WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-manganese austenitic steel

  1. Phase stability of high manganese austenitic steels for cryogenic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the austenitic stability against a' martensitic transformation of three non-magnetic austenitic steels : a new stainless steel X2CrMnNiMoN 19-12-11-1 grade, a traditional X8CrMnNiN 19-11-6 grade and a high manganese X8MnCrNi 28-7-1 grade. Measurements of relative magnetic susceptibility at room temperature are performed on strained tensile specimens at 4.2 K. A special extensometer for high precision strain measurements at low temperature has been developed at CERN to test specimens up to various levels of plastic strain. Moreover, the high precision strain recording of the extensometer enables a detailed study of the serrated yield phenomena associated with 4.2 K tensile testing and their influence on the evolution of magnetic susceptibility. The results show that high Mn contents increase the stability of the austenitic structure against a' martensitic transformation, while keeping high strength at cryogenic temperature. Moreover, proper elaboration through primary and possi...

  2. Influence of austenitic orientation on martensitic transformations in a compressed high manganese steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T.-Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xue Yuan Rd. 30, 100083, Beijing (China); Yang, P., E-mail: yangp@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xue Yuan Rd. 30, 100083, Beijing (China); Meng, L.; Lu, F.-Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xue Yuan Rd. 30, 100083, Beijing (China)

    2011-08-18

    Highlights: > Parent orientation affects product kinetics, variant, size and orientation. > Martensite, like austenite twinning, forms fastest in compressed <1 0 0> austenite. > The only one martensite variant formed in <1 0 0> austenite leads to grain coarsening. > Both transformation and deformation contribute to final <1 0 0> texture in martensite. - Abstract: High manganese TRIP/TWIP steels contain two types of martensite and the morphology, size, variant selection and texture of both types of martensite are influenced by the parent austenite grain orientation. In the present paper the TRIP effect was investigated in a compressed high manganese steel, focusing on the crystallographic behavior by means of X-ray diffraction and the electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. It is observed that {gamma} austenite oriented with <1 0 0> close to the compression axis (CA) transformed more easily into {alpha}'-martensite with only one variant, whereas the transformation in CA//<1 1 0> and <1 1 1>-oriented austenite was sluggish and often yielded several variants. This orientation dependency was ascribed to the ease of either deformation twinning or Shockley dislocation movement. Similarly, {epsilon}-M was also observed to transform smoothly into {alpha}'-M in nearly <1 0 0>-oriented austenite and more sluggishly in other austenite grains of other orientations. However, the number of {epsilon}-M variants detected by EBSD was higher than direct observation. In contrast to thermally induced martensitic transformations, the TRIP effect during compression failed to cause grain refinement in the transformed {alpha}'-M. The rapid formation of {alpha}'-M in <1 0 0>-oriented {gamma} promoted the formation of a <1 0 0> texture of the {alpha}'-M, whereas the <1 1 0> texture developed in the austenite at high level of compression led to a restricted transformation into martensite. The reasons for the occurrence of a <1 0 0> texture in the {alpha

  3. Attenuation capability of low activation-modified high manganese austenitic stainless steel for fusion reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eissa, M.M. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El-kameesy, S.U.; El-Fiki, S.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Ghali, S.N. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El Shazly, R.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt); Saeed, Aly, E-mail: aly_8h@yahoo.com [Nuclear Power station Department, Faculty of Engineering, Egyptian-Russian University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Improvement stainless steel alloys to be used in fusion reactors. • Structural, mechanical, attenuation properties of investigated alloys were studied. • Good agreement between experimental and calculated results has been achieved. • The developed alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactors. - Abstract: Low nickel-high manganese austenitic stainless steel alloys, SSMn9Ni and SSMn10Ni, were developed to use as a shielding material in fusion reactor system. A standard austenitic stainless steel SS316L was prepared and studied as a reference sample. The microstructure properties of the present stainless steel alloys were investigated using Schaeffler diagram, optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction pattern. Mainly, an austenite phase was observed for the prepared stainless steel alloys. Additionally, a small ferrite phase was observed in SS316L and SSMn10Ni samples. The mechanical properties of the prepared alloys were studied using Vickers hardness and tensile tests at room temperature. The studied manganese stainless steel alloys showed higher hardness, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength than SS316L. On the other hand, the manganese stainless steel elongation had relatively lower values than the standard SS316L. The removal cross section for both slow and total slow (primary and those slowed down in sample) neutrons were carried out using {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. Gamma ray attenuation parameters were carried out for different gamma ray energy lines which emitted from {sup 60}Co and {sup 232}Th radioactive sources. The developed manganese stainless steel alloys had a higher total slow removal cross section than SS316L. While the slow neutron and gamma rays were nearly the same for all studied stainless steel alloys. From the obtained results, the developed manganese stainless steel alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactor system with low activation based on the short life

  4. Microstructural and Texture Development in Two Austenitic Steels with High-Manganese Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Basudev; Ray, Ranjit Kumar; Leffers, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Two austenitic steels, Fe-21.3Mn-3.44Si-3.74Al-0.5C and Fe-29.8Mn-2.96Si-2.73Al-0.52C, were subjected to cold rolling with 30 to 80 pct reduction with an increment of 10 pct and subsequently the development of their microstructures and textures were studied. The overall texture after 80 pct cold ...

  5. Determination of low levels of retained austenite in low-carbon high-manganese steel using X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho Ferreira, Helder, E-mail: helder.ferreira@arcelormittal.com.br [ArcelorMittal Monlevade, Av. Getúlio Vargas, 100, 35930-000 João Monlevade, MG (Brazil); Jose Martins Boratto, Francisco, E-mail: francisco_boratto@yahoo.com.br [Independent Consultant, Av. Aeroporto, 9, 35930-438 João Monlevade, MG (Brazil); Tadeu Lopes Buono, Vicente, E-mail: vbuono@demet.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-03-25

    A method involving the decomposition of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks for the single wavelengths Kα{sub 1} and Kα{sub 2} was used to quantify the amount of retained austenite at levels lower than 5% in low-carbon high-manganese steels. By applying this method, it was possible to use the two main peaks of austenite (γ) and the two main peaks of ferrite (α) in the calculations, despite the partial overlapping of the (111)γ and (110)α peaks. The diffraction peaks were modeled with the Pearson VII equation using a nonlinear least-squares optimization technique. This allowed the integrated intensities of the XRD peaks to be calculated using only the Kα{sub 1} side. The method was used to measure the levels of retained austenite in samples of a metal-inert gas steel welding rod cooled at the rates of 10 °C/s and 1.6 °C/s. The accuracy of the method was determined by performing six measurements in different directions in both the longitudinal and the transverse section of the 1.6 °C/s sample.

  6. Microstructural Changes in a High-Manganese Austenitic Fe-Mn-Al-C Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witkowska M.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural changes in the age-hardenable Fe-28wt.%Mn-9wt.%Al-1wt.%C steel during ageing at 550°C for various times have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The steel was produced in an induction furnace and the ingot, after homogenization at 1150°C for 3 hours under a protective argon atmosphere, was hot-rolled and subsequently cold-rolled up to 23% reduction. The sheet was then aged at 550°C for various times in an argon atmosphere and cooled in air. XRD analysis and TEM observations revealed a modulated structure and superlattice reflections produced by spinodal decomposition, which occurred during ageing at 550°C. Theexistence of satellites suggests that either (Fe, Mn3AlCx carbides were formed within the austenite matrix by spinodal decomposition during cooling or chemical fluctuactions occurred between the (Fe, Mn3AlCx carbides and the austenitic matrix.

  7. Multi-scale Modeling of the Impact Response of a Strain Rate Sensitive High-Manganese Austenitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkun eÖnal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A multi-scale modeling approach was applied to predict the impact response of a strain rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel. The roles of texture, geometry and strain rate sensitivity were successfully taken into account all at once by coupling crystal plasticity and finite element (FE analysis. Specifically, crystal plasticity was utilized to obtain the multi-axial flow rule at different strain rates based on the experimental deformation response under uniaxial tensile loading. The equivalent stress – equivalent strain response was then incorporated into the FE model for the sake of a more representative hardening rule under impact loading. The current results demonstrate that reliable predictions can be obtained by proper coupling of crystal plasticity and FE analysis even if the experimental flow rule of the material is acquired under uniaxial loading and at moderate strain rates that are significantly slower than those attained during impact loading. Furthermore, the current findings also demonstrate the need for an experiment-based multi-scale modeling approach for the sake of reliable predictions of the impact response.

  8. Investigation of the Effect of Tungsten Substitution on Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of In Situ VC-Reinforced High-Manganese Austenitic Steel Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Emad Galin; Karimzadeh, Neda; Varahram, Naser; Davami, Parviz

    2013-08-01

    Particulate VC-reinforced high-manganese austenitic steel matrix composites with different vanadium and tungsten contents were synthesized by conventional alloying and casting route. Microstructural characterizations showed that the composites processed by in situ precipitation of the reinforcements were composed of V8C7 particulates distributed in an austenitic matrix. It was observed that addition of tungsten to austenite increases work-hardening rate of subsurface layer during pin-on disk wear test. The maximum abrasive wear resistance was achieved at tungsten content equal to 2 wt pct. However, excessive addition of tungsten promoted the formation of W3C phase and reduced the abrasive wear resistance because of decrease in distribution homogeneity and volume fraction of the reinforcing VC particles.

  9. Resistance to Abrasive Wear and Volume Fraction of Carbides in Cast High-manganese Austenitic Steel with Composite Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tęcza G.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cast Hadfield steel is characterised by high abrasion resistance, provided, however, that it is exposed to the effect of dynamic loads. During abrasion without loading, e.g. under the impact of loose sand jet, its wear resistance drops very drastically. To increase the abrasion resistance of this alloy under the conditions where no pressure is acting, primary vanadium carbides are formed in the metallurgical process, to obtain a composite structure after the melt solidification. The primary, very hard, carbides uniformly distributed in the austenitic matrix are reported to double the wear resistance of samples subjected to the effect of a silicon carbide-water mixture.

  10. Influence of tungsten, carbon and nitrogen on toughness and weldability of low activation austenitic high manganese stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoi, H.; Abraham, M.; Kutsuna, M.; Miyahara, K. (Nagoya Univ., Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Chikusa (Japan)); Shimoide, Y. (Daido Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya (Japan))

    1992-09-01

    The effect of alloying elements of tungsten, carbon and nitrogen on high temperature strength, toughness and weldability of Fe-12Cr-15Mn alloy has been investigated. The high temperature strength of Fe-12Cr-15Mn-0.2C-0.1N at 873 K increases with the addition of 2-300W without affecting ductility. The toughness as estimated by Charpy tests, is also not influenced by the addition of 2-3%W, while the increase of carbon content decreases the absorbed energy. The transition temperature shifts to higher temperature by aging at 873 K for 3600 ks, but it is still lower than room temperature. The degradation of toughness after aging is considered to be related to the precipitation of M[sub 23]C[sub 6] on grain boundaries. The weldability evaluated by hot cracking susceptibility is not affected by alloying of tungsten and carbon in this alloy system. It is noted that the alloys studied show less hot cracking susceptibility than commercial AISI 316L stainless steel. (orig.).

  11. Microstructural change during isothermal aging in high manganese austenitic steels; Ko Mn osutenaito ko no koon hentai ni tomonau soshiki henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Y.; Tsuchiyama, T.; Takaki, S. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School

    1998-04-01

    Since high Mn austenitic ({gamma}) steels represented by the Hadfield steel (13mass%Mn-1.2mass%C steel) had a good toughness and showed a remarkable work hardening during cold working, they were used in special rails and components of stone crushers as wear-resistant materials. In this study, the microstructure change during isothermal aging was investigated in the 13mass%Mn-0.9mass%C steel and the 22mass%Mn-0.6mass%C steel. The microstructure change during isothermal aging in high Mn austenitic steels could be classified into three types: the grain boundary precipitation of carbide, the precipitation of platelet carbide within grains, and the formation of lamella structure through eutectic transformation. In the 13mass%Mn-0.9mass%C steel, all kinds of microstructure changes occurred. The carbide precipitation reaction in the high Mn austenitic steels was effectively suppressed in the 22mass%Mn-0.6mass%C steel, in which the increased amount of Mn content was the same as the decreased amount of carbon content, and the isothermal aging curve shifted to a longer duration. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Mechanical Properties and Fractographic Analysis of High Manganese Steels After Dynamic Deformation Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabłońska M.B.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since few years many research centres conducting research on the development of high-manganese steels for manufacturing of parts for automotive and railway industry. Some of these steels belong to the group of AHS possessing together with high strength a great plastic elongation, and an ideal uniform work hardening behavior. The article presents the dynamic mechanical properties of two types of high manganese austenitic steel with using a flywheel machine at room temperature with strain rates between 5×102÷3.5×103s?–1. It was found that the both studied steels exhibit a high sensitivity Rm to the strain rate. With increasing the strain rate from 5×102 to 3.5×103s?–1 the hardening dominates the process. The fracture analysis indicate that after dynamic test both steel is characterized by ductile fracture surfaces which indicate good plasticity of investigated steels.

  13. Precipitation Effect on Mechanical Properties and Phase Stability of High Manganese Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Cheoljun; Kim, Rosa; Lee, Un-Hae; Kim, Jongryoul

    2017-09-01

    High manganese (Mn) steels are attractive for automotive applications due to their excellent tensile strength and superior elongation. However, the relatively low yield strength of Mn steels compared to other advanced high-strength steels is a critical problem limiting their use in structural parts. In order to increase the yield strength, the precipitation hardening effect of Mn steels was investigated by the addition of carbide-forming elements. Changes in the austenite phase stability were also evaluated in terms of stacking fault energy (SFE). As a result, fine V(C,N) precipitates were found to increase the yield strength effectively but to lower the SFE by the consumption of matrix carbons. For achieving precipitation hardening without sacrificing austenite stability, the soluble carbon content was discussed.

  14. Cracks in high-manganese cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The reasons which account for the formation of in service cracks in castings made from Hadfield steel were discussed. To explain the source of existence of the nuclei of brittle fractures, the properties of cast steel were examined within the range of solidification temperatures, remembering that feeding of this material is specially difficult, causing microporosity in hot spots. This creates conditions promoting the formation of microcracks which tend to propagate during service conditions involving high dynamic stresses, and explains why the cracks are mainly characterized by a brittle nature. The reason for crack formation in service are micro-porosities formed during casting solidification.

  15. Effect on Mechanical Properties of Heat Treated High Manganese Austenitic Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Muzafar A.K.; Rashidi M.M.; Mahadzir I.; Shayfull Z.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an attempt to study the effect of manganese addition and heat treatment on higher carbon austenitic cast iron to form high manganese austenitic cast iron with reduced nickel content (Mn-Ni-resist) on mechanical properties. The combination on microstructure (microsegregation), mechanical properties and the relationship of heat treatment on the alloy were analyzed. For this purpose Mn-Ni-resist (4.50C, 2.64Si, 6.0 Mn, 10 Ni) was melted and cast in the form of Y-block test pie...

  16. Investigation on Microstructure of Heat Treated High Manganese Austenitic Cast Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Muzafar A.K.; Rashidi M.M.; Mahadzir I.; Shayfull Z.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of manganese addition and annealing heat treatment on microstructure of austenitic cast irons with high manganese content (Mn-Ni-resist) were investigated. The complex relationship between the development of the solidification microstructures and buildup of microsegregation in Mn-Ni-resist was obtained by using microstructure analysis and EDS analysis. The annealing heat treatment was applied at 700°C up to 1000°C to investigate the effect of the annealing temperature on the micros...

  17. Investigation on Microstructure of Heat Treated High Manganese Austenitic Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzafar A.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of manganese addition and annealing heat treatment on microstructure of austenitic cast irons with high manganese content (Mn-Ni-resist were investigated. The complex relationship between the development of the solidification microstructures and buildup of microsegregation in Mn-Ni-resist was obtained by using microstructure analysis and EDS analysis. The annealing heat treatment was applied at 700°C up to 1000°C to investigate the effect of the annealing temperature on the microstructure. This experiment describes the characterization of microsegregation in Mn-Ni-reist was made by means of point counting microanalysis along the microstructure. With this method, the differences of silicon, manganese and nickel distribution in alloys solidified in the microstructure were clearly evidenced. The results show microstructure consists of flake graphite embedded in austenitic matrix and carbides. There is segregation of elements in the Late To Freeze (LTF region after solidification from melting. Manganese positively with high concentration detected in the LTF region. As for heat treatment, higher annealing temperature on the Mn-Ni-resist was reduced carbide formation. The higher annealing temperature shows carbide transformed into a smaller size and disperses through the austenitic matrix structure. The size of carbide decreased with increasing annealing temperature as observed in the microstructure.

  18. Effect on Mechanical Properties of Heat Treated High Manganese Austenitic Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzafar A.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an attempt to study the effect of manganese addition and heat treatment on higher carbon austenitic cast iron to form high manganese austenitic cast iron with reduced nickel content (Mn-Ni-resist on mechanical properties. The combination on microstructure (microsegregation, mechanical properties and the relationship of heat treatment on the alloy were analyzed. For this purpose Mn-Ni-resist (4.50C, 2.64Si, 6.0 Mn, 10 Ni was melted and cast in the form of Y-block test pieces. Four different heat treatment procedures were applied to the as-cast to investigate the effect of alloy modifications on Mn-Ni-resist. Optical and scanning electron microscopies were used for microstructure investigation. To determine the mechanical properties tensile test and hardness test were carried out. The result indicates both composition and heat treatment affect the performance of Mn-Ni-resist intensively. Microprobe analysis shows some silicon segregation near the graphite and practically little segregation of manganese. The increase in manganese contents developed some fractions of segregated carbide structures in LTF region located at austenite eutectic cell frame, which caused the tensile properties to drop in a small range. Application of annealing heat treatment gradually changed the carbide formation, so is the material’s strength.

  19. NATURE AND CHARACTER OF NON-METALLIC IMPURITIES IN HIGH-MANGANESE STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Garost

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of поп-metallic impurities of high-manganese wear-resistant steel is investigated by means of scanning electronic microscopy. The optimal compounds of complex additives (titan, vanadium, chromium, molybdenum, nitrogen, providing the highest operational characteristics of details, are determined.

  20. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  1. Austenite formation in C-Mn steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savran, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    The production process of almost all modern steels involves austenitization formation of the austenite phase upon continuous heating. Many of the microstructural features and properties that are obtained upon subsequent cooling are to a large extend determined by the evolution of the microstructure

  2. Strength of "Light" Ferritic and Austenitic Steels Based on the Fe - Mn - Al - C System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Svyazhin, A. G.; Smarygina, I. V.; Kindop, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The phase composition, the hardness, the mechanical properties at room temperature, and the resistance to hot (950 - 1000°C) and warm (550°C) deformation are studied for cast deformable "light" ferritic and austenitic steels of the Fe - (12 - 25)% Mn - (0 - 15)% Al - (0 - 2)% C system alloyed additionally with about 5% Ni. The high-aluminum high-manganese low-carbon and carbonless ferritic steels at a temperature of about 0.5 T melt have a specific strength close to that of the austenitic steels and may be used as weldable scale-resistant and wear-resistant materials. The high-carbon Fe - (20 - 24)% Mn - (5 - 9)% Al - 5% Ni - 1.5% C austenitic steels may be applied as light high-strength materials operating at cryogenic temperatures after a solution treatment and as scale- and heat-resistant materials in an aged condition.

  3. Consitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih

    2008-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels combine high formability and high strength, which are generally opposing properties in materials. This property is a consequence of the martensitic phase transformation that takes place during deformation. This transformation is purely mechanically induced

  4. Constitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han; Khan, A.

    2010-01-01

    A physically based, macroscale constitutive model has been developed that can describe the complex mechanical behavior of metastable austenitic stainless steels. In the developed model a generalized model for the mechanically induced martensitic transformation is introduced. Mechanical tests have

  5. The Cracking Mechanism of Ferritic-Austenitic Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the high-alloy, ferritic - austenitic (duplex stainless steels high tendency to cracking, mainly hot-is induced by micro segregation processes and change of crystallization mechanism in its final stage. The article is a continuation of the problems presented in earlier papers [1 - 4]. In the range of high temperature cracking appear one mechanism a decohesion - intergranular however, depending on the chemical composition of the steel, various structural factors decide of the occurrence of hot cracking. The low-carbon and low-alloy cast steel casting hot cracking cause are type II sulphide, in high carbon tool cast steel secondary cementite mesh and / or ledeburite segregated at the grain solidified grains boundaries, in the case of Hadfield steel phosphorus - carbide eutectic, which carrier is iron-manganese and low solubility of phosphorus in high manganese matrix. In duplex cast steel the additional factor increasing the risk of cracking it is very “rich” chemical composition and related with it processes of precipitation of many secondary phases.

  6. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Behavior of a Hot-Rolled High-Manganese Dual-Phase Transformation-Induced Plasticity/Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liming; Shan, Mokun; Zhang, Daoda; Wang, Huanrong; Wang, Wei; Shan, Aidang

    2017-05-01

    The microstructures and deformation behavior were studied in a high-temperature annealed high-manganese dual-phase (28 vol pct δ-ferrite and 72 vol pct γ-austenite) transformation-induced plasticity/twinning-induced plasticity (TRIP/TWIP) steel. The results showed that the steel exhibits a special Lüders-like yielding phenomenon at room temperature (RT) and 348 K (75 °C), while it shows continuous yielding at 423 K, 573 K and 673 K (150 °C, 300 °C and 400 °C) deformation. A significant TRIP effect takes place during Lüders-like deformation at RT and 348 K (75 °C) temperatures. Semiquantitative analysis of the TRIP effect on the Lüders-like yield phenomenon proves that a softening effect of the strain energy consumption of strain-induced transformation is mainly responsible for this Lüders-like phenomenon. The TWIP mechanism dominates the 423 K (150 °C) deformation process, while the dislocation glide controls the plasticity at 573 K (300 °C) deformation. The delta-ferrite, as a hard phase in annealed dual-phase steel, greatly affects the mechanical stability of austenite due to the heterogeneous strain distribution between the two phases during deformation. A delta-ferrite-aided TRIP effect, i.e., martensite transformation induced by localized strain concentration of the hard delta-ferrite, is proposed to explain this kind of Lüders-like phenomenon. Moreover, the tensile curve at RT exhibits an upward curved behavior in the middle deformation stage, which is principally attributed to the deformation twinning of austenite retained after Lüders-like deformation. The combination of the TRIP effect during Lüders-like deformation and the subsequent TWIP effect greatly enhances the ductility in this annealed high-manganese dual-phase TRIP/TWIP steel.

  7. Mechanical Properties of High-Mn Austenitic Steel Tested under Static and Dynamic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzański L. A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to investigate X73MnSiAlNbTi25-1-3 high manganese austenitic steel containing 0.73% C to determine structural mechanisms decisive for increasing a reserve of cold deformation energy of such steel. The influence of a strain rate on the structure of the investigated steels and on the structural mechanisms decisive for their properties was analysed. Specialist research instrumentation was used for this purpose such as Scanning Transmission Microscopy (including EBSD examinations, conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy together with diffraction examinations and metallographic examinations. It was found that the principal cause of an increased reserve of cold deformation energy of the investigated steels in dynamic conditions is the activation of mechanical twinning in the mutually intersecting systems in austenite grains and annealing twins, which are densifying when a cold deformation rate is growing, thereby confirming the basic mechanism of TWIP (TWinning Induced Plasticity.

  8. The Observation of the Structure of M23C6/γ Coherent Interface in the 100Mn13 High Carbon High Manganese Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenfeng; Ding, Zhimin; Liang, Bo

    2018-01-01

    The M23C6 carbides precipitate along the austenite grain boundary in the 100Mn13 high carbon high manganese steel after 1323 K (1050 °C) solution treatment and subsequent 748 K (475 °C) aging treatment. The grain boundary M23C6 carbides not only spread along the grain boundary and into the incoherent austenite grain, but also grow slowly into the coherent austenite grain. On the basis of the research with optical microscope, a further investigation for the M23C6/γ coherent interface was carried out by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that the grain boundary M23C6 carbides have orientation relationships with only one of the adjacent austenite grains in the same planes: (\\bar{1}1\\bar{1})_{M_{2 3}}{C}_{ 6} } / (\\bar{1}1\\bar{1})_{γ } , (\\bar{1}11)_{M}_{ 2 3} {C}_{ 6} } //(\\bar{1}11)_{γ } ,[ 1 10]_{{{M}_{ 2 3} {C}_{ 6} }} //[ 1 10]_{γ } . The flat M23C6/γ coherent interface lies on the low indexed crystal planes {111}. Moreover, in M23C6/γ coherent interface, there are embossments which stretch into the coherent austenite grain γ. Dislocations distribute in the embossments and coherent interface frontier. According to the experimental observation, the paper suggests that the embossments can promote the M23C6/γ coherent interface move. Besides, the present work has analyzed chemical composition of experimental material and the crystal structures of austenite and M23C6, which indicates that the transformation can be completed through a little diffusion for C atoms and a simple variant for austenite unit cell.

  9. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  10. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  11. Constitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel (CD-rom)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han; Boisse, P.

    2008-01-01

    A stress-update algorithm is developed for austenitic metastable steels which undergo phase evolution during deformation. The material initially comprises only the soft and ductile austenite phase which due to the phenomenon of mechanically induced martensitic transformation, transforms completely

  12. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  13. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  14. The influence of aluminum and carbon on the abrasion resistance of high manganese steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckholz, Samuel August

    Abrasive wear testing of lightweight, austenitic Fe-Mn-Al-C cast steel has been performed in accordance with ASTM G65 using a dry sand, rubber wheel, abrasion testing apparatus. Testing was conducted on a series of Fe-30Mn-XAl-YC-1Si-0.5Mo chemistries containing aluminum levels from 2.9 to 9.5 wt.% and carbon levels from 0.9 to 1.83 wt.%. Solution treated materials having an austenitic microstructure produced the highest wear resistance. Wear resistance decreased with higher aluminum, lower carbon, and higher hardness after age hardening. In the solution treated condition the wear rate was a strong function of the aluminum to carbon ratio and the wear rate increased with a parabolic dependence on the Al/C ratio, which ranged from 1.8 to 10.2. Examination of the surface wear scar revealed a mechanism of plowing during abrasion testing and this method of material removal is sensitive to work hardening rate. Work hardening behavior was determined from tensile tests and also decreased with increasing Al/C ratio and after aging hardening. The loss of wear resistance is related to short range ordering of Al and C in the solution treated materials and kappa-carbide precipitation in age hardened materials and both contribute to planar slip and lower work hardening rates. A high carbon tool steel (W1) and a bainitic low alloy steel (SAE 8620) were also tested for comparison. A lightweight steel containing 6.5 wt.% Al and 1.2 wt.% C has wear resistance comparable to within 5% of the bainitic SAE 8620 steel forging currently used for the Bradley Fighting Vehicle track shoe and this cast Fe-Mn-Al-C steel, at equivalent tensile properties, would be 10% lighter.

  15. Transformation in austenitic stainless steel sheet under different loading directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Krauer, J.; Hora, P.

    2011-01-01

    The stress-strain relation for austenitic stainless steels is based on 2 main contributions: work hardening and a phase transformation from austenite to martensite. The transformation is highly temperature dependent. In most models for phase transformation from austenite to martensite, the stress

  16. Transformation in Austenitic Stainless Steel Sheet under Different Loading Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Krauer, J.; Hora, P.

    2011-01-01

    The stress-strain relation for austenitic stainless steels is based on 2 main contributions: work hardening and a phase transformation from austenite to martensite. The transformation is highly temperature dependent. In most models for phase transformation from austenite to martensite, the stress

  17. Cyclic deformation behaviour of austenitic steels at ambient and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    In metastable austenitic steels due to plastic deformation local phase transformations of paramagnetic austenite in ferromagnetic martensite occur. The phase transformation of fcc γ-austenite to tetragonal distorted or bcc α -martensite is characterised by unambiguous distinguishing marks. It is a transformation without ...

  18. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solidification cracking is a significant problem during the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly in fully austenitic and stabilized compositions. Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, P and alloy elements such as Ti, Nb. The WRC-92 diagram can be ...

  19. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ke; Ren, Yibin

    2010-01-01

    The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainl...

  20. Microstructural studies of advanced austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, J. A.; Ren, Jyh-Ching [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science

    1989-11-15

    This report presents the first complete microstructural and analytical electron microscopy study of Alloy AX5, one of a series of advanced austenitic steels developed by Maziasz and co-workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their potential application as reheater and superheater materials in power plants that will reach the end of their design lives in the 1990's. The advanced steels are modified with carbide forming elements such as titanium, niobium and vanadium. When combined with optimized thermo-mechanical treatments, the advanced steels exhibit significantly improved creep rupture properties compared to commercially available 316 stainless steels, 17--14 Cu--Mo and 800 H steels. The importance of microstructure in controlling these improvements has been demonstrated for selected alloys, using stress relaxation testing as an accelerated test method. The microstructural features responsible for the improved creep strengths have been identified by studying the thermal aging kinetics of one of the 16Ni--14Cr advanced steels, Alloy AX5, in both the solution annealed and the solution annealed plus cold worked conditions. Time-temperature-precipitation diagrams have been developed for the temperature range 600 C to 900 C and for times from 1 h to 3000 h. 226 refs., 88 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  2. The influence of austenite texture on the martensitic transformation of an austenitic stainless steel.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilkhuijsen, P.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile tests on a highly textured, fully austenitic stainless steel were performed in the transverse and rolling directions. Differences in overall material and transformation behavior were observed: transformation from the austenite phase to the martensite phase during a test in the

  3. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yang and Yibin Ren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels.

  4. Low-temperature creep of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. P.; Walsh, R. P.

    2017-09-01

    Plastic deformation under constant load (creep) in austenitic stainless steels has been measured at temperatures ranging from 4 K to room temperature. Low-temperature creep data taken from past and unreported austenitic stainless steel studies are analyzed and reviewed. Creep at cryogenic temperatures of common austenitic steels, such as AISI 304, 310 316, and nitrogen-strengthened steels, such as 304HN and 3116LN, are included. Analyses suggests that logarithmic creep (creep strain dependent on the log of test time) best describe austenitic stainless steel behavior in the secondary creep stage and that the slope of creep strain versus log time is dependent on the applied stress/yield strength ratio. The role of cold work, strain-induced martensitic transformations, and stacking fault energy on low-temperature creep behavior is discussed. The engineering significance of creep on cryogenic structures is discussed in terms of the total creep strain under constant load over their operational lifetime at allowable stress levels.

  5. Prediction on Austenite Grain Growth in High Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The austenite grain growth behavior of Ti-bearing and Ti-free steel was investigated using confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM and transmission electron microscope (TEM.Samples were held for 60min at 1123-1473K and then austenite grain sizes for different holding time at a series of temperatures were measured.The results show that austenite grain size of both steels increases with the increase of temperature.Besides,the austenite grain size of both steels grows with the holding time,which meets parabolic equation.The second phase particle was observed.The equation of Ostwald ripening was introduced to calculate the size of particle,and the volume fraction equation of second phase particle was applied to calculate the volume fraction of particle.Meanwhile,the modified Gladman model was adopted to predict austenite grain growth.The predicted results agree well with the measured results.

  6. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  7. Microstructural evolution in deformed austenitic TWinning Induced Plasticity steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tol, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the effect of plastic deformation on the stability of the austenitic microstructure against martensitic transformation and diffusional decomposition and its role in the phenomenon of delayed fracture in austenitic manganese (Mn)-based TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels.

  8. Cyclic shear behavior of austenitic stainless steel sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Hilkhuijsen, P.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2015-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel has been subjected to large amplitude strain paths containing a strain reversal. During the tests, apart from the stress and the strain also magnetic induction was measured to monitor the transformation of austenite to martensite. From the in-situ magnetic induction

  9. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process...

  10. Nanostructured Bainite-Austenite Steel for Armours Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burian W.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite-austenite steels are applied in the armours construction due to their excellent combination of strength and ductility which enables to lower the armour weight and to improve the protection efficiency. Mechanical properties of the bainite-austenite steels can be controlled in the wide range by chemical composition and heat treatment. In the paper the results of investigation comprising measuring of quasi - static mechanical properties, dynamic yield stress and firing tests of bainite-austenite steel NANOS-BA® are presented. Reported results show that the investigated bainite-austenite steel can be used for constructing add-on armour and that the armour fulfils requirements of protection level 2 of STANAG 4569. Obtained reduction in weight of the tested NANOS-BA® plates in comparison with the present solutions is about 30%.

  11. Austenite grain growth calculation of 0.028% Nb steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priadi D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of microstructural evolution has become a powerful tool for materials and process design by providing quantitative relationships for microstructure, composition and processing. Insufficient attention has been paid to predicting the austenite grain growth of microalloyed steel and the effect of undissolved microalloys. In this research, we attempted to calculate a mathematical model for austenite grain growth of 0.028% Nb steel, which can account for abnormal grain growth. The quantitative calculation of austenite grain growth generated from this model fit well with the experimental grain growth data obtained during reheating of niobium steels. The results of this study showed that increasing the temperature increases the austenite grain size, with a sharp gradient observed at higher temperatures.

  12. Exploiting Process-Related Advantages of Selective Laser Melting for the Production of High-Manganese Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Haase

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal additive manufacturing has strongly gained scientific and industrial importance during the last decades due to the geometrical flexibility and increased reliability of parts, as well as reduced equipment costs. Within the field of metal additive manufacturing methods, selective laser melting (SLM is an eligible technique for the production of fully dense bulk material with complex geometry. In the current study, we addressed the application of SLM for processing a high-manganese TRansformation-/TWinning-Induced Plasticity (TRIP/TWIP steel. The solidification behavior was analyzed by careful characterization of the as-built microstructure and element distribution using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. In addition, the deformation behavior was studied using uniaxial tensile testing and SEM. Comparison with conventionally produced TRIP/TWIP steel revealed that elemental segregation, which is normally very pronounced in high-manganese steels and requires energy-intensive post processing, is reduced due to the high cooling rates during SLM. Also, the very fast cooling promoted ε- and α’-martensite formation prior to deformation. The superior strength and pronounced anisotropy of the SLM-produced material was correlated with the microstructure based on the process-specific characteristics.

  13. Exploiting Process-Related Advantages of Selective Laser Melting for the Production of High-Manganese Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Christian; Bültmann, Jan; Hof, Jan; Ziegler, Stephan; Bremen, Sebastian; Hinke, Christian; Schwedt, Alexander; Prahl, Ulrich; Bleck, Wolfgang

    2017-01-11

    Metal additive manufacturing has strongly gained scientific and industrial importance during the last decades due to the geometrical flexibility and increased reliability of parts, as well as reduced equipment costs. Within the field of metal additive manufacturing methods, selective laser melting (SLM) is an eligible technique for the production of fully dense bulk material with complex geometry. In the current study, we addressed the application of SLM for processing a high-manganese TRansformation-/TWinning-Induced Plasticity (TRIP/TWIP) steel. The solidification behavior was analyzed by careful characterization of the as-built microstructure and element distribution using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, the deformation behavior was studied using uniaxial tensile testing and SEM. Comparison with conventionally produced TRIP/TWIP steel revealed that elemental segregation, which is normally very pronounced in high-manganese steels and requires energy-intensive post processing, is reduced due to the high cooling rates during SLM. Also, the very fast cooling promoted ε- and α'-martensite formation prior to deformation. The superior strength and pronounced anisotropy of the SLM-produced material was correlated with the microstructure based on the process-specific characteristics.

  14. Reverted austenite in PH 13-8 Mo maraging steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnitzer, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.schnitzer@unileoben.ac.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Radis, Rene [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Vienna University of Technology, Favoritenstrasse 9-11, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Institute for Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Kopernikusgasse 24, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Noehrer, Matthias [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Schober, Michael [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Hochfellner, Rainer [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Zinner, Silvia [Boehler Edelstahl GmbH and Co KG, Mariazeller Strasse 25, A-8605 Kapfenberg (Austria); Povoden-Karadeniz, E.; Kozeschnik, Ernst [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Vienna University of Technology, Favoritenstrasse 9-11, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Leitner, Harald [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    The mechanical properties of maraging steels are strongly influenced by the presence of reverted austenite. In this study, the morphology and chemical composition of reverted austenite in a corrosion resistant maraging steel was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Two types of austenite, i.e. granular and elongated, are present after aging at 575 {sup o}C, whereby the content of the latter increases during aging. The investigations revealed that the austenite phase is enriched in Ni, which prevents the transformation to martensite during cooling. Inside and next to the austenitc areas, Mo and Cr-rich carbides, which form during the aging treatment, were found. Various aging treatments were performed to obtain the activation energy for the formation of reverted austenite. Additionally, the experimental data are compared with thermodynamic and kinetic simulations. Based on these results and the chemical composition changes of the phases, a model for the formation of reverted austenite is presented. It is concluded that precipitation of B2-ordered NiAl and formation of reverted austenite take place simultaneously during aging and that dissolution of precipitates is not essential for the initial formation of reverted austenite.

  15. Measurement and tailoring of residual stress in expanded austenite on austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Winther, Grethe

    2017-01-01

    Expanded austenite on stainless steel with a high interstitial nitrogen content is characterized by elasto-plastic accommodation of the large composition-induced lattice expansion leading to huge compressive residual stress. The elasto-plastic accommodation as well as the (steep) concentration...... profile has implications for the measurement strategy to determine lattice strains and associated residual stresses with X-ray diffraction. Lattice strain measurements were performed on nitrided as well as subsequently de-nitrided expanded austenite on AISI 316L stainless steel, for various grazing...

  16. Microstructural characterisation of carbon implanted austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.E. [Scientific Affairs Research Group, Stryker Orthopaedics, Raheen Business Park, Limerick (Ireland)]. E-mail: matthew.murphy@stryker.com; Insley, G.M. [Scientific Affairs Research Group, Stryker Orthopaedics, Raheen Business Park, Limerick (Ireland); Laugier, M.T. [Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Newcomb, S.B. [Sonsam Ltd., Glebe Laboratories, Newport, Tipperary (Ireland)

    2005-06-01

    Low carbon (316L) austenitic stainless steel has been implanted with carbon ions with a fluence of 5 x 10{sup 17} C ions/cm{sup 2} using an ion energy of 75 keV. The effect of carbon ion implantation on the microstructure of the austenitic steel has been examined in cross-section using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) both before and after implantation, and the implantation data correlated with a computer based simulation, TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter). It has been found that the high-fluence carbon ion implantation modified the microstructure of the steel, as demonstrated by the presence of two amorphous layers separated by a layer of expanded austenite.

  17. Modeling of Non-isothermal Austenite Formation in Spring Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Wang, Baoyu; Tang, Xuefeng; Li, Junling

    2017-12-01

    The austenitization kinetics description of spring steel 60Si2CrA plays an important role in providing guidelines for industrial production. The dilatometric curves of 60Si2CrA steel were measured using a dilatometer DIL805A at heating rates of 0.3 K to 50 K/s (0.3 °C/s to 50 °C/s). Based on the dilatometric curves, a unified kinetics model using the internal state variable (ISV) method was derived to describe the non-isothermal austenitization kinetics of 60Si2CrA, and the abovementioned model models the incubation and transition periods. The material constants in the model were determined using a genetic algorithm-based optimization technique. Additionally, good agreement between predicted and experimental volume fractions of transformed austenite was obtained, indicating that the model is effective for describing the austenitization kinetics of 60Si2CrA steel. Compared with other modeling methods of austenitization kinetics, this model, which uses the ISV method, has some advantages, such as a simple formula and explicit physics meaning, and can be probably used in engineering practice.

  18. The sub-zero Celsius treatment of precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    A precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel AISI 632 grade was austenitized according to industrial specifications and thereafter subjected to isothermal treatment at sub-zero Celsius temperatures. During treatment, austenite transformed to martensite. The isothermal austenite-to-m...

  19. Austenite Formation from Martensite in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P.F.; Sietsma, J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of austenitization treatment of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) on austenite formation during reheating and on the fraction of austenite retained after tempering treatment is measured and analyzed. The results show the formation of austenite in two

  20. Page 1 Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels 691 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels 691 and crack growth per event computed from acoustic emission and crack growth data are presented in table 3. The crack growth per event varies from less than a micron for a solution annealed material to 15 pm for 10% cold worked material. 4.4 Fractographic ...

  1. Cyclic deformation behaviour of austenitic steels at ambient and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of the present investigation is to characterise cyclic deformation behaviour and plasticity-induced martensite formation of metastable austenitic stainless steels at ambient and elevated temperatures, taking into account the influence of the alloying elements titanium and niobium. Titanium and niobium are ...

  2. Formation and stabilization of reversed austenite in supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    The formation and stabilization of reversed austenite upon inter-critical annealing was investigated in a X4CrNiMo16-5-1 (EN 1.4418) supermartensitic stainless steel by means of scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter-diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X...

  3. Influence of thermal treatment on structure and corrosion properties of high manganese triplex steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lasek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper corrosion properties of X70MnAl28-9 TRIPLEX steel were tested after hot rolling and subsequent aging at 500 °C for 6, 30 and 60 min. and at 600 °C for the same times. For comparison related steels(X100MnAl28-12, X70Mn22, C20 were also used. The microstructure wascharacterized by light microscopy, SEM, energy disperse Xray microanalysis. The corrosion behaviour of steels wasexamined by light and scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical techniques (potenciodynamic polarization method, linear polarization, using NaCl and H2SO4 water solutions, salt spray test and gravimetric method. Aging has relatively small influence on corrosion resistance of X70MnAl28-9 steel. The localized corrosion in relation to structure and phases is discussed and compared in terms of dissolution, pitting and changes inchemical composition.

  4. Austenite and ferrite grain size evolution in plain carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Militzer, M.; Giumelli, A.; Hawbolt, E.B.; Meadowcroft, T.R. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1995-01-01

    Grain size evolution in a 0.17%C, 0.74%Mn plain carbon steel is investigated using a Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. Austenite grain growth measurements in the temperature range from 900 to 1150{degrees}C have been used to validate the Abbruzzese and Luecke model, which is recommended for simulating grain growth during reheating. For run-out table conditions, the ferrite grain size decreases from 1l{mu}m to 4{mu}m when the cooling rate from the austenite is increased from 1 to 80{degrees}C/s.

  5. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  6. Galvannealing of (high-)manganese-alloyed TRIP- and X-IP registered -steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenau, M. [ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe AG, Bamenohler Strasse 211, D-57402 Finnentrop (Germany); Norden, M. [DOC Dortmunder Oberflaechencentrum GmbH, Eberhardstrasse 12, D-44145 Dortmund (Germany); Friedel, F.; Peters, K. [ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe AG, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Strasse 100, D-47166 Duisburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    In this study the influence of Mn on galvannealed coatings of 1.7% Mn-1.5% Al TRIP- and 23% Mn X-IP registered -steels was investigated. It is shown that the external selective oxides like Mn, Al and Si of the TRIP steel which occur after annealing at 800 C for 60 s at a dew point (DP) of -25 C (5% H{sub 2}) hamper the Fe/Zn-reaction during subsequent galvannealing. Preoxidation was beneficially utilized to increase the surface-reactivity of the TRIP steel under the same dew point conditions. The influence of Mn on the steel alloy was investigated by using a 23% Mn containing X-IP registered -steel which was bright annealed at 1100 C for 60 s at DP -50 C (5% H{sub 2}) to obtain a mainly oxide free surface prior to hot dip galvanizing (hdg) and subsequent galvannealing. As well known from the literature Mn alloyed to the liquid zinc melt stabilizes {delta}-phase at lower temperatures by participating in the Fe-Zn-phase reactions, it was expected that the metallic Mn of the X-IP registered -steel increases the Fe/Zn-reactivity in the same manner. The approximation of the effective diffusion coefficient (D{sub eff}(Fe)) during galvannealing was found to be higher than compared to a low alloyed steel reference. Contrary to the expectation no increased Fe/Zn-reaction was found by microscopic investigations. Residual {eta}- and {zeta}-phase fractions prove a hampered Fe/Zn-reaction. As explanation for the observed hampered Fe/Zn-reaction the lower Fe-content of the high-Mn-alloyed X-IP registered -steel was suggested as the dominating factor for galvannealing. (Copyright copyright 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Solidified Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktaş Çelik G.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the family of stainless steels, cast austenitic stainless steels (CASSs are preferably used due to their high mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. These steels owe their properties to their microstructural features consisting of an austenitic matrix and skeletal or lathy type δ-ferrite depending on the cooling rate. In this study, the solidification behavior of CASSs (304L and 316L grades was studied using ThermoCalc software in order to determine the solidification sequence and final microstructure during cooling. Theoretical findings were supported by the microstructural examinations. For the mechanical characterization, not only hardness measurements but also tribological studies were carried out under dry sliding conditions and worn surfaces were examined by microscopy and 3D profilometric analysis. Results were discussed according to the type and amount of microstructural features.

  8. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  9. Production of Austenitic Steel for the LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Komori, T; Peiro, G; Rossi, L

    2006-01-01

    The austenitic-steel collars are an important component of the LHC dipole magnets, operating at cryogenic temperature under high mechanical stress. The required steel, known as YUS 130S, has been specifically developed for this application by Nippon Steel Corporation (NSC), who was awarded a CERN contract in 1999 for the supply of 11 500 tonnes. In 2005 - after six years of work - the contract is being successfully completed, with final production being ensured since October 2003 by Nippon Steel & Sumikin Stainless Steel Corporation (NSSC). The paper describes the steel properties, its manufacturing and quality control process, organization of production, logistics and contract follow-up. Extensive statistics have been collected relating to mechanical, physical and technological parameters. Specific attention is dedicated to measurements of magnetic permeability performed at cryogenic temperatures by CERN, the equipment used and statistical results. Reference is also made to the resulting precision of the...

  10. INFLUENCE OF ABNORMAL AUSTENITE GRAIN GRAIN GROWTH IN QUENCHED ABNT 5135 STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Brito Ferreira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Grain size in the steels is a relevant aspect in quenching and tempering heat treatments. It is known that high austenitizing temperature and long time provide an increase in austenitic grain sizes. Likewise, after hardening of low alloy steel, the microstructure consists of martensite and a volume fraction of retained austenite. This paper evaluates the influence of austenite grain size on the volume fraction of retained austenite measured by metallographic analyses and X-ray diffraction. The Mi and Mf temperatures were calculated using an empirical equation and experimentally determined by differential thermal analysis. The mechanical behavior of the steel was evaluated by Vickers microhardness testing. Differently from other results published in the literature that steel hardenability increases with the austenite grain size, it was observed that the increase in austenite grain promotes greater volume fraction of retained austenite after water quenching.

  11. Modeling of Austenite Grain Growth During Austenitization in a Low Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dingqian; Chen, Fei; Cui, Zhenshan

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a pragmatic model to predict austenite grain growth in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel. Austenite grain growth kinetics has been investigated under different heating conditions, involving heating temperature, holding time, as well as heating rate. Based on the experimental results, the mathematical model was established by regression analysis. The model predictions present a good agreement with the experimental data. Meanwhile, grain boundary precipitates and pinning effects on grain growth were studied by transmission electron microscopy. It is found that with the increasing of the temperature, the second-phase particles tend to be dissolved and the pinning effects become smaller, which results in a rapid growth of certain large grains with favorable orientation. The results from this study provide the basis for the establishment of large-sized ingot heating specification for SA508-III steel.

  12. Study on Austenitization Kinetics of SA508 Gr.3 Steel Based on Isoconversional Method

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaomeng Luo; Lizhan Han; Jianfeng Gu

    2015-01-01

    The austenitization kinetics of SA508 Gr.3 steel during heating was studied using the isoconversional method combined with continuous thermal dilatometric tests for the first time. The model-free austenitization kinetics was built and the effective activation energy as a function of transformed austenite fraction was determined without transformation models. Then, the corresponding regression validation was carried out. The time-temperature-austenitization (TTA) diagram of SA508 Gr.3 steel, w...

  13. Study of irradiation damage structures in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shozo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-08-01

    The irradiation damage microstructures in austenitic stainless steels, which have been proposed to be a candidate of structural materials of a fusion reactor, under ions and neutrons irradiation have been studied. In ion irradiation experiments, cross-sectional observation of the depth distribution of damage formed due to ion irradiation became available. Comparison and discussion between experimental results with TEM and the calculated ones in the depth profiles of irradiation damage microstructures. Further, dual-phase stainless steels, consisted of ferritic/austenitic phases, showed irradiation-induced/enhanced precipitation during ion irradiation. High Flux Isotope Reactor with high neutron fluxes was employed in neutron-irradiation experiments. Swelling of 316 steel showed irradiation temperature dependence and this had strong correlation with phase instability under heavy damage level. Swelling resistance of Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel, which has good swelling resistance, decreased during high damage level. This might be caused by the instability of Ti-carbide particles. The preparation method to reduce higher radioactivity of neutron-irradiated TEM specimen was developed. (author). 176 refs.

  14. Diagnostic experimental results on the hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavriljuk, V.G.; Shivanyuk, V.N.; Foct, J

    2003-03-14

    Three main available hypotheses of hydrogen embrittlement are analysed in relation to austenitic steels based on the studies of the hydrogen effect on the interatomic bonds, phase transformations and microplastic behaviour. It is shown that hydrogen increases the concentration of free electrons, i.e. enhances the metallic character of atomic interactions, although such a decrease in the interatomic bonding cannot be a reason for brittleness and rather assists an increased plasticity. The hypothesis of the critical role of the hydrogen-induced {epsilon} martensite was tested in the experiment with the hydrogen-charged Si-containing austenitic steel. Both the fraction of the {epsilon} martensite and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement were increased due to Si alloying, which is at variance with the pseudo-hydride hypothesis. The hydrogen-caused early start of the microplastic deformation and an increased mobility of dislocations, which are usually not observed in the common mechanical tests, are revealed by the measurements of the strain-dependent internal friction, which is consistent with the hypothesis of the hydrogen-enhanced localised plasticity. An influence of alloying elements on the enthalpy E{sub H} of hydrogen migration in austenitic steels is studied using the temperature-dependent internal friction and a correlation is found between the values of E{sub H} and hydrogen-caused decrease in plasticity. A mechanism for the transition from the hydrogen-caused microplasticity to the apparent macrobrittle fracture is proposed based on the similarity of the fracture of hydrogenated austenitic steels to that of high nitrogen steels.

  15. Effect of shot peening on metastable austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargas, G., E-mail: gemma.fargas@upc.edu [CIEFMA - Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Roa, J.J.; Mateo, A. [CIEFMA - Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-12

    In this work, shot peening was performed in a metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4318 (AISI 301LN) in order to evaluate its effect on austenite to martensite phase transformation and also the influence on the fatigue limit. Two different steel conditions were considered: annealed, i.e., with a fully austenitic microstructure, and cold rolled, consisting of a mixture of austenite and martensite. X-ray diffraction, electron back-scattered diffraction and focus ion beam, as well as nanoindentation techniques, were used to elucidate deformation mechanisms activated during shot peening and correlate with fatigue response. Results pointed out that extensive plastic deformation and phase transformation developed in annealed specimens as a consequence of shot peening. However, the increase of roughness and the generation of microcracks led to a limited fatigue limit improvement. In contrast, shot peened cold rolled specimens exhibited enhanced fatigue limit. In the latter case, the main factor that determined the influence on the fatigue response was the distance from the injector, followed successively by the exit speed of the shots and the coverage factor.

  16. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczak Daria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel was characterized by only two zones: re-melted zone and base material. In the re-melted zone, a composite microstructure, consisting of hard ceramic phases (borides and a soft austenitic matrix, was observed. A significant increase in hardness and wear resistance of such a layer was obtained.

  17. STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF HIGH NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Bakajová

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the structural stability of an austenitic stainless steel with high nitrogen content. The investigated steel was heat treated at 800°C using different annealing times. Investigation was carried out using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermodynamic calculations. Three phases were identified by electron diffraction: Cr2N, sigma – phase and M23C6. The thermodynamic prediction is in good agreement with the experimental result. The only is the M23C6 carbide phase which is not thermodynamically predicted. Cr2N is the majority secondary phase and occurs in the form of discrete particles or cells (lamellas of Cr2N and austenite.

  18. Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Nitrogen Bearing Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, A.A.; Shinohara, Tadashi.; Tsujikawa, Shigeo. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    1999-03-15

    The effect of nitrogen alloying on the initiation, propagation and repassivation of crevice corrosion of SUS 304 and SUS 316 austenitic stainless steels was investigated through potentiostatic polarizations, cyclic polarizations and in-situ measurements of depth profiles by the moire method. The results showed that nitrogen alloying in austenitic stainless steels increased to more noble values both the critical potential for steady crevice corrosion, V{sub C,CREV}, and the critical potential for repassivation of crevice corrosion E{sub C,CREV}. Concerning the in-situ measurements results, the disolution rate just above the repassivation potential, V{sub I}I*, decreased with nitrogen alloying for the SUS 304 alloys, and did not change in the SUS 316 alloys. The ratio of repassivating picture elements increased in both SUS 304 and SUS 316 with nitrogen alloying. (author)

  19. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades; Analise da austenita expandida em camadas nitretadas em acos inoxidaveis austeniticos e superaustenitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia de Materais, Aeronautica e Automobilistica; Oliveira, A.M. [Instituto de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranhao (IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Gallego, J., E-mail: gallego@dem.feis.unesp.b [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Dept. Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  20. Anisotropy of nickel release and corrosion in austenitic stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reclaru, L; Lüthy, H; Ziegenhagen, R; Eschler, P-Y; Blatter, A

    2008-05-01

    The study of 316L-type stainless steel reveals a significant anisotropy of nickel release that is dependent on the orientation of the test surface with respect to the casting and rolling direction. Cross-sectional specimens (transversal cuts with respect to the rolling direction) show a substantially higher sensitivity to corrosion phenomena compared with longitudinal cuts and they release nickel ions at rates 10-100 times higher. These findings indicate that orientation needs to be taken into account when interpreting test results, in particular when comparing different grades of austenitic stainless steel, as well as in product and production design.

  1. Austenite Static Recrystallization Kinetics in Microalloyed B Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga-Otegui, Ane; Pereda, Beatriz; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Gutiérrez, Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Boron is added to steels to increase hardenability, substituting of more expensive elements. Moreover, B acts as a recrystallization delaying element when it is in solid solution. However, B can interact with N and/or C to form nitrides and carbides at high temperatures, limiting its effect on both phase transformation and recrystallization. On the other hand, other elements like Nb and Ti are added due to the retarding effect that they exert on the austenite softening processes, which results in pancaked austenite grains and refined room microstructures. In B steels, Nb and Ti are also used to prevent B precipitation. However, the complex interaction between these elements and its effect on the austenite microstructure evolution during hot working has not been investigated in detail. The present work is focused on the effect the B exerts on recrystallization when added to microalloyed steels. Although B on its own leads to retarded static recrystallization kinetics, when Nb is added a large delay in the static recrystallization times is observed in the 1273 K to 1373 K (1000 °C to 1100 °C) temperature range. The effect is larger than that predicted by a model developed for Nb-microalloyed steels, which is attributed to a synergistic effect of both elements. However, this effect is not so prominent for Nb-Ti-B steels. The complex effect of the composition on recrystallization kinetics is explained as a competition between the solute drag and precipitation pinning phenomena. The effect of the microalloying elements is quantified, and a new model for the predictions of recrystallization kinetics that accounts for the B and Nb+B synergetic effects is proposed.

  2. Market Opportunities for Austenitic Stainless Steels in SO2 Scrubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Harold T.

    1980-10-01

    Recent U.S. federal legislation has created new opportunities for SO2 scrubbers because all coals, even low-sulfur western coals, will probably require scrubbing to remove SO2 from gaseous combustion products. Scrubbing, the chemical absorption of SO2 by vigorous contact with a slurry—usually lime or limestone—creates an aggressive acid-chloride solution. This presents a promising market for pitting-resistant austenitic stainless steels, but there is active competition from rubber and fiberglass-lined carbon steel. Since the latter are favored on a first-cost basis, stainless steels must be justified on a cost/performance or life-cost basis. Nickel-containing austenitic alloys are favored because of superior field fabricability. Ferritic stainless steels have little utility in this application because of limitations in weldability and resulting poor corrosion resistance. Inco corrosion test spools indicate that molybdenum-containing austenitic alloys are needed. The leanest alloys for this application are 316L and 317L. Low-carbon grades of stainless steel are specified to minimize corrosion in the vicinity of welds. More highly alloyed materials may be required in critical areas. At present, 16,000 MW of scrubber capacity is operational and 17,000 MW is under construction. Another 29,000 MW is planned, bringing the total to 62,000 MW. Some 160,000 MW of scrubber capacity is expected to be placed in service over the next 10 years. This could translate into a total potential market of 80,000 tons of alloy plate for new power industry construction in the next decade. Retrofitting of existing power plants plus scrubbers for other applications such as inert gas generators for oil tankers, smelters, municipal incinerators, coke ovens, the pulp and paper industry, sulfuric acid plants, and fluoride control in phosphoric acid plants will add to this large market.

  3. Phase transformations in a manganese-alloyed austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jargelius-Pettersson, R.F.A. (Swedish Inst. for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-05-01

    The increasing demands placed on the corrosion resistance of stainless steels has led to the successive development of more highly alloyed materials. In this context nitrogen has shown considerable value as an alloying element but its use is restricted by a solubility limit of approximately 0.2 wt% in conventional austenitic stainless steel grades. Manganese increases the nitrogen solubility appreciably and for this reason there has also been an increased interest in its use as an alloying addition but numerous questions remain to be answered about the effect of both nitrogen and manganese on structural stability. Although much work has been published on the precipitation of secondary phases in CrNi(Mo) stainless steels, there is a relative paucity of information available on manganese-alloyed steels. Brandis et al. investigated precipitation in a 25Cr 17Ni 3Mo 6Mn 0.2Nb steel and found no manganese-enriched phases to occur. Sigma phase was the predominant intermetallic precipitate at low nitrogen contents while higher nitrogen contents retarded the onset of sigma phase precipitation but caused the appearance of chi phase. Boothby et al. investigated a 12Cr 11-35Ni (3Mo) steel in which the nickel was partially replaced by 20 or 30% manganese and found the precipitation of the intermetallic sigma, chi and Laves phases to be promoted by manganese, although again no manganese-enriched phases were observed. Fritscher demonstrated however the existence in the Fe-Cr-Ni system of a brittle ternary Y phase containing 30--60% manganese which was destabilized by nitrogen. The present work represents part of a study designed to gain greater understanding of the precipitation and sensitization behavior of highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels and concentrates on the influence of nitrogen additions up to 0.5wt% on precipitation of secondary phases in a 20Cr 18Ni 4.5Mo 10Mn steel.

  4. Phase Transformation of Metastable Austenite in Steel during Nano indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Taehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Bo; Han, Heung Nam [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyungtae [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    These can produce geometrical softening accompanied by a sudden displacement excursion during load-controlled nanoindentation, which referred to in the literature as a pop-in. In this study, phase transformation of metastable austenite to stress-induced ε martensite which causes pop-ins during nanoindentation of steel will be reported and discussed. This study investigated the relationship between pop-in behavior of austenite in the early stage of nanoindentation and formation of ε martensite based on microstructural analyses. The load-displacement curve obtained from nanoindentation revealed stepwise pop-ins in the early stage of plastic deformation. From analyses of high resolution TEM images, a cluster of banded structure under the indent turned out a juxtaposition of (111) planes of γ austenite and (0001) planes of ε martensite. The calculation of displacement along indentation axis for (111) slip system by formation of ε martensite showed that geometrical softening can also occur by ε martensite formation when considering that the stress-induced ε martensite transformation is the predominant deformation mode in the early stage of plastic deformation and its monopartial nature as well. These microstructural investigations strongly suggest that the pop-in behavior in the early stage of plastic deformation of austenite is closely related to the formation of ε martensite.

  5. Fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in different environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Yawas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid and wet steam corrosive media has been investigated. The immersion time in the corrosive media was 30 days to simulate the effect on stainless steel structures/equipment in offshore and food processing applications and thereafter annealing heat treatment was carried out on the samples. The findings from the fatigue tests show that seawater specimens have a lower fatigue stress of 0.5 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the heat treated sample and 0.1 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the unheat-treated sample compared to the corresponding hydrochloric acid and steam samples. The post-welding heat treatment was found to increase the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel especially tensile strength but it reduces the transformation and thermal stresses of the samples. These findings were further corroborated by the microstructural examination of the stainless steel specimen.

  6. Effect of Geobacter sulfurreducens on the microbial corrosion of mild steel, ferritic and austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehanna, Maha [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, CNRS - Universite de Toulouse, 5 rue Paulin Talabot, BP1301, 31029 Toulouse (France)], E-mail: mum34@psu.edu; Basseguy, Regine; Delia, Marie-Line; Bergel, Alain [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, CNRS - Universite de Toulouse, 5 rue Paulin Talabot, BP1301, 31029 Toulouse (France)

    2009-11-15

    The influence of Geobacter sulfurreducens was tested on the anaerobic corrosion of four different steels: mild steel 1145, ferritic steel 403 and austenitic steels 304L and 316L. Within a few hours, the presence of cells induced a free potential (E{sub oc}) ennoblement around +0.3 V on 1145 mild steel, 403 ferritic steel and 304L austenitic steels and slightly less on 316L. The kinetics of E{sub oc} ennoblement depended on the amount of bacteria in the inoculum, but the final potential value depended essentially on the nature of the material. This effect was due to the capacity of G. sulfurreducens to create a direct cathodic reaction on steel surfaces, extracting the electrons directly from material. The presence of bacterial cells modified the corrosion features of mild steel and ferritic steel, so that corrosion attacks were gathered in determined zones of the surface. Local corrosion was significantly enhanced on ferritic steel. Potential ennoblement was not sufficient to induce corrosion on austenitic steels. In contrast G. sulfurreducens delayed the occurrence of pitting on 304L steel because of its capability to oxidize acetate at high potential values. The electrochemical behaviour of 304L steel was not affected by the concentration of soluble electron donor (acetate, 1-10 mM) or the amount of planktonic cells; it was directly linked to the biofilm coverage. After polarization pitting curves had been recorded, microscopic observations showed that pits propagated only in the surface zones where cell settlement was the densest. The study evidenced that Geobacter sulfurreducens can control the electrochemical behaviour of steels in complex ways that can lead to severe corrosion. As Geobacteraceae are ubiquitous species in sediments and soils they should now be considered as possible crucial actors in the microbial corrosion of buried equipment.

  7. Effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb–Ti microalloyed steel

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Guiqin; Jin Duo; Zhu Miaoyong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb–Ti microalloyed steel was investigated. Steels were subjected to different austenitizing treatments (temperatures ranging from 850 °C to 1250 °C for 5-120 min) and rolled after being austenitized at different temperatures (i.e. 1020 °C, 1070 °C and 1150 °C). The results showed that austenite grain coarsening temperature was around 1000 °C. The mean grain size of the rolled steels initially ...

  8. Retained austenite variation in dual-phase steel after mechanical stressing and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, L.; Tiziani, A.; Zambon, A. (Dipt. di Innovazione Meccanica e Gestionale, Padua Univ. (Italy)); Matteazzi, P. (Ist. di Chimica, Univ. di Udine (Italy))

    1991-01-20

    Retained austenite changes in a dual-phase steel have been studied after mechanical and thermal treatments. In order to determine the quantitative variations of retained austenite, whose amount in the examined steel is of the order of 5%, Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used. Retained austenite undergoes a martensitic transformation during deformation, but does not transform under the heat treatments performed on the sheet during anticorrosion and painting processes. (orig.).

  9. Optimization of Melt Treatment for Austenitic Steel Grain Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakh, Simon N.; Ge, Jun; Richards, Von; O'Malley, Ron; TerBush, Jessica R.

    2017-02-01

    Refinement of the as-cast grain structure of austenitic steels requires the presence of active solid nuclei during solidification. These nuclei can be formed in situ in the liquid alloy by promoting reactions between transition metals (Ti, Zr, Nb, and Hf) and metalloid elements (C, S, O, and N) dissolved in the melt. Using thermodynamic simulations, experiments were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a predicted sequence of reactions targeted to form precipitates that could act as active nuclei for grain refinement in austenitic steel castings. Melt additions performed to promote the sequential precipitation of titanium nitride (TiN) onto previously formed spinel (Al2MgO4) inclusions in the melt resulted in a significant refinement of the as-cast grain structure in heavy section Cr-Ni-Mo stainless steel castings. A refined as-cast structure consisting of an inner fine-equiaxed grain structure and outer columnar dendrite zone structure of limited length was achieved in experimental castings. The sequential of precipitation of TiN onto Al2MgO4 was confirmed using automated SEM/EDX and TEM analyses.

  10. Fatigue behaviors and damage mechanism of a Cr-Mn-N austenitic steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Z.; Cai, P.; Yu, Tianbo

    2017-01-01

    Four-point bending fatigue tests were conducted on a Cr-Mn-N austenitic steel at room temperature, at frequency of 20 Hz and the stress ratio of R = 0.1, in air. The fatigue strength of this Cr-Mn-N austenitic steel was measured to be 503 MPa in the maximum stress from the S-N curve obtained...

  11. Creep properties and microstructure of the new wrought austenitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasak, T.; Hakl, J.; Novak, P. [SVUM a.s., Prague (Czech Republic); Vyrostkova, A. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia). Inst. of Materials Research

    2010-07-01

    The contribution is oriented on the new wrought austenitic steel BGA4 (Cr23Ni15Mn6Cu3W1.5NbVMo) developed by the British Corus Company. Our main aim is to present creep properties studied in SVUM a.s. Prague during COST 536 programme. The dependencies of the creep strength, strength for specific creep strain and minimum creep strain rate were evaluated on the basis of long term creep tests carried out at temperature interval (625; 725) C. Important part of a paper is metallographic analysis. (orig.)

  12. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  13. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abudaia, F. B., E-mail: fabudaia@yahoo.com; Khalil, E. O., E-mail: ekhalil9@yahoo.com; Esehiri, A. F., E-mail: Hope-eseheri@hotmail.co.uk; Daw, K. E., E-mail: Khawladaw@yahoo.com [University of Tripoli Department of Materials and Metallurgical Eng, Tripoli-Libya P.O.Box13589 (Libya)

    2015-03-30

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe{sub 2}C{sub 5}. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  14. Effect of high-manganese cast steel strain hardening on the abrasion wear resistance in a mixture of SiC and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandyk B.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study attempts to determine the impact of the high-manganese cast steel strain hardening on its abrasion wear resistance in a mixture of SiC and water prepared in accordance with ASTM G75. For tests, the high-manganese cast steel containing 10.7, 17.9 and 20.02% Mn was selected. The results of microstructure examinations and abrasion wear resistance tests carried out on the material in non-hardened condition and after strain hardening with a force of 539.55kN were disclosed. Additionally, the surface of samples after a 16-hour cycle of abrasion tests was examined. Moreover, based on the obtained results, the effect of different contents of Mn in cast steel was studied, mainly in terms of its impact on the abrasion wear resistance. The results obtained on the tested materials were compared with the results obtained on the low-alloyed abrasion wear-resistant cast steel L35GSM.

  15. Biofouling on austenitic stainless steels in spent nuclear fuel pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarro, M.I.; Moreno, D.A.; Chicote, E.; Lorenzo, P.I.; Garcia, A.M. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria y Ciencia de los Materiales, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Montero, F. [Iberdrola Generacion, S.A., y C.M.D.S., Centro de Tecnologia de Materiales, Paseo de la Virgen del Puerto, 53, E-28005 Madrid (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biofilm formation on three different types of austenitic stainless steel (UNS S30400, S30466 and S31600) submerged in a spent nuclear fuel pool. The presence of microorganisms in coupons was characterised using standard culture microbiological methods, microscopic techniques (epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy), and molecular biology techniques (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing fragments of 16S rDNA). The microscopy techniques showed signs of colonisation of stainless steels in spite of these extreme conditions. Based on sequencing of cultured microorganisms, different bacteria belonging to {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}-Proteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria classes have been identified. The biofilm radioactivity was measured using gamma-ray spectrometry and, according to the data gathered, the radionuclides present in the water pool were entrapped in the biofilm increasing the amount of radiation at the surface of the different materials. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Surface treatment and corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravcová, M.; Palček, P.; Zatkalíková, V.; Tański, T.; Król, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this article results from corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L after different surface treatments are published. “As received” surface and surface after grinding resulted in lower resistance to pitting corrosion in physiological solution than electrochemically polished in H3PO4+H2SO4+H2O. Electropolishing also improved the surface roughness in comparison with the “as received” surface. Deposition of Al2O3 nanometric ALD coating improves the corrosion resistance of stainless steel in chloride-containing environment by shifting the breakdown potential toward more positive values. This oxide coating not only improves the corrosion resistance but it also affects the wettability of the surface, resulting in hydrophobic surface.

  17. Overview of Intergranular Fracture of Neutron Irradiated Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hojná

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels are normally ductile and exhibit deep dimples on fracture surfaces. These steels can, however, exhibit brittle intergranular fracture under some circumstances. The occurrence of intergranular fracture in the irradiated steels is briefly reviewed based on limited literature data. The data are sorted according to the irradiation temperature. Intergranular fracture may occur in association with a high irradiation temperature and void swelling. At low irradiation temperature, the steels can exhibit intergranular fracture at low or even at room temperatures during loading in air and in high temperature water (~300 °C. This paper deals with the similarities and differences for IG fractures and discusses the mechanisms involved. The intergranular fracture occurrence at low temperatures might be correlated with decohesion or twinning and strain martensite transformation in local narrow areas around grain boundaries. The possibility of a ductile-to-brittle transition is also discussed. In case of void swelling higher than 3%, quasi-cleavage at low temperature might be expected as a consequence of ductile-to-brittle fracture changes with temperature. Any existence of the change in fracture behavior in the steels of present thermal reactor internals with increasing irradiation dose should be clearly proven or disproven. Further studies to clarify the mechanism are recommended.

  18. EBSD study of a hot deformed austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: h-m@gmx.com [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. Bases de Manresa 1, 08242 Manresa (Spain); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Calvillo, P.R. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. Bases de Manresa 1, 08242 Manresa (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural characterization of an austenitic stainless steel by EBSD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The role of twins in the nucleation and growth of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grain refinement through the discontinuous dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of recrystallized fraction using the grain average misorientation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationship between recrystallization and the frequency of high angle boundaries. - Abstract: The microstructural evolution of a 304 H austenitic stainless steel subjected to hot compression was studied by the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. Detailed data about the boundaries, coincidence site lattice (CSL) relationships and grain size were acquired from the orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) maps. It was found that twins play an important role in the nucleation and growth of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) during hot deformation. Moreover, the conventional discontinuous DRX (DDRX) was found to be in charge of grain refinement reached under the testing conditions studied. Furthermore, the recrystallized fraction (X) was determined from the grain average misorientation (GAM) distribution based on the threshold value of 1.55 Degree-Sign . The frequency of high angle boundaries showed a direct relationship with X. A time exponent of 1.11 was determined from Avrami analysis, which was related to the observed single-peak behavior in the stress-strain flow curves.

  19. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meric de Bellefon, G., E-mail: mericdebelle@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Duysen, J.C. van [EDF R& D (France); University of Tennessee-Knoxville (United States); Unité Matériaux et Transformation (UMET) CNRS, Université de Lille (France)

    2016-07-15

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details. - Highlights: • This article is part of an effort to tailor the plasticity of 304L and 316L steels for nuclear applications. • It reviews mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels during tensile tests. • Formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, grain rotation, and irradiation effects are discussed.

  20. Delineation of Prior Austenite Grain Boundaries in a Low Alloy High Performance Steel (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-31

    property relationships in steels, since prior austenite grain size plays an important role in defining the microstructural scale of low-temperature...the microstructure-24 property relationships in steels, since prior austenite grain size plays an important role in 25 defining the microstructural...steels [8]. A solution 73 containing 10g CrO3, 50g NaOH, 1.5g picric acid, and 100ml distilled water was also reported to 74 provide significantly

  1. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels in Lithium Bromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayo Samuel AFOLABI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steels in various concentrations of lithium, bromide solution was investigated by using the conventional weight loss measurement method. The results obtained show that corrosion of these steels occurred due to the aggressive bromide ion in the medium. Duplex stainless steel shows a greater resistance to corrosion than austenitic stainless steel in the medium. This was attributed to equal volume proportion of ferrite and austenite in the structure of duplex stainless steel coupled with higher content of chromium in its composition. Both steels produced electrochemical noise at increased concentrations of lithium bromide due to continuous film breakdown and repair caused by reduction in medium concentration by the alkaline corrosion product while surface passivity observed in duplex stainless steel is attributed to film stability on this steel.

  3. EFFECTS OF AUSTENITIZATION ON STRUCTURE FORMATION СHROMO-MOLYBDENUM-VANADIUM STEEL AFTER HIGH TEMPERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lutsenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of austenitization temperature of chrome-molybdenum-vanadium steel on structure formation at the softening heat treatment is studied. It is shown that the decline of the austenitization temperature promotes to reduce the micro-hardness values due to the intensification of spheroidizing of pearlite after the overcooling and high tempering. Increasing the austenitization temperature leads to formation of an uneven structure after tempering.

  4. Wearing Quality of Austenitic, Duplex Cast Steel, Gray and Spheroidal Graphite Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrowski S.

    2012-01-01

    The current work presents the research results of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing and liquid friction of new austenitic, austenitic-ferritic (“duplex”) cast steel and gray cast iron EN-GJL-250, spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3, pearlitic with ledeburitic carbides and spheroidal graphite iron with ledeburitic carbides with a microstructure of the metal matrix: pearlitic, upper bainite, mixture of upper and lower bainite, martensitic with austenite, pearlitic-martensitic-bainiti...

  5. Modified Monkman-Grant relationship for austenitic stainless steel foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman Ali, Hassan; Tamin, Mohd Nasir

    2013-02-01

    Characteristics of creep deformation for austenitic stainless steel foils are examined using the modified Monkman-Grant equation. A series of creep tests are conducted on AISI 347 steel foils at 700 °C and different stress levels ranging from 54 to 221 MPa. Results showed that at lower stress levels below 110 MPa, the creep life parameters ɛ, ɛr, tr can be expressed using the modified Monkman-Grant equation with exponent m'= 0.513. This indicates significant deviation of the creep behavior from the first order reaction kinetics theory for creep (m' = 1.0). The true tertiary creep damage in AISI 347 steel foil begins after 65.9% of the creep life of the foil has elapsed at stress levels above 150 MPa. At this high stress levels, Monkman-Grant ductility factor λ' saturates to a value of 1.3 with dislocation-controlled deformation mechanisms operating. At low stress levels, λ' increases drastically (λ'=190 at 54 MPa) when slow diffusion-controlled creep is dominant.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands.

  7. Dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puli, Ramesh, E-mail: rameshpuli2000@gmail.com; Janaki Ram, G.D.

    2012-12-15

    Friction surfacing involves complex thermo-mechanical phenomena. In this study, the nature of dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L coatings was investigated using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the alloy 316L undergoes discontinuous dynamic recrystallization under conditions of moderate Zener-Hollomon parameter during friction surfacing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L friction surfaced coatings is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfacing leads to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rates in friction surfacing exceed 400 s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated grain size matches well with experimental observations in 316L coatings.

  8. Small Punch Creep Test in a 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo-Muñoz, Maribel L.; Komazaki, Ken-Icbi; Ortiz-Mariscal, Arturo; Lopez-Hirata, Victor M.

    The small punch creep test was used to evaluate the creep behavior of a 316 type austenitic stainless steel at temperatures of 650, 675 and 700 °C and loads from 199 to 512 N using a creep tester with a specimen size of 10 x 10 x 0.3 mm under an argon atmosphere. The small punch creep curves shows the three stages found in the creep curves of the conventional uniaxial test. The time to rupture decreases as the testing temperature and load increase. The secondary stage is also reduced with the increase in test load. An intergranular ductile fracture mode was observed at a testing temperature of 700 °C, while intergranular brittle mode at 650 °C which is associated with the absence of abundant precipitation at 650 °C.

  9. Experiences with austenitic steels in boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, O. [Preussische Elektrizitaets-AG (Preussenelektra), Hannover (Germany); Bruemmer, G. [Hamburgische Electricitaets-Werke AG., Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-05-01

    Stabilized austenitic steels are susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) under boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions. This important finding for the German nuclear power station industry arises from the detection of cracks during the last 3 years in reactor hot water pipes made from titanium-stabilized steel AISI 321 in six BWRs and in reactor core components made from the niobium-stabilized steel AISI 347 in one BWR. All the observed cracks had a common feature: they had their origin in the chromium carbide precipitates at the grain boundaries and in the associated chromium-depleted region near the grain boundary. These microstructural features in the heat-affected zones of the hot water pipe weldments were caused by the heat input during deposition of the root bead. The TiC partially dissolved in the region near the fusion line and the released carbon reacted to form chromium-rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Regarding the cracks found in the core shroud and the core grid plates, it was shown that a sensitizing heat treatment of rings taken from the same heat of steel could give rise to a microstructure susceptible to IGSCC in the region of a weldment. High carbon contents coupled with low stabilization ratios led to sensitization. Residual stresses developed during welding provided the significant contributions to the tensile stress necessary for IGSCC. With regard to the service medium, the influence of the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) was recognized as a dominant factor, together with the conductivity. The corrosion potential was mainly determined by the radiolytic formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}; with increasing distance from the core, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content decreased owing to catalytic decomposition. For the pipes the problem of IGSCC could be resolved by the use of optimized steel (lower carbon content with maximum allowable stabilization ratio).

  10. Strain direction dependency of martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steels: The effect of gamma-texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilkhuijsen, P.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile tests on both a non-textured and a highly textured, fully austenitic stainless steel were performed in both the rolling and the transverse directions. Both materials show mechanically induced phase transformation from the austenitic FCC to the martensitic BCC phase. Differences in

  11. In Situ Techniques for the Investigation of the Kinetics of Austenitization of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Apel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The austenitization and inter-critical annealing of X4CrNiMo16-5-1 (1.4418) supermartensitic stainless steel were investigated in-situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), dilatometry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under isochronal heating conditions. Austenitization occurred...

  12. Effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb–Ti microalloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Guiqin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb–Ti microalloyed steel was investigated. Steels were subjected to different austenitizing treatments (temperatures ranging from 850 °C to 1250 °C for 5-120 min and rolled after being austenitized at different temperatures (i.e. 1020 °C, 1070 °C and 1150 °C. The results showed that austenite grain coarsening temperature was around 1000 °C. The mean grain size of the rolled steels initially increased and then decreased, but the ferrite content decreased with increasing austenitizing temperature. The precipitates in the prior austenite and rolled steel were both complex Nb–Ti carbonitrides. As the austenitizing temperature increased from 1020 °C to 1150 °C, most precipitates were dissolved and re-precipitated as dispersive particles with mean size decreasing from 30 nm to 10 nm. Meanwhile, the 80 nm to 100 nm rectangular Ti-rich carbonitrides were not dissolved and varied during the subsequent cooling process.The Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength increased but the elongation and reduction in area (in percent decreased with the elevated austenitizing temperature.

  13. Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bin [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Baker, Ian [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2016-03-31

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, the materials required must be strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and L12 precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. Microstructural and microchemical analyses of the recently developed alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steels (Fe-14Cr-32Ni-3Nb-3Al-2Ti-based) indicated they are strengthened by Ni3Al(Ti) L12, NiAl B2, Fe2Nb Laves phase and MC carbide precipitates. Different thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) were performed on these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The thermo-mechanical processing produced nanocrystalline grains in AFA alloys and dramatically increased their yield strength at room temperature. Unfortunately, the TMTs didn’t increase the yield strengths of AFA alloys at ≥700ºC. At these temperatures, dislocation climb is the dominant mechanism for deformation of TMT alloys according to strain rate jump tests. After the characterization of aged AFA alloys, we found that the largest strengthening effect from L12 precipitates can be obtained by aging for less than 24 h. The coarsening behavior of the L12 precipitates was not influenced by carbon and boron additions. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these AFA steels after creep tests. Though the Laves and B2-NiAl phase precipitated along the boundaries can improve the creep properties, cracks were

  14. Structure and properties of high-temperature austenitic steels for superheater tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    The structure and properties of high-temperature austenitic steels intended for superheater tubes are analyzed. Widely used Kh18N10T (AISI 304) and Kh16N13M3 (AISI 316) steels are found not to ensure a stable austenitic structure and stable properties during long-term thermal holding under stresses. The hardening of austenitic steels by fine particles of vanadium and niobium carbides and nitrides and γ'-phase and Fe2W and Fe2Mo Laves phase intermetallics is considered. The role of Cr23C6 chromium carbides, the σ phase, and coarse precipitates of an M 3B2 phase and a boron-containing eutectic in decreasing the time to failure and the stress-rupture strength of austenitic steels is established. The mechanism of increasing the stress-rupture strength of steels by boron additions is described. The chemical compositions, mechanical properties, stress-rupture strength, and creep characteristics of Russian and foreign austenitic steels used or designed for superheater tubes intended for operation under stress conditions at temperatures above 600°C are presented. The conditions are found for increasing the strength, plasticity, and thermodeformation stability of austenite in steels intended for superheater tubes operating at 700°C under high stresses for a long time.

  15. The influence of texture on phase transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilkhuijsen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels are used in many applications, from shavers and kitchen sinks to various applications in the food industry. The diversity in applications of this type of steels is possible due to the many positive properties of the steel. It is not only esthetically pleasing,

  16. The adhesion of hot-filament CVD diamond films on AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, J.G.; Shankar, P.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Schermer, J.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2004-01-01

    Steel ball indentation and scratch adhesion testing of hot filament chemical vapour deposited diamond films onto AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel substrates using two different interlayer systems, namely chromium nitride and borided steel, have been investigated. In order to compare the

  17. Experimental determination of the constitutive behaviour of a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Nolles, H.; Datta, K.; Datta, K.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents measurements to describe the constitutive behaviour of a semi-austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel called Sandvik Nanoflex™, during metal forming and hardening. The material is metastable, which causes strain-induced transformation during forming. Depending on

  18. The influence of nickel-nitrogen ratio on the deformation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schmid, OE

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effect that a partial substitution of nickel with nitrogen has on the deformation behaviour of a metastable austenitic stainless steel, AISI 301. The effect on the tensile deformation behaviour is studied in detail...

  19. Friction welding of Al-Cu-SiC composite to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Niyazi; Balaban, Zülküf

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates thefeasibility of joining an aluminium matrix composite reinforced with 5, 10 and15 vol. % of SiCp particles to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by usingfriction welding technique. In the present study, optical and electronmicroscopy as well as lap shear strength test and microhardness measurementswere used to evaluate the quality of bonding of Al-Cu-SiC and AISI 304austenitic stainless steel joints produced by friction welding

  20. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of gas tungsten arc welded super austenitic stainless steel joints

    OpenAIRE

    Vinoth Kumar, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Rajakumar, S.; Albert, Shaju K.

    2015-01-01

    Super 304H austenitic stainless steel with 3% of copper posses excellent creep strength and corrosion resistance, which is mainly used in heat exchanger tubing of the boiler. Heat exchangers are used in nuclear power plants and marine vehicles which are intended to operate in chloride rich offshore environment. Chloride stress corrosion cracking is the most likely life limiting failure with austenitic stainless steel tubing. Welding may worsen the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of t...

  1. V and Nb Influence on the Austenitic Stainless Steel Corrosion in 0.1 M HCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel GHARBI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium and niobium were added in AISI309 austenitic stainless steel composition to modify their structure and pitting corrosion resistance in 0.1 M HCl. The structural characterization was carried out by X-rays diffraction and optical microscopy. Corrosion behavior was investigated using potentiodynamic tests and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS .Results showed that vanadium and niobium addition precipitated stable carbides (VC, NbC to chromium carbides’ detriment and improved austenitic stainless steel corrosion resistance.

  2. Pitting corrosion in austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jargelius-Pettersson, R.F.A.; Pires Duarte, B.; Duchamp, G. [Swedish Inst. for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    Various electrochemical methods have been used to evaluate the pitting corrosion resistance of two austenitic and two duplex stainless steels. Testing has been performed in a purpose-built electrochemical cell which permits simultaneous evaluation of twelve specimens and in which crevice corrosion is avoided using a flushed-port design. A potential-independent critical pitting temperature below which pitting is not observed has been evaluated from potentiodynamic measurements, pitting potentials and pit induction times have also been evaluated at various temperatures above this critical value. Statistical treatment of the data has been used to evaluate the elementary pitting probability and pit generation rates. The good differentiation obtained using a large number of pitting potential measurements has permitted quantitative evaluation of the effect of testing and alloy variables. The surface finish is shown to have a significant effect on measured pitting resistance, as has the passivation time between specimen preparation and testing. The decrease in pitting resistance as a result of short-term sensitising heat treatment of the steels has also been evaluated. (orig.) 9 refs.

  3. The effect of solid solution treatment on the hardness and microstructure of 0.6%wt C-10.8%wt Mn-1.44%wt Cr austenitic manganese steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjaman, F.; Bahfie, F.; Astuti, W.; Shofi, A.

    2017-04-01

    Austenitic manganese steel is steel alloy that has high manganese content (10-14%wt Mn). The characteristics of austenitic manganese steel are good in toughness, ductility, and wear resistance. Effect of solid solution treatment on the hardness and microstructure of austenitic manganese steel was studied in this experiment. The solid solution treatment process of austenitic manganese steel, 0.6%wt C-10.8%wt Mn-1.44%wt Cr, was conducted by heating the material at varied temperatures (950°C, 1000°C, 1050°C) for an hour and then quenching it in two different quenching media, i.e. oil and water. Further, the samples were tempered at three different temperatures (300°C, 400°C, and 500°C) for 2 hours. The treated materials were analyzed by Rockwell Hardness Tester to obtain the information of materials hardness and by an optical microscope and XRD to investigate the microstructure phase of the treated materials. Heating the austenitic manganese steel at 950°C for an hour followed by water quenching dissolved all carbide in as-cast condition and resulted the fully austenitic on its microstructure. Carbide precipitation occurred due to the prolongation of soaking time in solid solution treatment and tempering process. The optimum hardness of sample was 53.3 HRC, which was resulted by heating this material until 1000°C for an hour, followed by water quenching and tempering at 400°C for 2 hours.

  4. Study on Austenitization Kinetics of SA508 Gr.3 Steel Based on Isoconversional Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Luo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The austenitization kinetics of SA508 Gr.3 steel during heating was studied using the isoconversional method combined with continuous thermal dilatometric tests for the first time. The model-free austenitization kinetics was built and the effective activation energy as a function of transformed austenite fraction was determined without transformation models. Then, the corresponding regression validation was carried out. The time-temperature-austenitization (TTA diagram of SA508 Gr.3 steel, which is very difficult to be obtained using experiment measures, was constructed. Finally, the austenitization kinetics in a more realistic case, i.e., under non-constant heating rates, was predicted, which is found to agree well with the experimental results.

  5. Study of biocompatibility of medical grade high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menghua; Yin, Tieying; Wang, Yazhou; Du, Feifei; Zou, Xingzheng; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2014-10-01

    Adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the living organism have resulted in development of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also improves steel properties. The cell cytocompatibility, blood compatibility and cell response of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel were studied in vitro. The mechanical properties and microstructure of this stainless steel were compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel. It was shown that the new steel material had comparable basic mechanical properties to 316L stainless steel and preserved the single austenite organization. The cell toxicity test showed no significant toxic side effects for MC3T3-E1 cells compared to nitinol alloy. Cell adhesion testing showed that the number of MC3T3-E1 cells was more than that on nitinol alloy and the cells grew in good condition. The hemolysis rate was lower than the national standard of 5% without influence on platelets. The total intracellular protein content and ALP activity and quantification of mineralization showed good cell response. We conclude that the high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel is a promising new biomedical material for coronary stent development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transformation of retained austenite in carburized 4320 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, R. W.; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    1991-07-01

    A systematic study of stress-induced and thermal-induced transformation of retained austenite in carburized 4320 steel with an initial retained austenite of 35 pct has been conducted. The transformation was monitored by recording the change in volume of smooth fatigue specimens. Stress-induced transformation was studied by conducting monotonic and cyclic tests at temperatures in the range from 22 °C to 150 °C. The volumetric transformation strain was as large as 0.006 at 22 °C. The anisotropy of the transformation was such that the axial transformation strain component exceeded the diametral transformation strain component by a factor of 1.4. Thermal-induced transformation was investigated with temperature stepup tests in the range from 150 °C to 255 °C at constant stress (-500 MPa, 0 MPa, and 500 MPa) and with static tests where temperature was held constant at zero load. The maximum thermal-induced volumetric transformation strain of 0.006 was independent of stress. However, the anisotropy of the transformation strain components was dependent on stress direction and magnitude. An axial tensile stress increased the axial transformation strain relative to the diametral transformation strain. The influence of low-temperature creep (T = 150 °C) on the anisotropy of strains is noted. The differences between stress-induced and thermal-induced transformation mechanisms are discussed. Thermal-induced transformation primarily occurred at temperatures between 100 °C and 200 °C, with the rate of transformation increasing with temperature, while the stress-induced transformation primarily occurred at 22 °C, with the rate of transformation decreasing with increasing temperature. There was no stress-induced transformation above 60 °C.

  7. Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure of AISI M42 High-Speed Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwa Luo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure of AISI M42 high-speed steel were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and in-situ observation by a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM. Results show that the network morphology of carbides could not dissolve completely and distribute equably in the case of the austenitizing temperature is 1373 K. When the austenitizing temperature reaches 1473 K, the excessive increase in temperature leads to increase in carbide dissolution, higher dissolved alloying element contents, and unwanted grain growth. Thus, 1453 K is confirmed as the best austenitizing condition on temperature for the steel. In addition, variations on the microstructure and hardness of the steel are not obvious when holding time ranges from 15 to 30 min with the austenitizing temperature of 1453 K. However, when the holding time reaches 45 min, the average size of carbides tends to increase because of Ostwald ripening. Furthermore, the value of Ms and Mf decrease with the increase of cooling rate. Hence, high cooling rate can depress the martensitic transformation and increase the content of retained austenite. As a result, the hardness of the steel is the best (65.6 HRc when the austenitizing temperature reaches 1453 K and is held for 30 min.

  8. Effect of Austenitizing Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Hardness of Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI 420

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, L. D.; Du Toit, M.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of austenitizing on the microstructure and hardness of two martensitic stainless steels was examined with the aim of supplying heat-treatment guidelines to the user that will ensure a martensitic structure with minimal retained austenite, evenly dispersed carbides and a hardness of between 610 and 740 HV (Vickers hardness) after quenching and tempering. The steels examined during the course of this examination conform in composition to medium-carbon AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, except for the addition of 0.13% vanadium and 0.62% molybdenum to one of the alloys. Steel samples were austenitized at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 °C, followed by oil quenching. The as-quenched microstructures were found to range from almost fully martensitic structures to martensite with up to 35% retained austenite after quenching, with varying amounts of carbides. Optical and scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the microstructures, and X-ray diffraction was employed to identify the carbide present in the as-quenched structures and to quantify the retained austenite contents. Hardness tests were performed to determine the effect of heat treatment on mechanical properties. As-quenched hardness values ranged from 700 to 270 HV, depending on the amount of retained austenite. Thermodynamic predictions (using the CALPHAD™ model) were employed to explain these microstructures based on the solubility of the carbide particles at various austenitizing temperatures.

  9. Influence of reverted austenite on the texture and magnetic properties of 350 maraging steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Hamilton F.G., E-mail: hamilton@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará, Campus do Pici-Bloco 729, CEP 60440-554 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Silva, Jean J. [Universidade Federal do Ceará, Campus do Pici-Bloco 729, CEP 60440-554 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Silva, Manoel R. [Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Campus Sede Itajubá/IFQ- Instituto de Física e Química, Itajubá, MG (Brazil); Gomes da Silva, Marcelo J., E-mail: mgsilva@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará, Campus do Pici-Bloco 729, CEP 60440-554 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    The aging temperature to improve magnetic properties in Maraging-350 steel (Mar-350) is limited by the onset of austenite reversion. The traditional process of cooling after aging is to remove the piece from the oven and then to air cool it. The purpose of this research was to characterize the reverted austenite and to investigate the effect of cooling below the martensite start temperature (M{sub s}) on the magnetic properties. The Mar350 samples aged at temperatures above 550 °C, and subsequently cooled in liquid nitrogen presented less austenite than samples cooled in air, resulting in higher magnetization saturation and a lower coercive force. A combination of optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were used to characterize the presence of reverted austenite. The crystallographic texture of both martensite and reverted austenite were analyzed. The texture of the reverted austenite coincides with the texture of the parent austenite indicating that a phenomenon of texture memory is present. - Highlights: • Cooling maraging samples in liquid nitrogen reduces reverted austenite fraction. • Retained austenite increases coercive force and decreases saturation magnetization. • Reverted and parent austenites have the same crystallographic texture. • Memory effect found during reversion transformation.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Thermally Aged Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds and Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sunghoon; Seo, Myeong-Gyu; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Conventional test methods for tensile and J-R properties of such weld require large size specimens. Meanwhile, small punch (SP) test has advantages of using small size samples at specific location. In this study, the mechanical property changes caused by the thermal aging were evaluated for the stainless steel welds and CASSs using tensile, J-R, and SP test. Based on the results, correlations were developed to estimate the fracture toughness using the load-displacement curve of SP tests. Finally, the fracture surfaces of compact tension (CT) and SP test specimens are compared and discussed in view of the effect of thermal aging on microstructure. Stainless steel welds of ER316L and ER347 as well as CASS (CF8M) were thermally aged at 400 .deg. C for 5,000 h. So far, tensile properties and fracture toughness of un-aged materials were carried out at room temperature and 320 .deg. C as a reference data. In order to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on mechanical properties, aged specimens are being tested and the changes in these properties will be discussed. In addition, correlations will be developed to estimate the fracture toughness in between J-R curve and SP curve.

  11. Accumulation of uranium on austenitic stainless steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombovari, Peter [Department of Radiochemistry, Pannon University, H-8201 Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 (Hungary); Kadar, Peter [Department of Radiochemistry, Pannon University, H-8201 Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 (Hungary); Kovacs, Tibor [Department of Radiochemistry, Pannon University, H-8201 Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 (Hungary); Somlai, Janos [Department of Radiochemistry, Pannon University, H-8201 Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 (Hungary); Rado, Krisztian [Department of Radiochemistry, Pannon University, H-8201 Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 (Hungary); Varga, Istvan [Department of Radiochemistry, Pannon University, H-8201 Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 (Hungary); Bujak, Renata [Department of Radiochemistry, Pannon University, H-8201 Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 (Hungary); Varga, Kalman [Department of Radiochemistry, Pannon University, H-8201 Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 (Hungary)]. E-mail: vargakl@almos.vein.hu; Halmos, Pal [Analytical Chemistry Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Veszprem (Hungary); Borszeki, Janos [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Pannon University, Veszprem (Hungary); Konya, Jozsef; Nagy, Noemi M. [Department of Colloid- and, Environmental Chemistry, Isotope Laboratory, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Koever, Laszlo; Varga, Dezso; Cserny, Istvan; Toth, Jozsef [Section of Electron Spectroscopy and Materials Science, Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Fodor, Lajos; Horvath, Attila [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Pannon University, Veszprem (Hungary); Pinter, Tamas; Schunk, Janos [Paks NPP Ltd., Paks (Hungary)

    2007-02-01

    The surface contamination by uranium in the primary circuit of PWR type nuclear reactors is a fairly complex problem as (i) different chemical forms (molecular, colloidal and/or disperse) of the uranium atoms can be present in the boric acid coolant, and (ii) only limited pieces of information about the extent, kinetics and mechanism of uranium accumulation on constructional materials are available in the literature. A comprehensive program has been initiated in order to gain fundamental information about the uranium accumulation onto the main constituents of the primary cooling circuit (i.e., onto austenitic stainless steel type 08X18H10T (GOSZT 5632-61) and Zr(1%Nb) alloy). In this paper, some experimental findings on the time and pH dependences of U accumulation obtained in a pilot plant model system are presented and discussed. The surface excess, oxidation state and chemical forms of uranium species sorbed on the inner surfaces of the stainless steel tubes of steam generators have been detected by radiotracer (alpha spectrometric), ICP-OES and XPS methods. In addition, the passivity, morphology and chemical composition of the oxide-layers formed on the studied surfaces of steel specimens have been analyzed by voltammetry and SEM-EDX. The experimental data imply that the uranium sorption is significant in the pH range of 4-8 where the intense hydrolysis of uranyl cations in boric acid solution can be observed. Some specific adsorption and deposition of (mainly colloidal and disperse) uranyl hydroxide to be formed in the solution prevail over the accumulation of other U(VI) hydroxo complexes. The maximum surface excess of uranium species measured at pH 6 ({gamma} {sub sample} = 1.22 {mu}g cm{sup -2} U {approx_equal} 4 x 10{sup -9} mol cm{sup -2} UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}) exceeds a monolayer coverage.

  12. Numerical Modelling of Micro-Stresses in Carbonised Austenitic Cast Steel under Rapid Cooling Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuleja J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of the numerical modelling of micro-stresses in carbonised austenitic cast steel being developed during rapid cooling due to differences in the values of thermal expansion coefficients for this material phases – carbides and austenitic matrix. Micro-stresses are indicated as the main cause of crack initiation in the tooling elements of carburising furnaces being mainly made of austenitic cast steel. A calculation model of carbonised and thermally fatigued austenitic cast steel was developed based on the microstructure images obtained using light microscopy techniques and the phase composition evaluated with the X-ray diffraction method. The values of the stress tensor components and the reduced stress in the complex models of test material structure were determined numerically by the finite element method. The effort analysis was performed and the areas where development of cracks is to be expected were identified, which was experimentally confirmed.

  13. Modeling of the Recrystallization and Austenite Formation Overlapping in Cold-Rolled Dual-Phase Steels During Intercritical Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollat, M.; Massardier, V.; Fabregue, D.; Buscarlet, E.; Keovilay, F.; Perez, M.

    2017-10-01

    Austenite formation kinetics of a DP1000 steel was investigated from a ferrite-pearlite microstructure (either fully recrystallized or cold-rolled) during typical industrial annealing cycles by means of dilatometry and optical microscopy after interrupted heat treatments. A marked acceleration of the kinetics was found when deformed ferrite grains were present in the microstructure just before austenite formation. After having described the austenite formation kinetics without recrystallization and the recrystallization kinetics of the steel without austenite formation by simple JMAK laws, a mixture law was used to analyze the kinetics of the cold-rolled steel for which austenite formation and recrystallization may occur simultaneously. In the case where the interaction between these two phenomena is strong, three main points were highlighted: (i) the heating rate greatly influences the austenite formation kinetics, as it affects the degree of recrystallization at the austenite start temperature; (ii) recrystallization inhibition above a critical austenite fraction accelerates the austenite formation kinetics; (iii) the austenite fractions obtained after a 1 hour holding deviate from the local equilibrium fractions given by Thermo-Calc, contrary to the case of the recrystallized steel. This latter result could be due to the fact that the dislocations of the deformed ferrite matrix could promote the diffusion of the alloying elements of the steel and accelerate austenite formation.

  14. General and Localized Corrosion of Austenitic And Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estill, J C; Rebak, R B; Fix, D V; Wong, L L

    2004-03-11

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  15. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Fix; J. Estill; L. Wong; R. Rebak

    2004-05-28

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  16. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  17. The Formation of Multipoles during the High-Temperature Creep of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, J.; Nielsson, O.; Horsewell, Andy

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that multipole dislocation configurations can arise during power-law creep of certain austenitic stainless steels. These multipoles have been analysed in some detail for two particular steels (Alloy 800 and a modified AISI 316L) and it is suggested that they arise either during...

  18. Wearing Quality of Austenitic, Duplex Cast Steel, Gray and Spheroidal Graphite Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The current work presents the research results of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing and liquid friction of new austenitic, austenitic-ferritic (“duplex” cast steel and gray cast iron EN-GJL-250, spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3, pearlitic with ledeburitic carbides and spheroidal graphite iron with ledeburitic carbides with a microstructure of the metal matrix: pearlitic, upper bainite, mixture of upper and lower bainite, martensitic with austenite, pearlitic-martensitic-bainitic-ausferritic obtained in the raw state. The wearing quality test was carried out on a specially designed and made bench. Resistance to abrasion wear was tested using sand paper P40. Resistance to adhesive wear was tested in interaction with steel C55 normalized, hardened and sulfonitrided. The liquid friction was obtained using CASTROL oil. It was stated that austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a similar value of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing friction. The smallest decrease in mass was shown by the cast steel in interaction with the sulfonitrided steel C55. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex��� in different combinations of friction pairs have a higher wear quality than gray cast iron EN-GJL- 250 and spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a lower wearing quality than the spheroidal graphite iron with bainitic-martensitic microstructure. In the adhesive wear test using CASTROL oil the tested cast steels and cast irons showed a small mass decrease within the range of 1÷2 mg.

  19. Rapid nickel diffusion in cold-worked type 316 austenitic steel at 360-500 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arioka, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety Systems, Inc., Mihama (Japan); Iijima, Yoshiaki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science; Miyamoto, Tomoki [Kobe Material Testing Laboratory Co. Ltd., Harima (Japan)

    2017-10-15

    The diffusion coefficient of nickel in cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel was determined by the diffusion couple method in the temperature range between 360 and 500 C. A diffusion couple was prepared by electroless nickel plating on the surface of a 20 % cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel specimen. The growth in width of the interdiffusion zone was proportional to the square root of diffusion time until 14 055 h. The diffusion coefficient of nickel (D{sub Ni}) in cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel was determined by extrapolating the concentration-dependent interdiffusion coefficient to 11 at.% of nickel. The value of D{sub Ni} at 360 C was about 5 000 times higher than the lattice diffusion coefficient of nickel in Type 316 austenitic steel. The determined activation energy 117 kJ mol{sup -1} was 46.6 % of the activation energy 251 kJ mol{sup -1} for the lattice diffusion of nickel in Type 316 austenitic steel.

  20. Influence of Austenitizing Heat Treatment on the Properties of the Tempered Type 410-1Mo Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabruri, E.; Syahlan, Z. A.; Sahlan; Prifiharni, S.; Anwar, M. S.; Chandra, S. A.; Romijarso, T. B.; Adjiantoro, B.

    2017-05-01

    The modified 410-1Mo stainless steel has been developed with higher tensile strength and elongation compared to the standard 410 stainless steel. This paper reports the influence of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure, hardness, impact resistance and corrosion resistance of the modified 410-1Mo steel. The steel samples were prepared by a process sequence of induction melting, hot forging, annealing, hardening, and tempering. The microstructure of the tempered steels revealed additional phase of delta ferrite at pre-austenitizing temperatures of 950 to 1050 °C and disappeared at a temperature of 1100 °C. The steels which underwent pre-austenitizing at 1100 °C showed the largest sized lath martensite and the largest amount of retained austenite. The tempered steels maintained hardness at austenitizing temperatures of 950 °C to 1000 °C and showed an increasing hardness at austenitizing temperatures from 1000 to 1100 °C. At a range of austenitizing temperatures, it was investigated that the steels exhibited higher impact resistance at 1050 °C. The tempered steels that were pre-austenitized at 950 °C and 1100 °C showed the lowest pitting potential due to the existence of carbides and coarse-high carbon martensite, respectively.

  1. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: mail@crism.ru; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-15

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  2. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CORROSION AND THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC...THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COATINGS by John A Luhn June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Sarath...precipitate. The resolution of the EDS process may not have been sufficient to show very small precipitates however. SEM imaging at higher

  3. The Effect of Precipitate Evolution on Austenite Grain Growth in RAFM Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Biyu; Liu, Yongchang; Wang, Zejun; Liu, Chenxi; Si, Yonghong; Li, Huijun; Yu, Jianxing

    2017-09-01

    To study the effects of various types of precipitates and precipitate evolution behavior on austenite (size and phase fraction) in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, RAFM steel was heated to various austenitizing temperatures. The microstructures of specimens were observed using optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that the M23C₆ and MX precipitates gradually coarsen and dissolve into the matrix as the austenitizing temperatures increase. The M23C₆ precipitates dissolve completely at 1100 °C, while the MX precipitates dissolve completely at 1200 °C. The evolution of two types of precipitate has a significant effect on the size of austenite. Based on the Zener pinning model, the effect of precipitate evolution on austenite grain size is quantified. It was found that the coarsening and dissolution of M23C₆ and MX precipitates leads to a decrease in pinning pressure on grain boundaries, facilitating the rapid growth of austenite grains. The austenite phase fraction is also affected by the coarsening and dissolution of precipitates.

  4. Measured Resolved Shear Stresses and Bishop Hill Stress States in Individual Grains of Austenitic Stainless Steel (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-13

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0330 MEASURED RESOLVED SHEAR STRESSES AND BISHOP-HILL STRESS STATES IN INDIVIDUAL GRAINS OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS ...IN INDIVIDUAL GRAINS OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...grains in austenitic stainless steel 316 L at 0.1 and 1% sample elongation has been determined with sufficient accuracy to allow comparison with the

  5. Shot-peening effect on the structure, microhardness, and compressive stresses of the austenitic steel 1.4539

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Nasiłowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents shot-peening effect on the structure, microhardness, and compressive stresses of the austenitic steel 1.4539. The research shows strengthening of the top layer and the formation of compressive stresses in the subsurface layers of the shot-peening elements.[b]Keyword[/b]: austenitic steel 1.4539, residual stresses, Waisman-Phillips’a method

  6. Small punch creep test in a 316 austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saucedo-Muñoz, Maribel L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The small punch creep test was applied to evaluate the creep behavior of a 316 type austenitic stainless steel at temperatures of 650, 675 and 700 °C. The small punch test was carried out using a creep tester with a specimen size of 10×10×0.3 mm at 650, 675 and 700 °C using loads from 199 to 512 N. The small punch creep curves show the three stages found in the creep curves of the conventional uniaxial test. The conventional creep relationships which involve parameters such as creep rate, stress, time to rupture and temperature were followed with the corresponding parameters of small punch creep test and they permitted to explain the creep behavior in this steel. The mechanism and activation energy of the deformation process were the grain boundary sliding and diffusion, respectively, during creep which caused the intergranular fracture in the tested specimens.El ensayo de termofluencia por indentación se utilizó para evaluar el comportamiento a la termofluencia en un acero inoxidable austenítico 316. Este ensayo se realizó en una máquina de indentación con muestras de 10×10×0,3 mm a temperaturas de 650, 675 y 700 °C con cargas de 199 a 512 N. Las curvas de termofluencia del ensayo mostraron las tres etapas características observadas en el ensayo convencional de tensión. Asimismo, las principales relaciones de termofluencia entre parámetros como velocidad de termofluencia, esfuerzo, tiempo de ruptura y temperatura se observaron en los parámetros correspondientes al ensayo de indentación, lo que permitió caracterizar el comportamiento de termofluencia en este acero. El mecanismo y la energía de activación del proceso de deformación en la termofluencia corresponden al deslizamiento de los límites de grano y la difusión a través de los mismos, respectivamente, lo cual causó la fractura intergranular en las muestras ensayadas.

  7. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Molin, Sebastian; Zhang, L.

    2015-01-01

    of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the IC plates. In this work, kinetic modeling of the inter-diffusion between Ni and FeCr based ferritic stainless steel was conducted, using the CALPHAD......Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or electrolysis cell (SOEC) stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/YSZ fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component diffuses into the IC plate, causing transformation...... approach with the DICTRA software. The kinetics of inter-diffusion and austenite formation was explored in full detail, as functions of layer thickness, temperature, time, and steel composition. The simulation was further validated by comparing with experimental results. Growth of the austenite phase...

  8. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of 317LN austenitic stainless steel in phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoro, J. [Ingenieria y Ciencia de los Materiales, ETSI Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: javier.onoro@upm.es

    2009-10-15

    The corrosion fatigue crack-growth behaviour of AISI 317LN stainless steel was evaluated in air and in 85% phosphoric acid at 20 deg. C. Austenitic stainless steels with high molybdenum content have high corrosion resistance and good mechanical properties. However, this increase in the molybdenum content and other elements such as nitrogen can also modify the microstructure. This leads to a modification of its mechanical properties. The corrosion fatigue crack-growth rate was higher in phosphoric acid immersion than in air. Austenitic stainless steels with a fully austenitic microstructure were more ductile, tough, and behave better against corrosion fatigue. The higher resistance to corrosion fatigue was directly associated to its higher resistance to corrosion.

  9. Nitriding Process Characterization of Cold Worked AISI 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Alfredo Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitriding behavior of austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and 316 was studied by different cold work degree (0% (after heat treated, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% before nitride processing. The microstructure, layer thickness, hardness, and chemical microcomposition were evaluated employing optical microscopy, Vickers hardness, and scanning electron microscopy techniques (WDS microanalysis. The initial cold work (previous plastic deformations in both AISI 304 and 306 austenitic stainless steels does not show special influence in all applied nitriding kinetics (in layer thicknesses. The nitriding processes have formed two layers, one external layer formed by expanded austenite with high nitrogen content, followed by another thinner layer just below formed by expanded austenite with a high presence of carbon (back diffusion. An enhanced diffusion can be observed on AISI 304 steel comparing with AISI 316 steel (a nitrided layer thicker can be noticed in the AISI 304 steel. The mechanical strength of both steels after nitriding processes reveals significant hardness values, almost 1100 HV, on the nitrided layers.

  10. Short-term low-temperature glow discharge nitriding of 316L austenitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Frączek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The AISI 316L austenitic steel after glow discharge nitriding at temperature of T = 673 K and duration of τ=14,4 ks, for two different variants of specimen arrangement in the glow-discharge chamber was investigated. In order to assess the effectiveness of nitriding process, the surface layers profile analysis examination, surface hardness and hardness profile examination, the analysis of surface layer structures and corrosion resistance tests were performed. It has been found that application of a booster screen effects in a nitrogen diffusion depth increment into the 316L austenitic steel surface, what results in the surface layer thickness escalation.

  11. The effect of grain size on the mechanical response of a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair C.W.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The combination of high environmental resistance and excellent strength, elongation and energy absorption make austenitic stainless steels potentially attractive for transportation applications. In the case of metastable grades that undergo a strain induced martensitic transformation it is possible to significantly change the mechanical properties simply by changing the austenite grain size. Predicting such behaviour using physically based models is, however, extremely challenging. Here, some recent work on the coupling between grain size and mechanical response will be presented for a metastable AISI 301 LN stainless steel. Successes and continuing challenges will be highlighted.

  12. The Analysis of AISI A3 Type Ferritic-Austenitic Cast Steel Crystallization Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski G.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High-alloy corrosion-resistant ferritic-austenitic steels and cast steels are a group of high potential construction materials. This is evidenced by the development of new alloys both low alloys grades such as the ASTM 2101 series or high alloy like super or hyper duplex series 2507 or 2707 [1-5]. The potential of these materials is also presented by the increasing frequency of sintered components made both from duplex steel powders as well as mixtures of austenitic and ferritic steels [6, 7]. This article is a continuation of the problems presented in earlier works [5, 8, 9] and its inspiration were technological observed problems related to the production of duplex cast steel.

  13. Effect of Grain Refinement on Deformation Mechanism and Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WAN Xiang-liang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of phase reversion involving cold deformation of metastable austenite to generate strain-induced martensite, followed by temperature-time annealing sequence, was used to obtain grain size of nanograined/ultrafine-grained and coarse-grained austenitic stainless steels. The mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels with different grain sizes were obtained by tensile testing, the deformation microstructure and fracture surface were analyzed by TEM and SEM observations, respectively. The results indicate that deformation twins contribute to excellent ductility in high yield strength nanograined/ultrafine-grained steel, while in the low yield strength coarse-grained steel, the high ductility is due to strain-induced martensite transformation. Interestingly, the tensile fracture of the two austensite stainless steels with different deformation mechanism is ductile fracture. The deformation mechanism from deformation twins to strain-induced martensite in the coarse-grained structure in nanograined/ultrafine-grained structures is owing to the increased stability of austenite with grain refining.

  14. Effect of electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Shu-cai

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on the influence of low frequency rotary electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting was experimentally conducted and carried out on an industrial trial basis. The results show that application of appropriate electromagnetic stirring parameters can obviously improve the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel, in which both columnar and equiaxed grains can be greatly refined and shrinkage porosity or cavity zone along centerline can be remarkably decreased due to eliminating intracrystalline and enlarging equiaxed grains zone. The industrial trials verify that the electromagnetic stirring intensity of austenitic stainless steel should be higher than that of plain carbon steel. Electromagnetic stirring has somewhat affected the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel even if the magnetic flux density of the electromagnetic stirring reaches 90 mT (amplitude reaches 141 mT in average at frequency f=3-4Hz, which provides a reference for the optimization of design and process parameters when applying the rotary electromagnetic stirrer.

  15. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  16. Review of environmental effects on fatigue crack growth of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessel cladding, and core components in light water reactors are potential concerns to the nuclear industry and regulatory agencies. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or stress corrosion cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Crack growth data for wrought and cast austenitic SSs in simulated BWR water, developed at Argonne National Laboratory under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship over the past 10 years, have been compiled into a data base along with similar data obtained from the open literature. The data were analyzed to develop corrosion-fatigue curves for austenitic SSs in aqueous environments corresponding to normal BWR water chemistries, for BWRs that add hydrogen to the feedwater, and for pressurized water reactor primary-system-coolant chemistry.

  17. Stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel under compressive stress: an investigation from macro to nano scale

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, R.; Pahlevani, F.; Quadir, M. Z.; Sahajwalla, V.

    2016-01-01

    Although high carbon martensitic steels are well known for their industrial utility in high abrasion and extreme operating environments, due to their hardness and strength, the compressive stability of their retained austenite, and the implications for the steels? performance and potential uses, is not well understood. This article describes the first investigation at both the macro and nano scale of the compressive stability of retained austenite in high carbon martensitic steel. Using a com...

  18. Studies Regarding the Elaboration of the Manganese Austenitic Steel in the Induction Electric Furnace with Acid Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Marta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper forwards a method of elaborating the manganese austenitic steel in induction electric furnaces with a capacity of 250 Kg having an acid furnace coating. Considering the fact that when elaborating the manganese austenitic steel sulphur can be obtained under 0.02% constitutes an additional reason to attempt the elaboration of this steel in the electric furnaces through induction with acid coating, even if the load has over 0.02% S.

  19. Influence of surface texture on the galling characteristics of lean duplex and austenitic stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadman, Boel; Eriksen, J.; Olsson, M.

    2010-01-01

    Two simulative test methods were used to study galling in sheet forming of two types of stainless steel sheet: austenitic (EN 1.4301) and lean duplex LDX 2101 (EN 1.4162) in different surface conditions. The pin-on-disc test was used to analyse the galling resistance of different combinations...

  20. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Everett E.; Stiegler, James O.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Leitnaker, James M.

    1977-03-08

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels.

  1. Modeling of the Austenite-Martensite Transformation in Stainless and TRIP Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Hilkhuijsen, P.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Zhang, S.-H.; Liu, X.-H.; Gheng, M.; Li, J.

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of austenite to martensite is a dominant factor in the description of the constitutive behavior during forming of TRIP assisted steels. To predict this transformation different models are currently available. In this paper the transformation is regarded as a stress induced process

  2. Void Volume Swelling Dependent on Grain Size in Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain

    1973-01-01

    Describes some of the main findings of a systematic study of the effect of grain size on the void volume swelling. In this study a powder-produced 20 Ni/20 Cr austenitic stainless steel, with 0.02% carbon and without carbide-forming elements was used. Some specimens containing dispersions...

  3. Stress and Composition of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite on Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature gaseous carburizing of stainless steel is associated with a colossal supersaturation of the fcc lattice with carbon, without the development of carbides. This article addresses the simultaneous determination of stress and composition profiles in layers of carbon xpanded austenite ...

  4. The efficiency of ion nitriding of austenitic stainless steel 304 using the “active screen”

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ogórek; Z. Skuza; T. Frączek

    2015-01-01

    The study examined layers were formed on the outer surface of austenitic stainless steel 304 under glow discharge conditions in the low-temperature and short-term ion nitriding. The outer layers analyzed in the work produced in parallel in the classical process of cathode and a novel method of “active screen”, intensifying the process of nitriding.

  5. The efficiency of ion nitriding of austenitic stainless steel 304 using the “active screen”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ogórek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined layers were formed on the outer surface of austenitic stainless steel 304 under glow discharge conditions in the low-temperature and short-term ion nitriding. The outer layers analyzed in the work produced in parallel in the classical process of cathode and a novel method of “active screen”, intensifying the process of nitriding.

  6. Dependence of corrosion properties of AISI 304L stainless steel on the austenite grain size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabooni, Soheil; Rashtchi, Hamed; Eslami, Abdoulmajid; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Enayati, Mohammad Hossein; Raeissi, Keyvan; Imani, Reihane Faghih [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan [The Univ. of Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-07-15

    The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels is known to be hampered by the loss of chromium available for passive surface layer formation as a result of chromium carbide precipitation at austenite grain boundaries during annealing treatments. Although high-temperature annealing can promote carbide dissolution leading to better corrosion resistance, grain coarsening also results, which would lead to poorer mechanical properties. Processing methods to achieve both good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties are thus highly desirable for austenitic stainless steels. In the present study, we show that the corrosion resistance of AISI 304L stainless steel can be improved by grain refinement into the ultrafine-grained regime. Specifically, samples with different austenite grain sizes in the range of 0.65-12 μm were studied by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. All samples showed a typical passive behavior with similar corrosion potential, but the corrosion current density decreased significantly with decreasing grain size. The results show that the sample with the finest grain size had the best corrosion resistance due to a higher resistance of the passive layer to pitting attacks. This study indicates that grain refinement which improves mechanical properties can also significantly improve the corrosion resistance of AISI 304L stainless steel.

  7. Acoustic Emission Technique for Characterizing Deformation and Fatigue Crack Growth in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2003-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) during tensile deformation and fatigue crack growth (FCG) of austenitic stainless steels has been studied. In AISI type 316 stainless steel (SS), AE has been used to detect micro plastic yielding occurring during macroscopic plastic deformation. In AISI type 304 SS, relation of AE with stress intensity factor and plastic zone size has been studied. In AISI type 316 SS, fatigue crack growth has been characterised using acoustic emission.

  8. Improving hardness and wear resistance of austenitic stainless steel; Harte und verschleissfeste Randschicht auf korrosionsbestaendigen Staehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guempel, Paul [Hochschule Konstanz (Germany). Werkstoffprueflabor; Waegner, Martina [Bodycote Hardiff GmbH, Huerth (Germany). S3P-Gruppe

    2010-09-15

    Nowadays more stainless steels are used in the field of automotive technology. These austenitic or ferritic steels have a high corrosion resistance but they are not hardenable and therefore they are susceptible to gallig / fretting during mechanical / tribological loading, for example in connecting rods. With a new surface hardening treatment these detrimental effects can be avoided. Hochschule Konstanz and Bodycote jointly develop this process further to open up new market areas. (orig.)

  9. A Short review on wrought austenitic stainless steels at high temperatures: processing, microstructure, properties and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Lesley Plaut

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Wrought austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high temperature applications. This short review discusses initially the processing of this class of steels, with emphasis on solidification and hot working behavior. Following, a brief summary is made on the precipitation behavior and the numerous phases that may appear in their microstructures. Creep and oxidation resistance are, then, briefly discussed, and finalizing their performance is compared with other high temperature metallic materials.

  10. Investigation of Parent Austenite Grains from Martensite Structure Using EBSD in a Wear Resistant Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyhlesten Back, Jessica; Engberg, Göran

    2017-04-26

    Crystallographic reconstruction of parent austenite grain boundaries from the martensitic microstructure in a wear resistant steel was carried out using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The present study mainly aims to investigate the parent austenite grains from the martensitic structure in an as-rolled (reference) steel sample and samples obtained by quenching at different cooling rates with corresponding dilatometry. Subsequently, this study is to correlate the nearest cooling rate by the dilatometer which yields a similar orientation relationship and substructure as the reference sample. The Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationship was used to reconstruct the parent austenite grain boundaries from the martensite boundaries in both reference and dilatometric samples using EBSD crystallographic data. The parent austenite grain boundaries were successfully evaluated from the EBSD data and the corresponding grain sizes were measured. The parent austenite grain boundaries of the reference sample match the sample quenched at 100 °C/s (CR100). Also the martensite substructures and crystallographic textures are similar in these two samples. The results from hardness measurements show that the reference sample exhibits higher hardness than the CR100 sample due to the presence of carbides in the reference sample.

  11. The stability of retained austenite at different locations during straining of I&Q&P steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chenghao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Yu, Hao, E-mail: yuhao@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Lili; Zhou, Tao; Lu, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xihui [Qingzhou Construction Quality and Safety Supervision Station, Shandong 262500 (China)

    2016-07-18

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the transformation behavior of retained austenite at different locations of intercritical heating, quenching and partitioning (I&Q&P) steel. The consumption of retained austenite at different strains is investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results indicate that retained austenite can transform into martensite progressively during the whole deformation process, which is in favor of a good combination of strength and ductility, contributing to a high product of strength and elongation (PSE) of 31.9 GPa%. The transformation characteristics of retained austenite at different locations after different strains are characterized by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that the transformation preferentially occurs in the retained austenite at ferrite grain boundaries, subsequently the one within ferrite grains (at 10% strain) and eventually the one between martensite laths (at 15% strain). In FCC phase, the average local misorientations are 0.547° and 0.674° at 5% and 10% strain, respectively; however, the values are not more than 0.7° at 15% and 20% strain due to the TRIP effect. For the retained austenite within ferrite grains, the interior part preferentially transforms into twin martensite, while the interface still remains due to alloying elements segregation.

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of carburisation and decarburisation of a meta-stable austenitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles West

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastable austenitic stainless steels are known to undergo a partial transformation of austenite to martensite as a consequence of plastic deformation. In the case of cyclic loading, a certain level of plastic strain must be exceeded, and phase formation takes place after an incubation period, during which the necessary amount of plastic deformation is accumulated. The susceptibility of the austenitic phase to deformation-induced martensite formation is strongly affected by the temperature of loading and the stability of austenite, which itself depends on the chemical composition. A key element in this regard is carbon which stabilizes the austenitic phase. It is shown in this study that the carbon concentration can be analysed systematically and reproducible by means of annealing treatments, if the parameters of these treatments are carefully defined on the basis of advanced theoretical thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. First results on the effect of carbon concentration and temperature of fatigue testing on the austenite/martensite transformation are presented, in order to illustrate the significance of these parameters on the martensite formation rate.

  13. Responses of the corroded surface layer of austenitic stainless steel to different corrosive conditions under cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Xingyue, E-mail: yongxy@mail.buct.edu.cn; Xiao, Ning; Shen, Hanjie; Song, Yili

    2016-08-01

    Nanoindentation was used to measure the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer of austenitic stainless steel after cavitation corrosion tests. The phase structures and chemical compositions of the corroded surface layer were analysed using X-ray diffraction and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The results show that corrosion caused a decrement of the nano-mechanical properties of the corroded surface layer. Once corrosion was weakened, the formation of a work-hardened layer resulted from the transformation of austenite into martensite. The synergistic effect caused the more rapid dissolution of Fe hydroxides, resulting in the enrichment of Cr and property changes of the corroded surface layer under cavitation.

  14. Hydrogen Absorption Induced Slow Crack Growth in Austenitic Stainless Steels for Petrochemical Pressure Vessel Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnie Rusli

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 304Land type 309 austenitic stainless steels were tested either by exposed to gaseous hydrogen or undergoing polarized cathodic charging. Slow crack growth by straining was observed in type 304L, and the formation of α‘ martensite was indicated to be precursor for such cracking. Gross plastic deformation was observed at the tip of the notch, and a single crack grew slowly from this region in a direction approximately perpendicular to the tensile axis. Martensite formation is not a necessary condition for hydrogen embrittlement in the austenitic phase.

  15. Investigation of coatings of austenitic steels produced by supersonic laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorunov, A. I.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2017-02-01

    The structure and properties of stainless austenitic steel coatings obtained by the supersonic laser deposition are studied in the paper. Implantation of the powder particles into the substrate surface and simultaneous plastic deformation at partial melting improved the mechanical properties of the coatings - tensile strength limit was 650 MPa and adhesion strength was 105 MPa. It was shown that insufficient laser power leads to disruption of the deposition process stability and coating cracking. Surface temperature increase caused by laser heating above 1300 °C resulted in coating melting. The X-ray analysis showed that radiation intensifies the cold spray process and does not cause changes in the austenitic base structure.

  16. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  17. Features of austenite formation in low-carbon steel upon heating in the intercritical temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, D. O.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    The features of austenite formation upon continuous heating of low-carbon steel at the rates of 90-0.15 K/s in the intercritical temperature range (ICTR) have been studied. It has been found that, in the initially high-tempered, initially quenched, and initially cold-deformed steel, the α → γ transition in the ICTR consists of three stages. The thermokinetic diagrams of the austenite formation with the indication of the positions of the critical points Ac 1 and Ac 3 and also of the temperature ranges of the development of each identified stage of the α → γ transformation have been constructed. A complex of structural studies has been carried out, and a scheme of the austenite formation upon continuous heating at a rate of 90 K/s in the ICTR for the initially high-tempered steel, initially quenched steel, and initially cold-deformed low-carbon steel has been suggested, which reflects all stages of this process.

  18. Influence of delta ferrite on corrosion susceptibility of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence O. Osoba

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, the influence of delta (δ ferrite on the corrosion susceptibility of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel was evaluated in 1Molar concentration of sulphuric acid (H2SO4 and 1Molar concentration of sodium chloride (NaCl. The study was performed at ambient temperature using electrochemical technique—Tafel plots to evaluate the corrosive tendencies of the austenitic stainless steel sample. The as-received (stainless steel specimen and 60% cold-worked (stainless steel specimens were isothermally annealed at 1,100°C for 2 h and 1 h, respectively, and quenched in water. The results obtained show that the heat-treated specimen and the 60% cold-worked plus heat-treated specimen exhibited higher corrosion susceptibility than the as-received specimen, which invariably contained the highest fraction of δ ferrite particles. The finding shows that the presence of δ ferrite, in which chromium (Cr, the main corrosion inhibitor segregates, does not degrade and or reduces the resistance to aqueous corrosion of the austenitic stainless steel material.

  19. Laser cladding crack repair of austenitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available @ 2 bar pressure Fig. 6: Crack sealing and overlay of 6.0mm plate 4 Typical hardness of the 316L crack seal layers is 160 HV1kg. Crack sealing can be performed with more noble Ni-base alloys to improved... of surface compressive stresses will avoid initiation of SCC. Due to primary austenitic solidification of laser cladded 316L, no delta ferrite is present in the microstructure. Although the susceptibility...

  20. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Low Temperature Surface Hardening of Austenitic and Precipitation Hardening Stainless Steels by Gaseous Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of three commercial austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304, EN 1.4369 and Sandvik Nanoflex® with various degrees of austenite stability. The materials were...

  1. In-situ investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation kinetics in an austenitic stainless steel by inductive measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso de Celada Casero, C.; Kooiker, Harm; Groen, Manso; Post, J; San Martin, D

    2017-01-01

    An inductive sensor developed by Philips ATC has been used to study in-situ the austenite (γ) to martensite (α′) phase transformation kinetics during tensile testing in an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. A correlation between the sensor output signal and the volume fraction of α′-martensite

  2. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Investigation of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite and Carbides in Stainless Steel AISI 316

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2011-01-01

    Low temperature carburized AISI 316 stainless steel - carbon expanded austenite - was investigated with EXAFS and synchrotron diffraction together with synthesized carbides of the type M3C2, M7C3 and M23C6. It was found that the chemical environment of carbon expanded austenite is not associated ...

  3. Fracture toughness of irradiated wrought and cast austenitic stainless steels in BWR environment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. Exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). We look at the results of a study of simulated light-water reactor coolants, material chemistry, and irradiation damage and their effects on the susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of various commercially available and laboratory-melted stainless steels.

  4. Unraveling the Effect of Thermomechanical Treatment on the Dissolution of Delta Ferrite in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezayat, Mohammad; Mirzadeh, Hamed; Namdar, Masih; Parsa, Mohammad Habibi

    2016-02-01

    Considering the detrimental effects of delta ferrite stringers in austenitic stainless steels and the industrial considerations regarding energy consumption, investigating, and optimizing the kinetics of delta ferrite removal is of vital importance. In the current study, a model alloy prone to the formation of austenite/delta ferrite dual phase microstructure was subjected to thermomechanical treatment using the wedge rolling test aiming to dissolve delta ferrite. The effect of introducing lattice defects and occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) were investigated. It was revealed that pipe diffusion is responsible for delta ferrite removal during thermomechanical process, whereas when the DRX is dominant, the kinetics of delta ferrite dissolution tends toward that of the static homogenization treatment for delta ferrite removal that is based on the lattice diffusion of Cr and Ni in austenite. It was concluded that the optimum condition for dissolution of delta ferrite can be defined by the highest rolling temperature and strain in which DRX is not pronounced.

  5. Tensile Ductility of Nanostructured Bainitic Steels: Influence of Retained Austenite Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Sourmail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High silicon (>1.5% steels with different compositions were isothermally transformed to bainite at 220 and 250 °C to produce what is often referred to as nanostructured bainite. Interrupted tensile tests were carried out and the retained austenite was measured as a function of strain. Results were correlated with tensile ductility. The role of retained austenite stability is remarkably underlined as strongly affecting the propensity to brittle failure, but also the tensile ductility. A simple quantitative relationship is proposed that clearly delimitates the different behaviours (brittle/ductile and correlates well with the measured ductility. Conclusions are proposed as to the role of retained austenite fraction and the existence of a threshold value associated with tensile rupture.

  6. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  7. Experimental Determination of the Primary Solidification Phase dependency on the solidification velocity for 17 different austenitic stainless steel compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Birthe Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Yardy, John

    1997-01-01

    , the primary solidification phase is found to change from ferrite to austenite.A novel laser remelting technique has been modified to enable the transition velocity for laser welded austenitic stainless steels to be deermined experimentally and on the basis of results from 17 different alloy compositions......When studying laser welding of austenitic stainless steel, hot cracking is frequently observed. To prevent hot cracking in laser welded stainless steel it is advantageous to obtain primary solidification of the ferrite phase that subsequently, on cooling, transforms in the solid state...... to the austenite phase.Most stainless steels are weldable by conventional welding techniques. However, during laser weldng the solidification velocities can be very much higher than by conventional welding techniques. By increasing the solidification velocity to a critical value known as the transition velocity...

  8. Comprehensive Deformation Analysis of a Newly Designed Ni-Free Duplex Stainless Steel with Enhanced Plasticity by Optimizing Austenite Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moallemi, Mohammad; Zarei-Hanzaki, Abbas; Eskandari, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    A new metastable Ni-free duplex stainless steel has been designed with superior plasticity by optimizing austenite stability using thermodynamic calculations of stacking fault energy and with reference to literature findings. Several characterization methods comprising optical microscopy, magneti...

  9. Irradiation effects on austenitic stainless steels for structural materials of IFMIF components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitsukawa, S.; Suzuki, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Zinkle, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., AK TN (United States); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Austenitic stainless steel, such as 316 stainless steel is one of the candidate structural materials for the target component and test modules of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility IFMIF, as well as that for ITER shield blanket. Anticipated displacement damage levels for the ITER shield blanket are as large as 3 displacements per atom (dpa), while those for the IFMIF target components and test modules will attain a high damage level of 50 dpa or even higher, depending on the service period. The anticipated operating temperature of the components is lower than 400 deg. C; therefore irradiation will cause hardening and reduction of elongation, as well as degradation of fracture toughness. This paper reviews the degradation of mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels introduced by irradiation to some tens of dpa level; degradation of fatigue properties, fracture toughness and ductility, as well as irradiation induced creep. Additional data, especially those at temperatures lower than 300 deg. C, are also introduced. The results have been obtained during the collaborative irradiation experiment between JAEA and US-DOE using HFIR. Irradiation causes degradation in mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steels. However, residual ductility and fracture toughness still seem to be large enough for the application as structural materials. This, however, does not assure that the current design criterion is applicable for the component engineering. A dedicated effort to develop engineering design criteria also needs to be accomplished. (authors)

  10. Evaluation of the fabricability of advanced iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohn, W.R.; Topolski, M.J. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States). Research and Development Div.

    1993-07-01

    Researchers at Babcock & Wilcox Alliance Research Center have investigated methods to produce bimetallic tubing consisting of iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel for practical use in fossil fueled energy equipment. In the course of this work, the compatibility of iron aluminide with four candidate austenitic stainless steel substrates was first evaluated using diffusion couples. Based on these results, a combination of iron aluminide and 304 stainless steel was selected for further development. Two composite billets of this combination were then prepared and extruded in separate trails at 2200F and 2000F. Both extrusions yielded 2-inch OD clad tubes, each approximately 18 feet long. Results of the evaluation show that the tube extruded at 2000F had a sound, integrally bonded clad layer throughout its entire length. However, the tube extruded at 2200F exhibited regions of disbonding between the clad layer and the substrate. In supplement to this work, an assessment of the technical and economic merits of iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel components in power generation systems was conducted by B&W Fossil Power Division. Future activities should include an investigation of lower extrusion processing temperatures to optimize the fabrication of high quality iron-aluminide clad tubing.

  11. Application Feasibility of PRE 50 grade Super Austenitic Stainless Steel as a Steam Generator Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Soo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young sik [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taek Jun; Kim, Sun Tae; Park, Hui Sang [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the properties of the super austenitic stainless steel, SR-50A for application as steam generator tubing material. The microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion properties, were analyzed and the results were compared between super austenitic stainless steel and Alloy 600 and Alloy 690. Super austenitic stainless steel, SR-50A is superior to Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and Alloy 800 in the mechanical properties(tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation). It was investigated that thermal conductivity of SR-50A was higher than Alloy 600. As a result of thermal treatment on super stainless steel, SR-50A, caustic SCC resistance was increased and its resistance was as much as Alloy 600TT and Alloy 690TT. In this study, optimum thermal treatment condition to improve the caustic corrosion properties was considered as 650 deg C or 550 deg C 15 hours. However, it is necessary to verify the corrosion mechanism and to prove the above results in the various corrosive environments. 27 refs., 6 tabs., 59 figs. (author)

  12. Austenite stability in TRIP steels studied by synchrotron radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blondé, R.

    2014-01-01

    TRIP steel is a material providing great mechanical properties. Such steels show a good balance between high-strength and ductility, not only as a result of the fine microstructure, but also because of the well-known TRIP effect. The Transformation Induced-Plasticity (TRIP) phenomenon is the

  13. Quantification of retained austenite by X-ray diffraction and saturation magnetization in a supermartensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sicupira, Felipe Lucas [Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais - Escola de Engenharia da UFMG, 31270–901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Sandim, Maria José R.; Sandim, Hugo R.Z. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena – USP, 12600–970 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dagoberto Brandão [Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais - Escola de Engenharia da UFMG, 31270–901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Renzetti, Reny Angela, E-mail: renzetti.ra@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Itajubá - UNIFEI, 35903–087 Itabira, MG (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    The good performance of supermartensitic stainless steels is strongly dependent on the volume fraction of retained austenite at room temperature. The present work investigates the effect of secondary tempering temperatures on this phase transformation and quantifies the amount of retained austenite by X-ray diffraction and saturation magnetization. The steel samples were tempered for 1 h within a temperature range of 600–800 °C. The microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Results show that the amount of retained austenite decreased with increasing secondary tempering temperature in both quantification methods. - Highlights: • The phase transformation during secondary tempering temperatures was observed. • Phases were quantified by X-ray diffraction and DC-saturation magnetization. • More retained austenite forms with increasing secondary tempering temperature. • The retained austenite is mainly located at the grain and lath boundaries.

  14. Chemical gradients across phase boundaries between martensite and austenite in steel studied by atom probe tomography and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitrieva, O.; Ponge, D.; Inden, G.; Millan, J.; Choi, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Sietsma, J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty 3mE, Dept. MSE, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Raabe, D., E-mail: d.raabe@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Partitioning at phase boundaries of complex steels is important for their properties. We present atom probe tomography results across martensite/austenite interfaces in a precipitation-hardened maraging-TRIP steel (12.2 Mn, 1.9 Ni, 0.6 Mo, 1.2 Ti, 0.3 Al; at.%). The system reveals compositional changes at the phase boundaries: Mn and Ni are enriched while Ti, Al, Mo and Fe are depleted. More specific, we observe up to 27 at.% Mn in a 20 nm layer at the phase boundary. This is explained by the large difference in diffusivity between martensite and austenite. The high diffusivity in martensite leads to a Mn flux towards the retained austenite. The low diffusivity in the austenite does not allow accommodation of this flux. Consequently, the austenite grows with a Mn composition given by local equilibrium. The interpretation is based on DICTRA and mixed-mode diffusion calculations (using a finite interface mobility).

  15. Influence of reverted austenite on static and dynamic mechanical properties of a PH 13-8 Mo maraging steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnitzer, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.schnitzer@unileoben.ac.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Zickler, Gerald A. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Lach, Erhardt [ISL, French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis, P.O. Box 70034, F-68301 Saint-Louis (France); Clemens, Helmut [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Zinner, Silvia [Boehler Edelstahl GmbH and Co KG, Mariazeller Strasse 25, A-8605 Kapfenberg (Austria); Lippmann, Thomas [GKSS Research Center Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Leitner, Harald [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2010-03-25

    Maraging steels are martensitic hardenable steels exhibiting an excellent combination of high strength and adequate toughness. Beside the intermetallic precipitates, reverted austenite, formed during aging, is a decisive microstructural constituent. Static tensile tests showed a pronounced influence of its phase fraction on mechanical properties. Reverted austenite also exhibits a distinctive effect on dynamic properties which were investigated on a split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar. However, reverted austenite is not mechanically stable during external loading and transforms back to martensite. This behavior was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Here, a decreasing phase fraction of austenite with increasing strain was observed. Furthermore, a change of the stability of revered austenite with aging time was noticed.

  16. Effects Of The Combined Heat And Cryogenic Treatment On The Stability Of Austenite In A High Co-Ni Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The stability of austenite is one of the most dominant factors affecting the toughness properties of high Co-Ni steels such as Aermet 100 and AF1410. Thus, the aim of this work was to get a deeper understanding on the impact of combined heat and cryogenic treatment on the stability of retained and reverted austenite. In order to characterize the evolution of the phase fraction of austenite during tempering at different temperatures and times, X-ray diffraction analyses were carried out. The stability of austenite, which was formed during tempering, was analyzed with dilatometric investigations by studying the transformation behavior of the austenite during cooling from tempering temperature down to −100°C. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy investigations were performed to characterize the chemical composition and phase distribution of austenite and martensite before and after tempering.

  17. Development of Creep-Resistant and Oxidation-Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Philip J.

    2017-11-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are cost-effective materials for high-temperature applications if they have the oxidation and creep resistance to withstand prolonged exposure at such conditions. Since 1990, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed advanced austenitic stainless steels with creep resistance comparable to Ni-based superalloy 617 at 800-900°C based on specially designed "engineered microstructures" utilizing a microstructure/composition database derived from about 20 years of radiation effect data on steels. The wrought high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened (HT-UPS) steels with outstanding creep resistance at 700-800°C were developed for supercritical boiler and superheater tubing for fossil power plants in the early 1990s, the cast CF8C-Plus steels were developed in 1999-2001 for land-based gas turbine casing and diesel engine exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications at 700-900°C, and, in 2015-2017, new Al-modified cast stainless steels with oxidation and creep resistance capabilities up to 950-1000°C were developed for automotive exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications. This article reviews and summarizes their development and their properties and applications.

  18. Development of Creep-Resistant and Oxidation-Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Philip J.

    2018-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are cost-effective materials for high-temperature applications if they have the oxidation and creep resistance to withstand prolonged exposure at such conditions. Since 1990, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed advanced austenitic stainless steels with creep resistance comparable to Ni-based superalloy 617 at 800-900°C based on specially designed "engineered microstructures" utilizing a microstructure/composition database derived from about 20 years of radiation effect data on steels. The wrought high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened (HT-UPS) steels with outstanding creep resistance at 700-800°C were developed for supercritical boiler and superheater tubing for fossil power plants in the early 1990s, the cast CF8C-Plus steels were developed in 1999-2001 for land-based gas turbine casing and diesel engine exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications at 700-900°C, and, in 2015-2017, new Al-modified cast stainless steels with oxidation and creep resistance capabilities up to 950-1000°C were developed for automotive exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications. This article reviews and summarizes their development and their properties and applications.

  19. Mechanism and estimation of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    2002-08-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters (such as steel type, strain range, strain rate, temperature, dissolved-oxygen level in water, and flow rate) on the fatigue lives of these steels. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic stainless steels as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. The influence of reactor environments on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in these steels is also discussed.

  20. Correlation Between Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Before and After Reversion of Metastable Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargas, Gemma; Zapata, Ana; Roa, Joan Josep; Sapezanskaia, Ina; Mateo, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Reversion treatments are a way to improve the mechanical response of metastable austenitic stainless steels by means of grain refinement. To effectively apply those treatments, the steel must be previously deformed to induce a significant amount of martensitic transformation. In this work, the effect of reversion treatments was studied on a commercial AISI 301LN grade subjected to an industrial cold rolling process, with thickness reductions not higher than 40 pct. Microstructural changes and evolution of both monotonic and cyclic mechanical properties were investigated after cold rolling and upon reversion treatments. Results revealed that the finer austenitic microstructure obtained after reversion leads to an interesting combination of properties, with strong increments in hardness and yield strength, and also fatigue limit improvement, as compared to the initial annealed condition.

  1. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Alimadadi, Hossein; Molin, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    stainless steel was conducted, using the CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) approach with the DICTRA (DIffusion Controlled TRAnsformation) software. The kinetics of inter-diffusion and austenite formation was explored in detail. The simulation was further validated by comparing with experiments......Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell and electrolysis cell stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component layer diffuses into the interconnect plate......, causing transformation of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume, and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the interconnect plates. In this work, kinetic modeling of the inter-diffusion between Ni and FeCr based ferritic...

  2. Diffusion of nitrogen in austenitic phase: Application to nitriding of stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torchane Lazhar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The nitriding treatment of the martensitic stainless steels aims to harden and to introduce compressive stresses on the surface of steel. Hardening is resulting of the martensitic transformation of the austenitic matrix enriched into nitrogen during cooling and of the germination and the nitride growth. In order to preserve the stainless character of the nitrided layer, it is imperative to control precipitation within the zone affected by the treatment. Our task consists in showing that is possible to control the composition of the gas atmosphere containing ammonia and argon and to carry out on the surface of nitrided samples at 1050°C two types of configuration of layers : a single phase layer made up by martensite enriched in nitrogen α’N and or a two phase layer made up by austenite γN and martensite α’N enriched in nitrogen.

  3. Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement on Austenitic Stainless Steels from Room Temperature to Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) on austenitic stainless steels SUS304, 304L, and 316L in the high pressure hydrogen gas was evaluated from ambient temperature to 20 K using a very simple mechanical properties testing procedure. In the method, the high- pressure hydrogen environment is produced just inside the hole in the specimen and the specimen is cooled in a cooled-alcohol dewar and a cryostat with a GM refrigerator. The effect of HEE was observed in tensile properties, especially at lower temperatures, and fatigue properties at higher stress level but almost no effect around the stress level of yield strength where almost no strain-induced martensite was produced. So, no effect of HEE on austenitic stainless steels unless the amount of the ferrite phase is small.

  4. Effect of Electrode Types on the Solidification Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    OpenAIRE

    J. U. Anaele; O. O. ONYEMAOBI; C. S. Nwobodo; C. C. Ugwuegbu

    2015-01-01

    The effect of electrode types on the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. Manual metal arc welding method was used to produce the joints with the tungsten inert gas welding serving as the control. Metallographic and chemical analyses of the fusion zones of the joints were conducted. Results indicate that weldments produced from E 308-16 (rutile coated), E 308-16(lime-titania coated) electrodes, and TIG welded joints fall within the range...

  5. Very high cycle regime fatigue of thin walled tubes made from austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, J.V.; Mayer, H.; Brøndsted, P.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue life data of cold worked tubes (diameter 4 mm, wall thicknesses 0.25 and 0.30 mm) of an austenitic stainless steel, AISI 904 L, were measured in the regime ranging from 2 × 105 to 1010 cycles to failure. The influence of the loading frequency was investigated as data were obtained...... scanning electron microscopy. Fatigue cracks initiate at the surface and no significant influence from frequency or from loading modes on fatigue crack initiation and growth is visible....

  6. Development of Ultra-Fine-Grained Structure in AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiamiyu, A. A.; Szpunar, J. A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Oguocha, I.; Eskandari, M.

    2017-12-01

    Ultra-fine-grained (UFG) structure was developed in AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) using cryogenic rolling followed by annealing treatments at 923 K, 973 K, 1023 K, and 1073 K (650 °C, 700 °C, 750 °C, and 800 °C) for different lengths of time. The α'-martensite to γ-austenite reversion behavior and the associated texture development were analyzed in the cryo-rolled specimens after annealing. The activation energy, Q, required for the reversion of α'-martensite to γ-austenite in the steel was estimated to be 80 kJ mol-1. TiC precipitates and unreversed triple junction α'-martensite played major roles in the development of UFG structure through the Zener pinning of grain boundaries. The optimum annealing temperature and time for the development of UFG structure in the cryo-rolled AISI 321 steel are (a) 923 K (650 °C) for approximately 28800 seconds and (b) 1023 K (750 °C) for 600 seconds, with average grain sizes of 0.22 and 0.31 µm, respectively. Annealing at 1023 K (750 °C) is considered a better alternative since the volume fraction of precipitated carbides in specimens annealed at 1023 K (750 °C) are less than those annealed at 923 K (650 °C). More so, the energy consumption during prolonged annealing time to achieve an UFG structure at 923 K (650 °C) is higher due to low phase reversion rate. The hardness of the UFG specimens is 195 pct greater than that of the as-received steel. The higher volume fraction of TiC precipitates in the UFG structure may be an additional source of hardening. Micro and macrotexture analysis indicated {110}〈uvw〉 as the major texture component of the austenite grains in the UFG structure. Its intensity is stronger in the specimen annealed at low temperatures.

  7. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  8. Use of Direct Current Resistivity Measurements to Assess AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel Sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Mesquita, Ramaiany Carneiro; Mecury, José Manoel Rivas; Tanaka, Auro Atsumi; Sousa, Regina Célia de

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the feasibility of using direct current electrical resistivity measurements to evaluate AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sensitization. ASTM A262 – Practice A and double loop electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (DL-EPR) tests were performed to assess the degree of sensitization (DoS) qualitatively and quantitatively, and electrical resistivity (ER) was measured by the four-point direct-current potential drop method. The results indicate that the DoS incr...

  9. The Influence of Porosity on Corrosion Attack of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Z.; Ismail, A.; Ahmad, S.

    2017-10-01

    Porous metals also known as metal foams is a metallic body having spaces orpores through which liquid or air may pass. Porous metals get an attention from researchers nowadays due to their unique combination of properties includes excellent mechanical and electrical, high energy absorption, good thermal and sound insulation and water and gas permeability. Porous metals have been applied in numerous applications such as in automotive, aerospace and also in biomedical applications. This research reveals the influence of corrosion attack in porous austenitic stainless steel 316L. The cyclic polarization potential analysis was performed on the porous austenitic stainless steel 316L in 3.5% NaCl solution. The morphology and the element presence on the samples before and after corrosion attack was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) respectively to determine the corrosion mechanism structure. The cyclic polarization potential analysis showed the result of (E corr ) for porous austenitic stainless steel type 316L in the range of -0.40v to -0.60v and breakdown potential (E b ) is -0.3v to -0.4v in NaCl solution.

  10. Hydrogen Susceptibility of Pre-strained Type 316L Austenitic Stainless Steels in Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mati, D.; Takasaki, A.; Uematsu, S.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the observations made as a result of hydrogen effects in austenitic stainless steels which led to reduction of its original mechanical properties. This paper therefore seeks to understand the mechanisms and effects induced by hydrogen leading to embrittlement. The samples of Type 316L austenitic stainless steel with 20% pre-strain were charged with hydrogen through galvanostastic cathodic loading for 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours respectively, with sample as Cathode and the platinum wire as Anode. Afterwards, they were fractured under tensile test at a slow strain rates. The loss of ductility was evident as observed by the brittle nature of fracture. Small pieces were cut-off near the fracture region and examined through XRD and SEM analysis. The peak widening and slight shifting of the peak positions was observed. The surface cracking was also observed, an indication of surface-induced stresses. The severity of the effects increased with the hydrogen loading time, which is predictive of a real service conditions for austenite steels in aqueous environments.

  11. A simplified LBB evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, R.M.; Wichman, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    The NRC previously has approved application of LBB analysis as a means to demonstrate that the probability of pipe rupture was extremely low so that dynamic loads associated with postulated pipe break could be excluded from the design basis (1). The purpose of this work was to: (1) define simplified procedures that can be used by the NRC to compute allowable lengths for circumferential throughwall cracks and assess margin against pipe fracture, and (2) verify the accuracy of the simplified procedures by comparison with available experimental data for piping having circumferential throughwall flaws. The development of the procedures was performed using techniques similar to those employed to develop ASME Code flaw evaluation procedures. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austentic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

  12. Development of a robust modeling tool for radiation-induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allen, Todd R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Busby, Jeremy T [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components has been linked to changes in grain boundary composition due to irradiation induced segregation (RIS). This work developed a robust RIS modeling tool to account for thermodynamics and kinetics of the atom and defect transportation under combined thermal and radiation conditions. The diffusion flux equations were based on the Perks model formulated through the linear theory of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Both cross and non-cross phenomenological diffusion coefficients in the flux equations were considered and correlated to tracer diffusion coefficients through Manning’s relation. The preferential atomvacancy coupling was described by the mobility model, whereas the preferential atom-interstitial coupling was described by the interstitial binding model. The composition dependence of the thermodynamic factor was modeled using the CALPHAD approach. Detailed analysis on the diffusion fluxes near and at grain boundaries of irradiated austenitic stainless steels suggested the dominant diffusion mechanism for chromium and iron is via vacancy, while that for nickel can swing from the vacancy to the interstitial dominant mechanism. The diffusion flux in the vicinity of a grain boundary was found to be greatly influenced by the composition gradient formed from the transient state, leading to the oscillatory behavior of alloy compositions in this region. This work confirms that both vacancy and interstitial diffusion, and segregation itself, have important roles in determining the microchemistry of Fe, Cr, and Ni at irradiated grain boundaries in austenitic stainless steels.

  13. Effect of material heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2005-07-31

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the design of Class 1 components of nuclear power plants. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify design curves for applicable structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. The existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. Under certain environmental and loading conditions, fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) can be a factor of 20 lower in water than in air. This report presents experimental data on the effect of heat treatment on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic Type 304 SS in LWR coolant environments. A detailed metallographic examination of fatigue test specimens was performed to characterize the crack morphology and fracture morphology. The key material, loading, and environmental parameters and their effect on the fatigue life of these steels are also described. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic SSs as a function of material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented.

  14. Fracture toughness of irradiated wrought and cast austenitic stainless steels in BWR environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Gruber, E.E.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness of wrought and cast austenitic stainless steels (SSs) that were irradiated to a fluence of {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV){sup *} ({approx} 2.3 dpa) at 296-305{sup o}C. To evaluate the possible effects of test environment and crack morphology on the fracture toughness of these steels, all tests were conducted in normal-water-chemistry boiling water reactor (BWR) environments at {approx} 289{sup o}C. Companion tests were also conducted in air on the same material for comparison. The fracture toughness J-R curves for SS weld heat-affected-zone materials in BWR water were found to be comparable to those in air. However, the results of tests on sensitized Type 304 SS and thermally aged cast CF-8M steel suggested a possible effect of water environment. The available fracture toughness data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to assess the potential for radiation embrittlement of reactor-core internal components. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components are also discussed. (author)

  15. Fatigue strength improvement of the AISI 316Ti austenitic stainless steel by shot peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Nový

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steels are structural materials used for a wide range of applications. One of the fields of application of these highly corrosion resistant materials is for various medical applications. Different methods of mechanical property improvement have been studied in recent years to increase the durability of components manufactured from these materials. The main goal of this study was an analysis of fatigue strength improvement of the AISI 316Ti austenitic stainless steel by shot peening. A significant improvement of surface hardness, yield strength and fatigue limit by shot peening was observed in this study. This is despite increasing the surface roughness which usually degrades material’s fatigue strength.

  16. Effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties of selected austenitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Oršulová

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels are materials, that are widely used in various fields of industry, architecture and biomedicine. Their specific composition of alloying elements has got influence on their deformation behavior. The main goal of this study was evaluation of magnetic properties of selected steels, caused by plastic deformation. The samples were heat treated in different intervals of temperature before measuring. Then the magnetic properties were measured on device designed for measuring of magnetism. From tested specimens, only AISI 304 confirmed effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties. Magnetic properties changed with increasing temperature.

  17. Retained Austenite Transformation during Heat Treatment of a 5 Wt Pct Cr Cold Work Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, M. Arbab; Medvedeva, Anna; Svensson, Lars-Erik; Karlsson, Leif

    2017-11-01

    Retained austenite transformation was studied for a 5 wt pct Cr cold work tool steel tempered at 798 K and 873 K (525 °C and 600 °C) followed by cooling to room temperature. Tempering cycles with variations in holding times were conducted to observe the mechanisms involved. Phase transformations were studied with dilatometry, and the resulting microstructures were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Tempering treatments at 798 K (525 °C) resulted in retained austenite transformation to martensite on cooling. The martensite start ( M s ) and martensite finish ( M f ) temperatures increased with longer holding times at tempering temperature. At the same time, the lattice parameter of retained austenite decreased. Calculations from the M s temperatures and lattice parameters suggested that there was a decrease in carbon content of retained austenite as a result of precipitation of carbides prior to transformation. This was in agreement with the resulting microstructure and the contraction of the specimen during tempering, as observed by dilatometry. Tempering at 873 K (600 °C) resulted in precipitation of carbides in retained austenite followed by transformation to ferrite and carbides. This was further supported by the initial contraction and later expansion of the dilatometry specimen, the resulting microstructure, and the absence of any phase transformation on cooling from the tempering treatment. It was concluded that there are two mechanisms of retained austenite transformation occurring depending on tempering temperature and time. This was found useful in understanding the standard tempering treatment, and suggestions regarding alternative tempering treatments are discussed.

  18. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless-Steel Pipes Welded by TIG Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Albdiry

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel (type 204 pipes welded by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG welding process. Testing of hardness (HRC, tensile strength and bending strength was performed for the steel pipes welded at two different welding temperatures (700 °C and 900 °C with and without using the weld filler wire. The microstructure of the welding regions was examined by using an optical microscopy. The properties showed that the steel pipes welded by 900 °C with using the weld filler obtained the highest tensile strength and bending strength versus these welded by 700 °C without the use of the weld filler. This is attributed to the weld filler heated and melt at sufficient temperature (900 °C and compensate losing in the Ni metal occurred in the base steel metal during the welding process.

  19. Tensile properties of shielded metal arc welded dissimilar joints of nuclear grade ferritic steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, K.; Malarvizhi, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Krishnan, S. A.; Sasikala, G.; Albert, Shaju K.

    2016-12-01

    In nuclear power plants, modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel (Grade 91 or P91) is used for constructing steam generators (SG's) whereas austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316LN) is a major structural member for intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). Therefore, a dissimilar joint between these materials is unavoidable. In this investigation, dissimilar joints were fabricated by Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) process with Inconel 82/182 filler metals. Transverse tensile properties and Charpy V-notch impact toughness for different regions of dissimilar joints of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel and AISI 316LN austenitic stainless steel were evaluated as per the standards. Microhardness distribution across the dissimilar joint was recorded. Microstructural features of different regions were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The transverse tensile properties of the joint is found to be inferior to base metals. Impact toughness values of different regions of dissimilar metal weld joint (DMWJ) is slightly higher than the prescribed value. Formation of a soft zone at the outer edge of the HAZ will reduce the tensile properties of DMWJ. The complex microstructure developed at the interfaces of DMWJ will reduce the impact toughness values.

  20. Surface analysis of localized corrosion of austenitic 316L and duplex 2205 stainless steels in simulated body solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conradi, Marjetka; Schön, Peter Manfred; Kocijan, Aleksandra; Jenko, M.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on cyclic voltammetry and in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) studies of localized corrosion of duplex 2205 stainless steel (DSS 2205) and austenitic stainless steel of the type AISI 316L in two model solutions, including artificial saliva (AS) and a simulated

  1. Fiber laser welding of austenitic steel and commercially pure copper butt joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuryntsev, S. V.; Morushkin, A. E.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2017-03-01

    The fiber laser welding of austenitic stainless steel and commercially pure copper in butt joint configuration without filler or intermediate material is presented. In order to melt stainless steel directly and melt copper via heat conduction a defocused laser beam was used with an offset to stainless steel. During mechanical tests the weld seam was more durable than heat affected zone of copper so samples without defects could be obtained. Three process variants of offset of the laser beam were applied. The following tests were conducted: tensile test of weldment, intermediate layer microhardness, optical metallography, study of the chemical composition of the intermediate layer, fractography. Measurements of electrical resistivity coefficients of stainless steel, copper and copper-stainless steel weldment were made, which can be interpreted or recalculated as the thermal conductivity coefficient. It shows that electrical resistivity coefficient of cooper-stainless steel weldment higher than that of stainless steel. The width of intermediate layer between stainless steel and commercially pure copper was 41-53 μm, microhardness was 128-170 HV0.01.

  2. Thermal and mechanical stability of retained austenite in aluminum-containing multiphase TRIP steels

    CERN Document Server

    Zwaag, S; Kruijver, S O; Sietsma, J

    2002-01-01

    Stability of retained austenite is the key issue to understand transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect. In this work, both thermal stability and mechanical stability are investigated by thermo-magnetic as well as in situ conventional X-ray diffraction and micro synchrotron radiation diffraction measurements. The thermal stability in a 0.20C-1.52Mn-0.25Si-0.96Al (wt%) TRIP steel is studied in the temperature range between 5 and 300 K under a constant magnetic field of 5T. It is found that almost all austenite transforms thermally to martensite upon cooling to 5K and M sub s and M sub f temperatures are analyzed to be 355 and 115 K. Transformation kinetics on the fraction versus temperature relation are well described by a model based on thermodynamics. From the in situ conventional X-ray and synchrotron diffraction measurements in a 0.17C-1.46Mn-0.26Si-1.81Al (wt%) steel, the volume fraction of retained austenite is found to decrease as the strain increases according to Ludwigson and Berger relation. T...

  3. Surface modification of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by plasma nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wang

    2003-04-01

    Plasma nitriding of austenitic stainless steel samples has been carried out using pulse dc glow discharge plasma of NH 3 gas at substrate temperature ranging from 350 to 520 °C. A nitriding time of only 4 h has been found to produce a compact surface nitride layer composed of γN' phase with a thickness of around 7-12 μm as processing temperature remained between 420 and 450 °C. The thickness of γN phase was found to be very thin only about 2 μm after plasma nitriding at temperature below 400 °C. Microhardness measurements showed significant increase in the hardness from 240 HV (for untreated samples) up to 1700 HV (for nitrided samples at temperature of 460 °C). For nitriding at higher temperature, i.e. above 460 °C, the chromium nitrides precipitated in the nitrided layer and caused austenite phase transform into ferrite phase or iron nitrides ( γ' or ɛ). The consequent result of chromium nitride precipitation is the reduction of corrosion resistance of nitrided layer. Compressive residual stresses existed in the nitrided layer due to nitrogen diffusion into austenitic stainless steel.

  4. Review of environmental effects on fatigue crack growth of austenitic stainless steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shack, W. J.; Kassner, T. F.; Energy Technology

    1994-07-11

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessel cladding, and core components in light water reactors are potential concerns to the nuclear industry and regulatory agencies. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or stress corrosion cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Crack growth data for wrought and cast austenitic SSs in simulated BWR water, developed at Argonne National Laboratory under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship over the past 10 years, have been compiled into a data base along with similar data obtained from the open literature. The data were analyzed to develop corrosion-fatigue curves for austenitic SSs in aqueous environments corresponding to normal BWR water chemistries, for BWRs that add hydrogen to the feedwater, and for pressurized water reactor primary-system-coolant chemistry. The corrosion-fatigue data and curves in water were compared with the air line in Section XI of the ASME Code.

  5. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  6. Patterning of magnetic structures on austenitic stainless steel by local ion beam nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menendez, E. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)], E-mail: enric.menendez@uab.es; Martinavicius, A.; Liedke, M.O.; Abrasonis, G.; Fassbender, J. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Sommerlatte, J. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Nielsch, K. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Surinach, S.; Baro, M.D. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Nogues, J. [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA) and Institut Catala de Nanotecnologia, Edifici CM7, Campus Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Sort, J. [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA) and Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    Periodic arrays of ferromagnetic structures with micrometer and submicrometer lateral sizes have been prepared at the surface of a paramagnetic austenitic stainless steel by means of ion beam nitriding through different types of shadow masks (such as transmission electron microscopy grids or self-assembled porous alumina membranes). This method takes advantage of the formation of the ferromagnetic supersaturated nitrogen solid solution {gamma}{sub N} phase (i.e., expanded austenite) upon nitriding at moderate temperatures. The local character of the induced ferromagnetism is confirmed by magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements together with magnetic force microscopy imaging. Furthermore, the influence of the nitriding temperature and time on the induced ferromagnetic and structural properties has been analyzed.

  7. Austenite Grain Growth in Peritectic Solidified Carbon Steels Analyzed by Phase-Field Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Munekazu; Tsuchiya, Shingo; Matsuura, Kiyotaka

    2012-06-01

    The formation of coarse columnar grains (CCGs) in the as-cast austenite structure of peritectic carbon steels is a serious problem in continuous casting processes. Recently, it was elucidated that the formation of CCGs is ascribed to a discontinuous grain growth. Furthermore, the critical condition for the discontinuous growth to occur was elicited on the basis of phase-field simulations and a theory of grain growth. In this study, by means of the phase-field simulations, the detailed investigation is carried out for the grain coarsening of the as-cast austenite structure. It is demonstrated in the two-dimensional simulations that the coarsest grain structure emerges by the discontinuous growth in the vicinity of the critical condition. In addition, a model for predicting the upper limit of grain size during the discontinuous growth is proposed. The model successfully describes the experimental result with reasonable accuracy.

  8. Effects of Austenitizing and Forging on Mechanical Properties of MIL A-12560/AISI 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbirowo, S.; Adjiantoro, B.; Romijarso, T. B.

    2017-05-01

    Laterite steels might be used for alternative armored steels. Their properties can be improved in various ways, such as by heat treatment. This paper reports the influences of tempering temperature on the hardness and microstructure of the modified MIL A-12560/AISI 4340 steels. Samples were austenitized at 1200, 1000, and 800°C and forged at 100, 75, and 50 tons. Mechanical properties consisted of Hardness measurement was conducted by Brinell indentation and metallographic observation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that increasing forging force until 100 tons can decrease hardness. The formation of the microstructure consists of tempered martensite containing ferrite and dual phase perlite. The presence of void and porous can also decrease hardness. Decreasing austenizing temperature from 1200 °C to 800°C can increase material strength and hardness.

  9. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  10. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2011-08-23

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  11. Effects of Cr - Ni 18/9 Austenitic Cast Steel Modification by Mischmetal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gajewski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of Cr - Ni 18/9 austenitic cast steel modifications by mischmetal. The study was conducted on industrial melts. Cast steel was melted in an electric induction furnace with a capacity of 2000 kg and a basic lining crucible. .The mischmetal was introduced into the ladle during tapping of the cast steel from the furnace. The effectiveness of modification was examined with the carbon content of 0.1% and the presence of δ ferrite in the structure of cast steel stabilized with titanium. The changes in the structure of cast steel and their effect on mechanical properties and intergranular corrosion were studied. It was found that rare earth metals decrease the sulfurcontent in cast steel and above all, they cause a distinct change in morphology of the δ ferrite and non-metallic inclusions. These changes have improved mechanical properties. R02, Rm, and A5 and toughness increased significantly. There was a great increase of the resistance to intergranular corrosion in the Huey test. The study confirmed the high efficiency of cast steel modification by mischmetal in industrial environments. The final effect of modification depends on the form and manner of placing mischmetal into the liquid metal and the melting technology, ie the degree of deoxidation and desulfurization of the metal in the furnace.

  12. Processing nickel free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels through conventional electroslag remelting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balanchandran, G.

    2000-05-01

    Nickel free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels, made through air-induction melting were processed using conventional electroslag remelting (ESR) process without application of nitrogen gas pressure over the melt. It was found possible to retain the high nitrogen contents of the original steel. The loss in nitrogen content during ESR was found to increase with increasing melt rate. Electroslag remelting was carted out on eleven steels with a base composition at around 18wt%Cr-18wt%Mn- 0.1 to 0.6wt%C-0.53 to 0.9wt%N. While the air-induction melted steel had extensive porosity, the ESR ingots were all sound and free from porosity. Thus, steels made in any other process route can be successfully remelted using conventional ESR. The cast structure analysis in a typical medium carbon high nitrogen steel showed that Cr and Mn has a tendency for microsegregation. The presence of microsegregation and residual carbides affect the ductility of the cast steel. (author)

  13. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Ibrahim [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Arroyave, Raymundo [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) study deformation twinning, its evolution, thermal stability, and the contribution on mechanical response of the new advanced stainless steels, especially at elevated temperatures; 2) study alumina-scale formation on the surface, as an alternative for conventional chromium oxide, that shows better oxidation resistance, through alloy design; and 3) design new generation of high temperature stainless steels that form alumina scale and have thermally stable nano-twins. The work involved few baseline alloys for investigating the twin formation under tensile loading, thermal stability of these twins, and the role of deformation twins on the mechanical response of the alloys. These baseline alloys included Hadfield Steel (Fe-13Mn-1C), 316, 316L and 316N stainless steels. Another baseline alloy was studied for alumina-scale formation investigations. Hadfield steel showed twinning but undesired second phases formed at higher temperatures. 316N stainless steel did not show signs of deformation twinning. Conventional 316 stainless steel demonstrated extensive deformation twinning at room temperature. Investigations on this alloy, both in single crystalline and polycrystalline forms, showed that deformation twins evolve in a hierarchical manner, consisting of micron–sized bundles of nano-twins. The width of nano-twins stays almost constant as the extent of strain increases, but the width and number of the bundles increase with increasing strain. A systematic thermomechanical cycling study showed that the twins were stable at temperatures as high as 900°C, after the dislocations are annealed out. Using such cycles, volume fraction of the thermally stable deformation twins were increased up to 40% in 316 stainless steel. Using computational thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, we designed two generations of advanced austenitic stainless steels. In the first generation, Alloy 1, which had been proposed as an alumina

  14. Effect of retained austenite on the hydrogen embrittlement of a medium carbon quenching and partitioning steel with refined microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jilan; Huang, Feng; Guo, Zhenghong, E-mail: zhenghongguo@sjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-05-17

    The effect of retained austenite on the hydrogen embrittlement of a medium carbon quenching and partitioning steel was investigated by comparison to a traditional quenching and tempering steel with an identical chemical composition. Electrochemical precharging reduces the plasticity, including the elongation and reduction in area, of both steels, and the embrittlement phenomenon is more severe in the quenching and tempering steel based on a slow strain rate tensile test. As a result, the ultimate tensile strength decreases, as well. The fracture mode was dominated by intergranular features in the areas containing hydrogen, suggesting the weakening of boundary cohesion. Retained austenite, which retards diffusion and increases the solubility of hydrogen, is stable under the attack of hydrogen, contributing to the high hydrogen embrittlement resistance of quenching and partitioning steel. Refining the microstructure further improves plasticity due to the lower hydrogen content per area. In general, the quenching and partitioning steel with a refined microstructure exhibits the lowest hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility.

  15. Effect of Austenite Stability on Microstructural Evolution and Tensile Properties in Intercritically Annealed Medium-Mn Lightweight Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyejin; Sohn, Seok Su; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-06-01

    The microstructural evolution with varying intercritical-annealing temperatures of medium-Mn ( α + γ) duplex lightweight steels and its effects on tensile properties were investigated in relation to the stability of austenite. The size and volume fraction of austenite grains increased as the annealing temperature increased from 1123 K to 1173 K (850 °C to 900 °C), which corresponded with the thermodynamic calculation data. When the annealing temperature increased further to 1223 K (950 °C), the size and volume fraction were reduced by the formation of athermal α'-martensite during the cooling because the thermal stability of austenite deteriorated as a result of the decrease in C and Mn contents. In order to obtain the best combination of strength and ductility by a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) mechanism, an appropriate mechanical stability of austenite was needed and could be achieved when fine austenite grains (size: 1.4 μm, volume fraction: 0.26) were homogenously distributed in the ferrite matrix, as in the 1123 K (850 °C)—annealed steel. This best combination was attributed to the requirement of sufficient deformation for TRIP and the formation of many deformation bands at ferrite grains in both austenite and ferrite bands. Since this medium-Mn lightweight steel has excellent tensile properties as well as reduced alloying costs and weight savings, it holds promise for new automotive applications.

  16. Pearlite transformation in high carbon steels deformed in metastable austenite region; Jun`antei austenite iki de kakoshita kotansoko no pearlite hentai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daito, Y.; Aihara, K.; Nishizawa, T. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Pearlite structure was discussed noticing particularly on the state of nucleus composition, for the case when high carbon steels mainly structured by pearlite was processed in metastable austenite region below the point A1 which is thought a non-recrystallized region. When the processing amount is increased in the metastable austenite region, the size of pearlite colonies decreased. This is because of increase in nucleus producing site as a result of the processing. Even with a steel of eutectoid carbon concentration of an equilibrium diagram, proeuctoid ferrite is produced if the processing is given in the metastable austenite region. Furthermore, the production amount of the proeuctoid ferrite increased with increasing processing amount. If the processing is given in the metastable austenite region, the region that becomes a single pearlite structure shifted to hypereuctoid carbon concentration side as the transformation temperature has fallen. The result of an experiment performed in carbon concentration at which the single pearlite structure is obtained agreed well with drive force equilibrium line of ferrite and cementite as calculated based on the Gibbs energy. 18 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Effect of alloying elements on ductile-to-brittle transition behavior of high-interstitial-alloyed 18Cr-10Mn austenitic steels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hwang, B; Lee, T-H; Kim, S-J

    2011-01-01

    ... of a stable austenitic steel, the DBTT measured by Charpy impact tests appeared to be higher than that calculated by an empirical equation depending on N and C. The DBTT of the N alloyed steels w...

  18. Handbook for tensile properties of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, W. G.; Chung, M. K.; Han, C. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    Database system of nuclear materials has not been developed and the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in nuclear power plant are not summarized systematically in Korea. Although Korea designs nuclear power plant, many materials used in nuclear power plant are imported because we do not have database system of nuclear material yet and it was hard to select a proper material for the structural materials of nuclear power plant. To develop database system of nuclear materials, data of mechanical, corrosion, irradiation properties are needed. Of theses properties, tensile properties are tested and summarized in this report. Tensile properties of stainless steel used in nuclear reactor internal were investigated. Data between Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and foreign laboratory were compared to determine the precision of the result. To develope database system, materials, chemical composition, heat treatment, manufacturing process, and grain size were classified. Tensile properties were tested and summarized to use input data of database system. 9 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  19. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of gas tungsten arc welded super austenitic stainless steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vinoth Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Super 304H austenitic stainless steel with 3% of copper posses excellent creep strength and corrosion resistance, which is mainly used in heat exchanger tubing of the boiler. Heat exchangers are used in nuclear power plants and marine vehicles which are intended to operate in chloride rich offshore environment. Chloride stress corrosion cracking is the most likely life limiting failure with austenitic stainless steel tubing. Welding may worsen the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the material. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Super 304H parent metal and gas tungsten arc (GTA welded joints were studied by constant load tests in 45% boiling MgCl2 solution. Stress corrosion cracking resistance of Super 304H stainless steel was deteriorated by GTA welding due to the formation of susceptible microstructure in the HAZ of the weld joint and the residual stresses. The mechanism of cracking was found to be anodic path cracking, with transgranular nature of crack propagation. Linear relationships were derived to predict the time to failure by extrapolating the rate of steady state elongation.

  20. Titanium diffusion coatings on austenitic steel obtained by the pack cementation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRELA BRITCHI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface of specimens made of 316L austenitic steel was modified by titanium diffusion. The diffusion coatings were obtained by packing in a powder mixture consisting of titanium powder, NH4Cl and Al2O3 powder. The procedure required high temperatures, over 900 °C, and long durations. Atomic titanium was formed in the muffle during the process. Titanium atoms from the metallic part surfaces diffuse towards the interior and a diffusion layer is formed as a function of the steel composition. Titanium diffusion into the surface of 316L austenitic steel determines the formation of a complex coating: a thin layer of TiN at the exterior and a layer consisting of compounds containing Ti, Ni and Fe in the interior of the coating. The obtained coatings were continuous, adherent and had a hardness higher than that of the substrate material. The diffusion coatings were investigated by optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers microhardness tests.

  1. On the constitutive model of nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel 316LN at elevated temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available The nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel 316LN has been chosen as the material for nuclear main-pipe, which is one of the key parts in 3rd generation nuclear power plants. In this research, a constitutive model of nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel is developed. The true stress-true strain curves obtained from isothermal hot compression tests over a wide range of temperatures (900-1250°C and strain rates (10(-3-10 s(-1, were employed to study the dynamic deformational behavior of and recrystallization in 316LN steels. The constitutive model is developed through multiple linear regressions performed on the experimental data and based on an Arrhenius-type equation and Zener-Hollomon theory. The influence of strain was incorporated in the developed constitutive equation by considering the effect of strain on the various material constants. The reliability and accuracy of the model is verified through the comparison of predicted flow stress curves and experimental curves. Possible reasons for deviation are also discussed based on the characteristics of modeling process.

  2. Copper, Boron, and Cerium Additions in Type 347 Austenitic Steel to Improve Creep Rupture Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, Kinkar; Kyono, J.; Shinya, Norio

    2012-04-01

    Type 347 austenitic stainless steel (18Cr-12Ni-Nb) was alloyed with copper (3 wt pct), boron (0.01 to 0.06 wt pct), and cerium (0.01 wt pct) with an aim to increase the creep rupture strength of the steel through the improved deformation and cavitation resistance. Short-term creep rupture strength was found to increase with the addition of copper in the 347 steel, but the long-term strength was inferior. Extensive creep cavitation deprived the steel of the beneficial effect of creep deformation resistance induced by nano-size copper particles. Boron and cerium additions in the copper-containing steel increased its creep rupture strength and ductility, which were more for higher boron content. Creep deformation, grain boundary sliding, and creep cavity nucleation and growth in the steel were found to be suppressed by microalloying the copper-containing steel with boron and cerium, and the suppression was more for higher boron content. An auger electron spectroscopic study revealed the segregation of boron instead of sulfur on the cavity surface of the boron- and cerium-microalloyed steel. Cerium acted as a scavenger for soluble sulfur in the steels through the precipitation of cerium sulfide (CeS). This inhibited the segregation of sulfur and facilitated the segregation of boron on cavity surface. Boron segregation on the nucleated cavity surface reduced its growth rate. Microalloying the copper-containing 347 steel with boron and cerium thus enabled to use the full extent of creep deformation resistance rendered by copper nano-size particle by increase in creep rupture strength and ductility.

  3. Laser etching of austenitic stainless steels for micro-structural evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghra, Chetan; Kumar, Aniruddha; Sathe, D. B.; Bhatt, R. B.; Behere, P. G.; Afzal, Mohd

    2015-06-01

    Etching is a key step in metallography to reveal microstructure of polished specimen under an optical microscope. A conventional technique for producing micro-structural contrast is chemical etching. As an alternate, laser etching is investigated since it does not involve use of corrosive reagents and it can be carried out without any physical contact with sample. Laser induced etching technique will be beneficial especially in nuclear industry where materials, being radioactive in nature, are handled inside a glove box. In this paper, experimental results of pulsed Nd-YAG laser based etching of few austenitic stainless steels such as SS 304, SS 316 LN and SS alloy D9 which are chosen as structural material for fabrication of various components of upcoming Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpakkam India were reported. Laser etching was done by irradiating samples using nanosecond pulsed Nd-YAG laser beam which was transported into glass paneled glove box using optics. Experiments were carried out to understand effect of laser beam parameters such as wavelength, fluence, pulse repetition rate and number of exposures required for etching of austenitic stainless steel samples. Laser etching of PFBR fuel tube and plug welded joint was also carried to evaluate base metal grain size, depth of fusion at welded joint and heat affected zone in the base metal. Experimental results demonstrated that pulsed Nd-YAG laser etching is a fast and effortless technique which can be effectively employed for non-contact remote etching of austenitic stainless steels for micro-structural evaluation.

  4. Evaluation of erosion-corrosion resistance in Fe-Mn-Al austenitic steels

    OpenAIRE

    William Arnulfo Aperador; Jorge Hernando Bautista Ruiz; Betancurt,Juan D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of Mn and Al against corrosion/errosion resistance of three samples of the Fe-Mn-Al austenitic alloys are evaluated. The samples have composition Fe-(4,9 ~ 11,0 wt. (%)) Al-(17,49 ~ 34,3 wt. (%)) Mn-(0,43 ~ 1,25 wt. (%))C, those were prepared in an induction furnace from high purity materials. The alloys were evaluated in a composed solution of NaCl 0,5 M and Silica in a special chamber and AISI 316 stainless steel as reference material. The electrochemical characte...

  5. An improved method to identify grain boundary creep cavitation in 316H austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Flewitt, P E J; Smith, D J; Jones, C P

    2011-04-01

    Inter-granular creep cavitation damage has been observed in an ex-service 316H austenitic stainless steel thick section weldment. Focused ion beam cross-section milling combined with ion channelling contrast imaging is used to identify the cavitation damage, which is usually associated with the grain boundary carbide precipitates in this material. The results demonstrate that this technique can identify, in particular, the early stage of grain boundary creep cavitation unambiguously in materials with complex phase constituents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Low Temperature Surface Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel by Gaseous Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of two commercial austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304 and EN 1.4369. The materials were plastically deformed to different equivalent strains by uniaxial...... tension. Gaseous nitriding of the strained material was performed in ammonia gas at atmospheric pressure at 703 K. Microstructural characterization of the as-deformed states and the nitrided case produced included X-ray diffraction analysis, reflected light microscopy, microhardness testing. The results...

  7. Formability and fracture studies of austenitic stainless steel 316 at different temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Hussaini, Syed Mujahed; Singh, Swadesh Kumar; Gupta, Amit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Deep drawing is one of the most important sheet metal forming processes in automotive, aerospace and nuclear industries. In this process, the sheet metal blank is formed into a cup shape by an application of punch into the die. The present work is aimed at studying the formability and the nature of fracture for one of the important materials in industrial applications, austenitic stainless steel 316 at different temperatures. Circular blanks were deep drawn at room temperature, 150 and 300 °C...

  8. Joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel through diffusion welding; Stellingen behorende bij het proefschrift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krugers, Jan-Paul

    1993-01-19

    In this thesis, the results are presented of a study dealing with joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel AIS316 by means of diffusion welding. Welding experiments were carried out without and with the use of a metallic intermediate, like copper, nickel and copper-nickel alloys at various conditions of process temperature, process time, mechanical pressure and interlayer thickness. Most experiments were carried out in high vacuum. For reasons of comparison, however, some experiments were also carried out in a gas shielded environment of 95 vol.% Ar and 5 vol.% H2.

  9. Metallographic screening of grain boundary engineered type 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanning, F., E-mail: Fabian.Hanning@googlemail.com; Engelberg, D.L., E-mail: Dirk.engelberg@manchester.ac.uk

    2014-08-15

    An electrochemical etching method for the identification of grain boundary engineered type 304 austenitic stainless steel microstructures is described. The method can be applied for rapid microstructure screening to complement electron backscatter diffraction analysis. A threshold parameter to identify grain boundary engineered microstructure is proposed, and the application of metallographic etching for characterising the degree of grain boundary engineering discussed. - Highlights: • As-received (annealed) and grain boundary engineered microstructures were compared. • Electro-chemical polarisation in nitric acid solutions was carried out. • A metallographic screening method has been developed. • The screening method complements EBSD analysis for microstructure identification.

  10. Post irradiation tensile and fatigue behavior of austenitic PCA stainless steels irradiated in HFIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M. P.; Hamada, S.; Hishinuma, A.; Grossbeck, M. L.

    1988-07-01

    Mechanical properties were determined on solution annealed (SA) and cold worked (CW) JPCA (Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel) irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures ranging from 300 to 600°C. The irradiation produced damage levels from 16 to 56 dpa and helium concentration from 1020 to 4100 appm. The improved stability of MC precipitates which formed in the matrix during irradiation prevent loss of ductility at 500°C and below. Application of solution annealed JPCA is recommended for structural components of fusion reactors to be operated at 500°C and below.

  11. Standard practice for X-Ray determination of retained austenite in steel with near random crystallographic orientation

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the determination of retained austenite phase in steel using integrated intensities (area under peak above background) of X-ray diffraction peaks using chromium Kα or molybdenum Kα X-radiation. 1.2 The method applies to carbon and alloy steels with near random crystallographic orientations of both ferrite and austenite phases. 1.3 This practice is valid for retained austenite contents from 1 % by volume and above. 1.4 If possible, X-ray diffraction peak interference from other crystalline phases such as carbides should be eliminated from the ferrite and austenite peak intensities. 1.5 Substantial alloy contents in steel cause some change in peak intensities which have not been considered in this method. Application of this method to steels with total alloy contents exceeding 15 weight % should be done with care. If necessary, the users can calculate the theoretical correction factors to account for changes in volume of the unit cells for austenite and ferrite resulting from vari...

  12. Interplay of microstructure defects in austenitic steel with medium stacking fault energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, C., E-mail: Christiane.Ullrich@ww.tu-freiberg.de [Institute of Materials Science, Technical University Freiberg (Germany); Eckner, R.; Krüger, L. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Technical University Freiberg (Germany); Martin, S.; Klemm, V.; Rafaja, D. [Institute of Materials Science, Technical University Freiberg (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure defects under compression, their mutual interactions at high defect densities and the effect of these phenomena on the hardening were studied in metastable austenitic steel containing 16 wt% Cr, 6 wt% Mn and 9 wt% Ni. At this chemical composition, the estimated martensite start temperature and the stacking fault energy of austenite are about −240 °C and 26 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively. Consequently, the metastable austenite should be thermodynamically stable far below the room temperature and the formation of stacking faults should be retarded. The microstructure analysis, which was performed by means of XRD, ECCI, EBSD and TEM, revealed that the dislocation slip is the dominant deformation mechanism in the initial stages of the deformation process (ε≤0.05). After a critical stress level was reached, stacking faults started to form and widen. In regions with high local stacking fault densities, twinning and the formation of ε-martensite were detected simultaneously. The local deformation mechanism and the related microstructure changes were found to depend on the orientation of the respective grain. In favorably oriented grains, deformation bands consisting of ε-martensite and twins were predominantly formed in the primary slip system. In other grains, the dislocation slip remained the dominant deformation mechanism. The coexistence of faulting, twinning and dislocation slip and the interaction between the dislocations and stacking faults are discussed as the main reasons for the high observed density of microstructure defects and high hardening.

  13. High Nb, Ta, and Al creep- and oxidation-resistant austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel HTUPS alloy includes, in weight percent: 15 to 30 Ni; 10 to 15 Cr; 2 to 5 Al; 0.6 to 5 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1 W; up to 0.5 Cu; up to 4 Mn; up to 1 Si; 0.05 to 0.15 C; up to 0.15 B; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni wherein said alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, said particles comprising at least one composition selected from the group consisting of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure, said austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  14. Work hardening mechanism in high nitrogen austenitic steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and in situ electron backscattering diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojima, M., E-mail: 07nd602g@hcs.ibaraki.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ibaraki University, Nakanarusawa, 316-8511 Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Adachi, Y. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Tomota, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ibaraki University, Nakanarusawa, 316-8511 Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Hikari, Kashima, Ibaraki 314-0014 (Japan); Kamiyama, T. [Institute of Material Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Katada, Y. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    With a focus on microstructural hierarchy, work hardening behaviour in high nitrogen-bearing austenitic steel (HNS) was investigated mainly by a combined technique of in situ neutron diffraction and in situ electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD). Stress partitioning due to difference in deformability among grains is enhanced in HNS. The larger stress partitioning among [h k l]-oriented family grains seems to realize high work hardening at a small strain. At a larger strain, dislocation density is higher in HNS than in low nitrogen austenitic steel (LNS), which is a possible reason for high work hardening after straining proceeds, resulting in large uniform elongation.

  15. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: margolinbz@yandex.ru; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-15

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  16. INFLUENCE OF AUSTENITE GRAIN SIZE TO DEVELOPMENT OF DECARBONIZATION IN PRODUCTION OF ROLLED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARUSOV E. V.

    2016-08-01

    ]. The paper [11] acknowledges the influence of micro-additives of boron on changes in the austenite grain size and accordingly the length of borders in high-carbon steels with austenitizing temperature increase within the range of 900…1 100ºС. The purpose of work is to research the effect of austenite grain size on the decarburization depth in carbon (base steel and boron micro-alloyed steel.

  17. Performance evaluation of vegetable-based oils in drilling austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Walter; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency of six cutting oils was evaluated in drilling AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel using conventional HSS-Co tools by measurements of tool life, tool wear, cutting forces and chip formation. Seven tools were tested with each fluid to catastrophic failure. Cutting forces and chip...... that a performing fluid produces longer tool life, better chip breaking, lower wear and cutting forces. In particular, good correlation was found between tool life and cutting forces. Differences in cutting forces due to the fluid could be measured with a higher repeatability than tool life, thus resulting...... in a measurement capability comparable to that obtained using tool life as a performance criterion. As a consequence, it is suggested that drilling thrust can be used to assess the performance of cutting fluids in drilling stainless steel, resulting in considerable time savings and cost reduction with respect...

  18. Effect of Carbon and Nitrogen Content on Deformation and Fracture of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Menapace

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of small differences in the content of carbon and nitrogen on the room temperature tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of an AISI 304 stainless steel was studied. In the steel containing the lower amount of carbon and nitrogen, a higher amount of strain induced alfa’ martensite is formed, which increases strain hardening rate and both uniform and total elongation at fracture. The presence of large martensitic areas in the cross section causes strain localization at the austenite/martensite interface, which promotes the nucleation of cracks and their propagation along the interface. This results in a decrease of Ultimate Tensile Strength. Strain induced transformation slightly reduces strain rate sensitivity, as well.

  19. Testing of intergranular and pitting corrosion in sensitized welded joints of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bore V. Jegdic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion resistance and intergranular corrosion of the austenitic stainless steel X5Cr Ni18-10 were tested on the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal. Testing of pitting corrosion was performed by the potentiodynamic polarization method, while testing of intergranular corrosion was performed by the method of electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation with double loop. The base metal was completely resistant to intergranular corrosion, while the heat affected zone showed a slight susceptibility to intergranular corrosion. Indicators of pitting corrosion resistance for the weld metal and the base metal were very similar, but their values are significantly higher than the values for the heat affected zone. This was caused by reduction of the chromium concentration in the grain boundary areas in the heat affected zone, even though the carbon content in the examined stainless steel is low (0.04 wt. % C.

  20. Influence of thermomechanical treatments on mechanical properties and fracture mechanism of high-nitrogen austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvina, Valentina; Astafurova, Elena; Maier, Galina; Melnikov, Eugene; Astafurov, Sergey; Burlachenko, Alexander; Galchenko, Nina

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms of the high-nitrogen austenitic steel Fe- 17Cr-10Mn-7Ni-0.95V-0.8N-0.1C (in wt %) processed by different thermomechanical treatments are investigated. Cold rolling and short-time solid solution hardening contribute to the formation of a rather homogeneous fine-grained structures in the steel, which possess high strength, sufficient plasticity and exhibit excellent product of strength and elongation (σYS = 540-570 MPa, σUTS = 900-950 MPa, EL = 36-37%, PSE=33-35 GPa %) in comparison with cold-rolled specimens possessing high strength properties, but extremely low elongation (σYS = 1200 MPa, σUTS = 1650 MPa, EL=1%, PSE=1.7 GPa %).

  1. Void-swelling and precipitation in a neutron-irradiated, niobium-stabilised austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. M.; Titchmarsh, J. M.; Arkell, D. R.

    1982-06-01

    Unstressed specimens of FV548 niobium-stabilised austenitic steel in three heat-treatment conditions (1150°C solutiontreated, 20% cold-worked, and 850°C aged) have been neutron-irradiated in the Dounreay Fast Reactor in the temperature range 380°-738°C and to displacement doses of up to 30 dpa. The irradiated specimens have been examined using transmission electron microscopy and EDX techniques to establish the void-swelling and precipitation behaviour under neutron irradiation. Where possible, the observations are compared with results obtained on type 316 steel. The similarities and differences in the behaviour of the two steels are used in an attempt to understand the factors affecting the precipitation under irradiation and the void-swelling behaviour of FV548 and type 316 steels. Irradiation is shown to enhance the formation of some precipitate phases (e.g. G-phase and carbides of the M 6C type) while having no effect on others (e.g. Sigma phase and M 23C 6). It is concluded that fine intragranular dispersions of niobium carbide particles play a major role in suppressing void-swelling in neutron-irradiated FV548 steel at relatively high irradiation temperatures.

  2. Thick-section Laser and Hybrid Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujanpää, Veli

    Austenitic stainless steels are generally known to have very good laser weldability, when ordinary grades of sheets are concerned. But it is not necessarily the case, if special grades of fully austenitic structures with e.g. high molybdenum, or thick-section are used. It is also known that hot cracking susceptibility is strictly controlled by composition and welding parameters. If solidification is primary ferritic, hot cracking resistance is dramatically increased. It is also well known that laser welding needs a careful control of weld edge preparation and air gap between the edges. The dependence on edge quality can be decreased by using filler metal, either cold wire, hot wire or hybrid laser-arc welding. An additional role is high molybdenum contents where micro segregation can cause low local contents in weld which can decrease the corrosion properties, if filler metal is not used. Another feature in laser welding is its incomplete mixing, especially in thick section applications. It causes inhomogeneity, which can make uneven microstructure, as well as uneven mechanical and corrosion properties In this presentation the features of laser welding of thick section austenitic stainless steels are highlighted. Thick section (up to 60 mm) can be made by multi-pass laser or laser hybrid welding. In addition to using filler metal, it requires careful joint figure planning, laser head planning, weld parameter planning, weld filler metal selection, non-destructive and destructive testing and metallography to guarantee high-quality welds in practice. In addition some tests with micro segregation is presented. Also some examples of incomplete mixing is presented.

  3. Cutting Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel by Using Laser Cutting Process without Assist Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Ozaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, laser cutting is used in many industries. Generally, in laser cutting of metallic materials, suitable assist gas and its nozzle are needed to remove the molten metal. However, because of the gas nozzle should be set closer to the surface of a workpiece, existence of the nozzle seems to prevent laser cutting from being used flexible. Therefore, the new cutting process, Assist Gas Free laser cutting or AGF laser cutting, has been developed. In this process, the pressure at the bottom side of a workpiece is reduced by a vacuum pump, and the molten metal can be removed by the air flow caused by the pressure difference between both sides of the specimen. In this study, cutting properties of austenitic stainless steel by using AGF laser cutting with 2 kW CO2 laser were investigated. Laser power and cutting speed were varied in order to study the effect of these parameters on cutting properties. As a result, austenitic stainless steel could be cut with dross-free by AGF laser cutting. When laser power was 2.0 kW, cutting speed could be increased up to 100 mm/s, and kerf width at specimen surface was 0.28 mm.

  4. Equi-biaxial loading effect on austenitic stainless steel fatigue life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gourdin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue lifetime assessment is essential in the design of structures. Under-estimated predictions may result in unnecessary in service inspections. Conversely, over-estimated predictions may have serious consequences on the integrity of structures. In some nuclear power plant components, the fatigue loading may be equibiaxial because of thermal fatigue. So the potential impact of multiaxial loading on the fatigue life of components is a major concern. Meanwhile, few experimental data are available on austenitic stainless steels. It is essential to improve the fatigue assessment methodologies to take into account the potential equi-biaxial fatigue damage. Hence this requires obtaining experimental data on the considered material with a strain tensor in equibiaxial tension. Two calibration tests (with strain gauges and image correlation were used to obtain the relationship between the imposed deflection and the radial strain on the FABIME2 specimen. A numerical study has confirmed this relationship. Biaxial fatigue tests are carried out on two austenitic stainless steels for different values of the maximum deflection, and with a load ratio equal to -1. The interpretation of the experimental results requires the use of an appropriate definition of strain equivalent. In nuclear industry, two kinds of definition are used: von Mises and TRESCA strain equivalent. These results have permitted to estimate the impact of the equibiaxiality on the fatigue life of components

  5. Mechanical and microstructural aspects of severe plastic deformation of austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, K.; Pawlicki, J.; Tkocz, M.

    2012-05-01

    The paper presents the effects of severe plastic deformation by multiple compression in the orthogonal directions on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of austenitic steel. Several deformation variants were conducted with different number of passes. FEM simulations were performed in order to evaluate the actual values of the effective strain in the examined, central parts of the compressed samples. The deformed microstructure was investigated by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) supported by the electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). X-ray phase analysis was performed to evaluate the martensite volume fraction. The mechanical properties were determined by means of the digital image correlation method and hardness testing. It is shown that the applied forming technique leads to strong grain refinement in the austenitic steel. Moreover, deformation induces the martensitic γ- α' transformation. The microstructural changes cause an improvement in the strength properties. The material exhibits the ultimate tensile strength of 1560 MPa and the yield stress of 1500 MPa after reaching the effective strain of 10.

  6. Corrosion fatigue crack growth behaviour of austenitic stainless steels under light water reactor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P., E-mail: hans-peter.seifert@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ritter, S.; Leber, H.J. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion fatigue in austenitic stainless steels under light water reactor conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of major parameters of influence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical system conditions for environmental acceleration of fatigue crack growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposal for new code fatigue curves, which consider environmental effects. - Abstract: The corrosion fatigue crack growth behaviour of different wrought low-carbon and stabilised austenitic stainless steels was characterised under simulated boiling water and primary pressurised water reactor conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in the temperature range from 70 to 320 Degree-Sign C. The major parameter effects and critical conjoint threshold conditions, which result in relevant environmental acceleration of fatigue crack growth are discussed and summarised. Furthermore, the observed corrosion fatigue behaviour is compared with the corresponding (corrosion) fatigue curves in the ASME and JSME boiler and pressure vessel code or open literature and conclusions with regard to their adequacy and conservatism are given.

  7. Formability and fracture studies of austenitic stainless steel 316 at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mujahed Hussaini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Deep drawing is one of the most important sheet metal forming processes in automotive, aerospace and nuclear industries. In this process, the sheet metal blank is formed into a cup shape by an application of punch into the die. The present work is aimed at studying the formability and the nature of fracture for one of the important materials in industrial applications, austenitic stainless steel 316 at different temperatures. Circular blanks were deep drawn at room temperature, 150 and 300 °C using a 20 Ton hydraulic press coupled with a furnace and found that formability of the austenitic stainless steel 316 increased as the temperature was increased. This material underwent dynamic strain aging between 350 and 550 °C. Fractured surface of the broken tensile test specimen at different regions were studied and analyzed using scanning electron microscope. It was observed that the nature of the fracture was brittle in dynamic strain aging region.

  8. High corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel alloyed with nitrogen in an acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metikos-Hukovic, M., E-mail: mmetik@fkit.h [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Babic, R. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Grubac, Z. [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, University of Split, 21000 Split (Croatia); Petrovic, Z. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Lajci, N. [Faculty of Mine and Metallurgy, University of Prishtina, 10000 Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} ASS alloyed with nitrogen treated at 1150 {sup o}C exhibits microstructure homogeneity. {yields} Passivation peak of ASS corresponds to oxidation of metal and absorbed hydrogen. {yields} Transfer phenomena and conductivity depend on the film formation potential. {yields} Electronic structure of the passive film and its corrosion resistance correlate well. {yields} Passive film on ASS with nitrogen is low disordered and high corrosion resistant. - Abstract: Passivity of austenitic stainless steel containing nitrogen (ASS N25) was investigated in comparison with AISI 316L in deareated acid solution, pH 0.4. A peculiar nature of the passivation peak in a potentiodynamic curve and the kinetic parameters of formation and growth of the oxide film have been discussed. The electronic-semiconducting properties of the passive films have been correlated with their corrosion resistance. Alloying austenitic stainless steel with nitrogen increases its microstructure homogeneity and decreases the concentration of charge carriers, which beneficially affects the protecting and electronic properties of the passive oxide film.

  9. Effect of tungsten addition on high-temperature properties and microstructure of alumina-forming austenitic heat-resistant steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Min-Ho [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-ku, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Joonoh; Kang, Jun-Yun; Ha, Heon-Young [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Baig Gyu [High Temperature Materials Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [Ferrous Alloy Department, Advanced Metallic Materials Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Seongsangu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changhee, E-mail: chlee@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-ku, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-28

    High-temperature tensile and creep properties of W-added Alumina-Forming austenitic (AFA{sub W}) heat-resistant steel were investigated as compared with AFA steel without W. High-temperature tensile properties of two steels were similar to each other, but creep lifetime of AFA{sub W} steel was increased. Microstructural examination using SEM and TEM revealed that creep rate rapidly decreased when Laves phase initially precipitated. This indicated that the precipitation of Laves phase played an important role in hardening of AFA steel. It is also found that AFA{sub W} steel exhibited finer and denser Laves phase compared with AFA steel, which is due to partial substitution of W for Mo. The finer and denser distribution of Laves phase contributed to improved creep properties of AFA{sub W} steel by enhancement in precipitation hardening.

  10. Surface modification of austenitic steel by various glow-discharge nitriding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Borowski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen intensive research on modifying glow-discharge nitriding processes. One of the most commonly used glow-discharge methods includes cathodic potential nitriding (conventional method, and active screen plasma nitriding. Each of these methods has a number of advantages. One very important, common feature of these techniques is full control of the microstructure, chemical and phase composition, thickness and the surface topography of the layers formed. Another advantage includes the possibility of nitriding such materials as: austenitic steels or nickel alloys, i.e. metallic materials which do not diffuse nitrogen as effectively as ferritic or martensitic steels. However, these methods have some disadvantages as well. In the case of conventional plasma nitriding, engineers have to deal with the edge effect, which makes it difficult to use this method for complexly shaped components. In turn, in the case of active screen plasma nitriding, the problem disappears. A uniform, smooth layer forms, but is thinner, softer and is not as resistant to friction compared to layers formed using the conventional method. Research is also underway to combine these methods, i.e. use an active screen in conventional plasma nitriding at cathodic potential. However, there is a lack of comprehensive data presenting a comparison between these three nitriding processes and the impact of pulsating current on the formation of the microstructure and functional properties of austenitic steel surfaces. The article presents a characterisation of nitrided layers produced on austenitic X2CrNiMo17-12-2 (AISI 316L stainless steel in the course of glow-discharge nitriding at cathodic potential, at plasma potential and at cathodic potential incorporating an active screen. All processes were carried out at 440 °C under DC glow-discharge conditions and in 100 kHz frequency pulsating current. The layers were examined in terms of their microstructure, phase and

  11. Application of electrochemical methods for the investigation of intergranular corrosion welded joint austenitic stainless steel 19Cr-9Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Bore V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitization degree of the austenitic stainless steel welded joints was investigated by electrochemical methods of the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL EPR in H2SO4 + KSCN solution, and by the measurement of corrosion potential of the steel in the drop of the solution of HNO3 + FeCl3 + HCl. The welded joints were tested by X-ray radiographic method in order to check the presence of the weld defects. Grain size of the base metal and the welded joints were determined by optical microscopy. Good agreement between the results obtained by different electrochemical methods was obtained. Heat-affected zone (HAZ of the austenitic stainless steel welded joints has shown significant degree of sensitization. The double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic method gave quantitative evidence about susceptibility of the stainless steel to intergranular corrosion.

  12. Prediction of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel welds by modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilpas, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1999-07-01

    The present study focuses on the ability of several computer models to accurately predict the solidification, microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel weld metals. Emphasis was given to modelling the effect of welding speed on solute redistribution and ultimately to the prediction of weld pitting corrosion resistance. Calculations were experimentally verified by applying autogenous GTA- and laser processes over the welding speed range of 0.1 to 5 m/min for several austenitic stainless steel grades. Analytical and computer aided models were applied and linked together for modelling the solidification behaviour of welds. The combined use of macroscopic and microscopic modelling is a unique feature of this work. This procedure made it possible to demonstrate the effect of weld pool shape and the resulting solidification parameters on microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance. Microscopic models were also used separately to study the role of welding speed and solidification mode in the development of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance. These investigations demonstrate that the macroscopic model can be implemented to predict solidification parameters that agree well with experimentally measured values. The linked macro-micro modelling was also able to accurately predict segregation profiles and CPT-temperatures obtained from experiments. The macro-micro simulations clearly showed the major roles of weld composition and welding speed in determining segregation and pitting corrosion resistance while the effect of weld shape variations remained negligible. The microscopic dendrite tip and interdendritic models were applied to welds with good agreement with measured segregation profiles. Simulations predicted that weld inhomogeneity can be substantially decreased with increasing welding speed resulting in a corresponding improvement in the weld pitting corrosion resistance. In the case of primary austenitic

  13. Partial transformation of austenite in Al-Mn-Si TRIP steel upon tensile straining: an in situ EBSD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Nybo; Adachi, Y.; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of austenite to martensite in an Al–Mn–Si transformation-induced plasticity steel was investigated with in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements under tensile straining. The visualisation of the microstructure upon straining allows for an investigation of th...

  14. Microstructural Evolution of a Low-Carbon Steel during Application of Quenching and Partitioning Heat Treatments after Partial Austenitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) process has been studied in a low-carbon steel containing 1.1 wt pct aluminum by heat treatments consisting of partial austenitization at 900 °C and subsequent rapid cooling to a quenching temperature in the range between 125 °C and 175 °C, followed by an

  15. Measured resolved shear stresses and Bishop-Hill stress states in individual grains of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Ytterdal; Oddershede, Jette; Beaudoin, Armand

    2017-01-01

    The full three-dimensional stress state of 172 individual bulk grains in austenitic stainless steel 316L at 0.1 and 1% sample elongation has been determined with sufficient accuracy to allow comparison with the theoretical Bishop-Hill stress states for plastically deforming grains as well as calc...

  16. Stability of grain-refined reversed structures in a 301LN austenitic stainless steel under cyclic loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M.; Man, Jiří; Karjalalinen, L.P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 703, č. 4 (2017), s. 280-292 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-32665S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : austenitic stainless steel * reversion treatment * grain size * deformation induced martensite * strain-controlled fatigue Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 3.094, year: 2016

  17. Serrated Flow Behavior of Aisi 316l Austenitic Stainless Steel for Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingshan; Shen, Yinzhong; Han, Pengcheng

    2017-10-01

    AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel is a candidate material for Generation IV reactors. In order to investigate the influence of temperature on serrated flow behavior, tensile tests were performed at temperatures ranging from 300 to 700 °C at an initial strain rate of 2×10-4 s-1. Another group of tensile tests were carried out at strain rates ranging from 1×10-4 to 1×10-2 s-1 at 600 °C to examine the influence of strain rates on serrated flow behavior. The steel exhibited serrated flow, suggesting the occurrence of dynamic strain ageing at 450-650°C. No plateau of yield stresses of the steel was observed at an initial strain rate of 2×10-4 s-1. The effective activation energy for serrated flow occurrence was calculated to be about 254.72 kJ/mol-1. Cr, Mn, Ni and Mo solute atoms are expected to be responsible for dynamic strain ageing at high temperatures of 450-650 °C in the steel.

  18. Statistical model of water environment effects on the fatigue behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, Paul [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Chair of Applied Mechanics; Steinmann, Paul [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Chair of Applied Mechanics; Rudolph, Juergen [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Many studies on the effects of elevated temperature environments on the cycle fatigue performance of austenitic stainless steels typically used for boiling and light water reactor components have been performed. The key parameters (e. g. strain rate, and temperature) that influence the fatigue life were identified and the range of these key parameters where environmental effects become pronounced were defined. The two major efforts to characterize environmentally assisted fatigue (EAF) are by Argonne National Laboratory (U. S.) and EFD (Japan). Since each nation considers only domestic fatigue data, the widely applied titanium and niobium stabilized austenitic stainless steels in Germany are not included by any data points in these models. Based on a review of past and current research reports about EAF a database for wrought Types 304, 304L, 316, 316NG, 321, 347, and 348 stainless steels was compiled. Only specimen tests under strain control with a fully reversed uniaxial loading were included. The modified Langer equation was used to develop the room temperature in air curve to the collected data, which serves as the basis for the discussion of the EAF database. Besides the key variables that influence fatigue life in light and boiling water reactor environments additional parameters like, for example, the strain amplitude, which pronounces environmental effects more at low than at high strain amplitudes, can reduce the fatigue life by a factor of about two and should not be neglected in the current fatigue approach. A statistical model is evolved to address EAF in fatigue usage calculation by a fatigue life correction factor (F{sub en}), which is defined as the ratio of life in air at room temperature to that in water at elevated temperature. Compared to the current ANL statistical prediction model, a different functional form is used and additional variables are considered, too.

  19. Analysis Of The Austenite Grain Growth In Low-Alloy Boron Steel With High Resistance To Abrasive Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Białobrzeska B.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Today low-alloy steels with boron achieve high resistance to abrasive wear and high strength. These features are obtained by using advanced technology of manufacturing. This makes boron steels increasingly popular and their application more diverse. Application of these steels can extend the lifetime of very expensive machine construction in many industries such as mining, the automotive, and agriculture industries. An interesting subgroup of these materials is steel with boron intended for heat treatment. These steels are supplied by the manufacturer after cold or hot rolling so that it is possible for them to be heat treated in a suitable manner by the purchaser for its specific application. Very important factor that determines the mechanical properties of final product is austenite grain growth occurring during hot working process such us quenching or hot rolling. Investigation of the effect of heating temperature and holding time on the austenite grain size is necessary to understand the growth behavior under different conditions. This article presents the result of investigation of austenite grain growth in selected low-allow boron steel with high resistance to abrasive wear and attempts to describe the influence of chemical composition on this process.

  20. Influence of Heating Rate on Ferrite Recrystallization and Austenite Formation in Cold-Rolled Microalloyed Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippot, C.; Bellavoine, M.; Dumont, M.; Hoummada, K.; Drillet, J.; Hebert, V.; Maugis, P.

    2017-11-01

    Compared with other dual-phase (DP) steels, initial microstructures of cold-rolled martensite-ferrite have scarcely been investigated, even though they represent a promising industrial alternative to conventional ferrite-pearlite cold-rolled microstructures. In this study, the influence of the heating rate (over the range of 1 to 10 K/s) on the development of microstructures in a microalloyed DP steel is investigated; this includes the tempering of martensite, precipitation of microalloying elements, recrystallization, and austenite formation. This study points out the influence of the degree of ferrite recrystallization prior to the austenite formation, as well as the importance of the cementite distribution. A low heating rate giving a high degree of recrystallization, leads to the formation of coarse austenite grains that are homogenously distributed in the ferrite matrix. However, a high heating rate leading to a low recrystallization degree, results in a banded-like structure with small austenite grains surrounded by large ferrite grains. A combined approach, involving relevant multiscale microstructural characterization and modeling to rationalize the effect of the coupled processes, highlights the role of the cold-worked initial microstructure, here a martensite-ferrite mixture: recrystallization and austenite formation commence in the former martensite islands before extending in the rest of the material.

  1. The influence of chromium on the pearlite-austenite transformation kinetics of the Fe–Cr–C ternary steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Lingnan; Liu, Yaohui, E-mail: liuyaohui2005@126.com; Liu, Jia' an; Song, Yulai; Li, Shasha; Zhang, Renhang; Li, Tuanjie; Liang, Yan

    2015-11-05

    The Fe–Cr–C ternary steels containing different contents of Cr were successfully cast and further processed in the lab. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), optical microscope (OM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were employed to investigate the transformation of the Fe–Cr–C ternary steels from pearlite to austenite. It is found that the values of Ac1 and Ac3 are raised with increase in the content of Cr. In addition, the information on the transformation kinetics was obtained from experiment results and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model (JMAK). The obtained austenitic transformation kinetic process has been described in three overlapping steps: site saturation nucleation, diffusion-controlled growth, and impingement correction. The pre-exponential factor for diffusion decreases firstly and then increases. The activation energy for diffusion increases with the Cr content. In addition, Cr strongly affects the effective diffusion distance, the austenite nucleation sites, and the carbon activity gradient during the austenitic transformation kinetic process. - Highlights: • The pearlite-austenite transformation kinetics is researched by DSC. • The transformation kinetics is analyzed by experiment results and the JMAK model. • The activation energy and the diffusion coefficient are discussed.

  2. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  3. Study of Secondary Phase Particle Dissolution and Austenite Grain Growth on Heating Fine-Grained High-Strength IF-Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hong-bin; Zhang, Hong-mei; Sun, Cheng-qian

    2016-09-01

    Dissolution of particles of second phase and growth of austenite grains in high-strength fine-grained IF-steel (0.0057% C, 0.0023% N) on heating is studied. Metallographic analysis of flat steel specimens cut from plates prepared by hot and cold rolling is performed. Steel structure is studied after holding for 10 - 60 min at different temperatures and water quenching. The quenching parameters at which the microalloying elements (Ti, Nb) dissolve completely with retention of fine-grained austenite are determined. Amathematical model of austenite grain growth is developed by nonlinear regression analysis of experimental data.

  4. Crack initiation in smooth fatigue specimens of austenitic stainless steel in light water reactor environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1999-04-08

    The fatigue design curves for structural materials specified in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code are based on tests of smooth polished specimens at room temperature in air. The effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves; however, recent test data illustrate the detrimental effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of austenitic stainless steels (SSs). Certain loading and environmental conditions have led to test specimen fatigue lives that are significantly shorter than those obtained in air. Results of fatigue tests that examine the influence of reactor environments on crack initiation and crack growth of austenitic SSs are presented. Block loading was used to mark the fracture surface to determine crack length as a function of fatigue cycles in water environments, Crack lengths were measured by scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism for decreased fatigue life in LWR environments is discussed, and crack growth rates in the smooth fatigue specimens are compared with existing data from studies of crack growth rates.

  5. Flow Softening Index for Assessment of Dynamic Recrystallization in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aashranth, B.; Samantaray, Dipti; Kumar, Santosh; Dasgupta, Arup; Borah, Utpal; Albert, Shaju K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2017-07-01

    The present study proposes a novel technique to assess dynamic recrystallization (DRX) and related microstructural phenomena during hot deformation of austenite. A `Flow Softening Index (FSI)' has been identified on the basis of investigations on elevated temperature deformation behaviour of austenitic stainless steel. This index corresponds to dominant microstructural phenomena at different deformation conditions. For this investigation, experimental results obtained from isothermal, constant true strain rate compression tests in a temperature range of 1173 (900)-1473 K (1200 °C) and strain rate range of 0.01-100 s-1 have been used. Resultant microstructures have been quantified using average grain size and grain size distributions. The dominant microstructural phenomena have been identified at different conditions using electron backscatter diffraction. Low FSI values are associated with the grain growth, intermediate values with DRX, and high values with the work-hardening and flow localisation phenomena. FSI also quantitatively indexes the average grain size and grain size distributions at different temperature-strain rate combinations. Analysis of the specific deformation conditions, particularly where 3.4 < FSI < 3.5, indicates a common thermo-mechanical origin of flow localisation and DRX. The potential technological implications thereof are discussed and a semi-empirical model of microstructural evolution is developed for the studied material.

  6. IASCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 in high dissolved oxygen water environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O.K.; Soppet, W.K. [Argonne National Lab., Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne, Illinois (United States); Dietz Rago, N.L. [Argonne National Lab., Chemical Engineering Div., Argonne, Illinois (United States); Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The influences of grain boundary engineering, alloying elements, and neutron dose on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels and Alloy 690 were investigated. Flat dog-bone specimens irradiated in the Halden boiling heavy water reactor to {approx}2 dpa were tested in slow strain rate tensile tests in high dissolved oxygen water at 289 {sup o}C. The area fractions of intergranular or transgranular fracture were measured using a scanning electron microscope. All tested materials showed significant hardening and loss of ductility after irradiation. The area fractions of the intergranular cracking decreased with increase of uniform elongation, and were used to rank IASCC susceptibility. The grain boundary engineering treatment employed in this study does not have a significant impact on IASCC susceptibility for austenitic SSs at {approx}2 dpa, but does affect the cracking behavior of Alloy 690. High-sulfur and low-carbon SSs are more susceptible to IASCC. Oxygen content also contributes to the IASCC susceptibility in high-purity Type 304L SS. (author)

  7. Assessment of void swelling in austenitic stainless steel PWR core internals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    As many pressurized water reactors (PWRs) age and life extension of the aged plants is considered, void swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel (SS) core internals has become the subject of increasing attention. In this report, the available database on void swelling and density change of austenitic SSs was critically reviewed. Irradiation conditions, test procedures, and microstructural characteristics were carefully examined, and key factors that are important to determine the relevance of the database to PWR conditions were evaluated. Most swelling data were obtained from steels irradiated in fast breeder reactors at temperatures >385 C and at dose rates that are orders of magnitude higher than PWR dose rates. Even for a given irradiation temperature and given steel, the integral effects of dose and dose rate on void swelling should not be separated. It is incorrect to extrapolate swelling data on the basis of 'progressive compounded multiplication' of separate effects of factors such as dose, dose rate, temperature, steel composition, and fabrication procedure. Therefore, the fast reactor data should not be extrapolated to determine credible void swelling behavior for PWR end-of-life (EOL) or life-extension conditions. Although the void swelling data extracted from fast reactor studies is extensive and conclusive, only limited amounts of swelling data and information have been obtained on microstructural characteristics from discharged PWR internals or steels irradiated at temperatures and at dose rates comparable to those of a PWR. Based on this relatively small amount of information, swelling in thin-walled tubes and baffle bolts in a PWR is not considered a concern. As additional data and relevant research becomes available, the newer results should be integrated with existing data, and the worthiness of this conclusion should continue to be scrutinized. PWR baffle reentrant corners are the most likely location to experience high swelling

  8. Effects of thermal oxidation and subsequent pickling on pitting geometry of austenitic stainless steels in chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alar, Vesna; Esih, Ivan; Budic, Ivan; Brod, Slavonski [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. of Materials

    2011-07-01

    Harmful effects of thermal oxides formed on austenitic stainless steels (SS) like AISI 304 and 316L by heating in air or other oxidizing gases on their pitting liability in chloride solutions have been studied by pursuing geometric characteristics of corrosion process (pits density, their depths, and mouth areas, ie. penetrating and superficial detrimental consequences etc.). The possibility of preventing the decay of thermally oxidized austenitic SS by chemical removal (pickling) of oxides before exposure to chloride solutions was successfully applied on simple specimens but serious difficulties arose on welded parts and on parts exposed to other temperature gradients during manufacture or in exploitation. (orig.)

  9. The mechanical properties of austenite stainless steel 304 after structural deformation through cold work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarok, Naila; Manaf, Azwar, E-mail: azwar@ui.ac.id [PPS Materials Science, FMIPA-Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Notonegoro, Hamdan Akbar [Mechanical Engineering Dept., FT-Universitas Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa,Cilegon 42435 (Indonesia); Thosin, Kemas Ahmad Zaini [Pusat Penelitian Fisika,LIPI, Serpong (Indonesia)

    2016-06-17

    The 304 stainless steel (SS) type is widely used in oil and gas operations due to its excellent corrosion resistance. However, the presence of the fine sand particles and H{sub 2}S gas contained in crude oil could lead the erosion and abrasion in steel. In this study, cold rolled treatments were conducted to the 304 SS in order to increase the wear resistance of the steel. The cold work has resulted in thickness reduction to 20%, 40% and 60% of the original. Various microstructural characterizations were used to analyze the effect of deformation. The hardness characterization showed that the initial hardness value increased from 145 HVC to 395 HVC as the level of deformation increase. Further, the wear resistance increased with the deformation rate from 0% to 40% and subsequently decreased from 40% to 60% deformation rate. Microstructural characterization shows that the boundary change to coincide by 56 µm, 49 µm, 45 µm, and 43 µm width and the grain go to flatten and being folded like needles. The effect of deformation on the grain morphology and structure was also studied by optical metallography and X-Ray Diffraction. It is shown that the deformation by means of a cold rolled process has transformed the austenite structure into martensitic structure.

  10. Recent Developments in Niobium Containing Austenitic Stainless Steels for Thermal Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Mariana Perez; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Hongyao; Bao, Hansheng; Xie, Xishan

    The challenge of growing continuously in a sustainable way is the main driver to improve efficiency in the use of natural resources. The increasing demand for energy has made thermal power based countries to set audacious programs to increase efficiency of thermal power generation. In China, coal-burning accounts nowadays for approximately 65% of the total primary energy supply being responsible for around 25% of the countries' CO2 emission, this coal-based energy supply scenario is believed to continue until 2020. Therefore, the country has invested strongly in the last years in the construction of more efficient power plants. To attend higher operating temperatures and steam pressures, the application of higher performance materials is mandatory, presenting improved mechanical resistance — to stand the higher pressures applied — and having sufficient high temperature and corrosion resistance with the best cost-benefit relation possible. The present work addresses some research developments made in niobium containing austenitic stainless steels for super heaters and re-heater tubes in the past years as a joint effort between industry and academia to understand mechanisms and optimize the steel chemical composition, improving its performance. Niobium role has been studied in detail in heat resistant stainless steels TP347H, Super 304 and HR3C, a summary of such studies is presented in this paper. Niobium improves high temperature properties as it precipitates as nano-size MX and NbCrN, well dispersed in the matrix, hindering dislocation movement, increasing precipitation strengthening and creep resistance.

  11. Impact of the nanostructuration on the corrosion resistance and hardness of irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, E.; Prasath Babu, R.; Monnet, I.; Etienne, A.; Moisy, F.; Pralong, V.; Enikeev, N.; Abramova, M.; Sauvage, X.; Radiguet, B.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of grain size and irradiation defects on the mechanical behavior and the corrosion resistance of a 316 stainless steel have been investigated. Nanostructured samples were obtained by severe plastic deformation using high pressure torsion. Both coarse grain and nanostructured samples were irradiated with 10 MeV 56Fe5+ ions. Microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Surface mechanical properties were evaluated thanks to hardness measurements and the corrosion resistance was studied in chloride environment. Nanostructuration by high pressure torsion followed by annealing leads to enrichment in chromium at grain boundaries. However, irradiation of nanostructured samples implies a chromium depletion of the same order than depicted in coarse grain specimens but without metallurgical damage like segregated dislocation loops or clusters. Potentiodynamic polarization tests highlight a definitive deterioration of the corrosion resistance of coarse grain steel with irradiation. Downsizing the grain to a few hundred of nanometers enhances the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples, despite the fact that the hardness of nanocrystalline austenitic steel is only weakly affected by irradiation. These new experimental results are discussed in the basis of couplings between mechanical and electrical properties of the passivated layer thanks to impedance spectroscopy measurements, hardness properties of the surfaces and local microstructure evolutions.

  12. Mechanical Properties, Short Time Creep, and Fatigue of an Austenitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Brnic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The correct choice of a material in the process of structural design is the most important task. This study deals with determining and analyzing the mechanical properties of the material, and the material resistance to short-time creep and fatigue. The material under consideration in this investigation is austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiTi18-10. The results presenting ultimate tensile strength and 0.2 offset yield strength at room and elevated temperatures are displayed in the form of engineering stress-strain diagrams. Besides, the creep behavior of the steel is presented in the form of creep curves. The material is consequently considered to be creep resistant at temperatures of 400 °C and 500 °C when subjected to a stress which is less than 0.9 of the yield strength at the mentioned temperatures. Even when the applied stress at a temperature of 600 °C is less than 0.5 of the yield strength, the steel may be considered as resistant to creep. Cyclic tensile fatigue tests were carried out at stress ratio R = 0.25 using a servo-pulser machine and the results were recorded. The analysis shows that the stress level of 434.33 MPa can be adopted as a fatigue limit. The impact energy was also determined and the fracture toughness assessed.

  13. Assessment the possibility of enhancing the tribological properties of the ferritic-austenitic cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Brodziak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to explore the possibility of enhancing the tribological properties of the ferritic-austenitic cast steel which is widely used in combustion gas desulphurization systems in the power industry. The subject of the research is the GX2CrNiMoN25-6-3 cast steel, a material for making pump rotors and other parts intended for operation at a temperature of up to 70°C in a water suspension containing Cl- and SO4-2 ions and sand / gypsum particles. It seems that in some applications, at low dynamics of parts’ operation and a predominance of erosive phenomena over corrosive ones, there is a potential for using the σ phase as a structural constitu-ent that enhances the tribological properties. However, due to the increased brittleness of the material, a need arises for optimizing the quantity of this phase and carrying out detailed research into the morphology of precipitates. To describe the tribological properties, the testing of the erosive and corrosive wear mechanism was used, which was carried out on a test stand of the authors' own construction. Metallographic and stereological examinations and hardness tests were performed, which enabled the understanding of the successive stages of tribological wear of the cast steel under investigation. The increasing volumetric share of the σ phase advantageously influenced the erosive wear resistance of the material.

  14. EBSD study of purity effects during hot working in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Wahabi, M. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France) and Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)]. E-mail: elwahabi@emse.fr; Gavard, L. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Prado, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Montheillet, F. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France)

    2005-02-25

    The technique of electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) is considered as a powerful instrument for the study of the microstructural changes during hot forming processes and gives the possibility to present the information in different ways (OIM, misorientation diagram and pole figures). The present work is focused on the observation by EBSD of the microstructure evolution during deformation at high temperature of three austenitic stainless steels: AISI-304H, AISI-304L and a high purity steel HP. The difference between the three steels is the content carbon and the presence of residual elements. To this aim compression tests were carried out at a constant strain rate of 0.001 s{sup -1} and different temperatures. The study showed an increase of twin boundary fractions and a diminution of substructure (low angle densities boundaries) at increasing temperatures. On the other hand, increasing carbon content promotes lower twin boundary fractions and larger amounts of low angle boundaries. This effect can be explained by the reduction of grain boundary mobility caused by increasing carbon contents, which in turn reduces the migration rate and consequently the probability of twin boundary generation. Moreover, the increment of low angle boundaries with carbon content accelerates the twin character loss. It was also found that the dynamically recrystallized grain size decreased at increasing carbon content due to a typical drag effect. No important features on textures were found during DDRX.

  15. Effect of lower bainite/martensite/retained austenite triplex microstructure on the mechanical properties of a low-carbon steel with quenching and partitioning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan-song; Gao, Hong-ye; Li, Zhong-yi; Nakashima, Hideharu; Hata, Satoshi; Tian, Wen-huai

    2016-03-01

    We present a study concerning Fe-0.176C-1.31Si-1.58Mn-0.26Al-0.3Cr (wt%) steel subjected to a quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process. The results of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and tensile tests demonstrate that the microstructures primarily consist of lath martensite, retained austenite, lower bainite (LB), and a small amount of tempered martensite; moreover, few twin austenite grains were observed. In the microstructure, three types of retained austenite with different sizes and morphologies were observed: blocky retained austenite (~300 nm in width), film-like retained austenite (80-120 nm in width), and ultra- fine film-like retained austenite (30-40 nm in width). Because of the effect of the retained austenite/martensite/LB triplex microstructure, the specimens prepared using different quenching temperatures exhibit high ultimate tensile strength and yield strength. Furthermore, the strength effect of LB can partially counteract the decreasing strength effect of martensite. The formation of LB substantially reduces the amount of retained austenite. Analyses of the retained austenite and the amount of blocky retained austenite indicated that the carbon content is critical to the total elongation of Q&P steel.

  16. Precipitation kinetics in austenitic 18Cr-30Ni-Nb cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garbiak

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the results of investigations on the precipitation kinetics in austenitic 18%Cr-30%Ni cast steel stabilised with an addition of 1.84 wt% niobium. Phase analysis of isolates extracted from the alloy subjected to annealing within the temperature range of 600–1000oC during 10–1000 h was made. The phase constitution of the isolates mainly comprised niobium carbides of the NbC type and complex chromium carbides of the Cr23C6 type. In specimens annealed within the temperature range of 700–900oC, a high-silicon G phase was additionally identified. The highest kinetics of the precipitation process was recorded after annealing at the temperatures of 800 and 900oC.

  17. Analysis of the austenitic stainless steel's r-value behavior at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Arsić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the anisotropy properties of austenitic steel AISI 304 (X5CrNi18-10 at elevated temperatures is presented in this paper. Considerations of the anisotropy problems are presented in the theoretical part of the paper, as well as the procedure for determination of the normal anisotropy coefficient. The experimental part of the paper describes the plan, methodology and equipment for testing of material's normal anisotropy and mechanical characteristics. The objective of conducting the experiments was to investigate influence of temperature on normal anisotropy, as well as on the mechanical properties of the considered material. The normal anisotropy was monitored by the coefficient – the so-called "r-value". Besides that, the tensile strength, yield stress and elongation at break were monitored, also. The tests were done on the 0.7 mm thick sheet metal within the temperature range 20 to 700°C.

  18. Evaluation of self-welding susceptibility of an austenitic stainless steel (alloy D9) in sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Albert, S. K.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Meikandamurthy, C.; Amarendra, G.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2008-02-01

    Self-welding susceptibility of a 15Cr-15Ni-2Mo titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel (alloy D9), in both annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions, have been evaluated in flowing sodium at 823 K for 2160 and 4320 h under contact stress of 9.4 MPa. Tests were performed on flat-on-flat geometry of hollow cylindrical specimens under compression. One pair of 20% cold-worked alloy D9 vs. 20% cold-worked alloy D9 specimens tested for 4320 h was self-welded for which the breakaway shear force was measured. Scanning electron micrographs of the self-welded region showed that portions of the original interface no longer existed. The paper discusses the experimental set-up installed in the sodium loop test facility and the results of self-welding susceptibility studies on this material.

  19. Novel approaches to determining residual stresses by ultramicroindentation techniques: Application to sandblasted austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frutos, E. [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Multigner, M. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L., E-mail: jlg@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    This research addresses the determination of residual stresses in sandblasted austenitic steel by ultramicroindentation techniques using a sharp indenter, of which the sensitivity to residual stress effects is said to be inferior to that of spherical ones. The introduction of an angular correction in the model of Wang et al. which relates variations in the maximum load to the presence of residual stresses is proposed. Similarly, the contribution to the hardness of grain size refinement and work hardening, developed as a consequence of the severe plastic deformation during blasting, is determined in order to avoid overestimation of the residual stresses. Measurements were performed on polished cross sections along a length of several microns, thus obtaining a profile of the residual stresses. Results show good agreement with those obtained by synchrotron radiation on the same specimens, which validates the method and demonstrates that microindentation using sharp indenters may be sensitive to the residual stress effect.

  20. Influence of the austenitic stainless steel microstructure on the void swelling under ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouxel Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the role of different metallurgical parameters on the void formation mechanisms, various austenitic stainless steels were elaborated and irradiated with heavy ions. Two alloys, in several metallurgical conditions (15Cr/15Ni–Ti and 15Cr/25Ni–Ti, were irradiated in the JANNUS-Saclay facility at 600 °C with 2 MeV Fe2+ ions up to 150 dpa. Resulting microstructures were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. Different effects on void swelling are highlighted. Only the pre-aged samples, which were consequently solute and especially titanium depleted, show cavities. The nickel-enriched matrix shows more voids with a smaller size. Finally, the presence of nano-precipitates combined with a dense dislocation network decreases strongly the number of cavities.

  1. Role of Slip Behavior in the Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking in Austenitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrey, M. D.; Was, G. S.

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking appears to be linked to the localization of slip into dislocation channels. Three austenitic steels with varying degrees of cracking susceptibility were irradiated with 2 MeV protons at 360°C to 5 dpa and strained in 288°C simulated BWR conditions. Deformation behavior was characterized by Schmid factors, resolved shear stresses, slip continuity across grain boundaries, and the angle between dislocation channels and the cracked boundaries. Cracking susceptibility was found to correlate with the dislocation channel properties, such as the resolved shear stress and slip continuity at grain boundaries. Higher cracking susceptibility was found at grain boundaries perpendicular to the tensile axis and adjacent to low Schmid factor grains, which have high normal stresses acting on the boundary. Localized deformation and high normal stress have significant roles in IASCC, though they do not fully describe cracking susceptibility.

  2. Effect of Electrode Types on the Solidification Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. U. Anaele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electrode types on the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. Manual metal arc welding method was used to produce the joints with the tungsten inert gas welding serving as the control. Metallographic and chemical analyses of the fusion zones of the joints were conducted. Results indicate that weldments produced from E 308-16 (rutile coated, E 308-16(lime-titania coated electrodes, and TIG welded joints fall within the range of 1.5≤Creq./Nieq.≤1.9 and solidified with a duplex mode and were found to be resistant to solidification cracking. The E 308-16 weld metal had the greatest resistance to solidification cracking. Joints produced from E 310-16 had Creq./Nieq. ratio 1.9 and solidified with ferrite mode. It had a low resistance to solidification cracking.

  3. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG welding of 4 (10 mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304 in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding and A-TIG welding was done. The A-TIG welds were subjected to bending test. A comparative study of TIG and A-TIG welding shows that A-TIG welding increases the weld penetration depth.

  4. Microstructural observations of HFIR-irratiated austenitic stainless steels including welds from JP9-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawai, T.; Shiba, K.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels, including specimens taken from various electron beam (EB) welds, have been irradiated in HFIR Phase II capsules, JP9-16. Fifteen specimens irradiated at 300, 400, and 500{degrees}C up to 17 dpa are so far examined by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). In 300{degrees}C irradiation, cavities were smaller than 2nm and different specimens showed little difference in cavity microstructure. At 400{degrees}C, cavity size was larger, but still very small (<8 nm). At 500{degrees}C, cavity size reached 30 nm in weld metal specimens of JPCA, while cold worked JPCA contained a small (<5 nm) cavities. Inhomogeneous microstructural evolution was clearly observed in weld-metal specimens irradiated at 500{degrees}C.

  5. Effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Alexander, D.J.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Shiba, K.

    1996-04-01

    An austenitic stainless steel, designated 316LN-IG, has been chosen for the first wall/shield (FW/S) structure for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The proposed operational temperature range for the structure (100 to 250{degree}C) is below the temperature regimes for void swelling (400-600{degree}C) and for helium embrittlement (500-700{degree}C). However, the proposed neutron dose is such that large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, and strain hardening capacity could be encountered which could significantly affect fracture properties. Definition of the irradiation regimes in which this phenomenon occurs is essential to the establishment of design rules to protect against various modes of failure.

  6. Hardness variation in a cathodic hydrogen-charged austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iost, A. [Univ. de Lille 1, Villeneuve d`Ascq (France). Lab. de Metallurgie Physique]|[Ecole Nationale Superieure d`Arts et Metiers, Lille (France); Vogt, J.B. [Univ. de Lille 1, Villeneuve d`Ascq (France). Lab. de Metallurgie Physique

    1997-11-15

    Hydrogen embrittlement has been studied for a long time but the mechanism has not been yet explained clearly. The difficulty lies in the fact that the cause of embrittlement can change from one alloy to another. In addition, a large part of the reactions take place at the surface, especially at the beginning of the process. Thus, analysis of the surface should provide useful information about the role of hydrogen in this process. While X-ray diffraction is commonly used, microhardness seems to be less developed. The primary objective of this paper is to study the hydrogen-enriched surface of an austenitic stainless steel with the microhardness test, and to show that reliable conclusions can be drawn provided a detailed analysis of the results is taken into account.

  7. Beneficial effect of shot peening on steamside oxidation of 300-series austenitic steels: An electrochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrianský, Václav; Krausová, Aneta; Macák, Jan; Děd, Jiří; Eltai, Elsadig; Hamouda, Abdel Magid

    2018-01-01

    The formation of a protective oxide ensures the good corrosion resistance of austenitic steels in high temperature steam. However after long-term interaction even the protective oxide may tend to exfoliate and cause operational problems. With shot peening believed to be an effective method for mitigating steamside oxidation and exfoliation, we compared oxide layers formed on two materials: AISI 316H with a rugged untreated surface and Super304H with a shot-peened surface. In addition to conventional methods (SEM/EDS, Raman spectroscopy), Mott-Schottky analysis was used to characterize the oxide layers in order to determine the quality of the protective oxide. The oxides formed on Super 304H showed unexpected semiconducting behaviour with a significantly lower charge carrier density, thereby supporting the benefits of shot peening. Our findings extend the knowledge applicable to the design of more efficient coal-fired power plants.

  8. Relative merits of duplex and austenitic stainless steels for applications in the oil and gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Elisabeth; Wegrelius, Lena; Pettersson, Rachel [Outokumpu Stainless AB, Avesta (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    The broad range of available stainless steel grades means that these materials can fulfil a wide variety of requirements within the oil and gas industry. The duplex grades have the advantage of higher strength than standard austenitic grades, while the superaustenitic grades provide a cost-effective alternative to nickel-base alloys in a number of cases. The paper presents the results of various types of laboratory testing to rank the grades in terms of resistance to pitting, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Results from field testing in actual or simulated service conditions are discussed and a number of application examples, including process piping flexible, heat exchangers and topside equipment are presented. (author)

  9. AN ULTRASONIC PHASED ARRAY EVALUATION OF CAST AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL PRESSURIZER SURGE LINE PIPING WELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2010-07-22

    A set of circumferentially oriented thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs) were implanted into three cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) pressurizer (PZR) surge-line specimens (pipe-to-elbow welds) that were fabricated using vintage CASS materials formed in the 1970s, and flaw responses from these cracks were used to evaluate detection and sizing performance of the phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods applied. Four different custom-made PA probes were employed in this study, operating nominally at 800 kHz, 1.0 MHz, 1.5 MHz, and 2.0 MHz center frequencies. The CASS PZR surge-line specimens were polished and chemically etched to bring out the microstructures of both pipe and elbow segments. Additional studies were conducted and documented to address baseline CASS material noise and observe possible ultrasonic beam redirection phenomena.

  10. Tool Wear Analysis due to Machining In Super Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polishetty Ashwin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents tool wear study when a machinability test was applied using milling on Super Austenitic Stainless Steel AL6XN alloy. Eight milling trials were performed under two cutting speeds, 100 m/min and 150 m/min, combined with two feed rates at 0.1mm/tooth and 0.15 mm/tooth and two depth of cuts at 2 mm and 3 mm. An Alicona 3D optical surface profilometer was used to scan cutting inserts flank and rake face areas for wear. Readings such as maximum and minimum deviations were extracted and used to analyse the outcomes. Results showed various types of wear were generated on the tool rake and flank faces. The common formed wear was the crater wear. The formation of the build-up edge was observed on the rake face of the cutting tool.

  11. Inhibition Effect of N, N'-Dimethylaminoethanol on the Pitting Corrosion Austenitic Stainless Steel Type 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Tolulope LOTO

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical influence and corrosion inhibition of N, N'-dimethylaminoethanol on the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel (type 304 in dilute sulphuric acid solution with sodium chloride addition was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Corrosion potential, pitting potential, repassivation potential, nucleation resistance, passivation range and repassivation capacity measurements and potentiodynamic analysis were used to evaluate the steel’s pitting resistance characteristics. The potentiodynamic experiments revealed that pitting potential increased with increase in concentration of the inhibiting compound coupled with an increase in the passivation range hence increased resistance to pittinggcorrosion.  DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.8977

  12. Stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel under compressive stress: an investigation from macro to nano scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, R.; Pahlevani, F.; Quadir, M. Z.; Sahajwalla, V.

    2016-10-01

    Although high carbon martensitic steels are well known for their industrial utility in high abrasion and extreme operating environments, due to their hardness and strength, the compressive stability of their retained austenite, and the implications for the steels’ performance and potential uses, is not well understood. This article describes the first investigation at both the macro and nano scale of the compressive stability of retained austenite in high carbon martensitic steel. Using a combination of standard compression testing, X-ray diffraction, optical microstructure, electron backscattering diffraction imaging, electron probe micro-analysis, nano-indentation and micro-indentation measurements, we determined the mechanical stability of retained austenite and martensite in high carbon steel under compressive stress and identified the phase transformation mechanism, from the macro to the nano level. We found at the early stage of plastic deformation hexagonal close-packed (HCP) martensite formation dominates, while higher compression loads trigger body-centred tetragonal (BCT) martensite formation. The combination of this phase transformation and strain hardening led to an increase in the hardness of high carbon steel of around 30%. This comprehensive characterisation of stress induced phase transformation could enable the precise control of the microstructures of high carbon martensitic steels, and hence their properties.

  13. submitter Physical Properties of a High-Strength Austenitic Stainless Steel for the Precompression Structure of the ITER Central Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Arauzo, Ana; Roussel, Pascal; Libeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ITER central solenoid (CS) consists of six independent coils kept together by a precompression support structure that must react vertical tensile loads and provide sufficient preload to maintain coil-to-coil contact when the solenoid is energized. The CS precompression system includes tie plates, lower and upper key blocks, load distribution and isolation plates and other attachment, support and insulating hardware. The tie plates operating at 4 K are manufactured starting from forgings in a high-strength austenitic stainless steel (FXM-19) with a stringent specification. Moreover, forged components for the lower and upper key blocks have to be provided in the same FXM-19 grade with comparably strict requirements. FXM-19 is a high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel, featuring high strength and toughness, ready weldability, and forgeability. It features as well higher integral thermal contraction down to 4 K compared with the very high Mn steel grade selected for the CS coil jackets, hence providing an ad...

  14. Formation of Inclusions in Ti-Stabilized 17Cr Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xue; Sun, Yanhui; Yang, Yindong; Bai, Xuefeng; Barati, Mansoor; Mclean, Alex

    2016-12-01

    The behavior and formation mechanisms of inclusions in Ti-stabilized, 17Cr Austenitic Stainless Steel produced by the ingot casting route were investigated through systematic sampling of liquid steel and rolled products. Analysis methods included total oxygen and nitrogen contents, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate that the composition of inclusions was strongly dependent on the types of added alloying agents. During the AOD refining process, after the addition of ferrosilicon alloy and electrolytic manganese, followed by aluminum, the composition of inclusions changed from manganese silicate-rich inclusions to alumina-rich inclusions. After tapping and titanium wire feeding, pure TiN particles and complex inclusions with Al2O3-MgO-TiO x cores containing TiN were found to be the dominant inclusions when [pct Ti] was 0.307 mass pct in the molten steel. These findings were confirmed by thermodynamic calculations which indicated that there was a driving force for TiN inclusions to be formed in the liquid phase due to the high contents of [Ti] and [N] in the molten steel. From the start of casting through to the rolled bar, there was no further change in the composition of inclusions compared to the titanium addition stage. Stringer-shaped TiN inclusions were observed in the rolled bar. These inclusions were elongated along the rolling direction with lengths varying from 17 to 84 µm and could have a detrimental impact on the corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties of the stainless steel products.

  15. Impact of the nanostructuration on the corrosion resistance and hardness of irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, E., E-mail: eric.hug@ensicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Matériaux, Normandie Université, CNRS UMR 6508, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Prasath Babu, R. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université et INSA de Rouen, Normandie Université, Saint-Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France); Monnet, I. [Centre de recherches sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique CEA-CNRS, Normandie Université, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Etienne, A. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université et INSA de Rouen, Normandie Université, Saint-Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France); Moisy, F. [Centre de recherches sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique CEA-CNRS, Normandie Université, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Pralong, V. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Matériaux, Normandie Université, CNRS UMR 6508, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Enikeev, N. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa (Russian Federation); Saint Petersburg State University, Laboratory of the Mechanics of Bulk Nanostructured Materials, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Abramova, M. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa (Russian Federation); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Impacts of nanostructuration and irradiation on the properties of 316 stainless steels are reported. • Irradiation of nanostructured samples implies chromium depletion as than depicted in coarse grain specimens. • Hardness of nanocrystalline steels is only weakly affected by irradiation. • Corrosion resistance of the nanostructured and irradiated samples is less affected by the chromium depletion. - Abstract: The influence of grain size and irradiation defects on the mechanical behavior and the corrosion resistance of a 316 stainless steel have been investigated. Nanostructured samples were obtained by severe plastic deformation using high pressure torsion. Both coarse grain and nanostructured samples were irradiated with 10 MeV {sup 56}Fe{sup 5+} ions. Microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Surface mechanical properties were evaluated thanks to hardness measurements and the corrosion resistance was studied in chloride environment. Nanostructuration by high pressure torsion followed by annealing leads to enrichment in chromium at grain boundaries. However, irradiation of nanostructured samples implies a chromium depletion of the same order than depicted in coarse grain specimens but without metallurgical damage like segregated dislocation loops or clusters. Potentiodynamic polarization tests highlight a definitive deterioration of the corrosion resistance of coarse grain steel with irradiation. Downsizing the grain to a few hundred of nanometers enhances the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples, despite the fact that the hardness of nanocrystalline austenitic steel is only weakly affected by irradiation. These new experimental results are discussed in the basis of couplings between mechanical and electrical properties of the passivated layer thanks to impedance spectroscopy measurements, hardness properties of the surfaces and local microstructure evolutions.

  16. Influence of the heat treatment on the microstructure and properties of austenitic cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bała

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Exploitation investigations of a centrifugally cast pipe of austenitic cast steel indicated a significant influence of its microstructure on functional properties. Determination of the possibility of forming the microstructure and properties of the investigated cast steel by heat treatments was the aim of the presented paper. According to the Standard ASTM A 297, material from which the pipe was made is determined as HF type cast steel. The solution heat treatment from a temperature of 1080 °C was performed and followed by the microstructure observations and hardness measurements. It was found, that the solution heat treatment from this temperature will notsignificantly improve the material strength properties. However, it will visibly influence its fracture toughness. An influence of agingperformed after the solution heat treatment on microstructure and hardness was also investigated. Cast steel was aged for 1 hour at 600°C (solution heat treatment from 1080 °C. On the basis of the obtained results it was found, that the solution heat treatment temperature should be the maximum permissible by the Standard i.e. 1150 °C. Heating the supersaturated material (from 1150 °C even toa temperature of 600 °C should not cause the carbide precipitation in a form of the continuous network in grain boundaries, which woulddecrease fracture toughness of the investigated cast steel. Due to fracture toughness a service exposure of this material should not exceed 600 °C. The permissible service exposure up to 900 °C, given for this material in the Standard, is correct only on account of heat and high temperature creep resistance but not fracture toughness.

  17. In Situ Investigation of the Evolution of Lattice Strain and Stresses in Austenite and Martensite During Quenching and Tempering of Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, M.; Niessen, F.; Somers, M. A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate in situ the evolution of lattice strains and stresses in austenite and martensite during quenching and tempering of a soft martensitic stainless steel. In one experiment, lattice strains in austenite and martensite were me...

  18. Comparison of Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance between 2205 Duplex Stainless Steels and type 316L Austenitic Stainless Steels Under the Cathodic Applied Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong-Il; Lee, Jae-Bong [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    2205 duplex stainless steels have been used for the construction of the marine environment, because of their excellent corrosion resistance and high strength. However, the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement (HE) may be less than that of 316L austenitic stainless steel. The reason why 316L stainless steels have better resistance to HE is associated with crystal structure (FCC, face centered cubic) and the higher stacking faults energy than 2205 duplex stainless steels. Furthermore 2205 stainless steels with or without tungsten were also examined in terms of HE. 2205 stainless steels containing tungsten is less resistible to HE. It is because dislocation tangle was formed in 2205 duplex stainless steels. Slow strain-rate tensile test (SSRT) was conducted to measure the resistance to HE under the cathodic applied potential. Hydrogen embrittlement index (HEI) was used to evaluate HE resistance through the quantitative calculation.

  19. On the Carbon Solubility in Expanded Austenite and Formation of Hägg Carbide in AISI 316 Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Ståhl, Kenny; Brink, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    –420 °C and 465–470 °C, respectively. Hägg carbide (x-M5C2)develops when the carbon content in the expanded austenite exceeds the metastable solubility limit; the transformation of carbon expanded austenite into Hägg carbide occurs irrespective of carburizing temperature in the investigated temperature......The carbon solubility in expanded austenite is investigated by controlled low temperaturegaseous through-carburizing of AISI 316 stainless steel thin foils with thermogravimetry and synchrotron powder diffraction analysis. Carburizing is carried out in C2H2–H2–N2 and CO–H2–N2 atmospheres at 380...

  20. The Effect Of Carbon Concentration On The Retained Austenite Content And The Mechanical Properties Of TRIP Steel Wire Rod Obtained From The Stelmor Controlled Cooling Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muskalski Z.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The austenite content of the multiphase TRIP-structure steels depends, inter alia, on the carbon concentration and the properly selected parameters of the two-stage heat treatment.

  1. The role of dislocation channeling in IASCC initiation of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kale Jennings

    The objective of this study was to understand the role of dislocation channeling in the initiation of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel using a novel four-point bend test. Stainless steels used in this study were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C, and included a commercial purity 304L stainless steel irradiated to 5.5, 10.2, and 47.5 dpa, and two high purity stainless steels, Fe-18Cr-12Ni and Fe-18Cr-25Ni, irradiated to ~10 dpa. The four-point bend test produced the same relative IASCC susceptibility as constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments performed on the same irradiated alloys in boiling water reactor normal water chemistry. The cracking susceptibility of the CP 304L alloy was high at all irradiation dose levels, enhanced by the presence of MnS inclusions in the alloy microstructure, which dissolve in the NWC environment. Dissolution of the MnS inclusion results in formation of an oxide cap that occludes the inclusion site, creating a crevice condition with a high propensity for crack initiation. Crack initiation at these locations was induced by stress concentration at the intersecting grain boundary, resulting from the intersection of a discontinuous dislocation channels (DC). Stress to initiate an IASCC crack decreased with dose due earlier DC initiation. The HP Fe-18Cr-12Ni alloy had low susceptibility to IASCC, while the high Ni alloy exhibited no cracking susceptibility. The difference in susceptibility among these conditions was attributed to the propensity for DCs to transmit across grain boundaries, which controls stress accumulation at DC -- grain boundary intersections.

  2. Investigations on structure–property relationships of activated flux TIG weldments of super-duplex/austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devendranath Ramkumar, K., E-mail: ramdevendranath@gmail.com; Bajpai, Ankur; Raghuvanshi, Shubham; Singh, Anshuman; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Arivarasu, M.; Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-06-25

    This research work articulated the effect of SiO{sub 2} flux assisted tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding on the microstructure and mechanical properties of marine grade stainless steel weldments, such as super-duplex stainless steel (UNS S32750) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L). The studies showed that the use of flux decreased the heat input required to obtain complete penetration. Microstructure studies revealed the presence of ferrite at the heat affected zone of AISI 316L and the fusion zone which obviated the hot cracking tendency. Tensile studies corroborated that the joint strength was sufficiently greater than that of the parent metals. Impact toughness slightly impoverished owing to the presence of large platelets of Widmanstätten austenite in the fusion zone. The study also explored the structure–property relationships of the flux assisted weldments using the combined techniques of optical and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Owing to the better metallurgical and mechanical properties, this study recommends the use of SiO{sub 2} flux for joining the dissimilar metals involving austenitic and super-duplex stainless steels.

  3. In-situ kinetics study on the growth of expanded austenite in AISI 316L stainless steels by XRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh-Michels, Zoltán; Faeht, Alexander; Kleiner, Simon; von Känel, Adrian; Rufer, Jean-Martin; Dommann, Alex; Margraf, Patrick; Tschopp, Gerhard; Neels, Antonia

    2017-07-01

    The formation of expanded austenite in Cr-Ni austenitic stainless steels like AISI 316L is not completely understood despite its technological relevance. In this work, we present an in-situ X-ray diffraction study on the growth kinetics of the expanded austenite. We applied a low-temperature nitrocarburizing treatment using a mixture of NH3, N2, H2, and C2H4 gases at atmospheric pressures in a novel and custom built chamber attached to a Bruker D8 Advance diffractometer. The nitrocarburizing temperature was varied between 340 and 440 °C, and the possible effects of the gas amount were also tested. The thickness of the growing layer was determined from the shrinkage of the unmodified austenite peak. The growth rate coefficient was calculated using the linear-parabolic equation. The resulting coefficients follow the Arrhenius law with the activation energy of 165 ± 12 kJ/mol. This value is in good agreement with the diffusion activation energy for heavy interstitials like carbon and nitrogen. The expanded austenite peak was modelled by a multilayer approach, where each 0.5 μm sublayer has a constant lattice parameter. The lattice expansion is analyzed as a function of the Boltzmann-variable (η = 0.5 × t-1/2). The expanded austenite layer in this metric has a constant width. Furthermore by rescaling with the lattice expansion of the first sublayer, it is possible to create a scale-independent master curve. These findings indicate that thickening of the expanded austenite is purely diffusion controlled, while the extent of strain is set by the uptake rate of the gas atoms.

  4. Protective coating of austenitic steel using robotized GMAW temper-bead technique; Rechargement d'inox austenitique en MAG temperbead robotise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpreau, J.M. [Electricite de France (EDF/R and D), Recherche et Developpement, 92 - Chatou (France); Dainelli, P. [Institut de Soudure, 57 - Yutz (France)

    2009-07-15

    This paper summarises experimental results obtained in a study of GMAW temper-bead on low alloyed steel with austenitic consumables. Temper-bead on low alloyed steel with austenitic consumables is mainly used for repairing operations of heavy components such as vessel reactor of nuclear power plants. Experimental work aims at showing the performance of GMAW compared to GTAW and the consequences of GMAW temper-bead on 2OMND5 heat affected zones. (authors)

  5. On the Carbon Solubility in Expanded Austenite and Formation of Hägg Carbide in AISI 316 Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Ståhl, Kenny; Brink, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    The carbon solubility in expanded austenite is investigated by controlled low temperaturegaseous through-carburizing of AISI 316 stainless steel thin foils with thermogravimetry and synchrotron powder diffraction analysis. Carburizing is carried out in C2H2–H2–N2 and CO–H2–N2 atmospheres at 380......–420 °C and 465–470 °C, respectively. Hägg carbide (x-M5C2)develops when the carbon content in the expanded austenite exceeds the metastable solubility limit; the transformation of carbon expanded austenite into Hägg carbide occurs irrespective of carburizing temperature in the investigated temperature...... range (380–470 °C). The maximum solubility of carbon in expanded austenite (380 °C) is found to correspond to an occupancy (yC) of 0.220 of the interstitial octahedral sites of the austenite lattice (i.e., 4.74wt%C). Decomposition of Hägg carbide into M7C3 occurs upon prolonged carburizing treatment...

  6. The Role of Retained Austenite on the Mechanical Properties of a Low Carbon 3Mn-1.5Ni Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Zhang, Wei-na; Liu, Zhen-yu; Wang, Guo-dong

    2017-12-01

    The present studies focus on the correlation between retained austenite characteristics and the cryogenic temperature Charpy impact toughness, strength, and plasticity. The steels with different volume fractions and stabilities of retained austenite were prepared by quenching followed by intercritical heat treatment, and the microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscope, electron back-scattered diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The grain size, dislocation density, crack initiation energy, and crack propagation energy were quantified. It has been demonstrated that the volume fraction of retained austenite plays a significant role in the reduction of the measured yield strength and the effect of tempered martensite/ferrite matrix on cryogenic temperature impact toughness can be assumed to be similar due to the similar grain size, dislocation density and element content in solution for different heat treatments. It was found that the stability of retained austenite plays a determining role in the increase of cryogenic temperature impact toughness. Furthermore, the dependence of the crack propagation energy on retained austenite is much greater than that of the crack initiation energy. Generally, an excellent UTS × TEL does not produce good cryogenic temperature impact toughness.

  7. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papula, Suvi; Sarikka, Teemu; Anttila, Severi; Talonen, Juho; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu

    2017-06-03

    Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC) phases ferrite and α'-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α'-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  8. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Papula

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC phases ferrite and α’-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α’-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  9. Investigation on cracking mechanism of austenite stainless steel during in situ tension in transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Peng; Hu Hongyan; Liu Yuanyuan [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang Yue [College of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Fang, Yuan [Advanced Technology Institute, Technology Center of Baoshan Iron and Steel company, Shanghai 201900 (China); Ren Xuejun [School of Engineering, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Liao Bo [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yang Qingxiang, E-mail: qxyang@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} During the initial stage of loading process, at the crack tip, the dislocations slip from center to around zone and the density of dislocation is increased at local zone. With the increase of load, around center, an oval-shaped dislocation free zone (DFZ) forms. When the displacement keeps constant, the dislocations continue moving. The DFZ become thinner and the nano-cracks initiate gradually, then, propagate abruptly along the direction vertical to the tensile force. {yields} The cracks may propagate in continuous propagation way. The micro-cracks initiate ahead of the main crack firstly, then propagate, grow and connect with the main crack finally, which results in that the main crack propagates too. The initiation direction of micro-crack has a certain angle with the tensile force direction. However, the direction of the main crack propagation is always along the direction vertical to the tensile force. {yields} The cracks may propagate in discontinuous way too. The dislocations pile up inversely in front of the crack tip. The propagation process of crack is that the crack tip is blunt at first. Then, with the increase of load, the new crack tip forms in the blunt crack firstly, then propagates and is blunt again. So back and forth, the cracks propagate forward continuously. - Abstract: Twin-roll strip casting technology is a new one to produce austenite stainless steel strip directly. However, during this process, the cracking occurs usually on the surface of the steel strip. The technique of in situ tension in transmission electron microscope was used to observe and analyze the crack initiation and propagation in austenite stainless steel produced by twin-roll strip casting technology in this work. The results show that the crack initiates in dislocation free-zone firstly and then propagates along the direction vertical to the tensile force. The crack may propagate in continuous propagation way and discontinuous one respectively

  10. The Prediction of Long-Term Thermal Aging in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yang, Ying; Lach, Timothy G.

    2017-02-15

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) materials are extensively used for many massive primary coolant system components of light water reactors (LWRs) including coolant piping, valve bodies, pump casings, and piping elbows. Many of these components are operated in complex and persistently damaging environments of elevated temperature, high pressure, corrosive environment, and sometimes radiation for long periods of time. Since a large number of CASS components are installed in every nuclear power plant and replacing such massive components is prohibitively expensive, any significant degradation in mechanical properties that affects structural integrity, cracking resistance in particular, of CASS components will raise a serious concern on the performance of entire power plant. The CASS materials for nuclear components are highly corrosion-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with 300 series stainless steel compositions and mostly austenite (γ)–ferrite (δ) duplex structures, which result from the casting processes consisting of alloy melting and pouring or injecting liquid metal into a static or spinning mold. Although the commonly used static and centrifugal casting processes enable the fabrication of massive components with proper resistance to environmental attacks, the alloying and microstructural conditions are not highly controllable in actual fabrication, especially in the casting processes of massive components. In the corrosion-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni alloy system, the minor phase (i.e., the δ-ferrite phase) is inevitably formed during the casting process, and is in a non-equilibrium state subject to detrimental changes during exposure to elevated temperature and/or radiation. In general, relatively few critical degradation modes are expected within the current design lifetime of 40 years, given that the CASS components have been processed properly. It has been well known, however, that both the thermal aging and the neutron irradiation can cause degradation of static

  11. Heat sink welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes to control distortion and residual stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, H.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Materials Technology Div., Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2007-07-01

    Construction of India's Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) involves extensive welding of austenitic stainless steels pipes of different dimensions. Due to high thermal expansion coefficient and poor thermal conductivity of this class of steels, welding can result in significant distortion of these pipes. Attempts to arrest this distortion can lead to high levels of residual stresses in the welded parts. Heat sink welding is one of the techniques often employed to minimize distortion and residual stress in austenitic stainless steel pipe welding. This technique has also been employed to repair welding of the piping of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) subjected to radiation induced intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In the present study, a comparison of the distortion in two pipe welds, one made with heat sink welding and another a normal welds. Pipes of dimensions 350{phi} x 250(L) x 8(t) mm was fabricated from 316LN plates of dimensions 1100 x 250 x 8 mm by bending and long seam (L-seam) welding by SMAW process. Two fit ups with a root gap of 2 mm, land height of 1mm and a groove angle of 70 were prepared using these pipes for circumferential seam (C-seam) welding. Dimensions at predetermined points in the fit up were made before and after welding to check the variation in radius, circumference and and ovality of the pipes. Root pass for both the pipe fit up were carried out using conventional GTAW process with 1.6 mm AWS ER 16-8-2 as consumables. Welding of one of the pipe fit ups were completed using conventions GTAW process while the other was completed using heat sink welding. For second and subsequent layers of welding using this process, water was sprayed at the root side of the joint while welding was in progress. Flow rate of the water was {proportional_to}6 1/minute. Welding parameters employed were same as those used for the other pipe weld. Results of the dimensional measurements showed that there is no circumferential shrinkage in

  12. Conduction mechanism in passive films on austenitic stainless steels in sulphate solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Betova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The passive state of three commercial highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels is studied by voltammetric, contact electric resistance and impedance measurements in 0.5 M sulphate solutions (pH 2-7. The three materials self-passivate and are susceptible to transpassive dissolution. The electric properties of the passive films formed are only slightly dependent on alloy composition. The impedance response can be interpreted as due to both the electronic properties of a thin semiconductor film of variable stoichiometry and the ionic defect migration through that film limiting the metal dissolution rate in the passive state. A range of kinetic, transport and structural parameters characterising the passive film and its interfaces with the underlying alloys and the electrolyte solution are determined by a quantitative comparison of the Mixed-Conduction Model to the experimental steady-state current and impedance data in a wide potential range. The relevance of the parameter values and the prospects of using the proposed approach to predict the steady-state metal dissolution rate and thus the general corrosion behaviour of stainless steels are discussed.

  13. Comparability and accuracy of nitrogen depth profiling in nitrided austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manova, D. [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Díaz, C. [AIN Centro de Ingeniería Avanzada de Superficies, 31191 Cordovilla, Pamplona (Spain); Pichon, L. [Institut P' , UPR3346 CNRS-Université de Poitiers-ISAE-ENSMA, Bat. SP2MI, Téléport 2, Boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, BP30179, 86962 Chasseneuil Futuroscope Cedex (France); Abrasonis, G. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Mändl, S., E-mail: stephan.maendl@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    A comparative study of nitrogen depth profiles in low energy ion implantation nitrided austenitic stainless steel 1.4301 by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) is presented. All methods require calibration either from reference samples or known scattering or reaction cross sections for the nitrogen concentration, while the methods producing a sputter crater – SIMS and GDOES – need additional conversion from sputter time to depth. NRA requires an assumption of material density for a correct conversion from the ‘natural’ units inherent to all ion beam analysis methods into ‘conventional’ depth units. It is shown that a reasonable agreement of the absolute concentrations and very good agreement of the layer thickness is obtained. The observed differences in broadening between the nitrogen distribution near the surface and the deeper region of the nitrided layer–steel interface are discussed on the basis of surface contaminations, surface roughening and energy straggling effects.

  14. Partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atabaki, M. Mazar, E-mail: m.mazaratabaki@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University Technology Malaysia, 81310 (Malaysia); Hanzaei, A. Talebi [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    An innovative method was applied for bonding Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321 using an active titanium interlayer. Specimens were joined by a partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding method in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures under 1 MPa dynamic pressure of contact. The influence of different bonding temperatures on the microstructure, microindentation hardness, joint strength and interlayer thickness has been studied. The diffusion of Fe, Cr, Ni and Zr has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy elemental analyses. Results showed that control of the heating and cooling rate and 20 min soaking at 1223 K produces a perfect joint. However, solid-state diffusion of the melting point depressant elements into the joint metal causes the solid/liquid interface to advance until the joint is solidified. The tensile strength of all the bonded specimens was found around 480-670 MPa. Energy dispersive spectroscopy studies indicated that the melting occurred along the interface of the bonded specimens as a result of the transfer of atoms between the interlayer and the matrix during bonding. This technique provides a reliable method of bonding zirconium alloy to stainless steel.

  15. Creep-fatigue damage characteristics for a welded cylindrical structure of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeo Yeon; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Seok Hoon; Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Jae Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    In the design and assessment of a high temperature structure, it is important to ensure the structural integrity for the welded joint subjected to a creep-fatigue load because a statistical investigation shows that 29 events out of 46 leaks in liquid metal reactors were caused at the welded joints. As for the structural integrity due to thermal ratchet load at the welded joint, KAERI has performed the test and analysis work for a cylindrical structure with welded joints. As a continuation of the study on welded joints at a high temperature structure, a creep-fatigue structural test and analysis work is now on-going and this paper present the interim findings for the structural test and analysis work. Recently the structural and analysis work for the Y-piece made of a 316L stainless steel structure has been carried out. The objectives of the present structural creep-fatigue test with the welded cylindrical specimen are to compare the creep-fatigue damage mechanisms for the 304 and 316L stainless steels, to compare the different behavior of the welding methods in a high temperature austenitic structures and to quantify the conservatism of the design guidelines for a high temperature structure.

  16. Strengthening of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni cast austenite stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.Q., E-mail: yqwang@ahut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan, Anhui, 243002 (China); Han, J. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang, B., E-mail: byang@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, X.T. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-10-15

    The strengthening mechanism of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni cast austenite stainless steel used for primary coolant pipes of nuclear power plants has been investigated. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths of aged specimens increased comparing with those of the unaged ones. It was found that the increase of strengths is due to the hard and brittle (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure which decomposed from α phase in the steel. Fracture surfaces of specimens after in situ tensile test showed that the inhibition of (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure on the dislocation movements was more significant than ferrite although cracks started predominately at σ/γ{sub 2} interfaces. The (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure behaves like a fiber reinforced composite material. - Highlights: • The strengthening mechanism of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni CASS is investigated. • The yield and ultimate tensile strengths increase with increasing of σ phase. • The increase of strengths is due to hard and brittle (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure. • The (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure in CASS behaves like a fibre reinforced composite material. • The σ/γ{sub 2} and α/σ/γ{sub 2} boundaries hinder the movement of dislocation.

  17. Microstructural changes induced near crack tip during corrosion fatigue tests in austenitic-ferritic steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołebiowski, B; Swiatnicki, W A; Gaspérini, M

    2010-03-01

    Microstructural changes occurring during fatigue tests of austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel (DSS) in air and in hydrogen-generating environment have been investigated. Hydrogen charging of steel samples during fatigue crack growth (FCG) tests was performed by cathodic polarization of specimens in 0.1M H(2)SO(4) aqueous solution. Microstructural investigations of specimens after FCG tests were carried out using transmission electron microscopy to reveal the density and arrangement of dislocations formed near crack tip. To determine the way of crack propagation in the microstructure, electron backscatter diffraction investigations were performed on fatigue-tested samples in both kinds of environment. To reveal hydrogen-induced phase transformations the atomic force microscopy was used. The above investigations allowed us to define the character of fatigue crack propagation and microstructural changes near the crack tip. It was found that crack propagation after fatigue tests in air is accompanied with plastic deformation; a high density of dislocations is observed at large distance from the crack. After fatigue tests performed during hydrogen charging the deformed zone containing high density of dislocations is narrow compared to that after fatigue tests in air. It means that hydrogenation leads to brittle character of fatigue crack propagation. In air, fatigue cracks propagate mostly transgranularly, whereas in hydrogen-generating environment the cracks have mixed transgranular/interfacial character.

  18. Welding of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel with Activated Tungsten Inert Gas Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, E.; Ebrahimi, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    The use of activating flux in TIG welding process is one of the most notable techniques which are developed recently. This technique, known as A-TIG welding, increases the penetration depth and improves the productivity of the TIG welding. In the present study, four oxide fluxes (SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO) were used to investigate the effect of activating flux on the depth/width ratio and mechanical property of 316L austenitic stainless steel. The effect of coating density of activating flux on the weld pool shape and oxygen content in the weld after the welding process was studied systematically. Experimental results indicated that the maximum depth/width ratio of stainless steel activated TIG weld was obtained when the coating density was 2.6, 1.3, 2, and 7.8 mg/cm2 for SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO, respectively. The certain range of oxygen content dissolved in the weld, led to a significant increase in the penetration capability of TIG welds. TIG welding with active fluxes can increase the delta-ferrite content and improves the mechanical strength of the welded joint.

  19. Analysis of the strain induced martensitic transformation in austenitic steel subjected to dynamic perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaera R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and numerical analysis on the martensitic transformation in AISI 304 steel sheets subjected to perforation by conical and hemispherical projectiles is reported. Two target thicknesses are considered, 0.5 and 1.0 mm, and impact velocities range from 35 to 200 m/s. The perforation mechanisms are identified and the effect of the projectile nose-shape on the ability of the target for energy absorption is evaluated. Martensite has been detected in all the impacted samples and the role played by the projectile nose-shape on the transformation is highlighted. A 3D model implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit allowed to simulate the perforation tests. The material is defined through a constitutive description developed by the authors to describe the strain induced martensitic transformation taking place in metastable austenitic steels at high strain rates. The numerical results are compared with the experimental evidence and satisfactory matching is obtained. The numerical model succeeds in describing the perforation mechanisms associated to each projectile-target configuration analysed.

  20. Characterization of Bimetallic Castings with an Austenitic Working Surface Layer and an Unalloyed Cast Steel Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the technology of bimetallic castings based on the founding method of layer coating directly in the cast process of the so-called method of mold cavity preparation. The prepared castings consist of two fundamental parts, i.e., the base and the working surface layer. The base part of the bimetallic casting is typical foundry material, i.e., unalloyed cast steel, whereas the working layer is a plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X2CrNi 18-9. The quality of the joint between the base part and the working layer was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic non-destructive testing and structure examinations containing metallographic macro- and microscopic studies with the use of a light microscope (LOM) with microhardness measurements and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with microanalysis of the chemical composition (energy dispersive spectroscopy—EDS). On the basis of the obtained results it was confirmed that the decisive phenomena needed to create a permanent joint between the two components of the bimetallic casting are carbon and heat transport in the direction from the high-carbon and hot base material which was poured into the mold in the form of liquid metal to the low-carbon and cold material of the working layer which was placed in the mold cavity in the form of a monolithic insert.

  1. INVESTIGATING SPOT WELD GROWTH ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL (2 mm SHEETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NACHIMANI CHARDE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW has revolutionized automotive industries since early 1970s for its mechanical assemblies. To date one mechanical assembly out five is welded using spot welding technology in various industries and stainless steel became very popular among common materials. As such this research paper analyses the spot weld growth on 304 austenitic stainless steels with 2mm sample sheets. The growth of a spot weld is primarily determined by its parameters such as current, weld time, electrode tip and force. However other factors such as electrode deformations, corrosions, dissimilar materials and material properties are also affect the weld growth. This paper is intended to analyze only the effects of nuggets growth due to the current and weld time increment with constant force and unchanged electrode tips. A JPC 75kVA spot welder was used to accomplish it and the welded samples were undergone tensile test, hardness test and metallurgical test to characterize the formation of weld nuggets.

  2. Estimation of the kinetics of martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steels by conventional and novel approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirdel, M., E-mail: mshirdel1989@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: hmirzadeh@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parsa, M.H., E-mail: mhparsa@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-29

    A comparative study was carried out on the kinetics of the martensitic transformation in a 304L stainless steel during cold rolling by conventional and novel approaches. The phase analysis based on X-ray diffraction patterns and metallography and also magnetic measurements based on ferritescope readings were utilized to elucidate the kinetics of the martensitic transformation. A straightforward magnetic measurement approach for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite in metastable austenitic stainless steels has been introduced in this study. This technique collects the data throughout the bulk of the material to give a realistic estimate of the amount of ferromagnetic martensite. This is an advantage over the surface collecting methods such as ferritescope readings, which overestimates the amount of martensite due to its inhomogeneous distribution through the thickness based on the frictional effects between the rolls and the specimen surface. The proposed approach can be applied in various designs for static/continuous magnetic measurement of bulk materials that is advantageous compared with the conventional vibrating sample magnetometer technique which is useful for static measurement of bulk materials with specific shapes. Moreover, in analogy to ferritescope, the output data of the developed device is directly related to the amount of martensite.

  3. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 1014 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2. The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I—the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 1017 D/cm2); II—the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 1017 to 8 × 1017 D/cm2); III—the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 1017 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The resulting structure shows stability against the action of

  4. Deformation behavior around grain boundaries for SCC propagation in hardened low-carbon austenitic stainless steel by micro hardness test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, N.; Hayakawa, M. [National Inst. for Materials Science (NIMS), Ibaraki (Japan); Tsukada, T; Kaji, Y.; Miwa, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki (Japan); Ando, M.; Nakata, K. [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES), Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was found in shroud and PLR piping made of low-carbon austenitic stainless steels in Japanese BWR plants. The intergranular type (IG) SCC propagated in hardened heat affected zones (HAZ) around welds. Strength behavior and local plastic deformation for a low-carbon austenitic stainless steel 316L, rolled at the reductions in area of 10, 30% at room temperature to simulate the hardened HAZ, were measured by a micro-hardness test machine and observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The tensile deformation at yield point (0.2% plastic strain) had given to the work-hardened 316L to simulate the plastic zone at the crack tip. It is suggested that one of the IGSCC propagation mechanism for 316L was related with the intergranular strength behavior and local plastic deformation around grain boundaries. (author)

  5. Cyclic deformation behaviour of three austenitic cast CrMnNi TRIP/TWIP steels with various Ni content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glage, A.; Weidner, A.; Biermann, H. [Technische Universitaet Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Institute of Materials Engineering

    2011-09-15

    This study presents the cyclic deformation behaviour of three high-alloyed austenitic cast steels which are characterized by different chemical compositions leading to different austenite stabilities and stacking fault energies. Thus, depending on the chemical composition different deformation mechanisms arise which have a significant influence on the cyclic deformation behaviour and life time relations. The materials were characterized under total-strain control. The fatigue life relations of Basquin and Manson-Coffin are applied successfully for all steel variants. The cyclic stress-strain response is described using the Ramberg-Osgood relationship. It is shown that the parameters n' and K' depend strongly on the accumulated plastic strain {lambda}{sub p}. The mechanical properties are discussed together with microstructural investigations of deformation structures and martensitic transformations as well as twinning, respectively. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. The influence of fire exposure on austenitic stainless steel for pressure vessel fitness-for-service assessment: Experimental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Shu, Wenhua; Zuo, Yantian

    2017-04-01

    The austenitic stainless steels are widely applied to pressure vessel manufacturing. The fire accident risk exists in almost all the industrial chemical plants. It is necessary to make safety evaluation on the chemical equipment including pressure vessels after fire. Therefore, the present research was conducted on the influences of fire exposure testing under different thermal conditions on the mechanical performance evolution of S30408 austenitic stainless steel for pressure vessel equipment. The metallurgical analysis described typical appearances in micro-structure observed in the material suffered by fire exposure. Moreover, the quantitative degradation of mechanical properties was investigated. The material thermal degradation mechanism and fitness-for-service assessment process of fire damage were further discussed.

  7. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of austenitic stainless steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Roa, A. S.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. NRC

    2010-12-15

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods changes the microstructure (radiation hardening) and microchemistry (radiation-induced segregation) of these steels, and degrades their fracture properties. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is another degradation process that affects LWR internal components exposed to neutron radiation. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to evaluate the effects of key parameters such as material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of these materials in LWR environments. The significance of microstructural and microchemistry changes in the material on IASCC susceptibility is also discussed. The results are used to determine (a) the threshold fluence for IASCC and (b) the disposition curves for cyclic and IASCC growth rates for irradiated SSs in LWR environments.

  8. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K., E-mail: okc@anl.gov [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rao, A.S. [Division of Engineering, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2011-02-28

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods changes the microstructure (radiation hardening) and microchemistry (radiation-induced segregation) of these steels, and degrades their fracture properties. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is another degradation process that affects LWR internal components exposed to neutron radiation. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to evaluate the effects of key parameters such as material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of these materials in LWR environments. The significance of microstructural and microchemistry changes in the material on IASCC susceptibility is also discussed. The results are used to determine (a) the threshold fluence for IASCC and (b) the disposition curves for cyclic and IASCC growth rates for irradiated SSs in LWR environments.

  9. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Various Nitrogen Contents Obtained by Prior High-Temperature Solution Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, high nitrogen steels (HNS) have been regarded as substitutes for conventional austenitic stainless steels because of their superior mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the main limitation to their wider application is their expensive production process....... As an alternative, high-temperature solution nitriding has been applied to produce HNS from three commercially available stainless steel grades (AISI 304L, AISI 316, and EN 1.4369). The nitrogen content in each steel alloy is varied and its influence on the mechanical properties and the stability of the austenite...

  10. Effect of strain rate and temperature on the susceptibility of 304 austenitic stainless steel to hydrogen embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Shawesh, F. [Petroleum Research Center, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1998-12-31

    Cathodic charging of notched 304 austenitic stainless steel specimens was carried out in aqueous solution of 1N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, containing 250 mg/l NaAsO{sub 2}, at room temperature and 70 {+-} 2 C while undergoing tensile straining over a wide range of crosshead speed (833 {micro}m/s, 83 {micro}m/s, 8.3 {micro}m/s, 833 nm/s, 83 nm/s and 9.8 nm/s). Test at room temperature 22 {+-} 2 C resulted in a marked reduction in the elongation to fracture ratio (Esol/Eair) by reducing the crosshead speed. However, little reduction was observed in the stress to fracture ratio ({sigma}sol/{sigma}air). Quasi cleavage and intergranular fractures where the predominant failure modes when tests were carried out at low crosshead speeds, The extent of these modes of fracture was observed to increase by reducing the crosshead speed. Cathodic charging of 304 austenitic stainless steel at 70 {+-} 2 C caused less reduction in the elongation to fracture ratio compared to the tests carried out at room temperature. Consistent with the room temperature test results, the reduction in the elongation to fracture ratio was found to increase with reduced crosshead speed. However, restoration in the elongation to fracture ratio was exhibited by 304 austenitic stainless steel specimens tested at the lowest crosshead speed (9.8 nm/s). These results are in good agreement with the finding that hydrogen embrittlement is temperature and strain dependent. Quasi cleavage fracture associated with the plastic deformation was the predominant failure mode exhibited by 304 austenitic stainless steel specimens tested at 70 {+-} 2 C at low crosshead speeds.

  11. Material Characterization of Fatigue Specimens made from Meta-stable Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niffenegger, M.; Grosse, M.; Kalkhof, D.; Leber, H. [Paul Scherrer Institut Villigen (Switzerland); Vincent, A.; Pasco, L.; Morin, M. [Insa de Lyon (France)

    2003-07-01

    The main objective of the EU-project CRETE (Contract No.: FIS5-1999-00280) was to assess the capability and the reliability of innovative NDT-inspection techniques for the detection of material degradation, induced by thermal fatigue and neutron irradiation, of metastable austenitic and ferritic low-alloy steel. Several project partners tested aged or irradiated samples, using various techniques (acoustic, magnetic and thermoelectric). However, these indirect methods require a careful interpretation of the measured signal in terms of micro-structural evolutions due to ageing of the material. Therefore the material had to be characterized in its undamaged, as well as in its damaged state. The present report summarises only the material characterization of the fatigue specimens. It is issued simultaneously as an PSI Bericht and the CRETE work package 3 (WP3) report. Each partner according to their own specifications purchased three materials under investigation, namely AISI 347, AISI 321 and AISI 304L. After sending the material to PSI, all fatigue specimens were manufactured by the same Swiss company. Each partner was responsible for his fatigue tests which are documented in the report WP1, written by FANP. In order to characterize the material in its unfatigued as well as in its fatigued state and to consider microstructural changes related to fatigue damage the methods listed below were employed either by PSI or by INSA de Lyon: (1) Inductive Coupled Plasma Emission Photometry (ICP-OES) was applied to determine the chemical composition, (2) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for observing cracks, slip bands between grain and twin boundaries, - Ferromaster for measuring the magnetic permeability, (3) Physical Properties Measuring System (PPMS) for measuring magnetization characteristics, (4) Neutron- and advanced X-ray diffraction methods for the quantitative determination of martensite, - Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the observation of crystalline

  12. Crack growth behavior of warm-rolled 316L austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Jin, Hyung-Ha; Kwon, Junhyun; Choi, Min-Jae; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of warm rolling on the crack growth of 316L austenitic stainless steel, the crack growth rate was measured and the oxide structure was characterized in high-temperature hydrogenated water. The warm-rolled specimens showed a higher crack growth rate compared to the as-received specimens because the slip bands and dislocations produced during warm rolling served as paths for corrosion and cracking. The crack growth rate increased with the dissolved hydrogen concentration. This may be attributed to the decrease in performance and stability of the protective oxide layer formed on the surface of stainless steel in high-temperature water.

  13. Feasibility of surface-coated friction stir welding tools to join AISI 304 grade austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Lakshminarayanan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to develop the tools that are capable enough to withstand the shear, impact and thermal forces that occur during friction stir welding of stainless steels. The atmospheric plasma spray and plasma transferred arc hardfacing processes are employed to deposit refractory ceramic based composite coatings on the Inconel 738 alloy. Five different combinations of self-fluxing alloy powder and 60% ceramic reinforcement particulate mixtures are used for coating. The best friction stir welding tool selected based on tool wear analysis is used to fabricate the austenitic stainless steel joints.

  14. Effects of Heat Input on Microstructure, Corrosion and Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of input heat of different welding processes on the microstructure, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS are reviewed. Austenitic stainless steel (ASS is welded using low-heat inputs. However, owing to differences in the physical metallurgy between ASS and DSS, low-heat inputs should be avoided for DSS. This review highlights the differences in solidification mode and transformation characteristics between ASS and DSS with regard to the heat input in welding processes. Specifically, many studies about the effects of heat energy input in welding process on the pitting corrosion, intergranular stress, stresscorrosion cracking, and mechanical properties of weldments of DSS are reviewed.

  15. Thermally Stable Ni-rich Austenite Formed Utilizing Multistep Intercritical Heat Treatment in a Low-Carbon 10 Wt Pct Ni Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Divya; Isheim, Dieter; Zhang, Xian J.; Ghosh, Gautam; Seidman, David N.

    2017-08-01

    Austenite reversion and its thermal stability attained during the transformation is key to enhanced toughness and blast resistance in transformation-induced-plasticity martensitic steels. We demonstrate that the thermal stability of Ni-stabilized austenite and kinetics of the transformation can be controlled by forming Ni-rich regions in proximity of pre-existing (retained) austenite. Atom probe tomography (APT) in conjunction with thermodynamic and kinetic modeling elucidates the role of Ni-rich regions in enhancing growth kinetics of thermally stable austenite, formed utilizing a multistep intercritical ( Quench- Lamellarization- Tempering (QLT)-type) heat treatment for a low-carbon 10 wt pct Ni steel. Direct evidence of austenite formation is provided by dilatometry, and the volume fraction is quantified by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results indicate the growth of nm-thick austenite layers during the second intercritical tempering treatment (T-step) at 863 K (590 °C), with austenite retained from first intercritical treatment (L-step) at 923 K (650 °C) acting as a nucleation template. For the first time, the thermal stability of austenite is quantified with respect to its compositional evolution during the multistep intercritical treatment of these steels. Austenite compositions measured by APT are used in combination with the thermodynamic and kinetic approach formulated by Ghosh and Olson to assess thermal stability and predict the martensite-start temperature. This approach is particularly useful as empirical relations cannot be extrapolated for the highly Ni-enriched austenite investigated in the present study.

  16. Effect of heat treatment on an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel evaluated by the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghanizadeh, Abbas; Farzi, Abolfazl [Islamic Azad Univ., Esfarayen (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2016-07-01

    The properties of metals can be substantially changed by various methods, one of them is using heat treatment processes. Moreover, ultrasonic testing is the most preferred and effective, nondestructive testing technique for characterization of mechanical material properties. Austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 serves in many applications due to high strength and corrosion resistance. In certain applications, it is important to evaluate the mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel. In this study, the ultrasonic method (attenuation measurement technique) is used to evaluate the hardness of AISI 304 stainless steel samples which were heat treated at different levels. Due to the heat treatment process, each sample has its specific microstructure and hardness which attenuate ultrasonic waves appropriately. The ultrasonic and hardness test show that it is possible to evaluate the hardness of AISI 304 stainless steel by ultrasonic attenuation coefficient. In addition, the relationship between ultrasonic attenuation coefficients and time of heat treatment is investigated.

  17. New developments for the ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassignole, Bertrand; Doudet, Loic; Dupond, Olivier; Fouquet, Thierry; Richard, Benoit [Electricite de France - EDF, 2, rue Louis-Murat, 75008 Paris (France)

    2006-07-01

    EDF R and D undertakes studies in non destructive testing (NDT) for better understanding the influence of various parameters (material, type of defect, geometry) on the 'controllability' of the critical components for nuclear safety. In the field of ultrasonic testing, one of the principal research orientations is devoted to the study of the austenitic stainless steel welds of the primary cooling system. Indeed, the structure of these welds present characteristics making difficult their examination, for example: - a strong anisotropy of the properties of elasticity which, coupled with the heterogeneity of the grain orientations, can involve phenomena of skewing, division and distortion of the beam; - a significant scattering of the waves by the grains involving an high attenuation and sometimes backscattered signals. For several years, actions have been launched to improve comprehension of these disturbing phenomena and to evaluate the controllability of those welds. This work is based on the one hand on experimental analyses on representative mock-ups and on the other hand on the developments of modelling codes taking into account the characteristics of the materials. We present in this document a synthesis of this work by developing the following points in particular: - a description of the phenomena of propagation; - the works undertaken to characterize the structure of the welds; - an example of study coupling experimental and modelling analyses for a butt weld achieved by manual arc welding with coated electrodes. The paper has the following contents: 1. Context; 2. Presentation of the problem; 3. Characterization of austenitic welds; 4. From comprehension to industrial application; 5. Conclusion and perspectives; 5. Conclusion and perspectives. This synthesis shows that each austenitic stainless steel weld is a particular case for the ultrasonic testing. This work allowed to better apprehend the disturbances of the ultrasonic propagation in the

  18. Plastic strain characterization in austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Maderuelo, A.; Castro, L.; de Diego, G.

    2011-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by cold work and causes many problems in components of the nuclear power plants. Besides, during manufacturing, installation, welding and service of the material, residual strains can be produced increasing the susceptibility to SCC. For this reason, it is important to characterize the degree of plastic strain due to dislocation accumulation in each crystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM), has been a great advance in this field because it enables to estimate the plastic strain in a quick and easy way. Nevertheless, over the last few years, a lot of different mathematical expressions to estimate the plastic strain have appeared in the literature. This situation hinders the election of one of them by a novel scientist in this field. Therefore, in this paper some of the more common expressions used in the calculation of the angular misorientation have been presented and discussed in order to clarify their more important aspects. Then, using one of these expressions (average local misorientation), curves relating misorientation density with known levels of strain will be obtained for an austenitic stainless steel 304L and nickel base alloy 690, which have shown a linear behaviour that is in good agreement with results found in the literature. Finally, using curves obtained in previous steps, levels of plastic strain in a plate of nickel base alloy 600 welded with weld metal 182 were estimated between 8 and 10% for a high temperature mill annealing sample.

  19. Microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with triple-beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shozo; Miwa, Yukio; Yamaki, Daiju [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Zhang Yichuan

    1997-03-01

    An austenitic stainless steel was simultaneously irradiated with nickel, helium and hydrogen ions at the temperature range of 573-673 K. The damage level and injected concentration of He and H ions in the triple-beam irradiated region are 57 dpa, 19000 and 18000 at.ppm, respectively. Following to irradiation, the cross sectional observation normal to the incident surface of the specimen was carried out with a transmission electron microscope. Two bands parallel to the incident surface were observed in the irradiated specimen, which consist of dislocation loops and lines of high number density. These locate in the range of the depth of 0.4 to 1.3 {mu}m and 1.8 to 2.4 {mu}m from the incident surface, respectively. The region between two bands, which corresponds to the triple beam irradiated region, shows very low number density of dislocations than that in each band. Observation with higher magnification of this region shows that fine cavities with high number density uniformly distribute in the matrix. (author)

  20. Improved Accident Tolerance of Austenitic Stainless Steel Cladding through Colossal Supersaturation with Interstitial Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Frank [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-10-13

    We proposed a program-supporting research project in the area of fuel-cycle R&D, specifically on the topic of advanced fuels. Our goal was to investigate whether SECIS (surface engineering by concentrated interstitial solute – carbon, nitrogen) can improve the properties of austenitic stainless steels and related structural alloys such that they can be used for nuclear fuel cladding in LWRs (light-water reactors) and significantly excel currently used alloys with regard to performance, safety, service life, and accident tolerance. We intended to demonstrate that SECIS can be adapted for post-processing of clad tubing to significantly enhance mechanical properties (hardness, wear resistance, and fatigue life), corrosion resistance, resistance to stress–corrosion cracking (hydrogen-induced embrittlement), and – potentially – radiation resistance (against electron-, neutron-, or ion-radiation damage). To test this hypothesis, we measured various relevant properties of the surface-engineered alloys and compared them with corresponding properties of the non–treated, as-received alloys. In particular, we studied the impact of heat exposure corresponding to BWR (boiling-water reactor) working and accident (loss-of-coolant) conditions and the effect of ion irradiation.

  1. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro, E-mail: chimi.yasuhiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kitsunai, Yuji [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kasahara, Shigeki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Yutaka [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%–2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps. - Highlights: • Visible step structures depend on the neutron dose and the applied strain. • Local strain at grain boundaries was accumulated with the neutron dose. • Oxide thickness increases with neutron dose and local strain at grain boundaries. • No penetrative oxidation was observed along grain boundaries or surface steps.

  2. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, K.; Ioka, I.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hamada, A.; Hishinuma, A. [and others

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small for not only base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  3. Influence of Localized Plasticity on IASCC Sensitivity of Austenitic Stainless Steels under PWR Primary Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cissé, Sarata; Tanguy, Benoit; Laffont, Lydia; Lafont, Marie-Christine; Guerre, Catherine; Andrieu, Eric

    The sensibility of precipitation-strengthened A286 austenitic stainless steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) is studied by means of Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT). First, alloy cold working by Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) is investigated. Fatigue tests under plastic strain control are performed at different strain levels (Δ ɛp/2=0.2%, 0.5% and 0.8%) in order to establish correlation between stress softening and deformation microstructure resulting from LCF tests. Deformed microstructures have been identified through TEM investigations. Three states of cyclic behaviour for precipitation-strengthened A286 have been identified: hardening, cyclic softening and finally saturation of softening. It is shown that the A286 alloy cyclic softening is due to microstructural features such as defects — free deformation bands resulting from dislocations motion along family plans , that swept defects or γ' precipitates and lead to deformation localization. In order to quantify effects of plastic localized deformation on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of the A286 alloy in PWR primary water, slow strain rate tests are conducted. For each cycling conditions, two specimens at a similar stress level are tested: the first containing free precipitate deformation bands, the other not significant of a localized deformation state. SSRT tests are still in progress.

  4. Microstructure of Al-Si Slurry Coatings on Austenitic High-Temperature Creep Resisting Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka E. Kochmańska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of microstructural examinations on slurry aluminide coatings using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction. Aluminide coatings were produced in air atmosphere on austenitic high-temperature creep resisting cast steel. The function of aluminide coatings is the protection of the equipment components against the high-temperature corrosion in a carburising atmosphere under thermal shock conditions. The obtained coatings had a multilayered structure composed of intermetallic compounds. The composition of newly developed slurry was powders of aluminium and silicon; NaCl, KCl, and NaF halide salts; and a water solution of a soluble glass as an inorganic binder. The application of the inorganic binder in the slurry allowed to produce the coatings in one single step without additional annealing at an intermediate temperature as it is when applied organic binder. The coatings were formed on both: the ground surface and on the raw cast surface. The main technological parameters were temperature (732–1068°C and time of annealing (3.3–11.7 h and the Al/Si ratio (4–14 in the slurry. The rotatable design was used to evaluate the effect of the production parameters on the coatings thickness. The correlation between the technological parameters and the coating structure was determined.

  5. Mechanism-Based Modeling for Low Cycle Fatigue of Cast Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; Sloss, Clayton

    2017-09-01

    A mechanism-based approach—the integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT)—is used to model low cycle fatigue behavior of 1.4848 cast austenitic steel over the temperature range from room temperature (RT) to 1173 K (900 °C) and the strain rate range from of 2 × 10-4 to 2 × 10-2 s-1. The ICFT formulates the material's constitutive equation based on the physical strain decomposition into mechanism strains, and the associated damage accumulation consisting of crack nucleation and propagation in coalescence with internally distributed damage. At room temperature, the material behavior is controlled by plasticity, resulting in a rate-independent and cyclically stable behavior. The material exhibits significant cyclic hardening at intermediate temperatures, 673 K to 873 K (400 °C to 600 °C), with negative strain rate sensitivity, due to dynamic strain aging. At high temperatures >1073 K (800 °C), time-dependent deformation is manifested with positive rate sensitivity as commonly seen in metallic materials at high temperature. The ICFT quantitatively delineates the contribution of each mechanism in damage accumulation, and predicts the fatigue life as a result of synergistic interaction of the above identified mechanisms. The model descriptions agree well with the experimental and fractographic observations.

  6. Methods for the In-Situ Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramuhalli, P.; Good, M. S.; Harris, R. J.; Bond, L. J.; Ruud, C. O.; Diaz, A. A.; Anderson, M. T.

    2011-06-01

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) that was commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. Its engineering properties made it a material of choice for selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems. However, the material manufacturing and fabrication processes result in a variety of coarse-grain microstructures that make current ultrasonic in-service inspection of components quite challenging. To address inspection needs, new ultrasonic inspection approaches are being sought. However, overcoming the deleterious and variable effects of the microstructure on the interrogating ultrasonic beam may require knowledge of the microstructure, for potential optimization of inspection parameters to enhance the probability of detection (POD). The ability to classify microstructure type (e.g. polycrystalline or columnar) has the potential to guide selection of optimal NDE approaches. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic and electromagnetic methods for classifying CASS microstructures, when making measurements from the outside surface of the component. Results to date demonstrate the potential of these measurements to discriminate between two consistent microstructures—equiaxed-grain material versus columnar-grain material. The potential for fusion of ultrasonic and electromagnetic measurements for in-situ microstructure characterization in CASS materials will be explored.

  7. Thermomechanical processing optimization for 304 austenitic stainless steel using artificial neural network and genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wen; Yang, Sen

    2016-12-01

    Thermomechanical processing has an important effect on the grain boundary character distribution. To obtain the optimal thermomechanical processing parameters is the key of grain boundary engineering. In this study, genetic algorithm (GA) based on artificial neural network model was proposed to optimize the thermomechanical processing parameters. In this model, a back-propagation neural network (BPNN) was established to map the relationship between thermomechanical processing parameters and the fraction of low-Σ CSL boundaries, and GA integrated with BPNN (BPNN/GA) was applied to optimize the thermomechanical processing parameters. The validation of the optimal thermomechanical processing parameters was verified by an experiment. Moreover, the microstructures and the intergranular corrosion resistance of the base material (BM) and the materials produced by the optimal thermomechanical processing parameters (termed as the GBEM) were studied. Compared to the BM specimen, the fraction of low-Σ CSL boundaries was increased from 56.8 to 77.9% and the random boundary network was interrupted by the low-Σ CSL boundaries, and the intergranular corrosion resistance was improved in the GBEM specimen. The results indicated that the BPNN/GA model was an effective and reliable means for the thermomechanical processing parameters optimization, which resulted in improving the intergranular corrosion resistance in 304 austenitic stainless steel.

  8. Improved austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications. [Improved stress-rupture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; .01-.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; .03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, 0; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P + wt. % B + wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  9. Assessment of the dislocation bias in fcc metals and extrapolation to austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Zhongwen, E-mail: zhongwen@kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Reactor Physics, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Sandberg, Nils [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Reactor Physics, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Solna Strandväg 96, SE-171 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Terentyev, Dmitry [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Samuelsson, Karl [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Reactor Physics, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bonny, Giovanni [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Olsson, Pär, E-mail: polsson@kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Reactor Physics, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    A systematic study of dislocation bias has been performed using a method that combines atomistic and elastic dislocation-point defect interaction models with a numerical solution of the diffusion equation with a drift term. Copper, nickel and aluminium model lattices are used in this study, covering a wide range of shear moduli and stacking fault energies. It is found that the dominant parameter for the dislocation bias in fcc metals is the width of the stacking fault ribbon. The variation in elastic constants does not strongly impact the dislocation bias value. As a result of this analysis and its extrapolation, the dislocation bias of the widely applied austenitic stainless steels of 316 type is predicted to be about 0.1 at temperature close to the swelling peak (815 K) and typical dislocation density of 10{sup 14} m{sup −2}. This is in line with the bias calculated using the elastic interaction model, which implies that the prediction method can be used readily in other fcc systems even without EAM potentials. By comparing the bias values obtained using atomistic- and elastic interaction energies, about 20% discrepancy is found, therefore a more realistic bias value for the 316 type alloy is 0.08 in these conditions.

  10. Parametric optimization during machining of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel using CVD coated DURATOMIC cutting insert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kaladhar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Taguchi method is applied to determine the optimum process parameters for turning of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel on CNC lathe. A Chemical vapour deposition (CVD coated cemented carbide cutting insert is used which is produced by DuratomicTM technology of 0.4 and 0.8 mm nose radii. The tests are conducted at four levels of Cutting speed, feed and depth of cut. The influence of these parameters are investigated on the surface roughness and material removal rate (MRR. The Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA is also used to analyze the influence of cutting parameters during machining. The results revealed that cutting speed significantly (46.05% affected the machined surface roughness values followed by nose radius (23.7%. The influence of the depth of cut (61.31% in affecting material removal rate (MRR is significantly large. The cutting speed (20.40% is the next significant factor. Optimal range and optimal level of parameters are also predicted for responses.

  11. The Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensite Reverse Transformation in AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cios, G.; Tokarski, T.; Żywczak, A.; Dziurka, R.; Stępień, M.; Gondek, Ł.; Marciszko, M.; Pawłowski, B.; Wieczerzak, K.; Bała, P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study on the strain-induced martensitic transformation and reversion transformation of the strain-induced martensite in AISI 304 stainless steel using a number of complementary techniques such as dilatometry, calorimetry, magnetometry, and in-situ X-ray diffraction, coupled with high-resolution microstructural transmission Kikuchi diffraction analysis. Tensile deformation was applied at temperatures between room temperature and 213 K (-60 °C) in order to obtain a different volume fraction of strain-induced martensite (up to 70 pct). The volume fraction of the strain-induced martensite, measured by the magnetometric method, was correlated with the total elongation, hardness, and linear thermal expansion coefficient. The thermal expansion coefficient, as well as the hardness of the strain-induced martensitic phase was evaluated. The in-situ thermal treatment experiments showed unusual changes in the kinetics of the reverse transformation (α' → γ). The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the reverse transformation may be stress assisted—strains inherited from the martensitic transformation may increase its kinetics at the lower annealing temperature range. More importantly, the transmission Kikuchi diffraction measurements showed that the reverse transformation of the strain-induced martensite proceeds through a displacive, diffusionless mechanism, maintaining the Kurdjumov-Sachs crystallographic relationship between the martensite and the reverted austenite. This finding is in contradiction to the results reported by other researchers for a similar alloy composition.

  12. Microstructural and Surface Texture Analysis due to Machining in Super Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanad Alabdullah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inferior surface quality is a significant problem faced by machinist. The purpose of this study is to present a surface texture analysis undertaken as part of machinability assessment of Super Austenitic Stainless Steel alloy-AL6XN. The surface texture analysis includes measuring the surface roughness and investigating the microstructural behaviour of the machined surfaces. Eight milling trials were conducted using combination of cutting parameters under wet machining. An optical profilometer (noncontact was used to evaluate the surface texture at three positions. The surface texture was represented using the parameter, average surface roughness. Scanning Electron Microscope was utilised to inspect the machined surface microstructure and correlate the microstructure with the surface roughness. Results showed that maximum roughness values recorded at the three positions in the longitudinal direction (perpendicular to the machining grooves were 1.21 μm (trial 1, 1.63 μm (trial 6, and 1.68 μm (trial 7, respectively, whereas the roughness values were greatly reduced in the lateral direction. Also, results showed that the feed rate parameter significantly influences the roughness values compared to the other cutting parameters. The microstructure of the machined surfaces was distorted by the existence of cracks, deformed edges, and bands and wear deposition due to machining process.

  13. Effects of pre-creep on the dislocations of 316LN Austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Hai-xiang; Hui, Jun; Hua, Hou; Feng, Zai-xin; Xu, Xiao-long

    2017-09-01

    The 316LN Austenite stainless steels (316LNASS) were pre-creep treated, the evolution of microstructure were investigated. The samples were pre-creep at 593 K and from 500 to 2000 h at 873 K with a stress in the range of 20 to 150 MPa, Then the evolution of microstructure and precipitation were investigated by optical microscope (OM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that the crystal surface slipping resulted in dislocations and original dislocations decomposition during the pre-creep process, and generate quadrilateral or hexagonal dislocation network was obviously. The sub-grain boundary gradually became narrow with the increasing of pre-creep treatment time and temperature. When the pre-creep temperature was 593 K and 873 K, dislocation network gradually disappear with the increasing of pre-creep time and load. When the pre-creep temperature was 873 K under 120 MPa, and the treatment time was 2000 h, the hexagonal dislocation network (HDN) would completely disappeared. When the pre-creep temperature was 593 K under 20 MPa, and the treatment time was 500 h, the quadrilateral dislocation network (QDN) would completely disappeared.

  14. Experimental and numerical investigation of formability for austenitic stainless steel 316 at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mujahed Hussaini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sheet metal forming at elevated temperature is not much used in industries but it is going to be a very important process in the future. The present work is aimed to investigate the formability of austenitic stainless steel 316 at elevated temperatures. Limiting drawing ratio and thickness of the drawn cup are the indicators of formability in deep drawing. In the present investigation circular blanks are deep drawn at room temperature, 150 °C and 300 °C using a 20 ton hydraulic press coupled with a furnace. Finite element simulations are carried out using Dynaform with LS-Dyna solver. Simulations and experimental results show an increase in the limiting drawing ration as the temperature increases and a decrease in the thickness of the drawn cup without any fracture. An artificial neural network model is developed for the prediction of the cup thickness at different locations. Based on the input variables, such as distance from the center of the cup, temperature and LDR, a back propagation neural network model to predict the thickness as output was develop. The comparison between these sets of results indicates the reliability of the predictions. It was found that there is a good agreement between the experimental and predicted values.

  15. Residual Stresses Due to Circumferential Girth Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steel Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarak, Farzan

    Welding, as a joining method in fabrication of engineering products and structural elements, has a direct influence on thermo-mechanical behavior of components in numerous structural applications. Since these thermo-mechanical behaviors have a major role in the life of welding components, predicting thermo-mechanical effects of welding is a major factor in designing of welding components. One of the major of these effects is generation of residual stresses due to welding. These residual stresses are not the causes of failure in the components solely, but they will add to external loads and stresses in operating time. Since, experimental methods are time consuming and expensive, computational simulation of welding process is an effective method to calculate these residual stresses. This investigation focuses on the evaluation of residual stresses and distortions due to circumferential girth welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes using the commercial finite element software ESI Visual-Environment and SYSWELDRTM to simulate welding process. Of particular importance is the comparison of results from three different types of mechanics models: 1) Axisymmetric, 2) Shell, and 3) Full 3-D.

  16. Effect of initial grain size on dynamic recrystallization in high purity austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Wahabi, M. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB - Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain); Gavard, L. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Montheillet, F. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB - Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.maria.cabrera@upc.edu; Prado, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB - Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-15

    The influence of initial microstructure on discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) has been investigated by using high purity and ultra high purity austenitic stainless steels with various initial grain sizes. After uniaxial compression tests at constant strain rates and various temperatures, the steady state microstructure or the state corresponding to the maximum strain ({epsilon} = 1) attained in the test was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy aided with automated electron back scattering diffraction. Recrystallized grain size d {sub rec} and twin boundary fraction f {sub TB} measurements were carried out. The mechanical behavior was also investigated by comparing experimental stress-strain curves with various initial grain sizes. DDRX kinetics was described by the classical Avrami equation. It was concluded that larger initial grain sizes promoted a delay in the DDRX onset in the two alloys. It was also observed that the softening process progressed faster for smaller initial grain sizes. The effect of initial grain size is larger in the HP material and becomes more pronounced at low temperature.

  17. Steady state creep of austenitic steel 16Cr-12Ni-2. 5Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahutova, M.; Cadek, J.; Cerny, V.

    1983-01-01

    The steady state creep of austenitic steel 16Cr-12Ni-2.5Mo was investigated by the isothermal test technique at a temperature interval of 873 to 1023 K and applied stress interval of 150 to 400 MPa. The activation energy of creep corrected for the temperature dependence of the Young modulus was found higher than the activation enthalpy of the lattice diffusion to which the self-diffusion of all the components of solid solution (Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo) contributes. The stress sensitivity parameter of the steady state creep rate reaches values as high as 12.5; in conformity with the activation energy of creep increasing with applied stress, the stress sensitivity parameter decreases with increasing temperature. The effective stress as measured by the strain transient dip test technique increases both with increasing applied stress and increasing temperature. The changes of structure in the course of creep were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. It was found that the carbide M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ and the intermetallic phases chi and eta do not contribute to the creep resistivity of the steel under consideration neither directly, i.e., as obstacles to the dislocation glide, nor indirectly, i.e., by influencing the stability of dislocation substructure. Therefore, the idea of interaction creep strengthening has been accepted; this type of strengthening follows from an elastic interaction of Cr and Mo atoms with C atoms and an elastic interaction of Cr-C and Mo-C pairs with dislocations, though the values of the stress sensitivity parameter of steady state creep rate do not support this idea.

  18. Experimental Analysis of Residual Stresses in Samples of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welded on Martensitic Stainless Steel Used for Kaplan Blades Repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Cojocaru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses occur in materials as a result of mechanical processes: welding, machining, grinding etc. If residual stresses reach high values they can accelerate the occurrence of cracks and erosion of material. An experimental research was made in order to study the occurrence of residual stresses in the repaired areas of hydraulic turbine components damaged by cavitation erosion. An austenitic stainless steel was welded in various layer thicknesses on a martensitic stainless steel base. The residual stresses were determined using the hole drilling strain gage method.

  19. A low-temperature study to examine the role of epsilon-martensite during strain-induced transformations in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datta, K.; Delhez, R.; Bronsveld, P. M.; Beyer, J.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; Post, J.

    A low-temperature study of the mechanical behaviour of a metastable semi-austenitic stainless steel was carried out. This class of stainless steels is found to show a characteristic hump followed by softening in their stress-strain curves, especially at low temperatures, much like dynamically

  20. A low-temperature study to examine the role of epsilon-martensite during strain-induced transformations in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datta, K.; Delhez, R; Bronsveld, P.M.; Beyer, J.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Post, J.

    2009-01-01

    A low-temperature study of the mechanical behaviour of a metastable semi-austenitic stainless steel was carried out. This class of stainless steels is found to show a characteristic hump followed by softening in their stress–strain curves, especially at low temperatures, much like dynamically

  1. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Various Nitrogen Contents Obtained by Prior High-Temperature Solution Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, high nitrogen steels (HNS) have been regarded as substitutes for conventional austenitic stainless steels because of their superior mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the main limitation to their wider application is their expensive production process. As an altern...

  2. Biocompatibility studies of low temperature nitrided and collagen-I coated AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinesi, M; Stio, M; Treves, C; Borgioli, F

    2013-06-01

    The biocompatibility of austenitic stainless steels can be improved by means of surface engineering techniques. In the present research it was investigated if low temperature nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel may be a suitable substrate for bioactive protein coating consisting of collagen-I. The biocompatibility of surface modified alloy was studied using as experimental model endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) in culture. Low temperature nitriding produces modified surface layers consisting mainly of S phase, the supersaturated interstitial solid solution of nitrogen in the austenite lattice, which allows to enhance surface microhardness and corrosion resistance in PBS solution. The nitriding treatment seems to promote the coating with collagen-I, without chemical coupling agents, in respect of the untreated alloy. For biocompatibility studies, proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and secretion of two metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were determined. Experimental results suggest that the collagen protection may be favourable for endothelial cell proliferation and for the control of MMP-2 release.

  3. Carbon-content dependent effect of magnetic field on austenitic decomposition of steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaoxue, E-mail: zhangxiaoxue1213@gmail.com [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, University of Metz, 57045 Metz (France); Wang Shoujing, E-mail: wsj210725@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhang Yudong, E-mail: yudong.zhang@univ-metz.fr [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, University of Metz, 57045 Metz (France); Esling, Claude, E-mail: claude.esling@univ-metz.fr [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, University of Metz, 57045 Metz (France); Zhao Xiang, E-mail: zhaox@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zuo Liang, E-mail: lzuo@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2012-04-15

    The transformed microstructures of the high-purity Fe-0.12C alloy and Fe-0.36C alloy heat treated without and with a 12 T magnetic field have been investigated to explore the carbon-content dependent field effect on austenitic decomposition in steels. Results show that, the field-induced transformed morphology characteristics in different alloys differ from each other. In the Fe-0.12C alloy, the pearlite colonies are elongated along the field direction, and shaped by the chained and elongated proeutectoid ferrite grains in the field direction. However, in the Fe-0.36C alloy, the field mainly reduces the amount of Widmaenstatten ferrite and elongates the formed proeutectoid ferrite grains in the field direction. No clear field direction alignment is obtained. The magnetic field also demonstrates carbon-content dependent effect on the texture of the formed ferrite. It clearly enhances the Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 001 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket fiber of the ferrite in the transverse field direction in the Fe-0.36C alloy. This field effect is related to the crystal lattice distortion induced by carbon solution and this impact becomes stronger with the increase of the carbon content. For the Fe-0.12C alloy, this field effect is greatly reduced due to the reduced carbon oversaturation in ferrite and elevated formation temperature. The orientation relationships (ORs) between the pearlitic ferrite and the pearlitic cementite in both alloys are less affected by the magnetic field. No obvious changes in the either type of the appearing ORs and their number of occurrences are detected. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon-content dependent field effect on austenitic decomposition is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The field-induced morphology features vary with the carbon content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The field effect on ferrite texture is more pronounced in high carbon content alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic field hardly

  4. High temperature oxidation of alumina forming cast austenitic stainless steels within an environment of pure steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenzlow, Elmer A.

    Steam cracking of hydrocarbons in the petrochemical industry is a multibillion dollar industry. The processes performed in these plants create byproducts that negatively affect the integrity of stainless steel piping through high temperature corrosion. Alloys used presently in industry rely on the formation of chromium oxide (chromia) as a protective layer between the bulk metal pipe and chemical byproducts. However, chromia can become susceptible to attack from aggressive species such as carbon, water vapor, and sulfur compounds, thus creating a need for a better protection method. A new series of austenitic stainless steels have been developed in recent years that, rather than forming chromia, create a protective layer of aluminum oxide (alumina) under oxidative conditions. These alloys have high nickel content for the stabilization of the austenitic phase, and a more thermodynamically stable oxide layer relative to the traditional chromia formers. Consequently, alumina forming alloys have been proposed as replacements for chromia forming alloys in the petrochemical industry. General oxidation testing has been performed on alumina forming alloys under dry and 10% water vapor conditions. However, oxidation conditions in industry resemble a 100% steam environment. Therefore, test methods to mimic such conditions are needed so that alloys can be tested and developed further for these applications. Four alloys with aluminum contents ranging from 2.6 to 3.9 wt% were cut from centrifugally cast pipes and subjected to oxidation in an environment of pure steam for up to 30 hours, at temperatures of 800 °C and 950 °C. Samples were analyzed using Raman, SEM, and EDS and showed a continuous alumina layer free of cracks. The alumina layer thickness increased with time. Additionally, larger thicknesses were observed in samples oxidized at 950 °C from those of 800 °C. Thickness measurements were used to calculate parabolic and non-parabolic oxidation rate constants

  5. Elaboration of austenitic stainless steel samples with bimodal grain size distributions and investigation of their mechanical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipon, B.; de la Cruz, L. Garcia; Hug, E.; Keller, C.; Barbe, F.

    2017-10-01

    Samples of 316L austenitic stainless steel with bimodal grain size distributions are elaborated using two distinct routes. The first one is based on powder metallurgy using spark plasma sintering of two powders with different particle sizes. The second route applies the reverse-annealing method: it consists in inducing martensitic phase transformation by plastic strain and further annealing in order to obtain two austenitic grain populations with different sizes. Microstructural analy ses reveal that both methods are suitable to generate significative grain size contrast and to control this contrast according to the elaboration conditions. Mechanical properties under tension are then characterized for different grain size distributions. Crystal plasticity finite element modelling is further applied in a configuration of bimodal distribution to analyse the role played by coarse grains within a matrix of fine grains, considering not only their volume fraction but also their spatial arrangement.

  6. Effects of Thermocapillary Forces during Welding of 316L-Type Wrought, Cast and Powder Metallurgy Austenitic Stainless Steels

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This 27 km long accelerator requires 1248 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. The cold mass of the dipole magnets is closed by a shrinking cylinder with two longitudinal welds and two end covers at both extremities of the cylinder. The end covers, for which fabrication by welding, casting or Powder Metallurgy (PM) was considered, are dished-heads equipped with a number of protruding nozzles for the passage of the different cryogenic lines. Structural materials and welds must retain high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature. AISI 316L-type austenitic stainless steel grades have been selected because of their mechanical properties, ductility, weldability and stability of the austenitic phase against low-temperature spontaneous martensitic transformation. 316LN is chosen for the fabrication of the end covers, while the interconnection components to be welded on the protrud...

  7. In-Situ Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation Kinetics in an Austenitic Stainless Steel by Inductive Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Celada-Casero

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An inductive sensor developed by Philips ATC has been used to study in-situ the austenite (γ to martensite (α′ phase transformation kinetics during tensile testing in an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. A correlation between the sensor output signal and the volume fraction of α′-martensite has been found by comparing the results to the ex-situ characterization by magnetization measurements, light optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The sensor has allowed for the observation of the stepwise transformation behavior, a not-well-understood phenomena that takes place in large regions of the bulk material and that so far had only been observed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

  8. Kinetics analysis of two-stage austenitization in supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    that the austenitization kinetics is governed by Ni-diffusion and that slow transformation kinetics separating the two stages is caused by soft impingement in the martensite phase. Increasing the lath width in the kinetics model had a similar effect on the austenitization kinetics as increasing the heating-rate....

  9. Evaluation of strain-rate sensitivity of ion-irradiated austenitic steel using strain-rate jump nanoindentation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University Gokasho, Uji 611-0011, Kyoto (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University Gokasho, Uji 611-0011, Kyoto (Japan); Hamaguchi, Dai; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We examined strain-rate jump nanoindentation on ion-irradiated stainless steel. • We observed irradiation hardening of the ion-irradiated stainless steel. • We found that strain-rate sensitivity parameter was slightly decreased after the ion-irradiation. - Abstract: The present study investigated strain-rate sensitivity (SRS) of a single crystal Fe–15Cr–20Ni austenitic steel before and after 10.5 MeV Fe{sup 3+} ion-irradiation up to 10 dpa at 300 °C using a strain-rate jump (SRJ) nanoindentation test. It was found that the SRJ nanoindentation test is suitable for evaluating the SRS at strain-rates from 0.001 to 0.2 s{sup −1}. Indentation size effect was observed for depth dependence of nanoindentation hardness but not the SRS. The ion-irradiation increased the hardness at the shallow depth region but decreased the SRS slightly.

  10. Austenite stabilization and high strength-elongation product of a low silicon aluminum-free hot-rolled directly quenched and dynamically partitioned steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Xiao-Dong [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Xu, Yun-Bo, E-mail: yunbo_xu@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Yang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Zhi-Ping; Peng, Fei [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Ju, Xiao-Wei [Ceri Long Product Co., Ltd., Beijing 100176 (China); Wu, Di [State Key Laboratory of Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Microstructures composed of lath martensite and retained austenite with volume fraction between 8.0 vol.% and 12.0 vol.% were obtained in a low-C low-Si Al-free steel through hot-rolling direct quenching and dynamical partitioning (HDQ&DP) processes. The austenite stabilization mechanism in the low-C low-Si Al-free steel under the special dynamical partitioning processes is investigated by analyzing the carbon partition behavior from martensite to austenite and the carbide precipitation-coarsening behavior in martensite laths combining with the possible hot rolling deformation inheritance. Results show that the satisfying retained austenite amount in currently studied low-Si Al-free HDQ&DP steel is caused by the high-efficiency carbon enrichment in the 30–80 nm thick regions of austenite near the interfaces in the hot-rolled ultra-fast cooled structure and the avoidance of serious carbides coarsening during the continuous cooling procedures. The excellent strength-elongation product reaching up to 26,000 MPa% shows that the involved HDQ&DP process is a promising method to develop a new generation of advanced high strength steel. - Highlights: • HDQ&DP processes were applied to a low-C low-Si Al-free steel. • Effective partitioning time during the continuous cooling processes is 1–220 s. • Retained austenite with volume fraction between 8.0 vol. % and 12.0 vol. % has been obtained. • The special austenite stabilization mechanism has been expounded.

  11. Three-dimensional transient thermoelectric currents in deep penetration laser welding of austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming; Xiao, Jianzhong; Jiang, Ping

    2017-04-01

    The existence of thermoelectric currents (TECs) in workpieces during the laser welding of metals has been common knowledge for more than 15 years. However, the time-dependent evolutions of TECs in laser welding remain unclear. The present study developed a novel three-dimensional theoretical model of thermoelectric phenomena in the fiber laser welding of austenite stainless steel and used it to observe the time-dependent evolutions of TECs for the first time. Our model includes the complex physical effects of thermal, electromagnetic, fluid and phase transformation dynamics occurring at the millimeter laser ablated zone, which allowed us to simulate the TEC, self-induced magnetic field, Lorentz force, keyhole and weld pool behaviors varying with the welding time for different parameters. We found that TECs are truly three-dimensional, time-dependent, and uneven with a maximum current density of around 107 A/m2 located at the liquid-solid (L/S) interface near the front or bottom part of the keyhole at a laser power of 1.5 kW and a welding speed of 3 m/min. The TEC formed three-dimensional circulations moving from the melting front to solidification front in the solid part of workpiece, after which the contrary direction was followed in the liquid part. High frequency oscillation characteristics (2.2-8.5 kHz) were demonstrated in the TEC, which coincides with that of the keyhole instability (2.0-5.0 kHz). The magnitude of the self-induced magnetic field and Lorentz force can reach 0.1 mT and 1 kN/m3, respectively, which are both consistent with literature data. The predicted results of the weld dimensions by the proposed model agree well with the experimental results. Our findings could enhance the fundamental understanding of thermoelectric phenomena in laser welding.

  12. Corrosion behavior of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Yuji

    2014-05-01

    The effect of cold working on the corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) was studied to develop accelerator-driven systems for the transmutation of long-lived radioactive wastes and lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors. Corrosion tests on solution-treated, 20% cold-worked and 50% cold-worked 316SS and JPCA (15Cr-15Ni-Ti) were conducted in oxygen-controlled LBE. Slight ferritization caused by Ni dissolution and Pb-Bi penetration were observed for all specimens in the corrosion test conducted at 500 °C for 1000 h in liquid LBE with an intermediate oxygen concentration (1.4 × 10-7 wt.%). In the corrosion test performed at 550 °C for 1000 h in liquid LBE with a low oxygen concentration (4.2 × 10-9 wt.%), the depth of the ferritization of 316SS and JPCA increased with the extent of cold working. Only oxidation was observed in the corrosion test that was performed at 550 °C for 1000 h in liquid LBE with a high oxygen concentration (approximately 10-5 wt.%). Cold working accelerated the formation of the double layer oxide and increased the thickness of the oxide layer slightly. In contrast, the ferritization accompanied by Pb-Bi penetration was widely observed with oxidation for all specimens corrosion tested at 550 °C for 3000 h under the high-oxygen condition. Cold working increased the depth of the ferritization of 316SS and JPCA. It is considered that cold working accelerated the ferritization and Pb-Bi penetration through the enhanced dissolution of Ni into LBE due to an increase in the dislocation density under conditions in which the protective oxide layer was not formed in liquid LBE.

  13. Study on laser welding of austenitic stainless steel by varying incident angle of pulsed laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Bandyopadhyay, Asish

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, AISI 304 stainless steel sheets are laser welded in butt joint configuration using a robotic control 600 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. The objective of the work is of twofold. Firstly, the study aims to find out the effect of incident angle on the weld pool geometry, microstructure and tensile property of the welded joints. Secondly, a set of experiments are conducted, according to response surface design, to investigate the effects of process parameters, namely, incident angle of laser beam, laser power and welding speed, on ultimate tensile strength by developing a second order polynomial equation. Study with three different incident angle of laser beam 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg has been presented in this work. It is observed that the weld pool geometry has been significantly altered with the deviation in incident angle. The weld pool shape at the top surface has been altered from semispherical or nearly spherical shape to tear drop shape with decrease in incident angle. Simultaneously, planer, fine columnar dendritic and coarse columnar dendritic structures have been observed at 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg incident angle respectively. Weld metals with 85.5 deg incident angle has higher fraction of carbide and δ-ferrite precipitation in the austenitic matrix compared to other weld conditions. Hence, weld metal of 85.5 deg incident angle achieved higher micro-hardness of ∼280 HV and tensile strength of 579.26 MPa followed by 89.7 deg and 83 deg incident angle welds. Furthermore, the predicted maximum value of ultimate tensile strength of 580.50 MPa has been achieved for 85.95 deg incident angle using the developed equation where other two optimum parameter settings have been obtained as laser power of 455.52 W and welding speed of 4.95 mm/s. This observation has been satisfactorily validated by three confirmatory tests.

  14. Pitting corrosion in austenitic stainless steel water tanks of hotel trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The water storage tanks of hotel trains suffered pitting corrosion. To identify the cause, the tanks were subjected to a detailed metallographic study and the chemical composition of the austenitic stainless steels used in their construction was determined. Both the tank water and the corrosion products were further examined by physicochemical and microbiological testing. Corrosion was shown to be related to an incompatibility between the chloride content of the water and the base and filler metals of the tanks. These findings formed the basis of recommendations aimed at the prevention and control of corrosion in such tanks.

    Se han detectado problemas de corrosión por picaduras en los depósitos de agua de trenes hotel. Para identificar las causas se llevó a cabo un detallado estudio metalográfico así como de la composición química de los aceros inoxidables austeníticos utilizados en su construcción. También se realizaron estudios fisicoquímicos y microbiológicos de los productos de corrosión. Se ha encontrado que los problemas de corrosión están relacionados con la incompatibilidad entre el contenido en cloruros del agua y los metales base y de aporte de la soldadura de los tanques. En base a estos hallazgos se proponen una serie de recomendaciones encaminadas a la prevención y control de la corrosión de dichos depósitos.

  15. Effect of plasma arc welding variables on fusion zone grain size and hardness of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondapalli, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, pulsed current microplasma arc welding is carried out on AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel of 0.3 mm thickness. Peak current, Base current, Pulse rate and Pulse width are chosen as the input variables, whereas grain size and hardness are considered as output responses. Response surface method is adopted by using Box-Behnken Design, and in total 27 experiments are performed. Empirical relation between input and output response is developed using statistical software and analysis of variance (ANOVA) at 95% confidence level to check the adequacy. The main effect and interaction effect of input variables on output response are also studied.

  16. Grain-to-Grain Variations in NbC Particle Size Distributions in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Claire; Ralph, B.; Silverman, B.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative information has been obtained concerning the size distributions of NbC precipitate particles in different grains in a deformed and aged austenitic stainless steel specimen. The precipitate size distributions obtained differ from one grain to another. The average disparity measured...... between the mean precipitate sizes was a function of the distance betwen the grains compared. The results obtained are considered in terms of differences in precipitation behaviour due to variations in the levels of plastic strain in constituent grains of the deformed specimen....

  17. High temperature and stress corrosion cracking of 310S austenitic stainless steel in wet chloride corrosive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pornpibunsompop

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of 310S austenitic stainless steel in wet chloride environment at a high temperature was investigated. The result showed that high temperature corrosion products mostly consisted of ferrous oxides and chromium oxides. Chloride ions attacked a chromium passive film and strongly reacted with iron and chromium. As a result of metal chlorides being volatized, tunnel of pores inside corrosion layer existed. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking was observed. The oxide originated on surface could act as a crack initiator and a crack propagation would progress along grain boundaries and particularly along tunnel of pores.

  18. Gas porosity evolution and ion-implanted helium behavior in reactor ferritic/martensitic and austenitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, I. I.; Kalin, B. A.; Staltsov, M. S.; Oo, Kyi Zin; Binyukova, S. Yu.; Staltsova, O. S.; Polyansky, A. A.; Ageev, V. S.; Nikitina, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The peculiarities of gas porosity formation and helium retention and release in reactor ferritic/martensitic EP-450 and EP-450-ODS and austenitic ChS-68 steels are investigated by transmission electron microscopy and helium thermal desorption spectrometry (HTDS). The samples were irradiated by 40 keV He+ ions up to a fluence of 5 · 1020 m-2 at 293 and 923 K. An nonuniform distribution of helium bubbles and high-level gas swelling in ferritic/martensitic steels were found at high-temperature helium implantation. The same irradiation conditions result in formation of uniformly distributed helium bubbles and low-level swelling in ChS-68 steel. Temperature range of helium release from EP-450-ODS steel was considerably wider in comparison to HTDS-spectra of the EP-450 steel. A considerable quantity of helium is released from ODS steel in the high-temperature range after the main peak of the HTDS-spectrum.

  19. Effect of retained austenite stability and morphology on the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility in quenching and partitioning treated steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xu [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Ship and Deep-Sea Exploration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Ke [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China); Li, Wei, E-mail: weilee@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jin, Xuejun, E-mail: jin@sjtu.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Ship and Deep-Sea Exploration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-03-21

    The effect of retained austenite (RA) stability and morphology on the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility were investigated in a high strength steel subjected to three different heat treatments, i.e., the intercritical annealing quenching and partitioning (IAQP), quenching and partitioning (QP) and quenching and tempering (QT). IAQP treatment results in the coexistence of blocky and filmy morphologies and both QP and QT treatments lead to only filmy RA. No martensitic transformation occurs in QT steel during deformation, while the QP and IAQP undergo the transformation with the same extent. It is shown that the HE susceptibility increases in the following order: QT, QP and IAQP. Despite of the highest strength level and the highest hydrogen diffusion rate, the QT steel is relative immune to HE, suggesting that the metastable RA which transforms to martensite during deformation is detrimental to the HE resistance. The improved resistance to HE by QP treatment compared with IAQP steel is mainly attributed to the morphology effect of RA. Massive hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) cracks are found to initiate in the blocky RA of IAQP steel, while only isolate voids are observed in QP steel. It is thus deduced that filmy RA is less susceptible to HE than the blocky RA.

  20. Fabrication, characterization, and irradiation of an austenitic oxide dispersion strengthened steel suited for next generation nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Adam J.

    As nuclear energy systems become more advanced, the materials encompassing them need to perform at higher temperatures for longer periods of time. In this Master's thesis we experiment with an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) austenitic steel that has been recently developed. ODS materials have a small concentration of nano oxide particles dispersed in their matrix, and typically have higher strength and better extreme temperature creep resistance characteristics than ordinary steels. However, no ODS materials have ever been installed in a commercial power reactor to date. Being a newer research material, there are many unanswered phenomena that need to be addressed regarding the performance under irradiation. Furthermore, due to the ODS material traditionally needing to follow a powder metallurgy fabrication route, there are many processing parameters that need to be optimized before achieving a nuclear grade material specification. In this Master's thesis we explore the development of a novel ODS processing technology conducted in Beijing, China, to produce solutionized bulk ODS samples with 97% theoretical density. This is done using relatively low temperatures and ultra high pressure (UHP) equipment, to compact the mechanically alloyed (MA) steel powder into bulk samples without any thermal phase change influence or oxide precipitation. By having solutionized bulk ODS samples, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of nano oxide precipitation within the steel material can be studied by applying post heat treatments. These types of samples will be very useful to the science and engineering community, to answer questions regarding material powder compacting, oxide synthesis, and performance. Subsequent analysis performed at Queen's University included X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Additional TEM in-situ 1MeV Kr2+ irradiation experiments coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX

  1. Mechanical property degradation and microstructural evolution of cast austenitic stainless steels under short-term thermal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lach, Timothy G.; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural characterization were performed on short-term thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) to understand the severity and mechanisms of thermal-aging degradation experienced during extended operation of light water reactor (LWR) coolant systems. Four CASS materials – CF3, CF3M, CF8, and CF8M – were thermally aged for 1500 hours at 290 °C, 330 °C, 360 °C, and 400 °C. All four alloys experienced insignificant change in strength and ductility properties but a significant reduction in absorbed impact energy. The primary microstructural and compositional changes during thermal aging were spinodal decomposition of the δ-ferrite into α/ α`, precipitation of G-phase in the δ-ferrite, segregation of solute to the austenite/ ferrite interphase boundary, and growth of M23C6 carbides on the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary. These changes were shown to be highly dependent on chemical composition, particularly the concentration of C and Mo, and aging temperature. A comprehensive model is being developed to correlate the microstructural evolution with mechanical behavior and simulation for predictive evaluations of LWR coolant system components.

  2. Comprehensive Deformation Analysis of a Newly Designed Ni-Free Duplex Stainless Steel with Enhanced Plasticity by Optimizing Austenite Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moallemi, Mohammad; Zarei-Hanzaki, Abbas; Eskandari, Mostafa; Burrows, Andrew; Alimadadi, Hossein

    2017-08-01

    A new metastable Ni-free duplex stainless steel has been designed with superior plasticity by optimizing austenite stability using thermodynamic calculations of stacking fault energy and with reference to literature findings. Several characterization methods comprising optical microscopy, magnetic phase measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron backscattered diffraction were employed to study the plastic deformation behavior and to identify the operating plasticity mechanisms. The results obtained show that the newly designed duplex alloy exhibits some extraordinary mechanical properties, including an ultimate tensile strength of 900 MPa and elongation to fracture of 94 pct due to the synergistic effects of transformation-induced plasticity and twinning-induced plasticity. The deformation mechanism of austenite is complex and includes deformation banding, strain-induced martensite formation, and deformation-induced twinning, while the ferrite phase mainly deforms by dislocation slip. Texture analysis indicates that the Copper and Rotated Brass textures in austenite (FCC phase) and {001} texture in ferrite and martensite (BCC phases) are the main active components during tensile deformation. The predominance of these components is logically related to the strain-induced martensite and/or twin formation.

  3. Corrosion resistance of various bio-films deposited on austenitic cast steel casted by lost-wax process and in gypsum mould

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gawroński

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is the next of a series concerning the improvement of austenitic cast steel utility predicted for use in implantology for complicated long term implants casted by lost-wax process and in gypsum mould. Austenitic cast steel possess chemical composition of AISI 316L medical steel used for implants. In further part of present work investigated cast steel indicated as AISI 316L medical steel. Below a results of electrochemical corrosion resistance of carbon layer and bi-layer of carbon/HAp deposited on AISI 316L researches are presented. Coatings were manufactured by RF PACVD and PLD methods respectively. Obtained results, unequivocally indicates on the improvement of this type of corrosion resistance by substrate material with as deposited carbon layer. While bi-layer of carbon/HAp are characterized by very low corrosion resistance.

  4. Effect of Nb Addition to Ti-Bearing Super Martensitic Stainless Steel on Control of Austenite Grain Size and Strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoping; Langelier, Brian; Gault, Baptiste; Subramanian, Sundaresa

    2017-05-01

    The role of Nb in normalized and tempered Ti-bearing 13Cr5Ni2Mo super martensitic stainless steel is investigated through in-depth characterization of the bimodal chemistry and size of Nb-rich precipitates/atomic clusters and Nb in solid solution. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography are used to analyze the samples and clarify precipitates/atom cluster interactions with dislocations and austenite grain boundaries. The effect of 0.1 wt pct Nb addition on the promotion of (Ti, Nb)N-Nb(C,N) composite precipitates, as well as the retention of Nb in solution after cooling to room temperature, are analyzed quantitatively. (Ti, Nb)N-Nb(C,N) composite precipitates with average diameters of approximately 24 ± 8 nm resulting from epitaxial growth of Nb(C,N) on pre-existing (Ti,Nb)N particles, with inter-particle spacing on the order of 205 ± 68 nm, are found to be associated with mean austenite grain size of 28 ± 10 µm in the sample normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C). The calculated Zener limiting austenite grain size of 38 ± 13 µm is in agreement with the experimentally observed austenite grain size distribution. 0.08 wt pct Nb is retained in the as-normalized condition, which is able to promote Nb(C, N) atomic clusters at dislocations during tempering at 873 K (600 °C) for 2 hours, and increases the yield strength by 160 MPa, which is predicted to be close to maximum increase in strengthening effect. Retention of solute Nb before tempering also leads to it preferentially combing with C and N to form Nb(C, N) atom clusters, which suppresses the occurrence of Cr- and Mo-rich carbides during tempering.

  5. COMPETITION BEETWEN DYNAMIC RECUPERATION AND RECRYSTALLIZATION OF ASTM F 138 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL UTILIZED IN MEDICAL DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Henrique Casarini Geronimo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ASTM F 138 austenitic stainless steel has being used in the manufacture of orthopedical devices by hot forging. In this work, the flow stress curves are determined by hot torsion tests in a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. With the observed microestrutural evolution by optical microscopy in different hot forming conditions in addiction with EBSD (Electron Backscatter Diffraction techniques it is possible to obtained the recrystallized volume fraction and the misorientation angles of the samples. Due to the intermediate level of stacking fault energy of this material, during the dynamic softening occurs a competition between recrystallization and recovery. The aim of this work is to identify the softening mechanisms in this stainless steel, as well as in which hot work conditions they become more active.

  6. Novel 1.5 GPa-strength with 50%-ductility by transformation-induced plasticity of non-recrystallized austenite in duplex steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Seok Su; Song, Hyejin; Jo, Min Chul; Song, Taejin; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-04-28

    Needs for steel designs of ultra-high strength and excellent ductility have been an important issue in worldwide automotive industries to achieve energy conservation, improvement of safety, and crashworthiness qualities. Because of various drawbacks in existing 1.5-GPa-grade steels, new development of formable cold-rolled ultra-high-strength steels is essentially needed. Here we show a plausible method to achieve ultra-high strengths of 1.0~1.5 GPa together with excellent ductility above 50% by actively utilizing non-recrystallization region and TRansformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) mechanism in a cold-rolled and annealed Fe-Mn-Al-C-based steel. We adopt a duplex microstructure composed of austenite and ultra-fine ferrite in order to overcome low-yield-strength characteristics of austenite. Persistent elongation up to 50% as well as ultra-high yield strength over 1.4 GPa are attributed to well-balanced mechanical stability of non-crystallized austenite with critical strain for TRIP. Our results demonstrate how the non-recrystallized austenite can be a metamorphosis in 1.5-GPa-grade steel sheet design.

  7. Crack growth behavior of warm-rolled 316L austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 50 UNIST-gil, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Hyung-Ha; Kwon, Junhyun; Choi, Min-Jae; Hwang, Seong Sik [Nuclear Materials Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 111, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 50 UNIST-gil, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of warm rolling on the crack growth of 316L austenitic stainless steel, the crack growth rate was measured and the oxide structure was characterized in high-temperature hydrogenated water. The warm-rolled specimens showed a higher crack growth rate compared to the as-received specimens because the slip bands and dislocations produced during warm rolling served as paths for corrosion and cracking. The crack growth rate increased with the dissolved hydrogen concentration. This may be attributed to the decrease in performance and stability of the protective oxide layer formed on the surface of stainless steel in high-temperature water. - Highlights: • 316L Stainless steels were used for the study of crack growth behavior in PWR water. • Warm rolling was applied to simulate the irradiation hardening of stainless steels. • DH concentration was changed to see the effect on crack growth and oxide structure. • Warm-rolled stainless steels showed higher rates of corrosion and crack growth. • Higher DH concentration also promoted the rates of corrosion and crack growth.

  8. Effects of reversion and recrystallization on microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb-alloyed low-Ni high-Mn austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisko, A., E-mail: anna.kisko@oulu.fi [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Hamada, A.S. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgy and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, P.O. Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Talonen, J. [Outokumpu Oyj, P.O. Box 140, FI-02201 Espoo (Finland); Porter, D.; Karjalainen, L.P. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2016-03-07

    The influence of reversion annealing on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an austenitic high-Mn low-Ni 15Cr–9Mn–1.1Ni–1.7Cu stainless steel with and without Nb alloying was investigated. The steel sheets were cold rolled to a 60% thickness reduction to obtain about 60% of strain-induced α'-martensite and subsequently annealed at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C for 0.1–1000 s in order to revert the α'-martensite back to austenite and recrystallize the retained austenite. Microstructure evolution was studied using X-ray diffraction, magnetic measurements, optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction techniques. Mechanical properties were determined using microhardness measurements and tensile tests at room temperature. It was observed that reversion could be completed at 700 °C but then recrystallization of the retained austenite remained partial. At 800 °C, a non-uniform grain structure was obtained consisting of ultrafine-grained areas formed via α'-martensite reversion and coarser ones by recrystallization of the retained austenite, whereas at 900 °C a uniform austenite grain size in the range of 1–2 μm was obtained for all the steels. The non-uniform grain structures exhibited excellent combinations of strength and ductility. The major contribution to the strength is attributed to the refined grain size. The strain hardening rate was higher for the Nb-free steel, even though strain-induced α'-martensite fractions after fracture were slightly lower than in the Nb-alloyed steels.

  9. The Influence of Austenite Grain Size on the Mechanical Properties of Low-Alloy Steel with Boron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Białobrzeska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study forms part of the current research on modern steel groups with higher resistance to abrasive wear. In order to reduce the intensity of wear processes, and also to minimize their impact, the immediate priority seems to be a search for a correlation between the chemical composition and structure of these materials and their properties. In this paper, the correlation between prior austenite grain size, martensite packets and the mechanical properties were researched. The growth of austenite grains is an important factor in the analysis of the microstructure, as the grain size has an effect on the kinetics of phase transformation. The microstructure, however, is closely related to the mechanical properties of the material such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and impact strength, as well as morphology of occurred fracture. During the study, the mechanical properties were tested and a tendency to brittle fracture was analysed. The studies show big differences of the analysed parameters depending on the applied heat treatment, which should provide guidance to users to specific applications of this type of steel.

  10. Aspects and mechanisms of austenitic stainless steel corrosion in case of sodium leaks under mineral wool insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, C.; Ardellier, A.

    1996-12-31

    Sodium pipe rupture tests representative of Fast Reactors Accidents have been carried out on austenitic stainless steel surfaces. These tests improve our knowledge of small sodium leakage propagation in mineral wool insulation. They explain the new and unexpected aspects of the crevice corrosion phenomenon which has been observed on austenitic stainless steel pipe surfaces. Experimental results show that corrosion is limited to a peripheral annular zone, which extends out in concentric waves. The diameter of this corrosion zone is practically constant. Tests show that sodium does not expand directly on the pipe surface. Sodium sprays through mineral wool insulation, where chemical reaction between silica fibers, occluded oxygen and water vapor occur at the same time. Simultaneously, there is a diffusion phenomenon of liquid Na droplets on the mineral wool fibers. The study allows to prove the electrochemical nature of the corrosion. The excess liquid Na, spraying as droplets induces an anodic dissolution mechanism by differential aeration. This phenomenon explains the random microscopic and macroscopic aspects of material removal. (authors). 1 ref., 16 figs.

  11. Aspects and mechanisms of austenitic stainless steel corrosion in case of sodium leaks under mineral wool insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, C.; Ardellier, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    1996-10-01

    Sodium pipe rupture tests representative of Fast Reactors accidents have been carried out on austenitic stainless steel surfaces. These tests improve the authors knowledge of small sodium leakage propagation in mineral wool insulation. Furthermore, they explain the new and unexpected aspects of the crevice corrosion phenomenon which has been observed on austenitic stainless steel external pipe surfaces. Experimental results show that the corrosion is limited to a peripheral annular zone, which extends out in concentric waves. The diameter of this corrosion zone is practically constant. Furthermore, the tests show that sodium does not expand directly on the pipe surface. The sodium sprays through the mineral wool insulation, where chemical reactions between silica fibers, occluded oxygen and water vapor occur at the same time. Simultaneously, there is a diffusion phenomenon of liquid sodium droplets on the mineral wool fibers. The study allows to prove the electrochemical nature of the corrosion. The excess liquid sodium, spraying as droplets on the pipe surface, induces an anodic dissolution mechanism by differential aeration. This phenomenon explains the random microscopic and macroscopic aspects of material removal.

  12. Effects of concentration of sodium chloride solution on the pitting corrosion behavior of AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaduzzaman M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The pitting corrosion behavior of the austenitic stainless steel in aqueous chloride solution was investigated using electrochemical technique. Corrosion potential (Ecorr measurement, potentiodynamic experiments, potential-hold experiments in the passive range, and microscopic examination were used for the evaluation of corrosion characteristics. The experimental parameters were chloride ion concentration, immersion time and anodic-hold potential. Ecorr measurements along with microscopic examinations suggest that in or above 3.5 % NaCl at pH 2 pitting took place on the surface in absence of applied potential after 6 hour immersion. The potentiodynamic experiment reveals that Ecorr and pitting potential (Epit decreased and current density in the passive region increased with the increase of chloride ion concentrations. A linear relationship between Epit and chloride ion concentrations was found in this investigation. The analysis of the results suggests that six chloride ions are involved for the dissolution of iron ion in the pitting corrosion process of austenitic stainless steel.

  13. Study of Creep of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonina, Natalie Petrovna

    To withstand the high temperature (>700°C) and pressure demands of steam turbines and boilers used for energy applications, metal alloys must be economically viable and have the necessary material properties, such as high-temperature creep strength, oxidation and corrosion resistance, to withstand such conditions. One promising class of alloys potentially capable of withstanding the rigors of aggressive environments, are alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels (AFAs) alloyed with aluminum to improve corrosion and oxidation resistance. The effect of aging on the microstructure, high temperature constant-stress creep behavior and mechanical properties of the AFA-type alloy Fe-20Cr-30Ni-2Nb-5Al (at.%) were investigated in this study. The alloy's microstructural evolution with increased aging time was observed prior to creep testing. As aging time increased, the alloy exhibited increasing quantities of fine Fe2Nb Laves phase dispersions, with a precipitate-free zone appearing in samples with higher aging times. The presence of the L1 2 phase gamma'-Ni3Al precipitate was detected in the alloy's matrix at 760°C. A constant-stress creep rig was designed, built and its operation validated. Constant-stress creep tests were performed at 760°C and 35MPa, and the effects of different aging conditions on creep rate were investigated. Specimens aged for 240 h exhibited the highest creep rate by a factor of 5, with the homogenized sample having the second highest rate. Samples aged for 2.4 h and 24 h exhibited similar low secondary creep rates. Creep tests conducted at 700oC exhibited a significantly lower creep rate compared to those at 760oC. Microstructural analysis was performed on crept samples to explore high temperature straining properties. The quantity and size of Fe2Nb Laves phase and NiAl particles increased in the matrix and on grain boundaries with longer aging time. High temperature tensile tests were performed and compared to room temperature results. The

  14. Atom-Probe Tomographic Investigation of Austenite Stability and Carbide Precipitation in a TRIP-Assisted 10 Wt Pct Ni Steel and Its Weld Heat-Affected Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Divya; Seidman, David N.; Barrick, Erin J.; DuPont, John N.

    2018-01-01

    Newly developed low-carbon 10 wt pct Ni-Mo-Cr-V martensitic steels rely on the Ni-enriched, thermally stable austenite [formed via multistep intercritical Quench-Lamellarization-Tempering (QLT)-treatment] for their superior mechanical properties, specifically ballistic resistance. Critical to the thermal stability of austenite is its composition, which can be severely affected in the weld heat-affected zones (HAZs) and thus needs investigations. This article represents the first study of the nanoscale redistributions of C, Ni, and Mn in single-pass HAZ microstructures of QLT-treated 10 wt pct Ni steels. Local compositions of Ni-rich regions (representative of austenite compositions) in the HAZs are determined using site-specific 3-D atom-probe tomography (APT). Martensite-start temperatures are then calculated for these compositions, employing the Ghosh-Olson thermodynamic and kinetics approach. These calculations predict that austenite (present at high temperatures) in the HAZs is susceptible to a martensitic transformation upon cooling to room temperature, unlike the austenite in the QLT-treated base-metal. While C in the QLT-treated base-metal is consumed primarily in MC and M2C-type carbide precipitates (M is Mo, Cr, V), its higher concentration in the Ni-rich regions in the HAZs indicates the dissolution of carbide precipitates, particularly M2C carbide precipitates. The role of M2C carbide precipitates and austenite stability is discussed in relation to the increase in microhardness values observed in the HAZs, relative to the QLT-treated base-metal. Insights gained from this research on austenite stability and carbide precipitation in the single-pass HAZ microstructures will assist in designing multiple weld cycles for these novel 10 wt pct Ni steels.

  15. Microstructure influence on fatigue behaviour of austenitic stainless steels with high molybdenum content; Influencia de la microestructura en el comportamiento a fatiga de aceros inoxidables austeniticos con alto contenido en molibdeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoro, J.; Gamboa, R.; Ranninger, C.

    2006-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels with molybdenum present high mechanical properties and corrosion resistance to aggressive environments. These steels have been used to tank and vessel components for high liquids as phosphoric, nitric and sulphuric acids. These materials with low carbon and nitrogen addition have been proposed candidates as structural materials for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) in-vessel components. Molybdenum addition in austenitic stainless steel improves mechanical and corrosion properties, but with it can produce the presence of nitrogen microstructure modifications by presence or precipitation of second phases. This paper summarises the fatigue and corrosion fatigue behaviour of two 317LN stainless steels with different microstructure. Fully austenitic steel microstructure show better fatigue, corrosion fatigue resistance and better ductility than austenitic steel with delta ferrite microstructure, mainly at low stresses. (Author)

  16. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    elements between austenite and nitrides, with chromium contents of about 80 wt.% in the precipitates. XRD analysis indicated that the Chromium-rich nitride precipitates are hexagonal (Cr, Mo)2N. Based on the TEM studies, (Cr, Mo)2N precipitates presented a (1 1 1)γ//(0 0 2)(Cr, Mo)2N, (Formula presented......, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride...

  17. Friction wear of an austenitic steel under low load in liquid media; Usure par glissement sous faible charge en milieu liquide d'un acier austenitique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riviere, J.P.; Brin, C.; Villain, J.P. [Poitiers Univ., 86 (France). Lab. de Metallurgie Physique; Cauvin, R. [Poitiers Univ., 86 (France). Lab. de Metallurgie Physique; EDF-GDL, Avoine (France)

    2001-04-01

    The following topics were dealt with: sliding friction usage of the austenitic steel 304 under low load in controlled environment (control rod movement), surface degradation and microstructural modification tested by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, martensitic transition of surface layers, martensitic structure of the abrasive debris.

  18. Effect of Plastic Pre-straining on Residual Stress and Composition Profiles in Low-Temperature Surface-Hardened Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Winther, Grethe

    2016-01-01

    The present work deals with the evaluation of the residual stress profiles in expanded austenite by applying grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) combined with successive sublayer removal. Annealed and deformed (εeq=0.5) samples of stable stainless steel EN 1.4369 were nitrided or nitroca...

  19. Modeling precipitation thermodynamics and kinetics in type 316 austenitic stainless steels with varying composition as an initial step toward predicting phase stability during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Jae-Hyeok, E-mail: jhshim@kist.re.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Povoden-Karadeniz, Erwin [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Vienna University of Technology, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Kozeschnik, Ernst [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We model the precipitation kinetics in irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels. • Radiation-induced phases are predicted to form at over 10 dpa segregation conditions. • The Si content is the most critical for the formation of radiation-induced phases. - Abstract: The long-term evolution of precipitates in type 316 austenitic stainless steels at 400 °C has been simulated using a numerical model based on classical nucleation theory and the thermodynamic extremum principle. Particular attention has been paid to the precipitation of radiation-induced phases such as γ′ and G phases. In addition to the original compositions, the compositions for radiation-induced segregation at a dose level of 5, 10 or 20 dpa have been used in the simulation. In a 316 austenitic stainless steel, γ′ appears as the main precipitate with a small amount of G phase forming at 10 and 20 dpa. On the other hand, G phase becomes relatively dominant over γ′ at the same dose levels in a Ti-stabilized 316 austenitic stainless steel, which tends to suppress the formation of γ′. Among the segregated alloying elements, the concentration of Si seems to be the most critical for the formation of radiation-induced phases. An increase in dislocation density as well as increased diffusivity of Mn and Si significantly enhances the precipitation kinetics of the radiation-induced phases within this model.

  20. Effects of Multiple Treatments of Low-Temperature Colossal Supersaturation on Tribological Characteristics of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Zhang, Ligong [University of Central Florida; Xu, Hanbing [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    An alternative carburization process, low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS), has demonstrated significant improvement on both wear- and corrosion-resistance for austenitic stainless steel surfaces in recent literature. This study explores the effects of multiple treatments of LTCSS on tribological characteristics for Type 316 stainless steel. Thicker carburized layers were produced by multiple LTCSS treatments, with 30, 45, and 55 m for one, two, and four treatments, respectively. Although the hardness remains unchanged at low-load microindentation, multiple treatments have showed higher values in both microindentation and scratch hardness tests when deeper penetrations occurred under heavier loads. The friction and wear characteristics of Type 316 stainless steel with multiple LTCSS treatments were evaluated in non-lubricated unidirectional sliding (pin-on-disk) against Type 440C stainless steel. While little change was observed on friction behavior, substantial further improvement on wear-resistance has been achieved for the multiple treatments. In addition, the wear of the counterface was also largely reduced when rubbing against a multiple-treated surface.

  1. On the mechanism for improved passivation by addition of molybdenum to austenitic stainless steels in O-phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenbour, A.; Faucheu, J.; Ben Bachir, A.

    1988-04-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism for increased corrosion resistance in O-phosphoric acid solutions by addition of molybdenum to 17Cr-13Ni stainless steel (SS), anodic curves polarization and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) have been performed on the Mo-containing steels passivated in 40 wt% H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ with chloride and fluoride ions as impurities. The addition of Mo to austenitic SS affects the nature and composition of the passive film. The studies by ESCA have shown that the passive film is formed in an overlap of two layers. The external layer contains phosphates and is rich in Mo(VI) and Si(IV). The improved resistance of SSs alloyed with Mo caused by that layer probably composed of silico-molybdic-hydrate complex, particularly stable in acidic pH. The similarity of results obtained between MO-alloyed steels and steels without Mo, but passivated in MoO/sub 4/ solutions, suggest that the protective layer is formed by soluble Mo compounds.

  2. A Modified HR3C Austenitic Heat-Resistant Steel for Ultra-supercritical Power Plants Applications Beyond 650 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, P.; Yang, Z.; Zhou, Y. L.; Huang, J. Y.; Yin, H. F.; Dang, Y. Y.; Zhao, X. B.; Lu, J. T.; Yan, J. B.; You, C. Y.

    2018-02-01

    A modified HR3C austenitic steel has been designed by optimizing the chemical composition. Compared with a commercial HR3C alloy, the modified steel has comparable oxidation resistance, yield strength, and plasticity, but higher creep rupture strength and impact toughness after long-term thermal exposure. The results suggest that the modified alloy is a promising candidate for the applications of ultra-supercritical power plants operating beyond 650 °C.

  3. Intermetallic diffusion coatings for enhanced hot-salt oxidation resistance of nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudali, U. Kamachi; Bhuvaneswaran, N.; Shankar, P.; Khatak, H. S.; Raj, B.

    2004-06-01

    This article presents the preparation, characterization, and hot-salt oxidation behavior of nitrogen-containing type 316L stainless steel (SS), surface modified with intermetallic coatings. Three different types of intermetallic coating systems, containing aluminum, titanium, and titanium/aluminum multilayers, were formed by diffusion annealing of type 316L austenitic SS containing 0.015, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.56 pct nitrogen. Analysis by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) confirmed the formation of various intermetallic phases such as AIN, Al13Fe4, FeAl2, FeTi, Ti2N, and Ti3Al in the coatings. Hot salt oxidation behavior of the uncoated and surface-modified stainless steels was assessed by periodic monitoring of the weight changes of NaCl salt-applied alloys kept in an air furnace at 1023 K up to 250 hours. The oxide scales formed were examined by XRD and stereomicroscopy. Among the various surface modifications investigated in the present study, the results indicate that the titanium-modified alloys show the best hot-salt oxidation resistance with the formation of an adherent, protective, thin, and continuous oxide layer. Among the four N-containing alloys investigated, the titanium and Ti/Al multilayer modified 0.56 pct N alloy showed the best hot-salt oxidation resistance as compared to uncoated alloys. The slower corrosion kinetics and adherent scale morphology indicate that the surface-modified titanium intermetallic coatings could provide high-temperature service applications up to 1073 K, particularly in chloride containing atmospheres, for austenitic stainless steels.

  4. Elastic interaction between twins during tensile deformation of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Ytterdal; Winther, Grethe; Dale, Darren

    2016-01-01

    In austenite, the twin boundary normal is a common elastically stiff direction shared by the two twins, which may induce special interactions. By means of three-dimensional X-ray diffraction this elastic interaction has been analysed and compared to grains separated by conventional grain boundari...

  5. Quantitative analysis of retained austenite in laser melted martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Seleka, T

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available of this study was to determine if X-ray diffraction (XRD) was sufficient for quantifying the volume percentage of retained austenite. After a preliminary qualitative analysis, a Rietveld full pattern refinement program was used to quantify the volume percentage...

  6. Towards a Map of Solidification Cracking Risk in Laser Welding of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, María-Asunción Valiente; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Hurtig, Kjell; Karlsson, Leif; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    In this work, two series of specimens with Hammar and Svensson's Cr- and Ni-equivalents (Creq+Nieq) = 35 and 45 wt% were used to cover a wide range of austenitic grades. These were laser welded with different energy inputs achieving cooling rates in the range of 103 °C/s to 104 °C/s. As high cooling rates and rapid solidification conditions could favour fully austenitic solidification and therefore raise susceptibility to solidification cracking, the solidification modes of the laser welded specimens were compared to the ones experienced by the same alloys under arc welding conditions. It was found that high cooling rates experienced in laser welding promoted fully austenitic solidification for a wider range of compositions, for example specimens with (Creq+Nieq) = 35% under arc welding cooling conditions at 10 °C/s showed fully austenitic solidification up to Creq/Nieq = 1.30, whilst the same specimens laser cooled at 103 °C/s showed fully austenitic solidification up to Creq/Nieq = 1.50 and those cooled at 104 °C/s showed it up to Creq/Nieq = 1.68. Therefore, high cooling rates extended the solidification cracking risk to a wider range of Creq/Nieq values. This work also compares the cooling rates experimentally determined by thermocouples to the computed cooling rates calculated by a highly-advanced computational model. The distance between the thermocouple's wires and the thermal resistance of thermocouples together with the small size of the weld pools proved to be practical limitations in the experimental determination of cooling rates. However, an excellent agreement was found between computed and experimental solidus isotherms at high energy input settings. For low energy input settings cooling rate was in the order of magnitude of 104 °C/s, whilst for high energy input settings cooling rate was found to be in the order of magnitude of 103 °C/s.

  7. In Situ Investigation of the Evolution of Lattice Strain and Stresses in Austenite and Martensite During Quenching and Tempering of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, M.; Niessen, F.; Somers, M. A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate in situ the evolution of lattice strains and stresses in austenite and martensite during quenching and tempering of a soft martensitic stainless steel. In one experiment, lattice strains in austenite and martensite were measured in situ in the direction perpendicular to the sample surface during an austenitization, quenching, and tempering cycle. In a second experiment, the sin2 ψ method was applied in situ during the austenite-to-martensite transformation to distinguish between macro- and phase-specific micro-stresses and to follow the evolution of these stresses during transformation. Martensite formation evokes compressive stress in austenite that is balanced by tensile stress in martensite. Tempering to 748 K (475 °C) leads to partial relaxation of these stresses. Additionally, data reveal that (elastic) lattice strain in austenite is not hydrostatic but hkl dependent, which is ascribed to plastic deformation of this phase during martensite formation and is considered responsible for anomalous behavior of the 200 γ reflection.

  8. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels; Fissuration en fatigue thermique des aciers inoxydables austenitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fissolo, A

    2001-07-01

    This report deals with the thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels as AISI 316 LN and 304 L. Such damage has been clearly observed for some components used in Fast Breeder reactors (FBR) and Pressure Water Reactor (PWR). In order to investigate thermal fatigue, quasi-structural specimen have been used. In this frame, facilities enforcing temperature variations similar to those found under the operation conditions have been progressively developed. As for components, loading results from impeded dilatation. In the SPLASH facility, the purpose was to establish accurate crack initiation conditions in order to check the relevance of the usual component design methodology. The tested specimen is continuously heated by the passage of an electrical DC current, and submitted to cyclic thermal down shock (up to 1000 deg C/s) by means of periodical spraying of water on two opposite specimen faces. The number of cycles to crack initiation N{sub i} is deduced from periodic examinations of the quenched surfaces, by means of optical microscopy. It is considered that initiation occurs when at least one 50{mu}m to 150{open_square}m long crack is observed. Additional SPLASH tests were performed for N >> N{sub i}, with a view to investigate the evolution of a surface multiple cracking network with the number of cycles N. The CYTHIA test was mainly developed for the purpose of assessing crack growth dynamics of one isolated crack in thermal fatigue conditions. Specimens consist of thick walled tubes with a 1 mm circular groove is spark-machined at the specimen centre. During the test, the external wall of the tube is periodically heated by using a HF induction coil (1 MHz), while its internal wall is permanently cooled by flowing water. Total crack growth is derived from post-mortem examinations, whereby the thermal fatigue final rupture surface is oxidized at the end of the test. The specimen is broken afterwards under mechanical fatigue at room temperature. All the

  9. Measurement of ultrasonic scattering attenuation in austenitic stainless steel welds: realistic input data for NDT numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploix, Marie-Aude; Guy, Philippe; Chassignole, Bertrand; Moysan, Joseph; Corneloup, Gilles; El Guerjouma, Rachid

    2014-09-01

    Multipass welds made of 316L stainless steel are specific welds of the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors in nuclear power plants. Because of their strong heterogeneous and anisotropic nature due to grain growth during solidification, ultrasonic waves may be greatly deviated, split and attenuated. Thus, ultrasonic assessment of the structural integrity of such welds is quite complicated. Numerical codes exist that simulate ultrasonic propagation through such structures, but they require precise and realistic input data, as attenuation coefficients. This paper presents rigorous measurements of attenuation in austenitic weld as a function of grain orientation. In fact attenuation is here mainly caused by grain scattering. Measurements are based on the decomposition of experimental beams into plane-wave angular spectra and on the modeling of the ultrasonic propagation through the material. For this, the transmission coefficients are calculated for any incident plane wave on an anisotropic plate. Two different hypotheses on the welded material are tested: first it is considered as monoclinic, and then as triclinic. Results are analyzed, and validated through comparison to theoretical predictions of related literature. They underline the great importance of well-describing the anisotropic structure of austenitic welds for UT modeling issues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Stress Corrosion Behavior of Low-temperature Liquid-Nitrided 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel in a Sour Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Yan, Jing; Duan, Lian; Gu, Tan; Xian, Guang; Sun, Lan; Wang, Danqi

    2017-10-01

    Low-temperature nitridation is a widely used surface heat treatment. Low-temperature liquid nitridation was applied to 316 austenitic stainless steel and an S-phase (expanded austenite) layer was achieved on the alloy surface. The effect of the S-phase layer on corrosion resistance and stress corrosion cracking was investigated in a sour environment. When a bending stress of 164 MPa (80 pct yield stress, YS) was applied, no macroscopic corrosion cracking and pits were observed on the nitrided samples and the S-phase layer stayed intact. Although no macroscopic corrosion cracking was observed on the non-nitrided samples under 205 MPa (100 pct YS), some pits were formed on the alloy surface. This could be attributed to the high stresses and hardness, and the excellent corrosion resistance of the S-phase layer introduced by low-temperature nitridation. Supersaturated nitrogen atoms in the S-phase layer can effectively prevent the decrease in pH of the corrosive medium and accelerate the alloy repassivation kinetics. However, when the bending stress was increased to 205 and 246 MPa (100 pct YS, 120 pct YS), macroscopic cracks were observed in the presence of both tensile stress and a corrosive medium.

  11. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  12. Stress Corrosion Behavior of Low-temperature Liquid-Nitrided 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel in a Sour Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Yan, Jing; Duan, Lian; Gu, Tan; Xian, Guang; Sun, Lan; Wang, Danqi

    2018-01-01

    Low-temperature nitridation is a widely used surface heat treatment. Low-temperature liquid nitridation was applied to 316 austenitic stainless steel and an S-phase (expanded austenite) layer was achieved on the alloy surface. The effect of the S-phase layer on corrosion resistance and stress corrosion cracking was investigated in a sour environment. When a bending stress of 164 MPa (80 pct yield stress, YS) was applied, no macroscopic corrosion cracking and pits were observed on the nitrided samples and the S-phase layer stayed intact. Although no macroscopic corrosion cracking was observed on the non-nitrided samples under 205 MPa (100 pct YS), some pits were formed on the alloy surface. This could be attributed to the high stresses and hardness, and the excellent corrosion resistance of the S-phase layer introduced by low-temperature nitridation. Supersaturated nitrogen atoms in the S-phase layer can effectively prevent the decrease in pH of the corrosive medium and accelerate the alloy repassivation kinetics. However, when the bending stress was increased to 205 and 246 MPa (100 pct YS, 120 pct YS), macroscopic cracks were observed in the presence of both tensile stress and a corrosive medium.

  13. Moessbauer spectroscopic investigation of retained-austenite content of high-carbon tool steel during isothermal tempering of as-quenched samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, Piotr, E-mail: pbala@agh.edu.pl; Krawczyk, Janusz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science (Poland); Hanc, Aneta [University of Silesia, Faculty of Computer and Materials Science (Poland)

    2009-04-15

    This work presents the results of investigations using Moessbauer spectroscopy technique and their interpretation concerning retained austenite (RA) and its transformation during tempering in relation to previously conducted dilatometric, microscopic and mechanical investigations. This research was conducted on a new high-carbon alloy steel 120 MnCrMoV8-6-4-2, which was designed in 1998, in Phase Transformations Research Group at the AGH UST. The influence of the tempering time on the mechanical and chemical stability of retained austenite and on the products of its transformation, nucleation and solubility of {epsilon} carbides and cementite nucleation and growth, was determined.

  14. Effect of alloy grain size on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of the austenitic steel TP 347

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Braz Trindade

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Generally, oxide scales formed on high Cr steels are multi-layered and the kinetics are strongly influenced by the alloy grain boundaries. In the present study, the oxidation behaviour of an austenite steel TP347 with different grain sizes was studied to identify the role of grain-boundaries in the oxidation process. Heat treatment in an inert gas atmosphere at 1050 °C was applied to modify the grain size of the steel TP347. The mass gain during subsequent oxidation was measured using a microbalance with a resolution of 10-5 g. The scale morphology was examined using SEM in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Oxidation of TP347 with a grain size of 4 µm at 750 °C in air follows a parabolic rate law. For a larger grain size (65 µm, complex kinetics is observed with a fast initial oxidation followed by several different parabolic oxidation stages. SEM examinations indicated that the scale formed on specimens with smaller grain size was predominantly Cr2O3, with some FeCr2O4 at localized sites. For specimens with larger grain size the main oxide is iron oxide. It can be concluded that protective Cr2O3 formation is promoted by a high density of fast grain-boundary diffusion paths which is the case for fine-grained materials.

  15. The compatibility of various austenitic steels with molten sodium (1963); Compatibilite de divers aciers austenitiques avec le sodium fondu (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champeix, L.; Sannier, J.; Darras, R.; Graff, W.; Juste, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Various techniques for studying corrosion by molten sodium have been developed and applied to the case of 18/10 austenitic steels. The results obtained are discussed as a function of various parameters: type of steel, temperature, oxygen content of the sodium, surface treatment, welds, mechanical strain. In general, these steels have an excellent resistance to sodium when the oxygen content is limited by a simple purification system of the 'cold trap' type, and when an attempt is made to avoid cavitation phenomena which are particularly dangerous, as is shown by the example given. (authors) [French] Des techniques d'etude de la corrosion par le sodium fondu en circulation ont ete mises au point et appliquees au cas des aciers austenitiques 18/10. Les resultats obtenus sont discutes en fonction de differents parametres: nuance de l'acier, temperature, teneur en oxygene du sodium, traitement de surface, soudure, contrainte mecanique. D'une maniere generale, ces aciers ont une excellente tenue dans le sodium lorsque, sa teneur en oxygene est limitee par un systeme simple de purification du type ''piege froid'' et lorsque l'on fait en sorte d'eviter les phenomenes de cavitation particulierement dangereux, comme il ressort d'un exemple cite. (auteurs)

  16. Characteristic of retained austenite decomposition during tempering and its effect on impact toughness in SA508 Gr.3 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guanghua; Han, Lizhan; Li, Chuanwei; Luo, Xiaomeng; Gu, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    Retained austenite(RA) usually presents in the quenched Nuclear Pressure-Vessel SA508 Gr.3 steel. In the present work, the characteristic of RA decomposition and its effect on the impact toughness were investigated by microstructure observation, dilatometric experiments and Charpy impact tests. The results show that the RA transformed into martensite and bainite during tempering at 230 °C and 400 °C respectively, while mixture of long rod carbides and ferrite formed at 650 °C. The long rod carbides formed from RA decomposition decrease the critical cleavage stress for initiation of micro-cracks, and deteriorate the impact toughness of the steel. Pre-tempering at a low temperature such as 230 °C or 400 °C leading to the decomposition of RA into martensite or baintie can eliminate the deterioration of the toughness caused by direct decomposition into long rod carbides. The absorbed energy indicate that pre-tempering at 400 °C can drive dramatically improvement in the toughness of the steel.

  17. Delta-Ferrite Distribution in a Continuous Casting Slab of Fe-Cr-Mn Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Cheng, Guoguang

    2017-10-01

    The delta-ferrite distribution in a continuous casting slab of Fe-Cr-Mn stainless steel grade (200 series J4) was analyzed. The results showed that the ferrite fraction was less than 3 pct. The "M" type distribution was observed in the thickness direction. For the distribution at the centerline, the maximum ferrite content was found in the triangular zone of the macrostructure. In addition, in this zone, the carbon and sulfur were severely segregated. Furthermore, an equilibrium solidification calculation by Thermo-Calc® software indicates that the solidification mode of the composition in this triangular zone is the same as the solidification mode of the averaged composition, i.e., the FA (ferrite-austenite) mode. None of the nickel-chromium equivalent formulas combined with the Schaeffler-type diagram could predict the ferrite fraction of the Cr-Mn stainless steel grade in a reasonable manner. The authors propose that more attention should be paid to the development of prediction models for the ferrite fraction of stainless steels under continuous casting conditions.

  18. On the Stress Corrosion Cracking and Hydrogen Embrittlement Behavior of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Boiling Saturated Magnesium Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama M. Alyousif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion cracking (SCC and hydrogen embrittlement (HE behaviors for types 304, 310, and 316 austenitic stainless steels were investigated in boiling saturated magnesium chloride solutions using a constant load method under different conditions including test temperature, applied stress, and sensitization. Both of type 304 and type 316 stainless steels showed quite similar behavior characteristics, whereas type 310 stainless steel showed a different behavior. The time to failure (tf parameter was used among other parameters to characterize the materials behavior in the test solution and to develop a mathematical model for predicting the time to failure in the chloride solution. The combination of corrosion curve parameters and fracture surface micrographs gave some explanation for the cracking modes as well as an indication for the cracking mechanisms. On the basis of the results obtained, it was estimated that intergranular cracking was resulted from hydrogen embrittlement due to strain-induced formation of martensite along the grain boundaries, while transgranular cracking took place by propagating cracks nucleated at slip steps by dissolution.

  19. Effect of Composition on the Formation of Delta Ferrite in 304L Austenitic Stainless Steels During Hot Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymani, S.; Ojo, O. A.; Richards, N.

    2015-01-01

    Four different AISI 304L austenitic stainless steels with chromium equivalent-to-nickel equivalent (Creq/Nieq) ratios of 1.57, 1.59, 1.62, and 1.81 were chosen for this study. The influence of chemical composition on solid-state formation of delta ferrite phase during hot deformation was investigated. Compression tests were performed at temperature, strain, and strain rate ranges of 1200 to 1300 °C, 10 to 70%, and 0.1 to 10 s-1, respectively. Increasing the temperature, strain, and strain rate led to increased formation of delta ferrite. The results show that the formation of delta ferrite during hot deformation is also strongly dependent on chemical composition. The higher the Creq/Nieq ratio, the higher the tendency for the formation of delta ferrite. The observed behavior may be attributed to plastic deformation-induced formation of crystallographic defects such as dislocations affecting the diffusion rate.

  20. Effect of Grain Size on Void Formation during High-Energy Electron Irradiation of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain

    1974-01-01

    ’ model based on the property of grain boundaries as neutral and unsaturable sinks for vacancies and self-interstitials. It is suggested that even in the presence of sufficiently large amount of impurity gas atoms, a critical level of vacancy supersaturation is necessary to produce critically sized......Thin foils of an ‘ experimental ’ austenitic stainless steel, with and without dispersions of aluminium oxide particles, are irradiated with 1 MeV electrons in a High Voltage Electron Microscope at 600°C. Evidence of grain size dependent void nucleation, void concentration, and void volume swelling...... are presented for grains in the size range 0°45 to 50 μ. In both undoped and helium-doped samples the void nucleation is delayed, void concentration is lowered, and void volume swelling is reduced by decreasing the size of the grain under irradiation. The results are discussed in terms of a ‘ defect depletion...

  1. Kinetics of dynamic recrystallization in Ti-modified 15Cr-15Ni-2Mo austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, A. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Marchattiwar, A. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Chakravartty, J.K., E-mail: jayanta@barc.gov.in [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kashyap, B.P. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2013-01-15

    The hot working behaviour of Ti-modified 15Cr-15Ni-2Mo austenitic stainless steel (Alloy D9) was studied by hot compression test at temperatures of 900-1200 Degree-Sign C and at strain rates of 0.002-1 s{sup -1}. The progress of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) was modelled by the Avarmi kinetics equation. The flow softening was directly related to the DRX volume fraction and the DRX time was determined by strain rate. For quantification of recrystallization rate, the time corresponding to the DRX fraction of 50% was used. Analysis of the sigmoid-shaped recrystallization curves revealed that the rate of DRX increases with increasing deformation temperature and strain rate. Results of the Avrami analysis were used to predict the DRX flow curves.

  2. Shielding gas effect on weld characteristics in arc-augmented laser welding process of super austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiya, P.; Kumar Mishra, Mahendra; Soundararajan, R.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    2013-02-01

    A series of hybrid welding (gas metal arc welding-CO2 laser beam welding) experiments were conducted on AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel sheet of 5 mm thickness. A detailed study of CO2 Laser-GMAW hybrid welding experiments with different shielding gas mixtures (100% He, 50% He+50% Ar, 50%He+45% Ar+5% O2, and 45% He+45% Ar+10% N2) were carried out and the results are presented. The resultant welds were subjected to detailed mechanical and microstructural characterization. Hardness testing revealed that the hardness values in the fusion zone were higher than the base material irrespective of the parameters. Transverse tensile testing showed that the joint efficiency is 100% with all the shielding gas experimented. Impact energy values of the welds were also found to be higher than the base material and the fractrograph taken in scanning electron microscope (SEM) has shown that the welds exhibited dimple fracture similar to the base material.

  3. The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of a novel alumina-forming austenitic stainless steel in supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongying; Yang, Haijie; Wang, Man; Giron-Palomares, Benjamin; Zhou, Zhangjian; Zhang, Lefu; Zhang, Guangming

    2017-02-01

    The general corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of Fe-27Ni-15Cr-5Al-2Mo-0.4Nb alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steel were investigated in supercritical water under different conditions. A double layer oxide structure was formed: a Fe-rich outer layer (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) and an Al-Cr-rich inner layer. And the inner layer has a low growth rate with exposing time, which is good for improvement of corrosion resistance. Additionally, some internal nodular Al-Cr-rich oxides were also observed, which resulted in a local absence of inner layer. Stress corrosion specimens exhibited a combination of high strength, good ductility and low susceptibility. The stress strength and elongation was reduced by increasing temperature and amount of dissolved oxygen. In addition, the corresponding susceptibility was increased with decreased temperatures and increased oxygen contents.

  4. Kinetics and critical conditions for initiation of dynamic recrystallization during hot compression deformation of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazani, Mehdi Shaban; Eghbali, Beitallah; Ebrahimi, Gholamreza

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic recrystallization behavior of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel were studied using hot compression tests over the range of temperatures from 900 °C to 1200 °C and strain rates from 0.001 s-1 to 1 s-1. The critical strain and stress for initiation of dynamic recrystallization were determined by plotting strain hardening rate vs. stress curves and a constitutive equation describing the flow stress at strains lower than peak strain. Also, the strain at maximum flow softening was obtained and the effect of deformation conditions (Z parameter) on the critical strain and stress were analyzed. Finally, the volume fraction of dynamic recrystallization was calculated at different deformation conditions using these critical values. Results showed that the model used for predicting the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization has a great consistency with the data, in the form of θ-ɛ curves, directly acquired from experimental flow curves.

  5. Nitriding using cathodic cage technique of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316 with addition of CH{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, R.R.M. de [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Piaui, Departamento de Mecanica, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Araujo, F.O. de [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido, Departamento de Ciencias Ambientais, Mossoro, RN (Brazil)], E-mail: odolbert@yahoo.com.br; Barbosa, J.C.P.; Ribeiro, K.J.B. [Labplasma, Departamento de Fisica - UFRN, Campus Universitario, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Costa, J.A.P. da [Departamento de Fisica - UFC, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Alves, C. [Labplasma, Departamento de Fisica - UFRN, Campus Universitario, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-25

    Samples of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316 were nitrided using the cathodic cage technique with the addition of methane in the nitriding atmosphere. The aim was to study the influence of this technique in reducing the precipitation of chromium nitrite and in improving the wear resistance. The results show that there was a significant improvement in such properties when compared to the results of ionic plasma nitriding. Formation of a double layer, one more internal composed of carbon and another with high nitrogen content, was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The microhardness profile of the layer showed an increase in hardness values and a larger uniformity, while X-ray analysis showed less chromium nitriding precipitation when compared with results obtained for samples treated using ionic plasma nitriding.

  6. Methodology for Estimating Thermal and Neutron Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds During Service in Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2016-04-28

    The effect of thermal aging on the degradation of fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties of austenitic stainless steel (SS) welds has been characterized at reactor temperatures. The solidification behavior and the distribution and morphology of the ferrite phase in SS welds are described. Thermal aging of the welds results in moderate decreases in Charpy-impact strength and fracture toughness. The upper-shelf Charpy-impact energy of aged welds decreases by 50–80 J/cm2. The decrease in fracture toughness J-R curve, or JIc is relatively small. Thermal aging has minimal effect on the tensile strength. The fracture properties of SS welds are insensitive to filler metal; the welding process has a significant effect. The large variability in the data makes it difficult to establish the effect of the welding process on fracture properties of SS welds. Consequently, the approach used for evaluating thermal and neutron embrittlement of austenitic SS welds relies on establishing a lower-bound fracture toughness J-R curve for unaged and aged, and non-irradiated and irradiated, SS welds. The existing fracture toughness J-R curve data for SS welds have been reviewed and evaluated to define lower-bound J-R curve for submerged arc (SA)/shielded metal arc (SMA)/manual metal arc (MMA) welds and gas tungsten arc (GTA)/tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in the unaged and aged conditions. At reactor temperatures, the fracture toughness of GTA/TIG welds is a factor of about 2.3 higher than that of SA/SMA/MMA welds. Thermal aging decreases the fracture toughness by about 20%. The potential combined effects of thermal and neutron embrittlement of austenitic SS welds are also described. Lower-bound curves are presented that define the change in coefficient C and exponent n of the power-law J-R curve and the JIc value for SS welds as a function of neutron dose. The potential effects of reactor coolant environment on the fracture toughness of austenitic SS welds are also discussed.

  7. Characteristics of oxide scale formed on Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel during early stages of high temperature oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan, E-mail: swaminathan@kist.re.kr [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136 791 (Korea, Republic of); Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kim, Dong-Ik, E-mail: dongikkim@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136 791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Initial oxidation characteristics of Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel at 650 °C were studied. • Strong segregation and oxidation of Mn and Nb were found in the entire oxide scale. • Surface coverage by metallic Cu-rich precipitates increases with exposure time. • Chemical heterogeneity of oxide scale revealed initial oxidation to be non-selective. • Fe-Cr and Mn-Cr mixed oxides were realized along with binary oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn. - Abstract: Oxide scale evolution on Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel 304H at 650 °C, in ambient air, for exposure times 100, 300, 500 and 1000 h, has been investigated. Surface morphology and chemistry of the oxide scale grown were examined using SEM/EDX and XPS. The oxidation kinetics was determined by measuring the weight change using an electronic balance. At the initial stage, up to 500 h of exposure time, the oxidation rate was rapid due to surface reactions governed primarily by oxygen ingress, and then, dropped to a low rate after prolonged oxidation for 1000 h. The diffusion of reactants through the initially formed oxide scale limits the oxidation rate at longer times, thus, the progress of reaction followed the parabolic kinetics. The formed oxide scale was enriched significantly with segregation and subsequent oxidation of Nb, and finely dispersed metallic Cu particles. Within the time frame of oxidation, the oxide scale was mainly composed of mixed oxides such as FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} along with the binary oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn. Moreover, the precipitation fraction of Cu-rich particles on the oxide scale increased markedly with increase of exposure times. The chemical heterogeneity of oxide scale suggests that the oxidation occurred in a non-selective manner.

  8. An experience with in-service fabrication and inspection of austenitic stainless steel piping in high temperature sodium system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi, S., E-mail: sravi@igcar.gov.in; Laha, K.; Sakthy, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Procedure for changing 304L SS pipe to 316L SS in sodium loop has been established. • Hot leg made of 304L SS was isolated from existing cold leg made of 316LN SS. • Innovative welding was used in joining the new 316L SS pipe with existing 316LN SS. • The old components of 304L SS piping have been integrated with the new piping. - Abstract: A creep testing facility along with dynamic sodium loop was installed at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, India to assess the creep behavior of fast reactor structural materials in flowing sodium. Type 304L austenitic stainless steel was used in the low cross section piping of hot-leg whereas 316LN austenitic stainless steel in the high cross section cold-leg of the sodium loop. The intended service life of the sodium loop was 10 years. The loop has performed successfully in the stipulated time period. To enhance its life time, it has been decided to replace the 304L piping with 316L piping in the hot-leg. There were more than 300 welding joints involved in the integration of cold-leg with the new 316L hot-leg. Continuous argon gas flow was maintained in the loop during welding to avoid contamination of sodium residue with air. Several innovative welding procedures have been adopted for joining the new hot-leg with the existing cold-leg in the presence of sodium residue adopting TIG welding technique. The joints were inspected for 100% X-ray radiography and qualified by performing tensile tests. The components used in the discarded hot-leg were retrieved, cleaned and integrated in the renovated loop. A method of cleaning component of sodium residue has been established. This paper highlights the in-service fabrication and inspection of the renovation.

  9. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel, nickel-base alloy and its weldments in aqueous LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S.I.Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012 E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    With the advances in materials production new alloys have been developed, such as High- Alloy Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-base alloys, with high corrosion resistance. These new alloys are finding applications in Lithium Bromide absorption refrigeration systems, because LiBr is a corrosive medium which can cause serious corrosion problems, in spite of its favourable properties as absorbent. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) used as its corresponding filler metal, and the weld metal obtained by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) procedure. The materials have been tested in different LiBr solutions (400 g/l, 700 g/l, 850 g/l and a commercial 850 g/l LiBr heavy brine containing Lithium Chromate as corrosion inhibitor), at 25 deg. C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the general electrochemical behaviour of the materials. The polarization curves of all the alloys tested were typical of passivable materials. Pitting corrosion susceptibility has been evaluated by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves, which provide parameters to analyse re-passivation properties. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded and the base material has been estimated from the polarization diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Method. Samples have been etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the pitting resistance of all these materials increases as the LiBr concentration decreases. In general, the presence of chromate tended to shift the pitting potential to more positive values than those obtained in the 850 g/l LiBr solution. (authors)

  10. The influence of the heat treatment on delta ferrite transformation in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mateša

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Shielded metal arc (SMAW welded specimens using austenitic consumable materials with different amount of delta-ferrite are annealed in range 650-750 °C through 2-10 hours. Factorial plan 33 with influenced factors regression analyze of measured delta-ferrite values is used. The transformation i.e. decomposition of delta ferrite during annealing was analyzed regarding on weld cracking resistance using metallographic examination and WRC-1992 diagram.

  11. Influence of deformation on the structure and mechanical and corrosion properties of high-nitrogen austenitic 07Kh16AG13M3 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezovskaya, V. V.; Khadyev, M. S.; Merkushkin, E. A.; Sokolovskaya, Yu. A.

    2013-11-01

    The correlation has been studied between the structure of a high-nitrogen austenitic Cr-Mn-N steel formed in the process of combined hardening treatment, including cold plastic deformation (CPD), and its mechanical and corrosion properties. The structure and properties of commercial high-nitrogen (0.8% N) 07Kh16AG13M3 steel is analyzed after rolling by CPD and aging at 500 and 800°C. It is shown that CPD of the steel occurs by dislocation slip and deformation twinning. Deformation twinning and also high resistance of austenite to martensitic transformations at true strains of 0.2 and 0.4 determine the high plasticity of the steel. The contribution of the structure imperfection parameters to the broadening of the austenite lines during CPD is estimated by X-ray diffraction. The main hardening factor is stated to be lattice microdistortions. Transmission electron microscopy study shows that heating of the deformed steel to 500°C leads to the formation of the intermediate CrN phase by a homogeneous mechanism, and the intermtallic χ phase forms along the austenite grain boundaries in the case of heating at 800°C. After hardening by all investigated technological schemes, exception for aging at 800°C, the steel does not undergo pitting corrosion and is slightly prone to a stress corrosion cracking during static bending tests, while aging at 800°C causes pitting corrosion at a pitting formation potential E pf = -0.25 V.

  12. Assessment of Creep Deformation, Damage, and Rupture Life of 304HCu Austenitic Stainless Steel Under Multiaxial State of Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, K. C.; Goyal, Sunil; Parameswaran, P.; Ravi, S.; Laha, K.

    2018-01-01

    The role of the multiaxial state of stress on creep deformation and rupture behavior of 304HCu austenitic stainless steel was assessed by performing creep rupture tests on both smooth and notched specimens of the steel. The multiaxial state of stress was introduced by incorporating circumferential U-notches of different root radii ranging from 0.25 to 5.00 mm on the smooth specimens of the steel. Creep tests were carried out at 973 K over the stress range of 140 to 220 MPa. In the presence of notch, the creep rupture strength of the steel was found to increase with the associated decrease in rupture ductility. Over the investigated stress range and notch sharpness, the strengthening was found to increase drastically with notch sharpness and tended toward saturation. The fractographic studies revealed the mixed mode of failure consisting of transgranular dimples and intergranular creep cavitation for shallow notches, whereas the failure was predominantly intergranular for relatively sharper notches. Detailed finite element analysis of stress distribution across the notch throat plane on creep exposure was carried out to assess the creep failure of the material in the presence of notch. The reduction in von-Mises stress across the notch throat plane, which was greater for sharper notches, increased the creep rupture strength of the material. The variation in fracture behavior of the material in the presence of notch was elucidated based on the von-Mises, maximum principal, and hydrostatic stresses. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis of creep strain distribution across the notch revealed localized creep straining at the notch root for sharper notches. A master curve for predicting creep rupture life under the multiaxial state of stress was generated considering the representative stress having contributions from both the von-Mises and principal stress components of the stress field in the notch throat plane. Rupture ductility was also predicted based on the

  13. Effects of strain-induced martensite and its reversion on the magnetic properties of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Filho, I.R. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, University of Sao Paulo, 12602-810 Lorena (Brazil); Sandim, M.J.R., E-mail: msandim@demar.eel.usp.br [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, University of Sao Paulo, 12602-810 Lorena (Brazil); Cohen, R.; Nagamine, L.C.C.M. [Instituto de Física, University of Sao Paulo, 05314-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hoffmann, J. [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, D-72061 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bolmaro, R.E. [Instituto de Física Rosario, CONICET-UNR, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Sandim, H.R.Z. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, University of Sao Paulo, 12602-810 Lorena (Brazil)

    2016-12-01

    Strain-induced martensite (SIM) and its reversion in a cold-rolled AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel was studied by means of magnetic properties, light optical (LOM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), texture measurements, and Vickers microhardness testing. According to Thermo-calc© predictions, the BCC phase (residual δ-ferrite and SIM) is expected to be stable until 600 °C. The current material was cold rolled up to 60% thickness reduction and submitted to both isothermal and stepwise annealing up to 800 °C. Magnetic measurements were taken during annealing (in situ) of the samples and also for their post mortem conditions. The Curie temperatures (T{sub c}) of residual δ-ferrite and SIM have similar values between 550 and 600 °C. Besides T{sub c}, the focused magnetic parameters were saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), remanent magnetization (M{sub R}), and coercive field (H{sub c}). SIM reversion was found to occur in the range of 600–700 °C in good agreement with Thermo-calc© predictions. The microstructures of the material, annealed at 600 and 700 °C for 1 h, were investigated via EBSD. Microtexture measurements for these samples revealed that the texture components were mainly those found for the 60% cold rolled material. This is an evidence that the SIM reversion occurred by an athermal mechanism. - Highlights: • H{sub c} and M{sub R}/M{sub S} ratio give information about distribution of strain-induced martensite. • According to Thermo-calc©, the BCC phase in AISI 201 steel is stable until 600 °C. • Thermo-calc predictions agrees with magnetic properties of AISI 201 steel. • Possible magnetic anisotropy induced by rolling in AISI 201 steel is investigated.

  14. Kinetics of phase transformations of undercooled austenite in 18CrNiMo7-6 steel applied for toothed wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Krawczyk

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Toothed wheels constitute essential part of the steel structural elements market. The most often hypereutectoid structural steels forcarburizing are used for toothed wheels. The final producers of toothed wheels are not demanding regarding a microstructure, providedthat the determined requirements will be fulfilled (e.g. metallurgical purity determined by ultrasounds. Therefore delivered forgings can be in an annealed or quenched state. This results from the situation that the final heat treatment or heat-chemical one is being done at one of the last stages of the toothed wheel production. An essential factor allowing to develop the proper heat treatment is the knowledge of the kinetics of phase transformations of undercooled austenite and its relating to technological conditions, being at the producer disposal, as well as to forging dimensions. Such investigations should be carried out on real melts used for forgings for toothed wheels production together with an analysis of microstructure changes on the forging cross-section. They should be based on calculation methods determining the distribution of cooling rates on its cross-section in dependence of an applied cooling medium.The mentioned above problems in relation to 18CrNiMo7-6 steel - are elucidated in this paper. The aim of the investigations wasthe description of the kinetics of phase transformations of undercooled austenite in this steel. The CCT diagram was constructed for the austenitizing temperature determined on the basis of phase transformations temperatures (the so-called critical points.

  15. Ultrasonic Flaw Detection of Cracks and Machined Flaws as Observed Through Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2009-07-01

    Piping welds in the pressure boundary of light water reactors (LWRs) are subject to a volumetric examination based on Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Due to access limitations and high background radiation levels, the technique used is primarily ultrasonic rather than radiographic. Many of the austenitic welds in safety-related piping systems provide limited access to both sides of the weld, so a far-side examination is necessary. Historically, far-side inspections have performed poorly because of the coarse and elongated grains that make up the microstructures of austenitic weldments. The large grains cause the ultrasound to be scattered, attenuated, and redirected. Additionally, grain boundaries or weld geometry may reflect coherent ultrasonic echoes, making flaw detection and discrimination a more challenging endeavor. Previous studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on ultrasonic far-side examinations in austenitic piping welds involved the application of conventional transducers, use of low-frequency Synthetic Aperture Focusing Techniques (SAFT), and ultrasonic phased-array (PA) methods on specimens containing implanted thermal fatigue cracks and machined reflectors [1-2]. From these studies, PA inspection provided the best results, detecting nearly all of the flaws from the far side. These results were presented at the Fifth International Conference on NDE in Relation to Structural Integrity for Nuclear and Pressurised Components in 2006. This led to an invitation to examine field-removed specimens containing service-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC) at the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center, in Charlotte, North Carolina. Results from this activity are presented.

  16. Microstructural origin of the skeletal ferrite morphology of austenitic stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy was conducted on welds exhibiting a variety of skeletal, or vermicular ferrite morphologies in addition to one lathy ferrite morphology. These ferrite morphologies result from primary ferrite solidification followed by a solid state transformation upon cooling. During cooling, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite leaving a variety of ferrite morphologies. Comparison of composition profiles and alloy partitioning showed both the skeletal and lathy ferrite structures result from a diffusion controlled solid state transformation. However, the overall measured composition profiles of the weld structure are a result of partitioning during both solidification and the subsequent solid state transformation.

  17. Synergy between molybdenum and nitrogen on the pitting corrosion and passive film resistance of austenitic stainless steels as a pH-dependent effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loable, Carole, E-mail: carole.loable@lepmi.grenoble-inp.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Dep. Eng. Quimica, Instituto Superior Técnico-Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 001 Lisbon (Portugal); Viçosa, Isadora N., E-mail: inogueira@poli.ufrj.br [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Mesquita, Thiago J., E-mail: Thiago.mesquita@total.com [CRU Ugitech, Avenue Paul Girod, 73403 Ugine Cedex (France); Mantel, Marc, E-mail: Marc.Mantel@ugitech.com [CRU Ugitech, Avenue Paul Girod, 73403 Ugine Cedex (France); Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Nogueira, Ricardo P., E-mail: rnogueira@pi.ac.ae [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Department of Chemical Engineering, The Petroleum Institute, P.O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Berthomé, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.berthome@simap.grenoble-inp.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Chauveau, Eric, E-mail: eric.chauveau@ugitech.fr [Department of Chemical Engineering, The Petroleum Institute, P.O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Roche, Virginie, E-mail: virginie.roche@lepmi.grenoble-inp.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2017-01-15

    This paper brings up some insights upon the pH dependence of the synergistic effect of Mo and N on the localized corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels. The objective of this work is to study the synergetic effect of Mo and N additions on corrosion and passive film properties of austenitic grades. A comparison between Mo containing (3 wt% Mo); Mo and N containing (3 wt% Mo and 0.1% N) and free Mo or free Mo and N grades of highly controlled laboratory heats was done considering their localized corrosion resistance and oxide film formation in different aggressive conditions, from neutral to alkaline pH. The passive layer was characterized by EIS and XPS analyses. The combined effect of Mo and N on the pitting potential was confirmed to be synergistic, and not just the addition of their individual effects. Moreover, this effect was found to be pH-dependent, being very positive in acid to neutral conditions whereas it was almost inexistent in high pH. - Highlights: • Laboratory austenitic stainless steels with Mo and/or N were tested. • Mo and N acted synergistically to improve pitting resistance. • Synergistic effect is pH-dependent. • N clearly enhanced the repassivation of austenitic SS in presence of Mo.

  18. Study of structural modifications induced by ion implantation in austenitic stainless steel; Etude des modifications structurales induites par implantation ionique dans les aciers austenitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudognon, J

    2006-12-15

    Ion implantation in steels, although largely used to improve the properties of use, involves structural modifications of the surface layer, which remain still prone to controversies. Within this context, various elements (N, Ar, Cr, Mo, Ag, Xe and Pb) were implanted (with energies varying from 28 to 280 keV) in a 316LVM austenitic stainless steel. The implanted layer has a thickness limited to 80 nm and a maximum implanted element concentration lower than 10 % at. The analysis of the implanted layer by grazing incidence X ray diffraction highlights deformations of austenite lines, appearance of ferrite and amorphization of the layer. Ferritic phase which appears at the grain boundaries, whatever the implanted element, is formed above a given 'threshold' of energy (produced of fluency by the energy of an ion). The formation of ferrite as well as the amorphization of the implanted layer depends only on energy. In order to understand the deformations of austenite diffraction lines, a simulation model of these lines was elaborated. The model correctly describes the observed deformations (broadening, shift, splitting) with the assumption that the expansion of the austenitic lattice is due to the presence of implanted element and is proportional to the element concentration through a coefficient k'. This coefficient only depends on the element and varies linearly with its radius. (author)

  19. Texture Analysis using The Neutron Diffraction Method on The Non Standardized Austenitic Steel Process by Machining,Annealing, and Rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Hardi Priyanto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic steel is one type of stainless steel which is widely used in the industry. Many studies on  austenitic stainless steel have been performed to determine the physicalproperties using various types of equipment and methods. In this study, the neutron diffraction method is used to characterize the materials which have been made from  minerals extracted from the mines in Indonesia. The materials consist of a granular ferro-scrap, nickel, ferro-chrome, ferro-manganese, and ferro-silicon added with a little titanium. Characterization of the materials was carried out in threeprocesses, namely: machining, annealing, and rolling. Experimental results obtained from the machining process generally produces a texture in the 〈100〉direction. From the machining to annealing process, the texture index decreases from 3.0164 to 2.434.Texture strength in the machining process (BA2N sample is  8.13 mrd and it then decreases to 6.99 in the annealing process (A2DO sample. In the annealing process the three-component texture appears, cube-on-edge type texture{110}〈001〉, cube-type texture {001}〈100〉, and brass-type {110}〈112〉. The texture is very strong leading to the direction of orientation {100}〈001〉, while the {011}〈100〉is weaker than that of the {001}, and texture withorientation {110}〈112〉is weak. In the annealing process stress release occurred, and this was shown by more randomly pole compared to stress release by the machining process. In the rolling process a brass-type texture{110}〈112〉with a spread towards the goss-type texture {110}〈001〉 appeared,  and  the  brass  component  is markedly  reinforced  compared  to  the undeformed state (before rolling. Moreover, the presence of an additional {110} component was observed at the center of the (110 pole figure. The pole density of three components increases withthe increasing degree of thickness reduction. By increasing degrees

  20. An Atom Probe Study of κ-carbide Precipitation in Austenitic Lightweight Steel and the Effect of Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, L. N.; Van Aken, D. C.; Medvedeva, J.; Isheim, D.; Medvedeva, N.; Song, K.

    2017-11-01

    The influence of phosphorus on κ-carbide precipitation and alloy partitioning in an austenitic Fe-30Mn-9Al-1Si-0.9C-0.5Mo cast steel was studied utilizing a combination of transmission electron microscopy, 3D atom probe tomography, X-ray diffraction, and first-principles atomistic modeling. Increasing the amount of phosphorus from 0.006 to 0.043 wt pct P increased the kinetics of the initial ordering reaction. Specimens from the high-phosphorus steel showed some degree of short-range ordering of Fe-Al-C that took place during the quench. It was shown that phosphorus increases both the size and volume fraction of κ-carbide during aging. However, the distribution of phosphorus appears to be homogeneous, and thus long-range diffusion of phosphorus was not responsible for the observed increase in hardening. It is shown that phosphorus encourages the initial short-range ordering into the E21 structure of κ-carbide and also accelerates spinodal decomposition associated with carbon and aluminum diffusions.

  1. Dynamical recrystallization of high purity austenitic stainless steels; Recristallisation dynamique d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques de haute purete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavard, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the performance of structural materials. The elementary mechanisms (strain hardening and dynamical regeneration, germination and growth of new grains) occurring during the hot working of metals and low pile defect energy alloys have been studied for austenitic stainless steels. In particular, the influence of the main experimental parameters (temperature, deformation velocity, initial grain size, impurities amount, deformation way) on the process of discontinuous dynamical recrystallization has been studied. Alloys with composition equal to those of the industrial stainless steel-304L have been fabricated from ultra-pure iron, chromium and nickel. Tests carried out in hot compression and torsion in order to cover a wide range of deformations, deformation velocities and temperatures for two very different deformation ways have allowed to determine the rheological characteristics (sensitivity to the deformation velocity, apparent activation energy) of materials as well as to characterize their microstructural deformations by optical metallography and electron back-scattered diffraction. The influence of the initial grain size and the influence of the purity of the material on the dynamical recrystallization kinetics have been determined. An analytical model for the determination of the apparent mobility of grain boundaries, a semi-analytical model for the dynamical recrystallization and at last an analytical model for the stationary state of dynamical recrystallization are proposed as well as a new criteria for the transition between the refinement state and the state of grain growth. (O.M.)

  2. Effect of solidification conditions on the solidification mode in austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suutala, N.

    1983-02-01

    The effect of the solidification conditions on the solidification mode in the composition range in which the primary austenitic and ferritic modes compete is studied by varying the welding parameters in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding and by comparing the results with those obtained from other laboratory experiments. A good agreement holds if the effect of the composition is described by the ratio Creq/Nieq (Creq = pct Cr + 1.37 × pct Mo + 1.5 × pct Si + 2 × pct Nb + 3 × pct Ti and Nieq = pct Ni + 0.31 × pct Mn + 22 × pct C + 14.2 × pct N + pct Cu) and the effect of the solidification conditions by the growth rate. The critical value of the ratio Creq/Nieq corresponding to the transition from primary austenitic to ferritic solidification increases from 1.43 to 1.55 with increasing growth rate. The upper limit is valid in GTA welding at high welding speeds, while the lower limit corresponds to the practical conditions which exist in ingot and shaped casting. The validity and applicability of this solidification model are discussed.

  3. High-plasticity heat-resistant 03Kh14G16N6Yu-type steels with heat-and deformation-resistant austenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, V. M.; Bannykh, I. O.; Zvereva, T. N.

    2008-08-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of 03Kh14G16N6Yu-type austenitic steels alloyed by molybdenum, tungsten, vanadium, and zirconium are studied after normalization at 1075°C and long-term holding at 500 700°C. The chemical composition of these steels ensures the resistance of their austenite to the martensitic transformation in the temperature range from 1200 to -196°C and during cold plastic deformation at a reduction of up to 60%. The best combination of the mechanical and technological properties is achieved in a 03Kh15G17N6YuVF steel with 0.08% W and 0.12% V. Long-term (up to 1000 h) holdings at 550 750°C do not cause the precipitation of carbide, nitride, and intermetallic phases in this steel. The long-term strength of the 03Kh15G17N6YuVF steel at temperatures up to 650°C is comparable with and its plasticity and impact toughness are higher than those of high-nickel Kh16N9M2 and Kh16N12M2 steels, which are applied in the main parts of electric power installations.

  4. 1020 AISI-SAE steel Austenitic Nitrocarburising with alcohol and triethanolamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Castro P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work shows AISI-SAE 1020 steel's nitrocarbide layer's microstructure and micro-hardness profile following 4 hours at 700ºC using methanol, isopropanol and triethanolamine. The steel was then hardened by quenching it in water and then tempered at 350ºC for 1 hour. Its surface had been partially oxidised by heating it at 400ºC for 1 hour. An example is given of other researchers analysing microstructure and propierties in steel having 0,5% C, using endothermic gas and different amounts of ammoniac.

  5. 1020 AISI-SAE steel Austenitic Nitrocarburising with alcohol and triethanolamine

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Castro P.; Carlos Bohórquez

    2010-01-01

    The present work shows AISI-SAE 1020 steel's nitrocarbide layer's microstructure and micro-hardness profile following 4 hours at 700ºC using methanol, isopropanol and triethanolamine. The steel was then hardened by quenching it in water and then tempered at 350ºC for 1 hour. Its surface had been partially oxidised by heating it at 400ºC for 1 hour. An example is given of other researchers analysing microstructure and propierties in steel having 0,5% C, using endothermic gas and different amou...

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Raman, R. K.; Siew, Wai Hoong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution. PMID:28788276

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Singh Raman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  8. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R K Singh; Siew, Wai Hoong

    2014-12-05

    This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in 30 wt. % MgCl₂ solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  9. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  10. Numerical simulation of hydrogen-assisted crack initiation in austenitic-ferritic duplex steels; Numerische Simulation der wasserstoffunterstuetzten Rissbildung in austentisch-ferritischen Duplexstaehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mente, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Duplex stainless steels have been used for a long time in the offshore industry, since they have higher strength than conventional austenitic stainless steels and they exhibit a better ductility as well as an improved corrosion resistance in harsh environments compared to ferritic stainless steels. However, despite these good properties the literature shows some failure cases of duplex stainless steels in which hydrogen plays a crucial role for the cause of the damage. Numerical simulations can give a significant contribution in clarifying the damage mechanisms. Because they help to interpret experimental results as well as help to transfer results from laboratory tests to component tests and vice versa. So far, most numerical simulations of hydrogen-assisted material damage in duplex stainless steels were performed at the macroscopic scale. However, duplex stainless steels consist of approximately equal portions of austenite and δ-ferrite. Both phases have different mechanical properties as well as hydrogen transport properties. Thus, the sensitivity for hydrogen-assisted damage is different in both phases, too. Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop a numerical model of a duplex stainless steel microstructure enabling simulation of hydrogen transport, mechanical stresses and strains as well as crack initiation and propagation in both phases. Additionally, modern X-ray diffraction experiments were used in order to evaluate the influence of hydrogen on the phase specific mechanical properties. For the numerical simulation of the hydrogen transport it was shown, that hydrogen diffusion strongly depends on the alignment of austenite and δ-ferrite in the duplex stainless steel microstructure. Also, it was proven that the hydrogen transport is mainly realized by the ferritic phase and hydrogen is trapped in the austenitic phase. The numerical analysis of phase specific mechanical stresses and strains revealed that if the duplex stainless steel is

  11. Proposal for the award of two contracts for the supply of fine-blanked austenitic steel collars for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the supply of 12 500 000 fine-blanked austenitic steel collars in three different shapes and of two different types for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets. Following a market survey carried out among 70 firms in fourteen Member States and one firm in Japan, a call for tenders (IT-2469/LHC/LHC) was sent on 3 June 1999 to eleven firms in five Member States and one firm in Japan. By the closing date, CERN had received five tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of two contracts with: - MALVESTITI (IT) for the supply of up to 7 812 500 fine-blanked austenitic steel collars, which represents 5/8 of the total quantity required for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets, for a total amount of up to 6 908 509 Swiss francs, subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, with an option for the supply of up to 4 687 500 additional fine-blanked austenitic steel collars, wh...

  12. Influence of temperature histories during reactor startup periods on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Shigeki; Kitsunai, Yuji; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-11-01

    This paper addresses influence of two different temperature profiles during startup periods in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor and a boiling water reactor upon microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons to about 1 dpa and 3 dpa. One of the temperature profiles was that the specimens experienced neutron irradiation in both reactors, under which the irradiation temperature transiently increased to 290 °C from room temperature with increasing reactor power during reactor startup periods. Another was that the specimens were pre-heated to about 150 °C prior to the irradiation to suppress the transient temperature increase. Tensile tests at 290 °C and Vickers hardness tests at room temperature were carried out, and their microstructures were observed by FEG-TEM. Difference of the temperature profiles was observed obviously in interstitial cluster formation, in particular, growth of Frank loops. Although influence of neutron irradiation involving transient temperature increase to 290 °C from room temperature on the yield strength and the Vickers hardness is buried in the trend curves of existing data, the influence was also found certainly in increment of in yield strength, existence of modest yield drop, and loss of strain hardening capacity and ductility. As a result, Frank loops, which were observed in austenitic stainless steel irradiated at doses of 1 dpa or more, seemed to have important implications regarding the interpretation of not irradiation hardening, but deformation of the austenitic stainless steel.

  13. Fatigue strain-life behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 600 in LWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keisler, J.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The existing fatigue strain vs. life (S-N) data, foreign and domestic, for carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, and Alloy 600 used in the construction of nuclear power plant components have been compiled and categorized according to material, loading, and environmental conditions. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the effects of the various service conditions on the fatigue life of these materials. The results of a rigorous statistical analysis have been used to estimate the probability of initiating a fatigue crack. Data in the literature were reviewed to evaluate the effects of size, geometry, and surface finish of a component on its fatigue life. The fatigue S-N curves for components have been determined by adjusting the probability distribution curves for smooth test specimens for the effect of mean stress and applying design margins to account for the uncertainties due to component size/geometry and surface finish. The significance of the effect of environment on the current Code design curve and on the proposed interim design curves published in NUREG/CR-5999 is discussed. Estimations of the probability of fatigue cracking in sample components from BWRs and PWRs are presented.

  14. Ultrasonic Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructure: Discrimination between Equiaxed- and Columnar-Grain Material – An Interim Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Good, Morris S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.; Watson, Bruce E.; Peters, Timothy J.; Dixit, Mukul; Bond, Leonard J.

    2009-10-27

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and inspection of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components used in the nuclear power industry is neither as effective nor reliable as is needed due to detrimental effects upon the interrogating ultrasonic beam and interference from ultrasonic backscatter. The root cause is the coarse-grain microstructure inherent to this class of materials. Some ultrasonic techniques perform better for particular microstructural classifications and this has led to the hypothesis that an ultrasonic inspection can be optimized for a particular microstructural class, if a technique exists to reliably classify the microstructure for feedback to the inspection. This document summarizes scoping experiments of in-situ ultrasonic methods for classification and/or characterization of the material microstructures in CASS components from the outside surface of a pipe. The focus of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic methods and provide an interim report that documents results and technical progress. An initial set of experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that in-service characterization of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) is feasible, and that, if reliably performed, such data would provide real-time feedback to optimize in-service inspections in the field. With this objective in mind, measurements for the experiment were restricted to techniques that should be robust if carried forward to eventual field implementation. Two parameters were investigated for their ability to discriminate between different microstructures in CASS components. The first parameter was a time-of-flight ratio of a normal incidence shear wave to that of a normal incidence longitudinal wave (TOFRSL). The ratio removed dependency on component thickness which may not be accurately reported in the field. The second parameter was longitudinal wave attenuation. The selected CASS specimens provided five equiaxed-grain material samples and five columnar

  15. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  16. Effect of microalloying elements (Nb, V and Ti) on the hot flow behavior of high-Mn austenitic twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Calderon, F. [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio ' U' , Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico (Mexico); Mejia, I., E-mail: imejia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio ' U' , Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico (Mexico); Boulaajaj, A.; Cabrera, J.M. [Departament de Ciencia dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, ETSEIB - Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. de las Bases de Manresa, 1, 08240 Manresa (Spain)

    2013-01-10

    This research work studies the effect of microalloying elements such as Nb, V and Ti on the hot flow behavior of high-Mn austenitic TWIP steel. For this purpose, isothermal uniaxial hot compression tests were carried out at three temperatures (900, 1000 and 1100 Degree-Sign C) and four constant strain rates (10{sup -1}, 10{sup -2}, 10{sup -3} and 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}). Experimental results revealed that hot flow curves of microalloyed TWIP steels show single peak curves for all test conditions. Results are discussed in terms of the peak stress ({sigma}{sub p}) and peak strain ({epsilon}{sub p}) and its dependence on the strain rate ({epsilon}) and temperature. The addition of microalloying elements such as Nb, V and Ti in TWIP steels generates a slight increase in the {sigma}{sub p} value, and Ti microalloyed TWIP steel exhibits the highest {sigma}{sub p} value. Hot deformed microstructures were analyzed by the Electron Back-Scattering Diffraction Technique (EBSD). The most important results of the austenitic recrystallized grain refinement were obtained for V and Ti microalloyed TWIP steels.

  17. Evolution of microstructure after irradiation creep in several austenitic steels irradiated up to 120 dpa at 320 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renault-Laborne, A., E-mail: alexandra.renault@cea.fr [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Garnier, J.; Malaplate, J. [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gavoille, P. [DEN-Service d' Etudes des Matériaux Irradiés, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sefta, F. [EDF R& D, MMC, Site des Renardières, F-77818, Morêt-sur-Loing Cedex (France); Tanguy, B. [DEN-Service d' Etudes des Matériaux Irradiés, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-07-15

    Irradiation creep was investigated in different austenitic steels. Pressurized tubes with stresses of 127–220 MPa were irradiated in BOR-60 at 320 °C to 120 dpa. Creep behavior was dependent on both chemical composition and metallurgical state of steels. Different steels irradiated with and without stress were examined by TEM. Without stress, the irradiation produced high densities of dislocation lines and Frank loops and, depending on the type of steels, precipitates. Stress induced an increase of the precipitate mean size and density and, for some grades, an increase of the mean loop size and a decrease of their density. An anisotropy of Frank loop density or size induced by stress was not observed systematically. Dislocation line microstructure seems not to be different between the stressed and unstressed specimens. No cavities were detectable in these specimens. By comparing with the data from this work, the main irradiation creep models are discussed.

  18. Operation corrosion test of austenitic steel bends for supercritical coal boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cizner J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion tests of both annealed and not annealed bends of HR3C and S304H steels in operation conditions of black and brown coal combustion boilers in EPRU and EDE. After a long-term exposure, the samples were assessed gravimetrically and metallographically. The comparison of annealed and unannealed states showed higher corrosion rates in the annealed state; corrosion of the sample surface did not essentially differ for compression and tensile parts of the beams. Detailed assessment of both steels is described in detail in this study.

  19. Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talha, Mohd [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University) Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India); Kumar, Sanjay [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India); Behera, C.K. [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University) Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India); Sinha, O.P., E-mail: opsinha.met@itbhu.ac.in [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University) Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2014-02-01

    The aims of the present work are to explore the effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized low cost Ni-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels (HNSs) and to compare it with conventionally used biomedical grade, i.e. AISI 316L and 316LVM, using Dalton's Lymphoma (DL) cell line. The MTT assay [3-(4,5-dimethythiazol 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] was performed on DL cell line for cytotoxicity evaluation and cell adhesion test. As a result, it was observed that the HNS had higher cell proliferation and cell growth and it increases by increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working. The surface wettability of the alloys was also investigated by water contact angle measurements. The value of contact angles was found to decrease with increase in nitrogen content and degree of cold working. This indicates that the hydrophilic character increases with increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working which further attributed to enhance the surface free energy (SFE) which would be conducive to cell adhesion which in turn increases the cell proliferation. - Graphical abstract: Effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized Ni-free nitrogen bearing austenitic stainless steels was explored using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line. Cell proliferation and cell adhesion increase by increasing the degree of cold working and nitrogen content in steel indicating that indigenized material is more biocompatible and no negative effect of cold working on these steels. - Highlights: • Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free austenitic stainless steels • Cell proliferation and adhesion increase with nitrogen and degree of cold working. • Contact angle values decrease with nitrogen and degree of cold working.

  20. Study of tensile test behavior of austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes in cold worked condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terui, Clarice, E-mail: clarice.terui@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CINA/CTMSP), Iperó, SP (Brazil). Centro Industrial Nuclear da Marinha; Lima, Nelson B. de, E-mail: nblima@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    These austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes are potential candidates to be used in fuel elements of nuclear power plants (as PWR - Pressurized Water Reactor). So, their metallurgical condition and mechanical properties, as the tensile strength and yield strength, normally are very restrict in demanding project and design requirements. Several full size tensile tests at room temperature and high temperature (315 deg C) were performed in these seamless tubes in cold-worked condition. The results of specified tensile and yield strengths were achieved but the elongation of the tube, in the geometry of the component, could not be measured at high temperature due to unconventional mode of rupture (helical mode without separation of parts). The average value of elongation was obtained from stress-strain curves of hot tensile tests and was around 5%. The results obtained in this research show that this behavior of the full size tensile test samples of thin-walled tube (wall thickness less than 0.5 mm) in high temperature (315°C) is due to the combination of the manufacturing process, the material (crystallographic structure and chemical composition) and the final geometry of the component. In other words, the strong crystallographic texture of material induced by tube drawing process in addition with the geometry of the component are responsible for the behavior in hot uniaxial tensile tests. (author)

  1. Nickel-based alloy/austenitic stainless steel dissimilar weld properties prediction on asymmetric distribution of laser energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Siyu; Ma, Guangyi; Chai, Dongsheng; Niu, Fangyong; Dong, Jinfei; Wu, Dongjiang; Zou, Helin

    2016-07-01

    A properties prediction method of Nickel-based alloy (C-276)/austenitic stainless steel (304) dissimilar weld was proposed and validated based on the asymmetric distribution of laser energy. Via the dilution level DC-276 (the ratio of the melted C-276 alloy), the relations between the weld properties and the energy offset ratio EC-276 (the ratio of the irradiated energy on the C-276 alloy) were built, and the effects of EC-276 on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds were analyzed. The element distribution Cweld and EC-276 accorded with the lever rule due to the strong convention of the molten pool. Based on the lever rule, it could be predicted that the microstructure mostly consists of γ phase in each weld, the δ-ferrite phase formation was inhibited and the intermetallic phase (P, μ) formation was promoted with the increase of EC-276. The ultimate tensile strength σb of the weld joint could be predicted by the monotonically increasing cubic polynomial model stemming from the strengthening of elements Mo and W. The corrosion potential U, corrosion current density I in the active region and EC-276 also met the cubic polynomial equations, and the corrosion resistance of the dissimilar weld was enhanced with the increasing EC-276, mainly because the element Mo could help form a steady passive film which will resist the Cl- ingress.

  2. Niobium carbo-nitride precipitation behavior in a high nitrogen 15Cr-15Ni heat resistant austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Vu The; Jung, Woo Sang

    2011-10-01

    A high nitrogen 15Cr-15Ni niobium-stabilized austenitic alloy has been produced and subjected to a special heat treatment consisting of 5 hours of solution treatment at 1270 °C followed by hot rolling, quenching and subsequent aging at temperatures of 700 °C to 800 °C. It was found that fine dispersion of nano-sized thermally stable primary Nb(C,N) precipitates had already formed in the as-cast condition. The particles were presented at all examined stages of the TMT process (as-homogenized, as-solution treated and as-aged conditions). Secondary precipitates Nb(C,N) were densely formed during subsequent aging; these precipitates had sizes of 4 nm to 5 nm. Both the primary and secondary Nb(C,N) particles showed excellent thermal stability within the temperature range of 700 °C to 800 °C. The creep properties of the studied alloy at 750 °C were superior when compared to those of commercial type 347 stainless steel.

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence applied to laser welding of austenitic stainless steel for dilute alloying element detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Brian J.; Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Williams, Paul A.

    2017-08-01

    Optical spectral analysis of the laser weld plume is a common technique for non-contact, in situ weld plume analysis. However, the low sensitivity of optical emission spectroscopy limits the available information during 1070 nm wavelength laser welding, which is becoming the standard in many industrial operations. Here we demonstrate an improved sensitivity of optical spectroscopy by applying laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for probing the hot gas plume induced during fiber laser welding of 304L austenitic stainless steel. As a proof-of-principle, we show that LIF is capable of resolving a spectral signal from silicon being emitted during welding. Optical detection of such a low concentration alloying element has not previously been reported and shows the capability of LIF for increased sensitivity. Silicon atoms in the weld plume were excited in the ultraviolet at 221.09 nm and detected at 221.64 nm. We demonstrate the detection of silicon LIF down to laser welding powers of 600 W (210 kW cm-2) making this technique applicable even in low-power laser welding or additive manufacturing scenarios.

  4. Through-Thickness Residual Stress Profiles in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds: A Combined Experimental and Prediction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Moat, R. J.; Paddea, S.; Francis, J. A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.; Bouchard, P. J.

    2017-10-01

    Economic and safe management of nuclear plant components relies on accurate prediction of welding-induced residual stresses. In this study, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness of austenitic stainless steel welds has been measured using neutron diffraction and the contour method. The measured data are used to validate residual stress profiles predicted by an artificial neural network approach (ANN) as a function of welding heat input and geometry. Maximum tensile stresses with magnitude close to the yield strength of the material were observed near the weld cap in both axial and hoop direction of the welds. Significant scatter of more than 200 MPa was found within the residual stress measurements at the weld center line and are associated with the geometry and welding conditions of individual weld passes. The ANN prediction is developed in an attempt to effectively quantify this phenomenon of `innate scatter' and to learn the non-linear patterns in the weld residual stress profiles. Furthermore, the efficacy of the ANN method for defining through-thickness residual stress profiles in welds for application in structural integrity assessments is evaluated.

  5. CRADA NFE-08-01456 Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys in Industrial Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Kumar, Deepak [ORNL; Lipschutz, Mark D. [Solar Turbines, Inc.

    2011-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for use of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels as a material of construction for industrial gas turbine recuperator components. ORNL manufactured lab scale foil of three different AFA alloy compositions and delivered them to Solar for creep properties evaluation. One AFA composition was selected for a commercial trial foil batch. Both lab scale and the commercial trial scale foils were evaluated for oxidation and creep behavior. The AFA foil exhibited a promising combination of properties and is of interest for future scale up activities for turbine recuperators. Some issues were identified in the processing parameters used for the first trial commercial batch. This understanding will be used to guide process optimization of future AFA foil material production.

  6. Tensile deformation of 316L austenitic stainless steel using in-situ electron backscatter diffraction and crystal plasticity simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Subhasis [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A9 (Canada); Kiran Kumar, N.A.P. [Materials Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tennesse (United States); Gurao, N.P., E-mail: npgurao@iitk.ac.in [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2015-06-18

    In-situ electron backscatter diffraction of low stacking fault energy 316L austenitic stainless steel was carried out in tension to study the evolution of microstructure and micro-texture as a function of strain till fracture. The microstructure was characterized by extensive twinning throughout the deformation process. At low and intermediate strain, scattered areas of twinned regions are observed in the microstructure with <101> grains with higher Schmid factor showing extensive twinning. However, not all the grains with <101> orientation show twinning despite the higher Schmid factor during initial stages of deformation. However, the entire microstructure appeared uniformly twinned irrespective of the orientation of the parent grains near the fractured region. Twinning was also accompanied with evolution of intragranular misorientation and concomitant roughness evolution in the deformed state. It was observed that the grains with <100> orientation show higher roughness evolution and contribute to failure. Crystal plasticity simulations indicate that saturation in twinning leads to lower work hardening rate, ultimately leading to failure.

  7. TEM study of the nucleation of bubbles induced by He implantation in 316L industrial austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Lescoat, M.-L.; Fortuna, F.; Legras, L.; Li, X.; Gentils, A.

    2015-11-01

    10 keV He ions were implanted in-situ in a TEM into thin foils of 316L industrial austenitic stainless steel at temperatures ranging from 200 to 550 °C. As a result, overpressurized nanometric bubbles are created with density and size depending strongly on both the temperature and fluence of implantation. An investigation on their nucleation and growth is reported through a rigorous statistical analysis whose procedure, including the consideration of free surface effects, is detailed. In the parameter range considered, the results show that an increase of fluence promotes both the nucleation and growth of the bubbles whilst an increase of temperature enhances the growth of the bubbles at the expense of their nucleation. The confrontation of resulting activation energies with existing models for bubble nucleation enables the identification of the underlying mechanisms. In spite of slight differences resulting from different conditions of implantation among which the He concentration, He production rate and He/dpa ratio, it appears that the dominating mechanisms are the same as those obtained in metals in previous studies, which, in addition to corroborating literature results, shows the suitability of in-situ TEM experiments to simulate the production of helium in nuclear materials.

  8. Through-Thickness Residual Stress Profiles in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds: A Combined Experimental and Prediction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Moat, R. J.; Paddea, S.; Francis, J. A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.; Bouchard, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    Economic and safe management of nuclear plant components relies on accurate prediction of welding-induced residual stresses. In this study, the distribution of residual stress through the thickness of austenitic stainless steel welds has been measured using neutron diffraction and the contour method. The measured data are used to validate residual stress profiles predicted by an artificial neural network approach (ANN) as a function of welding heat input and geometry. Maximum tensile stresses with magnitude close to the yield strength of the material were observed near the weld cap in both axial and hoop direction of the welds. Significant scatter of more than 200 MPa was found within the residual stress measurements at the weld center line and are associated with the geometry and welding conditions of individual weld passes. The ANN prediction is developed in an attempt to effectively quantify this phenomenon of `innate scatter' and to learn the non-linear patterns in the weld residual stress profiles. Furthermore, the efficacy of the ANN method for defining through-thickness residual stress profiles in welds for application in structural integrity assessments is evaluated.

  9. The finite element analysis of austenite decomposition during continuous cooling in 22MnB5 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangjun; Xiao, Namin; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Guangyao; Sun, Guangyong

    2014-09-01

    The hot stamping process has been increasingly used in newly designed vehicles to improve crash worthiness and fuel efficiency. In this study, a finite element model based on a subroutine of the commercial software ABAQUS is developed to predict the interactive influence of temperature field and phase transformation on high-strength boron steel. JMAK-type equations with the incubation time and additivity hypothesis are adopted to describe the austenite decomposition into ferrite, pearlite and bainite, while the Koistinen and Marburger (K-M) model is used to describe the displacive transformation of matensite. The simulation results show that the introduction of incubation time into a JMAK equation can provide a more reasonable prediction of the transformation kinetics than if the equation is unmodified. A comparison between the simulation and the standard Jominy end-quenching test demonstrates the capability of the present model for the prediction of transformation kinetics, microstructure distribution and mechanical properties. Furthermore, the adoption of experimentally measured microhardness values for the individual phase constituent can produce improved accuracy of the hardness predictions compared to the empirical hardness equations.

  10. Modelling the attenuation in the ATHENA finite elements code for the ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassignole, B; Duwig, V; Ploix, M-A; Guy, P; El Guerjouma, R

    2009-12-01

    Multipass welds made in austenitic stainless steel, in the primary circuit of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors, are characterized by an anisotropic and heterogeneous structure that disturbs the ultrasonic propagation and makes ultrasonic non-destructive testing difficult. The ATHENA 2D finite element simulation code was developed to help understand the various physical phenomena at play. In this paper, we shall describe the attenuation model implemented in this code to give an account of wave scattering phenomenon through polycrystalline materials. This model is in particular based on the optimization of two tensors that characterize this material on the basis of experimental values of ultrasonic velocities attenuation coefficients. Three experimental configurations, two of which are representative of the industrial welds assessment case, are studied in view of validating the model through comparison with the simulation results. We shall thus provide a quantitative proof that taking into account the attenuation in the ATHENA code dramatically improves the results in terms of the amplitude of the echoes. The association of the code and detailed characterization of a weld's structure constitutes a remarkable breakthrough in the interpretation of the ultrasonic testing on this type of component.

  11. Influence of the solution temperature on the corrosion behavior of an austenitic stainless steel in phosphoric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez-Ferrandiz, M.V.; Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Garcia-Garcia, D.M.; Garcia-Anton, J. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. ETSI Industriales, Valencia (Spain); Guenbour, A.; Bakour, S.; Benckokroun, A. [University Mohammed V-Agdal, Lab. Corrosion-Electrochimie, Faculty of Sciences, Rabat (Morocco)

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to study the effect of the solution temperature on the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, the welded metal obtained by TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding using a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) as filler metal, and the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of the base metal. The materials were tested in 5.5 M phosphoric acid solution at 25 C, 40 C, 60 C and 80 C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the electrochemical behavior of the materials. Corrosion potentials and corrosion current densities were obtained from Tafel analysis. The critic potentials and passivation current densities of the studied materials were also analyzed. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded metal, the base metal and the HAZ, was estimated from the polarisation diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Theory. The samples were etched to study their microstructure by Optical Microscopy. Results demonstrated that the corrosion potential values shift to more anodic potentials as temperature increases. The corrosion current densities and the passive current densities increased with temperature. Open circuit potential values were located in the passive zone of the potentiodynamic curves, which means that the materials passivated spontaneously. (authors)

  12. Effects of strain-induced martensite and its reversion on the magnetic properties of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Filho, I. R.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Cohen, R.; Nagamine, L. C. C. M.; Hoffmann, J.; Bolmaro, R. E.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Strain-induced martensite (SIM) and its reversion in a cold-rolled AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel was studied by means of magnetic properties, light optical (LOM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), texture measurements, and Vickers microhardness testing. According to Thermo-calc© predictions, the BCC phase (residual δ-ferrite and SIM) is expected to be stable until 600 °C. The current material was cold rolled up to 60% thickness reduction and submitted to both isothermal and stepwise annealing up to 800 °C. Magnetic measurements were taken during annealing (in situ) of the samples and also for their post mortem conditions. The Curie temperatures (Tc) of residual δ-ferrite and SIM have similar values between 550 and 600 °C. Besides Tc, the focused magnetic parameters were saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (MR), and coercive field (Hc). SIM reversion was found to occur in the range of 600-700 °C in good agreement with Thermo-calc© predictions. The microstructures of the material, annealed at 600 and 700 °C for 1 h, were investigated via EBSD. Microtexture measurements for these samples revealed that the texture components were mainly those found for the 60% cold rolled material. This is an evidence that the SIM reversion occurred by an athermal mechanism.

  13. Aging precipitation behavior and its influence on mechanical properties of Mn18Cr18N austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fengming; Li, Yajie; He, Wenwu; Zhao, Xiaodong; Chen, Huiqin

    2017-11-01

    The aging precipitation behavior in Mn18Cr18N austenitic stainless steel was investigated at temperatures from 600 °C to 900 °C. During isothermal aging treatment, the primary precipitate was Cr2N with a = 0.478 nm and c = 0.444 nm, and it preferentially nucleates along initial grain boundaries and gradually grows towards the interior of grains in discontinuous cellular way. Meanwhile, a small amount of granular face-centred cubic M23C6 with a = 1.066 nm also were observed, which mainly form along grain boundaries. The effect of these precipitates on mechanical properties of the alloy was studied. It was found that precipitates result in degeneration of the matrix hardness. Meanwhile, the SEM morphologies of aged tensile sample show that the brittle fracture predominates during deformation, i.e. the fracture mode transforms from intergranular fracture to transgranular fracture with the increasing of aging time. Compared with the solution-treated sample, the strength of the aged tensile samples slightly decreases and plasticity remarkably deteriorates.

  14. Creep properties of simulated heat-affected zone of HR3C austenitic steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenička, Václav; Kuchařová, Květa; Kvapilová, Marie; Svoboda, Milan; Král, Petr; Dvořák, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 128, JUN (2017), s. 238-247 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : HR3C steel * Welding * Heat affected zone * Creep * Microstructure * Fractography Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 2.714, year: 2016

  15. On the kinetics of oxidation of austenitic stainless steels AISI 304 and incoloy 800H

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langevoort, J.C.; Hanekamp, L.J.; Gellings, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of oxygen with clean surfaces of stainless steels has been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and AES. The reaction involves chemisorption and dissolution of oxygen into the surface of the metal via a place-exchange mechanism. Oxide thickening occurs via cation and anion migration

  16. Hydrogen Silsesquioxane based silica glass coatings for the corrosion protection of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampert, Felix; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Din, Rameez Ud

    2016-01-01

    The application of stainless steels in hostile environments, such as concentrated acid or hot sea water, requires additional surface treatments, considering that the native surface oxide does not guarantee sufficient corrosion protection under these conditions. In the present work, silica-like thin...

  17. Atomic-scale decoration for improving the pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S. J.; Wang, J.; San, X. Y.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stainless steels are susceptible to the localized pitting corrosion that leads to a huge loss to our society. Studies in the past decades confirmed that the pitting events generally originate from the local dissolution in MnS inclusions which are more or less ubiquitous in stainless steels. Although a recent study indicated that endogenous MnCr2O4 nano-octahedra within the MnS medium give rise to local nano-galvanic cells which are responsible for the preferential dissolution of MnS, effective solutions of restraining the cells from viewpoint of electrochemistry are being tantalizingly searched. Here we report such a galvanic corrosion can be greatly resisted via bathing the steels in Cu2+-containing solutions. This chemical bath generates Cu2−δS layers on the surfaces of MnS inclusions, invalidating the nano-galvanic cells. Our study provides a low-cost approach via an atomic scale decoration to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steels in a volume-treated manner. PMID:24398863

  18. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brimbal, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.brimbal@areva.com [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Fournier, Lionel [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Barbu, Alain [Alain Barbu Consultant, 6 Avenue Pasteur Martin Luther King, 78230 Le Pecq (France)

    2016-01-15

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium. - Highlights: • Irradiation of steels with helium is studied through a new cluster dynamics model. • There is only a small effect of helium on cavity distributions in PWR conditions. • An increase in helium production causes an increase in cavity density over 500 °C. • The role of helium is to stabilize cavities via reduced emission of vacancies.

  19. Dissolution corrosion of 316L austenitic stainless steels in contact with static liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 500 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinou, Konstantina; Charalampopoulou, Evangelia; Van der Donck, Tom; Delville, Rémi; Schryvers, Dominique

    2017-07-01

    This work addresses the dissolution corrosion behaviour of 316L austenitic stainless steels. For this purpose, solution-annealed and cold-deformed 316L steels were simultaneously exposed to oxygen-poor (<10-8 mass%) static liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) for 253-3282 h at 500 °C. Corrosion was consistently more severe for the cold-drawn steels than the solution-annealed steel, indicating the importance of the steel thermomechanical state. The thickness of the dissolution-affected zone was non-uniform, and sites of locally-enhanced dissolution were occasionally observed. The progress of LBE dissolution attack was promoted by the interplay of certain steel microstructural features (grain boundaries, deformation twin laths, precipitates) with the dissolution corrosion process. The identified dissolution mechanisms were selective leaching leading to steel ferritization, and non-selective leaching; the latter was mainly observed in the solution-annealed steel. The maximum corrosion rate decreased with exposure time and was found to be inversely proportional to the depth of dissolution attack.

  20. Effects of N/C Ratio on Solidification Behaviors of Novel Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels for Exhaust Components of Gasoline Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    In order to comply with more stringent environmental and fuel consumption regulations, novel Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels that withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1,323 K (1,050 °C) is urgently demanded from automotive industries. In the current research, the solidification behavior of these alloys with variations of N/C ratio is investigated. Directional solidification methods were carried out to examine the microstructural development in mushy zones. Computational thermodynamic calculations under partial equilibrium conditions were performed to predict the solidification sequence of different phases. Microstructural characterization of the mushy zones indicates that N/C ratio significantly influenced the stability of γ-austenite and the precipitation temperature of NbC/Nb(C,N), thereby altering the solidification path, as well as the morphology and distribution of NbC/Nb(C,N) and γ-ferrite. The solidification sequence of different phases predicted by thermodynamic software agreed well with the experimental results, except the specific precipitation temperatures. The generated data and fundamental understanding will be helpful for the application of computational thermodynamic methods to predict the as-cast microstructure of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant steels.