best data are selected in the following companion paper through a quantitative comparison with our experimental electron spectra.

  17. Phase-modulated electronic wave-packet interferometry reveals high resolution vibronic spectra of free Rb atoms and Rb*He molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bruder, Lukas; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Phase-modulated wave-packet interferometry is combined with mass-resolved photoion detection to investigate rubidium atoms attached to helium nanodroplets in a molecular beam experiment. The spectra of atomic Rb electronic states show a vastly enhanced sensitivity and spectral resolution when compared to conventional pump-probe wave-packet interferometry. Furthermore, the formation of Rb*He exciplex molecules is probed and for the first time a fully resolved vibrational spectrum for transitions between the lowest excited $5\\Pi_{3/2}$ and the high-lying electronic states $2^2\\Pi$, $4^2\\Delta$, $6^2\\Sigma$ is obtained and compared to theory. The feasibility of applying coherent multidimensional spectroscopy to dilute cold gas phase samples is demonstrated in these experiments.

  18. Structural characterization of Al0.55Ga0.45N epitaxial layer determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing-Jun; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Shi-Ying; Tao, Tao; Xie, Zi-Li; Xiu, Xiang-Qian; Chen, Dun-Jun; Chen, Peng; Han, Ping; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Dou

    2017-04-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Key Research and Development Project of China (Grant No. 2016YFB0400100), the Hi-tech Research Project of China (Grant Nos. 2014AA032605 and 2015AA033305), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274003, 61422401, 51461135002, and 61334009), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BY2013077, BK20141320, and BE2015111), the Project of Green Young and Golden Phenix of Yangzhou City, the Postdoctoral Sustentation Fund of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. 1501143B), the Project of Shandong Provinceial Higher Educational Science and Technology Program, China (Grant No. J13LN08), the Solid State Lighting and Energy-saving Electronics Collaborative Innovation Center, Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), and Research Funds from NJU-Yangzhou Institute of Opto-electronics.

  19. Structural studies of technetium-zirconium alloys by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy, and first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poineau, Frederic; Hartmann, Thomas; Weck, Philippe F; Kim, Eunja; Silva, G W Chinthaka; Jarvinen, Gordon D; Czerwinski, Kenneth R

    2010-02-15

    The structural properties of Tc-Zr binary alloys were investigated using combined experimental and computational approaches. The Tc(2)Zr and Tc(6)Zr samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Our XRD results show that Tc(6)Zr crystallizes in the cubic alpha-Mn-type structure (I43m space group) with a variable stoichiometry of Tc(6.25-x)Zr (0 Tc(2)Zr has a hexagonal crystal lattice with a MgZn(2)-type structure (P6(3)/mmc space group). Rietveld analysis of the powder XRD patterns and density functional calculations of the "Tc(6)Zr" phase show a linear increase of the lattice parameter when moving from Tc(6.25)Zr to Tc(4..80)Zr compositions, similar to previous observations in the Re-Zr system. This variation of the composition of "Tc(6)Zr" is explained by the substitution of Zr for Tc atoms in the 2a site of the alpha-Mn-type structure. These results suggest that the width of the "Tc(6)Zr" phase needs to be included when constructing the Tc-Zr phase diagram. The bonding character and stability of the various Tc-Zr phases were also investigated from first principles. Calculations indicate that valence and conduction bands near the Fermi level are dominated by electrons occupying the 4d orbital. In particular, the highest-lying molecular orbitals of the valence band of Tc(2)Zr are composed of d-d sigma bonds, oriented along the normal axis of the (110) plane and linking the Zr network to the Tc framework. Strong d-d bonds stabilizing the Tc framework in the hexagonal unit cell are also in the valence band. In the cubic structures of Tc-Zr phases, only Tc 4d orbitals are found to significantly contribute near the Fermi level.

  20. Structure analysis of OmpC, one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli, by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.F.

    1983-07-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the structure analysis of a pore-forming membrane protein, OmpC, which is one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. In order to obtain structural information it was necessary to develop a suitable technique for preparing two-dimensional crystalline arrays of this membrane protein in an unfixed, unstained and hydrated condition. Electron micrographs were recorded at exposures of less than 5 electrons/A/sup 2/ in order to avoid severe radiation damage. The resulting images were crystallographically averaged, in order to overcome the statistical limitations associated with the low electron exposures. The resulting images, which extend to a resolution of approx. 13.5 A, lend themselves to a natural interpretation that is consistent with the mass density of protein, water and lipid, prior data from 2-D and 3-D structure studies of negatively stained specimens at approx. = 20 A resolution, and published spectroscopic data on the peptide chain secondary structure.

  1. Study of superconducting and non-superconducting (Cu, Cr)-1212 compounds by high-resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Anan, Y; Kurami, H; Hatano, J; Tsutsumi, S; Kimoto, K; Matsui, Y

    2001-01-01

    Structure of YSr/sub 2-x/Ba/sub x/Cu/sub 2.8/Cr/sub 0.2/O/sub y/ (x =0-1.5) superconductors are examined by electron diffraction, HRTEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). YSr/sub 2/Cu/sub 2.8/Cr /sub 0.2/O/sub y/ (x=0) shows incommensurate superstructure with 3.67a/sub 0/ due to lattice strain and mixed intergrowth of -(Cr-Cu- Cu-Cu-Cr)- and -(Cr-Cu-Cu-Cr)- sequences. In the h 0 l electron diffraction pattern the wavevector [~0.27, 0, 1/2] due to the incommensurate superstructure disappear in the crystal with high Ba contain (x>or=1.0). This suggests that structural distortion decreases with Ba substitution. At the same time, Cr-L3, L2 edge of EELS spectra shifts toward the low-energy side with increase of Ba content. (13 refs).

  2. High-resolution chemical analysis on cycled LiFePO4 battery electrodes using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Joshua D.; El Gabaly, Farid; Chueh, William C.; Fenton, Kyle R.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Kotula, Paul G.; Bartelt, Norman C.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an ex situ method for analyzing the chemistry of battery electrode particles after electrochemical cycling using the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The arrangement of particles during our analysis is the same as when the particles are being cycled. We start by sectioning LiFePO4 battery electrodes using an ultramicrotome. We then show that mapping of the Fe2+ and Fe3+ oxidation state using energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) and multivariate statistical analysis techniques can be used to determine the spatial distribution of Li in the particles. This approach is validated by comparison with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) analysis of the same samples [Chueh et al. Nanoletters, 13 (3) (2013) 866-72]. EFTEM uses a parallel electron beam and reduces the electron-beam dose (and potential beam-induced damage) to the sample when compared to alternate techniques that use a focused probe (e.g. STEM-EELS). Our analysis confirms that under the charging conditions of the analyzed battery, mixed phase particles are rare and thus Li intercalation is limited by the nucleation of new phases.

  3. Application of Ion and Electron Momentum Imaging to Atomic Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocke, C. L.

    2000-06-01

    COLTRIMS (COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) combines fast imaging detectors with a supersonically cooled gas target to allow the charged particles from any ionizing collision, including both recoil ions and electrons, to be collected with extremely high efficiency and with fully measured vector momenta. Since all particles are measured in event mode, the full multi-dimensional momentum space is mapped. We will review several examples of the use of this technique to study two- , three- and four-body final states created in ionizing interactions of photons and charged particles with He and D2 . The momentum spectra of electrons ejected from these targets by slow projectiles reveal the stucture of the molecular orbitals which are promoted into the continuum. Double photoionization of the same targets reveals patterns which can be interpreted in terms of collective coordinates. Two-electron removal from D2 by Xe ^26+ reveals the influence of the projectile field on the dissociation process. A recent application of the technique to ionization by high intensity laser fields will be discussed. Work performed in collaboration with M.A.Abdallah^1, I.Ali^1, Matthias Achler^2, H.Braeuning^2,3, Angela Braeuning-Deminian^2, Achim Czasch^2,3, R.Doerner^2,3, R.DuBois^6, A. Landers^1,5, V.Mergel^2, R.E.Olson^6, T.Osipov^1, M.Prior^3, H.Schmidt-Boecking^2, M.Singh^1, A.Staudte^2,3, T.Weber^2, W.Wolff^4, and H.E.Wolf^4 ^1J.R.Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506; ^2 Institut fuer Kernphysik, Univ. Frankfurt, August-Euler-Str.6,D-60486 Frankfurt, Germany ; ^3Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720; ^4Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Caixa Postal 68.528, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; ^5Physics Dept., Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008; ^6Physics Dept., Univ. Missouri Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 Work supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic

  4. Theorectical Studies of Excitation in Low-Energy Electron-Polyatomic Molecule Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Isaacs, W A; Orel, A E; Meyer, H D

    2001-08-13

    This paper focuses on the channeling of energy from electronic to nuclear degrees of freedom in electron-polyatomic molecule collisions. We examine the feasibility of attacking the full scattering problem, both the fixed-nuclei electronic problem and the post-collision nuclear dynamics, entirely from first principles. The electron-CO{sub 2} system is presented as an example. We study resonant vibrational excitation, showing how a6 initio, fixed-nuclei electronic cross sections can provide the necessary input for a multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear vibrational dynamics.

  5. Front-End Board with Cyclone V as a Test High-Resolution Platform for the Auger-Beyond-2015 Front End Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Szadkowski, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    The surface detector (SD) array of the Pierre Auger Observatory containing at present 1680 water Cherenkov detectors spread over an area of 3000 km^2 started to operate since 2004. The currently used Front-End Boards are equipped with no-more produced ACEX and obsolete Cyclone FPGA (40 MSps/15-bit of dynamic range). Huge progress in electronics and new challenges from physics impose a significant upgrade of the SD electronics either to improve a quality of measurements (much higher sampling and much wider dynamic range) or pick-up from a background extremely rare events (new FPGA algorithms based on sophisticated approaches like e.g. spectral triggers or neural networks). Much higher SD sensitivity is necessary to confirm or reject hypotheses critical for a modern astrophysics. The paper presents the Front-End Board (FEB) with the biggest Cyclone V E FPGA 5CEFA9F31I7N, supporting 8 channels sampled with max. 250 MSps @ 14-bit resolution. Considered sampling for the SD is 120 MSps, however, the FEB has been de...

  6. High-resolution structure of the Shigella type-III secretion needle by solid-state NMR and cryo-electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Jean-Philippe; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Kumar Vasa, Suresh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Baker, David; Lange, Adam; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce a general hybrid approach for determining the structures of supramolecular assemblies. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) data define the overall envelope of the assembly and rigid-body orientation of the subunits while solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) chemical shifts and distance constraints define the local secondary structure, protein fold and inter-subunit interactions. Finally, Rosetta structure calculations provide a general framework to integrate the different sources of structural information. Combining a 7.7-Å cryo-EM density map and 996 ssNMR distance constraints, the structure of the type-III secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri is determined to a precision of 0.4 Å. The calculated structures are cross-validated using an independent data set of 691 ssNMR constraints and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements. The hybrid model resolves the conformation of the non-conserved N terminus, which occupies a protrusion in the cryo-EM density, and reveals conserved pore residues forming a continuous pattern of electrostatic interactions, thereby suggesting a mechanism for effector protein translocation.

  7. High-resolution imaging of living mammalian cells bound by nanobeads-connected antibodies in a medium using scanning electron-assisted dielectric microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomoko; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2017-02-01

    Nanometre-scale-resolution imaging technologies for liquid-phase specimens are indispensable tools in various scientific fields. In biology, observing untreated living cells in a medium is essential for analysing cellular functions. However, nanoparticles that bind living cells in a medium are hard to detect directly using traditional optical or electron microscopy. Therefore, we previously developed a novel scanning electron-assisted dielectric microscope (SE-ADM) capable of nanoscale observations. This method enables observation of intact cells in aqueous conditions. Here, we use this SE-ADM system to clearly observe antibody-binding nanobeads in liquid-phase. We also report the successful direct detection of streptavidin-conjugated nanobeads binding to untreated cells in a medium via a biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody. Our system is capable of obtaining clear images of cellular organelles and beads on the cells at the same time. The direct observation of living cells with nanoparticles in a medium allowed by our system may contribute the development of carriers for drug delivery systems (DDS).

  8. High-resolution imaging of living mammalian cells bound by nanobeads-connected antibodies in a medium using scanning electron-assisted dielectric microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomoko; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Nanometre-scale-resolution imaging technologies for liquid-phase specimens are indispensable tools in various scientific fields. In biology, observing untreated living cells in a medium is essential for analysing cellular functions. However, nanoparticles that bind living cells in a medium are hard to detect directly using traditional optical or electron microscopy. Therefore, we previously developed a novel scanning electron-assisted dielectric microscope (SE-ADM) capable of nanoscale observations. This method enables observation of intact cells in aqueous conditions. Here, we use this SE-ADM system to clearly observe antibody-binding nanobeads in liquid-phase. We also report the successful direct detection of streptavidin-conjugated nanobeads binding to untreated cells in a medium via a biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody. Our system is capable of obtaining clear images of cellular organelles and beads on the cells at the same time. The direct observation of living cells with nanoparticles in a medium allowed by our system may contribute the development of carriers for drug delivery systems (DDS). PMID:28230204

  9. Direct observation and analysis of york-shell materials using low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy: Nanometal-particles encapsulated in metal-oxide, carbon, and polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Asahina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanometal particles show characteristic features in chemical and physical properties depending on their sizes and shapes. For keeping and further enhancing their features, the particles should be protected from coalescence or degradation. One approach is to encapsulate the nanometal particles inside pores with chemically inert or functional materials, such as carbon, polymer, and metal oxides, which contain mesopores to allow permeation of only chemicals not the nanometal particles. Recently developed low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was applied to the study of structural, chemical, and electron state of both nanometal particles and encapsulating materials in york-shell materials of Au@C, Ru/Pt@C, Au@TiO2, and Pt@Polymer. Progresses in the following categories were shown for the york-shell materials: (i resolution of topographic image contrast by secondary electrons, of atomic-number contrast by back-scattered electrons, and of elemental mapping by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy; (ii sample preparation for observing internal structures; and (iii X-ray spectroscopy such as soft X-ray emission spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was also used for characterization of Au@C.

  10. Direct observation and analysis of yolk-shell materials using low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy: Nanometal-particles encapsulated in metal-oxide, carbon, and polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asahina, Shunsuke; Suga, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Hideyuki [JEOL Ltd., SM Business Unit, Tokyo (Japan); Young Jeong, Hu [Graduate School of EEWS, WCU/BK21+, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Galeano, Carolina; Schüth, Ferdi [Department of Heterogeneous Catalysis, Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Mülheim (Germany); Terasaki, Osamu, E-mail: terasaki@mmk.su.se, E-mail: terasaki@kaist.ac.kr [Graduate School of EEWS, WCU/BK21+, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Berzelii Centre EXSELENT on Porous Materials, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-11-01

    Nanometal particles show characteristic features in chemical and physical properties depending on their sizes and shapes. For keeping and further enhancing their features, the particles should be protected from coalescence or degradation. One approach is to encapsulate the nanometal particles inside pores with chemically inert or functional materials, such as carbon, polymer, and metal oxides, which contain mesopores to allow permeation of only chemicals not the nanometal particles. Recently developed low-voltage high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was applied to the study of structural, chemical, and electron state of both nanometal particles and encapsulating materials in yolk-shell materials of Au@C, Ru/Pt@C, Au@TiO{sub 2}, and Pt@Polymer. Progresses in the following categories were shown for the yolk-shell materials: (i) resolution of topographic image contrast by secondary electrons, of atomic-number contrast by back-scattered electrons, and of elemental mapping by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy; (ii) sample preparation for observing internal structures; and (iii) X-ray spectroscopy such as soft X-ray emission spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was also used for characterization of Au@C.

  11. Recent results from HADES on electron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Galatyuk, T; Balanda, A; Belver, D; Belyaev, A V; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cabanelas, P; Castro, E; Chernenko, S; Christ, T; Destefanis, M; Díaz, J; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O V; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gil, A; Gilardi, C; Golubeva, M; González-Díaz, D; Guber, F; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Kirschner, D; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kotte, R; Krizek, F; Krücken, R; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Lang, S; Lange, J S; Lapidus, K; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Morinière, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Otwinowski, J; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Sudol, M; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wisniowski, M; Wojcik, T; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y V; Zhou, P

    2009-01-01

    Systematic investigations of dilepton production are performed at the SIS accelerator of GSI with the HADES spectrometer. The goal of this program is a detailed understanding of di-electron emission from hadronic systems at moderate temperatures and densities. New results obtained in HADES experiments focussing on electron pair production in elementary collisions are reported here. They pave the way to a better understanding of the origin of the so-called excess pairs earlier on observed in heavy-ion collisions by the DLS collaboration and lately confirmed in two measurements of the HADES collaboration using C+C and Ar+KCl collisions. Results of these studies are discussed.

  12. High-resolution spectroscopy in superfluid helium droplets. Investigation of vibrational fine structures in electronic spectra of phthalocyanine and porphyrin derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechers, Ricarda Eva Friederike Elisabeth

    2011-03-22

    Since a considerably large variety of substituted compounds is commercially available and the electronic excitation spectra fit well into the spectral range covered by the continuous wave dye laser used for this study several porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives substituted with different types and numbers of alkyl and aryl groups were chosen as molecular probes. Recording fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra revealed exclusively sharp transitions for all species. A change of the molecule's electrostatic moments, primarily and most effectively, a change of the molecular dipole moment regarding both magnitude and orientation, was identified as the main contribution for line broadening effects. Apart from the sharp lines presented in their fluorescence excitation spectra, the phthalocyanine derivatives investigated for this study, namely chloro-aluminium-phthalocyanine (AlClPc) and tetra-tertbutyl-phthalocyanine (TTBPc), exhibited more than one emission spectrum.

  13. High-resolution studies of tropolone in the S0 and S1 electronic states: isotope driven dynamics in the zero-point energy levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keske, John C; Lin, Wei; Pringle, Wallace C; Novick, Stewart E; Blake, Thomas A; Plusquellic, David F

    2006-02-21

    Rotationally resolved microwave (MW) and ultraviolet (UV) spectra of jet-cooled tropolone have been obtained in S(0) and S(1) electronic states using Fourier-transform microwave and UV-laser/molecular-beam spectrometers. In the ground electronic state, the MW spectra of all heavy-atom isotopomers including one (18)O and four (13)C isotopomers were observed in natural abundance. The OD isotopomer was obtained from isotopically enriched samples. The two lowest tunneling states of each isotopomer except (18)O have been assigned. The observed inversion splitting for the OD isotopomer is 1523.227(5) MHz. For the asymmetric (13)C structures, the magnitudes of tunneling-rotation interactions are found to diminish with decreasing distance between the heavy atom and the tunneling proton. In the limit of closest approach, the 0(+) state of (18)O was well fitted to an asymmetric rotor Hamiltonian, reflecting significant changes in the tautomerization dynamics. Comparisons of the substituted atom coordinates with theoretical predictions at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory suggest the localized 0(+) and 0(-) wave functions of the heavier isotopes favor the C-OH and C=O forms of tropolone, respectively. The only exception occurs for the (13)C-OH and (13)C[Double Bond]O structures which correlate to the 0(-) and 0(+) states, respectively. These preferences reflect kinetic isotope effects as quantitatively verified by the calculated zero-point energy differences between members of the asymmetric atom pairs. From rotationally resolved data of the 0(+) <--0(+) and 0(-) <--0(-) bands in S(1), line-shape fits have yielded Lorentzian linewidths that differ by 12.2(16) MHz over the 19.88(4) cm(-1) interval in S(1). The fluorescence decay rates together with previously reported quantum yield data give nonradiative decay rates of 7.7(5) x 10(8) and 8.5(5) x 10(8) s(-1) for the 0(+) and 0(-) levels of the S(1) state of tropolone.

  14. Intergrowth in complex bismuth oxides, Bi 2CaNa n-2 Nb nO 3 n+3 ( n = 5 ˜ 8), revealed by 1-MV high-resolution electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Shigeo; Muramatsu, Kunitaka; Shimazu, Masaji

    1980-08-01

    A complex bismuth oxide crystal, prepared by heating powders with a nominal composition Bi 2CaNb 2O 9·4NaNbO 3, is composed of several phases, Bi 2CaNa n-2 Nb nO 3 n+3 , mainly with n = 5-8. One-megavolt high-resolution electron microscopy reveals that the structure of each phase is constructed by perovskite-like layers interleaved with Bi 2O 2 sheets. Any one of these phases grows only in limited regions, in which other phases with different values of n intergrow very finely. This causes a characteristic intensity profile on the diffraction pattern. Experimental evidence on the reaction of the crystal with water is presented.

  15. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission study of the Fermi surface and the normal-state electronic structure of Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, C.G.; Liu, R.; Lynch, D.W. (Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA (USA) Physics Department, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (USA)); List, R.S.; Arko, A.J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (USA)); Veal, B.W.; Chang, Y.C.; Jiang, P.Z.; Paulikas, A.P. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (USA))

    1990-07-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopic measurements were made of the Fermi edge of a single crystal of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} at 90 K along several directions in the Brillouin zone. The resultant Fermi-level crossings are consistent with local-density band calculations, including a point calculated to be of Bi-O character. Additional measurements were made where bands crossed the Fermi level between 100 and 250 K, along with measurements on an adjacent Pt foil. The Fermi edges of both materials agree to within the noise. Below the Fermi level the spectra show correlation effects in the form of an increased effective mass, but the essence of the single-particle band structure is retained. The shape of the spectra can be explained by a lifetime-broadened photohole and secondary electrons. The effective inverse photohole lifetime is linear in energy.

  16. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and molecular simulation analysis of ε-Fe{sub 2}-{sub 3}N and γ-Fe{sub 4}N formation for a nitrided 4140 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejar, L.; Medina-Flores, A.; Alfonso, I.; Carreon, H.; Solis, J.

    2015-07-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and molecular simulation techniques were applied to analyze phase formation in the post-discharge microwave nitriding process of a 4140 steel. The results showed the formation of ε-Fe{sub 2}-{sub 3}N and γ-Fe{sub 4}N. The morphology of theγ-Fe{sub 4}N phase was composed by cubic nanoparticles that grows in the <0 0 1> axis direction. Otherwise, the ε-Fe{sub 2}-{sub 3}N crystal is associated to hexagonal faces in the [0 0 1] direction which grows forming angles of 120 degree centigrade. The comparison between experimental and analytical results allowed a better understanding of the phases formed during this nitriding process. (Author)

  17. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  18. Characterization of InGaAs and InAlAs layers on InP by four-crystal high resolution X-ray diffraction and wedge transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houdre, R.; Gueissaz, F.; Gailhanou, M.; Ganiere, J.D.; Rudra, A.; Ilegems, M. (Inst. de Micro- et Optoelectronique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1991-05-01

    The indium desorption rates from InGaAs and InAlAs grown on InP substrates have been measured by wedge transmission electron microscopy as a function of the growth temperature. Desorption becomes significant at 545degC for both materials. No automatching effects could be observed under the growth conditions of the experiment. The bandgap of In{sub y}Al{sub 1-y}As has been measured at 77 K as a function of the indium content. The composition and the strain have been measured by four-crystal high resolution X-ray diffraction with symmetrical (004) and assymmetrical (115{+-}) Bragg reflections. The intrinsic bandgap follows the relation E{sub g}(y)=2.774-2.411y and the strained material the relation E{sub gs}(y)=0.671+5.236y-6.929y{sup 2}. (orig.).

  19. A split-step method to include electron-electron collisions via Monte Carlo in multiple rate equation simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huthmacher, Klaus; Molberg, Andreas K.; Rethfeld, Bärbel; Gulley, Jeremy R.

    2016-10-01

    A split-step numerical method for calculating ultrafast free-electron dynamics in dielectrics is introduced. The two split steps, independently programmed in C++11 and FORTRAN 2003, are interfaced via the presented open source wrapper. The first step solves a deterministic extended multi-rate equation for the ionization, electron-phonon collisions, and single photon absorption by free-carriers. The second step is stochastic and models electron-electron collisions using Monte-Carlo techniques. This combination of deterministic and stochastic approaches is a unique and efficient method of calculating the nonlinear dynamics of 3D materials exposed to high intensity ultrashort pulses. Results from simulations solving the proposed model demonstrate how electron-electron scattering relaxes the non-equilibrium electron distribution on the femtosecond time scale.

  20. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of aluminophosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulan, J.G.; Gronsky, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Szostak, R. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA)); Sorby, K. (Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-04-01

    VPI-5 transforms to AlPO{sub 4}-8 under mild thermal treatment (100{degree}C, 18 hrs). HRTEM micrographs, oriented normal to the c axis, show extensive defect-free regions in VPI-5, while slip planes normal to the c axis are found in AlPO{sub 4}-8. Analysis of the HRTEM data, in conjunction with infrared and thermal analysis, adsorption studies and x-ray powder diffraction, has lead to a proposed structure for AlPO{sub 4}-8. Though the sheets containing the 18 member rings which define the pores in VPI-5 remain intact in AlPO{sub 4}-8, reduction in the porosity is attributed to blockages created by the movement of these sheets relative to each other. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions. Updated 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawara, H.

    1997-04-01

    Following our previous compilations (IPPJ-AM-45 (1986), NIFS-DATA-7 (1990), NIFS-DATA-20 (1993)), bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1954-1996 are listed in the order of the publication year. For easy finding of the references for a combination of collision partners, a simple list is provided. (author)

  2. ELECTRON-CAPTURE IN HIGHLY-CHARGED ION-ATOM COLLISIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORGENSTERN, R

    1993-01-01

    An attempt is made to identify the most important mechanisms responsible for the rearrangement of electrons during collisions between multiply charged ions and atoms at keV energies. It is discussed to which extent the influence of binding energy, angular momentum of heavy particles and electrons, a

  3. HE-2+-H2 COLLISIONS - NONDISSOCIATIVE AND DISSOCIATIVE ONE-ELECTRON CAPTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEKSTRA, R; FOLKERTS, HO; BEIJERS, JPM; MORGENSTERN, R; DEHEER, FJ

    1994-01-01

    Electron-redistribution processes in collisions of He-2+ ions on H-2 are studied for energies from 1 to 25 keV amu-1. One-electron capture and target excitation cross sections are determined by photon-emission spectroscopy. At energies exceeding approximately 5 keV amu-1 capture into excited states

  4. STATE-SELECTIVE ELECTRON-CAPTURE IN HE2+ -H2 COLLISIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MENG, L; OLSON, RE; FOLKERTS, HO; HOEKSTRA, R

    1994-01-01

    A classical phase-space model of the hydrogen molecule which includes both electrons and nuclear centers is utilized to study state selective electron capture for collisions with alpha particles at intermediate impact energies (30-200 keV amu-1). The calculations am performed within the framework of

  5. Electron loss from multiply protonated lysozyme ions in high energy collisions with molecular oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, P; Nielsen, SB; Sørensen, M

    2001-01-01

    We report on the electron loss from multiply protonated lysozyme ions Lys-Hn(n)+ (n = 7 - 17) and the concomitant formation of Lys-Hn(n+1)+. in high-energy collisions with molecular oxygen (laboratory kinetic energy = 50 x n keV). The cross section for electron loss increases with the charge stat...

  6. ELECTRON-CAPTURE IN HIGHLY-CHARGED ION-ATOM COLLISIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORGENSTERN, R

    1993-01-01

    An attempt is made to identify the most important mechanisms responsible for the rearrangement of electrons during collisions between multiply charged ions and atoms at keV energies. It is discussed to which extent the influence of binding energy, angular momentum of heavy particles and electrons,

  7. Broadening of Plasmonic Resonance Due to Electron Collisions with Nanoparticle Boundary: а Quantum Mechanical Consideration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander; Protsenko, Igor E.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantum mechanical approach to calculate broadening of plasmonic resonances in metallic nanostructures due to collisions of electrons with the surface of the structure. The approach is applicable if the characteristic size of the structure is much larger than the de Broglie electron ...

  8. Probing the electronic structure and Au–C chemical bonding in AuC{sub 2}{sup −} and AuC{sub 2} using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Lai-Sheng, E-mail: Lai-Sheng-Wang@brown.edu [Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2014-02-28

    We report photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and high-resolution PE imaging of AuC{sub 2}{sup −} at a wide range of photon energies. The ground state of AuC{sub 2}{sup −} is found to be linear (C{sub ∞v}, {sup 1}Σ{sup +}) with a …8π{sup 4}4δ{sup 4}17σ{sup 2}9π{sup 4}18σ{sup 2} valence configuration. Detachments from all the five valence orbitals of the ground state of AuC{sub 2}{sup −} are observed at 193 nm. High-resolution PE images are obtained in the energy range from 830 to 330 nm, revealing complicated vibronic structures from electron detachment of the 18σ, 9π, and 17σ orbitals. Detachment from the 18σ orbital results in the {sup 2}Σ{sup +} ground state of neutral AuC{sub 2}, which, however, is bent due to strong vibronic coupling with the nearby {sup 2}Π state from detachment of a 9π electron. The {sup 2}Σ{sup +}–{sup 2}Π vibronic and spin-orbit coupling results in complicated vibronic structures for the {sup 2}Σ{sup +} and {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} states with extensive bending excitations. The electron affinity of AuC{sub 2} is measured accurately to be 3.2192(7) eV with a ground state bending frequency of 195(6) cm{sup −1}. The first excited state ({sup 2}A′) of AuC{sub 2}, corresponding to the {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} state at the linear geometry, is only 0.0021 eV above the ground state ({sup 2}A′) and has a bending frequency of 207(6) cm{sup −1}. The {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} state, 0.2291 eV above the ground state, is linear with little geometry change relative to the anion ground state. The detachment of the 17σ orbital also results in complicated vibronic structures, suggesting again a bent state due to possible vibronic coupling with the lower {sup 2}Π state. The spectrum at 193 nm shows the presence of a minor species with less than 2% intensity relative to the ground state of AuC{sub 2}{sup −}. High-resolution data of the minor species reveal several vibrational progressions in the Au–C stretching mode, which are assigned to

  9. Modeling of electron-electron collisions for particle-in-cell simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrea, D. d' ; Munz, C.D.; Schneider, R.

    2006-09-15

    The modeling of the physics of pulsed plasma thrusters requires the numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation for rarefied plasma flows where continuum assumptions fail. To tackle this challenging task, a cooperation between several institutes has been formed with the goal to develop a hybrid code based on Particle-In-Cell and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo techniques. These development activities are bundled in the project ''Numerische Simulation und Auslegung eines instationaeren gepulsten magnetoplasmadynamischen Triebwerks fuer eine Mondsonde'' which is funded by the Landesstiftung Baden-Wuerttemberg within the subject area ''Modellierung und Simulation auf Hochleistungscomputern''. In the frame of this project, the IHM is in charge to develop suitable physical-mathematical and numerical models to include charged particle collisions into the simulation. which can significantly affect the Parameters of such plasma devices. The intention of the present report is to introduce the Fokker-Planck approach for electron-electron interaction in Standard charged particle simulations. where the impact Parameter is usually large resulting in a small deflection angle. The theoretical and applicative framework is discussed in detail paying particular attention to the Particle-In-Cell approach in velocity space. a new technique which allows the self-consistent computation of the friction and diffusion coefficients arising from the Fokker-Planck treatment of collisions. These velocity-dependent coefficients thernselves are responsible for the change in velocity of the simulation particles, which is determined by the numerical solution of a Langevin-type equation. Simulation results for typical numerical experiments computed with the new developed Fokker-Planck solver are presented. demonstrating the quality. property and reliability of the applied numerical methods. (orig.)

  10. Analysis by high-resolution electron microscopy of elastic strain in thick InAs layers embedded in Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As buffers on InP(0 0 1) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatel, C., E-mail: gatel@cemes.fr [CNRS, CEMES (Centre d' Elaboration des Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales), BP 94347, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)] [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, 31055 Toulouse (France); Tang, H.; Crestou, C.; Ponchet, A. [CNRS, CEMES (Centre d' Elaboration des Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales), BP 94347, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)] [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, 31055 Toulouse (France); Bertru, N.; Dore, F.; Folliot, H. [FOTON-LENS-INSA, 20 av. des Buttes de Coesmes, CS 14315, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2010-05-15

    Elastic strain has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy in nanometric InAs layers grown on Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As/InP(0 0 1) by molecular beam epitaxy using a residual Sb flux. Deposits of 10 and 15 monolayers of InAs (3 and 4.5 nm) remain elastically stressed with a two-dimensional growth mode. The out-of-plane strain in the layers is analyzed by cross-sectional high-resolution electron microscopy. A distortion of the substrate below and on top of the InAs layers is detected and is attributed to a significant surface relaxation effect due to thinning. Surface relaxation is modeled by three-dimensional finite element modeling. An additional relaxation effect is obtained when the sample is not infinite along the direction perpendicular to the thinning. This effect enhances the buffer distortion of the buffers below and on top of the strained layers. Taking into account thin foil effects, the experimental out-of-plane strain is in excellent agreement with the theoretical value calculated for a pure InAs layer (i.e. 0.035), demonstrating the high level of strain and stress in the layers.

  11. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Howard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H...H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface.

  12. Order-Disorder Phenomena in the Binary Alloys Platinum(x)titanium, Platinum(x)vanadium (3 Less than or Equal to X Less than or Equal to 8) and NICKEL(3)MOLYBDENUM Studied by High Resolution Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryvers, Dominique

    In this work the results of an experimental study on the order-disorder behaviour of three different binary alloy systems are presented. The investigations were performed mainly using electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy techniques. In the first chapter an introduction with respect to the general aspects of ordering in alloys is given. The second chapter describes the most important properties of the investigation techniques. Both chapters are written in function of the needs in following chapters. Chapter III comprehends the results obtained in the platinum rich part of the Pt-Ti alloy system, while those of Pt-V are described in chapter IV. The main results in these alloy systems concern the characterization of new ordered phases. The complex dynamical ordering mechanism existing in {rm Ni_3 Mo} is discussed in chapter V. In chapter VI a calculation of possible ground state structures of a binary system based on the face centered cubic lattice and including the fourth nearest neighbour pair interaction is presented. A comparison between the theoretical results and the experimental ones of chapters III and IV is given.

  13. High-resolution land topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonnet, Didier; Elachi, Charles

    2006-11-01

    After a description of the background, methods of production and some scientific uses of high-resolution land topography, we present the current status and the prospect of radar interferometry, regarded as one of the best techniques for obtaining the most global and the most accurate topographic maps. After introducing briefly the theoretical aspects of radar interferometry - principles, limits of operation and various capabilities -, we will focus on the topographic applications that resulted in an almost global topographic map of the earth: the SRTM map. After introducing the Interferometric Cartwheel system, we will build on its expected performances to discuss the scientific prospects of refining a global topographic map to sub-metric accuracy. We also show how other fields of sciences such as hydrology may benefit from the products generated by interferometric radar systems. To cite this article: D. Massonnet, C. Elachi, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  14. Coupled state analysis of electron excitations in asymmetric collision systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehler, G.; Reus, T. de; Mueller, U.; Reinhardt, J.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.; Soff, G.

    1985-11-01

    A coupled channel formalism is presented, using relativistic basis states of the target atom. Screening effects are incorporated by means of an effective potential of the Hartree-Fock-Slater type. Relativistic wave packets are employed for the description of the continuum. The impact parameter dependence of the K-hole production in p-Ag collisions is calculated, including quadrupole contributions of the projectile Coulomb potential. The results are compared with experimental data. (orig.).

  15. High-resolution image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, K

    1986-01-01

    In many departments of cytology, cytogenetics, hematology, and pathology, research projects using high-resolution computerized microscopy are now being mounted for computation of morphometric measurements on various structural components, as well as for determination of cellular DNA content. The majority of these measurements are made in a partially automated, computer-assisted mode, wherein there is strong interaction between the user and the computerized microscope. At the same time, full automation has been accomplished for both sample preparation and sample examination for clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. At the time of writing, approximately 1,000 robot differential counting microscopes are in the field, analyzing images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the overall rate of about 100,000 slides per day. This mammoth through-put represents a major accomplishment in the application of machine vision to automated microscopy for hematology. In other areas of automated high-resolution microscopy, such as cytology and cytogenetics, no commercial instruments are available (although a few metaphase-finding machines are available and other new machines have been announced during the past year). This is a disappointing product, considering the nearly half century of research effort in these areas. This paper provides examples of the state of the art in automation of cell analysis for blood smears, cervical smears, and chromosome preparations. Also treated are new developments in multi-resolution automated microscopy, where images are now being generated and analyzed by a single machine over a range of 64:1 magnification and from 10,000 X 20,000 to 500 X 500 in total picture elements (pixels). Examples of images of human lymph node and liver tissue are presented. Semi-automated systems are not treated, although there is mention of recent research in the automation of tissue analysis.

  16. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  17. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  18. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W.; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  19. Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Kaushik, E-mail: kaushikbolpur@rediffmail.com [Beluti M. K. M. High School, P.O. Beluti, Birbhum, West Bengal 731301 (India); Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

  20. High-resolution TOF with RPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonte, P. E-mail: fonte@lipc.fis.uc.pt; Peskov, V

    2002-01-21

    In this work, we describe some recent results concerning the application of Resistive Plate Chambers operated in avalanche mode at atmospheric pressure for high-resolution time-of-flight measurements. A combination of multiple, mechanically accurate, thin gas gaps and state-of-the-art electronics yielded an overall (detector plus electronics) timing accuracy better than 50 ps {sigma} with a detection efficiency up to 99% for MIPs. Single gap chambers were also tested in order to clarify experimentally several aspects of the mode of operation of these detectors. These results open perspectives of affordable and reliable high granularity large area TOF detectors, with an efficiency and time resolution comparable to the existing scintillator-based TOF technology but with a significantly, up to an order of magnitude, lower price per channel.

  1. High-resolution electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jang-Ung; Hardy, Matt; Kang, Seong Jun; Barton, Kira; Adair, Kurt; Mukhopadhyay, Deep Kishore; Lee, Chang Young; Strano, Michael S.; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Georgiadis, John G.; Ferreira, Placid M.; Rogers, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Efforts to adapt and extend graphic arts printing techniques for demanding device applications in electronics, biotechnology and microelectromechanical systems have grown rapidly in recent years. Here, we describe the use of electrohydrodynamically induced fluid flows through fine microcapillary nozzles for jet printing of patterns and functional devices with submicrometre resolution. Key aspects of the physics of this approach, which has some features in common with related but comparatively low-resolution techniques for graphic arts, are revealed through direct high-speed imaging of the droplet formation processes. Printing of complex patterns of inks, ranging from insulating and conducting polymers, to solution suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and rods, to single-walled carbon nanotubes, using integrated computer-controlled printer systems illustrates some of the capabilities. High-resolution printed metal interconnects, electrodes and probing pads for representative circuit patterns and functional transistors with critical dimensions as small as 1μm demonstrate potential applications in printed electronics.

  2. Electron-positron pair creation in low-energy collisions of heavy bare nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Maltsev, I A; Tupitsyn, I I; Bondarev, A I; Kozhedub, Y S; Plunien, G; Stoehlker, Th

    2014-01-01

    A new method for calculations of electron-positron pair-creation probabilities in low-energy heavy-ion collisions is developed. The approach is based on the propagation of all one-electron states via the numerical solving of the time-dependent Dirac equation in the monopole approximation. The electron wave functions are represented as finite sums of basis functions constructed from B-splines using the dual-kinetic-balance technique. The calculations of the created particle numbers and the positron energy spectra are performed for the collisions of bare nuclei at the energies near the Coulomb barrier with the Rutherford trajectory and for different values of the nuclear charge and the impact parameter. To examine the role of the spontaneous pair creation the collisions with a modified velocity and with a time delay are also considered. The obtained results are compared with the previous calculations and the possibility of observation of the spontaneous pair creation is discussed.

  3. Cylindrical and spherical soliton collision of electron-acoustic waves in non-Maxwellian plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.; Moslem, W. M.; Elghmaz, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    Generation of quasielastic electron-acoustic (EA) waves head-on collision are investigated in non-planar (cylindrical/spherical) plasma composed of cold electrons fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. The cylindrical/spherical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations describing two bidirectional EA waves are derived and solved analytically. Numerical investigation have shown that only positive electron-acoustic (EA) structures can propagate and collide. The analytical phase shift |Δ A | due to the non-Maxwellian (nonthermal) electrons is different from the Maxwellian case. Both the hot-to-cold electron number density ratio α and nonthermal parameter β have opposite effect on the phase shift behavior. The phase shift of the spherical EA waves is smaller than the cylindrical case, which indicates that the former is more stable for collision. The relevance of the present study to EA waves propagating in the Earth's auroral zone is highlighted.

  4. Correlated double electron capture in slow, highly charged ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Havener, C.C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Swenson, J.K.; Shafroth, S.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent measurements of autoionization electrons produced in slow, highly charged ion-atom collisions are reviewed. Mechanisms for double electron capture into equivalent and nonequivalent configurations are analyzed by comparing the probabilities for the creation of L/sub 1/L/sub 23/X Coster Kronig electrons and L-Auger electrons. It is shown that the production of the Coster-Kronig electrons is due to electron correlation effects whose analysis leads beyond the independent-particle model. The importance of correlation effects on different capture mechanisms is discussed. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Influence of electron-neutral elastic collisions on the instability of an ion-contaminated cylindrical electron cloud: 2D3V PIC-with-MCC simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sengupta, Meghraj

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a simulation based investigation of the effect of elastic collisions and effectively elastic-like excitation collisions between electrons and background neutrals on the dynamics of a cylindrically trapped electron cloud that also has an ion contaminant mixed in it. Effects of the collisions on the instability are evident from alteration in the growth rate and energetics of the ion resonance instability caused by the presence of background neutrals as compared to a vacuum background. Further in order to understand if the non-ionizing collisions can independently be a cause of destabilization of an electron cloud, a second set of numerical experiments were performed with pure electron plasmas making non-ionizing collisions with different densities of background neutrals. These experiments reveal that the nature of potential energy extraction from the electron cloud by the non-ionizing collisions is not similar to the potential energy extraction of other destabilizing processes \\textit{e.g.} a resi...

  6. Single-Electron Detachment for Ti-,Fe-,Co-,Ni- and Cu- in Collision with Ar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Xue; ZHAO Jun; WEI Bao-Ren; ZHANG Xue-Mei

    2010-01-01

    @@ By using the micro-channel plate position sensitive detector with the delay-line anode we measure the single electron detachment cross sections for some transition elements in collision with Ar in the energy region 10-30 keV.These single electron detachment cross sections perform as velocity and electron affinity dependences.The experiments are carried out using the growth rate method.

  7. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  8. Collision of highly charged ion with clusters. Simulation study for electronic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabana, Kazuhiro [Niigata Univ. (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    Collision of highly charged ion with cluster, for example, collision of C{sub 60}-Ar{sup 8+} at E=80 KeV, was simulated by the time-dependence Kohn-Shame equation. The distribution of electron densities and the self-consistent potential were obtained. A part of C{sub 60} potential curve became depressed by the Coulomb force of ion, so that the saddle point was produced on the potential. The behavior of electron transfer on the saddle point was agreed with the classical barrier model. Time-dependent density functional method was explained. (S.Y.)

  9. High Resolution CryoFESEM of Microbial Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsen, Stanley; Lei, Ming; Martin-Lacave, Ines; Dunny, Gary; Wells, Carol

    2003-08-01

    The outer surfaces of three microorganisms, Giardia lamblia, Enterococcus faecalis, and Proteus mirabilis, were investigated by cryo-immobilization followed by sublimation of extracellular ice and cryocoating with either Pt alone or Pt plus carbon. Cryocoated samples were examined at [minus sign]125°C in either an in-lens field emission SEM or a below-the-lens field emission SEM. Cryocoating with Pt alone was sufficient for low magnification observation, but attempts to do high-resolution imaging resulted in radiolysis and cracking of the specimen surface. Double coating with Pt and carbon, in combination with high resolution backscatter electron detectors, enabled high-resolution imaging of the glycocalyx of bacteria, revealing a sponge-like network over the surface. High resolution examination of bacterial flagella also revealed a periodic substructure. Common artifacts included radiolysis leading to “cracking” of the surface, and insufficient deposition of Pt resulting in the absence of detectable surface topography.

  10. High-resolution infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  11. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  12. Electron charge distribution of CaAl 2-xZn x: Maximum entropy method combined with Rietveld analysis of high-resolution-synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Karin; Kubota, Yoshiki; Muroyama, Norihiro; Grüner, Daniel; Yoshimura, Arisa; Terasaki, Osamu

    2008-08-01

    Using short wavelength X-rays from synchrotron radiation (SPring-8), high-resolution powder diffraction patterns were collected. In order to study both the structural relationship and the mechanism of stability in the CaAl 2-xZn x system, among the Laves phases (MgCu 2 and MgNi 2 type) and KHg 2-type structures, the charge density distribution of CaAl 2-xZn x as a function of x was obtained from the diffraction data by Rietveld analysis combined with the maximum entropy method (MEM). In the MEM charge density maps overlapping electron densities were clearly observed, especially in the Kagomé nets of the Laves phases. In order to clarify the charge redistribution in the system, the deformation charge densities from the densities formed by the constituent free atoms are discussed. In the ternary MgNi 2-type phase, partial ordering of Al and Zn atoms is observed, a finding that is supported by ab-initio total energy calculations.

  13. Origin of the low-mass electron pair excess in light nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Agakichiev, G; Belver, D; Belyaev, A V; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Braun-Munzinger, P; Cabanelas, P; Castro, E; Chernenko, S; Christ, T; Destefanis, M; Díaz, J; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O V; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzón, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gil, A; Gilardi, C; Golubeva, M; González-Díaz, D; Guber, F; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Kirschner, D; König, I; König, W; Kolb, B W; Kotte, R; Krizek, F; Krücken, R; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Lang, S; Lange, J S; Lapidus, K; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Morinière, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Naumann, L; Otwinowski, J; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovskii, A; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Sudol, M; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlustý, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wisniowski, M; Wojcik, T; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Yu V; Zhou, P

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of electron pair production in elementary p+p and d+p reactions at 1.25 GeV/u with the HADES spectrometer. For the first time, the electron pairs were reconstructed for n+p reactions by detecting the proton spectator from the deuteron breakup. We find that the yield of electron pairs with invariant mass Me+e- > 0.15 GeV/c2 is about an order of magnitude larger in n+p reactions as compared to p+p. A comparison to model calculations demonstrates that the production mechanism is not sufficiently described yet. The electron pair spectra measured in C+C reactions are compatible with a superposition of elementary n+p and p+p collisions, leaving little room for additional electron pair sources in such light collision systems.

  14. Electron loss to continuum in near-relativistic ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, Siegbert [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Inst. f. Kernphysik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Nofal, Muaffaq [Max Planck Inst. f. Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)]|[GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Inst. f. Kernphysik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Stoehlker, Thomas; Fritzsche, Stefan [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Physikal. Institut, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Surzhykov, Andrey; Moshammer, Robert; Ullrich, Joachim [Max Planck Inst. f. Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Kozhuharov, Christophor; Gumberidze, Alexander; Spillmann, Uwe; Reuschl, Regina; Hess, Sebastian; Trotsenko, Sergej; Bosch, Fritz; Liesen, Dieter [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Doerner, Reinhard [Inst. f. Kernphysik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rothard, Hermann [CIRIL, GANIL, Caen (France)

    2008-07-01

    In fast ion-atom collisions the projectile electron loss to continuum (ELC) permits to study the dynamics of ionization very close to threshold; it is a test of unparalleled sensitivity for first order theories. We have studied forward electron emission in two collision systems of different projectile Compton profile, U88+ +N2 and Sn47+ +N2 using the forward electron spectrometer at the supersonic jet-target of the ESR storage ring. We report first results for 90 AMeV U88+ and 300 AMeV Sn47+ measuring coincidences between electrons around ve=vProj and charge-exchanged projectiles having lost one electron; results are compared with theory.

  15. Coincident Auger electron and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy for low-energy ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, G. E-mail: glaurent@ganil.fr; Tarisien, M.; Flechard, X.; Jardin, P.; Guillaume, L.; Sobocinski, P.; Adoui, L.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Chesnel, J.-Y.; Fremont, F.; Hennecart, D.; Lienard, E.; Maunoury, L.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Cassimi, A

    2003-05-01

    The recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (RIMS) method combined with the detection of Auger electrons has been used successfully to analyse double electron capture following O{sup 6+} + He collisions at low impact velocities. Although RIMS and Auger spectroscopies are known to be efficient tools to obtain details on the primary processes occurring during the collision, the conjunction of both techniques provides new insights on the electron capture process. In the present experiment, triple coincidence detection of the scattered projectile, the target recoil ion and the Auger electron allows for a precise identification of the doubly excited states O{sup 4+} (1s{sup 2}nln{sup '}l{sup '}) populated after double electron-capture events.

  16. High-resolution tunnel fluctuoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatz, A.; Varlamov, A. A.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2014-08-01

    Electron tunneling spectroscopy pioneered by Esaki and Giaever offered a powerful tool for studying electronic spectra and density of states (DOS) in superconductors. This led to important discoveries that revealed, in particular, the pseudogap in the tunneling spectrum of superconductors above their critical temperatures. However, the phenomenological approach of Giaever and Megerle does not resolve the fine structure of low-bias behavior carrying significant information about electron scattering, interactions, and decoherence effects. Here we construct a complete microscopic theory of electron tunneling into a superconductor in the fluctuation regime. We reveal a non-trivial low-energy anomaly in tunneling conductivity due to Andreev-like reflections of injected electrons from superconducting fluctuations. Our findings enable real-time observation of fluctuating Cooper pairs dynamics by time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy measurements and open new horizons for quantitative analysis of the fluctuation electronic spectra of superconductors.

  17. Influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on electron-ion collision in two-component semiclassical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Woo-Pyo [Department of Electronics Engineering, Catholic University of Daegu, Hayang 712-702 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States); Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on the electron-ion collision process is investigated in two-component semiclassical plasmas. The eikonal method and micropotential taking into account the quantum diffraction and shielding are used to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the collision energy, density parameter, Debye length, electron de Broglie wavelength, and the impact parameter. The result shows that the quantum diffraction and shielding effects suppress the eikonal scattering phase shift as well as the differential eikonal collision cross section, especially, in small-impact parameter regions. It is also shown that the quantum shielding effect on the eikonal collision cross section is more important in low-collision energies. In addition, it is found that the eikonal collision cross section increases with an increase in the density parameter. The variations of the eikonal cross section due to the quantum diffraction and shielding effects are also discussed.

  18. Anomalous four-fermion processes in electron-positron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Berends, F A

    1995-01-01

    This paper studies the electroweak production of all possible four-fermion states in e^+e^- collisions with non-standard triple gauge boson couplings. All CP conserving couplings are considered. It is an extension of the methods and strategy, which were recently used for the Standard Model electroweak production of four-fermion final states. Since the fermions are taken to be massless the matrix elements can be evaluated efficiently, but certain phase space cuts have to be imposed to avoid singularities. Experimental cuts are of a similar nature. With the help of the constructed event generator a number of illustrative results is obtained for W-pair production. These show on one hand the distortions of the Standard Model angular distributions caused by either off-shell effects or initial state radiation. On the other hand, also the modifications of distributions due to anomalous couplings are presented, considering either signal diagrams or all diagrams.

  19. High-resolution slug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases.

  20. Search for Excited Electrons in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deák, M; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krämer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, L; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagouliasl, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopouloul, T; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; VargasTrevino, A; Vazdik, Ya; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, C; Wünsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zácek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2008-01-01

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full $e^{\\pm}p$ data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb$^{-1}$. The electroweak decays of excited electrons ${e}^{*}\\to{e}{\\gamma}$, ${e}^{*}\\to{e}Z$ and ${e}^{*}{\\to}\

  1. LHC collision event at CMS showing four high energy electrons (CMS Higgs search)

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    11sec animation of a Higgs->ZZ->4e candidate in CMS. Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which 4 high energy electrons (orange lines and towers) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes.

  2. Inner- and outer-shell electron dynamics in proton collisions with sodium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zapukhlyak, M.; Kirchner, T.; Ludde, H.J.; Knoop, S.; Morgenstern, R.W.H.; Hoekstra, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    p+Na collisions have been investigated theoretically and experimentally at impact energies in the keV regime. We present results for capture and ionization processes; and, in particular, analyse the role of initial inner-shell electrons, whose active participation is identified in the experiments th

  3. Database for inelastic collisions of lithium atoms with electrons, protons, and multiply charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweinzer, J; Brandenburg, R; Bray, [No Value; Hoekstra, R; Aumayr, F; Janev, RK; Winter, HP

    1999-01-01

    New experimental and theoretical cross-section data for inelastic collision processes of Li atoms in the ground state and excited states (up to n = 4) with electrons, protons, and multiply charged ions have been reported since the database assembled by Wutte et al. [ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABL

  4. Theoretical investigation of the electron capture and loss processes in the collisions of He2+ + Ne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xuhai; Wang, Feng; Jiao, Yalong; Su, Wenyong; Wang, Jianguo; Gou, Bingcong

    2013-08-28

    Based on the time-dependent density functional theory, a method is developed to study ion-atom collision dynamics, which self-consistently couples the quantum mechanical description of electron dynamics with the classical treatment of the ion motion. Employing real-time and real-space method, the coordinate space translation technique is introduced to allow one to focus on the region of target or projectile depending on the actual concerned process. The benchmark calculations are performed for the collisions of He(2+) + Ne, and the time evolution of electron density distribution is monitored, which provides interesting details of the interaction dynamics between the electrons and ion cores. The cross sections of single and many electron capture and loss have been calculated in the energy range of 1-1000 keV/amu, and the results show a good agreement with the available experiments over a wide range of impact energies.

  5. Ionization and single electron capture in collision of highly charged Ar16+ ions with helium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Fei; Gou Bing-Cong

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses the two-centre atomic orbital close-coupling method to study the ionization and the single electron capture in collision of highly charged Ar16+ ions with He atoms in the velocity range of 1.2-1.9 a.u.. The relative importance of single ionization (SI) to single capture (SC) is explored. The comparison between the calculation and experimental data shows that the SI/SC cross section ratios from this work are in good agreement with experimental data. The total single electron ionization cross sections and the total single electron capture cross sections are also given for this collision. The investigation of the partial electron capture cross section shows a general tendency of capture to larger n and l with increasing velocity from 1.2 to 1.9 a.u..

  6. Measurements of Pair Production and Electron Capture from the Continuum in Heavy Particle Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % WA99 \\\\ \\\\ Large transient Coulomb fields, which are generated in collisions of high-Z systems at sufficiently high energies, lead to copious production of electron-positron pairs. It has been suggested that these lepton pairs might mask signals arising from plasma phase interaction. Pair-production cross-sections have been calculated by several authors with results that differ significantly from each other. For very heavy ions and high energies, multiple pairs are expected to be formed even in single peripheral collisions. Perturbative and nonperturbative treatments lead to various predictions for the fractions of multiple pair formation out of the total cross-sections. Some of the electrons produced will be captured into bound states of the ion, thereby, reducing its charge state by one unit. This process which has been termed $^{\\prime\\prime}$Electron Capture from Pair Production$^{\\prime\\prime}$, represents the only electron capture process which increases with energy, and as such, will dominate all oth...

  7. Quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron-beam collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, T G; Ridgers, C P; Kirk, J G; Bell, A R

    2014-01-10

    It is possible using current high-intensity laser facilities to reach the quantum radiation reaction regime for energetic electrons. An experiment using a wakefield accelerator to drive GeV electrons into a counterpropagating laser pulse would demonstrate the increase in the yield of high-energy photons caused by the stochastic nature of quantum synchrotron emission: we show that a beam of 10(9) 1 GeV electrons colliding with a 30 fs laser pulse of intensity 10(22)  W cm(-2) will emit 6300 photons with energy greater than 700 MeV, 60× the number predicted by classical theory.

  8. High-resolution intravital microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Andresen

    Full Text Available Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy--the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and

  9. Experimental Study of Single and Double Electron Detachment Cross Sections for Cl- in Collision with He

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG En-Bo; GAO Mei; HUANG Yong-Yi; WU Shi-Min; LI Guang-Wu; ZHANG Xue-Mei; LU Fu-Quan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Single-electron detachment (SED) and double-electron detachment (DED) for chlorine negative ions in collision with helium are investigated in the energy region of 5-30 keV (SED) and 5-19keV (DED) by growth rate method,respectively. Experimental data from this work are compared with the previous reported data, and a general discussion is given.

  10. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  11. Insights into complexation of dissolved organic matter and Al(III) and nanominerals formation in soils under contrasting fertilizations using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Chang; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; He, Xinhua; Zhou, Quansuo; Yu, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the organomineral associations in soils is of great importance. Using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques, this study compared the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under short-term (3-years) and long-term (22-years) fertilizations. Three fertilization treatments were examined: (i) no fertilization (Control), (ii) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and (iii) NPK plus swine manure (NPKM). Soil spectra detected by the 2DCOS Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that fertilization modified the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM at both short- and long- term location sites. The CH deformations in aliphatic groups played an important role in binding to Al(III) but with minor differences among the Control, NPK and NPKM at the short-term site. While at the long-term site both C-O stretching of polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances and aliphatic O-H were bound to Al(III) under the Control, whereas only aliphatic O-H, and only polysaccharides and silicates, were bound to Al(III) under NPK and NPKM, respectively. Images from HRTEM demonstrated that crystalline nanominerals, composed of Fe and O, were predominant in soil DOM under NPK, while amorphous nanominerals, predominant in Al, Si, and O, were dominant in soil DOM under Control and NPKM. In conclusion, fertilization strategies, especially under long-term, could affect the binding of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM, which resulted in alterations in the turnover, reactivity, and bioavailability of soil organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the FTIR-2DCOS combined with HRTEM techniques could enhance our understanding in the binding characteristics of DOM to Al(III) and the resulted nanominerals in soils.

  12. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  13. High Resolution Scanning Ion Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the thesis is the following. The first chapter is an introduction to scanning microscopy, where the path that led to the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is described and the main differences between electrons and ion beams are highlighted. Chapter 2 is what is normally referred to (which I d

  14. Single-photon emission associated with double electron capture in F9+ + C collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Elkafrawy, Tamer; Tanis, John A; Warczak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC), the one-step process occurring in ion-atom collisions, has been investigated for bare fluorine ions colliding with carbon. RDEC is completed when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of a projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. This work is a follow-up to our earlier measurement of RDEC for bare oxygen projectiles, thus providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields in both cases and allowing for the comparison between the two collision systems as well as with available theoretical studies. The most significant mechanisms of x-ray emission that may contribute to the RDEC energy region as background processes are also addressed.

  15. Electron emission in energetic ion-atom collisions in the presence of coherent electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciappina, M F [CONICET and Departamento de Fisica, Av. Alem 1253 (8000) BahIa Blanca (Argentina); Madsen, L B [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2006-12-28

    We consider the effect of a low-frequency electromagnetic field on the spectra of electron emission in energetic nonrelativistic ion-atom collisions. The field is assumed to have linear polarization and to be weak compared to the typical atomic field. The incorporation of the projectile interaction opens a new scenario to the combined study of electromagnetic and atomic interactions. Our work suggests that the electromagnetic field can have a profound effect on two of the most important structures that appear in the electron emission spectra: the electron capture into the continuum and binary encounter (BE) peaks. We show that in the BE peak region the result for the laser-assisted scattering depends on the theory applied for the collision part, the first Born approximation or the distorted wave Born approximation.

  16. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1989--June 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1992-08-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described.

  17. Implementation of variable time step stochastic dynamics for electronically inelastic gas-surface collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Murthy, C. S.; Redmon, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A variable time step algorithm has been implemented for solving the stochastic equations of motion for gas-surface collisions. It has been tested for a simple model of electronically inelastic collisions with an insulator surface in which the phonon manifold acts as a heat bath and electronic states are localized. In addition to reproducing the accurate nuclear dynamics of the surface atoms, numerical calculations have shown the algorithm to yield accurate ensemble averages of physical observables such as electronic transition probabilities and total energy loss of the gas atom to the surface. This new algorithm offers a gain in efficieny of up to an order of magnitude compared to fixed time step integration.

  18. Excitation of hydrogen atoms in collisions with helium atoms: the role of electron–electron interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémont, F.; Belyaev, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Cross sections for producing H(nl) excited state atoms in H(1s) + He(1s2) collisions are calculated using the CTMC method, at impact energies ranging from 20 eV to 100 keV. The role of the electron correlation is studied. In the first step, the interactions between each pair of the three electrons are neglected. This leads to disagreement of the calculated total cross section for producing H(2l) atoms with previous experimental and theoretical results. In a second step, the electron–electron interaction is taken into account in a rigorous way, that is, in the form of the pure Coulomb potential. To make sure that the He target is stable before the collision, phenomenological potentials for the electron–helium-nucleus interactions that simulate the Heisenberg principle are included in addition to the Coulomb potential. The excitation cross section calculated in the frame of this model is in remarkable agreement with previous data in the range between 200 eV and 5 keV. At other energies, discrepancies are revealed, but only by a factor of less than 2 at high energies. The present results show the decisive role of the electron–electron interaction during collisions. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of classical mechanics to take into account the effects of the electron correlation.

  19. Secondary electron emission in antiproton—carbon-foil collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Kuroki, K.; Andersen, L. H.; Horsdal-Pedersen, E.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Møller, S. P.; Uggerhøj, E.; Elsener, K.

    1991-04-01

    Energy spectra of electrons emitted in the forward direction by antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foil targets were measured in the incident energy region from 500 to 750 keV. In the spectra for antiproton impact, no sharp anticusp, which is expected in place of the cusp in the case of the proton impact, is recognized and a small bump is found at 50 eV below the cusp energy. The spectral profile in the equivelocity region, including smearing out of the anticusp, together with the energy and intensity of the bump, is consistent with a theoretical prediction for wake-riding electrons based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method.

  20. Secondary electron emission in antiproton-carbon foil collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Kuroki, K. (Inst. of Physics, Coll. of Arts and Sciences, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Andersen, L.H.; Horsdal-Pedersen, E.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.; Moeller, S.P.; Uggerhoej, E. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Elsener, K. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-04-01

    Energy spectra of electrons emitted in the forward direction by antiproton and proton bombardments on carbon foil targets were measured in the incident energy region from 500 to 750 keV. In the spectra for antiproton impact, no sharp anticusp, which is expected in place of the cusp in the case of the proton impact, is recognized and a small bump is found at 50 eV below the cusp energy. The spectral profile in the equivelocity region, including smearing out of the anticusp, together with the energy and intensity of the bump, is consistent with a theoretical prediction for wake-riding electrons based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. (orig.).

  1. High resolution STEM of quantum dots and quantum wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadkhodazadeh, Shima

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the application of high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and quantum wires (QWRs). Different imaging and analytical techniques in STEM are introduced and key examples of their application to QDs and QWRs...

  2. Correlated electron-ion collisions in a strong laser field; Korrelierte Elektron-Ion-Stoesse in starken Laserfeldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristow, T.

    2007-12-17

    Electron-ion-collisions in plasmas in the presence of an ultra-short intensive laser pulse can cause high energy transfers to the electrons. During the collision the oscillation energy of the electron in the laser field is changed into drift energy. In this regime, multi-photon processes, known from the ionization of neutral atoms (Above-Threshold Ionization), and successive, so called correlated collisions, are important. The subject of the thesis is a study of binary Coulomb collisions in strong laser fields. The collisions are treated both in the context of classical Newtonian mechanics and in the quantum-mechanical framework by the Schroedinger equation. In the classical case a simplified instantaneous collision model and a complete dynamical treatment are discussed. Collisions can be treated instantaneously, if the ratio of the impact parameter to the quiver amplitude is small. The energy distributions calculated in this approximation show an elastic peak and a broad plateau due to rescattered electrons. At incident velocities smaller than the quiver velocity, correlated collisions are observed in the electron trajectories of the dynamical model. This effect leads to characteristic momentum distributions of the electrons, that are explicitly calculated and compared with the results of the instantaneous model. In addition, the time-dependence of the collisions is discussed in the framework of a singular perturbation theory. The complete description of the Coulomb scattering requires a quantum-mechanical description. A time-dependent method of wave-packet scattering is used and the corresponding time-dependent three-dimensional Schroedinger equation is solved by an implicit ADImethod on a spatial grid. The momentum and the energy distributions of the scattered electrons are calculated by the Fourier transformation of the wavefunction. A comparison of the scattering from a repulsive and an attractive potential is used to distinguish between simple collisions and

  3. Contribution of backscattered electrons to the total electron yield produced in collisions of 8–28 keV electrons with tungsten

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Yadav; R Shanker

    2007-03-01

    It is shown experimentally that under energetic electron bombardment the backscattered electrons from solid targets contribute significantly (∼ 80%) to the observed total electron yield, even for targets of high backscattering coefficients. It is further found that for tungsten ( = 74) with a backscattering coefficient of about 0.50, about 20% of the total electron yield is contributed by the total secondary electrons for impact energies in the range of 8–28 keV. The yield of true backscattered electrons at normal incidence (0), total secondary electrons () and the total electron yield (tot) produced in collisions of 8–28 keV electrons with W have been measured and compared with predictions of available theories. The present results indicate that the constant-loss of primary electrons in the target plays a significant role in producing the secondary electrons and that it yields a better fit to the experiment compared to the power-law.

  4. Scaling laws for positron production in laser-electron-beam collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, T. G.; Ilderton, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Marklund, M.

    2017-08-01

    Showers of γ rays and positrons are produced when a high-energy electron beam collides with a superintense laser pulse. We present scaling laws for the electron-beam energy loss, the γ -ray spectrum, and the positron yield and energy that are valid in the nonlinear, radiation-reaction-dominated regime. As an application we demonstrate that by employing the collision of a >GeV electron beam with a laser pulse of intensity >5 ×1021W cm-2 , today's high-intensity laser facilities are capable of producing O (104) positrons per shot via light-by-light scattering.

  5. The second Born approximation in electron-atom collisions in the presence of a laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhoute, A. [UFR de Physique Atomique, Moleculaire et Optique Appliquee, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Moulay Ismail, Meknes (Morocco)]. E-mail: makhoute@fsmek.ac.ma; Khalil, D.; Zitane, M.; Bouzidi, M. [UFR de Physique Atomique, Moleculaire et Optique Appliquee, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Moulay Ismail, Meknes (Morocco)

    2002-02-28

    The second-order Born approximation (SBA) has been used to calculate the differential cross section for electron-hydrogen collisions in the presence of a linearly polarized laser field. We present a more precise treatment of the small-energy region of an incident electron by improving the calculation of the second Born term in this energy region. Detailed calculations of the scattering amplitudes are performed by using the Sturmian basis expansion. Our SBA results agree very well with those obtained in the first-order Born approximation at larger incident electron energies. (author)

  6. High resolution single particle refinement in EMAN2.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James M; Chen, Muyuan; Baldwin, Philip R; Ludtke, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    EMAN2.1 is a complete image processing suite for quantitative analysis of grayscale images, with a primary focus on transmission electron microscopy, with complete workflows for performing high resolution single particle reconstruction, 2-D and 3-D heterogeneity analysis, random conical tilt reconstruction and subtomogram averaging, among other tasks. In this manuscript we provide the first detailed description of the high resolution single particle analysis pipeline and the philosophy behind its approach to the reconstruction problem. High resolution refinement is a fully automated process, and involves an advanced set of heuristics to select optimal algorithms for each specific refinement task. A gold standard FSC is produced automatically as part of refinement, providing a robust resolution estimate for the final map, and this is used to optimally filter the final CTF phase and amplitude corrected structure. Additional methods are in-place to reduce model bias during refinement, and to permit cross-validation using other computational methods.

  7. Design and implementation of spaceborne high resolution infrared touch screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tai-guo; Li, Wen-xin; Dong, Yi-peng; Ma, Wen; Xia, Jia-gao

    2015-10-01

    For the consideration of the special application environment of the electronic products used in aerospace and to further more improve the human-computer interaction of the manned aerospace area. The research is based on the design and implementation way of the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen on the basis of FPGA and DSP frame structure. Beside the introduction of the whole structure for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, this essay also gives the detail information about design of hardware for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen system, FPGA design, GUI design and DSP algorithm design based on Lagrange interpolation. What is more, the easy makes a comprehensive research of the reliability design for the high resolution spaceborne infrared touch screen for the special purpose of it. Besides, the system test is done after installation of spaceborne infrared touch screen. The test result shows that the system is simple and reliable enough, which has a stable running environment and high resolution, which certainly can meet the special requirement of the manned aerospace instrument products.

  8. PHENIX Measurements of Single Electrons from Charm and Bottom Decays at Midrapidity in Au + Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlinchey, D.

    2016-12-01

    Heavy quarks are an ideal probe of the quark gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. They are produced in the initial hard scattering and therefore experience the full evolution of the medium. PHENIX has previously measured the modification of heavy quark production in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV via electrons from semileptonic decays, which indicated substantial modifications of the parent hadron momentum distribution. The PHENIX barrel silicon vertex detector (VTX), installed in 2011, allows for the separation of electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays through the use of displaced vertex measurements. These proceedings present the results of the completed analysis of the 2011 data set using the VTX.

  9. Bound-Free Electron-Positron Pair Production in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sengul, M Y; Fritzsche, S

    2009-01-01

    The bound-free electron-positron pair production is considered for relativistic heavy ion collisions. In particular, cross sections are calculated for the pair production with the simultaneous capture of the electron into the 1s ground state of one of the ions and for energies that are relevant for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Colliders (LHC). In the framework of perturbation theory, we applied Monte-Carlo integration techniques to compute the lowest-order Feynman diagrams amplitudes by using Darwin wave functions for the bound states of the elec- trons and Sommerfeld-Maue wave functions for the continuum states of the positrons. Calculations were performed especially for the collision of Au + Au at 100 GeV/nucleon and Pb + Pb at 3400 GeV/nucleon.

  10. Combining Higher-Energy Collision Dissociation and Electron-Transfer/Higher-Energy Collision Dissociation Fragmentation in a Product-Dependent Manner Confidently Assigns Proteomewide ADP-Ribose Acceptor Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilan, Vera; Leutert, Mario; Nanni, Paolo; Panse, Christian; Hottiger, Michael O

    2017-02-07

    Protein adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation is a physiologically and pathologically important post-translational modification. Recent technological advances have improved analysis of this complex modification and have led to the discovery of hundreds of ADP-ribosylated proteins in both cultured cells and mouse tissues. Nevertheless, accurate assignment of the ADP-ribose acceptor site(s) within the modified proteins identified has remained a challenging task. This is mainly due to poor fragmentation of modified peptides. Here, using an Orbitrap Fusion Tribrid mass spectrometer, we present an optimized methodology that not only drastically improves the overall localization scores for ADP-ribosylation acceptor sites but also boosts ADP-ribosylated peptide identifications. First, we systematically compared the efficacy of higher-energy collision dissociation (HCD), electron-transfer dissociation with supplemental collisional activation (ETcaD), and electron-transfer/higher-energy collision dissociation (EThcD) fragmentation methods when determining ADP-ribose acceptor sites within complex cellular samples. We then tested the combination of HCD and EThcD fragmentation, which were employed in a product-dependent manner, and the unique fragmentation properties of the ADP-ribose moiety were used to trigger targeted fragmentation of only the modified peptides. The best results were obtained with a workflow that included initial fast, high-energy HCD (Orbitrap, FT) scans, which produced intense ADP-ribose fragmentation ions. These potentially ADP-ribosylated precursors were then selected and analyzed via subsequent high-resolution HCD and EThcD fragmentation. Using these resulting high-quality spectra, we identified a xxxxxxKSxxxxx modification motif where lysine can serve as an ADP-ribose acceptor site. Due to the appearance of serine within this motif and its close presence to the lysine, further analysis revealed that serine serves as a new ADP-ribose acceptor site

  11. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  12. A new semiclassical decoupling scheme for electronic transitions in molecular collisions - Application to vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.-W.; Lam, K. S.; Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    A new semiclassical decoupling scheme (the trajectory-based decoupling scheme) is introduced in a computational study of vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer for a simple model system that simulates collinear atom-diatom collisions. The probability of energy transfer (P) is calculated quasiclassically using the new scheme as well as quantum mechanically as a function of the atomic electronic-energy separation (lambda), with overall good agreement between the two sets of results. Classical mechanics with the new decoupling scheme is found to be capable of predicting resonance behavior whereas an earlier decoupling scheme (the coordinate-based decoupling scheme) failed. Interference effects are not exhibited in P vs lambda results.

  13. Bibliography of electron transfer in heavy particle collisions, 1950--1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, S.W.; Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Thomas, E.W. (eds.)

    1979-02-01

    This annotated bibliography lists published work on electron transfer in heavy particle collisions for the period 1950 to 1975. Sources include scientific journals, abstract compilations, conference proceedings, books, and reports. The bibliography is arranged alphabetically by author. Each entry indicates whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, and what reactants were investigated. Following the bibliographical listing are indexes of reactants and authors.

  14. Double electron capture by protons in collisions with H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Zepeda, M.H. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenieria de la Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino Garcia Barragan 1421, Colonia Olimpica, Codigo Postal 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Gleason, Cristian [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Avenida Universidad 1001, Colonia Chamilpa, Codigo Postal 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Gonzalez, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Magana, O. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Universidad 3000, Circuito Exterior SN, Codigo Postal 04510, Ciudad Universitaria (Mexico); Hinojosa, Guillermo, E-mail: hinojosa@fis.unam.m [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Avenida Universidad SN, Colonia Chamilpa, Apartado Postal 48-3, Cuernavaca 62210 (Mexico)

    2010-05-15

    Double electron capture of protons in collisions with molecular hydrogen in the energy range 1.5-10 keV was studied by measuring the resulting H{sup -} velocity distributions. In this paper, a technique that provides experimental evidence about double capture mechanisms is proposed. In addition, cross-sections for this process were measured in the energy range of 1-5 keV.

  15. Light-fronts approach to electron-positron pair production in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences; Segev, B. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States). Inst. for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics

    1998-03-01

    The authors solve, in an ultrarelativistic limit, the time-dependent Dirac equation describing electron-positron pair production in peripheral relativistic heavy ion collisions using light front variables and a light-fronts representation, obtaining nonperturbative results for the free pair-creation amplitudes in the collider frame. Their result reproduces the result of second-order perturbation theory in the small charge limit while nonperturbative effects arise for realistic charges of the ions.

  16. Logging Data High-Resolution Sequence Stratigraphy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hongqi; Xie Yinfu; Sun Zhongchun; Luo Xingping

    2006-01-01

    The recognition and contrast of bed sets in parasequence is difficult in terrestrial basin high-resolution sequence stratigraphy. This study puts forward new methods for the boundary identification and contrast of bed sets on the basis of manifold logging data. The formation of calcareous interbeds, shale resistivity differences and the relation of reservoir resistivity to altitude are considered on the basis of log curve morphological characteristics, core observation, cast thin section, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the thickness of calcareous interbeds is between 0.5 m and 2 m, increasing on weathering crusts and faults. Calcareous interbeds occur at the bottom of Reservoir resistivity increases with altitude. Calcareous interbeds may be a symbol of recognition for the boundary of bed sets and isochronous contrast bed sets, and shale resistivity differences may confirm the stack relation and connectivity of bed sets. Based on this, a high-rcsolution chronostratigraphic framework of Xi-1 segment in Shinan area, Junggar basin is presented, and the connectivity of bed sets and oil-water contact is confirmed. In this chronostratigraphic framework, the growth order, stack mode and space shape of bed sets are qualitatively and quantitatively described.

  17. Laser wavelength comparison by high resolution interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, H P; Deslattes, R D; Schweitzer, W G

    1976-03-01

    High resolution interferometry has been used to determine the wavelength ratio between two molecularly stabilized He-Ne lasers, one locked to a methane absorption at 3.39 microm and the other locked to the k peak of (129)I(2) at 633 nm. An optical beat frequency technique gave fractional orders while a microwave sideband method yielded the integer parts. Conventional (third derivative) peak seeking servoes stabilized both laser and cavity lengths. Reproducibility of the electronic control system and optics was a few parts in 10(12), while systematic errors associated with curvature of the cavity mirrors limited the accuracy of the wavelength ratio measurement to 2 parts in 10(10). The measured wavelength ratio of the methane stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 microm [P(7) line, nu(3) band] to the (129)I(2) (k peak) stabilized He-Ne laser at 633 nm was 5.359 049 260 6 (0.000 2 ppm). This ratio agrees with that calculated from the (lower accuracy) results of earlier wavelength measurements made relative to the (86)Kr standard. Its higher accuracy thus permits a provisional extension of the frequency scale based on the cesium oscillator into the visible spectrum.

  18. DESIR high resolution separator at GANIL, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toprek Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution separator for the SPIRAL2/DESIR project at GANIL has been designed. The extracted isotopes from SPIRAL2 will be transported to and cooled in a RFQ cooler yielding beams with very low transverse emittance and energy spread. These beams will then be accelerated to 60 keV and sent to a high-resolution mass separator where a specific isotope will be selected. The good beam properties extracted from the RFQ cooler will allow one to obtain a mass resolution of č26000 with the high-resolution mass separator.

  19. Forward electron production in heavy ion-atom and ion-solid collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellin, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    A sharp cusp in the velocity spectrum of electrons, ejected in ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is observed when the ejected electron velocity vector v/sub e/ matches that of the emergent ion vector v/sub p/ in both speed and direction. In ion-atom collisions, the electrons originate from capture to low-lying, projectile-centered continuum states (ECC) for fast bare or nearly bare projectiles, and from loss to those low-lying continuum states (ELC) when loosely bound projectile electrons are available. Most investigators now agree that ECC cusps are strongly skewed toward lower velocities, and exhibit full widths half maxima roughly proportional to v/sub p/ (neglecting target-shell effects, which are sometimes strong). A close examination of recent ELC data shows that ELC cusps are instead nearly symmetric, with widths nearly independent on v/sub p/ in the velocity range 6 to 18 a.u., a result only recently predicted by theory. Convoy electron cusps produced in heavy ion-solid collisions at MeV/u energies exhibit approximately velocity-independent widths very similar to ELC cusp widths. While the shape of the convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, velocity, and of target material, it is found that the yields in polycrystalline targets exhibit a strong dependence on projectile Z and velocity. While attempts have been made to link convoy electron production to binary ECC or ELC processes, sometimes at the last layer, or alternatively to a solid-state wake-riding model, our measured dependences of cusp shape and yield on projectile charge state and energy are inconsistent with the predictions of available theories. 10 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  20. Electron Capture in Collisions of Slow Highly Charged Ions with an Atom and a Molecule: Processes and Fragmentation Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Husson

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract : Processes involved in slow collisions between highly charged ions (HCI and neutral targets are presented. First, the mechanisms responsible for double electron capture are discussed. We show that, while the electron-nucleus interaction is expected to be dominant at projectile velocities of about 0.5 a.u., the electron-electron interaction plays a decisive role during the collision and gains importance when the projectile velocity decreases. This interaction has also to be invoked in the capture of core electrons by HCI. Finally, the molecular fragmentation of H2 following the impact of HCI is studied.

  1. Nature of mixed symmetry 2{sup +} states in {sup 94}Mo from high resolution electron and proton scattering and line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burda, Oleksiy

    2007-07-15

    The present work contains two parts. The first one is devoted to the investigation of mixed-symmetry structure in {sup 94}Mo and the second one to the astrophysical relevant line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be. In the first part of the thesis the nature of one- and two-phonon symmetric and mixed-symmetric 2{sup +} states in {sup 94}Mo is investigated with high-resolution inelastic electron and proton scattering experiments in a combined analysis. The (e,e') experiments were carried out at the 169 magnetic spectrometer at the S-DALINAC. Data were taken at a beam energy E e=70 MeV and scattering angles {theta}{sub e}=93 -165 . In dispersion-matching mode an energy resolution {delta}{sub E}=30-45 keV (full width at half maximum) was achieved. The (p,p') measurements were performed at iThemba LABS, South Africa, using a K600 magnetic spectrometer at a proton energy E p=200 MeV and scattering angles {theta}{sub p}=4.5 -26 . Typical energy resolutions were {delta}{sub E}{approx_equal}35 keV. The combined analysis reveals a dominant one-phonon structure of the transitions to the first and third 2{sup +} states, as well as an isovector character of the transition to the one-phonon mixed-symmetric state within the valence shell. Quantitatively consistent estimates of the one-phonon admixtures are obtained from both experimental probes when two-step contributions to the proton scattering cross sections are taken into account. In the second part of the thesis the line shape of the first excited 1/2{sup +} state in {sup 9}Be is studied. Spectra of the {sup 9}Be(e,e') reaction were measured at the S-DALINAC at an electron energy E e=73 MeV and scattering angles of 93 and 141 with high energy resolution up to excitation energies E{sub x}=8 MeV. The form factor of the first excited state has been extracted from the data. The astrophysical relevant {sup 9}Be({gamma},n) cross sections have been extracted from the (e,e') data. The

  2. Chirped Auger electron emission due to field-assisted post-collision interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonitz M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the Auger decay in the temporal domain by applying a terahertz streaking light field. Xenon and krypton atoms were studied by implementing the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH as well as a source of high-order harmonic radiation combined with terahertz pulses from an optical rectification source. The observed linewidth asymmetries in the streaked spectra suggest a chirped Auger electron emission which is understood in terms of field-assisted post-collision interaction. The experimentally obtained results agree well with model calculations.

  3. Differential cross sections for single-electron capture in He{sup 2+}-D collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France)]|[Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France)

    1995-06-14

    A translational energy spectroscopy technique was used to study single-electron capture into the He{sup +} (n = 2) and He{sup +} (n 3) states in He{sup 2+}-D collisions. Differential cross sections were determined at 4, 6 and 8 keV in the angular range 5`-1{sup o}30` (laboratory frame). As expected, single-electron capture into the n = 2 state was found to be the dominant process; total cross sections for capture into the He{sup +} (n = 3) state were compared to other experimental and theoretical results. (author).

  4. Electronic-excitation versus nuclear collision damage by ion-beams in dielectric materials (LiNbO{sub 3})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Campus de Cantoblanco, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Olivares, J. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Campus de Cantoblanco, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G. [CELLS, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Agullo-Lopez, F. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Campus de Cantoblanco, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: fal@uam.es

    2008-06-15

    The lattice disorder generated in LiNbO{sub 3} by electronic excitation is quantitatively assessed and compared to that produced by elastic nuclear collisions. In particular, the main differential features between the two mechanisms are clearly established. The analysis is based on a recent non-radiative exciton decay model. For ions with atomic mass {>=}15, the local damage caused by electronic excitation is strongly enhanced (up to three orders of magnitude) in comparison to that predicted by nuclear collisions.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of cold magnetized non-relativistic plasma in the presence of electron-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Biswajit, E-mail: biswajit-sahu@yahoo.co.in [Department of Mathematics, West Bengal State University, Barasat, Kolkata 700126 (India); Sinha, Anjana, E-mail: sinha.anjana@gmail.com [Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar, E-mail: rroychoudhury123@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan - 731 204, India and Advanced Centre for Nonlinear and Complex Phenomena, 1175 Survey Park, Kolkata 700 075 (India)

    2015-09-15

    A numerical study is presented of the nonlinear dynamics of a magnetized, cold, non-relativistic plasma, in the presence of electron-ion collisions. The ions are considered to be immobile while the electrons move with non-relativistic velocities. The primary interest is to study the effects of the collision parameter, external magnetic field strength, and the initial electromagnetic polarization on the evolution of the plasma system.

  6. High resolution SPM imaging of organic molecules with functionalized tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Pavel

    2017-08-01

    One of the most remarkable and exciting achievements in the field of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the last years is the unprecedented sub-molecular resolution of both atomic and electronic structures of single molecules deposited on solid state surfaces. Despite its youth, the technique has already brought many new possibilities to perform different kinds of measurements, which cannot be accomplished by other techniques. This opens new perspectives in advanced characterization of physical and chemical processes and properties of molecular structures on surfaces. Here, we discuss the history and recent progress of the high resolution imaging with a functionalized probe by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). We describe the mechanisms responsible for the high-resolution AFM, STM and IETS-STM contrast. The complexity of this technique requires new theoretical approaches, where a relaxation of the functionalized probe is considered. We emphasise the similarities of the mechanism driving high-resolution SPM with other imaging methods. We also summarise briefly significant achievements and progress in different branches. Finally we provide brief perspectives and remaining challenges of the further refinement of these high-resolution methods.

  7. High Resolution Silicon Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes a plan to build a prototype small stroke, high precision deformable mirror suitable for space-based operation in systems for high-resolution...

  8. High Resolution Silicon Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal we describe a plan to build a deformable mirror suitable for space-based operation in systems for high-resolution imaging. The prototype DM will be...

  9. VT Hydrography Dataset - High Resolution NHD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Vermont Hydrography Dataset (VHD) is compliant with the local resolution (also known as High Resolution) National Hydrography Dataset (NHD)...

  10. Structure of high-resolution NMR spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Corio, PL

    2012-01-01

    Structure of High-Resolution NMR Spectra provides the principles, theories, and mathematical and physical concepts of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.The book presents the elementary theory of magnetic resonance; the quantum mechanical theory of angular momentum; the general theory of steady state spectra; and multiple quantum transitions, double resonance and spin echo experiments.Physicists, chemists, and researchers will find the book a valuable reference text.

  11. The effect of q-distributed electrons on the head-on collision of ion acoustic solitary waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Uday Narayan; Chatterjee, Prasanta [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Physics and Applied Mathematics, ISI, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2012-01-15

    The head-on collision of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in two component plasma comprising nonextensive distributed electrons is investigated. Two opposite directional Kortewg-de-vries (KdV) equations are derived and the phase shift due to collision is obtained using the extended version of Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method. Different ranges of nonextensive parameter q are considered and their effects on phase shifts are observed. It is found that the presence of nonextensive distributed electrons plays a significant role on the nature of collision of ion acoustic solitary waves.

  12. Backscattered electron image of osmium-impregnated/macerated tissues as a novel technique for identifying the cis-face of the Golgi apparatus by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, D; Bochimoto, H; Watanabe, T; Ushiki, T

    2016-07-01

    The osmium maceration method with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) enabled to demonstrate directly the three-dimensional (3D) structure of membranous cell organelles. However, the polarity of the Golgi apparatus (that is, the cis-trans axis) can hardly be determined by SEM alone, because there is no appropriate immunocytochemical method for specific labelling of its cis- or trans-faces. In the present study, we used the osmium impregnation method, which forms deposits of reduced osmium exclusively in the cis-Golgi elements, for preparation of specimens for SEM. The newly developed procedure combining osmium impregnation with subsequent osmium maceration specifically visualised the cis-elements of the Golgi apparatus, with osmium deposits that were clearly detected by backscattered electron-mode SEM. Prolonged osmication by osmium impregnation (2% OsO4 solution at 40°C for 40 h) and osmium maceration (0.1% OsO4 solution at 20°C for 24 h) did not significantly impair the 3D ultrastructure of the membranous cell organelles, including the Golgi apparatus. This novel preparation method enabled us to determine the polarity of the Golgi apparatus with enough information about the surrounding 3D ultrastructure by SEM, and will contribute to our understanding of the global organisation of the entire Golgi apparatus in various differentiated cells.

  13. Influence of electron-neutral elastic collisions on the instability of an ion-contaminated cylindrical electron cloud: 2D3V PIC-with-MCC simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is a simulation based investigation of the effect of elastic collisions and effectively elastic-like excitation collisions between electrons and background neutrals on the dynamics of a cylindrically trapped electron cloud that also has an ion contaminant mixed in it. A cross section of the trapped non neutral cloud composed of electrons mixed uniformly with a fractional population of ions is loaded on a 2D PIC grid with the plasma in a state of unstable equilibrium due to differential rotation between the electron and the ion component. The electrons are also loaded with an axial velocity component, vz, that mimics their bouncing motion between the electrostatic end plugs of a Penning-Malmberg trap. This vz loading facilitates 3D elastic and excitation collisions of the electrons with background neutrals under a MCC scheme. In the present set of numerical experiments, the electrons do not ionize the neutrals. This helps in separating out only the effect of non-ionizing collisions of electrons on the dynamics of the cloud. Simulations reveal that these non-ionizing collisions indirectly influence the ensuing collisionless ion resonance instability of the contaminated electron cloud by a feedback process. The collisional relaxation reduces the average density of the electron cloud and thereby increases the fractional density of the ions mixed in it. The dynamically changing electron density and fractional density of ions feed back on the ongoing ion-resonance (two-stream) instability between the two components of the nonneutral cloud and produce deviations in the paths of progression of the instability that are uncorrelated at different background gas pressures. Effects of the collisions on the instability are evident from alteration in the growth rate and energetics of the instability caused by the presence of background neutrals as compared to a vacuum background. Further in order to understand if the non-ionizing collisions can independently be a cause

  14. Beauty production in pp collisions at s=2.76 TeV measured via semi-electronic decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anticic, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371577810; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371578248; Bielcík, J.; Bielcíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355079615; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070139032; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411885812; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A R; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411888056; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315888644; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372618715; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355502488; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052577; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration at the LHC reports measurement of the inclusive production cross section of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of beauty hadrons with rapidity |y|<0.8 and transverse momentum 1collisions at s=2.76 TeV. Electrons not originating from semi-electronic decay

  15. Beauty production in pp collisions at s=2.76 TeV measured via semi-electronic decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anticic, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielcík, J.; Bielcíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A R; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J. Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, O.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration at the LHC reports measurement of the inclusive production cross section of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of beauty hadrons with rapidity |y|<0.8 and transverse momentum 1collisions at s=2.76 TeV. Electrons not originating from semi-electronic decay

  16. Study of Electron Pair Production in Hadron and Nuclear Collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Liebold, H-P; Sako, H; Belaga, V; Bielcikova, J; Stachel, J

    2002-01-01

    The NA45/CERES experiment investigates primarily the production of electron-positron pairs and of direct photons in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. For electron-positron pairs the experiment studies the continuum in the mass region of about 0.05 to 2 GeV/c$^2$ and the vector mesons $\\varrho ,~ \\omega$, and, $\\phi$. Since for electromagnetic probes final state interactions are practically negligible these observables are unique for studying the evolution and dynamics of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions from the hot and dense early stage where a quark-gluon plasma is expected to be formed to the final freeze-out stage when hadrons decouple.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment also studies the spectral distributions of charged particles, their distribution relative to the reaction plane, and identified high momentum pions. Another topic of investigation are QED pairs produced in peripheral nuclear collisions.\\\\ \\\\ The first phase of the experiment, NA45, has been concluded with two main results: i) There is...

  17. The influence of electron collisions on non-LTE Li line formation in stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, Y; Lind, K; Asplund, M

    2011-01-01

    The influence of uncertainties in the rate coefficient data for electron-impact excitation and ionization on non-LTE Li line formation in cool stellar atmospheres is investigated. We examine the collision data used in previous non-LTE calculations and compare with recent calculations using convergent close-coupling (CCC) techniques, as well our own calculations using the R-matrix with pseudostates (RMPS) method. We find excellent agreement between rate coefficients from the CCC and RMPS calculations, and reasonable agreement between these data and the semi-empirical data used in non-LTE calculations up till now. The results of non-LTE calculations using the old and new data sets are compared and only small differences are found; of order 0.01 dex (~ 2%) or less in the abundance corrections. We therefore conclude that electron collision data are not a significant source of uncertainty in non-LTE Li line formation calculations. Indeed, together with the collision data for the charge exchange process Li(3s) + H ...

  18. Single and multiple electron removal and fragmentation in collisions of protons with water molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyás, L.; Egri, S.; Ghavaminia, H.; Igarashi, A.

    2016-03-01

    Single and multiple electron removal processes (capture and ionization) in proton-H2O collisions have been investigated applying the continuum distorted wave with eikonal initial-state model within the framework of independent electron approach. Probabilities and cross sections for electron capture are derived from the same quantities evaluated for ionization using the continuity of transition quantities across the ionization threshold. Dissociation and fragmentation cross sections for the H2Oq + (q =1 -3) ions have been evaluated by considering branching ratios that include the effect of multiple electron removal transitions. The results are compared with experimental and other theoretical data in the range of impact energies from 30 kev to 5 MeV. Generally, the evaluated cross sections and fragmentation yields show good agreement with experiments at impact energies above 100-150 keV.

  19. Measurements of Pair Production and Electron Capture from the Continuum in Heavy Particle Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Large transient Coulomb fields, which are generated in collisions of high-Z systems at sufficiently high energies, lead to copious production of electron-positron pairs. It has been suggested that these lepton pairs might mask signals arising from plasma phase interaction. Pair-production cross sections have been calculated by several authors with results which differ significantly from each other. Some of the electrons produced may be captured into bound states of the ion, thereby, reducing its charge state by one unit. This process which has been termed ``Electron Capture from Pair Production``, represents the only electron capture pro which increases with energy, and as such, will dominate all others in the ultrarelativistic energy regime. Ions having undergone this process would be lost from storage-type accelerators. The absolute cross sections for capture have been calculated with results which differ by as much as an order of magnitude. If as large as some of the calculations predict, Relativistic Heav...

  20. Double lepton pair production with electron capture in relativistic heavy--ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Artemyev, A N; Surzhykov, A

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of a double lepton pair production in ultra--relativistic collision between two bare ions. Special emphasis is placed to processes in which creation of (at least one) $e^+ e^-$ pair is accompanied by the capture of an electron into a bound ionic state. To evaluate the probability and cross section of these processes we employ two approaches based on (i) the first--order perturbation theory and multipole expansion of Dirac wavefunctions, and (ii) the equivalent photon approximation. With the help of such approaches, detailed calculations are made for the creation of two bound--free $e^+ e^-$ pairs as well as of bound--free $e^+ e^-$ and free--free $\\mu^+ \\mu^-$ pairs in collisions of bare lead ions Pb$^{82+}$. The results of the calculations indicate that observation of the double lepton processes may become feasible at the LHC facility.

  1. Coordinate space translation technique for simulation of electronic process in the ion-atom collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Hong, Xuhai; Wang, Jian; Kim, Kwang S

    2011-04-21

    Recently we developed a theoretical model of ion-atom collisions, which was made on the basis of a time-dependent density functional theory description of the electron dynamics and a classical treatment of the heavy particle motion. Taking advantage of the real-space grid method, we introduce a "coordinate space translation" technique to allow one to focus on a certain space of interest such as the region around the projectile or the target. Benchmark calculations are given for collisions between proton and oxygen over a wide range of impact energy. To extract the probability of charge transfer, the formulation of Lüdde and Dreizler [J. Phys. B 16, 3973 (1983)] has been generalized to ensemble-averaging application in the particular case of O((3)P). Charge transfer total cross sections are calculated, showing fairly good agreements between experimental data and present theoretical results.

  2. Observation of exclusive electron-positron production in hadron-hadron collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Caron, B; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; Cecco, S De; Deisher, A; Lentdecker, G De; Dell'orso, M; Paoli, F Delli; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Pedis, D De; Derwent, P F; Giovanni, G P Di; Dionisi, C; Ruzza, B Di; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; 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Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-03-16

    We present the first observation of exclusive e(+)e(-) production in hadron-hadron collisions, using pp[over] collision data at (square root) s = 1.96 TeV taken by the run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 532 pb(-1). We require the absence of any particle signatures in the detector except for an electron and a positron candidate, each with transverse energy E(T) > 5 GeV and pseudorapidity |eta| p + e(+)e(-) + p[over] through two-photon exchange. The measured cross section is 1.6(-0.3)(+0.5)(stat) +/- 0.3(syst) pb. This agrees with the theoretical prediction of 1.71+/-0.01 pb.

  3. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David R. Farley

    2010-08-19

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N≥3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N=0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  4. High-resolution modeling of protein structures based on flexible fitting of low-resolution structural data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Tekpinar, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    To circumvent the difficulty of directly solving high-resolution biomolecular structures, low-resolution structural data from Cryo-electron microscopy (EM) and small angle solution X-ray scattering (SAXS) are increasingly used to explore multiple conformational states of biomolecular assemblies. One promising venue to obtain high-resolution structural models from low-resolution data is via data-constrained flexible fitting. To this end, we have developed a new method based on a coarse-grained Cα-only protein representation, and a modified form of the elastic network model (ENM) that allows large-scale conformational changes while maintaining the integrity of local structures including pseudo-bonds and secondary structures. Our method minimizes a pseudo-energy which linearly combines various terms of the modified ENM energy with an EM/SAXS-fitting score and a collision energy that penalizes steric collisions. Unlike some previous flexible fitting efforts using the lowest few normal modes, our method effectively utilizes all normal modes so that both global and local structural changes can be fully modeled with accuracy. This method is also highly efficient in computing time. We have demonstrated our method using adenylate kinase as a test case which undergoes a large open-to-close conformational change. The EM-fitting method is available at a web server (http://enm.lobos.nih.gov), and the SAXS-fitting method is available as a pre-compiled executable upon request.

  5. Electron's anomalous magnetic moment effects on electron-hydrogen elastic collisions in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Elhandi, S; attaourti, Y; Manaut, B; Oufni, L

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the electron's anomalous magnetic moment on the relativistic electronic dressing for the process of electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions is investigated. We consider a laser field with circular polarization and various electric field strengths. The Dirac-Volkov states taking into account this anomaly are used to describe the process in the first order of perturbation theory. The correlation between the terms coming from this anomaly and the electric field strength gives rise to new results, namely the strong dependence of the spinor part of the differential cross section (DCS) with respect to these terms. A detailed study has been devoted to the non relativistic regime as well as the moderate relativistic regime. Some aspects of this dependence as well as the dynamical behavior of the DCS in the relativistic regime have been addressed.

  6. Comprehensive rate coefficients for electron-collision-induced transitions in hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrinceanu, D. [Department of Physics, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Onofrio, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia " Galileo Galilei," Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sadeghpour, H. R., E-mail: daniel.vrinceanu@gmail.com, E-mail: onofrior@gmail.com, E-mail: hrsadeghpour@gmail.com [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Energy-changing electron-hydrogen atom collisions are crucial to regulating the energy balance in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas and are relevant to the formation of stellar atmospheres, recombination in H II clouds, primordial recombination, three-body recombination, and heating in ultracold and fusion plasmas. Computational modeling of electron-hydrogen collision has been attempted through quantum mechanical scattering state-to-state calculations of transitions involving low-lying energy levels in hydrogen (with principal quantum number n < 7) and at large principal quantum numbers using classical trajectory techniques. Analytical expressions are proposed that interpolate the current quantum mechanical and classical trajectory results for electron-hydrogen scattering in the entire range of energy levels for nearly the entire temperature range of interest in astrophysical environments. An asymptotic expression for the Born cross section is interpolated with a modified expression previously derived for electron-hydrogen scattering in the Rydberg regime using classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. The derived formula is compared to existing numerical data for transitions involving low principal quantum numbers, and the dependence of the deviations on temperature is discussed.

  7. Multiple electron capture from isolated protein poly-anions in collision with slow highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, A R; Rousseau, P; Domaracka, A; Huber, B A; Giuliani, A

    2017-08-02

    Collisions of 375 keV Xe(25+) ions with trapped mass/charge selected poly-anions of the cytochrome C protein (∼12.5 kDa) were studied by coupling a linear quadrupole ion trap with low-energy ion beam facility. Tandem mass spectra were recorded for the protein precursor charge states ranging from -9 to -17. The present work reports the first study of slow highly charged ion collisions with poly-anions. A high signal to noise ratio allowed the study of the intensity of single and multiple electron removal by a projectile, as well as associated neutral losses, as a function of the target charge state. Relative single and double electron detachment cross sections were found to increase with increasing charge state of the precursor anion. The experimental findings are supported by the calculations of the total electron capture cross sections, based on the classical over-the-barrier model, restricted to a simple uniformly charged linear protein structure and a near-end electron capture.

  8. Electron efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using 2012 LHC proton-proton collision data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M. [Univ. Mohamed Premier et LPTPM, Oujda (Morocco). Faculte des Sciences; Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2017-03-15

    This paper describes the algorithms for the reconstruction and identification of electrons in the central region of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These algorithms were used for all ATLAS results with electrons in the final state that are based on the 2012 pp collision data produced by the LHC at √(s) = 8 TeV. The efficiency of these algorithms, together with the charge misidentification rate, is measured in data and evaluated in simulated samples using electrons from Z → ee, Z → eeγ and J/ψ → ee decays. For these efficiency measurements, the full recorded data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb{sup -1}, is used. Based on a new reconstruction algorithm used in 2012, the electron reconstruction efficiency is 97% for electrons with E{sub T} = 15 GeV and 99% at E{sub T} = 50 GeV. Combining this with the efficiency of additional selection criteria to reject electrons from background processes or misidentified hadrons, the efficiency to reconstruct and identify electrons at the ATLAS experiment varies from 65 to 95%, depending on the transverse momentum of the electron and background rejection. (orig.)

  9. Electron efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using 2012 LHC proton-proton collision data.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zwalinski, L

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the algorithms for the reconstruction and identification of electrons in the central region of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These algorithms were used for all ATLAS results with electrons in the final state that are based on the 2012 pp collision data produced by the LHC at [Formula: see text] = 8 [Formula: see text]. The efficiency of these algorithms, together with the charge misidentification rate, is measured in data and evaluated in simulated samples using electrons from [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] decays. For these efficiency measurements, the full recorded data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb[Formula: see text], is used. Based on a new reconstruction algorithm used in 2012, the electron reconstruction efficiency is 97% for electrons with [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] and 99% at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]. Combining this with the efficiency of additional selection criteria to reject electrons from background processes or misidentified hadrons, the efficiency to reconstruct and identify electrons at the ATLAS experiment varies from 65 to 95%, depending on the transverse momentum of the electron and background rejection.

  10. High resolution solar soft X-ray spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fei; WANG Huan-Yu; PENG Wen-Xi; LIANG Xiao-Hua; ZHANG Chun-Lei; CAO Xue-Lei; JIANG Wei-Chun; ZHANG Jia-Yu; CUI Xing-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution solar soft X-ray spectrometer (SOX) payload onboard a satellite is developed.A silicon drift detector (SDD) is adopted as the detector of the SOX spectrometer.The spectrometer consists of the detectors and their readout electronics,a data acquisition unit and a payload data handling unit.A ground test system is also developed to test SOX.The test results show that the design goals of the spectrometer system have been achieved.

  11. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectra of silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrie, A.; Christensen, N. E.

    1976-01-01

    An electron spectrometer fitted with an x-ray monochromator for Al Kα1,2 radiation (1486.6 eV) has been used to record high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectra for the 4d valence band as well as the 3d spin doublet in silver. The core-level spectrum has a line shape that can be described...

  12. Signatures of quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron-beam collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H. Y. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Yan, X. Q. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zepf, M., E-mail: m.zepf@uni-jena.de [Helmholtz Institute Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Electron dynamics in the collision of an electron beam with a high-intensity focused ultrashort laser pulse are investigated using three-dimensional QED particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and the results are compared with those calculated by classical Landau and Lifshitz PIC simulations. Significant differences are observed from the angular dependence of the electron energy distribution patterns for the two different approaches, because photon emission is no longer well approximated by a continuous process in the quantum radiation-dominated regime. The stochastic nature of photon emission results in strong signatures of quantum radiation-reaction effects under certain conditions. We show that the laser spot size and duration greatly influence these signatures due to the competition of QED effects and the ponderomotive force, which is well described in the classical approximation. The clearest signatures of quantum radiation reaction are found in the limit of large laser spots and few cycle pulse durations.

  13. Double scattering production of two positron-electron pairs in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Klusek-Gawenda, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    We present first measurable predictions for electromagnetic (two-photon) double scattering production of two positron-electron pairs in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at LHC. Measureable cross sections are obtained with realistic cuts on electron/positron (pseudo)rapidities and transverse momenta for the ALICE and ATLAS or CMS experiments. The predictions for total and differential cross sections are presented. We show also two-dimensional distributions in rapidities of the opposite-sign (from the same or different subcollisions) and of the same-sign ($e^+ e^+$ or $e^- e^-$) electrons and in rapidity distance between them. Expected number of events are presented and discussed. Our calculations strongly suggest that relevant measurements with the help of ATLAS, CMS and ALICE detectors are possible in a near future.

  14. Double scattering production of two positron-electron pairs in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-12-01

    We present first measurable predictions for electromagnetic (two-photon) double scattering production of two positron-electron pairs in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at LHC. Measurable cross sections are obtained with realistic cuts on electron/positron (pseudo)rapidities and transverse momenta for the ALICE and ATLAS or CMS experiments. The predictions for total and differential cross sections are presented. We show also two-dimensional distributions in rapidities of the opposite-sign (from the same or different subcollisions) and of the same-sign (e+e+ or e-e-) electrons and in rapidity distance between them. Expected number of events are presented and discussed. Our calculations strongly suggest that relevant measurements with the help of ATLAS, CMS and ALICE detectors are possible in a near future. We show and compare energy dependence of the cross sections for one-pair and two-pair production.

  15. Will Allis Prize for the Study of Ionized Gases: Electron Collisions - Experiment, Theory, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, and molecules represent one of the very early topics of quantum mechanics. In spite of the field's maturity, a number of recent developments in detector technology (e.g., the ``reaction microscope'' or the ``magnetic-angle changer'') and the rapid increase in computational resources have resulted in significant progress in the measurement, understanding, and theoretical/computational description of few-body Coulomb problems. Close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists worldwide continue to produce high-quality benchmark data, which allow for thoroughly testing and further developing a variety of theoretical approaches. As a result, it has now become possible to reliably calculate the vast amount of atomic data needed for detailed modelling of the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres, the interpretation of astrophysical data, optimizing the energy transport in reactive plasmas, and many other topics - including light-driven processes, in which electrons are produced by continuous or short-pulse ultra-intense electromagnetic radiation. I will highlight some of the recent developments that have had a major impact on the field. This will be followed by showcasing examples, in which accurate electron collision data enabled applications in fields beyond traditional AMO physics. Finally, open problems and challenges for the future will be outlined. I am very grateful for fruitful scientific collaborations with many colleagues, and the long-term financial support by the NSF through the Theoretical AMO and Computational Physics programs, as well as supercomputer resources through TeraGrid and XSEDE.

  16. Single electron capture measurements in collisions of K{sup +} on N{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcón, F.B. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62210 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Fuentes, B.E., E-mail: beatriz.fuentes@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Cd. Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Martínez, H. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62210 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Yousif, F.B. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad #1000, Col. Chamilpa, C.P. 62210, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-08-01

    Absolute total charge transfer cross sections have been measured for K{sup +}–N{sub 2} collisions, at impact energies between 1.0 and 3.5 keV. The charge transfer cross sections show a monotonic increasing behaviour as a function of the incident energy. Agreement with other groups is observed as the present measurements extend to lower energies. A semi-empirical calculation shows a similar behaviour to the present data with respect to the electron capture cross sections as a function of energy.

  17. Production of bound triplet $\\mu^{+} \\mu^{-}$ system in collisions of electrons with atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Artéaga-Romero, N; Serbo, V G

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the production of orthodimuonium (OM) ($\\mu^{+} nuclei or atoms. This reaction was previously studied by Holvik and Olsen [Phys. Rev. D 35, 2124 (1987)] on the basis of a bremsstrahlung mechanism where OM is produced by only one virtual photon. In the present paper we consider a competing three-photon mechanism where the production of OM results from the collision of a photon generated by the electron with two photons emitted by the nucleus. We derive the corresponding spectrum and production rate of OM and show that the three-photon mechanism is the dominant one for heavy atom target.

  18. Pressure broadening calculations for OH in collisions with argon: Rotational, vibrational, and electronic transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2017-03-01

    Collisional parameters describing both the pressure-induced broadening and shifting of isolated lines in the spectrum of the hydroxyl radical in collisions with argon have been determined through quantum scattering calculations using accurate potential energy surfaces describing the OH(X2 Π , A2Σ+)-Ar interactions. These calculations have been carried for pure rotational, vibrational, and electronic transitions. The calculated pressure broadening coefficients are in good agreement with the available measurements in the microwave, infrared, and ultraviolet spectral regions. Computed pressure broadening coefficients as a function of temperature are reported for these three types of transitions.

  19. Single-electron capture in He[sup 2+]-D[sub 2] collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France))

    1994-02-14

    Doubly differential cross sections of single-electron capture were measured for He[sup 2+] impinging on a molecular deuterium target. The investigated collision energies are 4, 6 and 8 keV and the scattering angles range from 10' to 2[sup o]30' (laboratory frame). The exothermic capture leading to He[sup +] (1s) + D[sub 2][sup +*] was found to be the most important process at low energies and angles, whereas the endothermic channels leading to dissociative capture become the main processes at high scattering angles, i.e. at small impact parameters. (author).

  20. A kinetic study of solar wind electrons in the transition region from collision dominated to collisionless flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie-Svendsen, O.; Leer, E.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the evolution of the velocity distribution function of a test population of electrons in the solar corona and inner solar wind region, using a recently developed kinetic model. The model solves the time dependent, linear transport equation, with a Fokker-Planck collision operator to describe Coulomb collisions between the 'test population' and a thermal background of charged particles, using a finite differencing scheme. The model provides information on how non-Maxwellian features develop in the distribution function in the transition region from collision dominated to collisionless flow. By taking moments of the distribution the evolution of higher order moments, such as the heat flow, can be studied.

  1. Collisions of carbon and oxygen ions with electrons, H, H/sub 2/ and He: Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, R.A.; Janev, R.K.; Pindzola, M.S.

    1987-02-01

    This report provides a handbook for fusion research of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for collisions of carbon and oxygen ions with electrons, hydrogen atoms and molecules, and helium atoms. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical, and parametrized form. Processes considered include exciation, ionization, and charge exchange at collision energies appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  2. COINCIDENCES BETWEEN ELECTRONS AND TARGET IONS TO IDENTIFY CAPTURE CHANNELS IN COLLISIONS OF MULTIPLY CHARGED IONS ON GAS TARGETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTHUMUS, JH; MORGENSTERN, R

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated multielectron capture processes in collisions of Ar9+ on Ar by measuring the resulting Auger electrons in coincidence with charge-state-analyzed target ions. In this way it was possible to reconstruct partial electron energy spectra, each corresponding to a particular number of

  3. STRONG VELOCITY DEPENDENCE OF ELECTRON-CAPTURE IN COLLISIONS BETWEEN ALIGNED NA-ASTERISK(3P) AND HE-2+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHLATMANN, AR; HOEKSTRA, R; MORGENSTERN, R; OLSON, RE; PASCALE, J

    1993-01-01

    By analyzing spectra of emitted photons, we have studied state-selective electron capture in collisions of He2+ on aligned Na*(3p) atoms that span the ''velocity-matching'' energy between projectile and target electron. We find a strong dependence of the capture cross sections on the Na*(3p) orbital

  4. High resolution spectroscopy of planet bearing stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Gálvez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here the first steps of an extended spectroscopic survey in order to characterize the stellar hosts of extra-solar planets. We have selected several known stars with plan- ets and using high resolution spectroscopy, we have studied their properties.

  5. High-resolution seismic profiling on water

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    Herein is presented an overview of high-resolution seismic profiling on water. Included are basic concepts and terminology as well as discussions of types of sources and receivers, field practice, data recording and data processing. Emphasis is on digital single-channel profiling for engineering and environmental purposes.

  6. Compact high-resolution spectral phase shaper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, S.; Walle, van der P.; Offerhaus, H.L.; Hulst, van N.F.

    2005-01-01

    The design and operation of a high-resolution spectral phase shaper with a footprint of only 7×10 cm2 is presented. The liquid-crystal modulator has 4096 elements. More than 600 independent degrees of freedom can be positioned with a relative accuracy of 1 pixel. The spectral shaping of pulses fro

  7. A High-Resolution Stopwatch for Cents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingl, Z.; Kopasz, K.

    2011-01-01

    A very low-cost, easy-to-make stopwatch is presented to support various experiments in mechanics. The high-resolution stopwatch is based on two photodetectors connected directly to the microphone input of a sound card. Dedicated free open-source software has been developed and made available to download. The efficiency is demonstrated by a free…

  8. Compressive sensing for high resolution radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging. CS is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than what is required by the Shannon sampling th

  9. Electron efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using 2012 LHC proton-proton collision data

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antrim, Daniel Joseph; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Bajic, Milena; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blue, Andrew; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burger, Angela Maria; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carlson, Benjamin Taylor; Carminati, Leonardo; Carney, Rebecca; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Felix; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Petrillo, Karri Folan; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Díez Cornell, Sergio; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudder, Andreas Christian; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Duncan, Anna Kathryn; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Flierl, Bernhard Matthias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Ganguly, Sanmay; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Gui, Bin; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Wen; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Han, Shuo; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, Ahmed; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hladik, Ondrej; Hoad, Xanthe; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Honda, Shunsuke; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Janus, Piotr Andrzej; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Javurkova, Martina; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, Christian; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Köhler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kuprash, Oleg; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurth, Matthew Glenn; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopez, Jorge; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Menary, Stephen Burns; Meng, Lingxin; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mizukami, Atsushi; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mogg, Philipp; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moschovakos, Paris; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Harry James; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panagoulias, Ilias; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauch, Daniel; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reed, Robert; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reiss, Andreas; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resseguie, Elodie Deborah; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Roberts, Rhys Thomas; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Roloff, Jennifer; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sanchez Pineda, Arturo Rodolfo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sato, Koji; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schouwenberg, Jeroen; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shirabe, Shohei; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shope, David Richard; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sideras Haddad, Elias; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Siral, Ismet; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Joshua Wyatt; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Ian Michael; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Stark, Simon Holm; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Suster, Carl; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Swift, Stewart Patrick; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turgeman, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usui, Junya; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vasquez, Gerardo; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Wenxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Weber, Stephen; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolff, Robert; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Worm, Steven; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xi, Zhaoxu; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zacharis, Georgios; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liqing; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Maosen; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-03-27

    This paper describes the algorithms for the reconstruction and identification of electrons in the central region of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These algorithms were used for all ATLAS results with electrons in the final state that are based on the 2012 pp collision data produced by the LHC at $\\sqrt{\\mathrm{s}}$ = 8 TeV. The efficiency of these algorithms, together with the charge misidentification rate, is measured in data and evaluated in simulated samples using electrons from $Z\\rightarrow ee$, $Z\\rightarrow ee\\gamma$ and $J/\\psi \\rightarrow ee$ decays. For these efficiency measurements, the full recorded data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$, is used. Based on a new reconstruction algorithm used in 2012, the electron reconstruction efficiency is 97% for electrons with $E_\\mathrm{T}=15$ GeV and 99% at $E_\\mathrm{T} = 50$ GeV. Combining this with the efficiency of additional selection criteria to reject backgrounds from background electrons or misi...

  10. Advances and challenges in electron molecule scattering physics—A Report of the 14th International Symposium on Electron Molecule Collisions and Swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Lima, M. A. P.; Tennyson, J.

    2006-07-01

    A report is presented of the 13th International Symposium on Electron Molecule Collisions Physics (Instituto de Fisica, Unicamp, Campinas, Brazil, 27 30 July 2005). This workshop covered low-energy electron interactions with atoms, molecules and condensed matter systems. Several important aspects of this symposium were to bring together theory and experimental advances in this field for gaseous targets as well as showcasing the increasing diversity of electron molecule collision applications in condensed matter and biological applications. A summary session was held wherein were discussed aspects of the future of the field, including the development of new theoretical and experimental capabilities.

  11. NA45/2. Study of Electron Pair & Photon Production in Lead Gold Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Ravinovich, I; Fraenkel, Z; Gnaenski, A

    2002-01-01

    The NA45/CERES experiment investigates primarily the production of electron-positron pairs and of direct photons in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. For electron-positron pairs the experiment studies the continuum in the mass region of about 0.05 to 2 GeV/c$^2$ and the vector mesons $\\varrho ,~ \\omega$, and, $\\phi$. Since for electromagnetic probes final state interactions are practically negligible these observables are unique for studying the evolution and dynamics of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions from the hot and dense early stage where a quark-gluon plasma is expected to be formed to the final freeze-out stage when hadrons decouple. The experiment also studies the spectral distributions of charged particles, their correlations and distribution relative to the reaction plane, event-by-event fluctuations, $\\Lambda$ and K$^0_s$ and identified high momentum pions. The first phase of the experiment, NA45/1, has been concluded with two main results: i) There is a significant excess, by a ...

  12. Single- and Multiple-Electron Removal Processes in Proton-Water Vapor Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Kirchner, Tom; Horbatsch, Marko; Jürgen Lüdde, Hans

    2012-06-01

    Charge-state correlated cross sections for single- and multiple-electron removal processes due to capture and ionization in proton-H2O collisions are calculated by using the non-perturbative basis generator method adapted for ion-molecule collisions [1]. Orbital-specific cross sections for vacancy production are evaluated using this method to predict the yields of charged fragments (H2O^+, OH^+, H^+, O^+) according to branching ratios known to be valid at high impact energies. At intermediate and low energies, we obtain fragmentation results on the basis of predicted multi-electron removal cross sections, and explain most of the available experimental data [2]. The cross sections for charge transfer and for ionization are also compared with recent multi-center classical-trajectory Monte Carlo calculations [3] for impact energies from 20keV to several MeV. [4pt] [1] H.J. L"udde et al, Phys. Rev. A 80, 060702(R) (2009)[0pt] [2] M. Murakami et al, to be submitted to Phys. Rev. A (2012)[0pt] [3] C. Illescas et al, Phys. Rev. A 83, 052704 (2011)

  13. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  14. Computational Study of Electron-Molecule Collisions Related to Low-Temperature Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1997-10-01

    Computational study of electron-molecule collisions not only complements experimental measurements, but can also be used to investigate processes not readily accessible experimentally. A number of ab initio computational methods are available for this type of calculations. Here we describe a recently developed technique, the finite element Z-matrix method. Analogous to the R-matrix method, it partitions the space into regions and employs real matrix elements. However, unlike the implementation of the R-matrix method commonly used in atomic and molecular physics,(C. J. Gillan, J. Tennyson, and P. G. Burke, Chapter 10 in Computational Methods for Electron-Molecule Collisions), W. M. Huo and F. A. Gianturco, Editors, Plenum, New York (1995), p. 239. the Z-matrix method is fully variational.(D. Brown and J. C. Light, J. Chem. Phys. 101), 3723 (1994). In the present implementation, a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians is used to represent the continuum electron, thus offering full flexibility without imposing fixed boundary conditions. Numerical examples include the electron-impact dissociation of N2 via the metastable A^3Σ_u^+ state, a process which may be important in the lower thermosphere, and the dissociation of the CF radical, a process of interest to plasma etching. To understand the dissociation pathways, large scale quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for all target states which dissociate to the lowest five limits in the case of N_2, and to the lowest two limits in the case of CF. For N_2, the structural calculations clearly show the preference for predissociation if the initial state is the ground X^1Σ_g^+ state, but direct dissociation appears to be preferable if the initial state is the A^3Σ_u^+ state. Multi-configuration SCF target functions are used in the collisional calculation,

  15. Influence of electron-ion collisions in plasma on the electron energy gain using the TE11 mode inside an elliptical waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli-Arani, A.; Basiry, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of electron-ion collisions in plasma on the electron energy gain and total energy of an externally injected electron inside an elliptical waveguide, including collisional plasma using the transverse electric mode, is investigated. It is noted that microwave radiation is used for excitations of the TE11 even mode in the configuration. The electromagnetic field components of the TE11 mode in the considered waveguide are obtained and graphically presented. It is seen that the strength of the fields reduces in the collisional plasma. Furthermore, the deflection angle, energy gain of the electron and total energy of the electron due to the mode are obtained. It is illustrated that electron-ion collisions in plasma reduce the energy gain and total energy of electrons injected into the elliptical waveguide.

  16. PREFACE: XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, I. D.; van der Hart, H. W.; McCann, J. F.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2012-11-01

    The XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held at Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, 27 July - 2 August 2011. Members of the Local Organising Committee were drawn from the School of Mathematics and Physics of Queen's University Belfast, the School of Physical Sciences at Dublin City University, the School of Physics at University College Dublin and the Department of Experimental Physics at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. The Conference was attended by 566 participants with contributions from 54 countries. The meeting attracted 786 contributed papers for presentation in the poster sessions. The conference included 20 Special Reports selected from the contributed papers, and these are included in part 1 of this volume. During the meeting a total of 65 Progress Reports were also presented, and the authors invited to submit written versions of their talks (see Part 1). Of the total number of contributed papers, 663 are included as refereed abstracts in parts 2 to 15 of this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Part 1 of this volume includes detailed write-ups of the majority of plenary lectures, progress reports and special reports, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting, and is additionally published in hard-copy as the Conference Proceedings. There were 5 plenary lectures given by Margaret Murnane on Ultrafast processes in atomic dynamics; Chris Greene on Few-body highly-correlated dynamics; Michael Allan on Electron-molecule collisions; Yasunori Yamazaki on Antiproton and positron collisions and Thomas Stöhlker on Relativistic ion collisions. Ian Spielman, winner of the IUPAP Young Scientist Prize for 2011, gave a special lecture entitled Modifying interatomic interactions using Raman coupling: a tale of slowly colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. In addition an evening public lecture by Mike Baillie on How precise tree-ring dating raises issues concerning the

  17. Single electrons from heavy-flavor mesons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Taesoo; Berrehrah, Hamza; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Tolos, Laura; Cabrera, Daniel; Cassing, Wolfgang; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2017-07-01

    We study the single electron spectra from D - and B - meson semileptonic decays in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 , 62.4, and 19.2 GeV by employing the parton-hadron-string dynamics (PHSD) transport approach that has been shown to reasonably describe the charm dynamics at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider energies on a microscopic level. In this approach the initial charm and bottom quarks are produced by using the PYTHIA event generator which is tuned to reproduce the fixed-order next-to-leading logarithm calculations for charm and bottom production. The produced charm and bottom quarks interact with off-shell (massive) partons in the quark-gluon plasma with scattering cross sections which are calculated in the dynamical quasiparticle model that is matched to reproduce the equation of state of the partonic system above the deconfinement temperature Tc. At energy densities close to the critical energy density (≈0.5 GeV /fm3 ) the charm and bottom quarks are hadronized into D and B mesons through either coalescence or fragmentation. After hadronization the D and B mesons interact with the light hadrons by employing the scattering cross sections from an effective Lagrangian. The final D and B mesons then produce single electrons through semileptonic decay. We find that the PHSD approach well describes the nuclear modification factor RAA and elliptic flow v2 of single electrons in d +Au and Au+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV and the elliptic flow in Au+Au reactions at √{sNN}=62.4 GeV from the PHENIX Collaboration, however, the large RAA at √{sNN}=62.4 GeV is not described at all. Furthermore, we make predictions for the RAA of D mesons and of single electrons at the lower energy of √{sNN}=19.2 GeV . Additionally, the medium modification of the azimuthal angle ϕ between a heavy quark and a heavy antiquark is studied. We find that the transverse flow enhances the azimuthal angular distributions close to ϕ =0 because the heavy

  18. Molecular interactions on single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by high-resolution transmission microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Baek, Jinseok; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Abou-Chahine, Fawzi; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    .... Here, we show that the sidewall of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) represents a unique molecular dimer platform that can be directly visualized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy...

  19. Excitation and charge transfer in He/sup +/ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-06-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He/sup +/ + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes.

  20. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yong; Wang Xuben; Li Zhirong; Li Qiong; Li Zhengwen

    2009-01-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  1. Smartphone microendoscopy for high resolution fluorescence imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Xiangqian; Mugler, Dale H; Yu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    High resolution optical endoscopes are increasingly used in diagnosis of various medical conditions of internal organs, such as the gastrointestinal tracts, but they are too expensive for use in resource-poor settings. On the other hand, smartphones with high resolution cameras and Internet access have become more affordable, enabling them to diffuse into most rural areas and developing countries in the past decade. In this letter we describe a smartphone microendoscope that can take fluorescence images with a spatial resolution of 3.1 {\\mu}m. Images collected from ex vivo, in vitro and in vivo samples using the device are also presented. The compact and cost-effective smartphone microendoscope may be envisaged as a powerful tool for detecting pre-cancerous lesions of internal organs in low and middle income countries.

  2. Progress toward high resolution EUV spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendyke, C.; Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H.; Young, P. R.; Chua, D.; Hassler, D. M.; Landi, E.; Davila, J. M.; Klimchuck, J.; Tun, S.; DeForest, C.; Mariska, J. T.; Solar C Spectroscopy Working Group; LEMUR; EUVST Development Team

    2013-07-01

    HIgh resolution EUV spectroscopy is a critical instrumental technique to understand fundamental physical processes in the high temperature solar atmosphere. Spectroscopic observations are used to measure differential emission measure, line of sight and turbulent flows, plasma densities and emission measures. Spatially resolved, spectra of these emission lines with adequate cadence will provide the necessary clues linking small scale structures with large scale, energetic solar phenomena. The necessary observations to determine underlying physical processes and to provide comprehensive temperature coverage of the solar atmosphere above the chromosphere will be obtained by the proposed EUVST instrument for Solar C. This instrument and its design will be discussed in this paper. Progress on the VEry high Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (VERIS) sounding rocket instrument presently under development at the Naval Research Laboratory will also be discussed.

  3. Stellar Tools for High Resolution Population Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Rodríguez-Merino, L.; Buzzoni, A.

    2005-12-01

    We present preliminary results of the application of a new stellar library of high-resolution synthetic spectra (based upon ATLAS9 and SYNTHE codes developed by R. L. Kurucz) in the calculation of the ultraviolet-optical spectral energy distribution of simple stellar populations (SSPs). For this purpose, the library has been coupled with Buzzoni's population synthesis code. Part of this paper is also devoted to illustrate quantitatively the extent to which synthetic stellar libraries represent real stars.

  4. Petrous apex mucocele: high resolution CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memis, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Memis, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Alper, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Calli, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Ozer, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Ozdamar, N. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hospital of Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    1994-11-01

    Mucocele of the petrous apex is very rare, only three cases having been reported. Since this area is inaccessible to direct examination, imaging, preferably high resolution computed tomography (HR CT) is essential. We report a case showing an eroding, non enhancing mass with sharp, lobulated contours, within the petrous apex. The presence of a large air cell on the opposite side suggested a mucocele. (orig.)

  5. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1969-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications focuses on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as chemical shifts, lattices, and couplings. The book first offers information on the theory of NMR, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, spin lattice relaxation, line widths, saturation, quantum mechanical description of NMR, and ringing. The text then ponders on instrumentation and techniques and chemical shifts. Discussions focus on the origin of chemical shifts, reference compounds, empirical correlations of chemical shifts, modulation and phase detection,

  6. 4MOST: the high-resolution spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, W.; Xu, W.; Buschkamp, P.; Feiz, C.; Saviauk, A.; Barden, S.; Quirrenbach, A.; Mandel, H.

    2016-08-01

    4MOST (4-meter Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope) is a wide-field, fiber-feed, high-multiplex spectroscopic survey facility to be installed on the 4-meter ESO telescope VISTA in Chile. It consists of two identical low resolution spectrographs and one high resolution spectrograph. The instrument is presently in the preliminary design phase and expected to get operational end of 2022. The high resolution spectrograph will afford simultaneous observations of up to 812 targets - over a hexagonal field of view of 4.1 sq.degrees on sky - with a spectral resolution R>18,000 covering a wavelength range from 393 to 679nm in three channels. In this paper we present the optical and mechanical design of the high resolution spectrograph (HRS) as prepared for the review at ESO, Garching. The expected performance including the highly multiplexed fiber slit concept is simulated and its impact on the optical performance given. We show the thermal and finite element analyses and the resulting stability of the spectrograph under operational conditions.

  7. High-Resolution US of Rheumatologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Gimber, Lana H; Scalcione, Luke R; Miller, Margaret D; Kwoh, C Kent; Klauser, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    For the past 15 years, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) is being routinely and increasingly used for initial evaluation and treatment follow-up of rheumatologic diseases. This imaging technique is performed by using high-frequency linear transducers and has proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool in evaluation of articular erosions, simple and complex joint and bursal effusions, tendon sheath effusions, and synovitis, with results comparable to those of magnetic resonance imaging, excluding detection of bone marrow edema. Crystal deposition diseases including gouty arthropathy and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) have characteristic appearances at US, enabling differentiation between these two diseases and from inflammatory arthropathies. Enthesopathy, which frequently accompanies psoriatic and reactive arthritis, also has a characteristic appearance at high-resolution US, distinguishing these two entities from other inflammatory and metabolic arthropathies. The presence of Doppler signal in examined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths indicates active synovitis. Microbubble echo contrast agents augment detection of tissue vascularity and may act in the future as a drug delivery vehicle. Frequently, joint, tendon sheath, and bursal fluid aspirations and therapeutic injections are performed under US guidance. The authors describe the high-resolution US technique including gray-scale, color or power Doppler, and contrast agent-enhanced US that is used in evaluation of rheumatologic diseases of the wrist and hand and the ankle and foot in their routine clinical practice. This article demonstrates imaging findings of normal joints, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis, CPPD, psoriatic and reactive arthritis, and osteoarthritis.

  8. High-resolution traction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Sergey V; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S; Waterman, Clare M

    2014-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of angular scattering models for electron-neutral collisions in Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J. F. J.; Pitchford, L. C.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; van Dijk, J.

    2016-10-01

    In Monte Carlo simulations of electron transport through a neutral background gas, simplifying assumptions related to the shape of the angular distribution of electron-neutral scattering cross sections are usually made. This is mainly because full sets of differential scattering cross sections are rarely available. In this work simple models for angular scattering are compared to results from the recent quantum calculations of Zatsarinny and Bartschat for differential scattering cross sections (DCS’s) from zero to 200 eV in argon. These simple models represent in various ways an approach to forward scattering with increasing electron energy. The simple models are then used in Monte Carlo simulations of range, straggling, and backscatter of electrons emitted from a surface into a volume filled with a neutral gas. It is shown that the assumptions of isotropic elastic scattering and of forward scattering for the inelastic collision process yield results within a few percent of those calculated using the DCS’s of Zatsarinny and Bartschat. The quantities which were held constant in these comparisons are the elastic momentum transfer and total inelastic cross sections.

  10. Electron efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using the 2015 LHC proton-proton collision data

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note summarises the electron efficiency measurements using the 2015 LHC pp collision data at 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy. The data, collected by the ATLAS detector, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb−1. The studies are focused on electron reconstruction, identification, trigger and isolation algorithms. The combination of these algorithms leads to a large variety of operating points for the electron measurement, with diverse signal efficiency versus background rejection performance. Samples of electron candidates with transverse energies above 7 GeV, in the central region of the detector defined by the pseudorapidity range |η| < 2.47 are selected using the tag-and-probe method for Z → ee and J/ψ → ee processes. The measurements performed on data are compared to the measurements done on Monte Carlo simulations in the same phase space. The deviations are expressed as data-to-MC ratios, which are provided for a variety of operating points, and used in the physics analyses in order ...

  11. A single particle detector for electron-ion collision experiments in the Cryogenic Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija; Mueller, Alfred; Schippers, Stefan [Institut fuer Atom- und Molekuelphysik, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Krantz, Claude; Becker, Arno; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Novotny, Oldrich [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, New York (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The study of ion chemistry in the interstellar medium requires, among others, knowledge about cross sections for the recombination of atomic and molecular ions with low temperature (∝10 K) electrons. Especially the database on singly charged atomic ions relevant to the chemistry of molecular clouds is incomplete in this respect. The electrostatic Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR), currently being commissioned at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, will allow experiments with atomic, molecular and cluster ions at beam energies up to 300 keV per unit charge in a cryogenic extremely high vacuum (XHV) environment. Collisions of stored atomic ions with electrons provided by an electron cooler will lead to reaction products with charge states that differ from those of the parent particles. The detection of these products will be carried out behind a bending deflector of the storage ring by a high-efficiency movable single-particle detector, based on a secondary electron converter backed by heatable microchannel plates. The designs of the mechanical actuator and the detector are compatible with the cryogenic operating conditions at 10 K and a bakeout temperature of up to 530 K.

  12. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Elastic electron collisions with the aza-derivatives of furan, pyrrole and thiophene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossoski, Fabris; Freitas, Thiago Correa de; Bettega, Marcio Henrique Franco [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text. Experimental studies of electron collisions with furan, pyrrole, thiophene and their corresponding aza-derivatives show the occurrence of several resonant states at low impact energies (0-10 eV), for all the structures. These resonances are associated with the occupation of an unoccupied molecular orbital by the incident electron, and the consequent formation of a temporary anionic state, or resonance. Theoretical studies of elastic electron collisions with furan and pyrrole also show the presence of shape resonances in good agreement with the experimental positions of the resonance peaks. In this work we present integral cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by the aza-derivatives of furan, pyrrole and thiophene, namely, oxazole, isoxazole, imidazole, pyrazole, thiazole and isothiazole. Our studied structures differ from furan, pyrrole and thiophene by the substitution of a C-H by an N atom, in different positions of the ring. The ground state geometry was optimized using second order perturbation theory with the TZV++(2d,1p) basis set. The molecular ground state was described in the Hartree-Fock approximation, and the virtual molecular orbitals obtained were used to represent the scattering orbitals. In order to compute the elastic cross sections we employed the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with pseudopotentials of Bachelet, Hamann and Schlueter, in the static-exchange approximation. The six molecules present shape resonances at low energies, in both A' and A{sup '}' symmetries. Electronic structure calculations were performed in order to characterize the resonant orbitals. Each of the three pairs of isomers presented very similar integral cross sections at high energies. At low energies, on the other hand, the cross sections become more distinct, specially due to the different positions of the resonances. We also discuss the effects on the cross sections caused by aza-substitution, when compared to

  14. Observation of Exclusive Electron-Positron Production in Hadron-Hadron Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Abulencia, A; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Caron, B; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca-Almenar, C; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Di Turo, P; Dorr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; García, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P F; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pinfold, J L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; Van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-01-01

    We present the first observation of exclusive $e^+e^-$ production in hadron-hadron collisions, using $p\\bar{p}$ collision data at \\mbox{$\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV} taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of \\mbox{532 pb$^{-1}$}. We require the absence of any particle signatures in the detector except for an electron and a positron candidate, each with transverse energy {$E_T>5$ GeV} and pseudorapidity {$|\\eta|<2$}. With these criteria, 16 events are observed compared to a background expectation of {$1.9\\pm0.3$} events. These events are consistent in cross section and properties with the QED process \\mbox{$p\\bar{p} \\to p + e^+e^- + \\bar{p}$} through two-photon exchange. The measured cross section is \\mbox{$1.6^{+0.5}_{-0.3}\\mathrm{(stat)}\\pm0.3\\mathrm{(syst)}$ pb}. This agrees with the theoretical prediction of {$1.71 \\pm 0.01$ pb}.

  15. Electron-Pair Production in 158 AGeV/c Pb-Au Collisions from CERES

    CERN Document Server

    Yurevich, Sergey

    2006-01-01

    The CERES experiment is devoted to the measurement of low-mass electron pairs in proton and ion-induced collisions at the Super Proton Synchrotron accelerator. The main goal of the CERES experiment is to investigate modifications of hadron properties in hot and dense nuclear matter. A significant enhancement of dilepton pair yield with respect to expectations based on hadron decays was observed in the mass range 0.25 m 0.7 GeV/c. This fascinating result can only be described by models invoking in-medium modifications of the meson. To distinguish between different theoretical explanations of the enhancement the experiment was upgraded in 1998 by the addition of a radial TPC to improve the mass resolution in the vector meson region. In this thesis, the analysis of the data sample taken in 2000 in 158 A GeV/c Pb-Au collisions with the upgraded experimental setup is presented. The observed enhancement of the pairs confirms previous results of CERES. The data, compared to the theoretical calculations based on drop...

  16. High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-07-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.