WorldWideScience

Sample records for high-chromium nickel-base weld

  1. Research on CMT welding of nickel-based alloy with stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) welding technique is a new welding technique introduced by Fronius company. CMT welding of nickel-based alloy with stainless steel was carried out using CuSi3 filler wire in this paper. Effects of welding parameters, including welding current, welding speed, etc, on weld surface appearance were tested. Microstructure and mechanical properties of CMT weld were studied. The results show that the thickness of interface reaction layer of the nickel-based alloy is 14.3μm, which is only 4.33% of base material. The weld is made up of two phases,α-copper and iron-based solid solution. Rupture occurs initially at the welded seam near the edge of stainless steel in shear test. The maximum shear strength of the CuSi3 welded joint is 184.9MPa.

  2. Wear and Grip Loss Evaluation of High Chromium Welding Deposits Applied on Sugar Cane Rolls1

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz Millan, Sebastian; Rugbeño S.A.S; Aguilar Castro, Yesid; Escuela de Ingeniería de Materiales, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia; Casanova García, Gonzalo Fernando; Escuela de Ingeniería Mecánica,Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia

    2015-01-01

    Wear on sugar cane rolls is an expensive maintenance problem for the sugar cane industry. Wear produces loss of sucrose extraction and loss of grip of the roll on the bagasse. This paper presents the evaluation of wear and loss of grip of hypoeutectic and hypereutectic high chromium welding deposits applied on ASTM A-36 steel and gray cast iron. A modified ASTM G-65 standard test was used. Wear was produced by the abrasive action of wet bagasse with three levels of mineral extraneous matter. ...

  3. Inertia Friction Welding Dissimilar Nickel-Based Superalloys Alloy 720Li to IN718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z. W.; Li, H. Y.; Preuss, M.; Karadge, M.; Bowen, P.; Bray, S.; Baxter, G.

    2007-07-01

    This article describes a comprehensive microstructural characterization of an inertia friction welded joint between nickel-based superalloys 720Li and IN718. The investigation has been carried out on both as-welded and postweld heat-treated conditions. The detailed metallographic analysis has enabled the relation of hardness profiles across inertia-welded alloy 720Li to IN718 and morphological changes of the precipitates present. The work demonstrates that inertia friction welding (IFW) 720Li to IN718 results in a weld free of micropores and microcracks and no significant chemical migration across the weld line. However, substantial differences in terms of grain structure and precipitation phase distribution variations are observed on each side of the dissimilar weld. The high γ‧ volume fraction alloy 720Li exhibits a wider heat-affected zone than the mainly γ‧‧ strengthened IN718. Alloy 720Li displays only a small hardness trough near the weld line in the as-welded condition due to the depletion of γ‧, while γ″-strengthened IN718 shows a soft precipitation-free weld region. Postweld heat treatment (PWHT) of the dissimilar weld at 760 °C, a typical annealing temperature for alloy 720Li, results in an overmatch of the heat-affected zone in both sides of the weld. The comparison of the as-welded and postweld heat-treated condition also reveals that IN718 is in an overaged condition after the stress relief treatment.

  4. On Post-Weld Heat Treatment of a Single Crystal Nickel-Based Superalloy Joint by Linear Friction Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three types of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT, i.e. solution treatment + primary aging + secondary aging (I, secondary aging (II, and primary aging + secondary aging (III, were applied to a single crystal nickel-based superalloy joint made with linear friction welding (LFW. The results show that the grains in the thermomechanically affected zone (TMAZ coarsen seriously and the primary γ' phase in the TMAZ precipitates unevenly after PWHT I. The primary γ' phase in the TMAZ and weld zone (WZ precipitates insufficiently and fine granular secondary γ' phase is observed in the matrix after PWHT II. After PWHT III, the primary γ' phase precipitates more sufficiently and evenly compared to PWHTs I and II. Moreover, the grains in the TMAZ have not coarsened seriously and fine granular secondary γ' phase is not found after PWHT III. PWHT III seems more suitable to the LFWed single crystal nickel-based superalloy joints when performing PWHT.

  5. Optimality analysis of multiplex A-TIG welding flux for nickel-base superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Chenglei; Yang Chunli; Liang Yingchun; Lin Sanbao; Yu Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Orthogonal experiment is employed to study a new kind of multiplex flux for nickel-base superalloy. This activated TIG welding flux is composed of NaF, MgF2 and CaF2, and their proportion is 5:4:1. Compared with conventional TIG welding, the penetration increases 164% by the action of the flux. Tensile test result indicates that the fracture strength of the mixed flux A-TIG weld bead is higher than base metal, and it increases along with the decrement of the welding current. The average extensibility of the weldment is beyond 100%, which means perfect ductility. Metallographs elucidate that there exist lots of deep and evenly distributed dimples on the fracture section of weld bead while on that of base metal there only exists a few shallow dimples and massive tearing ridge.

  6. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  7. Welding Metallurgy of Nickel-Based Superalloys for Power Plant Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, David C.

    Increasing the steam temperature and pressure in coal-fired power plants is a perpetual goal driven by the pursuit of increasing thermal cycle efficiency and reducing fuel consumption and emissions. The next target steam operating conditions, which are 760°C (1400°F) and 35 MPa (5000 psi) are known as Advanced Ultra Supercritical (AUSC), and can reduce CO2 emissions up to 13% but this cannot be achieved with traditional power plant construction materials. The use of precipitation-strengthened Nickel-based alloys (superalloys) is required for components which will experience the highest operating temperatures. The leading candidate superalloys for power plant construction are alloys 740H, 282, and 617. Superalloys have excellent elevated temperature properties due to careful microstructural design which is achieved through very specific heat treatments, often requiring solution annealing or homogenization at temperatures of 1100 °C or higher. A series of postweld heat treatments was investigated and it was found that homogenization steps before aging had no noticeable effect on weld metal microhardness, however; there were clear improvements in weld metal homogeneity. The full abstract can be viewed in the document itself.

  8. A Comparison of Residual Stress Development in Inertia Friction Welded Fine Grain and Coarse Grain Nickel-Base Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, N.; Rolph, J.; Moat, R.; Hughes, D.; Hofmann, M.; Kelleher, J.; Baxter, G.; Withers, P. J.; Preuss, M.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the base material microstructure on the development of residual stresses across the weld line in inertia friction welds (IFWs) of high-strength nickel-base superalloy RR1000 was studied using neutron diffraction. A comparison was carried out between tubular IFW specimens generated from RR1000 heat treated below (fine grain (FG) structure) and above (coarse grain (CG) structure) the γ'-solvus. Residual stresses were mapped in the as-welded (AW) condition and, after a postweld heat treatment (PWHT), optimized for maximum alloy strength. The highest tensile stresses were generally found in the hoop direction at the weld line near the inner diameter of the tubular-shaped specimens. A comparison between the residual stresses generated in FG and CG RR1000 suggests that the starting microstructure has little influence on the maximum residual stresses generated in the weld even though different levels of energy must be input to achieve a successful weld in each case. The residual stresses in the postweld heat treated samples were about 35 pct less than for the AW condition. Despite the fact that the high-temperature properties of the two parent microstructures are different, no significant differences in terms of stress relief were found between the FG and CG RR1000 IFWs. Since the actual weld microstructures of FG and CG RR1000 inertia welds are very similar, the results suggest that it is the weld microstructure and its associated high-temperature properties rather than the parent material that affects the overall weld stress distribution and its subsequent stress relief.

  9. Modeling Long-term Creep Performance for Welded Nickel-base Superalloy Structures for Power Generation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Gupta, Vipul [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Huang, Shenyan [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Soare, Monica [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Zhao, Pengyang [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States); Wang, Yunzhi [GE Global Research, NIskayuna, NY (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The goal of this project is to model long-term creep performance for nickel-base superalloy weldments in high temperature power generation systems. The project uses physics-based modeling methodologies and algorithms for predicting alloy properties in heterogeneous material structures. The modeling methodology will be demonstrated on a gas turbine combustor liner weldment of Haynes 282 precipitate-strengthened nickel-base superalloy. The major developments are: (1) microstructure-property relationships under creep conditions and microstructure characterization (2) modeling inhomogeneous microstructure in superalloy weld (3) modeling mesoscale plastic deformation in superalloy weld and (4) a constitutive creep model that accounts for weld and base metal microstructure and their long term evolution. The developed modeling technology is aimed to provide a more efficient and accurate assessment of a material’s long-term performance compared with current testing and extrapolation methods. This modeling technology will also accelerate development and qualification of new materials in advanced power generation systems. This document is a final technical report for the project, covering efforts conducted from October 2014 to December 2016.

  10. Nickel-based alloy/austenitic stainless steel dissimilar weld properties prediction on asymmetric distribution of laser energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Siyu; Ma, Guangyi; Chai, Dongsheng; Niu, Fangyong; Dong, Jinfei; Wu, Dongjiang; Zou, Helin

    2016-07-01

    A properties prediction method of Nickel-based alloy (C-276)/austenitic stainless steel (304) dissimilar weld was proposed and validated based on the asymmetric distribution of laser energy. Via the dilution level DC-276 (the ratio of the melted C-276 alloy), the relations between the weld properties and the energy offset ratio EC-276 (the ratio of the irradiated energy on the C-276 alloy) were built, and the effects of EC-276 on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds were analyzed. The element distribution Cweld and EC-276 accorded with the lever rule due to the strong convention of the molten pool. Based on the lever rule, it could be predicted that the microstructure mostly consists of γ phase in each weld, the δ-ferrite phase formation was inhibited and the intermetallic phase (P, μ) formation was promoted with the increase of EC-276. The ultimate tensile strength σb of the weld joint could be predicted by the monotonically increasing cubic polynomial model stemming from the strengthening of elements Mo and W. The corrosion potential U, corrosion current density I in the active region and EC-276 also met the cubic polynomial equations, and the corrosion resistance of the dissimilar weld was enhanced with the increasing EC-276, mainly because the element Mo could help form a steady passive film which will resist the Cl- ingress.

  11. 3D modelling of a multi pass dissimilar tube welding and post weld heat treatment of nickel based alloy and chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar-Krishnasamy, Ram, E-mail: ram.kumar.krishnasamy@iwm.fraunhofer.d [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials, Woehlerstrasse 11, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Siegele, Dieter [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials, Woehlerstrasse 11, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    A dissimilar tube welding is performed between the nickel based Alloy617 and creep resistant steel VM12 using the former as the weld material. SYSWELD welding software is used to model the thermal and mechanical analysis. A readily available thermal history is used to calibrate the heat source input for the thermal analysis to generate the adequate thermal cycle by fitting the welding velocity, heat intensity factor of the GOLDAK heat source and the length of molten zone. The transient temperature field is then incorporated as the input for the mechanical analysis to obtain the residual stresses in which the phase transformation of the materials during welding is taken into account. Subsequently, the weld materials are characterized by using the Norton's creep law to determine the Norton parameters based on relaxation experiments. The residual stresses generated after the multi pass welding by SYSWELD is transferred into ABAQUS as the initial condition for the post weld heat treatment (PWHT) simulation. The simulations show that the residual stresses reduce in magnitude but still present even after PWHT.

  12. Evaluation of the Low Heat Input Process for Weld Repair of Nickel-Base Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, J.; Richards, N. L.

    2011-10-01

    The repair of turbine blades and vanes commonly involves gas tungsten arc welding or an equivalent process, but unfortunately these components are often susceptible to heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking during the weld repair process. This is a major problem especially in cast alloys due to their coarse-grain size and where the (Al + Ti) contents is in excess of 3-4%; vacuum brazing is also used but mainly on low stress non-rotating components such as vanes. Micro-welding has the potential to deposit small amounts of filler at low heat input levels with minimum HAZ and thus is an attractive process for depositing a quality weld. As with conventional fusion processes, the filler alloy is deposited by the generation of a low power arc between a consumable electrode and the substrate. The low heat input of this process offers unique advantages over more common welding processes such as gas tungsten arc, plasma arc, laser, and electron beam welding. In this study, the low heat input characteristic of micro-welding has been used to simulate weld repair using Inconel (IN) (Inconel and IN are trademarks of INCO Alloys International) 625, Rene (Rene is a trademark of General Electric Company) 41, Nimonic (Nimonic is a trademark of INCO Alloys International) 105 and Inconel 738LC filler alloys, to a cast Inconel 738LC substrate. The effect of micro-welding process parameters on the deposition rate, coating quality, and substrate has been investigated.

  13. Characterization of the Micro-Welding Process for Repair of Nickel Base Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, J.; Richards, N. L.

    2007-12-01

    Micro-welding is a low-heat input process whereby a metal or cermet, is deposited by the generation of a low-power arc between a consumable electrode and a substrate. The low-heat input of this process offers unique advantages over more common welding processes such as gas tungsten arc, plasma arc, laser, and electron beam welding. At present, the repair of turbine blades and vanes commonly involves gas tungsten arc welding and these components are susceptible to heat affected zone cracking during the weld repair process; vacuum brazing is also used but mainly on low-stress components such as stators. In this study, the low-heat input characteristic of micro-welding has been utilized to simulate repair of Inconel (Trade Mark of Special Metals) 625, Inconel 718, and Inconel 722 filler alloys to a cast Inconel 738 substrate. The effect of micro-welding process parameters on the deposition rate, coating quality, and substrate has been investigated.

  14. Microstructure and abrasive wear properties of M(Cr,Fe7C3 carbides reinforced high-chromium carbon coating produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner BUYTOZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, high-chromium ferrochromium carbon hypereutectic alloy powder was coated on AISI 4340 steel by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. The coating layers were analyzed by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Depending on the gas tungsten arc welding pa-rameters, either hypoeutectic or hypereutectic microstructures were produced. Wear tests of the coatings were carried out on a pin-on-disc apparatus as function of contact load. Wear rates of the all coating layers were decreased as a function of the loading. The improvement of abrasive wear resistance of the coating layer could be attributed to the high hardness of the hypereutectic M7C3 carbides in the microstruc-ture. As a result, the microstructure of surface layers, hardness and abrasive wear behaviours showed different characteristics due to the gas tungsten arc welding parameters.

  15. Dendritic grain growth simulation in weld pool of nickel base alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan Xiaohong; Wei Yanhong; Ma Rui; Dong Zhibo

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic grain growth at the edge of the weld pool is simulated using a stochastic numerical model of cellular automaton algorithm. The grain growth model is established based upon the balance of solute in the solid/liquid interface of the dendrite tip. Considering the complicated nucleation condition and competitive growth, the dendrite morphologies of different nucleation condition are simulated. The simulated results reproduced the dendrite grain evolution process at the edge of the weld pool. It is indicated that the nucleation condition is an important factor influencing the grain morphologies especially the morphologies of secondary and tertiary arms.

  16. Computational and experimental observations of welds in third-generation nickel-based superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naffakh-Moosavy, Homam

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study is to introduce the weld quantitative solidification paths in the newly designed third-generation superalloys. The research has been conducted using both computational and experimental approaches. The model used the Scheil solidification relations to correlate the partitioning elements with their effects on the solidification paths. Accordingly, the k values were calculated for all the participating elements in the superalloy welds. The results of model demonstrated that these were very close to unity for austenite former elements, i.e. Ni, Co, Cr and Fe, while the other elements such as Ti, Nb and Mo displayed a significant tendency for segregation. The mathematical equations were calculated for weld solidification paths of superalloys. In all the welds, a remarkable segregation behaviour was observed, especially for Nb and Ti. The solidification path equations predicted type and amount of secondary phases. The solidification paths were compared with eutectic reactions ?, and ?, on the basis of the Ni-Ti-C and Ni-Nb-C ternary phase diagrams. Both the experimental measurements and microstructural observations of eutectics exhibited an appropriate accordance with the solidification paths obtained by model calculations.

  17. The Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Nickel Based Alloy Weld Overlay and Coextruded Claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Andrew

    The use of low NOx boilers in coal fired power plants has resulted in sulfidizing corrosive conditions within the boilers and a reduction in the service lifetime of the waterwall tubes. As a solution to this problem, Ni-based weld overlays are used to provide the necessary corrosion resistance however; they are susceptible to corrosion fatigue. There are several metallurgical factors which give rise to corrosion fatigue that are associated with the localized melting and solidification of the weld overlay process. Coextruded coatings offer the potential for improved corrosion fatigue resistance since coextrusion is a solid state coating process. The corrosion and corrosion fatigue behavior of alloy 622 weld overlays and coextruded claddings was investigated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator retrofitted with a retort. The experiments were conducted at a constant temperature of 600°C using a simulated combustion gas of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-0.12%H 2S. An alternating stress profile was used with a minimum tensile stress of 0 MPa and a maximum tensile stress of 300 MPa (ten minute fatigue cycles). The results have demonstrated that the Gleeble can be used to successfully simulate the known corrosion fatigue cracking mechanism of Ni-based weld overlays in service. Multilayer corrosion scales developed on each of the claddings that consisted of inner and outer corrosion layers. The scales formed by the outward diffusion of cations and the inward diffusion of sulfur and oxygen anions. The corrosion fatigue behavior was influenced by the surface finish and the crack interactions. The initiation of a large number of corrosion fatigue cracks was not necessarily detrimental to the corrosion fatigue resistance. Finally, the as-received coextruded cladding exhibited the best corrosion fatigue resistance.

  18. Dissimilar steel welding and overlay covering with nickel based alloys using SWAM (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) and GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) processes in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Chilque, Angel Rafael [Centro Tecnico de Engenharia e Inovacao Empresarial Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Bracarense, Alexander Queiroz; Lima, Luciana Iglesias Lourenco [Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Quinan, Marco Antonio Dutra; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca [Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Marconi, Guilherme [Federal Center of Technological Education (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work presents the welding of dissimilar ferritic steel type A508 class 3 and austenitic stainless steel type AISI 316 L using Inconel{sup R} 600 (A182 and A82) and overlay covering with Inconel{sup R} 690 (A52) as filler metal. Dissimilar welds with these materials without defects and weldability problems such as hot, cold, reheat cracking and Ductility Dip Crack were obtained. Comparables mechanical properties to those of the base metal were found and signalized the efficiency of the welding procedure and thermal treatment selected and used. This study evidences the importance of meeting compromised properties between heat affected zone of the ferritic steel and the others regions presents in the dissimilar joint, to elaborate the dissimilar metal welding procedure specification and weld overlay. Metallographic studies with optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness were carried out to justified and support the results, showing the efficiency of the technique of elaboration of dissimilar metal welding procedure and overlay. The results are comparables and coherent with the results found by others. Some alternatives of welding procedures are proposed to attain the efficacy. Further studies are proposed like as metallographic studies of the fine microstructure, making use, for example, of scanning electron microscope (SEM adapted with an EDS) to explain looking to increase the resistance to primary water stress corrosion (PWSCC) in nuclear equipment. (author)

  19. The environmentally-assisted cracking behaviour in the transition region of nickel-base alloy/low-alloy steel dissimilar weld joints under simulated BWR conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.; Leber, H.J. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Lab for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour perpendicular to the fusion line in the transition region between the Alloy 182 nickel-base weld metal and the adjacent low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel of simulated dissimilar metal weld joints was investigated under boiling water reactor normal water chemistry conditions at different stress intensities and chloride concentrations. A special emphasis was placed to the question whether a fast growing inter-dendritic SCC crack in the highly susceptible Alloy 182 weld metal can easily cross the fusion line and significantly propagate into the adjacent low-alloy RPV steel. Cessation of inter-dendritic stress corrosion crack growth was observed in high-purity or sulphate-containing oxygenated water under periodical partial unloading or constant loading conditions with stress intensity factors below 60 MPa-m{sup 1/2} for those parts of the crack front, which reached the fusion line. In chloride containing water, on the other hand, the inter-dendritic stress corrosion crack in the Alloy 182 weld metal very easily crossed the fusion line and further propagated with a very high growth rate as a transgranular crack into the heat-affected zone and base material of the adjacent low-alloy steel. (authors)

  20. GH 99镍基合金薄板电子束焊接头疲劳性能研究%Study on Fatigue Property of Electron Beam Welded Joint of GH9 9 Nickel-based Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张航; 孙通伯; 于明玄

    2014-01-01

    电子束焊作为一种先进的连接技术,具有能量集中、焊接速度快、热影响区小等特点,被广泛应用于工业工程、航空航天等国民经济的重要领域。随着航天飞行器发动机设计寿命的不断提高,主要结构部件的电子束焊接头疲劳性能越来越受到设计工作者的关注,研究电子束焊接头的疲劳性能已经成为焊接工作者一个重要的课题。本文采用电子束焊接工艺,制备了 GH99镍基高温合金薄板对接接头。针对电子束焊接头,进行了显微硬度测试、疲劳性能的研究及疲劳失效机理分析。研究表明,电子束焊接头焊缝中心及热影响区的维氏硬度与 GH99镍基高温合金母材金属基本相同,接头并未出现性能的不均匀性。对两种工艺下的电子束焊接头的疲劳 S-N 曲线分析表明,适当加大电子束焊焊接电流,有利于减少焊缝焊根部位的焊接缺陷,有利于提高电子束焊接头的疲劳性能,从而提高了焊接接头疲劳寿命。%Electron beam welding is an advanced welding technology,which has the characteristics of high energy density,fast welding speed and small heat-affected zone.The electron beam weld-ing is widely used in industrial engineering,aerospace and other areas of the national economy. With the continuous improvement of design life of the spacecraft engine,the designers pay more and more attentions to the fatigue properties of electron beam welded joints of the main structural components.Research on the fatigue properties of electron beam welded joints has become an im-portant issue for welding workers.Square butt joints of GH99 nickel-base alloy sheet are fabrica-ted using electron beam welding.The micro-hardness,fatigue properties and fatigue failure mechanism of the electron beam welded joints are tested and analyzed.It is found that the vickers hardness of weld center and heat affected zone of electron beam welded joints are

  1. Structure and Properties of Nickel-based Surfacing on Crust Breaker Deposited by Plasma Arc Welding%打壳锤头等离子堆焊镍基涂层组织和性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国栋; 李莉; 刘念; 曹红美; 毛艳

    2014-01-01

    Nickel-based alloy coatings are deposited on the surface of crust breaker made of Q235 steel through plasma arc welding with the nickel-based powders containing 50% WC, 40% WC and 30% WC+TiC, respectively. And the microstructure, chemical composition, micro-hardness, abrasive resistance and corrosion resistance are examined on the samples investigated by using optical microscope(OM), scanning electron microscope(SEM), Vickers hardness tester and friction and wear testing machine. The microstructures of the coatings are γ-Ni solid solution and hard dispersed compound particles, such as WC, (Ti, V) C, etc. The coatings with low dilution rate possess a better metallurgical bonding with the matrix metal, and better electrolytic corrosion resistance compared with the Q235 matrix. The Nickel-based alloy coating containing 30%WC+TiC has the highest wear resistance and hot corrosion resistance in comparison with the coatings containing 50%WC and 40%WC. Therefore, the Nickel-based alloy coating layer containing 30%WC+TiC has the optimum comprehensive properties and extensive application prospect.%采用等离子堆焊技术在打壳锤头基体Q235钢表面进行堆焊,堆焊材料选用分别含有50%WC、40%WC和30%WC+TiC的复合镍基粉末。借助金相显微镜、扫描电子显微镜、显微硬度仪、摩擦磨损试验仪等仪器对所得各堆焊层的显微组织、化学成分、显微硬度、耐磨性和耐蚀性进行分析。试验结果表明,三种合金堆焊层显微组织均为γ-Ni 固溶体和弥散分布的不同形态的硬质化合物相,如WC,(Ti,V)C等。三种合金堆焊层与基体界面处冶金结合良好,堆焊层稀释率低,且与基体Q235钢相比,耐电解腐蚀性显著提高。含有30%WC+TiC的镍基合金堆焊层与含有50%WC和40%WC的镍基合金堆焊层相比,具有更高的耐磨性和抗热腐蚀性。因而含有30%WC+TiC的镍基合金堆焊层综合性能最优,能够大幅度延长打壳锤头使

  2. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  3. Creep and creep-fatigue behavior of high chromium steel weldment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yukio TAKAHASHI; Masaaki TABUCHI

    2011-01-01

    Manuscript received I December 2010; in revised form 9 March 2011Strength of welded joints of high chromium steels is one of the important concerns for fabricators and operators of ultra supercritical thermal power plants. A number of creep as well as creep-fatigue tests with tensile hold have been carried out on the welded joints of two types of high chromium steels widely used in Japan, I.e. Grade 91 and 122 steels. It was found that failure occurred in fine grain heat-affected zone in all the creep-fatigue tests, even at a relatively low temperature and fairly short time where failure occurred in plain base metal region in simple creep testing. Four procedures were used to predict failure lives and their results were compared with the test results. A newly proposed energy-based approach gave the best estimation of failure life, without respect of the material and temperature.

  4. New approach for assessing the weldability of precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Homam Naff akh Moosavy; Mohammad-Reza Aboutalebi; Seyed Hossein Seyedein; Meisam Khodabakhshi; Carlo Mapelli

    2013-01-01

    A new procedure was proposed for evaluating the weldability of nickel-base superalloys. The theory is on the basis of two microstructural patterns. In pattern I, the weld microstructure exhibits severe alloying segregation, many low-melting eutectic structures, and low weldability. The weld requires a weaker etchant and a shorter time for etching. In pattern II, the weld microstructure displays less alloying segregation, low quantity of eutectic structures, and high weldability. The weld needs a stronger etchant and a longer time for etching. Five superalloys containing diff erent amounts of Nb and Ti were designed to verify the patterns. After welding operations, the welds were etched by four etchants with diff erent corrosivities. The weldability was determined by TG-DSC measurements. The metallography and weldability results confirmed the theoretic patterns. Finally, the etchant corrosivity and etching time were proposed as new criteria to evaluate the weldability of nickel-base superalloys.

  5. New approach for assessing the weldability of precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavy, Homam Naffakh; Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein; Khodabakhshi, Meisam; Mapelli, Carlo

    2013-12-01

    A new procedure was proposed for evaluating the weldability of nickel-base superalloys. The theory is on the basis of two microstructural patterns. In pattern I, the weld microstructure exhibits severe alloying segregation, many low-melting eutectic structures, and low weldability. The weld requires a weaker etchant and a shorter time for etching. In pattern II, the weld microstructure displays less alloying segregation, low quantity of eutectic structures, and high weldability. The weld needs a stronger etchant and a longer time for etching. Five superalloys containing different amounts of Nb and Ti were designed to verify the patterns. After welding operations, the welds were etched by four etchants with different corrosivities. The weldability was determined by TG-DSC measurements. The metallography and weldability results confirmed the theoretic patterns. Finally, the etchant corrosivity and etching time were proposed as new criteria to evaluate the weldability of nickel-base superalloys.

  6. Investigations on avoidance of hot cracks during laser welding of austenitic Cr-Ni steels and nickel-based alloys using temperature field tailoring. Final report; Untersuchungen zur Vermeidung von Heissrissen beim Laserstrahlschweissen von austenitischen Cr-Ni-Staehlen und Nickelbasislegierungen mittels Temperaturfeld-Tailoring. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-08

    The aim of the project was to transfer the developed method of laser beam welding of heat treated machining steels of temperature field tailoring on hot crack endangered austenitic Cr-Ni steels and nickel-based alloys. With this method, transient thermal stresses adjacent to the weld are produced by an travelling induction heating so that the hot cracking is prevented during welding. As test materials the austenitic Cr-Ni steel with sulfur additive 1.4305, the Cr-Ni steels 1.4404 and 1.4435 and the nickel-based alloy Udimet 720 were selected. As a result of the research it was shown that a hot crack-free laser welding in the investigated materials using at least three different welding and material-technical approaches is possible. [German] Das Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens bestand darin, das fuer das Laserstrahlschweissen verguetbarer Automatenstaehle entwickelte Verfahren des Temperaturfeld-Tailorings auf heissrissgefaehrdete austenitische Cr-Ni-Staehle und Nickelbasislegierungen zu uebertragen. Mit diesem Verfahren werden waehrend des Schweissens transiente thermische Spannungen neben der Schweissnaht durch eine mitlaufende induktive Erwaermung so erzeugt, dass die Heissrissbildung verhindert wird. Als Versuchswerkstoffe wurden der austenitische Cr-Ni-Stahl mit Schwefelzusatz 1.4305, die Cr-Ni-Staehle 1.4404 und 1.4435 sowie die Nickelbasislegierung Udimet 720 ausgewaehlt. Im Ergebnis des Forschungsvorhabens konnte gezeigt werden, dass ein heissrissfreies Laserstrahlschweissen bei den untersuchten Werkstoffen unter Nutzung von mindestens drei verschiedenen schweiss- und werkstofftechnischen Ansaetzen moeglich ist: Erstens koennen mit einem Temperaturfeld-Tailoring bei im Stumpfstoss zu verschweissenden Blechen aus austenitischen Staehlen bis mindestens 6 mm Dicke senkrecht zur Naht und parallel zur Blechoberflaeche wirkende transiente Druckspannungen erzeugt werden, die der Bildung von Mittelrippenrissen oder dazu parallel liegenden Heissrissen entgegenwirken

  7. High-temperature performance of a new nickel-based filler metal for power generation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shingledecker, J.; Coleman, K. [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Siefert, J.; Tanzosh, J. [Babcok and Wilcox Research Center, Barberton, OH (United States); Newell, W. [Euroweld, Mooresville, NC (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A new nickel-based weld filler metal, EPRI P87, has been developed as a superior alternative to ERNiCr-3 for use in dissimilar metal welds (DMW) between ferritic and austenitic materials. EPRI P87 has a low coefficient of thermal expansion more closely matching alloys such as Grade 91 and 92 than other available filler metals. Additionally, the size of the carbon denuded region adjacent to the weld in the heat-affected-zone is minimized/eliminated by proper control of weld metal composition. In this work the high-temperature mechanical behavior of DMWs utilizing EPRI P87 (GTAW and GMAW processes) was characterized through tensile and long-term creep-rupture testing. Microstructure analysis was also conducted on tested specimens to evaluate the HAZ regions and failure modes. Performance of the weld metal and welded joints is discussed and compared with ERNiCr-3 and typical 9%Cr-MoV filler metals. (orig.)

  8. Etude expérimentale du soudage par laser YAG de l'alliage base nickel Hastelloy X Experimental study of YAG laser welding of nickel base alloy Hastelloy X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graneix Jérémie

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Le procédé de soudage laser YAG est envisagé pour remplacer le procédé de soudage TIG manuel pour la réalisation de pièces de turboréacteur en alliage nickel-chrome-molybdène Hastelloy X. Cette étude expérimentale a permis de définir un domaine de soudabilité de cet alliage répondant aux critères spécifiques du secteur aéronautique. The YAG laser welding process is contemplated to replace the manual TIG welding process for the production of parts of turbojet in Hastelloy X. This experimental study has identified the field of weldability of this alloy to meet the specific requirements of the aerospace industry.

  9. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  10. Aspectos metalúrgicos de revestimentos dissimilares com a superliga à base de níquel inconel 625 Metallurgical aspects of dissimilar weld overlays of inconel 625 nickel based superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleiton Carvalho Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolongar a vida útil e aumentar a confiabilidade de equipamentos e tubulações de plantas de produção e processamento de petróleo é uma busca constante no setor de petróleo e gás. Tais aspectos dependem essencialmente do uso de ligas resistentes à corrosão. Neste contexto, a soldagem de revestimento com superligas à base de níquel tem sido uma alternativa interessante, pois confere aos equipamentos uma alta resistência à corrosão com um custo inferior, se comparado à fabricação de componentes ou tubulações maciças com superligas. Assim, o objetivo do presente trabalho foi investigar o comportamento metalúrgico de revestimento de superliga à base de níquel do tipo Inconel 625 depositados pelo processo TIG com alimentação de arame frio. As soldagens foram realizadas em uma bancada robotizada, empregando uma fonte eletrônica de soldagem com sistema de aquisição de dados para o monitoramento dos sinais de corrente e tensão. A caracterização microestrutural foi realizada através das técnicas de microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV e transmissão (MET, espectroscopia de energia dispersiva de raios-X (EDS. Os resultados mostraram que a microestrutura do metal de solda foi constituída por uma matriz γ com fases secundárias ricas em Nb. Foi encontrada a formação de precipitados complexos de carbonetos/nitretos de Ti e Nb.To extend the life and reliability of pipes and equipment in oil & gas production and processing settings is a continuous demand. These aspects are essentially dependent on corrosion resistant alloys used. In this context, the weld overlay with Ni-based superalloys is a great interesting alternative, since improve the corrosion resistance without increase the cost of manufacture when compared to massive equipment. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the metallurgical aspects of Inconel 625 weld overlays deposited by GTAW cold wire feed process. The welds were performed using a

  11. Simulation and experiments of ultrasonic propagation in nickel-based alloy weldments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to obtain good understanding of complicated beam propagation behaviors in nickel-based alloy weldments, ray tracing simulation is established to predict the ultrasonic beam path in a special welded structure of dissimilar steels. Also experimental examinations are carried out to measure the ultrasonic beam paths in the weldment. Then comparisons of the modeling predictions with experimental results are presented to reveal the complicated beam propagation behaviors.

  12. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V. [Central Scientific-Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  13. Investigations on avoidance of hot cracks during laser welding of austenitic Cr-Ni steels and nickel-based alloys using temperature field tailoring. Final report; Untersuchungen zur Vermeidung von Heissrissen beim Laserstrahlschweissen von austenitischen Cr-Ni-Staehlen und Nickelbasislegierungen mittels Temperaturfeld-Tailoring. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-08

    The aim of the project was to transfer the developed method of laser beam welding of heat treated machining steels of temperature field tailoring on hot crack endangered austenitic Cr-Ni steels and nickel-based alloys. With this method, transient thermal stresses adjacent to the weld are produced by an travelling induction heating so that the hot cracking is prevented during welding. As test materials the austenitic Cr-Ni steel with sulfur additive 1.4305, the Cr-Ni steels 1.4404 and 1.4435 and the nickel-based alloy Udimet 720 were selected. As a result of the research it was shown that a hot crack-free laser welding in the investigated materials using at least three different welding and material-technical approaches is possible. [German] Das Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens bestand darin, das fuer das Laserstrahlschweissen verguetbarer Automatenstaehle entwickelte Verfahren des Temperaturfeld-Tailorings auf heissrissgefaehrdete austenitische Cr-Ni-Staehle und Nickelbasislegierungen zu uebertragen. Mit diesem Verfahren werden waehrend des Schweissens transiente thermische Spannungen neben der Schweissnaht durch eine mitlaufende induktive Erwaermung so erzeugt, dass die Heissrissbildung verhindert wird. Als Versuchswerkstoffe wurden der austenitische Cr-Ni-Stahl mit Schwefelzusatz 1.4305, die Cr-Ni-Staehle 1.4404 und 1.4435 sowie die Nickelbasislegierung Udimet 720 ausgewaehlt. Im Ergebnis des Forschungsvorhabens konnte gezeigt werden, dass ein heissrissfreies Laserstrahlschweissen bei den untersuchten Werkstoffen unter Nutzung von mindestens drei verschiedenen schweiss- und werkstofftechnischen Ansaetzen moeglich ist: Erstens koennen mit einem Temperaturfeld-Tailoring bei im Stumpfstoss zu verschweissenden Blechen aus austenitischen Staehlen bis mindestens 6 mm Dicke senkrecht zur Naht und parallel zur Blechoberflaeche wirkende transiente Druckspannungen erzeugt werden, die der Bildung von Mittelrippenrissen oder dazu parallel liegenden Heissrissen entgegenwirken

  14. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  15. Recent breakthroughs in nickel base superalloys

    OpenAIRE

    Honnorat, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Meanwhile the considerable amount of results acquired since more than sixty years in the study of this class of materials, the pre-eminence of nickel base superalloys in the gas turbine engineering, which is a domain in constant evolution, drives the significant progresses accomplished along the five last years. The knowledge, each day more precisely known, of the working conditions of the parts, the continuous increase of the computer capacity and the progressive sophistication of the design...

  16. Nickel Base Alloy Cladding by Double Hot Wire TIG Welding Procedure on Tubesheet of Steam Generator%核电蒸汽发生器管板镍基合金双热丝钨极氩弧焊堆焊技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗成

    2012-01-01

    介绍了蒸汽发生器管板镍基合金堆焊新工艺——双热丝钨极氩弧焊,从热丝钨极氩弧焊的基本原理、堆焊材料的选择和堆焊工艺参数等方面作了基本论述.就双热丝钨极氩弧堆焊的使用,简述了堆焊工艺试验、工艺评定、预评定和产品应用的过程,说明镍基合金双热丝钨极氩弧焊在蒸发器管板上堆焊应用是成功的.%It is introduced that nickel - base alloy double hot wire TIG cladding procedure on tubesheet of steam generator. Those aspects are discussed basically from principle of double hot wire TIG cladding, choosing of cladding consumables and cladding parameters etc. Cladding test, procedure qualification, prequalification and product application for nickel base alloy double hot wire TIG cladding are described briefly. It is successful that application of nickel base alloy double hot wire TIG cladding procedure on tubesheet of steam generators.

  17. Semisolid Slurry Preparation of Die Steel with High Chromium Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Wei-min; ZHAO Ai-min; ZHANG Li-juan; ZHONG Xue-you

    2004-01-01

    The semisolid slurry preparation of die steels Cr12 and Cr12MoV with high chromium content was studied. The results show that the semisolid slurry of both steels with solid of 40 %-60 % can be made by electromagnetic stirring method and is easy to be discharged from the bottom little hole of the stirring chamber. The sizes of the spherical primary austenite in the slurry of die steels Cr12 and Cr12MoV are 50-100 μm and 80-150 μm, respectively. The homogeneous temperature field and solute field for both steel melts are obtained. The strong temperature fluctuation in the melt with many fine primary austenite grains occurs and the remelting of the secondary arm roots at the same time is accelerated because of the electromagnetic stirring. These are the most important reasons for deposition of spherical primary austenite grains.

  18. Analysis of the ductility dip cracking in the nickel-base alloy 617mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, A.; Nellesen, J.; Zielke, R.; Tillmann, W.

    2017-03-01

    While testing steam leading power plant components made of the nickel-base alloy A617mod at elevated temperatures (700 °C), ductility dip cracking (DDC) was observed in welding seams and their surroundings. In order to clarify the mechanism of crack formation, investigations were carried out on welded specimens made of A617mod. Interrupted tensile tests were performed on tensile specimens taken from the area of the welding seam. To simulate the conditions, the tensile tests were conducted at a temperature of 700 °C and with a low strain rate. Local strain fields at grain boundaries and inside single grains were determined at different deformation states by means of two-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC). Besides the strain fields, local hardnesses (nanoindentation), energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were performed. Besides information concerning the grain orientation, the EBSD measurement provides information on the coincidence site lattice (CSL) at grain boundaries as well as the Schmid factor of single grains. All results of the analysis methods mentioned above were correlated and compared to each other and related to the crack formation. Among other things, correlations between strain fields and Schmid factors were determined. The investigations show that the following influences affect the crack formation: orientation of the grain boundaries to the direction of the loading, the orientation of the grains to each other (CSL), and grain boundary sliding.

  19. Research on Laser Cladded Nickel Based Nanometer Tungsten Carbide Composite Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guang-jun; DAI Jian-qiang; WANG Hui-ping; YAN Min-jie; XI Wen-long; ZOU Chang-gu; GE Da-fang

    2004-01-01

    CO2 laser is adopted on the surface of austenitic stainless steel (1Cr18Ni9) to clad nickel based nanometer WC/Co composite coating. SEM, EDAX, XRD, AFM and Scratch Testers are adopted to conduct analysis and research on the microstructure, composition, phase and bonding strength of the coating. Results indicate that the microstructure of coating is metallurgically bonded with stainless steel base, eliminating porosities and cracks. The coating has a considerable quantity of nanometer particles visible with a granularity ≤ 100nm under a nanoscope atomic microscope. The bonding strength of the laser cladded coating is remarkably improved respectively compared with conventional hot-sprayed coating and spray welding. The nanometer effect of nanometer WC/Co introduced into the coating plays an important role in the laser cladding processes.

  20. Research on Laser Cladded Nickel Based Nanometer Tungsten Carbide Composite Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGGuang-jun; DAIJian-qiang; WANGHui-ping; YANMin-jie; XIWen-long; ZOUChang-gu; GEDa-fang

    2004-01-01

    CO2 laser is adopted on the surface of austenitic stainless steel (1Cr18Ni9) to clad nickel based nanometer WC/Co composite coating. SEM, EDAX, XRD, AFM and Scratch Testers are adopted to conduct analysis and research on the microstructure, composition, phase and bonding strength of the coating. Results indicate that the microstructure of coating is metallurgically bonded with stainless steel base, eliminating porosities and cracks. The coating has a considerable quantity of nanometer particles visible with a granularity ≤100nm under a nanoscope atomic microscope. The bonding strength of the laser cladded coating is remarkably improved respectively compared with conventional hot-sprayed coating and spray welding. The nanometer effect of nanometer WC/Co introduced into the coating plays an important role in the laser cladding processes.

  1. Experimental Design for Evaluation of Co-extruded Refractory Metal/Nickel Base Superalloy Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ME Petrichek

    2005-12-16

    Prior to the restructuring of the Prometheus Program, the NRPCT was tasked with delivering a nuclear space reactor. Potential NRPCT nuclear space reactor designs for the Prometheus Project required dissimilar materials to be in contact with each other while operating at extreme temperatures under irradiation. As a result of the high reactor core temperatures, refractory metals were the primary candidates for many of the reactor structural and cladding components. They included the tantalum-base alloys ASTAR-811C and Ta-10W, the niobium-base alloy FS-85, and the molybdenum base alloys Moly 41-47.5 Rhenium. The refractory metals were to be joined to candidate nickel base alloys such as Haynes 230, Alloy 617, or Nimonic PE 16 either within the core if the nickel-base alloys were ultimately selected to form the outer core barrel, or at a location exterior to the core if the nickel-base alloys were limited to components exterior to the core. To support the need for dissimilar metal joints in the Prometheus Project, a co-extrusion experiment was proposed. There are several potential methods for the formation of dissimilar metal joints, including explosive bonding, friction stir welding, plasma spray, inertia welding, HIP, and co-extrusion. Most of these joining methods are not viable options because they result in the immediate formation of brittle intermetallics. Upon cooling, intermetallics form in the weld fusion zone between the joined metals. Because brittle intermetallics do not form during the initial bonding process associated with HIP, co-extrusion, and explosive bonding, these three joining procedures are preferred for forming dissimilar metal joints. In reference to a Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory report done under a NASA sponsored program, joints that were fabricated between similar materials via explosive bonding had strengths that were directly affected by the width of the diffusion barrier. It was determined that the diffusion zone should not exceed

  2. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Tobias; Rommel, Daniel; Scherm, Florian; Gorywoda, Marek; Glatzel, Uwe

    2017-03-10

    Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co-28Cr-9W-1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE) study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  3. Laser Cladding of Ultra-Thin Nickel-Based Superalloy Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding is a well-established process to apply coatings on metals. However, on substrates considerably thinner than 1 mm it is only rarely described in the literature. In this work 200 µm thin sheets of nickel-based superalloy 718 are coated with a powder of a cobalt-based alloy, Co–28Cr–9W–1.5Si, by laser cladding. The process window is very narrow, therefore, a precisely controlled Yb fiber laser was used. To minimize the input of energy into the substrate, lines were deposited by setting single overlapping points. In a design of experiments (DoE study, the process parameters of laser power, laser spot area, step size, exposure time, and solidification time were varied and optimized by examining the clad width, weld penetration, and alloying depth. The microstructure of the samples was investigated by optical microscope (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Similarly to laser cladding of thicker substrates, the laser power shows the highest influence on the resulting clad. With a higher laser power, the clad width and alloying depth increase, and with a larger laser spot area the weld penetration decreases. If the process parameters are controlled precisely, laser cladding of such thin sheets is manageable.

  4. RESEARCH AND APPLICATION OF AS-CAST WEAR RESISTANCE HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The influence of alloy elements, such as boron and silicon, on the microstructure and properties of as-cast high chromium cast iron is studied. The results show that boron and silicon have a great effect on the mechanical properties and the wear resistance. Through proper addition of boron and silicon, the properties of as-cast high chromium cast iron can be improved effectively. Through analyzing the distribution of elements by scanning electron microscope, it has been shown that the addition of boron and silicon lowers the mass fraction of chromium saturated in as-cast austenite, and makes it unstable and liable to be transformed into martensite. The as-cast high chromium cast iron with proper content of boron and silicon is suitable for the manufacture of lining for asphalt concrete mixer and its wear resistance is 14 times that of lining made of low alloy white cast iron.

  5. Abrasive Wear Behavior of High Chromium Cast Iron and Hadfield Steel-- A Comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehdi Mazar Atabaki; Sajjad Jafari; Hassan Abdollah-pour

    2012-01-01

    Wear properties of two different crushers used for grinding raw materials of cement industry are compared using pin-on-disk wear test.The wear test was carried out with different loads on a pin.Abrasive wear behavior of two alloys was evaluated by comparing mass loss,wear resistance,microhardness and friction coefficient.The microstructure of the specimens was detected using optical microscope.The results showed that abrasive wear of high chromium cast iron is lower than that of Hadfield steel.Due to the presence of M7C3 carbides on the high chromium cast iron matrix,impact crushers exhibited higher friction coefficient

  6. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel, nickel-base alloy and its weldments in aqueous LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S.I.Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012 E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    With the advances in materials production new alloys have been developed, such as High- Alloy Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-base alloys, with high corrosion resistance. These new alloys are finding applications in Lithium Bromide absorption refrigeration systems, because LiBr is a corrosive medium which can cause serious corrosion problems, in spite of its favourable properties as absorbent. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) used as its corresponding filler metal, and the weld metal obtained by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) procedure. The materials have been tested in different LiBr solutions (400 g/l, 700 g/l, 850 g/l and a commercial 850 g/l LiBr heavy brine containing Lithium Chromate as corrosion inhibitor), at 25 deg. C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the general electrochemical behaviour of the materials. The polarization curves of all the alloys tested were typical of passivable materials. Pitting corrosion susceptibility has been evaluated by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves, which provide parameters to analyse re-passivation properties. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded and the base material has been estimated from the polarization diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Method. Samples have been etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the pitting resistance of all these materials increases as the LiBr concentration decreases. In general, the presence of chromate tended to shift the pitting potential to more positive values than those obtained in the 850 g/l LiBr solution. (authors)

  7. Recrystallization characteristics of oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotzler, R. K.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopy was employed to study the process of recrystallization in two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) mechanically alloyed nickel-base alloys, MA 754 and MA 6000E. MA 754 contained both fine, uniformly dispersed particles and coarser oxides aligned along the working direction. Hot rolled MA 754 had a grain size of 0.5 microns and high dislocation densities. After partial primary recrystallization, the fine grains transformed to large elongated grains via secondary (or abnormal) grain growth. Extruded and rolled MA 6000E contained equiaxed grains of 0.2 micron diameter. Primary recrystallization occurring during working eliminated virtually all dislocations. Conversion from fine to coarse grains was triggered by gamma prime dissolution; this was also a process of secondary or abnormal grain growth. Comparisons were made to conventional and oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloys.

  8. CONTINUOUSLY-CYCLIC CASTING OF HOLLOW CYLINDER SLUGS OF HIGH-CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of castings formation is presented and the package of measures dircted on increase of stability of casting process is developed. Parametres of casting of hollow cylindrical billets by the method of directional solidification out of white high-chromium cast iron are defined.

  9. Influences of copper on solidification structure and hardening behavior of high chromium cast irons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; XIONG Ji; FAN Hong-yuan; SHEN Bao-luo; GAO Sheng-ji

    2008-01-01

    The influences of copper on microstructure and the hardening behavior of high chromium cast irons subjected to sub-critical treatment were investigated.The results show that the mierostructure of the as-cast high chromium cast irons consists of retained austenite,martensite and M7 C3 type eutectic carbide.When copper is added into high chromium cast irons,austenite and carbide contents are increased.The increased addition of copper content from 0%to 1.84%leads to the increase of austenite and carbide from 15.9%and 20.0% to 61.0%and 35.5%,respectively.In the process of sub-critical treatment,the retained austenite in the matrix can be precipitated into secondary carbides and then transforms into martensite in cooling process,which causes the secondary hardening of the alloy under sub-critical treatment.High chromium cast irons containing copper in sub-critical treatment appear the second hardening curve peak due to the precipitation of copper from supersaturated matrix.

  10. Nickel-Based Superalloy Resists Embrittlement by Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan; Chen, PoShou

    2008-01-01

    A nickel-based superalloy that resists embrittlement by hydrogen more strongly than does nickel alloy 718 has been developed. Nickel alloy 718 is the most widely used superalloy. It has excellent strength and resistance to corrosion as well as acceptably high ductility, and is recognized as the best alloy for many high-temperature applications. However, nickel alloy 718 is susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and to delayed failure and reduced tensile properties in gaseous hydrogen. The greater resistance of the present nickel-based superalloy to adverse effects of hydrogen makes this alloy a superior alternative to nickel alloy 718 for applications that involve production, transfer, and storage of hydrogen, thereby potentially contributing to the commercial viability of hydrogen as a clean-burning fuel. The table shows the composition of the present improved nickel-based superalloy in comparison with that of nickel alloy 718. This composition was chosen to obtain high resistance to embrittlement by hydrogen while maintaining high strength and exceptional resistance to oxidation and corrosion. The most novel property of this alloy is that it resists embrittlement by hydrogen while retaining tensile strength greater than 175 kpsi (greater than 1.2 GPa). This alloy exhibits a tensile elongation of more than 20 percent in hydrogen at a pressure of 5 kpsi (approximately equal to 34 MPa) without loss of ductility. This amount of elongation corresponds to 50 percent more ductility than that exhibited by nickel alloy 718 under the same test conditions.

  11. Study of the structure and properties of metal of the major steam lines of a CCGT-420 unit made from high-chromium X10CrMoVNb9-1 (P91) steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grin', E. A.; Anokhov, A. E.; Pchelintsev, A. V.; Krüger, E.-T.

    2016-07-01

    The technology of manufacture of live steam lines and hot reheat lines at FINOW Rohrsysteme GmbH are discussed. These pipelines are designed for high-performance CCGT units and are made from high-chromium martensitic steel X10CrMoVNb9-1 (P91). The principles of certification and evaluation of conformance of thermal and mechanical equipment made from new construction materials with the TRCU 032-2013 technical regulation of the Customs Union are detailed. The requirements outlined in Russian and international regulatory documents regarding the manufacture of pipes and semifinished products for pipeline systems are compared. The characteristic features of high-chromium martensitic steel, which define the requirements for its heat treatment and welding, are outlined. The methodology and the results of a comprehensive analysis of metal of pipes, fittings, and weld joints of steam lines are presented. It is demonstrated that the short-term mechanical properties of metal (P91 steel) of pipes, bends, and weld joints meet the requirements of European standards and Russian technical specifications. The experimental data on long-term strength of metal of pipes from a live steam line virtually match the corresponding reference curve from the European standard, while certain experimental points for metal of bends of this steam line and metal of pipes and bends from a hot reheat line lie below the reference curve, but they definitely stay within the qualifying (20%) interval of the scatter band. The presence of a weakened layer in the heat-affected zone of weld joints of steel P91 is established. It is shown that the properties of this zone govern the short-term and long-term strength of weld joints in general. The results of synthesis and analysis of research data support the notion that the certification testing of steam lines and other equipment made from chromium steels should necessarily involve the determination of long-term strength parameters.

  12. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel-Base Alloys, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of high chromium alloy 690 and its weld metals, establish quantitative measurements of crack-growth rates and determine relationships among cracking susceptibility, environmental conditions and metallurgical characteristics. Stress-corrosion, crack-growth rates have been determined for 12 alloy 690 specimens, 11 alloy 152/52/52M weld metal specimens, 4 alloy 52M/182 overlay specimens and 2 alloy 52M/82 inlay specimens in simulated PWR primary water environments. The alloy 690 test materials included three different heats of extruded control-rod-drive mechanism (CRDM) tubing with variations in the initial material condition and degree of cold work for one heat. Two cold-rolled (CR) alloy 690 plate heats were also obtained and evaluated enabling comparisons to the CR CRDM materials. Weld metal, overlay and inlay specimens were machined from industry mock ups to provide plant-representative materials for testing. Specimens have been tested for one alloy 152 weld, two alloy 52 welds and three alloy 52M welds. The overlay and inlay specimens were prepared to propagate stress-corrosion cracks from the alloy 182 or 82 material into the more resistant alloy 52M. In all cases, crack extension was monitored in situ by direct current potential drop (DCPD) with length resolution of about +1 µm making it possible to measure extremely low growth rates approaching 5x10-10 mm/s. Most SCC tests were performed at 325-360°C with hydrogen concentrations from 11-29 cc/kg; however, environmental conditions were modified during a few experiments to evaluate the influence of temperature, water chemistry or electrochemical potential on propagation rates. In addition, low-temperature (~50°C) cracking behavior was examined for selected alloy 690 and weld metal specimens. Extensive characterizations have been performed on material microstructures and stress-corrosion cracks by

  13. Phase diagram calculation of high chromium cast irons and influence of its chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Da; Liu Ligang; Zhang Yunkun; Ye Chunlei [National Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Material Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Ren Xuejun [School of Engineering, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Yang Yulin [National Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Material Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yang Qingxiang [National Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Material Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)], E-mail: qxyang@ysu.edu.cn

    2009-02-15

    The phase transformation and the carbide precipitation temperatures of the high chromium cast iron with Cr content of 15% were measured by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The matrix and the type of carbides of the specimen after quenching were determined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) in this work. Meanwhile, the shape and the number of carbides in the different specimens were detected by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The equilibrium phase of this high chromium cast iron was calculated by using Thermo-Calc software based on above experiments. The calculation results obtained from Thermo-Calc software is agreed with the ones from experiments. The work provides a practical method for engineers and researchers in related areas.

  14. Novel high chromium containing braze filler metals for heat exchanger applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, S.; Fortuna, D. [Sulzer Metco, Troy (United States)

    2007-07-01

    A new family of boron-free, high chromium containing braze filler metal compositions were developed (Amdry 105, Amdry 108, Amdry 805). Filler metal properties including metallurgical phases, melting range, flow, corrosion resistance and high temperature oxidation resistance are reported. Additionally, the technical and economical advantages of using these new filler metals in fabricating flat plate type of heat exchangers and metallic catalytic converters is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Raffi Mohammed; G. Madhusudhan Reddy; K. Srinivasa Rao

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD) method was used to determine t...

  16. TO SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGICAL SCHEME OF SOFTENING HEAT TREATMENT FOR HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Efremenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. High chromium cast irons with austenitic matrix have low machinability. The aim of work is search of new energy-saving modes of preliminary softening heat treatment enhancing the machinability of castings by forming an optimum microstructure. Methodology. Metallographic analysis, hardness testing and machinability testing are applied. Findings. It was found out that high temperature annealing with continuous cooling yields to martensite-austenite matrix in cast iron 270Х15Г2Н1MPhT, which abruptly affects the machinability of cast iron. Significant improvement of machinability is achieved by forming of structure "ferrite + granular carbides" and by decline of hardness to 37-39 HRC in the case of two-stage isothermal annealing in the subcritical temperature range or by the use of quenching and tempering (two-step or cyclic. Originality. It was found that the formation of the optimal structure of the matrix and achievement of desired hardness level needed for improving machinability of high chromium cast iron containing 3 % austenite-forming elements, can be obtained: 1 due to pearlite original austenite followed by spherodization eutectoid carbides, and 2 by getting predominantly martensite structure followed by the decay of martensite and carbides coagulation at high-temperature tempering. Practical value. The new energy-saving schemes of softening heat treatment to ensure the growth of machinability of high chromium cast iron, alloyed by higher quantity of austenite forming elements, are proposed.

  17. Automated Identification and Characterization of Secondary & Tertiary gamma’ Precipitates in Nickel-Based Superalloys (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    METHODOLOGY A nickel-based superalloy sample (Rene88DT) was cut from a forged disc developed under a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency funded...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2010-4064 AUTOMATED IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SECONDARY & TERTIARY γ’ PRECIPITATES IN NICKEL-BASED SUPERALLOYS ...AUTOMATED IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SECONDARY & TERTIARY γ’ PRECIPITATES IN NICKEL-BASED SUPERALLOYS (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In

  18. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  19. Creep curve modelling of a conventionally cast nickel base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupinc, V.; Maldini, M. [CNR - IENI, Milan (Italy); Poggio, E.; Vacchieri, E. [Ansaldo Energia S.p.A., Genoa (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Constant load creep tests on Rene 80, a nickel base superalloy for gas turbine blade application, were run in the temperature interval 800-950 C with applied stresses producing rupture times up to 1000 h. Creep curves are generally dominated by a long accelerating/tertiary creep that follows a relatively small decelerating/primary creep. No steady state stage has been observed. Analysis of the creep curves has shown that a single damage parameter can describe the long accelerating/tertiary state in the explored temperature range. The damage appears to be dependent on the accumulated creep strain and, as a first approximation, independent on the applied stress and temperature. The whole creep curve, primary and tertiary stages, has been modelled by a simple set of coupled differential equations obtained using the formalism of the Continuum Damage Mechanics. The proposed set of equations has an analytical solution, strain vs. time, for creep curves at constant temperature and stress. (orig.)

  20. HIGH CYCLE FATIGUE PROPERTIES OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOY 718

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Kobayashi; K.Yamaguchi; M.Hayakawa; M.Kimura

    2004-01-01

    The fatigue properties of nickel-base Alloy 718 with fine- and grain-coarse grains were investigated. In the fine-grain alloy, the fatigue strength normalized by the tensile strengtn was 0.51 at 107 cycles. In contrast, the fatigue strength of the coarse-grain alloy was 0.32 at the same cycles, although the fatigue strengths in the range from 103to 105 cycles are the same for both alloys. The fracture appearances fatigued at around 106 cycles showed internal fractures originating from the flat facets of austenite grains for both alloys. The difference in fatigue strength at 107 cycles between the fine- and coarse-grain alloys could be explained in terms of the sizes of the facets from which the fractures originated.

  1. Corrosion-resistant nickel-base alloys for gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.W.; Hulsizer, W.R.

    1976-08-01

    Laboratory corrosion screening procedures used during the past ten years in developing nickel-base superalloys for gas turbine applications are described. Hot salt corrosion tests have included crucible and salt shower exposures. Reproducible techniques were established and alloy composition effects defined, leading to development of M313, IN-587, a IN-792. Correlations have been made with corrosion results in burner rigs, and engine experience confirming anticipated behavior is now becoming available. During this work a number of limitations of these accelerated laboratory tests were uncovered; these are discussed. Finally, brief descriptions of the states of development of alloy MA 755E (an oxide dispersion-strengthened superalloy) and IN-939 (a cast 23 percent chromium superalloy) are outlined as examples of advanced corrosion resistant, high strength materials of the future.

  2. Abrasion Resistance of as-Cast High-Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokusová Marcela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High chromium cast irons are widely used as abrasion resistant materials. Their properties and wear resistance depend on carbides and on the nature of the matrix supporting these carbides. The paper presents test results of irons which contain (in wt.% 18-22 Cr and 2-5 C, and is alloyed by 1.7 Mo + 5 Ni + 2 Mn to improve the toughness. Tests showed as-cast irons with mostly austenitic matrix achieved hardness 36-53 HRC but their relative abrasion-resistance was higher than the tool steel STN 19436 heat treated on hardness 60 HRC.

  3. The French regulatory experience and views on nickel-base alloy PWSCC prevention and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turluer, G.; Cattiaux, G.; Monnot, B. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Emond, D.; Reuchet, J.; Chartier, Ph. [Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-10-01

    preventing any leaking on the main primary circuit. - In service inspections (ISI), including volumetric and surface NDE, have been agreed upon between ASN and EDF for all vessel head penetrations with a re-inspection schedule. - The preexisting regulatory hydraulic testing program was carefully implemented, which implied the removal of thermal insulation on the vessel heads. - A comprehensive R and D program had to be conducted by EDF, the main progress reports and presentations had to be regularly submitted to DGSNR and IRSN staff. - The assessment and the ranking of the sensitivity of the different nickel base alloy zones, derived from R and D and empirical models, would have to be confirmed by a comprehensive ISI program, including bottom head penetrations, steam generator partition plates, and more specific weld metal zones. - ASN reviewed the various mitigations and preventive measures proposed by EDF either temporary, such as leak detection systems, anti-ejections devices, interim repairs, or long term commitment of the French operator to replace in due time the vessel heads comprising the most affected CRDM penetrations. - This paper also presents the ASN's follow up of the domestic and international feedback, such as the occurrence of PWSCC cracking (initiation and propagation) in the weld materials, whose occurrence is rather limited in France. (authors)

  4. Physical Simulation of Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Nickel-Base Alloys Using Hot Torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, James R.; Lippold, John C.

    2013-08-01

    The Gleeble hot torsion test was utilized in an attempt to simulate the friction stir-processed microstructure of three Ni-base alloys: Hastelloy X, Alloy 625, and Alloy 718. The simulation temperatures were based on actual thermal cycles measured by embedded thermocouples during friction stir processing of these alloys. Peak process temperatures were determined to be approximately 1423 K (1150 °C) for Hastelloy X and Alloy 625 K and 1373 K (352 °C and 1100 °C) for Alloy 718. The peak temperature and cooling rates were programed into the Gleeble™ 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator to reproduce the stir zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ) microstructures. The TMAZ was successfully simulated using this technique, but the stir zone microstructure could not be accurately reproduced, with hot torsion samples exhibiting larger grain size than actual friction stir processing trials. Shear stress and strain rates as a function of temperature were determined for each material using hot torsion simulation.

  5. Erosion-corrosion investigation of high chromium cast irons using newly designed jet type tester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Xiao-hui; LIU Jun-quan; LI Wei; ZHANG Feng-hua; SU Jun-yi

    2004-01-01

    A jet type erosion-corrosion tester was developed for the erosion-corrosion investigation of high-chromium cast irons. During tests the size and the shape of particles in the slurry can be maintained stable. The jet velocity and attack angle can be accurately controlled. The repeatability and ranking consistency of the test results are satisfactory. The test parameters can be adjusted in a wide range, so that the tester can simulate various practical working conditions. Electrochemical test data can be automatically collected and processed. Dynamic polarization curves can be obtained during erosion-corrosion test, which can be used to study the dynamic corrosion characteristics.Two high chromium cast irons were studied in hot concentrated alkaline slurry. The results show that the erosioncorrosion mass loss rate and dynamic corrosion rate of 295Cr26 iron is lower than that of 185Cr13 under the conditions similar to alumyte processing. The mechanism of erosion-corrosion of 295Cr26 and 185Cr13 was studied by using the tester. The interaction between erosion and corrosion was also quantitatively evaluated.

  6. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  7. Property Enrichment of Aged Nickel Base Superalloy Supercast 247A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavakumar Avala

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The commercial nickel-base superalloy Supercast 247A can be used for applications in which is required high mechanical strength and corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures, such as turbine blades and automotive turbocharger rotors. The mechanical properties are totally connected to the morphology, size and distribution of γ' phase and carbides. In order to improve the mechanical properties, the material is subjected to solution and aging heat treatment, to raise the volume fraction of γ' phase in the matrix and to form carbides at grain boundaries. In the present study the Supercast 247A superalloy was remelted and cast to obtain the desired polycrystalline test bars by controlling casting parameters, followed by the investigation of precipitation morphology and mechanical properties with respect to solution treatment and aging treatment. The experimental results show that by well controlled casting parameters the Supercast 247A owns excellent castability to form a superalloy with fine grain structure, resistance to indentation as well as superior strength.

  8. MACHINING OF NICKEL BASED ALLOYS USING DIFFERENT CEMENTED CARBIDE TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BASIM A. KHIDHIR

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of experimental work in dry turning of nickel based alloys (Haynes – 276 using Deferent tool geometer of cemented carbide tools. The turning tests were conducted at three different cutting speeds (112, 152, 201and 269 m/min while feed rate and depth of cut were kept constant at 0.2 mm/rev and 1.5 mm, respectively. The tool holders used were SCLCR with insert CCMT-12 and CCLNR – M12-4 with insert CNGN-12. The influence of cutting speed, tool inserts type and workpiece material was investigated on the machined surface roughness. The worn parts of the cutting tools were also examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results showed that cutting speed significantly affected the machined surface finish values in related with the tool insert geometry. Insert type CCMT-12 showed better surface finish for cutting speed to 201 m/min, while insert type CNGN-12 surface roughness increased dramatically with increasing of speed to a limit completely damage of insert geometer beyond 152 m/min.

  9. ISOTHERMAL AND THERMOMECHANICAL FATIGUE OF A NICKEL-BASE SUPERALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Carvalho Engler-Pinto Júnior

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal gradients arising during transient regimes of start-up and shutdown operations produce a complex thermal and mechanical fatigue loading which limits the life of turbine blades and other engine components operating at high temperatures. More accurate and reliable assessment under non-isothermal fatigue becomes therefore mandatory. This paper investigates the nickel base superalloy CM 247LC-DS under isothermal low cycle fatigue (LCF and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF. Test temperatures range from 600°C to 1,000°C. The behavior of the alloy is strongly affected by the temperature variation, especially in the 800°C-1,000°C range. The Ramberg-Osgood equation fits very well the observed isothermal behavior for the whole temperature range. The simplified non-isothermal stress-strain model based on linear plasticity proposed to represent the thermo-mechanical fatigue behavior was able to reproduce the observed behavior for both in-phase and out-of-phase TMF cycling.

  10. Coarsening in high volume fraction nickel-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R. A.; Nathal, M. V.

    1990-01-01

    The coarsening behavior of the gamma-prime precipitate has been examined in high volume fraction nickel-base alloys aged at elevated temperatures for times of up to 5000 h. Although the cube rate law was observed during coarsening, none of the presently available coarsening theories showed complete agreement with the experimental particle size distributions (PSDs). These discrepancies were thought to be due to elastic coherency strains which were not considered by the available models. Increasing the Mo content significantly influenced the PSDs and decreased the coarsening rate of the gamma-prime cubes, as a result of increasing the magnitude of the lattice mismatch. After extended aging times, the gamma-prime cubes underwent massive coalescence into plates at a rate which was much faster than the cuboidal coarsening rate. Once the gamma-prime plates were formed, further coarsening was not observed, and this stabilization of the microstructure was attributed to the development of dislocation networks at the gamma-gamma-prime interfaces.

  11. Anisotropy of nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R. A.; Maier, R. D.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of crystal orientation on the mechanical properties of single crystals of the nickel-based superalloy Mar-M247 are investigated. Tensile tests at temperatures from 23 to 1093 C and stress rupture tests at temperatures from 760 to 1038 C were performed for 52 single crystals at various orientations. During tensile testing between 23 and 760 C, single crystals with high Schmid factors were found to be favorably oriented for slip and to exhibit lower strength and higher ductility than those with low Schmid factors. Crystals which required large rotations to become oriented for cross slip were observed to have the shortest stress rupture lives at 760 C, while those which required little or no rotation had the longest lives. In addition, stereographic triangles obtained for Mar-M247 and Mar-M200 single crystals reveal that crystals with orientations near the -111 had the highest lives, those near the 001 had high lives, and those near the 011 had low lives.

  12. Mechanical properties of nanostructured nickel based superalloy Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtarov, Sh; Ermachenko, A.

    2010-07-01

    This paper will describe the investigations of a nanostructured (NS) state of nickel based INCONEL® alloy 718. This structure was generated in bulk semiproducts by severe plastic deformation (SPD) via multiple isothermal forging (MIF) of a coarse-grained alloy. The initial structure consisted of γ-phase grains with disperse precipitations of γ"-phase in the forms of discs, 50-75 nm in diameter and 20 nm in thickness. The MIF generated structures possess a large quantity of non-coherent plates and rounded precipitations of δ-phase, primarily along grain boundaries. In the duplex (γ+δ) structure the grains have high dislocation density and a large number of nonequilibrium boundaries. Investigations to determine mechanical properties of the alloy in a nanostructured state were carried out. Nanocrystalline Inconel 718 (80 nm) possesses a very high room-temperature strength after SPD. Microcrystalline (MC) and NS states of the alloy were subjected to strengthening thermal treatment, and the obtained results were compared in order to determine their mechanical properties at room and elevated temperatures.

  13. Anisotropy of nickel-base superalloy single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R. A.; Maier, R. D.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of crystal orientation on the mechanical properties of single crystals of the nickel-based superalloy Mar-M247 are investigated. Tensile tests at temperatures from 23 to 1093 C and stress rupture tests at temperatures from 760 to 1038 C were performed for 52 single crystals at various orientations. During tensile testing between 23 and 760 C, single crystals with high Schmid factors were found to be favorably oriented for slip and to exhibit lower strength and higher ductility than those with low Schmid factors. Crystals which required large rotations to become oriented for cross slip were observed to have the shortest stress rupture lives at 760 C, while those which required little or no rotation had the longest lives. In addition, stereographic triangles obtained for Mar-M247 and Mar-M200 single crystals reveal that crystals with orientations near the -111 had the highest lives, those near the 001 had high lives, and those near the 011 had low lives.

  14. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  15. SPHERICAL MICROSTRUCTURE FORMATION OF THE SEMI-SOLID HIGH CHROMIUM CAST IRON Cr20Mo2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.M. Mao; A.M. Zhao; X.Y. Zhong

    2004-01-01

    The nondendritic semi-solid slurry preparation of high chromium cast iron Cr20Mo2 has been studied in this paper. The experiments show that the proeutectic austenitic particles are more spherical under a larger stirring power condition, even if the stirring time is shorter, while the proeutectic austenitic particles are not very much spherical under a smaller stirring power condition and some proeutectic austenitic dendrites also exist, even if the stirring time is very long. The experiments also show that when stirred for 5 6 minutes under the test condition, the semi-solid slurry with 40vol. %-50vol. % solid fraction and spherical proeutectic austenite in the size of 50-80μm can be obtained.

  16. Use of electron microscopy on microstructure characterization of high chromium cast irons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.T.H. Pearce; T. Chairuangsri; A. Wiengmoon; N. Poolthong; H. Nomura

    2007-01-01

    The physical metallurgy underlying the development of cast microstructures in abrasion resistant high chromium cast irons, and their structural modification by thermal treatments is relatively complex. Structural characterisation via electron microscopy therefore has a key role to play in furthering our understanding of the phase transformations that control the microstructures and hence the service performances of these irons as wear parts.This paper shows how both scanning and especially transmission electron microscopy can provide valuable information on the nature of eutectic and secondary carbides and on the matrix structures in these irons. Particular attention is given to current characterisation research on conventionally cast 30%Cr irons that are used for applications involving corrosive wear e.g. slurry pumps and on a semi-solid cast 27%Cr iron that has a potential for applications in industry.

  17. Microstructure and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron containing niobium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhiguo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the effect of niobium addition on the microstructure, mechanical properties and wear resistance of high chromium cast iron has been studied. The results show that the microstructure of the heat-treated alloys is composed of M7C3 and M23C6 types primary carbide, eutectic carbide, secondary carbide and a matrix of martensite and retained austenite. NbC particles appear both inside and on the edge of the primary carbides. The hardness of the studied alloys maintains around 66 HRC, not significantly affected by the Nb content within the selected range of 0.48%-0.74%. The impact toughness of the alloys increases with increasing niobium content. The wear resistance of the specimens presents little variation in spite of the increase of Nb content under a light load of 40 N. However, when heavier loads of 70 and 100 N are applied, the wear resistance increases with increasing Nb content.

  18. Theromdynamics of carbon in nickel-based multicomponent solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D. J.

    1978-04-01

    The activity coefficient of carbon in nickel, nickel-titanium, nickel-titanium-chromium, nickel-titanium-molybdenum and nickel-titanium-molybdenum-chromium alloys has been measured at 900, 1100 and 1215/sup 0/C. The results indicate that carbon obeys Henry's Law over the range studied (0 to 2 at. percent). The literature for the nickel-carbon and iron-carbon systems are reviewed and corrected. For the activity of carbon in iron as a function of composition, a new relationship based on re-evaluation of the thermodynamics of the CO/CO/sub 2/ equilibrium is proposed. Calculations using this relationship reproduce the data to within 2.5 percent, but the accuracy of the calibrating standards used by many investigators to analyze for carbon is at best 5 percent. This explains the lack of agreement between the many precise sets of data. The values of the activity coefficient of carbon in the various solid solutions are used to calculate a set of parameters for the Kohler-Kaufman equation. The calculations indicate that binary interaction energies are not sufficient to describe the thermodynamics of carbon in some of the nickel-based solid solutions. The results of previous workers for carbon in nickel-iron alloys are completely described by inclusion of ternary terms in the Kohler-Kaufman equation. Most of the carbon solid solution at high temperatures in nickel and nickel-titantium alloys precipitates from solution on quenching in water. The precipitate is composed of very small particles (greater than 2.5 nm) of elemental carbon. The results of some preliminary thermomigration experiments are discussed and recommendations for further work are presented.

  19. Compositional Effects on Nickel-Base Superalloy Single Crystal Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Garg,Anita; Rogers, Richard B.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Fourteen nickel-base superalloy single crystals containing 0 to 5 wt% chromium (Cr), 0 to 11 wt% cobalt (Co), 6 to 12 wt% molybdenum (Mo), 0 to 4 wt% rhenium (Re), and fixed amounts of aluminum (Al) and tantalum (Ta) were examined to determine the effect of bulk composition on basic microstructural parameters, including gamma' solvus, gamma' volume fraction, volume fraction of topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, phase chemistries, and gamma - gamma'. lattice mismatch. Regression models were developed to describe the influence of bulk alloy composition on the microstructural parameters and were compared to predictions by a commercially available software tool that used computational thermodynamics. Co produced the largest change in gamma' solvus over the wide compositional range used in this study, and Mo produced the largest effect on the gamma lattice parameter and the gamma - gamma' lattice mismatch over its compositional range, although Re had a very potent influence on all microstructural parameters investigated. Changing the Cr, Co, Mo, and Re contents in the bulk alloy had a significant impact on their concentrations in the gamma matrix and, to a smaller extent, in the gamma' phase. The gamma phase chemistries exhibited strong temperature dependencies that were influenced by the gamma and gamma' volume fractions. A computational thermodynamic modeling tool significantly underpredicted gamma' solvus temperatures and grossly overpredicted the amount of TCP phase at 982 C. Furthermore, the predictions by the software tool for the gamma - gamma' lattice mismatch were typically of the wrong sign and magnitude, but predictions could be improved if TCP formation was suspended within the software program. However, the statistical regression models provided excellent estimations of the microstructural parameters based on bulk alloy composition, thereby demonstrating their usefulness.

  20. Investigating chemical and microstructural evolution at dissimilar metal welds

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, John William Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are widely used in steam vessels in thermal power stations to join low-temperature alloys, such as steels, to high temperature alloys, such as nickel-based alloys. This provides a cost-effective manufacturing solution. However, there is a history of DMWs failing due to creep in service environments. Many investigations have been performed on weld systems and failures in the traditional 2.25Cr-1Mo (P22) steels, but fewer have been performed on newer 9Cr-1Mo steels...

  1. Study on fragmentation and dissolution behavior of carbide in a hot-rolled hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fei; Jiang, Yehua, E-mail: jiangyehua@kmust.edu.cn; Xiao, Han; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • The method to prepare Carbon steel/High chromium iron is totally new. • High chromium iron can achieve small plastic deformation during hot rolling process. • Carbides in high chromium irons are crushed, refined obviously and becoming isolated, which is benefit to improve the impact toughness. • The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. - Abstract: A sandwich-structured composite containing a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron (HCCI) and low carbon steel (LCS) claddings was newly fabricated by centrifugal casting, then the blank was hot-rolled into composite plate. The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. During hot rolling, significant refinement of carbides was discovered in hot-rolled HCCI specimens. The carbides were broken and partly dissolved into the austenite matrix. The results show that carbides are firstly dissolved under the action of stress. There are grooves appeared at the boundaries of the carbides. The grooves reduce the cross section of the carbide. When the cross section of the carbide reaches to the required minimum critical cross section, the carbide breaks through the tensile force. After break, carbides continue to dissolve since more interfaces between the matrix and carbides are generated. The secondary carbides precipitated due to the dissolution are index as fcc and stacking faults parallel to the {1 1 1} are observed.

  2. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  3. Numerical simulation of dissimilar metal welding and its verification for determination of residual stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sz. Szávai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the results of the through-thickness residual stress distributions on dissimilar metal weld (DMW mock-up. DMWs, as welded joints between ferritic steels and either austenitic stainless steels or nickel-based alloys, are commonly found in piping systems of NPPs as well as in other industrial plants. The welding of the mock-up is simulated by the 3D finite element model using temperature and phase dependent material properties. The commercial finite element code MSC.Marc is used to obtain the numerical results by implementing the Goldak’s double ellipsoidal shaped weld heat source and combined convection radiation boundary conditions. Residual stress measurements are performed on welded joints to validate the simulation results. The validated residual stress distributions can be used for the life time assessment and failure mode predictions of the welded joints.

  4. Environmental effects of microstructure stability on nickel-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sah, In Jin

    2011-02-15

    Next generation nuclear reactor VHTR (Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor) wants to achieve higher thermal efficiency and hydrogen production. IHX (Intermediate Heat eXchanger) will be exposed to the highest temperature condition among lots of structural components. Solid-solution hardening nickel-base superalloys Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 are expected to use for this applications. Studies on oxidation test and time dependent deformation at 900 .deg. C were conducted before. This study is focused on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties at other temperature ranges. Furthermore, considering heat treatment history especially cooling rate effects on microstructure evolution, those of two superalloys are cooled down to room temperature by air and furnace. Materials behavior at intermediation temperature ranges from 600-900 .deg. C and diffusion bonding condition (1150 .deg. C) were evaluated. Vicker's hardness test and small-size tensile test were carried out for each specimen at room temperature. Hardness number and tensile strength were higher than any other temperature condition at 700 .deg. C due to gamma prime phases for Alloy 617. As the aluminum contents of Haynes 230 is far less than Alloy 617, there is no big difference for Haynes 230 at intermediate temperature ranges. The value of mechanical property of alloys at 1150 .deg. C air cooling condition was severely decreased and fully ductile fracture was detected for both alloys. On the other hand, the values showed the tendency of return to the intermediate temperature ranges when the specimen was slowly cooled down. Characteristic precipitates along the grain boundaries were detected. There was no other singularity up to 700 .deg. C for Alloy 617. However, lots of tiny M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type carbide were formed after 800 .deg. C heat treatment, and those of carbide got bigger and bigger as the heat treatment temperature increased up to 900 .deg. C. For diffusion bonding temperature

  5. Influence of rare earth nanoparticles and inoculants on performance and microstructure of high chromium cast iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Yuncheng; WANG You; PAN Zhaoyi; YU Lili

    2012-01-01

    The high chromium cast irons (HCCIs) with rare earth (RE) nanoparticles or inoculants were fabricated in the casting process.The phase compositions and microstructure were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy (OM),respectively.The hardness and impact toughness were tested by Rockwel-hardmeter and impacting test enginery.And then,the morphology of fracture was researched by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).The results demonstrated that the phase compositions of HCCIs with addition of RE nanoparticles or inoculants which were M7C3 carbides + α -Fe did not change obviously.However,the prime M7C3 carbides morphology had great changes with the increase of RE nanoparticles,which changed from long lath to granular or island shape.When the content of RE nanoparticles was 0.4 wt.%,the microstructure of high chromium cast iron was refined greatly.The microstructure of carbides was coarser when the addition of RE nanoparticles was higher than 0.4 wt.%.The hardness and impact toughness of HCCIs were improved by addition of RE nanoparticles or inoculants.The impact toughness of HCCIs was increased 36.4% with RE nanoparticles of 0.4 wt.%,but the hardness changed slightly.In addition,the adding of RE nanoparticles or inoculants could reduce the degree of the brittle fracture.Fracture never seemed regular,instead,containing lots of laminates and dimples with the increase of the RE nanoparticles.The results also indicated that the optimal addition amonnt of the RE nanoparticles was 0.4%,under this composition,the microstructure and mechanical property achieved the best cooperation.In addition,through the study of erosion wear rate,when adding 0.4% RE nanoparticles into the HCCIs,the erosion wear rate got the minimum 0.32×10-3 g/mm2,which could increase 51.5% compared with that without any RE nanoparticles.

  6. Development of a High Chromium Ni-Base Filler Metal Resistant to Ductility Dip Cracking and Solidification Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Adam T.

    Many nuclear reactor components previously constructed with Ni-based alloys containing 20 wt% Cr have been found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. The nuclear power industry now uses high chromium (˜30wt%) Ni-based filler metals to mitigate stress corrosion cracking. Current alloys are plagued with weldability issues, either solidification cracking or ductility dip cracking (DDC). Solidification cracking is related to solidification temperature range and the DDC is related to the fraction eutectic present in the microstructure. It was determined that an optimal alloy should have a solidification temperature range less than 150°C and at least 2% volume fraction eutectic. Due to the nature of the Nb rich eutectic that forms, it is difficult to avoid both cracking types simultaneously. Through computational modeling, alternative eutectic forming elements, Hf and Ta, have been identified as replacements for Nb in such alloys. Compositions have been optimized through a combination of computational and experimental techniques combined with a design of experiment methodology. Small buttons were melted using commercially pure materials in a copper hearth to obtain the desired compositions. These buttons were then subjected to a gas tungsten arc spot weld. A type C thermocouple was used to acquire the cooling history during the solidification process. The cooling curves were processed using Single Sensor Differential Thermal Analysis to determine the solidification temperature range, and indicator of solidification cracking susceptibility. Metallography was performed to determine the fraction eutectic present, an indicator of DDC resistance. The optimal level of Hf to resist cracking was found to be 0.25 wt%. The optimal level of Ta was found to be 4 wt%. gamma/MC type eutectics were found to form first in all Nb, Ta, and Hf-bearing compositions. Depending on Fe and Cr content, gamma/Laves eutectic was sometimes found in Nb and Ta-bearing compositions, while

  7. Effect of Process Variables on the Inertia Friction Welding of Superalloys LSHR and Mar-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, D. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Shivpuri, R.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of inertia friction welding process parameters on microstructure evolution, weld plane quality, and the tensile behavior of welds between dissimilar nickel-base superalloys was established. For this purpose, the fine-grain, powder metallurgy alloy LSHR was joined to coarse-grain cast Mar-M247 using a fixed level of initial kinetic energy, but different combinations of the flywheel moment of inertia and initial rotation speed. It was found that welds made with the largest moment of inertia resulted in a sound bond with the best microstructure and room-temperature tensile strength equal to or greater than that of the parent materials. A relationship between the moment of inertia and weld process efficiency was established. The post-weld tensile behavior was interpreted in the context of observed microstructure gradients and weld-line defects.

  8. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  9. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling......Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  10. Filter effectiveness in the manufacture of high-chromium steel castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garbiak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies on the application of ceramic filters in the manufacture of cast hearth plates at the WestPomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin. Castings were poured from the heat-resistant G-X40CrNiSi27-4 cast steel in greensand moulds. The development of casting manufacturing technology included the following studies: analysis of the causes of nonmetallicinclusions in high-chromium alloys, computer simulation of mould filling with liquid metal using standard gating systems without filters and new systems with the built-in filter, making pilot castings, quantitative determination of the content of non-metallicinclusions, determination of the oxygen and nitrogen content, and evaluation of the extent of occurrence of the raw casting s urfacedefects. As a result of the conducted studies and analyses, the quality of produced castings was improved, mainly through the reducedcontent of non-metallic inclusions and better raw casting surface quality.

  11. Effect of Different Inoculants on Impact Toughness in High Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siekaniec D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work, presented the study of effect of different inoculants on impact toughness in High Chromium Cast Iron. The molds were pouring in industrial conditions and samples were tested in laboratory in Faculty of Foundry Engineering at AGH. Seven samples were tested - one reference sample, three with different addition of Fe-Ti, and three with different addition of Al. The samples were subjected to impact toughness on Charpy hammer and the hardness test. The presented investigations indicate that for the each inoculant there is an optimal addition at which the sample obtained the highest value of impact toughness. For the Fe-Ti it is 0.66% and for Al is 0.17%. Of all the examined inoculants best results were obtained at a dose of 0.66% Fe-Ti. Titanium is a well-known as a good modifier but very interesting results gives the aluminum. Comparing the results obtained for the Fe-Ti and Al can be seen that in the case of aluminum hardness is more stable. The hardness of all samples is around 40-45 HRC, which is not high for this type of cast iron. Therefore, in future studies it is planned to carry out the heat treatment procedure that may improves hardness.

  12. Ultrasound Velocity Measurements in High-Chromium Steel Under Plastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunev, Aleksey; Bochkareva, Anna; Barannikova, Svetlana; Zuev, Lev

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the variation of the propagation velocity of ultrasound in the plastic deformation of corrosion-resistant high-chromium steel 40X13 with ferrite-carbide (delivery status), martensitic (quenched) and sorbitol (after high-temperature tempering) structures have beem studied/ It is found that each state shows its view of the loading curve. In the delivery state diagram loading is substantially parabolic throughout, while in the martensitic state contains only linear strain hardening step and in the sorbitol state the plastic flow curve is three-step. The velocity of ultrasonic surface waves (Rayleigh waves) was measured simultaneously with the registration of the loading curve in the investigated steel in tension. It is shown that the dependence of the velocity of ultrasound in active loading is determined by the law of plastic flow, that is, the staging of the corresponding diagram of loading. Structural state of the investigated steel is not only changing the type of the deformation curve under uniaxial tension, but also changes the nature of ultrasound speed of deformation.

  13. Microstructure and properties of Ti–Nb–V–Mo-alloyed high chromium cast iron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Youping Ma; Xiulan Li; Yugao Liu; Shuyi Zhou; Xiaoming Dang

    2013-10-01

    The correlations of microstructure, hardness and fracture toughness of high chromium cast iron with the addition of alloys (titanium, vanadium, niobium and molybdenum) were investigated. The results indicated that the as-cast microstructure changed from hypereutectic, eutectic to hypoeutectic with the increase of alloy contents. Mo dissolved in austenite and increased the hardness by solid solution strengthening. TiC and NbC mainly existed in austenite and impeded the austenite dendrite development. V existed in multicomponent systems in forms of V alloy compounds (VCrFe8 and VCr2C2).With the increase of alloy additions, carbides size changed gradually from refinement to coarseness, hardness and impact toughness were increased and then decreased. Compared with the fracture toughness (6 J/cm2) and hardness (50.8HRC) without any alloy addition, the toughness and hardness at 0.60 V–0.60Ti–0.60Nb–0.35Mo (wt%) additions were improved and achieved to 11 J/cm2 and 58.9HRC, respectively. The synergistic roles of Ti, Nb, V and Mo influenced the solidification behaviour of alloy. The refinement of microstructure and improvement of carbides morphologies, size and distribution improved the impact toughness.

  14. Identification, size classification and evolution of Laves phase precipitates in high chromium, fully ferritic steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Barrilao, Jennifer; Kuhn, Bernd; Wessel, Egbert

    2017-10-01

    To fulfil the new challenges of the German "Energiewende" more efficient, sustainable, flexible and cost-effective energy technologies are strongly needed. For a reduction of consumed primary resources higher efficiency steam cycles with increased operating parameters, pressure and temperature, are mandatory. Therefore advanced materials are needed. The present study focuses on a new concept of high chromium, fully ferritic steels. These steels, originally designed for solid oxide fuel cell applications, provide favourable steam oxidation resistance, creep and thermomechanical fatigue behaviour in comparison to conventional ferritic-martensitic steels. The strength of this type of steel is achieved by a combination of solid-solution hardening and precipitation strengthening by intermetallic Laves phase particles. The effect of alloy composition on particle composition was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and partly verified by thermodynamic modelling results. Generally the Laves phase particles demonstrated high thermodynamic stability during long-term annealing up to 40,000h at 600°C. Variations in chemical alloy composition influence Laves phase particle formation and consequently lead to significant changes in creep behaviour. For this reason particle size distribution evolution was analysed in detail and associated with the creep performance of several trial alloys. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Ti-V-Nb-Mo addition on microstructure of high chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Youping

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of trace additions of multi-alloying elements (Ti, Nb, V, Mo on carbides precipitation and as-cast microstructure of eutectic high chromium cast iron containing 2.85wt.%C and 31.0wt.%Cr were investigated from thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. The thermodynamic calculations show that Ti and Nb exist in the multi-alloying system in the forms of TiC and NbC. The formation of VC during the solidification is not feasible from the thermodynamic consideration. XRD analysis shows that the V exists in alloy compounds (VCr2C2, VCrFe8. The first precipitated high melting point particles (TiC, NbC can act as the heterogeneous substrate of M7C3 carbides, which results in significant refinement of the M7C3 carbides. After the addition of alloying elements, C atom diffusion is hindered due to the strong affinities of the strong carbide forming elements for carbon, which decreases the growth rate of carbides. The combined roles of the increase of nucleation rate and the decrease of carbides growth rate lead to the finer microstructure.

  16. Effects of Si on the Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of High-Chromium Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J. P.; Pan, Q. L.; Peng, H. J.; Cui, H. R.; Xiao, C. A.

    2016-11-01

    Effect of Si on the microstructures and mechanical properties of high-chromium cast iron was investigated. The eutectic carbides are refined greatly and a transformation of matrix from austenitic matrix to pearlite is observed with increase in Si content from 0.5 to 1.5 wt.%. The refinement of eutectic microstructure is attributed to the decrease in the eutectic temperature, while the transformation from austenite matrix to pearlite is associated with the increase in solubility of carbon in the matrix. In the pearlite matrix, two types of pearlite are observed: one with lamellar pearlite, distributing at the periphery, and the second one with granular pearlite at the center. The density of secondary carbides precipitated from the matrix increases greatly with addition of Si from 0.5 to 1.5 wt.%, which is associated with more carbon and chromium elements confined in the matrix in the alloy containing 1.5 wt.%. More rod-like particles are observed in the alloy containing 0.5 wt.% Si, while the morphology of secondary carbides of alloy containing 1.5 wt.% is granular. The mechanical properties are improved with a 7% increase in tensile strength from 586 to 626 MPa and impact toughness from 5.8 to 7.3 J cm-2.

  17. Evaluation of the AISI 904L Alloy Weld Overlays Obtained by GMAW and Electro-Slag Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Jorge C. F.; Meira, O. G.; Madalena, F. C. A.; de Souza, L. F. G.; Araujo, L. S.; Mendes, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    The use of superaustenitic stainless steels (SASS) as an overlay replacement for nickel-based alloys can be an interesting alternative for the oil and gas industries, due to its lower cost, when compared to superalloys. Usually, the deposition is made with several welding passes by using conventional arc welding processes, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. In this respect, electro-slag welding (ESW), which promotes high heat inputs and low dilution of the welds, can also be attractive for this application, as it provides a higher productivity, once only one layer is needed for the deposition of the minimum thickness required. The present work evaluates the behavior of an AISI 904L SASS weld overlay deposited on a carbon steel ASTM A516 Grade 70 by ESW and GMAW processes. Both as-welded and heat-treated conditions were evaluated and compared. A multipass welding by GMAW process with three layers and 48 passes was performed on 12.5 × 200 × 250 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 1.0 kJ/mm. For ESW process, only one layer was deposited on 50 × 400 × 400 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 11.7 kJ/mm. After welding, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 620 °C for 10 h was performed in half of the steel plate, in order to allow the comparison between this condition and the as-welded one. For both processes, the austenitic microstructure of the weld deposits was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction. A low proportion of secondary phases were observed in all conditions, and the PWHT did not promote significant changes on the hardness profile. Martensite for GMAW process and bainite for ESW process were the microstructural constituents observed at the coarse grain heat-affected zone, due to the different cooling rates. For ESW process, no evidences of partially diluted zones were found. As a consequence of the microstructural

  18. Evaluation of the AISI 904L Alloy Weld Overlays Obtained by GMAW and Electro-Slag Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Jorge C. F.; Meira, O. G.; Madalena, F. C. A.; de Souza, L. F. G.; Araujo, L. S.; Mendes, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    The use of superaustenitic stainless steels (SASS) as an overlay replacement for nickel-based alloys can be an interesting alternative for the oil and gas industries, due to its lower cost, when compared to superalloys. Usually, the deposition is made with several welding passes by using conventional arc welding processes, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. In this respect, electro-slag welding (ESW), which promotes high heat inputs and low dilution of the welds, can also be attractive for this application, as it provides a higher productivity, once only one layer is needed for the deposition of the minimum thickness required. The present work evaluates the behavior of an AISI 904L SASS weld overlay deposited on a carbon steel ASTM A516 Grade 70 by ESW and GMAW processes. Both as-welded and heat-treated conditions were evaluated and compared. A multipass welding by GMAW process with three layers and 48 passes was performed on 12.5 × 200 × 250 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 1.0 kJ/mm. For ESW process, only one layer was deposited on 50 × 400 × 400 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 11.7 kJ/mm. After welding, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 620 °C for 10 h was performed in half of the steel plate, in order to allow the comparison between this condition and the as-welded one. For both processes, the austenitic microstructure of the weld deposits was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction. A low proportion of secondary phases were observed in all conditions, and the PWHT did not promote significant changes on the hardness profile. Martensite for GMAW process and bainite for ESW process were the microstructural constituents observed at the coarse grain heat-affected zone, due to the different cooling rates. For ESW process, no evidences of partially diluted zones were found. As a consequence of the microstructural

  19. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyutina, Yu. N., E-mail: iuliiamaliutina@gmail.com; Bataev, A. A., E-mail: bataev@adm.nstu.ru; Shevtsova, L. I., E-mail: edeliya2010@mail.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation); Mali, V. I., E-mail: vmali@mail.ru; Anisimov, A. G., E-mail: anis@hydro.nsc.ru [Lavrentyev Institute of Hydrodynamics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  20. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyutina, Yu. N.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Anisimov, A. G.; Shevtsova, L. I.

    2015-10-01

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  1. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  2. Recent progress in nickel based materials for high performance pseudocapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Liangdong; Zhu, Yufu; Ding, Hongyan; Ni, Chaoying

    2014-12-01

    Nickel based materials have been intensively investigated and considered as good potential electrode materials for pseudocapacitors due to their high theoretical specific capacity values, high chemical and thermal stability, ready availability, environmentally benign nature and lower cost. This review firstly examines recent progress in nickel oxides or nickel hydroxides for high performance pseudocapacitor electrodes. The advances of hybrid electrodes are then assessed to include hybrid systems of nickel based materials with compounds such as carbonaceous materials, metal and transition metal oxides or hydroxides, in which various strategies have been adopted to improve the electrical conductivity of nickel oxides or hydroxides. Furthermore, the energy density and power density of some recently reported NiO, nickel based composites and NiCo2O4 are summarized and discussed. Finally, we provide some perspectives as to the future directions of this intriguing field.

  3. Microstructural studies of carbides in MAR-M247 nickel-based superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotok, A.; Rodak, K.

    2012-05-01

    Carbides play an important role in the strengthening of microstructures of nickel-based superalloys. Grain boundary carbides prevent or retard grain-boundary sliding and make the grain boundary stronger. Carbides can also tie up certain elements that would otherwise promote phase instability during service. Various types of carbides are possible in the microstructure of nickel-based superalloys, depending on the superalloy composition and processing. In this paper, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of carbides occurring in the microstructure of polycrystalline MAR-M247 nickel-based superalloy were carried out. In the present work, MC and M23C6 carbides in the MAR-M247 microstructure were examined.

  4. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  5. Electrochemical isolation of intermetallic and carbide phases from nickel-base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shul' ga, A.V.; Nikishanov, V.V.; Ofitserov, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Parameters of carbide phases were examined to find the optimum conditions for isolating intermetallic and carbide phases from complex nickel-base alloys. Conditions for an electrochemical isolation of the phases are chosen on the basis of polarization curves for the matrix and phases to be isolated. Electrochemical studies were performed with a potentiostat and data from x-ray analyses of the phases are tabulated. Two electrolytes were developed, the first for isolating carbide phases from nickel matrix and from nickel-base superalloys and the second electrolyte isolates intermetallic phases.

  6. High temperature thermal diffusivity of nickel-based superalloys and intermetallic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Hazotte, A.; Perrot, B.; Archambault, P

    1993-01-01

    By means of an installation developed in our laboratory, we measured the thermal diffusivity (α) as a function of temperature for several single and polycrystal nickel-based superalloys as well as for different intermetallic compounds with a L12 (Ni3Al, Ni3Si, Ni3Ge, Ni3Fe, Zr3Al, Co3Ti), L10 (TiAl) or B2 (NiAl) structure. In the case of nickel-based superalloys, the experiments pointed out an unexpected but reproductible slope change in the α=f(T) curves at about 750°C, which is not explaine...

  7. Effect of molybdenum, vanadium, boron on mechanical properties of high chromium white cast iron in as-cast condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjaman, F.; Sumardi, S.; Shofi, A.; Aryati, M.; Suharno, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this experiment, the effect of the addition carbide forming elements on high chromium white cast iron, such as molybdenum, vanadium and boron on its mechanical properties and microstructure was investigated. The high chromium white cast iron was produced by casting process and formed in 50 mm size of grinding balls with several compositions. Characterization of these grinding balls was conducted by using some testing methods, such as: chemical and microstructure analysis, hardness, and impact test. From the results, the addition of molybdenum, vanadium, and boron on high chromium white cast iron provided a significant improvement on its hardness, but reduced its toughness. Molybdenum induced fully austenitic matrix and Mo2C formation among eutectic M7C3 carbide. Vanadium was dissolved in the matrix and carbide. While boron was played a role to form fine eutectic carbide. Grinding balls with 1.89 C-13.1 Cr-1.32 Mo-1.36 V-0.00051 B in as-cast condition had the highest hardness, which was caused by finer structure of eutectic carbide, needle like structure (upper bainite) matrix, and martensite on its carbide boundary.

  8. Use of atomic force microscopy to quantify slip irreversibility in a nickel-base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risbet, M.; Feaugas, X.; Guillemer-Neel, C.; Clavel, M

    2003-09-15

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the evolution of surface deformation during cyclic loading in a nickel-base superalloy. Cyclic slip irreversibility has been investigated using quantitative evaluation of extrusion heights and inter-band spacing. This approach is applied to formulate a microscopic crack initiation law, compared to a classical Manson-Coffin relationship.

  9. Directional coarsening in nickel-base superalloys and its effect on the mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinga, T.; Brekelmans, W.A.M.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2009-01-01

    During high temperature loading, the regular microstructure of nickel-base superalloys consisting of a γ-matrix (Ni) containing a large volume fraction of γ′-particles (Ni3Al) degrades. The cubic precipitates coarsen and elongate in a direction normal to the applied stress in a process called raftin

  10. Nickel-based anodic electrocatalysts for fuel cells and water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dayi

    Our world is facing an energy crisis, so people are trying to harvest and utilize energy more efficiently. One of the promising ways to harvest energy is via solar water splitting to convert solar energy to chemical energy stored in hydrogen. Another of the options to utilize energy more efficiently is to use fuel cells as power sources instead of combustion engines. Catalysts are needed to reduce the energy barriers of the reactions happening at the electrode surfaces of the water-splitting cells and fuel cells. Nickel-based catalysts happen to be important nonprecious electrocatalysts for both of the anodic reactions in alkaline media. In alcohol fuel cells, nickel-based catalysts catalyze alcohol oxidation. In water splitting cells, they catalyze water oxidation, i.e., oxygen evolution. The two reactions occur in a similar potential range when catalyzed by nickel-based catalysts. Higher output current density, lower oxidation potential, and complete substrate oxidation are preferred for the anode in the applications. In this dissertation, the catalytic properties of nickel-based electrocatalysts in alkaline medium for fuel oxidation and oxygen evolution are explored. By changing the nickel precursor solubility, nickel complex nanoparticles with tunable sizes on electrode surfaces were synthesized. Higher methanol oxidation current density is achieved with smaller nickel complex nanoparticles. DNA aggregates were used as a polymer scaffold to load nickel ion centers and thus can oxidize methanol completely at a potential about 0.1 V lower than simple nickel electrodes, and the methanol oxidation pathway is changed. Nickel-based catalysts also have electrocatalytic activity towards a wide range of substrates. Experiments show that methanol, ethanol, glycerol and glucose can be deeply oxidized and carbon-carbon bonds can be broken during the oxidation. However, when comparing methanol oxidation reaction to oxygen evolution reaction catalyzed by current nickel-based

  11. Thermal Recovery of Plastic Deformation in Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Dongxiao [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Yu, Xinghua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zhang, Wei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Crooker, Paul [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); David, Stan A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-05-23

    Stainless steel has been widely used in challenging environments typical to nuclear power plant structures, due its excellent corrosion resistance. Nickel filler metals containing high chromium concentration, including Alloy 82/182, are used for joining stainless steel to carbon steel components to achieve similar high resistance to stress corrosion cracking. However, the joint usually experience weld metal stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which affects the safety and structural integrity of light water nuclear reactor systems. A primary driving force for SCC is the high tensile residual stress in these welds. Due to large dimension of pressure vessel and limitations in the field, non-destructive residual stress measurement is difficult. As a result, finite element modeling has been the de facto method to evaluate the weld residual stresses. Recent studies on this subject from researchers worldwide report different residual stress value in the weldments [5]. The discrepancy is due to the fact that most of investigations ignore or underestimate the thermal recovery in the heat-affect zone or reheated region in the weld. In this paper, the effect of heat treatment on thermal recovery and microhardness is investigated for materials used in dissimilar metal joint. It is found that high equivalent plastic strains are predominately accumulated in the buttering layer, the root pass, and the heat affected zone, which experience multiple welding thermal cycles. The final cap passes, experiencing only one or two welding thermal cycles, exhibit less plastic strain accumulation. Moreover, the experimental residual plastic strains are compared with those predicted using an existing weld thermo-mechanical model with two different strain hardening rules. The importance of considering the dynamic strain hardening recovery due to high temperature exposure in welding is discussed for the accurate simulation of weld residual stresses and plastic strains. In conclsuion, the

  12. Online monitoring of thermo-cycles and its correlation with microstructure in laser cladding of nickel based super alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muvvala, Gopinath; Patra Karmakar, Debapriya; Nath, Ashish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding, basically a weld deposition technique, is finding applications in many areas including surface coatings, refurbishment of worn out components and generation of functionally graded components owing to its various advantages over conventional methods like TIG, PTA etc. One of the essential requirements to adopt this technique in industrial manufacturing is to fulfil the increasing demand on product quality which could be controlled through online process monitoring and correlating the signals with the mechanical and metallurgical properties. Rapid thermo-cycle i.e. the fast heating and cooling rates involved in this process affect above properties of the deposited layer to a great extent. Therefore, the current study aims to monitor the thermo-cycles online, understand its variation with process parameters and its effect on different quality aspects of the clad layer, like microstructure, elemental segregations and mechanical properties. The effect of process parameters on clad track geometry is also studied which helps in their judicious selection to deposit a predefined thickness of coating. In this study Inconel 718, a nickel based super alloy is used as a clad material and AISI 304 austenitic steel as a substrate material. The thermo-cycles during the cladding process were recorded using a single spot monochromatic pyrometer. The heating and cooling rates were estimated from the recorded thermo-cycles and its effects on microstructures were characterised using SEM and XRD analyses. Slow thermo-cycles resulted in severe elemental segregations favouring Laves phase formation and increased γ matrix size which is found to be detrimental to the mechanical properties. Slow cooling also resulted in termination of epitaxial growth, forming equiaxed grains near the surface, which is not preferred for single crystal growth. Heat treatment is carried out and the effect of slow cooling and the increased γ matrix size on dissolution of segregated elements in

  13. ELECTRIC WELDING EQUIPMENT AND AUTOMATION OF WELDING IN CONSTRUCTION,

    Science.gov (United States)

    WELDING , *ARC WELDING , AUTOMATION, CONSTRUCTION, INDUSTRIES, POWER EQUIPMENT, GENERATORS, POWER TRANSFORMERS, RESISTANCE WELDING , SPOT WELDING , MACHINES, AUTOMATIC, STRUCTURES, WIRING DIAGRAMS, USSR.

  14. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  15. The Effect of Forging Variables on the Supersolvus Heat-Treatment Response of Powder-Metallurgy Nickel-Base Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2015-0160 THE EFFECT OF FORGING VARIABLES ON THE SUPERSOLVUS HEAT-TREATMENT RESPONSE OF POWDER-METALLURGY NICKEL -BASE SUPERALLOYS...POWDER-METALLURGY NICKEL - BASE SUPERALLOYS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR...of Powder-Metallurgy Nickel -Base Superalloys S.L. SEMIATIN, J.M. SHANK, A.R. SHIVELEY, W.M. SAURBER, E.F. GAUSSA, and A.L. PILCHAK The effect of

  16. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Robert M.; Cohen, Isadore

    1990-01-01

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  17. Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

    1988-04-26

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

  18. Experimental studies on improving the performance of electrochemical machining of high carbon, high chromium die steel using jet patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sathiyamoorthy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical machining (ECM is a non-traditional process used mainly to cut hard or difficult-to-cut metals, where the application of a more traditional process is not convenient. Stiff market competition and ever-growing demand for better, durable and reliable products has brought about a material revolution, which has greatly expanded the families of difficult-to-machine materials namely highcarbon,high-chromium die steel; stainless steel and superalloys. This investigation attempts to analyze the effect of electrolyte distribution on material removal rate (MRR and surface roughness (SR on electrochemical machining of high-carbon, high-chromium die steel using NaCl aqueous solution. Three electrolyte jet patterns namely straight jet in circular, inclined jet in circular and straight jet in spiral were used for this experimentation. The results reveal that electrolyte distribution significantly improves the performance of ECM and the straight jet in spiral pattern performs satisfactorily in obtaining better MRR and surface roughness.

  19. Effect of vibration frequency on microstructure and performance of high chromium cast iron prepared by lost foam casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-qi Zou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, high chromium cast irons (HCCIs were prepared using the lost foam casting (LFC process. To improve the wear resistance of the high chromium cast irons (HCCIs, mechanical vibration was employed during the solidification of the HCCIs. The effects of vibration frequency on the microstructure and performance of the HCCIs under as-cast, as-quenched and as-tempered conditions were investigated. The results indicated that the microstructures of the LFC-produced HCCIs were refined due to the introduction of mechanical vibration, and the hardness was improved compared to that of the alloy without vibration. However, only a slight improvement in hardness was found in spite of the increase of vibration frequency. In contrast, the impact toughness of the as-tempered HCCIs increased with an increase in the vibration frequency. In addition, the wear resistance of the HCCIs was improved as a result of the introduction of vibration and increased with an increase in the vibration frequency.

  20. Effect of vibration frequency on microstructure and performance of high chromium cast iron prepared by lost foam casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-qi Zou; Zhi-guo Zhang; Hao Yang; Wei Li

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, high chromium cast irons (HCCIs) were prepared using the lost foam casting (LFC) process. To improve the wear resistance of the high chromium cast irons (HCCIs), mechanical vibration was employed during the solidiifcation of the HCCIs. The effects of vibration frequency on the microstructure and performance of the HCCIs under as-cast, as-quenched and as-tempered conditions were investigated. The results indicated that the microstructures of the LFC-produced HCCIs were reifned due to the introduction of mechanical vibration, and the hardness was improved compared to that of the aloy without vibration. However, only a slight improvement in hardness was found in spite of the increase of vibration frequency. In contrast, the impact toughness of the as-tempered HCCIs increased with an increase in the vibration frequency. In addition, the wear resistance of the HCCIs was improved as a result of the introduction of vibration and increased with an increase in the vibration frequency.

  1. Effect of Grinding Temperatures on the Surface Integrity of a Nickel-based Superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigat e the influence of temperatures on workpiece surface integrity in surface grinding of a cast nickel-based superalloy with alumina abrasive wheels. Temperatur e response at the wheel-workpiece interface was measured using a grindable foil /workpiece thermocouple. Specimens with different grinding temperatures were obt ained through changing grinding conditions including depth of cut, workpiece fee d speed, and coolant supply. Changes in surface roughnes...

  2. NICKEL-BASED ALLOYS IN GE AIRCRAFT TURBINES:PAST,PRESENT & FUTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Chang; R. Schafrik

    2005-01-01

    Improvements in materials have been critical to advances in the propulsion system. Over the past 50 years, many improvements have been made to nickel-based superalloys to satisfy design requirements; several key developments will be highlighted. Today, millions of pounds of superalloys are annually produced for use in turbine blades, vanes, disks, cases, and frames throughout the engine. Looking to the future, several themes emerge, although predicting the future is inherently risky.

  3. Microstructurally sensitive crack nucleation around inclusions in powder metallurgy nickel based superalloys

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, J; Yang, J; Zhang, T.; J Zou; Wang,Y.,; Dunne, F.P.E.; Britton, T. B.

    2016-01-01

    ? 2016 Acta Materialia Inc.Nickel-based superalloys are used in high strength, high-value applications, such as gas turbine discs in aero engines. In these applications the integrity of the disc is critical and therefore understanding crack initiation mechanisms is of high importance. With an increasing trend towards powder metallurgy routes for discs, sometimes unwanted non-metallic inclusions are introduced during manufacture. These inclusions vary in size from ?10??m to 200??m which is com...

  4. Factors affecting the corrosion fatigue life in nickel based superalloys for disc applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rosier Hollie; Perkins Karen; Girling Andrew; Leggett Jonathan; Gibson Grant

    2014-01-01

    The nickel based superalloy 720Li is employed in the gas turbine due to its mechanical performance at elevated temperature. A comprehensive assessment of the materials behaviour under representative service conditions is reported to address the drive for ever increasing temperatures and more arduous environmental exposure. Fatigue experiments have been performed in an air and air/SOx environment at 700 ∘C containing a mixed salt as a contaminant. There is an intimate relationship between loca...

  5. Use of Precious Metal-Modifed Nickel-Base Superalloys for Thin Gage Applications (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Historically, sandwich construction MTPS (outer surface-Alloy 617 nickel-base superalloy honeycomb core and face sheets; inner surface titanium alloy honeycomb ...National Aeronautics and Space Administration ( NASA ) X-33 vehicle2, a wedged-shaped subscale prototype of a reusable launch vehicle4 designed by...MTPS, materials under consideration must be very thin, 0.17 mm-0.25 mm for a typical face sheet and 0.05mm-0.10 mm for honeycomb core. One

  6. Gamma Prime Morphology and Creep Properties of Nickel Based Superalloys With Platinum Group Metal Additions (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    creep resistance. Polycrystalline superalloy MAR - M247 can sustain a creep rate of 10-8 s-1 at 982°C at a stress of 172 MPa [44], while the alloys...Nathal, R.D. Maier, and L.J. Ebert, “The Influence of Cobalt on the Tensile and Stress Rupture Properties of the Nickel-Base Superalloy MAR - M247 ,” Metallurgical Transactions A, 13 (A) (1982), 1767-1774.           10

  7. Influence of the Overlapping Factor and Welding Speed on T-Joint Welding of Ti6Al4V and Inconel 600 Using Low-Power Fiber Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamini Janasekaran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Double-sided laser beam welding of skin-stringer joints is an established method for many applications. However, in certain cases with limited accessibility, single-sided laser beam joining is considered. In the present study, single-sided welding of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V and nickel-based alloy Inconel 600 in a T-joint configuration was carried out using continuous-wave (CW, low-power Ytterbium (Yb-fiber laser. The influence of the overlapping factor and welding speed of the laser beam on weld morphology and properties was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD, respectively. XRD analysis revealed the presence of intermetallic layers containing NiTi and NiTi2 at the skin-stringer joint. The strength of the joints was evaluated using pull testing, while the hardness of the joints was analyzed using Vickers hardness measurement at the base metal (BM, fusion zone (FZ and heat-affected zone (HAZ. The results showed that the highest force needed to break the samples apart was approximately 150 N at a laser welding power of 250 W, welding speed of 40 mm/s and overlapping factor of 50%. During low-power single-sided laser welding, the properties of the T-joints were affected by the overlapping factor and laser welding speed.

  8. Effects of RE, V, Ti and B composite modification on the microstructure and properties of high chromium cast iron containing 3 % molybdenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Erjun; WANG Lihua; WANG Liping; HUANG Yongchang

    2009-01-01

    The effects of RE, V, Ti and B on the microstructure and properties of high chromium cast iron containing 3% molybdenum under as-cast and heat treatment conditions were investigated with the method of comparing experiments. The results show that with the increase of RE content, the primary austenite of high chromium east iron is obviously refined. The morphology of carbide is changed from netlike and lath to small multiangular isolated blocks or massive blocks, the isolated degree of carbide is improved obviously, and the size is significantly re-fined. The addition of V and B into high chromium cast iron can refine the microstructure, reduce coarse columnar crystals and make the carbide smaller and uniform. Through composite modification with RE, V, Ti and B, the hardness, wear resistance and impact toughness of high chromium cast iron are increased conspicuously. After heat treatment, the hardness of high chromium iron is increased significantly, but the toughness and wear resistance do not show great improvement.

  9. The strengthening mechanism of a nickel-based alloy after laser shock processing at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghong Li, Liucheng Zhou, Weifeng He, Guangyu He, Xuede Wang, Xiangfan Nie, Bo Wang, Sihai Luo and Yuqin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the strengthening mechanism of laser shock processing (LSP at high temperatures in the K417 nickel-based alloy. Using a laser-induced shock wave, residual compressive stresses and nanocrystals with a length of 30–200 nm and a thickness of 1 μm are produced on the surface of the nickel-based alloy K417. When the K417 alloy is subjected to heat treatment at 900 °C after LSP, most of the residual compressive stress relaxes while the microhardness retains good thermal stability; the nanocrystalline surface has not obviously grown after the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, which shows a comparatively good thermal stability. There are several reasons for the good thermal stability of the nanocrystalline surface, such as the low value of cold hardening of LSP, extreme high-density defects and the grain boundary pinning of an impure element. The results of the vibration fatigue experiments show that the fatigue strength of K417 alloy is enhanced and improved from 110 to 285 MPa after LSP. After the 900 °C per 10 h heat treatment, the fatigue strength is 225 MPa; the heat treatment has not significantly reduced the reinforcement effect. The feature of the LSP strengthening mechanism of nickel-based alloy at a high temperature is the co-working effect of the nanocrystalline surface and the residual compressive stress after thermal relaxation.

  10. Welded Kimberlite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straaten, B. I.; Kopylova, M. G.; Russell, J. K.; Scott Smith, B. H.

    2009-05-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits generally involves the sintering of hot glassy vesicular particles and requires the presence of a load and/or high temperatures. Welding can occur on various scales as observed in large welded pyroclastic flows, in small-volume agglutinated spatter rims, or as in coalesced clastogenic lava flows. In all these examples welding occurs mainly by reduction or elimination of porosity within the vesicular clasts and/or inter-clast pore space. The end result of welding in pyroclastic deposits is to produce dense, massive, coherent deposits. Here, we present a possible new end-member of the welding process: welding of non- vesicular pyroclasts in intra-crater kimberlite deposits. Kimberlite melt is a low-viscosity liquid carrying abundant crystals. Because of this, kimberlite eruptions generally produce non-vesicular pyroclasts. During welding, these pyroclast cannot deform by volume reduction to form typical fiamme. As a result, welding and compaction in kimberlites proceeds via the reduction of inter-clast pore space alone. The lack of porous pyroclasts limits the maximum amount of volumetric strain within pyroclastic kimberlite deposits to about 30%. This value is substantially lower than the limiting values for welding of more common felsic pyroclastic flows. The lower limit for volumetric strain in welded kimberlite deposits severely restricts the development of a fabric. In addition, pyroclastic kimberlite deposits commonly feature equant-shaped pyroclasts, and equant-shaped crystals. This, in turn, limits the visibility of the results of compaction and pore space reduction, as there are few deformable markers and elongate rigid markers that are able to record the strain during compaction. These features, together with the low viscosity of kimberlite magma and the stratigraphic position of these kimberlite deposits within the upper reaches of the volcanic conduit, call for careful interpretation of coherent-looking rocks in these

  11. The elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloy in molten salt corrosion by using nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qiantao; Liu, Ke; Gao, Jie; Li, Xiaolin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Nickel-based alloys as candidate materials for Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR), need to be used under high temperature in molten salt environment. In order to ensure the safety of the reactor running, it is necessary to study the elemental move characteristic of nickel-based alloys in the high temperature molten salts. In this work, the scanning nuclear microprobe at Fudan University was applied to study the elemental move. The Nickel-based alloy samples were corroded by molten salt at different temperatures. The element concentrations in the Nickel-based alloys samples were determined by the scanning nuclear microprobe. Micro-PIXE results showed that the element concentrations changed from the interior to the exterior of the alloy samples after the corrosion.

  12. Probability of Occurrence of Life-Limiting Fatigue Mechanism in P/M Nickel-Based Alloys (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0146 PROBABILITY OF OCCURRENCE OF LIFE-LIMITING FATIGUE MECHANISM IN P/M NICKEL-BASED ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) M.J...February 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PROBABILITY OF OCCURRENCE OF LIFE-LIMITING FATIGUE MECHANISM IN P/M NICKEL-BASED ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) 5a...paper, a micro structure-based model of the probability of occurrence of the minimum-lifetime, or the life-limiting, mechanism in powder processed Ni

  13. THE ROLE OF NIOBIUM IN NICKEL-BASED SUPERALLOYS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PM ALLOY EP741NP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Carneiro; J. Radavich; D. Furrer

    2005-01-01

    The role of niobium in nickel-based superalloys is reviewed. The importance of niobium as a strengthener is discussed. New developments in nickel-based superalloys are also briefly mentioned, including some results that show improved resistance to sulfidation by niobium. Research results from a current program on the role of niobium in the Russian powder metallurgy alloy EP741NP are presented. Future research plans on the role of niobium in superalloys are also discussed.

  14. A Coupled Creep Plasticity Model for Residual Stress Relaxation of a Shot Peened Nickel-Base Superalloy (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    McLean, M. “Tension- Compression creep asymmetry in a turbine disc superalloy : roles of internal stress and thermal ageing,” Acta Materialia, 52, 2004...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2009-4156 A COUPLED CREEP PLASTICITY MODEL FOR RESIDUAL STRESS RELAXATION OF A SHOT PEENED NICKEL-BASE SUPERALLOY (POSTPRINT...SUBTITLE A COUPLED CREEP PLASTICITY MODEL FOR RESIDUAL STRESS RELAXATION OF A SHOT PEENED NICKEL-BASE SUPERALLOY (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  15. Welding Curtains

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Concept of transparent welding curtains made of heavy duty vinyl originated with David F. Wilson, President of Wilson Sales Company. In 1968, Wilson's curtains reduced glare of welding arc and blocked ultraviolet radiation. When later research uncovered blue light hazards, Wilson sought improvement of his products. He contracted Dr. Charles G. Miller and James B. Stephens, both of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and they agreed to undertake development of a curtain capable of filtering out harmful irradiance, including ultraviolet and blue light and provide protection over a broad range of welding operation. Working on their own time, the JPL pair spent 3 years developing a patented formula that includes light filtering dyes and small particles of zinc oxide. The result was the Wilson Spectra Curtain.

  16. Characterization and Optimization of Ni-WC Composite Weld Matrix Deposited by Plasma-Transferred Arc Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahaei, Ali; Horley, Paul; Merlin, Mattia; Torres-Torres, David; Garagnani, Gian Luca; Praga, Rolando; Vázquez, Felipe J. García; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana

    2017-03-01

    This work is dedicated to optimization of carbide particle system in a weld bead deposited by PTAW technique over D2 tool steel with high chromium content. The paper reports partial melting of the original carbide grains of the Ni-based filling powder, and growing of the secondary carbide phase (Cr, Ni)_3W_3C in the form of dendrites with wide branches that enhanced mechanical properties of the weld. The optimization of bead parameters was made with design of experiment methodology complemented by a complex sample characterization including SEM, EDXS, XRD, and nanoindentation measurements. It was shown that the preheat of the substrate to a moderate temperature 523 K (250° C) establishes linear pattern of metal flow in the weld pool, resulting in the most homogeneous distribution of the primary carbides in the microstructure of weld bead.

  17. Characterization and Optimization of Ni-WC Composite Weld Matrix Deposited by Plasma-Transferred Arc Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahaei, Ali; Horley, Paul; Merlin, Mattia; Torres-Torres, David; Garagnani, Gian Luca; Praga, Rolando; Vázquez, Felipe J. García; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana

    2017-01-01

    This work is dedicated to optimization of carbide particle system in a weld bead deposited by PTAW technique over D2 tool steel with high chromium content. The paper reports partial melting of the original carbide grains of the Ni-based filling powder, and growing of the secondary carbide phase (Cr, Ni)_3 W_3 C in the form of dendrites with wide branches that enhanced mechanical properties of the weld. The optimization of bead parameters was made with design of experiment methodology complemented by a complex sample characterization including SEM, EDXS, XRD, and nanoindentation measurements. It was shown that the preheat of the substrate to a moderate temperature 523 K (250° C) establishes linear pattern of metal flow in the weld pool, resulting in the most homogeneous distribution of the primary carbides in the microstructure of weld bead.

  18. Stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 182 weld metal in primary coolant - Influence of chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O.; Foucault, M.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF SEPTEN (France)

    2011-07-01

    Nickel-base alloys 182 and 82 have been used extensively for dissimilar metal welds. Typical applications are the J-groove welds of alloy 600 vessel head penetrations, pressurizer penetrations, heater sleeves and bottom mounted instrumented nozzles as well as some safe end butt welds. While the overall performance of these weld metals has been good, during the last decade, an increasing number of cases of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 182 weld metal have been reported in PWRs. In this context, the role of weld defects has to be examined. Their contribution in the crack initiation mechanism requires laboratory investigations with small scale characterizations. In this study, the influence of both alloy composition and weld defects on PWSCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking in Primary Water) initiation was investigated using U-bend specimens in simulated primary water at 320 C. The main results are the following: -) the chemical compositions of the weld deposits leading to a large propensity to hot cracking are not the most susceptible to PWSCC initiation, -) macroscopically, superficial defects did not evolve during successive exposures. They can be included in large corrosion cracks but their role as 'precursors' is not yet established. (authors)

  19. Hot Corrosion Behavior of High-Chromium, High-Carbon Cast Irons in NaCl-KCl Molten Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vuelvas-Rayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on the corrosion behavior of a series of experimental high-chromium (18.53–30.48 wt.%, high-carbon (3.82–5.17% cast irons in NaCl-KCl (1 : 1 M at 670°C has been evaluated by using weight loss technique and compared with a 304-type stainless steel. It was found that all castings had a higher corrosion rate than conventional 304SS and that the addition of Cr increased the degradation rate of the cast irons. Additionally, corrosion rate increased by increasing the C contents up to 4.29%, but it decreased with a further increase in its contents. Results are discussed in terms of consumption of the Cr2O3 layer by the melt.

  20. Effect of prior deformation on microstructural development and Laves phase precipitation in high-chromium stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Z-W; Chen, D; Kuo, J-C; Lin, D-Y

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of deformation on precipitation behaviour and microstructure change during annealing. Here, the prior deformation of high-chromium stainless steel was tensile deformation of 3%, 6% and 10%, and the specimens were then annealed at 700˚C for 10 h. The specimens were subsequently analyzed using backscattered electron image and electron backscattering diffraction measurements with SEM. Compared with the deformation microstructure, the grains revealed no preferred orientation. The precipitates of TiN and NbC were formed homogenously in the grain interior and at grain boundaries after annealing. Fine Laves phase precipitates were observed in grains and along subgrain boundaries as the deformation increased. Furthermore, the volume fraction of Laves phase increased, but the average particle diameter of precipitate was reduced as the deformation increased. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Effect of Manganese on As-Cast Microstructure and Hardening Behavior of High Chromium White Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-ping; SHEN Bao-luo; WANG Jun; LIU Hao-huai; LUO Cheng

    2005-01-01

    The effect of manganese on the as-cast structure and hardening behavior of high chromium white cast iron subjected to sub-critical treatment was studied. The results indicate that the fraction of retained austenite and the manganese distribution in as-cast alloys are controlled by manganese content. The manganese distribution in as-cast alloys is not homogeneous. The manganese content in carbide is higher than that in matrix. Whether the secondary hardening occurs or not and the peak hardness of secondary hardening is controlled by manganese content in retained austenite in as-cast structure. Higher manganese content can cause more retained austenite. The secondary hardening occurs in sub-critical treating process if the fraction of retained austenite is high.

  2. Modeling Long-term Creep Performance for Welded Nickel-base Superalloy Structures for Power Generation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    We report here a constitutive model for predicting long-term creep strain evolution in’ strengthened Ni-base superalloys. Dislocation climb-bypassing’, typical in intermediate’ volume fraction (~20%) alloys, is considered as the primary deformation mechanism. Dislocation shearing’ to anti-phase boundary (APB) faults and diffusional creep are also considered for high-stress and high-temperature low-stress conditions, respectively. Additional damage mechanism is taken into account for rapid increase in tertiary creep strain. The model has been applied to Alloy 282, and calibrated in a temperature range of 1375-1450°F, and stress range of 15-45ksi. The model parameters and a MATLAB code are provided. This report is prepared by Monica Soare and Chen Shen at GE Global Research. Technical discussions with Dr. Vito Cedro are greatly appreciated. This work was supported by DOE program DE-FE0005859

  3. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  4. Nucleation mechanism of a nickel-base superalloy during dynamic recrystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuai WANG; Lei WANG; Yang LIU; Guohua XU; Beijiang ZHANG; Guangpu ZHAO

    2011-01-01

    Hot compression test was carried out at 1000 ℃ to investigate the dynamic recrystallization nucleation mechanism of a nickel-base superalloy.It was found that the bulging of original grain boundaries was inhibited by carbides and deformation twins at the boundaries.Recrystallized nuclei evolved from the subgrains of dislocation reconfiguration along original grain boundaries,and the growth of the potential nuclei was carried out by the coalescence of subgrains.The necklace structure of recrystallized grains along original grain boundaries was attributed to the strain gradient from grain boundary to grain interior.

  5. The machinability of nickel-based alloys in high-pressure jet assisted (HPJA turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kramar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to their mechanical, thermal and chemical properties, nickel-based alloys are generally included among materials that are hard to machine. An experimental study has been performed to investigate the capabilities of conventional and high-pressure jet assisted (HPJA turning of hard-to-machine materials, namely Inconel 718. The capabilities of different hard turning procedures are compared by means of chip breakability. The obtained results show that HPJA method offers a significant increase in chip breakability, under the same cutting conditions (cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut.

  6. Analysis of the solidified structure of rheocast and VADER processed nickel-base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelian, D.; Cheng, J.-J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Conventional 'ingot' processing of highly alloyed compositions results in a cast product which suffers from extensive macrosegregation, hot tears, and heterogeneities. By controlling the solidification journey, one can produce a fine grained cast product. This is achieved by manipulating the melt in the mushy zone. Rheocasting and vacuum arc double electrode remelting (VADER) are two such technologies where the melt is processed in the mushy zone. IN-100, a nickel based superalloy, was rheocast as well as VADER processed. The resultant cast structures are analyzed, compared and discussed both onmicro- and macrostructural levels. The effect of the rheocast processing variables (stirring seed, time and temperature) on the cast microstructure are also discussed.

  7. Interface reaction between nickel-base self-fluxing alloy coating and steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, F.; Era, H.; Kishitake, K.

    2000-06-01

    The interface reaction between a nickel-base, self-fluxing alloy coating and a steel substrate has been investigated to examine the formation of “pores,” which are observed along the interface of used boiler tubes. It was found that lumpy precipitates form along the interface instead of pores after heating at high temperatures and that the precipitates are of Fe2B boride. The adhesion strength of the coating is not decreased by the formation of Fe2B precipitates along the interface because of the increase of the adhesion due to interdiffusion.

  8. Precipitation in Powder Metallurgy, Nickel Base Superalloys: Review of Modeling Approach and Formulation of Engineering (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    such as those of interest here, the work of Campbell et al. [60] and Semiatin et al. [50] suggests that Cr diffusion is rate limiting in γ-γ...the work of Campbell et al. [60]. In addition, w(f ) was taken from the research of Voorhees and Glicksman [20], and σ was assumed to be 23 mJ/m2 per...2104) Alloying-element loss during high-temperature processing of a nickel-base superalloy. Metall Mater Trans A 45:962–979 60. Campbell CE, Zhao JC

  9. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of a Transient Liquid Phase Bonded Nickel-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebajo, O. J.; Ojo, O. A.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical analysis of corrosion performance of a transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded nickel-based superalloy was performed. The TLP bonding process resulted in significant reduction in corrosion resistance due to the formation of non-equilibrium solidification reaction micro-constituents within the joint region. The corrosion resistance degradation is completely eliminated through a new application of composite interlayer that had been previously considered unusable for joining single-crystal superalloys. The effectiveness of the new approach becomes more pronounced as the severity of environment increases.

  10. Metallurgical instabilities during the high temperature low cycle fatigue of nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolovich, S. D.; Jayaraman, N.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation is made of the microstructural instabilities that affect the high temperature low cycle fatigue (LCF) life of nickel-base superalloys. Crack initiation processes, provoked by the formation of carbides and the coarsening of the grains of the material at high temperatures are discussed. Experimental results are examined, and it is concluded that LCF behavior can be understood more fully only if details of the material and its dynamic behavior at high temperatures are considered. The effects of high stress, dislocation debris, and increasing environmental damage on the life of the alloy are discussed.

  11. Laser-Aided Direct Writing of Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Super Alloy (N5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichen; Choi, Jeongyoung; Mazumder, Jyoti

    2016-12-01

    This communication reports direct writing of René N5 nickel-based Super alloy. N5 powder was deposited on (100) single-crystal substrate of René N5, for epitaxial growth, using laser and induction heating with a specially designed closed-loop thermal control system. A thin wall (1 mm width) of René N5 single crystal of 22.1 mm (including 3 mm SX substrate) in height was successfully deposited within 100 layers. SEM and EBSD characterized the single-crystal nature of the deposit.

  12. Evolution of precipitate in nickel-base alloy 718 irradiated with argon ions at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shuoxue; Luo, Fengfeng; Ma, Shuli; Chen, Jihong; Li, Tiecheng; Tang, Rui; Guo, Liping

    2013-07-01

    Alloy 718 is a nickel-base superalloy whose strength derives from γ'(Ni3(Al,Ti)) and γ″(Ni3Nb) precipitates. The evolution of the precipitates in alloy 718 irradiated with argon ions at elevated temperature were examined via transmission electron microscopy. Selected-area electron diffraction indicated superlattice spots disappeared after argon ion irradiation, which showing that the ordered structure of the γ' and γ″ precipitates became disordered. The size of the precipitates became smaller with the irradiation dose increasing at 290 °C.

  13. SOLIDIFICATION OF NICKEL-BASED SINGLE CRYSTAL SUPERALLOY BY ELECTRIC FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Yang; X.H. Feng; G.F. Cheng; Y.J. Li; Z.Q. Hu

    2005-01-01

    The crystal growth of a nickel-based single crystal superalloy DD3 was researched via controlled directional solidification under the action of a DC electric field. The cellular or dendrite spacing of the single crystal superalloy is refined and microsegregation of alloying elements Al,Ti, Mo and W, is reduced by the electric field. The electric field decreases the interface stability and reduces the critical growth rate of the cellular-dendritic translation because of Thomson effect and Joule heating. The precipitation of the γ' phase is more uniform and the size of the γ'phase is smaller with the electric field than that without the electric field.

  14. Ion irradiation induced disappearance of dislocations in a nickel-based alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.C.; Li, D.H.; Lui, R.D.; Huang, H.F.; Li, J.J.; Lei, G.H.; Huang, Q.; Bao, L.M.; Yan, L., E-mail: yanlong@sinap.ac.cn; Zhou, X.T., E-mail: zhouxingtai@sinap.ac.cn; Zhu, Z.Y.

    2016-06-15

    Under Xe ion irradiation, the microstructural evolution of a nickel based alloy, Hastelloy N (US N10003), was studied. The intrinsic dislocations are decorated with irradiation induced interstitial loops and/or clusters. Moreover, the intrinsic dislocations density reduces as the irradiation damage increases. The disappearance of the intrinsic dislocations is ascribed to the dislocations climb to the free surface by the absorption of interstitials under the ion irradiation. Moreover, the in situ annealing experiment reveals that the small interstitial loops and/or clusters induced by the ion irradiation are stable below 600 °C.

  15. Morphology and Magnetic Properties of Electrodeposited Iron and Nickel Based Alloy Foils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhan-cheng; LIU Mei-feng; SUN Chun-wen; LIU Yu-xing; LU Wei-chang

    2004-01-01

    An alternative to conventional process for the preparation of soft magnetic metal foils of Fe, Fe-Ni, Fe-Co and Fe-Ni-Co by electroforming was described. The microstructure and magnetic properties were observed. The results showed that the crystal size of the iron-based alloy foil is less than 10 μm, while that of nickel-based alloy foil is about 2 μm. Moreover, the electroformed Fe-Ni foil has better magnetic properties than the conventional milled permalloy 1J79 foil.

  16. Temperature of phase transformations in heat-resistant nickel-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. D.; Ukhlinov, A. G.

    1997-11-01

    The study of phase transformations in heating and cooling of alloys is needed for choosing optimum regimes of their melting, plastic deformation, and heat treatment. In the present paper differential thermal analysis is used to determine the temperature of phase transformations in complexly alloyed nickel-base alloys. Industrial nickel alloys with intermetallic reinforcement manufactured by means of vacuum arc remelting (VAR) and hot deformation (HD) were studied. Alloy KhN56MBYuD was studied after different metallurgical processes, namely, electroslag remelting (ESR), centrifugal casting (CC), powder spraying (PS), and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). All the alloys were studied in the initial state and after heat treatment.

  17. Homogenization kinetics of a nickel-based superalloy produced by powder bed fusion laser sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan; Levine, Lyle E.; Allen, Andrew J.; Campbell, Carelyn E.; Lass, Eric A.; Cheruvathur, Sudha; Stoudt, Mark R.; Williams, Maureen E.; Idell, Yaakov

    2017-04-01

    Additively manufactured (AM) metal components often exhibit fine dendritic microstructures and elemental segregation due to the initial rapid solidification and subsequent melting and cooling during the build process, which without homogenization would adversely affect materials performance. In this letter, we report in situ observation of the homogenization kinetics of an AM nickel-based superalloy using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering. The identified kinetic time scale is in good agreement with thermodynamic diffusion simulation predictions using microstructural dimensions acquired by ex situ scanning electron microscopy. These findings could serve as a recipe for predicting, observing, and validating homogenization treatments in AM materials.

  18. Modelling NiFe hydrogenases: nickel-based electrocatalysts for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canaguier, S.; Artero, V.; Fontecave, M. [CEA, DSV, iRTSV, Lab Chim Biol Metaux, CEA-CNRS-Univ Grenoble 1, UMR 5249, F-38054 Grenoble 9 (France)

    2008-07-01

    NiFe hydrogenases are unique enzymes that catalyze the H{sup +}/H{sub 2} interconversion with remarkable efficiency. The determination of the tridimensional structure of their active site (a sulfur-rich dinuclear nickel-iron cluster with diatomic cyanide and carbonyl ligands) has stimulated the synthesis of a variety of nickel-based complexes as potential electrocatalysts for hydrogen production. These catalysts may provide an adequate alternative to platinum. This paper gives an historical perspective of this biomimetic structural approach and then focusses on recently reported bio-inspired functional mimics displaying electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen production. (authors)

  19. Prediction of recrystallisation in single crystal nickel-based superalloys during investment casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panwisawas Chinnapat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of gas turbines for jet propulsion and power generation requires the manufacture of turbine blades from single crystal nickel-based superalloys, most typically using investment casting. During the necessary subsequent solution heat treatment, the formation of recrystallised grains can occur. The introduction of grain boundaries into a single crystal component is potentially detrimental to performance, and therefore manufacturing processes and/or component geometries should be designed to prevent their occurrence. If the boundaries have very low strength, they can degrade the creep and fatigue properties. The root cause for recrystallisation is microscale plasticity caused by differential thermal contraction of metal, mould and core; when the plastic deformation is sufficiently large, recrystallisation takes place. In this work, numerical and thermo-mechanical modelling is carried out, with the aim of establishing computational methods by which recrystallisation during the heat treatment of single crystal nickel-based superalloys can be predicted and prevented prior to their occurrence. Elasto-plastic law is used to predict the plastic strain necessary for recrystallisation. The modelling result shows that recrystallisation is most likely to occur following 1.5–2.5% plastic strain applied at temperatures between 1000 ∘C and 1300 ∘C; this is validated with tensile tests at these elevated temperatures. This emphasises that high temperature deformation is more damaging than low temperature deformation.

  20. Solid particle erosion of steels and nickel based alloys candidates for USC steam turbine blading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernuschi, Federico; Guardamagna, Cristina; Lorenzoni, Lorenzo [ERSE SpA, Milan (Italy); Robba, Davide [CESI, Milan (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    The main objective of COST536 Action is to develop highly efficient steam power plant with low emissions, from innovative alloy development to validation of component integrity. In this perspective, to improve the operating efficiency, materials capable of withstanding higher operating temperatures are required. For the manufacturing of components for steam power plants with higher efficiency steels and nickel-based alloys with improved oxidation resistance and creep strength at temperature as high as 650 C - 700 C have to be developed. Candidate alloys for manufacturing high pressure steam turbine diaphragms, buckets, radial seals and control valves should exhibit, among other properties, a good resistance at the erosion phenomena induced by hard solid particles. Ferric oxide (magnetite) scales cause SPE by exfoliating from boiler tubes and steam pipes (mainly super-heaters and re-heaters) and being transported within the steam flow to the turbine. In order to comparatively study the erosion behaviour of different materials in relatively short times, an accelerated experimental simulation of the erosion phenomena must be carried out. Among different techniques to induce erosion on material targets, the use of an air jet tester is well recognised to be one of the most valid and reliable. In this work the results of SPE comparative tests performed at high temperatures (550 C, 600 C and 650 C) at different impaction angles on some steels and nickel based alloys samples are reported. (orig.)

  1. Mapping single-crystal dendritic microstructure and defects in nickel-base superalloys with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husseini, Naji S. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)], E-mail: najihuss@umich.edu; Kumah, Divine P. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yi, Jian Z.; Torbet, Christopher J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Arms, Dohn A.; Dufresne, Eric M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Pollock, Tresa M.; Wayne Jones, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Clarke, Roy [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Solidification of single-crystal nickel-base superalloys introduces large-scale segregation of constituent elements and defects such as dislocations and mosaicity. By exploiting the energy tunability and interference capabilities of high-brilliance X-ray radiation, key structural features of the dendritic single crystals were mapped over large areas. Interference and diffraction of synchrotron X-rays revealed significant misorientations between individual dendrites in the as-solidified state. For the first time this mosaic structure was quantified for an array of dendrites and correlated with the density of 'grown-in' dislocations whose density ranged from 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. Absorption contrast permitted simultaneous mapping of the distribution of refractory metal additives (e.g. rhenium and tungsten), which segregated preferentially to the dendrite cores with a linear composition gradient toward the interdendritic regions. The results demonstrate that synchrotron X-ray imaging is promising for in situ studies of single-crystal structure and defects in nickel-base superalloys.

  2. Influence of Ta content on hot corrosion behaviour of a directionally solidified nickel base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, F.F. [Superalloy Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Chang, J.X., E-mail: jxchang11s@imr.ac.cn [Superalloy Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, H.; Lou, L.H. [Superalloy Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, J. [Superalloy Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Three nickel-base superalloys containing different Ta content were subjected to Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-induced hot corrosion. • Ta improved the hot corrosion resistance. • Ta decreased the diffusion rate of alloying elements. • Ta promoted the formation of (Cr, Ti)TaO{sub 4} layer. - Abstract: Hot corrosion behaviour of a directionally solidified nickel base superalloy with different tantalum (Ta) addition in fused sodium sulphate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) under an oxidizing atmosphere at 900 °C has been studied. It was shown that the hot corrosion resistance was improved by increasing of Ta content. The hot corrosion kinetics of the alloy with lower Ta content deviated from parabolic law after 60 h corrosion test, whereas the corrosion kinetics of the alloy with high Ta content followed the parabolic law before 60 h and with less mass change afterwards. A detailed microstructure study using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed to investigate the corrosion products and mechanisms. The beneficial effect of Ta was found to be resulted from a Ta-enriched (Cr, Ti)TaO{sub 4} layer inside the corrosion scale, which led to the retarding of the element diffusion so as to decrease the hot corrosion kinetics.

  3. Effect of Heat Treatment Process on Microstructure and Fatigue Behavior of a Nickel-Base Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of fatigue behaviors for nickel-base superalloys is very significant because fatigue damage results in serious consequences. In this paper, two kinds of heat treatment procedures (Pro.I and Pro.II were taken to investigate the effect of heat treatment on microstructures and fatigue behaviors of a nickel-base superalloy. Fatigue behaviors were studied through total strain controlled mode at 650 °C. Manson-Coffin relationship and three-parameter power function were used to predict fatigue life. A good link between the cyclic/fatigue behavior and microscopic studies was established. The cyclic deformation mechanism and fatigue mechanism were discussed. The results show that the fatigue resistance significantly drops with the increase of total strain amplitudes. Manson-Coffin relationship can well predict the fatigue life for total strain amplitude from 0.5% to 0.8%. The fatigue resistance is related with heat treatment procedures. The fatigue resistance performance of Pro.I is better than that of Pro.II. The cyclic stress response behaviors are closely related to the changes of the strain amplitudes. The peak stress of the alloy gradually increases with the increase of total strain amplitudes. The main fracture mechanism is inhomogeneous deformation and the different interactions between dislocations and γ′ precipitates.

  4. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  5. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  6. Effects of Nitrogen and Carbon on Mechanical Properties of Weld-Simulated 19% Chromium Steels

    OpenAIRE

    ShinIchiro, OCHIAI; Nobuhiro, SAITO; Yoneo, Kikuta; Department of Welding Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Osaka University

    1980-01-01

    Poor toughnesses of welded high-chromium ferritic steels are due to the coarsened grain and the deteriorating effects of carbon and nitrogen impurities upon the intrinsically brittle b.c.c. materials. The control of these impurity elements is crucial for the improvement of the weldability and reduction of hot-cracking susceptibility. 19% chromium steels with various impurity levels of C : 10-800ppm and N : 30-740ppm, together with a commercial 19% Cr super ferritic, are high-temperature heat-...

  7. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ met

  8. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  9. Oxidation and thermal fatigue of coated and uncoated NX-188 nickel-base alloy in a high velocity gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Young, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A cast nickel-base superalloy, NX-188, coated and uncoated, was tested in a high-velocity gas stream for resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue by cycling between room temperature and 980, 1040, and 1090 C. Contrary to the behavior of more conventional nickel-base alloys, uncoated NX-188 exhibited the greatest weight loss at the lowest test temperature. In general, on the basis of weight change and metallographic observations a coating consisting of vapor-deposited Fe-Cr-Al-Y over a chromized substrate exhibited the best overall performance in resistance to oxidation and thermal fatigue.

  10. Laser welding in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  11. Comparison of laboratory and field experience of PWSCC in Alloy 182 weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P.; Meunier, M.-C.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, Paris La Defense (France); Calonne, O.; Foucault, M. [AREVA NP, Centre Technique, Le Creusot Cedex (France); Combrade, P. [ACXCOR, Saint Etienne (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF, SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    2007-07-01

    Laboratory studies of stress corrosion cracking of the nickel base weld metal, Alloy 182, in simulated PWR primary water suggest similar resistance to crack initiation and somewhat enhanced propagation rates relative to wrought Alloy 600. By contrast, field experience of cracking in the primary circuits of PWRs shows in general much better performance for Alloy 182 relative to Alloy 600 than would be anticipated from laboratory studies. This paper endeavours to resolve this apparent conundrum. It draws on the conclusions of recent research that has focussed on the role of surface finish, particularly cold work and residual stresses resulting from different fabrication processes, on the risk of initiating IGSCC in nickel base alloys in PWR primary water. It also draws on field experience of stress corrosion cracking that highlights the important role of surface finish for crack initiation. (author)

  12. Fabrication of plain carbon steel/high chromium white cast iron bimetal by a liquid-solid composite casting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V Javaheri; H Rastegari; M Naseri

    2015-01-01

    High-chromium white cast iron (HCWCI) is one of the most widely used engineering materials in the mining and cement indus-tries. However, in some components, such as the pulverizer plates of ash mills, the poor machinability of HCWCI creates difficulties. The bimetal casting technique is a suitable method for improving the machinability of HCWCI by joining an easily machined layer of plain car-bon steel (PCS) to its hard part. In this study, the possibility of PCS/HCWCI bimetal casting was investigated using sand casting. The inves-tigation was conducted by optical and electron microscopy and non-destructive, impact toughness, and tensile tests. The hardness and chemical composition profiles on both sides of the interface were plotted in this study. The results indicated that a conventional and low-cost casting technique could be a reliable method for producing PCS/HCWCI bimetal. The interfacial microstructure comprised two distinct lay-ers:a very fine, partially spheroidized pearlite layer and a coarse full pearlite layer. Moreover, characterization of the microstructure revealed that the interface was free of defects.

  13. Reduction mechanism of high-chromium vanadium-titanium magnetite pellets by H2-CO-CO2 gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jue; Chu, Man-sheng; Li, Feng; Tang, Ya-ting; Liu, Zheng-gen; Xue, Xiang-xin

    2015-06-01

    The reduction of high-chromium vanadium-titanium magnetite as a typical titanomagnetite containing 0.95wt% V2O5 and 0.61wt% Cr2O3 by H2-CO-CO2 gas mixtures was investigated from 1223 to 1373 K. Both the reduction degree and reduction rate increase with increasing temperature and increasing hydrogen content. At a temperature of 1373 K, an H2/CO ratio of 5/2 by volume, and a reduction time of 40 min, the degree of reduction reaches 95%. The phase transformation during reduction is hypothesized to proceed as follows: Fe2O3 → Fe3O4 → FeO → Fe; Fe9TiO15 + Fe2Ti3O9 → Fe2.75Ti0.25O4 → FeTiO3 → TiO2; (Cr0.15V0.85)2O3 → Fe2VO4; and Cr1.3Fe0.7O3 → FeCr2O4. The reduction is controlled by the mixed internal diffusion and interfacial reaction at the initial stage; however, the interfacial reaction is dominant. As the reduction proceeds, the internal diffusion becomes the controlling step.

  14. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Abrasive Wear Behavior of High Chromium Iron under Dry Sliding Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Ayeni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment on the abrasive wear behavior of high chromium cast iron (NF253AHT under dry sliding condition has been investigated. Rectangular cross sectioned samples of the alloy were produced by sand casting. After casting, the samples were machined to equal dimensions of 50 mm x 15 mm x 10 mm and heat treated by annealing, hardening and tempering. Abrasive wear tests were carried out on the samples using the pin-on-disc wear test. The tests were carried out under restricted values of speed, load and time. Within this limit, the hardened sample displayed a superior wear resistance, while the annealed sample displayed the weakest wear resistance. A graphical model (wear map displaying all the wear regimes of the alloy, which may serve as a wear predictive tool was subsequently developed from the results of the wear tests. With the exception of the as-cast and annealed specimen, all other specimens (hardened and tempered have functioned adequately in wear prone environment, but with different degree of effectiveness. Hence, the hardened and tempered samples can be used in shot blast equipments and in the grinding of minerals.

  15. Mechanical properties of white layers formed by different machining processes on nickel-based superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust, Edouard

    Nickel-based superalloys are widely used in the aerospace industry in the production of turbine discs and blades because of their good mechanical properties and great corrosion resistance at high temperature. Although very useful, these alloys are hard to machine. Their structure is responsible for rapid wear of cutting tools. Moreover, under certain machining conditions, near-surface regions of the material undergo a phase transformation resulting in the formation of a thin layer called "white etching layer" at the surface of the machined workpiece. Because turbine discs are safety critical components, no defects can be tolerated on the workpiece. Therefore, efforts should be made to ensure that this white etching layer can't influence the operating life of the workpiece and make its operation unsafe. Even if the existence of the white etching layer is well known, its mechanical properties have never been assessed in detail. In this thesis, we present a study of the mechanical (hardness and Young's modulus) and microstructural properties of white etching layers formed at the surface of nickel-based superalloy IN100 turbine discs fabricated by different machining processes. This work aims at evaluating the impact of the machining process and of fatigue on the properties of the white etching layers under study. The originality of this study primarily lies in the employed characterization technique. Using nanoindentation has allowed us to very precisely assess the variations of both the hardness and the Young's modulus along the white etching layers. Also, the use of a sophisticated indentation system has enabled the acquisition of very precise surface images of the samples and therefore to study the microstructure of the white etching layers. This research has demonstrated that the mechanical and microstructural properties of the white etching layers are closely linked to the machining conditions of the material. Therefore, our study will help researchers gain a

  16. Skeletal Amorphous Nickel Based Alloy Catalysts and Magnetically Stabilized Bed Hydrogenation Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Enze

    2004-01-01

    Looking toward 21 century, smaller, cleaner and more energy-efficient technology will be an important trend in the development of chemical industry. In light of the new process requirements,a number of technology breakthroughs have occurred. One of these discoveries, the magnetically stabilized bed (MSB), has been proven a powerful process for intensification. Since its initial research in the late 1980's at Research Institute of Petroleum Processing (RIPP), the MSB technology and related catalytic material have matured rapidly through an intensive research and engineering program, primarily focused on its scaling-up.In this paper, we report the discovery of a novel skeletal amorphous nickel-based alloy and its use in magnetically stabilized bed (MSB). Amorphous alloys are new kinds of catalytic materials with short-range order but long-range disorder structure. In comparison with Raney Ni, the skeletal amorphous nickel-based alloy has an increasingly higher activity in the hydrogenation of reactive groups and compounds including nitro, nitrile, olefin, acetylene, aromatics, etc. Up to now, the amorphous nickel based alloy catalysts, SRNA series catalyst, one with high Ni ratio have been commercially manufactured more than four year. The new SRNA catalyst has been successfully implemented for hydrogenation applications in slurry reactor at Balin Petrochemical, SINOPEC.SRNA catalyst with further improvement in catalytic activity and stability raise its relative stability to 2~4 times of that of conventional catalyst. In the course of the long-cycle operation of SRNA-4 the excellent catalyst activity and stability can bring about such advantage as low reaction temperature, good selectivity and low catalyst resumption.Magnetically stabilized bed (MSB), a fluidized bed of magnetizable particles by applying a spatially uniform and time-invariant magnetic field oriented axially relative to the fluidizing fluid flow, had many advantages such as the low pressure drop and

  17. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  18. Friction assisted solid state lap seam welding and additive manufacturing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prasad Rao KALVALA; Javed AKRAM; Mano MISRA

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes results of seam welding of relatively high temperature melting materials, AISI 304, C-Mn steels, Ni-based alloys, CP Cu, CP Ni, Ti6Al4V and relatively low temperature melting material, AA6061. It describes the seam welding of multi-layered similar and dissimilar metallic sheets. The method described and involved advancing a rotating non-consumable rod (CP Mo or AISI 304) toward the upper sheet of a metallic stack clamped under pressure. As soon as the distal end of the rod touched the top portion of the upper metallic sheet, an axial force was applied. After an initial dwell time, the metallic stack moved horizontally relative to the stationery non-consumable rod by a desired length, thereby forming a metallurgical bond between the metallic sheets. Multi-track and multi-metal seam welds of high temperature metallic sheets, AISI 304, C-Mn steel, Nickel-based alloys, Cp Cu, Ti6Al4V and low temperature metallic sheets, AA6061 were obtained. Optical and scanning electron microscopy examination and 180 degree U-bend test indicated that defect free seam welds could be obtained with this method. Tensile-shear testing showed that the seam welds of AISI 304, C-Mn steel, Nickel-based alloy were stronger than the starting base metal counterparts while AA6061 was weaker due to softening. The metallurgical bonding at the interface between the metallic sheets was attributed to localized stick and slip at the interface, dynamic recrystallization and diffusion. The method developed can be used as a means of welding, cladding and additive manufacturing.

  19. Microstructural characterization of the A-508/82/182/316L dissimilar metal weld with reinforcement of 52 weld; Caracterizacao microestrutural da solda de metais dissimilares A-508/82/182/316L com reforco de solda 52

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Raphael G.; Figueiredo, Celia A.; Campos, Wagner R.C., E-mail: caf@cdtn.br, E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is the major corrosion concern in the plant life management of ageing plants. The main classes of nuclear power plant materials that are potentially subjected to SCC are austenitic stainless steels and nickel based alloys. The nickel alloys 600, 82 and 182, originally selected due to their high corrosion resistance, show after many years of plant operation, susceptibility to SCC. Those alloys are used in steam generators and as dissimilar metal weld materials for nozzles of components such as the reactor pressure vessel and the pressurizer. Several techniques have been developed to mitigate the consequences of SCC in dissimilar metal welds; e. g. deposition of a compatible structural layer over the nozzle external surface, known as weld overlay, to induce compressive stresses on the nozzle critical region and weld repair. The material used in this work is a mock-up of an Angra 1 pressurizer nozzle weld, manufactured at CDTN according to procedures established for nuclear power plants. The weld links the forged 316 stainless steel to the A-508 carbon steel by Inconel 182 weld metal. On the carbon steel side, a buttering layer is applied (alloy 82). Alloy 52 is employed as weld overlay. The objective of this work is to perform a microstructural and metallographic characterization of the mock up materials, which includes an optical microscope analysis of the general structure of the material, microhardness determinations and a microstructure evaluation of selected regions of the mock up. (author)

  20. Thermophysical and structural study of IN 792-5A nickel based superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zlá

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with study of phase transformations temperatures of nickel based superalloy IN 792-5A with application of DTA – method and use of experimental laboratory system for simultaneous thermal analysis SETARAM Setsys 18TM. Samples taken from as-received state of superalloy were heated with controlled ramp rates (1, 5, 10 and 20 °C•min-1 and immediately after melting they were cooled with the same controlled ramp rate. The samples before and after DTA-analysis were also subjected to the phase analysis with use of scanning electron microscopy on the microprobe (JCXA 733 equipped with energy dispersive analyser EDAX (EDAM 3.

  1. Corrosion of Nickel-Based Alloys in Ultra-High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2017-03-01

    MgCl2-KCl binary system has been proposed to be used as high temperature reactor coolant. Due to its relatively low melting point, good heat capacity and excellent thermal stability, this system can also be used in high operation temperature concentrating solar power generation system as heat transfer fluid (HTF). The corrosion behaviors of nickel based alloys in MgCl2-KCl molten salt system at 1,000 °C were determined based on long-term isothermal dipping test. After 500 h exposure tests under strictly maintained high purity argon gas atmosphere, the weight loss and corrosion rate analysis were conducted. Among all the tested samples, Ni-201 demonstrated the lowest corrosion rate due to the excellent resistance of Ni to high temperature element dissolution. Detailed surface topography and corrosion mechanisms were also determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS).

  2. Analysis of Nickel Based Hardfacing Materials Manufactured by Laser Cladding for Sodium Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, P.; Blanc, C.; Demirci, I.; Dal, M.; Malot, T.; Maskrot, H.

    For improving the operational capacity, the maintenance and the decommissioning of the future French Sodium Fast Reactor ASTRID which is under study, it is asked to find or develop a cobalt free hardfacing alloy and the associated manufacturing process that will give satisfying wear performances. This article presents recent results obtained on some selected nickel-based hardfacing alloys manufactured by laser cladding, particularly on Tribaloy 700 alloy. A process parameter search is made and associated the microstructural analysis of the resulting clads. A particular attention is made on the solidification of the main precipitates (chromium carbides, boron carbides, Laves phases,…) that will mainly contribute to the wear properties of the material. Finally, the wear resistance of some samples is evaluated in simple wear conditions evidencing promising results on tribology behavior of Tribaloy 700.

  3. Rafting in single crystal nickel-base superalloys — An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Kamaraj

    2003-02-01

    Currently nickel-base single crystal (SX) superalloys are considered for the manufacture of critical components such as turbine blades, vanes etc., for aircraft engines as well as land-based power generation applications. Microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties are the major factors controlling the performance of SX superalloys. Rafting is an important phenomenon in these alloys which occurs during high temperature creep. It is essential to understand the rafting mechanism, and its characteristics on high temperature properties before considering the advanced applications. In this review article, the thermodynamic driving force for rafting with and without stress is explained. The nature and influence of rafting on creep properties including pre-rafted conditions are discussed. In addition, the effect of stress state on $\\gamma /\\gamma'$ rafting, kinetics and morphological evolution are discussed with the recent experimental results.

  4. Dynamic precipitation of nickel-based superalloys undergoing severe deformation below the solvus temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowotnik, Andrzej; Rokicki, Pawel; Mrowka-Nowotnik, Grazyna; Sieniawski, Jan [Rzeszow Univ. of Technology (Poland). Dept. of Material Science

    2015-07-15

    The authors performed uniaxial compression tests of nickel-based superalloys: single crystal CMSX-4, also precipitation hardened; Inconel 718 and X750, at temperatures below the γ' solvus, in order to study the effect of temperature and strain rate on their flow stress and microstructural development. On the basis of the obtained flow stress values, the activation energy of a high-temperature deformation process was estimated. Microstructural observations of the deformed samples at high temperatures, previously solution heat treated and aged CMSX-4 and Inconel alloys revealed non-uniform deformation effects. Distribution of either molybdenum- or niobium-rich carbides was found to be affected by localized flow within the investigated strain range at relatively low deformation temperatures, 720-850 C. Microstructural examination of the alloys also showed that shear banding and cavity growth were responsible for the decrease in flow stress and a specimen fracture at larger strains.

  5. Microstructure Evolution of a Single Crystal Nickel-Base Superalloy During Heat Treatment and Creep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Da-yun,JIN Tao; ZHAO Nai-ren; WANG ZHi-hui; SUN Xiao-feng; GUAN Heng-rong; HU Zhuang-qi

    2004-01-01

    Microstructure evolution of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy during heat treatment and tensile creep at1010℃ and 248 MPa for 30h was observed and analyzed. Internal stresses because of lattice mismatch between γ and γphase provided the driving force for γ shape evolution during heat treatment. More than 65 vol. % distorted cubic γ phase keeping coherency with the γ matrix precipitated after solution at 1295 ℃ for 32h. The shape of γ phase was perfectly cubic with increasing precipitate size during the two-step aging treatment. Due to the applied stress and internal stress field the continuous γ-γ lamellar structure perpendicular to the applied stress was formed after 30h tensile creep.

  6. Wear Resistance of Deposited Layer Using Nickel-Based Composite Powders by Plasma-Arc Surfacing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-hong; ZHU Sheng; XU Bin-shi; DU Ze-yu

    2004-01-01

    Nickel-based composite alloy powders were deposited on the surface of Q235 steel by plasma-arc surfacing in this work. Optimal proportions of elements intensifying the composite powders were ascertained by orthogonal design of three factors and three levels and orthogonal polynomial regression analysis , which Cr , Mn , W were 10% ,4% and 7 % respectively.Phase and structure of deposited materials were characterized by optical microscope and X- ray diffraction. Hardness tests and wear resistance tests were carried out to determine the performance of the deposited layers. The results show that the microstructure of deposited layers of composite powders mainly consist of γ-( Ni, Fe ) , γ- Ni, WC, W2 C, Mn31Si12, Cr23 C6,Cr7 C3, Cr, NiB, Ni2B etc. Wear resistance and hardness of the surface increased evidently.

  7. Tensile properties of a nickel-base alloy subjected to surface severe plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, J.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dai, K. [Quality Engineering and Software Technology, East Hartford, CT 06108 (United States); Villegas, J.C. [Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ (United States); Shaw, L. [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)], E-mail: leon.shaw@uconn.edu; Liaw, P.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Klarstrom, D.L. [Haynes International, Inc., Kokomo, IN (United States); Ortiz, A.L. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Energetica y de los Materiales, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    A surface severe plastic deformation (S{sup 2}PD) method has been applied to bulk specimens of HASTELLOY C-2000 alloy, a nickel-base alloy. The mechanical properties of the processed C-2000 alloy were determined via tensile tests and Vickers hardness measurements, whereas the microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. The improved tensile strength was related to the nanostructure at the surface region, the residual compressive stresses, and the work-hardened surface layer, all of which resulted from the S{sup 2}PD process. To understand the contributions of these three factors, finite element modeling was performed. It was found that the improved tensile strength could be interpreted based on the contributions of nano-grains, residual stresses, and work hardening.

  8. Hot corrosion behavior of the spray-formed nickel-based superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Min; Gu, Tian-Fu; Jia, Chong-Lin; Ge, Chang-Chun

    2016-12-01

    An investigation of low temperature hot corrosion is carried out on a spray-formed nickel-based superalloy FGH100 pre-coated with Na2SO4-NaCl at 700 °C for 100 h. Mass gain measurement, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are used to study the corrosion behavior. Results reveal that corrosion behavior follows a sequence, that is, first rapidly proceeding, then gradually slowing down, and finally forming an outer layer composed of different types of oxides and an inner layer mainly comprised of sulfides. In-depth analysis reveals that the hot corrosion of FGH100 is a combined effect of oxidation-sulfidation and transfer of oxides.

  9. Fabrication of directional solidification components of nickel-base superalloys by laser metal forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Feng; Weidong Huang; Darong Chen; Xin Lin; Haiou Yang

    2004-01-01

    Straight plates, hollow columns, ear-like blade tips, twist plates with directional solidification microstructure made of Rene 95 superalloys were successfully fabricated on Nickel-base superalloy and DD3 substrates, respectively. The processing conditions for production of the parts with corresponding shapes were obtained. The fabrication precision was high and the components were compact. The solidification microstructure of the parts was analyzed by optical microscopy. The results show that the solidification microstructure is composed of columnar dendrites, by epitaxial growth onto the directional solidification substrates. The crystallography orientation of the parts was parallel to that of the substrates. The primary arm spacing was about 10 μm, which is in the range of superfine dendrites, and the secondary arm was small or even degenerated. It is concluded that the laser metal forming technique provides a method to manufacture directional solidification components.

  10. The effects of thermomechanical history on the microstructure of a nickel-base superalloy during forging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S., E-mail: 485354@swansea.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Bay Campus, Swansea University, Swansea SA1 8EN (United Kingdom); Li, W. [Rolls-Royce plc, PO Box 31, Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom); Coleman, M. [College of Engineering, Bay Campus, Swansea University, Swansea SA1 8EN (United Kingdom); Johnston, R., E-mail: r.johnston@swansea.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Bay Campus, Swansea University, Swansea SA1 8EN (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-21

    The effect of thermo-mechanical history on hot compression behaviour and resulting microstructures of a nickel base superalloy is presented. Hot compression tests were carried out on HAYNES® 282® specimens to varying strains from 0.1 to 0.8. Both single pass and multi-pass tests were completed. 60 min inter-pass times were utilized to accurately replicate industrial forging practices. The effect of dynamic, metadynamic and static recrystallization during inter-pass times on flow stress was investigated. The resulting microstructures were analysed using scanning electron, optical microscopy and EBSD to relate grain size and homogeneity with flow stress data. The study showed a negligible difference between multi-pass and single pass tests for strain increments above 0.2. Therefore, when modelling similar low strain and strain rate forging processes in HAYNES® 282®, previous forging steps can be ignored.

  11. Temperature dependence of gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch in nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.; Garlick, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    High temperature X-ray diffraction techniques were used to determine the gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch of three different nickel-base superalloys at temperatures between 18 and 1000 C. The measurements were performed on oriented single-crystal disks which had been aged to produce a semicoherent gamma-gamma prime structure. The thermal expansion of the lattice parameters of the gamma and gamma-prime phases was described by a second-order polynomial expression. The expansion of the gamma-prime phase was consistently smaller than that of the gamma phase, which caused the lattice mismatch to become more negative at higher temperatures. It was also shown that high values of lattice mismatch resulted in increased rates of directional gamma-prime coarsening during elevated temperature creep exposure.

  12. Microstructure-property relationships in directionally solidified single-crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Rebecca A.; Nathal, Michael V.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the microstructural features which influence the creep properties of directionally solidified and single-crystal nickel-base superalloys. Gamma prime precipitate size and morphology, gamma-gamma (prime) lattice mismatch, phase instability, alloy composition, and processing variations are among the factors considered. Recent experimental results are reviewed and related to the operative deformation mechanisms and to the corresponding mechanical properties. Special emphasis is placed on the creep behavior of single-crystal superalloys at high temperatures, where directional gamma (prime) coarsening is prominent, and at lower temperatures, where gamma (prime) coarsening rates are significantly reduced. It can be seen that very subtle changes in microstructural features can have profound effects on the subsequent properties of these materials.

  13. Microstructure of the Nickel-Base Superalloy CMSX-4 Fabricated by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsperger, Markus; Singer, Robert F.; Körner, Carolin

    2016-03-01

    Powder bed-based additive manufacturing (AM) processes are characterized by very high-temperature gradients and solidification rates. These conditions lead to microstructures orders of magnitude smaller than in conventional casting processes. Especially in the field of high performance alloys, like nickel-base superalloys, this opens new opportunities for homogenization and alloy development. Nevertheless, the high susceptibility to cracking of precipitation-hardenable superalloys is a challenge for AM. In this study, electron beam-based AM is used to fabricate samples from gas-atomized pre-alloyed CMSX-4 powder. The influence of the processing strategy on crack formation is investigated. The samples are characterized by optical and SEM microscopy and analyzed by microprobe analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to demonstrate the effect of the fine microstructure on characteristic temperatures. In addition, in situ heat treatment effects are investigated.

  14. Factors affecting the corrosion fatigue life in nickel based superalloys for disc applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosier Hollie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nickel based superalloy 720Li is employed in the gas turbine due to its mechanical performance at elevated temperature. A comprehensive assessment of the materials behaviour under representative service conditions is reported to address the drive for ever increasing temperatures and more arduous environmental exposure. Fatigue experiments have been performed in an air and air/SOx environment at 700 ∘C containing a mixed salt as a contaminant. There is an intimate relationship between local salt level (flux, stress level and stress state, i.e. static or cyclic. The interaction with these variables with the work hardened layer present on the surface of all tested specimens as a result of the shot peening process directly affects the crack initiation process. If specific conditions of environment and stress are achieved, a significant reduction in fatigue life is observed.

  15. Development of a Nickel-base Cast Superalloy with High Strength and Superior Creep Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jieshan HOU; Jianting GUO; Lanzhang ZHOU; Zhijun LI

    2005-01-01

    Derived from Russian alloy CHS88U, six experimental Ni-base alloys named as A to F in the Ni-Cr-Co-W-Ti-Al-Hf system are designed, evaluated and processed. One of these alloys, F, shows excellent high temperature tensile strength and ductility with superior creep rupture properties. As predicted by using modeling tools such as PHACOM and NEW PHACOMP, there is hardly the tendency for formation of topologically close-packed phase (TCP) phase in alloy F. Furthermore, through microstructural observation, it is also found that no TCP phase is formed in alloy F after long-time exposure at high temperature. So alloy F has well balance of phase stability and mechanical properties in view of application for gas turbines. It is proved that d-electron approach can be applied for design and development of nickel-base superalloys for gas turbine application.

  16. Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth Interaction in Nickel Base Supper Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Djavanroodi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most engineering components which operate at elevated temperatures are subjected to non-steady loading during service. This paper describes the current fracture mechanics concepts that are employed to predict cracking of Nickel base supper alloy materials at high temperatures under low and high frequency cyclic loading. A model for predicting creep crack growth in terms of C* and the creep uniaxial ductility is presented at low frequency and at high frequency power law relation is used to predict the crack growth rate. When dealing with creep/fatigue interaction a simple cumulative damage concept with fractography evidence is used to predict the crack growth rate. It is shown that these models give good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of carbides in nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotok, A.

    2011-05-01

    It has been established that carbides in superalloys serve three functions. Fine carbides precipitated in the matrix give strengthening results. Carbides also can tie up certain elements that would otherwise promote phase instability during service. Grain boundary carbides prevent or retard grain-boundary sliding and strengthen the grain boundary, which depends significantly on carbide shape, size and distribution. Various types of carbides are possible, depending on superalloy composition and processing. In the paper optical and scanning electron microscopy investigations of carbides occurring in specimens of the polycrystalline nickel-base superalloy MAR-M247 were carried out. Conditions of carbides revealing and microstructure images acquisition have been described. Taking into consideration distribution and morphology of the carbides in matrix a method of quantitative description of Chinese script-like and blocky primary carbides on the basis of image analysis was proposed.

  18. Investigation into the influence of post-weld heat treatment on the microstructure and hardness of Inconel X-750

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachya Peasura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a post-weld heat treatment for a precipitation-hardened nickel alloy. Inconel X-750 is a nickel-based superalloy for gas tungsten arc welding processes. The materials were heat-treated in two steps: solution and aging. The post-weld heat treatment variables examined in this study included post-weld heat treatment temperatures of 705°C, 775°C, and 845°C and post-weld heat treatment time of 2–24 h in 2-h increments. The resulting materials were examined using the full factorial design of experiments to determine the resulting material hardness and observed with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone. The results show that a longer post-weld heat treatment time corresponds to larger γ′ precipitates and a smaller amount of Cr23C6 at the grain boundaries, which can decrease the overall hardness. The post-weld heat treatment analysis indicates that an increase in the amount of γ′ results in better mechanical properties for particles with octagonal shapes and a small size. A factorial analysis, which was conducted on the relationship between the post-weld heat treatment temperature and time to the hardness of the fusion zone, had a 95% confidence level.

  19. Internal nitridation of nickel-base alloys; Innere Nitrierung von Nickelbasis-Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupp, U.; Christ, H.J. [Siegen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik

    1998-12-31

    The chromuim concentration is the crucial variable in nitridation processes in nickel-base alloys. Extensive nitridation experiments with various specimen alloys of the system Ni-Cr-Al-Ti have shown that the Cr itself starts to form nitrides as from elevated initial concentrations of about 10 to 20 weight%, (depending on temperature), but that lower concentrations have an earlier effect in that they induce a considerable increase in the N-solubility of the nickel-base alloys. This causes an accelerated nitridation attack on the alloying elements Ti and Al. Apart from experimental detection and analysis, the phenomenon of internal nitridation could be described as well by means of a mathematical model calculating the diffusion with the finite-differences method and determining the precipitation thermodynamics by way of integrated equilibrium calculations. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Im Verlauf der Hochtemperaturkorrosion von Nickelbasis-Superlegierungen kann durch beanspruchungsbedingte Schaedigungen der Oxiddeckschicht ein Verlust der Schutzwirkung erfolgen und als Konsequenz Stickstoff aus der Atmosphaere in den Werkstoff eindringen. Der eindiffundierende Stickstoff bildet vor allem mit den Legierungselementen Al, Cr und Ti Nitridausscheidungen, die zu einer relativ rasch fortschreitenden Schaedigung fuehren koennen. Eine bedeutende Rolle bei diesen Nitrierungsprozessen in Nickelbasislegierungen spielt die Cr-Konzentration in der Legierung. So ergaben umfangreiche Nitrierungsexperimente an verschiedenen Modellegierungen des Systems Ni-Cr-Al-Ti, dass Cr zwar selbst erst ab Ausgangskonzentrationen von ca. 10-20 Gew.% (abhaengig von der Temperatur) Nitride bildet, allerdings bereits bei geringen Konzentrationen die N-Loeslichkeit von Nickelbasis-Legierungen entscheidend erhoeht. Dies hat zur Folge, dass es zu einem beschleunigten Nitrierungsangriff auf die Legierungselemente Ti und Al kommt. Neben den experimentellen Untersuchungen konnte das Phaenomen der inneren

  20. Misorientation related microstructure at the grain boundary in a nickel-based single crystal superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ming; Zhuo, Longchao [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Zhanli [Applied Mechanics Lab, School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lu, Xiaogang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai (China); Shi, Zhenxue; Li, Jiarong [Science and Technology on Advanced High Temperature Structural Materials Laboratory, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Zhu, Jing, E-mail: jzhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-07-29

    The mechanical properties of nickel-based single crystal superalloys deteriorate with increasing misorientation, thus the finished product rate of the casting of single crystal turbine airfoils may be reduced due to the formation of grain boundaries especially when the misorientation angle exceeds to some extent. To this day, evolution of the microstructures at the grain boundaries with misorientation and the relationship between the microstructures and the mechanical properties are still unclear. In this work a detailed characterization of the misorientation related microstructure at the grain boundary in DD6 single crystal superalloy has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques; the elemental distribution at the grain boundaries has been analyzed by energy dispersive (EDS) X-ray mapping; and the effect of precipitation of μ phases at the grain boundary on the mechanical property has been evaluated by finite element calculation. It is shown that the proportion of γ phase at the grain boundaries decreases, while the proportion of γ′ phase at the grain boundaries increases with increasing misorientation; the μ phase is precipitated at the grain boundaries when the misorientation angle exceeds about 10° and thus it could lead to a dramatic deterioration of the mechanical properties, as well as that the enrichment of Re and W gradually disappears as the misorientation angle increases. All these factors may result in the degradation of the mechanical properties at the grain boundaries as the misorientation increases. Furthermore, the finite element calculation confirms that precipitation of μ phases at the grain boundary is responsible for the significant deterioration of the mechanical properties when the misorientation exceeds about 10°. This work provides a physical imaging of the microstructure for understanding the relationship between the mechanical properties and the misorientation

  1. Effects of cyclic stress and temperature on oxidation damage of a nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabela, A. [Department of Mechanical and Design Engineering, University of Portsmouth, Anglesea Building, Anglesea Road, Portsmouth PO1 3DJ (United Kingdom); Zhao, L.G., E-mail: liguo.zhao@port.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical and Design Engineering, University of Portsmouth, Anglesea Building, Anglesea Road, Portsmouth PO1 3DJ (United Kingdom); Tong, J. [Department of Mechanical and Design Engineering, University of Portsmouth, Anglesea Building, Anglesea Road, Portsmouth PO1 3DJ (United Kingdom); Simms, N.J.; Nicholls, J.R. [School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Hardy, M.C. [Rolls-Royce plc, Elton Road, Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-25

    Highlights: {yields} FIB shows the formation of surface oxide scales and internal micro-voids. {yields} Oxidation damage at 800 deg. C is much more severe than that at 700 deg. C and 750 deg. C. {yields} Cyclic stress enhances the extent of oxidation damage at 750 deg. C and above. {yields} Enrichment of Cr and Ti, as well as lower Ni and Co levels, in the surface oxides. {yields} Penetration of oxygen into the material and internal oxidation are evidenced. - Abstract: Oxidation damage, combined with fatigue, is a concern for nickel-based superalloys utilised as disc rotors in high pressure compressor and turbine of aero-engines. A study has been carried out for a nickel-based alloy RR1000, which includes cyclic experiments at selected temperatures (700-800 deg. C) and microscopy examination using focused ion beam (FIB). The results suggest that the major mechanism of oxidation damage consists of the formation of surface oxide scales and internal micro-voids and oxide particles beneath the oxide scales, which become more severe with the increase of temperature. Applying a cyclic stress does not change the nature of oxidation damage but tends to enhance the extent of oxidation damage for temperatures at 750 deg. C and 800 deg. C. The influence of cyclic stress on oxidation damage appears to be insignificant at 700 deg. C, indicating a combined effect of cyclic stress and temperature. Further energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDXS) analyses show the enrichment of Cr and Ti, together with lower Ni and Co levels, in the surface oxide scales, suggesting the formation of brittle Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, NiO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxides on the specimen surface. Penetration of oxygen into the material and associated internal oxidation, which leads to further material embrittlement and associated failure, are evidenced from both secondary ion imaging and EDXS analyses.

  2. First principles calculations of the site substitution behavior in gamma prime phase in nickel based superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Mrunalkumar

    Nickel based superalloys have superior high temperature mechanical strength, corrosion and creep resistance in harsh environments and found applications in the hot sections as turbine blades and turbine discs in jet engines and gas generator turbines in the aerospace and energy industries. The efficiency of these turbine engines depends on the turbine inlet temperature, which is determined by the high temperature strength and behavior of these superalloys. The microstructure of nickel based superalloys usually contains coherently precipitated gamma prime (gamma') Ni3Al phase within the random solid solution of the gamma (gamma) matrix, with the gamma' phase being the strengthening phase of the superalloys. How the alloying elements partition into the gamma and gamma' phases and especially in the site occupancy behaviors in the strengthening gamma' phases play a critical role in their high temperature mechanical behaviors. The goal of this dissertation is to study the site substitution behavior of the major alloying elements including Cr, Co and Ti through first principles based calculations. Site substitution energies have been calculated using the anti-site formation, the standard defect formation formalism, and the vacancy formation based formalism. Elements such as Cr and Ti were found to show strong preference for Al sublattice, whereas Co was found to have a compositionally dependent site preference. In addition, the interaction energies between Cr-Cr, Co-Co, Ti-Ti and Cr-Co atoms have also been determined. Along with the charge transfer, chemical bonding and alloy chemistry associated with the substitutions has been investigated by examining the charge density distributions and electronic density of states to explain the chemical nature of the site substitution. Results show that Cr and Co atoms prefer to be close by on either Al sublattice or on a Ni-Al mixed lattice, suggesting a potential tendency of Cr and Co segregation in the gamma' phase.

  3. Welded solar cell interconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofel, E. J.; Browne, E. R.; Meese, R. A.; Vendura, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of the welding of solar-cell interconnects is compared with the efficiency of soldering such interconnects, and the cases in which welding may be superior are examined. Emphasis is placed on ultrasonic welding; attention is given to the solar-cell welding machine, the application of the welding process to different solar-cell configurations, producibility, and long-life performance of welded interconnects. Much of the present work has been directed toward providing increased confidence in the reliability of welding using conditions approximating those that would occur with large-scale array production. It is concluded that there is as yet insufficient data to determine which of three methods (soldering, parallel gap welding, and ultrasonic welding) provides the longest-duration solar panel life.

  4. Finite element thermal analysis of the fusion welding of a P92 steel pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Yaghi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fusion welding is common in steel pipeline construction in fossil-fuel power generation plants. Steel pipes in service carry steam at high temperature and pressure, undergoing creep during years of service; their integrity is critical for the safe operation of a plant. The high-grade martensitic P92 steel is suitable for plant pipes for its enhanced creep strength. P92 steel pipes are usually joined together with a similar weld metal. Martensitic pipes are sometimes joined to austenitic steel pipes using nickel based weld consumables. Welding involves severe thermal cycles, inducing residual stresses in the welded structure, which, without post weld heat treatment (PWHT, can be detrimental to the integrity of the pipes. Welding residual stresses can be numerically simulated by applying the finite element (FE method in Abaqus. The simulation consists of a thermal analysis, determining the temperature history of the FE model, followed by a sequentially-coupled structural analysis, predicting residual stresses from the temperature history.

    In this paper, the FE thermal analysis of the arc welding of a typical P92 pipe is presented. The two parts of the P92 steel pipe are joined together using a dissimilar material, made of Inconel weld consumables, producing a multi-pass butt weld from 36 circumferential weld beads. Following the generation of the FE model, the FE mesh is controlled using Model Change in Abaqus to activate the weld elements for each bead at a time corresponding to weld deposition. The thermal analysis is simulated by applying a distributed heat flux to the model, the accuracy of which is judged by considering the fusion zones in both the parent pipe as well as the deposited weld metal. For realistic fusion zones, the heat flux must be prescribed in the deposited weld pass and also the adjacent pipe elements. The FE thermal results are validated by comparing experimental temperatures measured by five thermocouples on the

  5. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plasti...... as a knowledge handbook for laser welding of plastic components. This document should provide the information for all aspects of plastic laser welding and help the design engineers to take all critical issues into consideration from the very beginning of the design phase....

  6. Efficiency of the Inertia Friction Welding Process and Its Dependence on Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkov, O. N.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Tung, D. J.; Zhang, W.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2017-07-01

    It has been widely assumed, but never proven, that the efficiency of the inertia friction welding (IFW) process is independent of process parameters and is relatively high, i.e., 70 to 95 pct. In the present work, the effect of IFW parameters on process efficiency was established. For this purpose, a series of IFW trials was conducted for the solid-state joining of two dissimilar nickel-base superalloys (LSHR and Mar-M247) using various combinations of initial kinetic energy ( i.e., the total weld energy, E o), initial flywheel angular velocity ( ω o), flywheel moment of inertia ( I), and axial compression force ( P). The kinetics of the conversion of the welding energy to heating of the faying sample surfaces ( i.e., the sample energy) vs parasitic losses to the welding machine itself were determined by measuring the friction torque on the sample surfaces ( M S) and in the machine bearings ( M M). It was found that the rotating parts of the welding machine can consume a significant fraction of the total energy. Specifically, the parasitic losses ranged from 28 to 80 pct of the total weld energy. The losses increased (and the corresponding IFW process efficiency decreased) as P increased (at constant I and E o), I decreased (at constant P and E o), and E o (or ω o) increased (at constant P and I). The results of this work thus provide guidelines for selecting process parameters which minimize energy losses and increase process efficiency during IFW.

  7. Microstructural analysis of laser weld fusion zone in Haynes 282 superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osoba, L.O. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 (Canada); Ding, R.G. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Ojo, O.A., E-mail: ojo@cc.umanitoba.ca [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Analytical electron microscopy and spectroscopy analyses of the fusion zone (FZ) microstructure in autogenous laser beam welded Haynes 282 (HY 282) superalloy were performed. The micro-segregation patterns observed in the FZ indicate that Co, Cr and Al exhibited a nearly uniform distribution between the dendrite core and interdendritic regions while Ti and Mo were rejected into the interdendritic liquid during the weld solidification. Transmission electron diffraction analysis and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed the second phase particles formed along the FZ interdendritic region to be Ti-Mo rich MC-type carbide particles. Weld FZ solidification cracking, which is sometimes associated with the formation of {gamma}-{gamma}' eutectic in {gamma}' precipitation strengthened nickel-base superalloys, was not observed in the HY 282 superalloy. Modified primary solidification path due to carbon addition in the newly developed superalloy is used to explain preclusion of weld FZ solidification cracking in the material. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A newly developed superalloy was welded by CO{sub 2} laser beam joining technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron microscopy characterization of the weld microstructure was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identified interdendritic microconstituents consist of MC-type carbides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of primary solidification path is used to explain cracking resistance.

  8. Residual stress measurements in the dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Mansur, Tanius R.; Scaldaferri, Denis H.B.; Paula, Raphael G., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: tanius@cdtn.br, E-mail: dhbs@cdtn.br, E-mail: tanius@cdtn.br, E-mail: raphaelmecanica@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Souto, Joao P.R.S.; Carvalho Junior, Ideir T., E-mail: joprocha@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ideir_engenharia@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica

    2013-07-01

    Weld residual stresses have a large influence on the behavior of cracking that could possibly occur under normal operation of components. In case of an unfavorable environment, both stainless steel and nickel-based weld materials can be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). Stress corrosion cracks were found in dissimilar metal welds of some pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear plants. In the nuclear reactor primary circuit the presence of tensile residual stress and corrosive environment leads to so-called Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). The PWSCC is a major safety concern in the nuclear power industry worldwide. PWSCC usually occurs on the inner surface of weld regions which come into contact with pressurized high temperature water coolant. However, it is very difficult to measure the residual stress on the inner surfaces of pipes or nozzles because of inaccessibility. A mock-up of weld parts of a pressurizer safety nozzle was fabricated. The mock-up was composed of three parts: an ASTM A508 C13 nozzle, an ASTM A276 F316L stainless steel safe-end, an AISI 316L stainless steel pipe and different filler metals of nickel alloy 82/182 and AISI 316L. This work presents the results of measurements of residual strain from the outer surface of the mock-up welded in base metals and filler metals by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. (author)

  9. Hall coefficient measurement for residual stress assessment in precipitation hardened IN718 nickel-base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velicheti, Dheeraj; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the feasibility of residual stress assessment based on Hall coefficient measurements in precipitation hardened IN718 nickel-base superalloy. As a first step, we studied the influence of microstructural variations on the galvanomagnetic properties of IN718 nickel-base superalloy. We found that the Hall coefficient of IN718 increases from ≈ 8.0×10-11 m3/C in its fully annealed state of 15 HRC Rockwell hardness to ≈ 9.4×10-11 m3/C in its fully hardened state of 45 HRC. We also studied the influence of cold work, i.e., plastic deformation, at room temperature and found that cold work had negligible effect on the Hall coefficient of fully annealed IN718, but significantly reduced it in hardened states of the material. For example, measurements conducted on fully hardened IN718 specimens showed that the Hall coefficient decreased more or less linearly with cold work from its peak value of ≈ 9.4×10-11 m3/C in its intact state to ≈ 9.0×10-11 m3/C in its most deformed state of 22% plastic strain. We also studied the influence of applied stress and found that elastic strain significantly increases the Hall coefficient of IN718 regardless of the state of hardening. The relative sensitivity of the Hall coefficient to elastic strain was measured as a unitless gauge factor K that is defined as the ratio of the relative change of the Hall coefficient ΔRH/RH divided by the axial strain ɛ = σ/E, where σ is the applied uniaxial stress and E is the Young's modulus of the material. We determined that the galvanomagnetic gauge factor of IN718 is κ ≈ 2.6 - 2.9 depending on the hardness level. Besides the fairly high value of the gauge factor, it is important that it is positive, which means that compressive stress in surface-treated components decreases the Hall coefficient in a similar way as plastic deformation does, therefore the unfortunate cancellation that occurs in fully hardened IN718 in the case of electric conductivity measurements will not

  10. Near-surface residual stresses and microstructural changes after turning of a nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlauer, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are precipitation hardened alloys with complex compositions. They are used in aircraft engines and land-based gas turbines in load bearing structural components that are exposed to high temperatures. Failure mechanisms in this environment are high and low cycle fatigue, creep, and corrosion. During manufacturing, residual stresses are often introduced into the material due to inhomogeneous plastic deformations, both intentionally and unintentionally. One such manufacturing process is metal cutting, which introduces residual stresses in the surface layer. The stress state in the near-surface zone of components is of special interest as the surface often experiences peak loads and cracks have their starting point there. In this thesis, near-surface residual stress distributions and microstructural changes are studied in the nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 for two different turning operations, face grooving and facing. Process variables are in both cases cutting speed and feed that have been varied between (10 and 1200) m/min and (0.01 and 0.5) mm, respectively. The first turning technique face grooving, which gives cutting conditions similar to orthogonal cutting, showed a clear dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed. The tensile stress at the surface, the maximum compressive stress below the surface, and the thickness of the affected layer increase with increasing cutting speed. The tensile stresses are constrained to a thin surface layer and compressive residual stresses below the surface dominate the depth profile of the residual stresses. Only at low cutting speed, residual stresses were largely avoided. The second turning technique facing confirmed the dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed and revealed a similar dependency on the feed. Microstructural investigations of near-surface cross-sections by means of transmission electron microscopy showed a zone where the grains had undergone plastic

  11. Changes in the microstructure occurring during the creep of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, P.; Komenda, J. [Institutet foer Metallforskning, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Nickel-base superalloy single crystal components are now being introduced into industrial gas turbines as first row turbine blades report and in the future methods of remaining life assessment will be required. In this report an introduction to single crystal alloys is given and the effects of service exposure and principles of remaining life assessment of nickel-base superalloys have been reviewed. During creep (in cast Ni-base superalloys) cavities appear at grain boundaries and shape changes occur in the {gamma}` particles. Interrupted and full length creep tests have been performed at 750 and 950 deg C on the Ni-base single crystal alloy CMSX-4 and the resulting changes in microstructure have been quantified using a wide variety of parameters. The solidification process results in interdendritic porosity and the {gamma}` particles are initially cuboidal in shape. At 750 deg C no changes in the particles or porosity could be detected. At 950 deg C the volume fraction and number per sq.mm of measured cavities increased during creep. The smallest cavities measured by optical microscopy were 2-3 {mu}m in diameter, which was the limit of resolution of the system. The increase in cavity numbers is caused by the growth of cavities originally under 2 {mu}m. At 950 deg C the {gamma}` particles coalesced during creep to form a network of rafts, containing isolated plates of matrix and the volume percent of {gamma}` increased from ca 50 to ca 75%. The rafts reached their maximum length before 2% strain, but continued to thicken throughout the test. Although of different dimensions, the aspect ratio (length-to-width ratio as measured by the intersection of chords) of the {gamma}` rafts and the matrix plates were similar at the same levels of strain, reaching a maximum before 2% strain. These changes at 950 deg C were strain- and not time-dependent. Based on these findings, a way forward for the remaining life assessment of single crystal components has been proposed.

  12. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  13. Coil Welding Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  14. Variable polarity arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  15. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  16. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  17. Optical modeling of nickel-base alloys oxidized in pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clair, A. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France); Foucault, M.; Calonne, O. [Areva ANP, Centre Technique Departement Corrosion-Chimie, 30 Bd de l' industrie, BP 181, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Finot, E., E-mail: Eric.Finot@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS, Universite de Bourgogne, 9 avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon cedex (France)

    2012-10-01

    The knowledge of the aging process involved in the primary water of pressurized water reactor entails investigating a mixed growth mechanism in the corrosion of nickel-base alloys. A mixed growth induces an anionic inner oxide and a cationic diffusion parallel to a dissolution-precipitation process forms the outer zone. The in situ monitoring of the oxidation kinetics requires the modeling of the oxide layer stratification with the full knowledge of the optical constants related to each component. Here, we report the dielectric constants of the alloys 600 and 690 measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry and fitted to a Drude-Lorentz model. A robust optical stratification model was determined using focused ion beam cross-section of thin foils examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric constants of the inner oxide layer depleted in chromium were assimilated to those of the nickel thin film. The optical constants of both the spinels and extern layer were determined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopic ellipsometry of Ni-base alloy oxidation in pressurized water reactor Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements of the dielectric constants of the alloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical simulation of the mixed oxidation process using a three stack model Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattered crystallites cationic outer layer; linear Ni-gradient bottom layer Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the refractive index of the spinel and the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers.

  18. Hot deformation of spray formed nickel-base superalloy using processing maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Fu-wei; ZHANG Guo-qing; LI Zhou; SUN Jian-fei

    2008-01-01

    The hot compression testing of hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) spray formed (SF) nickel-base superalloy was carried out by thermal mechanical simulator in the temperature range of 1050-1140℃ at strain rates of 0.01-10 S-1 and engineering strain of 50%. A processing map was developed on the basis of these data by using the principles of dynamic materials modeling. The microstructural evolution of deformed samples was also examined on the basis of optical and electron microscopic observations. The map exhibits two domains: the instability domain at the temperatures of 1050℃-1110℃ and strain rate of 0.01 S-1, the stability domain at the temperatures of 1110℃-1140℃ and strain rates of 1s-1-10 S-1, with a peak efficiency of about 40%. The dynamic recrystallization(DRX) is observed in the stability domain and the deformed specimens are no cracking or instabilities. However, there is no DRX in the instability domain and the alloy exhibits flow instability with cracks due to poor workability. The optimum hot working condition Was determined in the stability domain.

  19. LDRD Final Report - In Operando Liquid Cell TEM Characterization of Nickel-Based Electrocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-07

    A commercial electrochemistry stage for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was tested to determine whether to purchase one for the microscopes at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). Deposition of a nickel-based electrocatalyst was pursued as a material system for the purpose of testing the stage. The stage was found to be problematic with recurring issues in the electrical connections and vacuum sealing, which has thus far precluded a systematic investigation of the original material system. However, the electrochemical cells purchased through this FS will allow the Lawrence Fellow (Nielsen) to continue testing the stage. Furthermore, discussions with a second vendor, which released a similar electrochemical TEM stage during the course of this FS, have resulted in an upcoming longterm loan of their stage at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) for testing. In addition, low-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements on nickel-bearing electrolyte solutions led to a broader EELS investigation of solvents and salt solutions. These measurements form the basis of a manuscript in preparation on EELS measurements of the liquid phase.

  20. Study of Flow Softening Mechanisms of a Nickel-Based Superalloy With Δ Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Y.C.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The flow softening behaviors of a nickel-based superalloy with δ phase are investigated by hot compression tests over wide ranges of deformation temperature and strain rate. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD, optical microscopy (OM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM are employed to study the flow softening mechanisms of the studied superalloy. It is found that the flow softening behaviors of the studied superalloy are sensitive to deformation temperature and strain rate. At high strain rate and low deformation temperature, the obvious flow softening behaviors occur. With the increase of deformation temperature or decrease of strain rate, the flow softening degree becomes weaken. At high strain rate (1s−1, the flow softening is mostly induced by the plastic deformation heating and flow localization. However, at low strain rate domains (0.001-0.01s−1, the effects of deformation heating on flow softening are slight. Moreover, the flow softening at low strain rates is mainly induced by the discontinuous dynamic recrystallization and the dissolution of δ phase (Ni3Nb.

  1. Isothermal oxidation behavior and mechanism of a nickel-based superalloy at 1000°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-yuan; Cai, Yuan-fei; Gong, You-jun; Shen, Guo-ping; Tu, Yu-guo; Zhang, Guo-fu

    2017-07-01

    The oxidation behavior of a nickel-based superalloy at 1000°C in air was investigated through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis. A series of oxides, including external oxide scales (Cr2O3, (TiO2 + MnCr2O4)) and internal oxides (Al2O3,TiN), were formed on the surface or sub-surface of the substrate at 1000°C in experimental still air. The oxidation resistance of the alloy was dependent on the stability of the surface oxide layer. The continuity and density of the protective Cr2O3 scale were affected by minor alloying elements such as Ti and Mn. The outermost oxide scale was composed of TiO2 rutile and MnCr2O4 spinel, and the growth of TiO2 particles was controlled by the outer diffusion of Ti ions through the pre-existing oxide layer. Severe internal oxidation occurred beneath the external oxide scale, consuming Al and Ti of the strength phase γ' (Ni3(Al,Ti)) and thereby severely deteriorating the surface mechanical properties. The depth of the internal oxidation region was approximately 35 μm after exposure to experimental air at 1000°C for 80 h.

  2. Effect of tube-electrode inner diameter on electrochemical discharge machining of nickel-based superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nickel-based superalloys are widely employed in modern aircraft engines because of their excellent material characteristics, particularly in the fabrication of film cooling holes. However, the high machining requirement of a large number of film cooling holes can be extremely challenging. The hybrid machining technique of tube electrode high-speed electrochemical discharge drilling (TEHECDD has been considered as a promising method for the production of film cooling holes. Compared with any single machining process, this hybrid technique requires the removal of more complex machining by-products, including debris produced in the electrical discharge machining process and hydroxide and bubbles generated in the electrochemical machining process. These by-products significantly affect the machining efficiency and surface quality of the machined products. In this study, tube electrodes in different inner diameters are designed and fabricated, and the effects of inner diameter on the machining efficiency and surface quality of TEHECDD are investigated. The results show that larger inner diameters could effectively improve the flushing condition and facilitate the removal of machining by-products. Therefore, higher material removal efficiency, surface quality, and electrode wear rate could be achieved by increasing the inner diameter of the tube electrode.

  3. Effect of tube-electrode inner diameter on electrochemical discharge machining of nickel-based superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yan; Xu Zhengyang; Xing Jun; Zhu Di

    2016-01-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are widely employed in modern aircraft engines because of their excellent material characteristics, particularly in the fabrication of film cooling holes. How-ever, the high machining requirement of a large number of film cooling holes can be extremely chal-lenging. The hybrid machining technique of tube electrode high-speed electrochemical discharge drilling (TEHECDD) has been considered as a promising method for the production of film cooling holes. Compared with any single machining process, this hybrid technique requires the removal of more complex machining by-products, including debris produced in the electrical discharge machin-ing process and hydroxide and bubbles generated in the electrochemical machining process. These by-products significantly affect the machining efficiency and surface quality of the machined prod-ucts. In this study, tube electrodes in different inner diameters are designed and fabricated, and the effects of inner diameter on the machining efficiency and surface quality of TEHECDD are inves-tigated. The results show that larger inner diameters could effectively improve the flushing condi-tion and facilitate the removal of machining by-products. Therefore, higher material removal efficiency, surface quality, and electrode wear rate could be achieved by increasing the inner diam-eter of the tube electrode.

  4. Creep properties of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy CMSX-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linde, L.; Henderson, P

    1998-10-01

    Creep testing has been performed on the nickel based single crystal alloy CMSX-4 at 750, 982 and 1050 deg C. The crystals had been hot isostatically pressed before testing. At 750 deg C the material exhibited primary creep which was not present at the higher temperatures. A tensile pre-creep at 750 deg C and 250 MPa for 4400 hours reduced the amount of primary creep and the minimum creep rate during creep at 750 deg C and 600 MPa. The pre-crept specimen also failed prematurely at an extensometer ridge. At 982 deg C and 206.9 MPa, tests were interrupted at 0.98, 1.96 and 7.5% strain for investigation of the microstructural changes during a test. Quantitative metallography of specimens after testing showed that at 750 deg C the {gamma}/{gamma}` microstructure was practically unchanged with cuboidal {gamma}` particles in a {gamma} matrix. At the higher temperatures, a transformation of the structure occurred where rafts of {gamma}` phase were formed and the rafts became shorter and thicker as the creep strain increased. Porosity measurements of tested material showed a large increase in porosity up to 2% strain, thereafter the increase was less. One specimen failed in an unexpected manner and was studied using electron back scatter patterns (EBSP). The EBSP investigation revealed the presence of an isolated grain in the gauge length where the fracture occurred 7 refs, 26 figs, 3 tabs

  5. Electrochemical characterisation of nickel-based alloys in sulphate solutions at 320 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Canut, J.-M.; Maximovitch, S. E-mail: suzanne.maximovitch@lepmi.inpg.fr; Dalard, F

    2004-08-15

    Nickel alloy steam generator tubes of pressurized water reactors (PWR) are sensitive to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and the possibility of predicting SCC from electrochemical measurements is of considerable interest for nuclear industry. The electrochemical properties of several nickel-based alloys were studied at 320 deg. C in sulphate solutions at neutral or slightly alkaline pH from corrosion potential measurements, polarisation curves and polarisation resistance (R{sub p}) measurements by linear voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The passive layers were much more stable in neutral conditions, due to the presence of chromium oxide, and alloys 600TT and 690 showed the best passivity. R{sub p} measurements confirmed that alloys 600TT and 690 have the lowest corrosion rates. At alkaline pH, the passivation currents were higher than those obtained at neutral pH, and the alloys showed a close behaviour. Reduction of sulphates to sulphides seemed to be possible. Results are in agreement with thermodynamic and surface analysis data of literature. The electrochemical stability did not appear to be directly related to SCC susceptibility since it varied inversely with the pH dependance of SCC in sulphate medium.

  6. Characterization of constitutional liquid film migration in nickel-base alloy 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acoff, V. L.; Thompson, R. G.

    1996-09-01

    When multiphase alloys are rapidly heated, it is possible to cause melting of the interface between phases. This is called constitutional liquation if, during melting, the bulk composition is in a nonliquid region of the phase diagram but the tie-line between the liquating phases passes through a liquid region. The liquid produced during constitutional liquation can spread along grain boundaries and promote liquid film migration (LFM). This is known as constitutional liquid film migration (CLFM), which is thermodynamically similar to liquid film migration; however, mechanistically there are significant differences. Nickel-base alloy 718 has been studied to show the features of migration that are unique to CLFM. Experimentation consisted of heat-treating rods of alloy 718 to promote the trapping of niobium carbide particles on the grain boundaries. These samples were then subjected to isothermal treatments above their constitutional-liquation temperature, which produced CLFM of the grain boundaries. The movement of the liquid films away from their centers of curvature, the formation of a new solid solution behind the migrated liquid films, and the reversals of curvature of the migrated liquid films confirmed that CLFM was the phenomenon observed. The concentration of niobium behind the migrated liquid films for isothermal treatments below the solidus temperature was shown to be greater than the niobium concentration in the matrix. Above the solidus temperature, there was no increase in niobium concentration. The validity of the coherency strain hypothesis as the driving force for CLFM in alloy 718 is discussed.

  7. Microstructural evolution and castability prediction in newly designed modern third-generation nickel-based superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naffakh-Moosavy, Homam

    2016-05-01

    The present research aims to establish a quantitative relation between microstructure and chemical composition (i.e., Ti, Al, and Nb) of newly designed nickel-based superalloys. This research attempts to identify an optimum microstructure at which the minimum quantities of γ/γ' and γ/γ″ compounds are achieved and the best castability is predicted. The results demonstrate that the highest quantity of intermetallic eutectics (i.e., 41.5wt%) is formed at 9.8wt% (Ti + Al). A significant quantity of intermetallics formed in superalloy 1 (with a composition of γ - 9.8wt% (Ti + Al)), which can deteriorate its castability. The type and morphology of the eutectics changed and the amount considerably decreased with decreasing Ti + Al content in superalloy 2 (with a composition of γ - 7.6wt% (Ti + Al), 1.5wt% Nb). Thus, it is predicted that the castability would improve for superalloy 2. The same trend was observed for superalloy 4 (with a composition of γ - 3.7wt% (Ti + Al), 4.4wt% Nb). This means that the amount of Laves increases with increasing Nb (to 4.4wt%) and decreasing Ti + Al (to 3.7wt%) in superalloy 4. The best castability was predicted for superalloy 3 (with a composition of γ - 5.7wt% (Ti + Al), 2.8wt% Nb).

  8. Synthesis of nickel-based skeletal catalyst for an alkaline electrolyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, W.M.; Fernandez, A.M. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Av. Xochicalco s/n, Col. Centro, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Cano, U. [Gerencia de Energias No Convencionales, Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira 62490, Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico); Sandoval J, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N (Km. 36.5), La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Mexico C.P.

    2010-08-15

    A method for preparing Nickel-based skeletal catalyst as well as its characterization is reported. The catalyst has an intended use as a cathode in alkaline electrolysis. Skeletal catalyst electrodes were synthesized from equal weights (50% each) of aluminum and nickel powders. The catalyst was prepared with metal powders which were melted in an induction oven, allowing the alloy to solidify at room temperature to obtain the thermodynamically-stable phases of the alloy. Samples from the resulting alloy went through a leaching process in an alkaline solution using two different leaching times. After leaching, porous and amorphous electrodes were obtained and then subjected to a slow oxidative stage to avoid ignition. The structure, composition, morphology and electrochemical characteristics of the electrodes were studied. The leached samples showed a high exchange current density indicating that are good catalysts for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER), a property enhanced by the adsorption of hydrogen during the leaching process which facilitated the hydrogen reduction overall reaction. (author)

  9. CO2 laser cut quality of Inconel 718 nickel - based superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasçalık, Ahmet; Ay, Mustafa

    2013-06-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the cut quality of laser cutting for the age hardened Inconel 718 nickel based super alloy, with the use of a continuous CO2 4.0 kW laser cutting system. The quality of the cut has been monitored by measuring the kerf taper ratio, the recast layer thickness and the surface roughness of the cut specimens. The effects of processing parameters, such as the laser power, the cutting speed and the assisting gas pressure were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectrography (EDS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Knoop hardness tests are carried out to examine the cutting defects, the kerf size variation and formed carbide on the surfaces. A statistical analysis of the results has been performed in order for the effect of each parameter on the cutting quality to be determined. The regression analysis has been used for the development of empirical models able to describe the effect of the process parameters on the quality of laser cutting.

  10. The stability of lamellar gamma-gamma-prime structures. [nickel-base superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The stability of stress-annealed gamma/gamma-prime lamellar structures were investigated using three nickel-base single-crystal alloys (the NASAIR 100 and two similar alloys, E and F, containing 5 and 10 wt pct Co, respectively) stress-annealed at 1000 C to form lamellae perpendicular to the applied stress. The rate of the lamellar thickening under various thermal and creep exposures was examined by SEM. For unstressed aging at 1100 C, the lamellar structures of the NASAIR and the E alloys exhibited continuous but slow lamellar coarsening, whereas the lamellae of the alloy F showed pronounced thickening plus spheroidization. Resistance to lamellar thickening was correlated with high magnitudes of lattice mismatch, which promoted a more regular lamellar structure and a finer spacing of misfit dislocations. Specimens which were tension-annealed prior to compressive creep testing exhibited an earlier onset of tertiary creep in comparison with only heat-treated specimens. This was associated with accelerated lamellar coarsening in the stress-annealed specimens.

  11. Grain boundary transformations during isothermal exposure of powder metallurgy nickel base superalloys for turbine disc applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R.J.; Rae, C.M.F.; Tin, S.

    2005-01-15

    Nickel base superalloys are used for high pressure turbine discs, because they are capable of sustained operation under high mechanical loading at elevated temperatures. In service, turbine discs operate at high temperatures (approaching 700 deg C at the disc rim), which can lead to various microstructural changes and influence the resulting structural integrity of the component. In the alloys studied in the present work, the development of the topologically close packed phase (TCP) {sigma} has been characterised for various time and temperature combinations. The formation of {sigma} is particularly important for these alloys, as it is known to have a dramatic effect on fatigue crack growth owing to grain boundary embrittlement. In the present study, various techniques have been used to quantify the amount of {sigma} phase present for given times and temperatures, similar to those seen during operation. Both qualitative microscopy and quantitative X-ray diffraction have been conducted to establish the time-temperature-transformation relationship for {sigma} formation in two experimental turbine disc alloys. Both of the alloys studied here exhibit a low susceptibility to {sigma} formation compared with conventional alloys such as Udimet 720Li and RR1000. (Author)

  12. Deformation mechanisms of IN713C nickel based superalloy during Small Punch Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, M., E-mail: m.p.coleman@swansea.ac.uk; Alshehri, H.; Banik, R.; Harrison, W.; Birosca, S.

    2016-01-05

    The role of local microstructure is critical in materials performance and integrity in a cast alloy. The grain size and grain boundary distributions as well as local texture can create various microstructure/microtexture clusters that cause deformation localisation in the alloy. Inconel 713C nickel base superalloys are used as turbocharger turbine wheels for modern diesel engines, produced via investment casting. In such an alloy localised deformation is highly expected during service, as the strain distribution is not uniform in the component due to casting geometrical factors in addition to non-homogenous microstructure and microtexture in the cast alloy. In the current investigation Small Punch (SP) tensile tests were carried out on IN713C at room temperature and 650 °C in an air environment under stroke control at a rate of 0.02 mm/s. The fracture surface examination and microstructure characterisation as well as detailed texture analyses were performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). Finite Element (FE) analysis of the SP test was also implemented to investigate the role of stress state on the local deformation. It was evident that microstructure parameters such as grain morphology and original texture existed in the disc were the most influential factors in governing the deformation texture in mixed columnar/equiaxed (transition) disc microstructure. Whereas, the temperature was the determining parameter in grain rotations and texture changes for wholly columnar disc microstructures.

  13. Nanocrystalline MgO supported nickel-based bimetallic catalysts for carbon dioxide reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkani, Fereshteh [Catalyst and Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran); Rezaei, Mehran [Catalyst and Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran)

    2010-10-15

    Nanocrystalline magnesium oxide with high surface area and plate-like shape was employed as catalyst support for preparation of nickel-based bimetallic catalysts in methane reforming with carbon dioxide. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption (BET), Temperature programmed oxidation and desorption (TPO-TPD), Thermal gravimetric and differential thermal gravimetric (TGA-DTG), H{sub 2} chemisorption and Transmission and electron microscopies (TEM and SEM) analyses. CO{sub 2}-TPD data showed the high CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of catalysts which improves the resistance of catalysts against the carbon formation. The H{sub 2} chemisorption results also indicated that the addition of Pt to nickel catalyst improved the nickel dispersion. The obtained results revealed that the prepared catalysts showed a high activity and stability during the reaction with a low amount of deposited carbon. Addition of Pt to nickel catalyst improved both the activity and resistivity against carbon formation. (author)

  14. ADSORPTION PROPERTIES OF NICKEL-BASED MAGNETIC ACTIVATED CARBON PREPARED BY PD-FREE ELECTROLESS PLATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyang Jia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nickel-based magnetic activated carbon was synthesized from coconut shell activated carbon by electroless plating with palladium-free activation. The effect of plating solution volume on metallic ratio and adsorption capacity were evaluated. The effect of metallic ratio on specific area, pore volume, and magnetic properties were investigated. The morphologies of activated carbon before and after plating were observed by SEM, and the composition of the layer was analyzed by EDS analysis. The results showed that the metallic ratio was increased with the increase of the plating solution volume. The magnetic activated carbon showed high adsorption capacity for methylene blue and a high iodine number. Those values reached 142.5 mg/g and 1035 mg/g, respectively. The specific area and pore volume decreased from 943 m2/g to 859 m2/g and 0.462 ml/g to 0.417 ml/g, respectively. And the layer was more compact and continuous when the metallic ratio reached 16.37 wt.%. In the layer, there was about 97 wt.% nickel and 3 wt.% phosphorus, which indicates that the layer was a low-phosphorus one. At the same time, magnetism was enhanced, making the product suitable for some special applications.

  15. Amorphous Nickel Based Alloy Catalysts and Magnetically Stabilized Bed Hydrogenation Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MuXuhong; ZongBaoning; 等

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous nickel based alloy catalysts(denoted as the SRNA series catalysts)were prepared via rapid quenching method followed by alkali leaching and other activation procedures.The physicochemical characterizations show that nickel,the active component in these catalysts,exists in the amorphous state,and the catalyst particles possess many nanosized voids leading to large surface area(the highest is 145m2/g).The evaluation results in some model reactions show that the SRNA series catalysts have 2 to 4 times higher activity and selectivity than conventional Raney Ni catalyst for the hydrogenation of compounds with unsatur-ated functional groups.At present,the SRNA series catalysts have been successfully used in hydrogenation of glucose,hydrogenation of pharmaceutical intermediates and purification of caprolactam.In order to use these catalysts efficiently,a magnetically stabilized bed(MSB) technology has been developed by combining the ferromagnetic property of the catalyst with the good mass transfer characteristics of MSB.The demonstration unit of MSB hydrogenation technology has been set up and has kept running for 2800 hours.The results show that,after running 2800 hours,the catalyst still retained good activity; meanwhile,the hydrogenation effi-ciency had been improved 10 times in comparison with the traditional CSTR process.

  16. Amorphous Nickel Based Alloy Catalysts and Magnetically Stabilized Bed Hydrogenation Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous nickel based alloy catalysts (denoted as the SRNA series catalysts) were prepared viarapid quenching method followed by alkali leaching and other activation procedures. The physicochemicalcharacterizations show that nickel, the active component in these catalysts, exists in the amorphous state, andthe catalyst particles possess many nanosized voids leading to large surface area (the highest is 145m2/g). Theevaluation results in some model reactions show that the SRNA series catalysts have 2 to 4 times higheractivity and selectivity than conventional Raney Ni catalyst for the hydrogenation of compounds with unsatur-ated functional groups. At present, the SRNA series catalysts have been successfully used in hydrogenation ofglucose, hydrogenation of pharmaceutical intermediates and purification of caprolactam. In order to use thesecatalysts efficiently, a magnetically stabilized bed (MSB) technology has been developed by combining theferromagnetic property of the catalyst with the good mass transfer characteristics of MSB. The demonstrationunit of MSB hydrogenation technology has been set up and has kept running for 2800 hours. The results showthat, after running 2800 hours, the catalyst still retained good activity; meanwhile, the hydrogenation effi-ciency had been improved 10 times in comparison with the traditional CSTR process.

  17. Amorphous Nickel Based Alloy Catalysts and Magnetically Stabilized Bed Hydrogenation Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Xuhong; Zong Baoning; Meng Xiangkun; Min Enze

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous nickel based alloy catalysts (denoted as the SRNAseries catalysts) were prepared viarapid quenching method followed by alkali leaching and other activation procedures. The physicochemicalcharacterizations show that nickel, the active component in these catalysts, exists in the amorphous state, andthe catalyst particles possess many nanosized voids leading to large surface area (the highest is 145m2/g). Theevaluation results in some model reactions show that the SRNA series catalysts have 2 to 4 times higheractivity and selectivity than conventional Raney Ni catalyst for the hydrogenation of compounds with unsatur-ated functional groups. At present, the SRNA series catalysts have been successfully used in hydrogenation ofglucose, hydrogenation of pharmaceutical intermediates and purification of caprolactam. In order to use thesecatalysts efficiently, a magnetically stabilized bed (MSB) technology has been developed by combining theferromagnetic property of the catalyst with the good mass transfer characteristics of MSB. The demonstrationunit of MSB hydrogenation technology has been set up and has kept running for 2800 hours. The results showthat, after running 2800 hours, the catalyst still retained good activity; meanwhile, the hydrogenation effi-ciency had been improved 10 times in comparison with the traditional CSTR process.

  18. Methane Decomposition into Carbon Fibers over Coprecipitated Nickel-Based Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ju; Fengyi Li; Renzhong Wei

    2005-01-01

    Decomposition of methane in the presence of coprecipitated nickel-based catalysts to produce carbon fibers was investigated. The reaction was studied in the temperature range of 773 K to 1073 K.At 1023 K, the catalytic activities of three catalysts kept high at the initial period and then decreased with the reaction time. The lifetimes of Ni-Cu-Al and Ni-La-Al catalysts are longer than that of Ni-Al catalyst. With three catalysts, the yield of carbon fibers was very low at 773 K. The yield of carbon fibers for Ni-La-Al catalyst was more than those for Ni-Al and Ni-Cu-Al catalysts. For Ni-La-Al catalyst, the elevation of temperature from 873 K up to 1073 K led gradually to an increase in the yield of carbon fibers.XRD studies on the Ni-La-Al catalyst indicate that La2NiO4 was formed. The formation of La2NiO4 is responsible for the increase in the catalytic lifetime and the yield of carbon fibers synthesized on Ni-La-Al at 773-1073 K. Carbon fibers synthesized on Ni-Al catalyst are thin, long carbon nanotubes. There are bamboo-shaped carbon fibers synthesized on Ni-Cu-Al catalyst. Carbon fibers synthesized on Ni-La-Al catalyst have large hollow core, thin wall and good graphitization.

  19. The Effect of Multi-inclined Holes on the Creep Properties of Nickel-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongfan; Wen, Zhixun; Wang, Shaofei; Liu, Chenyu; Yue, Zhufeng

    2017-07-01

    The creep properties of GH3536 nickel-based superalloy plate specimens without/with multi-inclined holes were studied under applied stress 80/90/100 MPa at 850 °, respectively. Interesting finding is focused on the inflection point, that is, both the fraction elongation and creep strain achieve the maximum value under 90 MPa. Further study is carried out by two methods: the finite element analysis (FEA) calculation and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The FEA results show that the dangerous areas appear in the regions near the end of ellipse axis along the inclined angle orientation, which is similar to the actual fracture appearances. What is more, the tiny holes and dimples are the main characters of creep fracture for multi-inclined hole specimens, whereas the creep fracture of specimens without holes is the result of growth and coalescence of voids. In addition, based on creep performance, laser drilling is better than that of the electric spark drilling, which provides a proof that the creep performance of specimens with multi-inclined holes will be better with the improvement of the drilling process.

  20. Annealing behavior of the ODS nickel-based superalloy PM 1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayama, A.O.F.; Sandim, H.R.Z.; Lins, J.F.C.; Hupalo, M.F.; Padilha, A.F

    2004-04-25

    PM 1000 is a powder-metallurgy (P/M) nickel-based superalloy containing about 1% (volume) of fine and uniformly dispersed incoherent particles in an austenitic matrix. In the present paper, we have investigated the annealing behavior of rods deformed by cold swaging to reductions of 24 and 44% followed by annealing in temperatures varying from 800 to 1350 deg. C. The microstructural changes were followed by channeling contrast in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that discontinuous recrystallization and extended recovery are responsible for the softening of this alloy. A few grains found preferentially at grain boundary regions and within deformation heterogeneities like shear bands are able to grow corresponding to a recrystallized volume fraction lower than 10%. These new grains are arranged in colonies having a significant amount of annealing twins with {sigma}3-symmetry boundaries. The pinning effect on boundaries exerted by hard non-deformable particles (Zener drag) tends to suppress growth of most recrystallized grains. In the less deformed regions of the microstructure, a particle-stabilized subgrain structure is present and further softening is not significant even when longer annealing is performed.

  1. Solution and Aging of MAR-M246 Nickel-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldan, Renato; da Silva, Antonio Augusto Araújo Pinto; Nunes, Carlos Angelo; Couto, Antonio Augusto; Gabriel, Sinara Borborema; Alkmin, Luciano Braga

    2017-02-01

    Solution and aging heat-treatments play a key role for the application of the superalloys. The aim of this work is to evaluate the microstructure of the MAR-M246 nickel-based superalloy solutioned at 1200 and 1250 °C for 330 min and aged at 780, 880 and 980 °C for 5, 20 and 80 h. The γ' solvus, solidus and liquidus temperatures were calculated with the aid of the JMatPro software (Ni database). The as-cast and heat-treated samples were characterized by SEM/EDS and SEM-FEG. The γ' size precipitated in the aged samples was measured and compared with JMatPro simulations. The results have shown that the sample solutioned at 1250 °C for 330 min showed a very homogeneous γ matrix with carbides and cubic γ' precipitates uniformly distributed. The mean γ' size of aged samples at 780 and 880 °C for 5, 20 and 80 h did not present significant differences when compared to the solutioned sample. However, a significant increasing in the γ' particles was observed at 980 °C, evidenced by the large mean size of these particles after 80 h of aging heat-treatment.

  2. Laser micro-hole drilling in thermal barrier coated nickel based superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Umashanker; Nath, A. K.; Bandyopadhyay, P. P.

    2016-09-01

    This investigation deals with laser drilling of micro holes in yttria stabilised zirconia coated nickel based superalloy using a power modulated fiber laser. The parameters taken into account are assist gas pressure, modulation frequency, pulse on time and hole inclination angle. These parameters affect the important geometrical characteristics of holes, e.g., hole diameter, hole wall smoothness, taper angle and recast layer thickness. It has been found that the assist gas pressure has a significant effect on hole entry and exit diameter, taper angle and hole wall smoothness. It has also been observed less number of pulses of higher energy produces a hole with smaller entry and exit diameter, smaller taper angle, smoother hole wall and a thin stretched recast layer (∼ 15μm). The minimum achieved hole entrance diameter, exit diameter and taper was 342 μm, 200 μm and 3.54° respectively. Off normal drilling produces a hole with elliptical entrance. The eccentricity of such holes increases with inclination angle. Thick recast layers are produced at high inclination angles.

  3. Effect of welding parameters of Gas Metal Arc welding on weld bead geometry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushp Kumar Baghel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Weld quality comprises bead geometry and its microstructure, which influence the mechanical properties of the weld. This brief review illustrates the effect of pulse parameters on weld quality. The responsefactors, namely bead penetration, weld width, reinforcement height, weld penetration shape factor and weld reinforcement form factor as affected by arc voltage, wire feed rate, welding speed, gas flow rate and nozzle-toplate distance has also been analysed

  4. The Potential Link Between High Angle Grain Boundary Morphology and Grain Boundary Deformation in a Nickel-Based Superalloy (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    B.V. All rights reserved.1. Introduction The creep deformation in polycrystalline nickel based super alloys is a heterogeneous process, the primary...annealing twins in G1 and G2 (TG1 and TG2 respectively). The d via the offset in hafnium oxide grid lines (white) deposited prior to deformation...titanium alloy , Acta Mater. 58 (16) (2010) 5511–5519 , URL 〈http://journals.ohiolink.edu/ejc/article.cgi? issn 13596454&issue v58i0016&article

  5. Damage in nickel base superalloy: Influence of local parameters measured by electron backscattered diffraction and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risbet, M. [Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6253 UTC-CNRS, Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, BP 20529-60205 Compiegne cedex (France)], E-mail: marion.risbet@utc.fr; Feaugas, X. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs, EA 3127, Universite de La Rochelle, 17000 La Rochelle cedex (France); Guillemer-Neel, C. [Laboratoire de Technologies Innovantes, EA 3899, IUT Genie Mecanique d' Amiens, 80025 Amiens Cedex (France); Clavel, M. [Laboratoire Mecanique des Sols, Structures et Materiaux, UMR 8579 CNRS, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2009-03-15

    The low-cycle fatigue behaviour of a nickel-based superalloy has been investigated with regard to its surface damage features. This alloy endures localized plastic deformation confined in slip bands emerging as extrusions. The correlations between damage, grain orientation, the Schmid factor of slip systems and the height of extrusions have been questioned. It is proved here that reaching a critical height value is not a sufficient condition for an extrusion to induce the apparition of a transgranular crack.

  6. A Coupled Creep-Plasticity Model for Residual Stress Relaxation of a Shot-Peened Nickel-Base Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Superalloys for Turbine Discs ,” Journal of the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (JOM), January 1999, pp. 14-17. 48. Fecht, H., and Furrer, D...Processing of Nickel-Base Superalloys for Turbine Engine Disc Applications,” Advanced Engineering Materials, Vol. 2, No. 12, 2000, pp. 777-787. 49...and McLean, M. “Tension-Compression creep asymmetry in a turbine disc superalloy : roles of internal stress and thermal ageing,” Acta Materialia, 52

  7. Crack initiation and propagation induced by inclusions in a nickel-base P/M superalloy under fatigue load

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yanping; ZHANG Maicang; DONG Jianxin; ZHANG Lina; XIE Xishan

    2005-01-01

    In situ fatigue tests in special designed SEM were conducted to trace the whole process of crack initiation and propagation till to fracture in nickel-base P/M superalloy seeded inclusions. The experimental results show that non-metallic inclusions can induce crack initiation. When the inclusion size is larger than the critical one, the crack can propagate as the main crack that induces the specimen to fracture. As a result, the LCF life of the specimen decreases.

  8. Optically controlled welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  9. A computational approach for thermomechanical fatigue life prediction of dissimilarly welded superheater tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnasamy, Ram-Kumar; Seifert, Thomas; Siegele, Dieter [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik (IWM), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a computational approach for fatigue life prediction of dissimilarly welded superheater tubes is presented and applied to a dissimilar weld between tubes made of the nickel base alloy Alloy617 tube and the 12% chromium steel VM12. The approach comprises the calculation of the residual stresses in the welded tubes with a multi-pass dissimilar welding simulation, the relaxation of the residual stresses in a post weld heat treatment (PWHT) simulation and the fatigue life prediction using the remaining residual stresses as initial condition. A cyclic fiscoplasticity model is used to calculate the transient stresses and strains under thermocyclic service loadings. The fatigue life is predicted with a damage parameter which is based on fracture mechanics. The adjustable parameters of the model are determined based on LCF and TMF experiments. The simulations show, that the residual stresses that remain after PWHT further relax in the first loading cycles. The predicted fatigue lives depend on the residual stresses and, thus, on the choice of the loading cycle in which the damage parameter is evaluated. It the first loading cycle, where residual stresses are still present, is considered, lower fatigue lives are predicted compared to predictions considering loading cycles with relaxed residual stresses. (orig.)

  10. A round-robin analysis of temperature and residual stresses in dissimilar metal weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Min Sup; Kang, Sun Ye; Park, June Soo; Sohn, Gap Heon [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    DMWs are common feature of the PWR in the welded connections between carbon steel and stainless steel piping. The nickel-based weld metal, Alloy 82/182, is used for welding the dissimilar metals and is known to be susceptible to PWSCC. A round-robin program has been implemented to benchmark the numerical simulation of the transient temperature and weld residual stresses in the DMWs. To solve the round-robin problem related to pressurizer safety and relief nozzle, the thermal elasto-plastic analysis is performed in the DMW by using the FEM. The welding includes both the DMW of the nozzle to safe-end and the SMW of the safe-end and piping. Major results of the analyses are discussed: The axial and circumferential residual stresses are found to be -88MPa(225MPa) and -38MPa(293MPa) on the inner surface of the DMW; where the values in parenthesis are the residual stresses after the DMW. Thermo-mechanical interaction by the SMW has a significant effect on the residual stress fields in the DMW.

  11. Investigation of electron-beam welding in wrought Inconel 706--experimental and numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro, Paolo [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Stradella S. Nicola, 3 I-36100 Vicenza (Italy)]. E-mail: ferro@gest.unipd.it; Zambon, Andrea [DIMEG, University of Padova, Via Marzolo, 9 I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonollo, Franco [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Stradella S. Nicola, 3 I-36100 Vicenza (Italy)

    2005-02-15

    Electron-beam welding (EBW) is commonly employed in the aeroengine industry for the welding of high integrity components, fabricated from high-strength superalloys. For such applications, it is important to predict distortions and residual stresses induced by the process. Melt run trials have been carried out on nickel-base superalloy Inconel 706 plates using the EBW technique in order to analyse the effects of welding parameters on geometrical characteristics and microstructure of the bead. Butt-welded plates have been then investigated by means of tensile tests, microstructural analysis, and X-ray diffraction measurements. A finite element model of the process has been set up using an uncoupled thermal-mechanical analysis. The heat source was modelled using a superimposition of a spherical and a conical shape heat source with Gaussian power density distribution in order to reproduce the nail shape of the fusion zone (FZ). The parameters of the source were chosen so that the model would match with experimentally determined weld pool shape and temperatures, measured with thermocouples. Subsequently, the thermal analysis was used to drive the non-linear mechanical analysis. The predicted residual stresses were then compared with X-ray diffraction measurements. It was found that the correct thermal and residual stresses prediction is influenced by the shape of the fusion zone, the highest thermal tensile stress arising under the nailhead of the fusion zone where microfissuring can be observed.

  12. Inorganic Nickel-Based Nanocomposites%无机镍纳米复合材料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林丽娟; 周苇; 郭林

    2011-01-01

    Nanocomposites have become hot issues in the field of nanomaterials due to their unique physical and chemical properties.As an important transitional metal nanomaterial,nickel material has been widely used in magnetics,electrochemistry,catalytic chemistry and other fields.The composites of nickel and other metals or oxides with improved inherent properties would show novel properties by the synergy of composition and nanostructure.Therefore,it is of scientific significance to study the nickel-based nanocomposites.Because of the differences of the combining positions and methods for different components in various nanostructures,the progress of nickel-based nanocomposites is reviewed according to three main structures,which are core-shell structure,supported structure,and multisegment nanowires.Based on the introduction to the various synthetic methods and structures,we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of these methods and composite structures,as well as probable applications.It will be helpful for preparing other similar nanocomposites.%纳米复合材料因具有独特的物理、化学性能而成为纳米领域研究的热点。镍纳米材料作为一种重要的过渡金属纳米材料,在磁学、电化学、催化等领域具有广泛的应用。将它与其他金属、氧化物等材料复合,一方面使其固有性质得到明显改善,另一方面利用其他组成和镍基材料的协同作用,可得到具有新特性的异质材料,因此研究镍基纳米复合材料的合成具有重要的科学意义。由于纳米材料的结构不同,其复合位置和复合方式均存在不同,本文按照复合材料的结构特征,分别从核壳型、负载型、多节段纳米线3种类型对镍纳米复合材料的研究进展进行评述,在介绍这些材料的合成方法、结构特点的基础上,综述各种方法、各类结构的优缺点及应用前景,为类似复合材料的合成提供借鉴。

  13. Dynamic recrystallization behavior of a γ′-hardened nickel-based superalloy during hot deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Zhang, Kaifeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Jiang, Shaosong, E-mail: jiangshaosong@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou, Haiping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhao, Changhong; Yang, Xiaoli [Fushun Special Steel Co. Ltd, Fushun 113000 (China)

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • The relationship between the peak stress and stable DRX grain size has been expressed by a power law function. • The effect of CDRX characterized by progressive subgrain rotation became weaker with the increasing deformation temperature. • The effect of DDRX became stronger with the increasing strain for the alloy deformed at 1160 °C/0.1 s{sup −1}. • The fraction of twin boundaries is closely related to the deformation temperature and strain. - Abstract: The hot deformation behavior of a γ′-hardened nickel-based superalloy was investigated by means of isothermal compression tests in the temperature range of 1010–1210 °C with a strain rate of 0.1 s{sup −1}. The electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were employed to investigate the effect of deformation temperature and strain on the microstructure evolution and nucleation mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization (DRX). Microstructure observations revealed that the size and volume fraction of DRX grains increased with the increasing temperature. A power exponent relationship was obtained between the stable DRX grain size and the peak stress. Additionally, it was found that the effect of CDRX characterized by progressive subgrain rotation became weaker with the increasing deformation temperature, and DDRX was the operating nucleation mechanism of DRX at higher deformation temperature. On the other hand, the effect of DDRX became stronger with the increasing strain, and CDRX can only be considered as an assistant nucleation mechanism of DRX at the later stage of deformation for the alloy deformed at 1160 °C. Nucleation of DRX can also be activated by the twinning formation. Hence, particular attention was also paid to the evolution of twin boundaries during hot deformation.

  14. Influence of composition on microstructural parameters of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, R.A., E-mail: Rebecca.A.MacKay@nasa.gov [NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Gabb, T.P. [NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Garg, A. [NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Rogers, R.B.; Nathal, M.V. [NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Fourteen nickel-base superalloy single crystals containing a range of chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), and rhenium (Re) levels, and fixed amounts of aluminum (Al) and tantalum (Ta), were examined to determine the effect of bulk composition on basic microstructural parameters, including {gamma} Prime solvus, {gamma} Prime volume fraction, topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phase chemistries, and {gamma}-{gamma} Prime lattice mismatch. Regression models describing the influence of bulk alloy composition on each of the microstructural parameters were developed and compared to predictions by a commercially-available software tool that used computational thermodynamics. Co produced the largest change in {gamma} Prime solvus over the wide compositional range explored and Mo produced the biggest effect on the {gamma} lattice parameter over its range, although Re had a very potent influence on all microstructural parameters investigated. Changing the Cr, Co, Mo, and Re contents in the bulk alloy had an impact on their concentrations in the {gamma} matrix and to a smaller extent in the {gamma} Prime phase. The software tool under-predicted {gamma} Prime solvus temperatures and {gamma} Prime volume fractions, and over-predicted TCP phase volume fractions at 982 Degree-Sign C. However, the statistical regression models provided excellent estimations of the microstructural parameters and demonstrated the usefulness of such formulas. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of Cr, Co, Mo, and Re on microstructure in new low density superalloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co produced a large change in {gamma} Prime solvus; Mo had a large effect on lattice mismatch. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Re exhibited very potent influence on all microstructural parameters was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phase chemistries both varied with temperature and alloy composition. Black

  15. Hot Corrosion of Nickel-Base Alloys in Biomass-Derived Fuel Simulated Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyens, C.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1999-02-28

    Biomass fuels are considered to be a promising renewable source of energy. However, impurities present in the fuel may cause corrosion problems with the materials used in the hot sections of gas turbines and only limited data are available so far. As part of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy, the present study provides initial data on the hot corrosion resistance of different nickel-base alloys against sodium sulfate-induced corrosion as a baseline, and against salt compositions simulating biomass-derived fuel deposits. Single crystal nickel-superalloy Rene N5, a cast NiCrAlY alloy, a NiCoCrAlY alloy representing industrially used overlay compositions, and a model {beta}NiAl+Hf alloy were tested in 1h thermal cycles at 950 C with different salt coatings deposited onto the surfaces. Whereas the NiCoCrAlY alloy exhibited reasonable resistance against pure sodium sulfate deposits, the NiCrAiY alloy and Rene N5 were attacked severely. Although considered to be an ideal alumina former in air and oxygen at higher temperatures, {beta}NiAl+Hf also suffered from rapid corrosion attack at 950 C when coated with sodium sulfate. The higher level of potassium present in biomass fuels compared with conventional fuels was addressed by testing a NiCoCrAlY alloy coated with salts of different K/Na atomic ratios. Starting at zero Na, the corrosion rate increased considerably when sodium was added to potassium sulfate. In an intermediate region the corrosion rate was initially insensitive to the K/Na ratio but accelerated when very Na-rich compositions were deposited. The key driver for corrosion of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was sodium sulfate rather than potassium sulfate, and no simple additive or synergistic effect of combining sodium and potassium was found.

  16. Aging of a New Niobium-Modified MAR-M247 Nickel-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldan, Renato; Azevedo e Silva, Paulo Ricardo Soares; Nunes, Carlos Angelo; Coelho, Gilberto Carvalho

    2013-08-01

    MAR-M247 is a nickel-based superalloy that contains 3 wt.% Ta (weight percent of tantalum). Considering the chemical similarity between tantalum and niobium (Nb) and the lower cost of Nb, a modified MAR-M247 superalloy was produced with total replacement of Ta by Nb in this work. The samples were previously solutioned at 1260°C for 8 h and then aged at different times (between 5 and 80 h) and temperatures (between 780 and 980°C). The microstructures of the aged samples were characterized with a scanning electron microscope (SEM and FEG-SEM, both with EDS). Simulations of the MC carbide and γ' fraction and the Ta and Nb content in both MC carbide and γ' phase were performed with Thermo-Calc software (TT_Ni8 database) and simulations of the γ' growth rate and γ' mean diameter were performed with JMatPro software. MC carbide with high Hf content was observed in all the aged samples, in agreement with thermodynamic simulation results. The equilibrium γ' fraction decreases from 67 mol.% at 780°C to 52 mol.% at 980°C. Good agreement between the calculated and experimentally determined γ' particle size was also found. The growth rate of γ' at 980°C is about 8 times higher than that at 780°C and 3 times higher than that at 880°C. The hardness values do not change considerably after aging at 780 and 880°C. However, these values decrease significantly after aging at 980°C.

  17. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  18. VPPA weld model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-07-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  19. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  20. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  1. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  2. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  3. Manganese Content Control in Weld Metal During MAG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Chinakhova, E. D.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the welding current and method of gas shielding in MAG welding on the content of manganese is considered in the paper. Results of study of the welded specimens of steels 45 when applying welding wire of different formulas and different types of gas shielding (traditional shielding and double-jet shielding) are given. It is found that in MAG welding the value of the welding current and the speed of the gas flow from the welding nozzle have a considerable impact on the chemical composition of the weld metal. The consumable electrode welding under double-jet gas shielding provides the directed gas-dynamics in the welding area and enables controlling the electrode metal transfer and the chemical composition of a weld.

  4. Studies of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krupa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of a welded joint were described. The joint was made as a result of the reconstruction of a truss and one of the possible means to make a repair. The studies were of a simulation character and were targeted at the detection of welding defects and imperfections thatshould be eliminated in a real structure. A model was designed and on this model the tests and examinations were carried out. The modelwas made under the same conditions as the conditions adopted for repair. It corresponded to the real object in shape and dimensions, and in the proposed technique of welding and welding parameters. The model was composed of five plates joined together with twelve beads.The destructive and non-destructive tests were carried out; the whole structure and the respective welds were also examined visually. Thedefects and imperfections in welds were detected by surface methods of inspection, penetration tests and magnetic particle flaw detection.The model of the welded joint was prepared by destructive methods, a technique that would never be permitted in the case of a realstructure. For the investigations it was necessary to cut out the specimens from the welded joint in direction transverse to the weld run. The specimens were subjected to metallographic examinations and hardness measurements. Additionally, the joint cross-section was examined by destructive testing methods to enable precise determination of the internal defects and imperfections. The surface methods were applied again, this time to determine the severity of welding defects. The analysis has proved that, fabricated under proper conditions and with parameters of the welding process duly observed, the welded joint has good properties and repairs of this type are possible in practice.

  5. Determination of Aluminum in Nickel-Based Superalloys by Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy%Determination of Aluminum in Nickel-Based Superalloys by Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱德华; 王茜; 倪晓武; 陈建平; 陆建

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was developed to detect aluminum in nickel-based superalloys (K417, GH4033, DZ125L, З ∏742y) using a non-intensified, non-gated, low-cost detection system. The precision of LIBS depends strongly on the experimental conditions. The calibration curves of Al(I)394.4 nm and Al(I)396.2 nm under the optimum experimental parameters are presented. Finally the limit of detection (LOD) for aluminum is calculated from the experimental data, which is in the range of 0.09% to 0.1% by weight.

  6. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  7. Explosive welding of pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drennov, O.; Burtseva, O.; Kitin, A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    2006-08-15

    Arrangement of pipelines for the transportation of oil and gas is a complicated problem. In this paper it is suggested to use the explosive welding method to weld pipes together. This method is rather new. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its static analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. We suggest to perform explosive welding according to the following scheme: the ends of the 2 pipes are connected, the external surfaces are kept at a similar level. A cylindrical steel layer of diameter larger than the pipe diameter is set around the pipe joint and an explosive charge is placed on its external surface. The basic problem is the elimination of strains and reduction of pipe diameter in the area of the dynamic effect. The suggestion is to use water as filler: the volume of pipes in the area adjacent to the zone of explosive welding is totally filled with water. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gas dynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water. Model experiments with pipes having radii R = 57 mm confirmed results of the calculations and the possibility in principle to weld pipes by explosion with use of water as filler.

  8. Investigation of Creep Feed Grinding Parameters and Heat treatment Effects on the Nickel-base Superalloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasan Jamshidi; Sayed Ali Sadough Vanini; Alireza Attari

    2004-01-01

    The Nickel base Superalloys are the most famous complicated and useable of Superalloys to make hot zone components of the gas turbines. The complicated dimensional tolerances, specially at the root of the blade show importance of grinding processes at the production of blades root. The prediction of the effect of machining parameters on the soundness of component surface strengthening for reaching to a suitable surface finishing and avoiding from crack formation at the work part during machining operation often is not easy and feasible so needs to more industrial investigation.This research is about frame 5 blade designed by GE and made from Superalloy IN738LC has been investigated. The formation of a plastically deformed and heat affected zone during grinding of Superalloy IN738LC with a high depth of cut but slow work speed (creep feed grinding) was investigated. Parameters such as work speed, depth of cut and radial dressing speed have been considered as variables and their effects have been studied. During experimental performed, the voltage and current of motor measured and power and special energy calculated.Some samples heat-treated (of the 1176℃ for 1 hr under neutral argon gas and cooling rate of 15℃/min up to 537℃ and then air cooling) to study grains recrystallization. Other samples have been created from the roots of blades and then coated by Nickel to measure boundary layer micro-hardness. The results show that increasing work speed leads to increasing the use power. Increasing the depth of cut, by increasing material removal rate, and the radial dressing speed, by decreasing power, lead to decreasing special energy. The temperature created by grinding lead to decreasing plastic deformation and boundary layer formation. When the radial dressing speed changes from 1 to 0.6 μm/rev and other parameters are kept unchanged the roughness of surface increases and the special energy decreases. Sufficient dressing is very essential in limiting the width

  9. High temperature corrosion of nickel-base alloys in environments containing alkali sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Rachel; Flyg, Jesper; Caddeo, Sophie [Corrosion and Metals Research Institute, KIMAB, Stockholm (Sweden); Karlsson, Fredrik [Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspong (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    This work is directed towards producing data to assist in lifetime assessment of components in gas turbines run in severely polluted industrial environments where the main corrosive species is SO{sub 2}, which can condense to form alkali sulphates. Corrosion rates have been measured for the base materials, in order to assess the worst-case scenario, in which cracks or other damage has occurred to the protective coating. The information is expected to be of value to manufacturers, owners and inspectors of gas turbines. Six nickel-base superalloys were subject to thermal cycles of 160 hours duration, and 0.8mg/cm{sup 2} of 20 mol % Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 80mol% K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was applied before each cycle. The test temperatures were 850 deg C and 900 deg C, with maximum test durations of 24 cycles and 12 cycles respectively. The metal loss was assessed by metallography of cross sections and the sulphidation attack was found to be very uneven. Mass change data indicated that the corrosion process was largely linear in character, and probability plots and estimations of the propagation rate of corrosion based on the linear growth assumption were produced. The performance of the alloys increased with increasing chromium content. The single crystal materials CMSX4 and MD2 showed such high corrosion rates that their use in severely contaminated industrial environments is considered inadvisable. The best performance was shown by Inconel 939 and Inconel 6203, so that even if cracks occur in the protective coating, a reasonable remaining lifetime can be expected for these materials. Sulphide formation occurred at the reaction front in all cases and mixed sulphides such as Ta-Ni or Ti-Nb sulphides were often present. The work has news value since very little long-term data is currently available for materials performance in severely sulphidising environments. The project goals in terms of exposures and metrology have been fully realised. Contributions have been made to the

  10. Hot Deformation Characteristics for a Nickel-base Superalloy GH742y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuwei Kang; Jianfei Sun; Guoqing Zhang; Zhou Li

    2009-01-01

    The hot deformation characteristics of as-cast nickel-base superalloy GH742y after hot isostatic pressing (HIP)(hereafter referred to as-cast alloy) have been investigated by hot compression tests in the temperature range of 1050 to 1140℃, strain rate range of 0.01 s-1 to 10 s-1 and strain range of 35% to 50% by means of Gleeble-3500 thermal mechanical simulator.The results show that the as-cast alloy exhibits the poor deformability, and shows wedge-shaped cracking beyond the strain of 35%.At strain rates less than 1.0 s-1,the stress-strain curves exhibit nearly steady-state behavior, while at strain rate of 10 s-1, a yield drop and serrated yielding occur.The activation energy values developed on the basis of the experimental data are divided into three domains.The first domain appears at lower strain rate (≤1.0 s-1) and lower temperature (≤1080℃), with the lowest mean value of activation energy about 261.4 kJ/mol.The second domain appears at the same strain rate as the first domain, but higher temperature (>1080℃), with the intermediate mean value of activation energy about 328.8 kJ/mol.The third domain appears at higher strain rate (10 s-1) and temperature range of 1050 to 1140℃, with the largest mean value of activation energy about 605.05 kJ/mol.Three different constitutive equations are established in corresponding to domains.Microstructural observations in the third domain reveal non-uniform dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of homogeneous γ phase, which leads to the poor deformability and the highest Q value.In contrast, microstructures in the first domain show fully DRX of homogeneous γ phase, leading to the better deformability and the lowest Q value.It is noted that the grain size increases with the increment of strain rate or temperature.These results suggest that bulk metal working of this material may be carried out in the first domain where fully DRX of γ homogeneous occurred.

  11. Competing fatigue mechanisms in Nickel-base superalloy Rene 88DT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Paul N.

    Nickel base superalloys exhibit superior high temperature mechanical properties required for aircraft engine components. It has been known that the processing of these alloys by the powder metallurgy route introduces inclusions inside the material. The presence of such inclusions often leads to competing failure modes in fatigue that is described by a step-wise or two distinct S-N curves involving both the surface and internally-initiated cracks, resulting in large uncertainties of fatigue life. A clear understanding of such behavior is yet to be established. The principal objective of this research is to examine the effect of inclusions on the extent of fatigue failure competition from surface and internal initiators at two different specimen test volumes. Experimental fatigue testing has been performed to explore how the presence of inclusions affects the competing fatigue failure modes. In addition, how the competing failure modes will behave with changes in the specimen size was also studied. Two groups of material each with two different specimen sizes were used in this study. It has been shown that the two crack initiation mechanisms occurred in the small unseeded Rene 88DT specimens tested at 650ºC over the stress range tested. Additionally, the fatigue lives were reduced with increase in specimen volume. All fatigue failures in seeded material occurred due to crack initiations from the seeded inclusions. In the fatigue life of seeded material, two competing and separate S-N curves were found in small test volume, whereas, in the large test volume, the regions were separated by a "step" in S-N curve. It has been found that the largest inclusion size observed in metallographic surfaces was smaller than the size determined from the fatigue failure origin. An analysis method based on extreme value statistics developed by Murakami was used to predict the largest size of inclusion in the test volume. The results of this study clearly show that competition for

  12. Magnetic and elastic anisotropy in magnetorheological elastomers using nickel-based nanoparticles and nanochains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Romina A.; Soledad Antonel, Paula; Ruiz, Mariano M.; Perez, Oscar E.; Butera, Alejandro; Jorge, Guillermo; Oliveira, Cristiano L. P.; Negri, R. Martín

    2013-12-01

    Nickel (Ni) based nanoparticles and nanochains were incorporated as fillers in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers and then these mixtures were thermally cured in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. In this way, macroscopically structured-anisotropic PDMS-Ni based magnetorheological composites were obtained with the formation of pseudo-chains-like structures (referred as needles) oriented in the direction of the applied magnetic field when curing. Nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature, under air ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure) and then calcined at 400 °C (in air atmosphere also). The size distribution was obtained by fitting Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments with a polydisperse hard spheres model and a Schulz-Zimm distribution, obtaining a size distribution centered at (10.0 ± 0.6) nm with polydispersivity given by σ = (8.0 ± 0.2) nm. The SAXS, X-ray powder diffraction, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) experiments are consistent with single crystal nanoparticles of spherical shape (average particle diameter obtained by TEM: (12 ± 1) nm). Nickel-based nanochains (average diameter: 360 nm; average length: 3 μm, obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy; aspect ratio = length/diameter ˜ 10) were obtained at 85 °C and ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure). The magnetic properties of Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains at room temperature are compared and discussed in terms of surface and size effects. Both Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains were used as fillers for obtaining the PDMS structured magnetorheological composites, observing the presence of oriented needles. Magnetization curves, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra, and strain-stress curves of low filler's loading composites (2% w/w of fillers) were determined as functions of the relative orientation with respect to the needles. The results indicate that even at low loadings it is possible to obtain

  13. Study of alumina-trichite reinforcement of a nickel-based matric by means of powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, A.; Hivert, A.

    1982-01-01

    Research was conducted on reinforcing nickel based matrices with alumina trichites by using powder metallurgy. Alumina trichites previously coated with nickel are magnetically aligned. The felt obtained is then sintered under a light pressure at a temperature just below the melting point of nickel. The halogenated atmosphere technique makes it possible to incorporate a large number of additive elements such as chromium, titanium, zirconium, tantalum, niobium, aluminum, etc. It does not appear that going from laboratory scale to a semi-industrial scale in production would create any major problems.

  14. Special Features of Creep and Long-Term Strength of Single-Crystal Refractory Nickel-Base Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, S. G.; Getsov, L. B.; Tikhomirova, E. A.; Semenov, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Results of experimental studies of creep in a wide range of temperatures and stresses are presented for three modern single-crystal nickel-base alloys. A method for determining the creep characteristics by tests including step increase of the tension is suggested and tested. The effect of transition into plastic condition on the creep parameters, the influence of the chemical composition and loading conditions on the duration of creep stages I, II and III, and the conditions of appearance of crystallographic and not crystallographic modes of fracture are analyzed. Possible simple approximations of the creep curves are considered with allowance for the accumulation of damage and occurrence of unsteady creep stages.

  15. Improved diffusion welding and roll welding of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holko, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Auto-vacuum cleaning technique was applied to titanium parts prior to welding. This provides oxide-free welding surfaces. Diffusion welding can be accomplished in as little as five minutes of hot pressing. Roll welding can be accomplished with only ten percent deformation.

  16. A Review: Welding Of Dissimilar Metal Alloys by Laser Beam Welding & Friction Stir Welding Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Deepika Harwani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Welding of dissimilar metals has attracted attention of the researchers worldwide, owing to its many advantages and challenges. There is no denial in the fact that dissimilar welded joints offer more flexibility in the design and production of the commercial and industrial components. Many welding techniques have been analyzed to join dissimilar metal combinations. The objective of this paper is to review two such techniques – Laser welding and Friction stir welding. Laser beam welding, a high power density and low energy-input process, employs a laser beam to produce welds of dissimilar materials. Friction stir welding, a solid-state joining process, is also successfully used in dissimilar welding applications like aerospace and ship building industries. This paper summarizes the trends and advances of these two welding processes in the field of dissimilar welding. Future aspects of the study are also discussed.

  17. Fine welding with lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process.

  18. Simulation of welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Song WU; Michael RETHMEIER; Christopher SCHWENK

    2011-01-01

    @@ Welding has become the most important materials processing technology in manufacturing, and has critical effects on the quality, reliability and life of products as well as production cost, efficiency and response speed to market.As various kinds of high performance metallic materials are widely used in engineering, there are more demands in manufacturing industry for advanced welding technology.

  19. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  20. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  1. The effect of welding fixtures on welding distortions

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is to examine the effect of welding fixture used to prevent the distortions duringcooling process utilizing a robot controlled gas metal arc welding method on cooling rate and distortions ofwelded structures.Design/methodology/approach: Using a specially designed welding fixture for a welded steel structure, sixdifferent types of AISI 1020 steel specimens are tested in three different welding speeds and two differentcooling conditions either at fixture or without using ...

  2. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...... in the weld causing expulsion of the melt pool. Trailing beams were applied to melt additional material and ensure a melt pool. The method showed good results for increasing tolerances to impurities and reduction of scrapped parts from blowouts during laser welding....

  3. Rheomorphism of welded tuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, J. A.; Wright, J. V.

    1981-05-01

    Peralkaline welded tuffs from the islands of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, and Pantelleria, Italy, show abundant evidence for post-depositional flow. It is demonstrated that rheomorphism, or secondary mass flowage, can occur in welded tuffs of ignimbrite and air-fall origin. The presence of a linear fabric is taken as the diagnostic criterion for the recognition of the process. Deposition on a slope is an essential condition for the development of rheomorphism after compaction and welding. Internal structures produced during rheomorphic flow can be studied by the methods of structural geology and show similar dispositions to comparable features in sedimentary slump sheets. It is shown that secondary flowage can occur in welded tuffs emplaced on gentle slopes, provided that the apparent viscosity of the magma is sufficiently low. Compositional factors favor the development of rheomorphism in densely welded tuffs of peralkaline type.

  4. Theoretical investigation of the mechanism of tritiated methane dehydrogenation reaction using nickel-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Liang; Li, Jiamao; Deng, Bing; Yang, Yong; Wang, Heyi [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Weiyi [School of Physics and Chemistry, Xihua University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Li, Shuo, E-mail: lishuo@cqut.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Tan, Zhaoyi, E-mail: tanzhaoyi@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Four-step dehydrogenation of CT{sub 4} catalyzed by Ni to form Ni–C by releasing T{sub 2}. • The process of Ni + CT{sub 4} → NiCT{sub 2} + T{sub 2} is more achievable than that of NiCT{sub 2} → NiC + T{sub 2}. • TNiCT → T{sub 2}NiC step is the RDS with the rate constant of k = 2.8 × 10{sup 13} exp(−313,136/RT). • The hydrogen isotope effect value of k{sub H}/k{sub T} is 2.94, and k{sub D}/k{sub T} is 1.39. • CH{sub 4} and CD{sub 4} dehydrogenations are likely to occur, accompanied by the CT{sub 4} cracking. - Abstract: The mechanism of tritiated methane dehydrogenation reaction catalyzed by nickel-based catalyst was investigated in detail by density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/[6-311++G(d, p), SDD] level. The computational results indicated that the dehydrogenation of tritiated methane is endothermic. The decomposition of tritiated methane catalyzed by Ni to form Ni-based carbon (Ni–C) after a four-step dehydrogenation companied with releasing tritium. After the first and second dehydrogenation steps, Ni + CT{sub 4} formed NiCT{sub 2}. After the third and fourth dehydrogenation steps, NiCT{sub 2} formed NiC. The first and second steps of dehydrogenation occurred on both the singlet and triplet states, and the lowest energy route is Ni + CT{sub 4} → {sup 1}COM → {sup 1}TS1 → {sup 3}IM1 → {sup 3}TS2 → {sup 3}IM2. The third and fourth steps of dehydrogenation occurred on both the singlet and quintet states, and the minimum energy reaction pathway appeared to be IM3 → {sup 1}TS4 → {sup 5}IM4 → {sup 5}TS5 → {sup 5}IM5 → {sup 5}pro + T{sub 2}. The fourth step of dehydrogenation TNiCT → T{sub 2}NiC was the rate-determining step of the entire reaction with the rate constant of k{sub 2} = 2.8 × 10{sup 13} exp(−313,136/RT) (in cm{sup 3} mol{sup −1} s{sup −1}), and its activation energy barrier was calculated to be 51.8 kcal/mol. The Ni-catalyzed CH{sub 4} and CD{sub 4} cracking

  5. Mechanical properties and microstructure changes after long-term aging at 700℃ for a nickel-base superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuangqun Zhao; Jianxin Dong; Xishan Xie

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructure changes have been investigated on a new nickel-base superalloy after long-term aging at 700℃. It is found that the major precipitates of the tested alloy are MC, M23C6, M6C and γ' in the course of long-term aging at 700℃. The carbides maintain good thermal stability with the aging time up to 5008 h. The growth rate of gamma prime precipitates is relatively high in the early aging period and then slows down. The coarsening behavior of gamma prime follows a diffusion-controlled growth procedure. The room temperature Rockwell hardness of the alloy aged at 700℃ increases slightly at the initial stage of aging, but it decreases with the prolonged time. It mainly depends on the size of gamma prime. In comparison with Nimonic lloy 263, the new alloy characterizes with higher tensile and stress-rupture strengths at high temperatures. The new nickel-base superalloy offers a combination of microstructure stability, strength, ductility and toughness at 700℃.

  6. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  7. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  8. Laser forming and welding processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shuja, Shahzada Zaman

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces model studies and experimental results associated with laser forming and welding such as laser induced bending, welding of sheet metals, and related practical applications. The book provides insight into the physical processes involved with laser forming and welding. The analytical study covers the formulation of laser induced bending while the model study demonstrates the simulation of bending and welding processes using the finite element method. Analytical and numerical solutions for laser forming and welding problems are provided.

  9. Guidelines for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    in a large void at the termination point of the weld, the effects the exit hole will have on structural integrity must be considered. The...3.6 Cavity. A void -type discontinuity within a solid-state weld. See Figure 3.4. 3.7 Complex weld joint. A continuous weld...except as affected by corner radii. 3.61 Underfill . A depression resulting when the weld face is below the adjacent parent material surface. See

  10. Elucidation of laser welding phenomena and factors affecting weld penetration and welding defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Seiji; Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami

    The behavior and effect of a plasma plume on the weld penetration are greatly different between CO2 laser welding and YAG, disk or fiber laser welding. The effects of the power and the power density on the weld penetration are elucidated. Spattering leading to the formation of underfilled weld beads is controlled by inclining the laser beam. Porosity is formed from bubbles generated from the tip of the keyhole at low welding speed or from the middle part of the keyhole at high laser power density. Cracking easily occurs in pulsed spot welding of aluminum alloys.

  11. Pitting corrosion behaviour of built-up welds - Effects of welding layers and tarnish; Lochkorrosionsverhalten von Auftragschweissungen - Schweisslagen- und Oberflaecheneffekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyn, A.; Schilling, K.; Boese, E.; Spieler, S.; Altendorf, S. [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg, IWW, PF 4120, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany); Burkert, A. [BAM, Berlin, Fachgruppe VII.3, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Schultze, S. [LMPA Sachsen-Anhalt, Grosse Steinernetischstrasse 4, 39104 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2003-12-01

    The pitting corrosion resistance of nickel based deposition welds on a superduplex steel made by active-gas metal pulsed-arc welding was studied. Therefore the determination of the CPT (Critical Pitting Temperature) should be carried out corresponding to ASTM G 48 C. However an unexpectedly low resistance of the built-up welds also at multilayer order was noticed. After visual assessment of the examined specimens a significant effect of the surface condition was assumed. Because the CPT determination according to ASTM does not allow any statement about the corrosion process, this method was not suitable to characterize the corrosion system. For this reason a new method was applied to clarify the causes of the low corrosion resistance. This method determines the CPT with the help of the electrochemical current noise under the same conditions demanded in ASTM G 48 C. The temperature is increased continuously and the characteristic parameters of the system are recorded and evaluated objectively within short time. So it was possible to see the influence of the surface condition on the pitting corrosion behaviour of the examined specimens. The required parameters to the post-processing of the deposition welds were determined. The comparison of the results show that the surface tarnish formed after the shielded arc welding process influences the pitting corrosion resistance negatively. After its elimination the CPT could be determined in dependence of the welding layers. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Zur vergleichenden Einschaetzung der Lochkorrosionsbestaendigkeit von verschiedenen, mehrlagigen MAGp-auftraggeschweissten Nickelbasis-Schweissguetern auf einem Superduplexstahl wurden kritische Lochkorrosionstemperaturen (critical pitting temperature, CPT) nach ASTM G 48 C ermittelt. Es zeigte sich eine unerwartet niedrige Bestaendigkeit der Auftragschweissungen, als dessen Ursache ein unguenstiger Oberflaechenzustand angenommen wurde. Da die

  12. Weldability of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel under ultra power density fiber laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serizawa, H.; Kawahito, Y.; Katayama, S. [Osaka Univ., Joining and Welding research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan); Ogiwara, H.; Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems as it has been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. As one of RAFMS, F82H, which has been developed and studied in Japan, is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the collaboration of IEA fusion materials development. Although F82H is the well perceived RAFM as ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) structural material, the weldability was proved though TIG, EB and YAG laser weld tests using only 15 and 25 mm thickness plate. In order to reduce the welding distortion, the residual stress and the area of the heat affected zone, it is necessary to decrease the total heat input under the welding. Recently, as a result of R and D efforts about the sources of laser beam, a high-power fiber laser beam has been developed as one of the desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. Since the power density of the fiber laser beam is very large, it is possible to increase the welding speed more than 10 m/min. So, in this study, the weldability of 1.5 mm thickness F82H plate and pipe was examined by using a ultra power density fiber laser, in order to reveal the excellent weldability of F82H. As a basic study of the butt welding between 1.5 mm plate and 1.5 mm thickness pipe with 11 mm outer diameter, the focus position, the beam position and the laser power were varied using 25 mm square plate and 25 mm length pipe. Then, by using the fiber laser with 1.1 MW/mm{sup 2} peak power density under the appropriate welding condition obtained from the basic study, a full penetrated weld bead with narrow width was formed in the butt

  13. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  14. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  15. Application of explosive welding to heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, G.

    1983-10-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: advantages of explosive welding; principle of explosive welding; explosive welding of tubes; metallurgy of explosive welds (micrographs; microhardness); tubular heat exchangers; plugging; sleeving; retubing; construction of new heat exchangers; thermal sleeves.

  16. Nano-structural and Nano-chemical analysis of dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Shang Hoon; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Dissimilar metal weld is generally applied to nuclear power plant for manufacturing and machining in structural components such as RPV and Pressurizer nozzles. Alloy 152 is used frequently as filler metal in the manufacture of dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) in light water reactors (LWR) to join the low alloy steel (LAS) pressure vessel nozzles and steam generator nozzles to nickel-based wrought alloy or austenitic stainless steel components. The thermal expansion coefficient of the alloy lies between those of ferrite steel and austenitic stainless steel, and it also significantly retards the carbon diffusion from the ferrite base metal to the weld metal. However, in recent years cracking phenomena have been observed in the welded joints. A concern has been raised about the integrity and reliability in the joint transition zone due to the high susceptibility of heat affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The dissimilar metal joints which were welded between Inconel 690, Ni-based alloy and A533B, low alloy steel with Inconel 152, filler metal were investigated. This study shows microstructural and chemical analysis between Inconel 152 and A533B by using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and 3 dimension atom probe (3D AP). In the root region, OM and SEM analysis show the microstructure which contains the interface of Inconel 152 and A533B near the rooter region. And it shows unidentified band structure which is formed along weld interface. AP and TEM/EDS analyses show the chemical gradient containing higher Fe but lower Mn, Ni and Cr than Inconel 152 and the unidentified band

  17. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD method was used to determine the phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl environment using a GillAC electrochemical system. The investigation results showed that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in a maximum reduction in delta-ferrite and improvement in pitting corrosion resistance of the weld zone was attributed to the coarse austenite grains owing to the reduction in active sites of the austenite/delta ferrite interface and the decrease in galvanic interaction between austenite and delta-ferrite.

  18. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  19. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  20. Fusion Welding Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    RD-AlSO 253 FUSION WELDING RESEARCH(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH L/I CAMBRIDGE DEPT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING T W EAGAR ET AL. 30 RPR 85...NUMBER 12. GOV’ ACCESSION NO. 3. RECICIE-S CATALOG NUMBER 4. T TL V nd Subtitle) S. P OFRPR PERIOD COVERED 5t h A~nnual Technical Report Fusion Welding ...research S on welding processes. Studies include metal vapors in the arc, development of a high speed infrared temperature monitor, digital signal

  1. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  2. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  3. Development, processing and fabrication of a nickel based nickel-chromium-iron alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlade, Dotun Adebayo

    An optimal powder metallurgy (P/M) approach to produce a nickel base Superalloy similar in composition to INCONEL(TM) 600 was carried out utilising a simple uniaxial pressing process. The efficiencies of a lubricant addition, binder, sintering times and temperatures were measured in terms of green and sintered densities as well as microstructural changes that occurred during processing. It was observed that with increasing % polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), an overall decrease in density of compact was obtained and that using 0.75wt % of lubricant (microwax) green densities in excess of 70% can be obtained. The samples were subsequently sintered in air at 1270°C for times ranging from 0.5h to 5h and also in vacuum (6 millitorr) with temperatures ranging from 1260 through to 1400°C. The air sintering was carried out to optimize sintering time, whereas the vacuum sintering was employed to optimize sintering temperature. On sintering for 5h in air, chromium enrichment occurred at the grain boundaries with subsequent depletion of nickel and iron; this was not noted for 2h sintering or for sintering under vacuum. The optimum sintering conditions were determined to be at 1300°C sintering for 2h in vacuum. The samples processed under the optimum conditions were successfully cold rolled to 40% of the original thickness without cracking. An investigation was also undertaken to determine the effect of Al concentration (1-12w/o) on the microstructure of the powder metallurgically (P/M) processed Ni-Cr-Fe ternary alloy, with a view to determine the concentration of aluminium that would yield a homogenously distributed and optimum volume fraction of the intermetallic-gamma'(Ni3Al) phase without the formation of topologically closed packed phases in the ternary alloy. The phases that were likely to form with the variation in concentration of Al were first simulated by JMatPro(TM) thermodynamic software package, and then Ni-Cr-Fe alloys with varying concentration of aluminum were

  4. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  5. Magnetic Pulse Welding Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. Jassim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the benefits of using Magnetic Pulse machine which is belong to Non-conventional machine instead of conventional machine. Magnetic Pulse Technology is used for joining dissimilar metals, and for forming and cutting metals. It is a non contact technique. Magnetic field is used to generate impact magnetic pressure for welding and forming the work piece by converted the electrical energy to mechanical energy. It is enable us to design previously not possible by welding dissimilar materials and allowing to welds light and stronger materials together. It can be used to weld metallic with non metallic materials to created mechanical lock on ceramics, polymers, rubbers and composites. It is green process; there is no heat, no radiation, no gas, no smoke and sparks, therefore the emissions are negligible.

  6. Effect of Continuous and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Dissimilar Weldments Between Hastelloy C-276/AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumitra; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Vashishtha, Himanshu

    2017-03-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to join Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based superalloy and AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel using ERNiCrMo-4 filler. The joints were fabricated by continuous and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding processes. Experimental studies to ascertain the structure-property co-relationship with or without pulsed current mode were carried out using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Further, the energy-dispersive spectroscope was used to evaluate the extent of microsegregation. The microstructure of fusion zone was obtained as finer cellular dendritic structure for pulsed current mode, whereas columnar structure was formed with small amount of cellular structure for continuous current mode. The scanning electron microscope examination witnessed the existence of migrated grain boundaries at the weld interfaces. Moreover, the presence of secondary phases such as P and μ was observed in continuous current weld joints, whereas they were absent in pulsed current weld joints, which needs to be further characterized. Moreover, pulsed current joints resulted in narrower weld bead, refined morphology, reduced elemental segregation and improved strength of the welded joints. The outcomes of the present investigation would help in obtaining good quality dissimilar joints for industrial applications and AISI 321 ASS being cheaper consequently led to cost-effective design also.

  7. Effect of Continuous and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Dissimilar Weldments Between Hastelloy C-276/AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumitra; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Vashishtha, Himanshu

    2017-02-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to join Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based superalloy and AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel using ERNiCrMo-4 filler. The joints were fabricated by continuous and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding processes. Experimental studies to ascertain the structure-property co-relationship with or without pulsed current mode were carried out using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Further, the energy-dispersive spectroscope was used to evaluate the extent of microsegregation. The microstructure of fusion zone was obtained as finer cellular dendritic structure for pulsed current mode, whereas columnar structure was formed with small amount of cellular structure for continuous current mode. The scanning electron microscope examination witnessed the existence of migrated grain boundaries at the weld interfaces. Moreover, the presence of secondary phases such as P and μ was observed in continuous current weld joints, whereas they were absent in pulsed current weld joints, which needs to be further characterized. Moreover, pulsed current joints resulted in narrower weld bead, refined morphology, reduced elemental segregation and improved strength of the welded joints. The outcomes of the present investigation would help in obtaining good quality dissimilar joints for industrial applications and AISI 321 ASS being cheaper consequently led to cost-effective design also.

  8. Explosive Welding with Nitroguanidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadwin, L D

    1964-03-13

    By using the explosive nitroguanidine, continuous welds can be made between similar and dissimilar metals. Since low detonation pressures are attainable, pressure transfer media are not required between the explosive and the metal surface. The need for either a space or an angle between the metals is eliminated, and very low atmospheric pressures are not required. Successful welds have been made between tantalum and 4140 steel, 3003H14 aluminum and 4140 steel, and 304 stainless steel and 3003H14 aluminum.

  9. Laser Impact Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Daehn, Glenn S.; Lippold, John; Liu, Deijan; Taber, Geoff; Wang, Huimin

    2012-01-01

    Laser impact welding is a solid-state, collision-based welding process. In this process, laser-generated optical energy is converted to kinetic energy through the ablation at the surface and confinement of the gas generated between a flyer and backing plate. The launch of the flyer can be affected by many factors, for example, backing material, ablative layer, and flyer thickness. In this paper, the effect of three backing materials: glass, polycarbonate and cellophane tape, we...

  10. Welding of solid wood

    OpenAIRE

    Ivica Župčić; Goran Mihulja; Andrija Bogner; Ivica Grbac; Ivica @up~i}, Goran Mihulja, Andrija Bogner, Ivica Grbac,; Božidar Hrovat

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the up-to-date knowledge and results of the application of wood welding techniques at the Faculty of Forestry University of Zagreb. Wood welding technologies have been developed as a new way of bonding timber by using high temperature generatedby friction and pressure. Timber is assembled without any adhesives. During the process the surface layer of timber (lignin), which is in direct contact with its counterpart, melts due to high pressure and temperature, which is usual...

  11. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Steam- and CO2-Reforming as Well as Oxidation of Methane over Nickel-Based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Herrera Delgado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and kinetic modeling study on the Ni-catalyzed conversion of methane under oxidative and reforming conditions is presented. The numerical model is based on a surface reaction mechanism consisting of 52 elementary-step like reactions with 14 surface and six gas-phase species. Reactions for the conversion of methane with oxygen, steam, and CO2 as well as methanation, water-gas shift reaction and carbon formation via Boudouard reaction are included. The mechanism is implemented in a one-dimensional flow field description of a fixed bed reactor. The model is evaluated by comparison of numerical simulations with data derived from isothermal experiments in a flow reactor over a powdered nickel-based catalyst using varying inlet gas compositions and operating temperatures. Furthermore, the influence of hydrogen and water as co-feed on methane dry reforming with CO2 is also investigated.

  12. Study on Coke Formation and Stability of Nickel-Based Catalysts in CO2 Reforming of CH4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎先财; 吴敏; 杨沂凤; 何琲

    2004-01-01

    CO2 reforming of CH4 over nickel-based catalysts was investigated by using a fixed-bed reactor. Catalytic activity and amount of carbon deposition effects by nickel loading content, rare earth promoter and promoter contents were evaluated. It is found that nickel loading as well as reaction temperature can influence the activity and carbon deposition amounts,and with the addition of rare earth promoter, it can greatly improve the catalytic activity and exert a strong effect on the anticoking performance of the catalysts. The 5.0%(mass fraction)Ni-0.75%La-BaTiO3 catalyst shows great resistance to coke formation and higher thermal stability as well as the catalytic activity.

  13. A model for life predictions of nickel-base superalloys in high-temperature low cycle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanoski, Glenn R.; Pelloux, Regis M.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1988-01-01

    Extensive characterization of low-cycle fatigue damage mechanisms was performed on polycrystalline Rene 80 and IN100 tested in the temperature range from 871 to 1000 C. Low-cycle fatigue life was found to be dominated by propagation of microcracks to a critical size governed by the maximum tensile stress. A model was developed which incorporates a threshold stress for crack extension, a stress-based crack growth expression, and a failure criterion. The mathematical equivalence between this mechanistically based model and the strain-life low-cycle fatigue law was demonstrated using cyclic stress-strain relationships. The model was shown to correlate the high-temperature low-cycle fatigue data of the different nickel-base superalloys considered in this study.

  14. Influences of processing parameters on microstructure during investment casting of nickel-base single crystal superalloy DD3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Sifeng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of solidification variables on the as-cast microstructures of nickel-base single crystal superalloy DD3 have been investigated by using the modified Bridgman apparatus. The experiments were performed under a thermal gradient of approximately 45 K·cm-1 and at withdrawal rates ranging from 30 to 200 m·s-1. The experimental results show that the primary and secondary dendritic arm spacings (PDAS and SDAS decrease when the withdrawal rate is increased. Compared with the theoretical models of PDAS, the results are in good agreement with Trivedi’s model. The relationships of PDAS and SDAS with withdrawal rates can be described as l1 = 649.7V -0.24±0.02 and l2 = 281V -0.32±0.03, respectively. In addition, the size of the γ′ phase significantly decreases with increasing withdrawal rate.

  15. Effect of solidification rate on competitive grain growth in directional solidification of a nickel-base superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU YiZhou; SUN XiaoFeng

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of grain structure evolution during directional solidification is a fundamental subject in material science.Within the published research there exist conflicting views on the mechanism of grain overgrowth.To study the effect of solidification rate on grain structure evolution,bi-crystals samples were produced in a nickel-base superalloy at different solidification rates.It was found that at the convergent grain boundaries those grains better aligned with respect to the heat flux more readily overgrew neighbouring grains with misaligned orientations and the effect became more pronounced as solidification rate was increased.However,at diverging grain boundaries the rate of overgrowth was invariant to the solidification rate.These experimental results were compared with models in the literature.Thus,a better insight into competitive grain growth in directional solidification processes was obtained.

  16. Effect of cooling rate on MC carbide in directionally solidified nickel-based superalloy under high thermal gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weiguo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of directional solidification experiments have been performed to study the effect of cooling rate on the precipitation behavior of MC carbide in nickel-based superalloy under the temperature gradient of 500 K·s-1. Results reveal that the morphology of MC carbide changes from coarse block to fine strip, then to Chinese-script, and their sizes reduce gradually with the increasing of cooling rate from 2.53 K·s-1 to 36.4 K·s-1. At low cooling rates, most of these carbides are found to be located at the grain boundary and interdendritic regions, while the coupled growth of some carbides and γ matrix in the center of γ grains is occurred at high cooling rate. The main elements forming MC carbide are Ta, W, and Hf.

  17. The Microstructure of RR1000 Nickel-Base Superalloy: The FIB-SEM Dual-Beam Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxall, S. A.; Hardy, M. C.; Stone, H. J.; Midgley, P. A.

    Nickel-base superalloys are aerospace materials that exhibit exceptional mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at very high temperatures. RR1000 is used in discs in gas turbine engines, where temperatures reach in excess of 650°C with high mechanical stresses. Study of the microstructure at the micron and sub-micron level has conventionally been undertaken using scanning electron microscope images, often meaning the underlying 3D microstructure can be inferred only with additional knowledge. Using a dual-beam workstation, we are able to interrogate directly the 3D microstructure using a serial sectioning approach. The 3D data set, typically (10µm)3 in volume, reveals microstructural detail with lateral resolution of circa 8nm and a depth resolution dictated by the slice thickness, typically 50nm. Morphological and volumetric analysis of the 3D reconstruction of RR1000 superalloy reveals microstructural details hitherto unseen.

  18. Effect of chromium on the corrosion resistance of aluminide coatings on nickel and nickel-based substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlewski, K.; Godlewska, E.

    1987-04-01

    The aluminide and Cr-Al diffusion coatings on nickel and the nickel-based alloy EI 867 obtained by a two-step pack cementation technique were subjected to various corrosion tests consisting of oxidation under thermal cycling conditions as well as isothermal oxidation in the presence of fused Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The presence of chromium in the surface layer of aluminide coatings had a beneficial effect on their resistance to oxidation in that the oxide layer formed was less prone to spallation. This type of coating microstructure also appeared to be advantageous with respect to hot corrosion since pitting, which is typical of the degradation of aluminide coatings, was not observed. It is postulated that the chromium-enriched zone acts as a barrier to the oxidation of refractory metals (molybdenum, tungsten and vanadium) present in somewhat deeper coating layers in the form of carbide or intermetallic phases, thus preventing the onset of catastrophic corrosion.

  19. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Nickel-base Superalloy Haynes 282 at 550-750 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozman, K. A.; Kruzic, J. J.; Hawk, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    The fatigue crack growth rates for nickel-based superalloy Haynes 282 were measured at temperatures of 550, 650, and 750 °C using compact tension specimens with a load ratio of 0.1 and cyclic loading frequencies of 25 Hz and 0.25 Hz. Increasing the temperature from 550 to 750 °C caused the fatigue crack growth rates to increase from ~20 to 60% depending upon the applied stress intensity level. The effect of reducing the applied loading frequency increased the fatigue crack growth rates from ~20 to 70%, also depending upon the applied stress intensity range. The crack path was observed to be transgranular for the temperatures and frequencies used during fatigue crack growth rate testing. At 750 °C, there were some indications of limited intergranular cracking excursions at both loading frequencies; however, the extent of intergranular crack growth was limited and the cause is not understood at this time.

  20. Changes of structure in nickel-based cast materials IN 100 and IN 713C after creep load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillhoefer, H.; Track, W.; Wege, R.

    1987-01-01

    Creep values of the nickel-based cast alloys IN 100 and IN 713C were determined at the Institute for Materials of the Darmstadt Technical College on behalf of the FVV Working Party on 'Long Term Creep' and these were evaluated with the aim of: Producing documentation of structural changes, documentation of changes of the ..gamma.. separation phase depending on temperature, stress and time. Clearing up the stress to which ..gamma.. separation particles remain stable; from this one can judge how sensible it is to produce a defined hardened structure in IN 100 by heat treatment. Formulating subjects and tasks for an FVV Research Project 'Creep equations'. (orig./IHOE).

  1. The Influence of Cobalt on the Microstructure of the Nickel-Base Superalloy MAR-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Maier, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1982-10-01

    The influence of cobalt on the microstructure of MAR-M247, a cast nickel-base superalloy, was investigated. Nickel was substituted for Co to produce 0, 5, and the standard 10 pct Co versions of MAR-M247. The microstructures of the alloys were examined using optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, phase extraction, and differential thermal analysis. Samples were examined in as-cast, heat treated, long-time aged, and stress-rupture tested conditions. As Co was removed from MAR-M247, the γ' volume fraction decreased, the mean γ' particle size increased, the W and Ti concentrations in the γ' increased, the Cr and Al concentrations in the γ phase decreased, and the amount of carbides increased. This increase in carbide precipitation caused a change from discrete grain boundary carbides to a grain boundary film as Co level decreased.

  2. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Two Nickel-Based Superalloys Produced by Metal Injection Molding for Aero Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Benedikt; Völkl, Rainer; Glatzel, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    For different high-temperature applications like aero engines or turbochargers, metal injection molding (MIM) of superalloys is an interesting processing alternative. For operation at high temperatures, oxidation behavior of superalloys produced by MIM needs to match the standard of cast or forged material. The oxidation behavior of nickel-based superalloys Inconel 713 and MAR-M247 in the temperature interval from 1073 K to 1373 K (800 °C to 1100 °C) is investigated and compared to cast material. Weight gain is measured discontinuously at different oxidation temperatures and times. Analysis of oxidized samples is done via SEM and EDX-measurements. MIM samples exhibit homogeneous oxide layers with a thickness up to 4 µm. After processing by MIM, Inconel 713 exhibits lower weight gain and thinner oxide layers than MAR-M247.

  3. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE NOTCH EFFECT ON THE CREEP BEHAVIOR AND LIFE OF NICKEL-BASE SINGLE CRYSTAL SUPERALLOYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Q.M. Yu; Z.F. Yue

    2004-01-01

    Numerical calculations of creep damage development and life behavior of circular notched specimens of nickel-base single crystal had been performed. The creep stress distributions depend on the specimen geometry. For a small notch radius, von Mises stress has an especial distribution. The damage distribution is greatly influenced by the notch depth, notch radius as well as notch type. The creep crack initiation place is different for each notched specimen. The characteristics of notch strengthening and notch weakening depend on the notch radius and notch type. For the same notch type,the creep rupture lives decrease with the decreasing of notch radius. A creep life model has been presented for the multiaxial stress states based on the crystallographic slip system theory.

  4. Effects of aging in high temperature helium environments on room temperature tensile properties of nickel-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daejong [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear Materials Technology Development Division, KAERI, 150 Deogjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Sah, Injin [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Changheui, E-mail: chjang@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Haynes 230 is susceptible to carburization, but Alloy 617 to decarburization and inter-granular oxidation. {yields} Decarburization of Nickel-base superalloys can be accelerated in impure helium with H{sub 2}. {yields} Aging heat treatment causes inter-granular fracture primarily along inter-granular oxide and grain boundary carbides, which results in the loss of ductility. {yields} Thin-plate specimen of Alloy 617 tends to favor failure by glide plane fracture when it is heavily decarburized. - Abstract: The influence of high temperature aging treatment on room temperature tensile properties of wrought nickel-base superalloys Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 was investigated. A significant decrease in elongation was observed for Alloy 617 exposed to a heavily oxidizing and decarburizing condition because of coarsening of grain boundary carbides and extensive inter-granular oxidation. On the other hand, Haynes 230 showed much lower ductility when exposed to a heavily carburizing condition, especially at 1000 deg. C because extensive carburization occurred due to a reaction with tungsten. Considerable loss of ductility for Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 was also observed in He-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CO-CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} and He-H{sub 2}O-CO-CO{sub 2} environments, which were the slightly oxidizing and decarburizing conditions. Loss of ductility was predominantly associated with brittle inter-granular cracking, while the extent of loss of ductility decreased depending on the decarburization depth. Decarburization was observed more extensively in helium with H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-CO-CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} than helium with H{sub 2}O-CO-CO{sub 2}, and for Alloy 617 than for Haynes 230. Finally, the role of H{sub 2} in accelerating decarburization is discussed.

  5. Comprehensive study of the abrasive wear and slurry erosion behavior of an expanded system of high chromium cast iron and microstructural modification for enhanced wear resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Reinaldo Javier

    High chromium cast irons (HCCIs) have been demonstrated to be an effective material for a wide range of applications in aggressive environments, where resistances to abrasion, erosion and erosion-corrosion are required. For instance, machinery and facilities used in mining and extraction in Alberta's oil sands suffer from erosion and erosion-corrosion caused by silica-containing slurries, which create challenges for the reliability and maintenance of slurry pumping systems as well as other processing and handling equipment. Considerable efforts have been made to determine and understand the relationship between microstructural features of the HCCIs and their wear performance, in order to guide the material selection and development for specific service conditions with optimal performance. The focus was previously put on a narrow group of compositions dictated by ASTM A532. However, with recent advances in casting technology, the HCCI compositional range can be significantly expanded, which potentially brings new alloys that can be superior to those which are currently employed. This work consists of three main aspects of study. The first one is the investigation of an expanded system of white irons with their composition ranging from 1 to 6 wt.% C and 5 to 45 wt.% Cr, covering 53 alloys. This work has generated wear and corrosion maps and established correlation between the performance and microstructural features for the alloys. The work was conducted in collaboration with the Materials Development Center of Weir Minerals in Australia, and the results have been collected in a database that is used by the company to guide materials selection for slurry pump components in Alberta oil sands and in other mining operations throughout the world. The second part consists of three case studies on effects of high chromium and high carbon, respectively, on the performance of the HCCIs. The third aspect is the development of an approach to enhance the wear resistance of

  6. Dissimilar Joining of ODS and F/M Steel Tube by Friction Stir Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Oxide Dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides Dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the Dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and

  7. Environmental effect of S02-bearing atmosphere on the creep fatigue failure of aluminide-coated MM-002 nickel-base superalloy at 870°C

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aghion, E

    1995-04-15

    Full Text Available High-temperature low-cycle fatigue (HTLCF) failure mechanisms of aluminide-coated MAR-M002 nickel-base superalloy in air, argon and Ar+5% SO2 atmospheres were investigated at 870°C. The loading conditions were constant and consisted of creep tension...

  8. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  9. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  10. Welding defects at friction stir welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Podržaj

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of different types of defects at friction stir welding. In order to explain the reasons for their occurrence a short theoretical background of the process is given first. The main emphasis is on the parameters that influence the process. An energy supply based division of defects into three disjoint groups was used. The occurring defects are demonstrated on various materials.

  11. A New Resource-Saving, High Chromium and Manganese Super Duplex Stainless Steels 29Cr-12Mn-2Ni-1Mo-xN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zheng-huan; ZHAO Xiang-juan; GE Chang-sheng; DING Tie-suo; LI Jun; XIAO Xue-shan

    2011-01-01

    A new family of resource saving, high chromium and manganese super duplex stainless steels (DSSs), with a composition in mass percent, % of Cr 0.29, Mn 0.12, Ni 2.0, Mo i. 0, and N 0. 51-0. 68, has been developed by examining the effect of N on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion properties. The results show that these alloys have a balanced ferrite-austenite relation. The austenite volume fraction decreases with the solution treatment temperature, but it increases with an increase in N content. The increases in nitrogen enhance the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and reduce the ductility of the material slightly. The pitting corrosion potential increases first and then decreases with an increase in nitrogen content when the amount of N arrives to 0.68%. The yield stress and ultimate tensile strength of solution treated samples were more than 680 and 900 MPa, the elongation of experimental alloys are higher than 30%, respectively, what is more, the pitting potentials were beyond 1 100 mV.

  12. Application of a water cooling treatment and its effect on coal-based reduction of high-chromium vanadium and titanium iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song-tao; Zhou, Mi; Jiang, Tao; Guan, Shan-fei; Zhang, Wei-jun; Xue, Xiang-xin

    2016-12-01

    A water cooling treatment was applied in the coal-based reduction of high-chromium vanadium and titanium (V-Ti-Cr) iron ore from the Hongge region of Panzhihua, China. Its effects on the metallization ratio ( η), S removal ratio ( R S), and P removal ratio ( R P) were studied and analyzed on the basis of chemical composition determined via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The metallic iron particle size and the element distribution of Fe, V, Cr, and Ti in a reduced briquette after water cooling treatment at 1350°C were determined and observed via scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the water cooling treatment improved the η, R S, and R P in the coal-based reduction of V-Ti-Cr iron ore compared to those obtained with a furnace cooling treatment. Meanwhile, the particle size of metallic iron obtained via the water cooling treatment was smaller than that of metallic iron obtained via the furnace cooling treatment; however, the particle size reached 70 μm at 1350°C, which is substantially larger than the minimum particle size required (20 μm) for magnetic separation. Therefore, the water cooling treatment described in this work is a good method for improving the quality of metallic iron in coal-based reduction and it could be applied in the coal-based reduction of V-Ti-Cr iron ore followed by magnetic separation.

  13. Microstructure And Erosion-Corrosion Behaviour Of As-Cast High Chromium White Irons Containing Molybdenum In Aqueous Sulfuric-Acid Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imurai S.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure and erosion-corrosion behaviour of as-cast high chromium white irons containing molybdenum in aqueous sulfuric-acid slurry was studied. The experimental irons contained 28 wt.%Cr with a Cr:C ratio of about 10 and up to 10 wt.%Mo. The irons with up to 6 wt.%Mo are hypoeutectic, whereas the iron with 10 wt.%Mo becomes eutectic/peritectic. Mo addition promotes formation of M23C6 and M6C, instead of typical M7C3. Erosion-corrosion testing was performed in aqueous sulfuric-acid slurry containing alumina particles. The hypoeutectic Fe-28Cr-2.7C-1Mo with mainly M7C3 and the eutectic/peritectic Fe-28Cr-2.6C-10Mo showed reduced wear rates of about 30% and 7% of that of the reference iron without Mo addition, respectively. The reduction of the carbide-matrix hardness difference, the increase of corrosion resistance of the matrices, and the increase of macro-hardness are determining factors for the improvement of erosion-corrosion resistance of the irons.

  14. Application of a water cooling treatment and its effect on coal-based reduction of high-chromium vanadium and titanium iron ore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song-tao Yang; Mi Zhou; Tao Jiang; Shan-fei Guan; Wei-jun Zhang; and Xiang-xin Xue

    2016-01-01

    A water cooling treatment was applied in the coal-based reduction of high-chromium vanadium and titanium (V–Ti–Cr) iron ore from the Hongge region of Panzhihua, China. Its effects on the metallization ratio (η), S removal ratio (RS), and P removal ratio (RP) were studied and analyzed on the basis of chemical composition determined via inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The metallic iron particle size and the element distribution of Fe, V, Cr, and Ti in a reduced briquette after water cooling treatment at 1350°C were determined and observed via scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the water cooling treatment improved theη,RS, and RP in the coal-based reduction of V–Ti–Cr iron ore compared to those obtained with a furnace cooling treatment. Meanwhile, the particle size of metallic iron obtained via the water cooling treatment was smaller than that of metallic iron obtained via the furnace cooling treatment; however, the particle size reached 70μm at 1350°C, which is substantially larger than the minimum particle size required (20μm) for mag-netic separation. Therefore, the water cooling treatment described in this work is a good method for improving the quality of metallic iron in coal-based reduction and it could be applied in the coal-based reduction of V–Ti–Cr iron ore followed by magnetic separation.

  15. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  16. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  17. ON INTELLIGENTIZED TECHNOLOGIES FOR MODERN WELDING MANUFACTURING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shanben; Qiu Tao; Lin Tao; Wu Yixiong

    2003-01-01

    A short survey on researching and developing status of intelligent technologies in modem welding manufacturing is given. According to the developing trend of advanced manufacturing technology, a concept on intelligentized welding manufacturing engineering (IWME), is presented for systematization of researching and developing domains on welding automation, intelligentized welding,robotic and flexible welding and advanced welding manufacturing technologies. And key technologies of welding intelligent manufacturing and its developing trend in the future are investigated.

  18. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  19. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  20. Weld pool image sensor for pulsed MIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Pengfei; Sun Zhenguo; Huang Cao; Chen Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Visual image sensor is developed to detect the weld pool images in pulsed MIG welding. An exposure controller, which is composed of the modules of the voltage transforming, the exposure parameters presetting, the complex programmable logic device (CPLD) based logic controlling, exposure signal processing, the arc state detecting, the mechanical iris driving and so on, is designed at first. Then, a visual image sensor consists of an ordinary CCD camera, optical system and exposure controller is established. The exposure synchronic control logic is described with very-high-speed integrated circuit hardware description language (VHDL) and programmed with CPLD, to detect weld pool images at the stage of base current in pulsed MIG welding. Finally, both bead on plate welding and V groove filled welding are carried out, clear and consistent weld pool images are acquired.

  1. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  2. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...

  3. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  4. Transient liquid phase bonding of titanium-, iron- and nickel-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A. H. M. Esfakur

    The operating temperature of land-based gas turbines and jet engines are ever-increasing to increase the efficiency, decrease the emissions and minimize the cost. Within the engines, complex-shaped parts experience extreme temperature, fatigue and corrosion conditions. Ti-based, Ni-based and Fe-based alloys are commonly used in gas turbines and jet engines depending on the temperatures of different sections. Although those alloys have superior mechanical, high temperature and corrosion properties, severe operating conditions cause fast degradation and failure of the components. Repair of these components could reduce lifecycle costs. Unfortunately, conventional fusion welding is not very attractive, because Ti reacts very easily with oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures, Ni-based superalloys show heat affected zone (HAZ) cracking, and stainless steels show intergranular corrosion and knife-line attack. On the other hand, transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding method has been considered as preferred joining method for those types of alloys. During the initial phase of the current work commercially pure Ti, Fe and Ni were diffusion bonded using commercially available interlayer materials. Commercially pure Ti (Ti-grade 2) has been diffusion bonded using silver and copper interlayers and without any interlayer. With a silver (Ag) interlayer, different intermetallics (AgTi, AgTi2) appeared in the joint centerline microstructure. While with a Cu interlayer eutectic mixtures and Ti-Cu solid solutions appeared in the joint centerline. The maximum tensile strengths achieved were 160 MPa, 502 MPa, and 382 MPa when Ag, Cu and no interlayers were used, respectively. Commercially pure Fe (cp-Fe) was diffusion bonded using Cu (25 m) and Au-12Ge eutectic interlayer (100 microm). Cu diffused predominantly along austenite grain boundaries in all bonding conditions. Residual interlayers appeared at lower bonding temperature and time, however, voids were observed in the joint

  5. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  6. Milestones in welding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolby, Richard E.

    2013-09-01

    Sir Alan's PhD thesis describes his research into cracking during arc welding of armour steels. Throughout his career, he had a strong interest in defects of all types, how they formed in metallic structures and how the larger ones could be detected and sized by non-destructive techniques. He was also vitally concerned with how defects impacted on the engineering integrity of welded structures, particularly the risk of fracture in nuclear plant. This study presents a view of some of the major milestones in global welding technology that took place over the 60 or more years of Sir Alan's career and highlights those where he had a personal and direct involvement.

  7. Recent Corrosion Research Trends in Weld Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwan Tae; Kil, Sang Cheol [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Woon Suk [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The increasing interest in the corrosion properties of weld joints in the corrosive environment is placing stringent demands on the manufacturing techniques and performance requirements, and the manufacture employs the high quality and efficiency welding process to produce welds. Welding plays an important role in the fabrication of chemical plants, nuclear power plant, ship construction, and this has led to an increasing attention to the corrosion resistant weld joints. This paper covers recent technical trends of welding technologies for corrosion resistance properties including the COMPENDEX DB analysis of welding materials, welding process, and welding fabrications

  8. Effects of welding wire composition and welding process on the weld metal toughness of submerged arc welded pipeline steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-liang Ren; Fu-ren Xiao; Peng Tian; Xu Wang; Bo Liao

    2009-01-01

    The effects of alloying elements in welding wires and submerged arc welding process on the microstructures and low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals have been investigated.The results indicate that the optimal contents of alloying elements in welding wires can improve the low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals because the proentectoid ferrite and bainite formations can be suppressed,and the fraction of acicular ferrite increases.However,the contents of alloying elements need to vary along with the welding heat input.With the increase in welding heat input,the contents of alloying elements in welding wires need to be increased accordingly.The microstructures mainly consisting of acicular ferrite can be obtained in weld metals after four-wire submerged arc welding using the wires with a low carbon content and appropriate contents of Mn,Mo,Ti-B,Cu,Ni,and RE,resulting in the high low-temperature impact toughness of weld metals.

  9. Weld penetration and defect control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, B.A.

    1992-05-15

    Highly engineered designs increasingly require the use of improved materials and sophisticated manufacturing techniques. To obtain optimal performance from these engineered products, improved weld properties and joint reliability are a necessarily. This requirement for improved weld performance and reliability has led to the development of high-performance welding systems in which pre-programmed parameters are specified before any welding takes place. These automated systems however lack the ability to compensate for perturbations which arise during the welding process. Hence the need for systems which monitor and control the in-process status of the welding process. This report discusses work carried out on weld penetration indicators and the feasibility of using these indicators for on-line penetration control.

  10. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F; Ostendorf, A; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as

  11. Infrared-Controlled Welding of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, R.; Finnell, S. E.; Decker, H. J.; Hodor, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed apparatus for welding large arrays of solar cells to flexible circuit substrates would sense infrared emission from welding spot. Emission would provide feedback for control of welding heat. Welding platform containing optical fibers moves upward through slots in movable holding fixture to contact solar cells. Fibers pick up infrared radiation from weld area.

  12. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, Dimitrios; Aarts, Ronald; Meijer, Johan

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  13. Effect of Calcium Oxide on the Crushing Strength, Reduction, and Smelting Performance of High-Chromium Vanadium–Titanium Magnetite Pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongjin Cheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of calcium oxide on the crushing strength, reduction, and smelting performance of high-chromium vanadium–titanium magnetite pellets (HCVTMP was studied in this work. The main characterization methods of an electronic universal testing machine (EUTM, X-ray fluorescent (XRF, inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscope-energy disperse spectroscopy (SEM-EDS were employed. The crushing strength was affected by the mineral phases generated during oxidative baking and the subsequently-formed pellet microstructures owing to CaO addition. The reduction and smelting properties of HCVTMP with different CaO additives were measured and characterized with different softening-melting-dripping indices. Although HCVTMP showed the highest crushing strength with CaO addition of ca. 2 wt %, more CaO addition may be needed to achieve high permeability of the furnace burdens and a good separation condition of the slag and melted iron. In the formation process of the slag and melted iron, it can be determined that CaO could have a relationship with the transformation behavior of Cr, V, and Ti to some extent, with respect to the predominant chemical composition analysis of ICP-AES and XRF. With the microscopic examination, the restraining formation of Ti(C,N and the promoting formation of CaTiO3 are in accordance with the improved melting-dripping indices, including the decrease of the maximum external static load and gas permeability, and the increase of the melting-dripping zone and dripping difficulty.

  14. Repair welding process of friction stir welding groove defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui-jie; ZHANG Hui-jie

    2009-01-01

    The groove defect formed in the friction stir welding dramatically deteriorates weld appearances and mechanical properties of the joints owing to its larger size and penetration. Therefore, the friction stir repair welding was utilized to remove such a groove defect, and the focus was placed on the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the repair joints so as to obtain an optimum repair welding process. The experimental results indicate that the groove defect can be removed by friction stir repair welding, and the offset repair welding process is superior to the symmetrical repair welding process. In the symmetrical repair welding process, a large number of fine cavity defects and an obvious aggregation of hard-brittle phase Al2Cu occur, accordingly the mechanical properties of the repair joint are weakened, and the fracture feature of repair joint is partially brittle and partially plastic. A good-quality repair joint can be obtained by the offset repair welding process, and the repair joint is fractured near the interface between the weld nugget zone and thermal-mechanically affected zone.

  15. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  16. Effect of weld microstructure on weld properties in A-TIG welding of titanium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘凤尧; 杨春利; 林三宝; 吴林; 苏生

    2003-01-01

    Conventional TIG welding is known as its low productivity and limited weld depth in a single pass. Activating TIG welding (A-TIG) can greatly improve the penetration when compared with the conventional TIG welding. The effects of five kinds of activating fluxes with single component (NaF, CaF2, AlF3, NaCl or CaCl2) on penetration, microstructure and weld mechanical properties during the TIG welding of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V were studied. Compared with the conventional TIG welding, the experimental results show that the fluxes can greatly improve the penetration at the same welding specifications. This is because of the constriction of anode spots and the change of surface tension grads. Among them the effect of flux NaF is the best in the weld tensile strength, and the effect of flux CaF2 on the weld bend intension is the best. The appearance of inferior crystal grains and the structure of trident crystal grains are the main reasons that the performance of weld with fluoride is improved. These experimental results can be used as an aid for selecting suitable activating flux for titanium alloy.

  17. Development of Temper Bead Welding Process for Weld Overlay of Dissimilar Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byeon, J. G.; Park, K. S.; Kim, Y. J. [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    In recent years, the dissimilar weld metal used to connect stainless steel piping and low alloy steel or carbon steel components have experienced cracking in nuclear reactor piping systems. The cracking has been observed in several Pressurized Water Reactors in overseas. In Several cases, the cracking was repaired using structural weld overlays, a repair technique that has been in use in the U.S. in Boiling Water Reactors for over twenty years. Although weld overlays have been used primarily as a repair for flawed piping, they can also be applied at locations that have not yet exhibited any cracking, but are considered susceptible to cracking. The purpose of this research is to develop the temper bead weld process for the weld overlay of the dissimilar weld pipe. We developed equipment for the overlay system, applied Procedure Qualification(PQ) for the temper bead welding process.

  18. High-Temperature Deformation Constitutive Law for Dissimilar Weld Residual Stress Modeling: Effect of Thermal Load on Strain Hardening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Crooker, Paul [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Weld residual stress is one of the primary driving forces for primary water stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metal welds (DMWs). To mitigate tensile residual stress in DMWs, it is critical to understand residual stress distribution by modeling techniques. Recent studies have shown that weld residual stress prediction using today s DMW residual stress models strongly depends on the strain-hardening constitutive model chosen. The commonly used strain-hardening models (isotropic, kinematic, and mixed) are all time-independent and inadequate to account for the time-dependent (viscous) plastic deformation at the elevated temperatures experienced during welding. For materials with profound strain-hardening, such as stainless steels and nickel-based alloys that are widely used in nuclear reactor and piping systems, the equivalent plastic strain the determinate factor of the flow stress can be highly dependent on the recovery and recrystallization processes. These processes are in turn a strong function of temperature, time, and deformation rate. Recently, the authors proposed a new temperature- and time-dependent strain-hardening constitutive model: the dynamic strain-hardening constitutive model. The application of such a model has resulted in improved weld residual stress prediction compared to the residual stress measurement results from the contour and deep-hole drilling methods. In this study, the dynamic strain-hardening behavior of Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 82 used in pressure vessel nozzle DMWs is experimentally determined. The kinetics of the recovery and recrystallization of flow stress are derived from experiments, resulting in a semi-empirical equation as a function of pre-strain, time, and temperature that can be used for weld residual stress modeling. The method used in this work also provides an approach to study the kinetics of recovery and recrystallization of other materials with significant strain-hardening.

  19. Strain Amount Dependent Grain Size and Orientation Developments during Hot Compression of a Polycrystalline Nickel Based Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoai He

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Controlling grain size in polycrystalline nickel base superalloy is vital for obtaining required mechanical properties. Typically, a uniform and fine grain size is required throughout forging process to realize the superplastic deformation. Strain amount occupied a dominant position in manipulating the dynamic recrystallization (DRX process and regulating the grain size of the alloy during hot forging. In this article, the high-throughput double cone specimen was introduced to yield wide-range strain in a single sample. Continuous variations of effective strain ranging from 0.23 to 1.65 across the whole sample were achieved after reaching a height reduction of 70%. Grain size is measured to be decreased from the edge to the center of specimen with increase of effective strain. Small misorientation tended to generate near the grain boundaries, which was manifested as piled-up dislocation in micromechanics. After the dislocation density reached a critical value, DRX progress would be initiated at higher deformation region, leading to the refinement of grain size. During this process, the transformations from low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs to high angle grain boundaries (HAGBs and from subgrains to DRX grains are found to occur. After the accomplishment of DRX progress, the neonatal grains are presented as having similar orientation inside the grain boundary.

  20. Modelling of phase distributions in MCrAlY coatings and their interactions with nickel based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achar, D.R.G.; Munaz-Arroyo, R.; Singheiser, L.; Quadakkers, W.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute for Materials and Processes in Energy Systems (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    In recent years gas turbine manufacturers are demanding higher operating temperatures for achieving improved efficiency. At high operating temperatures the oxidation resistant MCrAlY (M=Ni, Co) coatings and the substrate alloys are highly susceptible to phase changes, particularly, after long hours of exposure. With the advent of computational modelling involving metallurgical thermodynamics and diffusion parameters in recent times, it is now possible to follow these phase changes and interdiffusion processes through simulation. In the present work, phase changes in the temperature range between 950 and 1050 Celsius degrees in the MCrAlY coating materials containing additions of Cobalt and Rhenium have been determined through such an approach. Furthermore, using a diffusion simulation software interdiffusion between a commercial NiCoCrAlY coating and a Nickel-base super-alloy substrate material at 1000 C has been simulated. The simulated results have been compared with the experimental findings and they are found to be in reasonable agreement with each other. Some deviations observed are discussed in the light of limited availability of thermodynamic and kinetic data. (authors)

  1. Performance study of direct borohydride fuel cells employing polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel membrane and nickel-based anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Choudhury, N.A.; Sahai, Y.; Buchheit, R.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    A direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) employing a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel membrane and a nickel-based composite anode is reported. Carbon-supported platinum and sputtered gold have been employed as cathode catalysts. Oxygen, air and acidified hydrogen peroxide have been used as oxidants in the DBFC. Performance of the PVA hydrogel membrane-based DBFC was tested at different temperatures and compared with similar DBFCs employing Nafion registered membrane electrolytes under identical conditions. The borohydride-oxygen fuel cell employing PVA hydrogel membrane yielded a maximum peak power density of 242 mW cm{sup -2} at 60 C. The peak power densities of the PVA hydrogel membrane-based DBFCs were comparable or a little higher than those using Nafion registered 212 membranes at 60 C. The fuel efficiency of borohydride-oxygen fuel cell based on PVA hydrogel membrane and Ni-based composite anode was found to be between 32 and 41%. The cell was operated for more than 100 h and its performance stability was recorded. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Hot corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxyfuel sprayed coatings on a nickel-base superalloy in molten salt environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, T. S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    No alloy is immune to hot corrosion attack indefinitely. Coatings can extend the lives of substrate materials used at higher temperatures in corrosive environments by forming protective oxides layers that are reasonably effective for long-term applications. This article is concerned with studying the performance of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-NiCr, Ni-20Cr, and Stellite-6 coatings on a nickel-base superalloy at 900 °C in the molten salt (Na2SO4-60% V2O5) environment under cyclic oxidation conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of corrosion. Optical microscope, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings and corrosion products. The bare superalloy suffered somewhat accelerated corrosion in the given environmental conditions. whereas hot corrosion resistance of all the coated superalloys was found to be better. Among the coating studied, Ni-20Cr coated superalloy imparted maximum hot corrosion resistance, whereas Stellite-6 coated indicated minimum resistance. The hot corrosion resistance of all the coatings may be attributed to the formation of oxides and spinels of nickel, chromium, or cobalt.

  3. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  4. Interrogation of the microstructure and residual stress of a nickel-base alloy subjected to surface severe plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, A.L. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Energetica y de los Materiales, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Tian, J.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Villegas, J.C. [Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ (United States); Shaw, L.L. [Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)], E-mail: Leon.Shaw@Uconn.Edu; Liaw, P.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2008-02-15

    A low stacking-fault energy nickel-base, single-phase, face-centered-cubic (fcc) alloy has been subjected to surface severe plastic deformation (S{sup 2}PD) to introduce nano-grains and grain size gradients to the surface region of the alloy. The simultaneous microstructural and stress state changes induced by S{sup 2}PD have been investigated via the X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis that includes evaluation of annealing and deformation twins, deformation faults, in-plane lattice parameters and elastic strains of the crystal lattice, macroscopic residual in-plane stresses, crystallite sizes, internal strains, dislocation densities, and crystallographic texture as a function of the depth measured from the processed surface. Microstructural changes have also been characterized using optical and electron microscopy in order to corroborate the findings from the XRD analysis. The results from the XRD analysis are in excellent agreement with those derived from the microscopy analysis. This is the first systematic and comprehensive study using XRD to quantify depth-profile changes in a wide range of microstructural features and stress states in a fcc material resulting from the S{sup 2}PD process.

  5. Characterization of complex (B + C) diffusion layers formed on chromium and nickel-based low-carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertek, A.; Kulka, M

    2002-12-30

    Combined surface hardening with boron and carbon was used for low-carbon chromium and nickel-based steels. The microstructure, boron contents, carbon profiles and chosen properties of borided layers produced on the carburized steels have been examined. These complex (B+C) layers are termed borburized layers. The microhardness profiles and wear resistance of these layers have been studied. In the microstructure of the borocarburized layer two zones have been observed: iron borides (FeB+Fe{sub 2}B) and a carburized layer. The depth (70-125 {mu}m) and microhardness (1500-1800 HV) of iron borides zone have been found. The carbon content (1.2-1.94 wt.%) and microhardness (700-950 HV) beneath iron borides zone have been determined. The microhardness gradient in borocarburized layer has been reduced in comparison with the only borided layer. An increase of distance from the surface is accompanied by a decrease of carbon content and microhardness in the carburized zone. The carbon and microhardness profiles of borided, carburized and borocarburized layers have been presented. A positive influence of complex layers (B+C) on the wear resistance was determined. The wear resistance of the borocarburized layer was determined to be greater in comparison with that for only borided or only carburized layers.

  6. Effect of B, Zr, and C on Hot Tearing of a Directionally Solidified Nickel-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzki, J.; Hartmann, N.; Rettig, R.; Affeldt, E.; Singer, R. F.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of the minor elements B, Zr, and C on the castability of a Nickel-based γ'-strengthened superalloy has been investigated. Tube-like specimens were prepared by directional solidification where the rigid ceramic core leads to hoop stresses and grain boundary cracking. It was found that an important improvement in castability can be achieved by adjusting the minor elemental composition. Too low C (≤0.15 pct) and too high B and Zr contents (≥0.05 pct) lead to material that is very prone to solidification cracking and should be avoided. The results cannot be rationalized on the basis of the current models for solidification cracking. Instead, pronounced hot tearing is observed to occur at high amounts of γ/ γ'-eutectic and high Zr contents. The critical film stage where dendrites at the end of solidification do not touch and are separated by thin liquid films must be avoided. How Zr promotes the film stage will be discussed in the paper.

  7. Effect of Notches on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of a P/M Nickel-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesman, Jack; Gabb, Timothy P.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Gayda, John, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A study was performed to determine and model the effect of high temperature dwells on notched low cycle fatigue (NLCF) and notch stress rupture behavior of a fine grain LSHR powder metallurgy (PM) nickel-based superalloy. It was shown that a 90 second dwell applied at the minimum stress (min dwell) was considerably more detrimental to the NLCF lives than similar dwell applied at the maximum stress (max dwell). The short min dwell NLCF lives were shown to be caused by growth of small oxide blisters which caused preferential cracking when coupled with high concentrated notch root stresses. The cyclic max dwell notch tests failed mostly by a creep accumulation, not by fatigue, with the crack origin shifting internally to a substantial distance away from the notch root. The classical von Mises plastic flow model was unable to match the experimental results while the hydrostatic stress profile generated using the Drucker-Prager plasticity flow model was consistent with the experimental findings. The max dwell NLCF and notch stress rupture tests exhibited substantial creep notch strengthening. The triaxial Bridgman effective stress parameter was able to account for the notch strengthening by collapsing the notched and uniform gage geometry test data into a singular grouping.

  8. The potential link between high angle grain boundary morphology and grain boundary deformation in a nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Jennifer L.W., E-mail: jennifer.w.carter@case.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 44321 (United States); Sosa, John M. [Center for Accelerated Maturation of Materials, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 44321 (United States); Shade, Paul A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials & Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL/RXCM, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Fraser, Hamish L. [Center for Accelerated Maturation of Materials, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 44321 (United States); Uchic, Michael D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials & Manufacturing Directorate, AFRL/RXCM, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Mills, Michael J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 44321 (United States)

    2015-07-29

    Focused ion beam (FIB) based serial sectioning was utilized to characterize the morphology of two high angle grain boundaries (HAGB) in a nickel based superalloy, one that experienced grain boundary sliding (GBS) and the other experienced strain accumulation, during elevated temperature constant stress loading conditions. A custom script was utilized to serial section and collect ion-induced secondary electron images from the FIB-SEM system. The MATLAB based MIPAR{sup TM} software was utilized to align, segment and reconstruct 3D volumes from the sectioned images. Analysis of the 3D data indicates that the HAGB that exhibited GBS had microscale curvature that was planar in nature, and local serrations on the order of ±150 nm. In contrast, the HAGB that exhibited strain accumulation was not planar and had local serrations an order of magnitude greater than the other grain boundary. It is hypothesized that the serrations and the local grain boundary network are key factors in determining which grain boundaries experience GBS during creep deformation.

  9. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2016-12-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  10. Influence of orientation and temperature on the fatigue crack growth of a nickel-based directionally solidified superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaohua [AML, School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Yangyang [Beijing Institute of Space Launch Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); Shi, Huiji, E-mail: shihj@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [AML, School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gu, Jialin [Department of Material Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Changpeng [Corporate Technology, Siemens Ltd. (China); Kadau, Kai [Siemens Energy Inc., Charlotte (United States); Luesebrink, Oliver [Siemens Power Generation, Mulheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2014-11-17

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) behaviors of a widely used nickel-based directionally solidified (DS) superalloy have been investigated. Standard compact tension (CT) specimens in longitudinal, transverse and diagonal directions are cast and tested at 25 °C, 600 °C and 850 °C to reveal the orientation and temperature dependence. The post-test fractography is observed through scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope (OM) to understand the underlying mechanism responsible for the fracture modes. Results indicate that cracks in all three orientations exhibit a similar propagating behavior, while the temperature shows a significant effect on the crack propagation regardless of the influence of orientation. It has been found that a higher temperature leads to a faster propagation rate in the initial stage due to the cyclic softening response of materials. However, the FCG rates of specimens at lower temperature speed up more rapidly and exceed those at higher temperature in the following stage. This is attributed to the crack closure effect induced by the oxidation at a much higher temperature. Therefore, a new model based on thermal activation is proposed to get a better ability for the FCG rate prediction of the DS superalloy under different temperatures.

  11. Mathematical modeling and analysis of WEDM machining parameters of nickel-based super alloy using response surface methodology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P GARG; ANISH KUMAR; C K SAHU

    2017-06-01

    Inconel 625 is one of the most versatile nickel-based super alloy used in the aerospace, automobile, chemical processing, oil refining, marine, waste treatment, pulp and paper, and power industries. Wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM) is the process considered in the present text for machining of Inconel 625 as it can provide an effective solution for machining ultra-hard, high-strength and temperature-resistant materials and alloys, overcoming the constraints of the conventional processes. The present work is mainly focused on the analysis and optimization of the WEDM process parameters of Inconel 625. The four machining parameters, that is, pulse on time, pulse off time, spark gap voltage and wire feed have been varied to investigate their effects onthree output responses, such as cutting speed, gap current, and surface roughness. Response surface methodology was used to develop the experimental models. The parametric analysis-based results revealed that pulse on time and pulse off time were significant, spark gap voltage is the least significant, and wire feed as a single factor is insignificant. Multi-objective optimization technique was employed using desirability approach to obtain theoptimal parameters setting. Furthermore, surface topography in terms of machining parameters revealed that pulse on time and pulse off time significantly deteriorate the surface of the machined samples, which produce thedeeper, wider overlapping craters and globules of debris.

  12. PREPARATION OF MICROWAVE ABSORBING NICKEL-BASED ACTIVATED CARBON BY ELECTROLESS PLATING WITH PALLADIUM-FREE ACTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyang Jia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Nickel-based activated carbon was prepared from coconut shell activated carbon by electroless plating with palladium-free activation. The materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM, and vector network analyzer, respectively. The results show that the surface of the activated carbon was covered by a Ni-P coating, which was uniform, compact, and continuous and had an obvious metallic sheen. The content of P and Ni was 2.73% and 97.27% in the coating. Compared with the untreated activated carbon, the real permeability μ′ and imaginary permeability μ″ of Ni-based activated carbon became greater, whereas the real permittivity ε′ and imaginary permittivity ε″ became smaller. Also, the plated activated carbon was magnetic, making it suitable for some special applications. In general, the method reported here might be a feasible procedure to coat activated carbon with other magnetic metals, which may find application in various areas.

  13. Interfacial Dislocation Networks and Creep in Directional Coarsened Ru-Containing Nickel-Base Single-Crystal Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, L. J.; Feng, Q.; Pollock, T. M.

    2008-06-01

    Mechanisms of creep deformation in nickel-base superalloy single crystals in the directional coarsening regime have been studied in alloys with large variations in γ- γ' lattice misfit and phase composition, achieved by Ru additions and variable levels of Cr and Co. Interfacial dislocation spacings established by long-term annealing experiments under no externally applied stress indicate that the experimental alloys have high-temperature lattice misfits ranging from near-zero to as large as -0.65 pct. Variation in misfit influences the stress-induced directional coarsening (rafting) behavior during creep deformation at 950 °C and 290 MPa. In postcreep deformed material, the density of excess dislocations (defined as the dislocations beyond those necessary to relieve the lattice misfit) at the γ- γ' interfaces varied with alloy composition, with the most creep-resistant alloy containing the highest excess interfacial dislocation density. In the directional coarsening creep regime, continued deformation requires shearing of the γ' rafts and is strongly influenced by the resistance of the precipitates to shearing as well as the interfacial dislocation structure. A preliminary model for creep in the rafting regime is developed.

  14. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-10-01

    The influence of composition on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys was investigated. Co was replaced by Ni, and Ta was replaced by either Ni or W, according to a matrix of compositions based on MAR-M247. Substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in γ' solvus temperature, an increase in γ-γ' lattice mismatch, and the precipitation of W-rich phases in the alloys with high refractory metal levels. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large decreases in γ' solvus temperature, γ' volume fraction, and γ-γ' lattice mismatch, whereas substitution of W for Ta resulted in smaller decreases in these features. For the alloys with γ' particles that remained coherent, substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in γ' coarsening rate. The two alloys with the largest magnitude of lattice mismatch possessed γ' particles which lost coherency during unstressed aging and exhibited anomalously low coarsening rates. Creep exposure at 1000 °C resulted in the formation of γ' lamellae oriented perpendicular to the applied stress axis in all alloys.

  15. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the elevated temperature mechanical properties of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-10-01

    The influence of composition on the tensile and creep strength of [001] oriented nickel-base superalloy single crystals at temperatures near 1000 °C was investigated. Cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten concentrations were varied according to a matrix of compositions based on the single crystal version of MAR-M247.* For alloys with the baseline refractory metal level of 3 wt pct Ta and 10 wt pct W, decreases in Co level from 10 to 0 wt pct resulted in increased tensile and creep strength. Substitution of 2 wt pct W for 3 wt pct Ta resulted in decreased creep life at high stresses, but improved life at low stresses. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large reductions in tensile strength and creep resistance, and corresponding increases in ductility. For these alloys with low Ta plus W totals, strength was independent of Co level. The effects of composition on properties were related to the microstructural features of the alloys. In general, high creep strength was associated with high levels of γ' volume fraction, γ-γ' lattice mismatch, and solid solution hardening.

  16. Multi-objective constrained design of nickel-base superalloys using data mining- and thermodynamics-driven genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menou, Edern; Ramstein, Gérard; Bertrand, Emmanuel; Tancret, Franck

    2016-06-01

    A new computational framework for systematic and optimal alloy design is introduced. It is based on a multi-objective genetic algorithm which allows (i) the screening of vast compositional ranges and (ii) the optimisation of the performance of novel alloys. Alloys performance is evaluated on the basis of their predicted constitutional and thermomechanical properties. To this end, the CALPHAD method is used for assessing equilibrium characteristics (such as constitution, stability or processability) while Gaussian processes provide an estimate of thermomechanical properties (such as tensile strength or creep resistance), based on a multi-variable non-linear regression of existing data. These three independently well-assessed tools were unified within a single C++ routine. The method was applied to the design of affordable nickel-base superalloys for service in power plants, providing numerous candidates with superior expected microstructural stability and strength. An overview of the metallurgy of optimised alloys, as well as two detailed examples of optimal alloys, suggest that improvements over current commercial alloys are achievable at lower costs.

  17. Fusion Welding Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-30

    of deep surface depresion due to vortex formation is being studied through a mathematical model. I Welding direction (a)e S (b) Figure 27: Schematic...each weldment. Specimens were cleaned in acetone and alcohol to remove grease and * dirt. They were finally cleaned ultrasonically in a detergent

  18. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  19. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  20. Analysis of thermoelectric properties of high-temperature complex alloys of nickel-base, iron-base and cobalt-base groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1984-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties alloys of the nickel-base, iron-base, and cobalt-base groups containing from 1% to 25% 106 chromium were compared and correlated with the following material characteristics: atomic percent of the principle alloy constituent; ratio of concentration of two constituents; alloy physical property (electrical resistivity); alloy phase structure (percent precipitate or percent hardener content); alloy electronic structure (electron concentration). For solid-solution-type alloys the most consistent correlation was obtained with electron concentration, for precipitation-hardenable alloys of the nickel-base superalloy group, the thermoelectric potential correlated with hardener content in the alloy structure. For solid-solution-type alloys, no problems were found with thermoelectric stability to 1000; for precipitation-hardenable alloys, thermoelectric stability was dependent on phase stability. The effects of the compositional range of alloy constituents on temperature measurement uncertainty are discussed.

  1. Nickel Base Alloy Strip Electroslag Cladding of Nuclear Power Equipment%核电设备中的镍基合金带极电渣堆焊

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李双燕

    2011-01-01

    以Inconel 690镍基合金堆焊为例,简述了堆焊工艺评定、模拟件试验和产品应用,结果表明:带极电渣堆焊可用于压水堆核电站核岛主设备蒸汽发生器管板大面积镍基合金堆焊.%Taking Inconel 690 nickel base alloy strip cladding for example,the cladding procedure qualification test, mock ?up test and product application were briefly described. Test results indicate that strip electroslag cladding technology can apply to large area nickel base alloy cladding on tube - sheet of steam generators for pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant nuclear island main equipment.

  2. SHADOW: a new welding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Thorsten; Olowinsky, Alexander M.; Durand, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    The new welding technique 'SHADOW ' is introduced. SHADOW means the use of a single pulse to generate a quasi continuous weld of several millimeters in length. HET processing time is defined by the pulse duration of the pulsed laser. At present, a state-of-the-art laser is capable of a maximum pulse duration of 20 ms. The variation of the laser power depend on time is a vital capability of the pulsed laser to adapt the energy deposition into the workpiece. Laser beam welds of several watch components were successfully performed. Similar metals like crowns and axes made out of stainless steel have been welded using pulsed laser radiation. Applying a series of about 130 single pulses for the crown-axis combination the total energy accumulates to 19.5 J. The use of the SHADOW welding technique reduces the energy to 2.5 J. While welding dissimilar metals like stainless steel and bras, the SHADOW welding reduces drastically the contamination as well as the distortion. Laser beam welding of copper has a low process reliability due to the high reflection and the high thermal conductivity. SHADOW welds of 3.6 mm length were performed on 250 micrometers thick copper plates with very high reproducibility. As a result, a pilot plant for laser beam welding of copper plates has been set up. The work to be presented has partly been funded by the European Commission in a project under the contract BRPR-CT-0634.

  3. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  4. Small-scale explosive welding of aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Welding technique uses very small quantities of explosive ribbon to accomplish small-scale lap-welding of aluminum plates. Technique can perform small controlled welding with no length limitations and requires minimal protective shielding.

  5. Resistivity-Microstructure Relationships in Nickel Base Superalloys Used in Gas Turbine Engines for Power Generation and as Interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, Rosario A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-02-20

    This report summarizes the results accomplished during this 3-year with funds from this grant. The most important new contribution was the development of a microstructural model, based on analysis of the small angle scattering spectra that can relate the measured electrical resistivity to the precipitate population present in a nickel base superalloy in a quantitative way. A total of 24 research articles were published or were in press at the time the final report was written.

  6. PARTIAL OXIDATION OF ETHANE TO SYNGAS OVER NICKEL-BASED CATALYSTS%Ni基催化剂上的乙烷部分氧化制合成气

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘盛林; 熊国兴; 盛世善; 杨维慎; 徐龙伢

    1999-01-01

    @@ There is abundant supply of light alkanes and relatively few routes of converting them to more valuable products. Although CH4 predominates in natural gas, it also contains C2H6, C3H8 and C4H10 (from 5 % to 30% ), and with C2H6 as the most abundant secondary component[1]. Partial oxidation of methane to syngas (CH4 +0.5O2 →CO + 2H2) over nickel-based catalysts has received intensive attention[2]and much research has been devoted to conversion of ethane to ethylene[3]. Ethylene has been shown to be formed from ethane by thermal dehydrogenation (C2H6 →C2H4 + H2) and oxidative dehydrogenation (C2H6 + 0. 5O2 →C2H4 + H2O). These processes are operated under severely fuel-rich conditions. The carbon-deposition and consequent deactivation of the catalysts are major problems, which leads to poor conversion of the above mentioned reactions. As an alternative strategy for the elaboration of ethane, little work on the partial oxidation of ethane (POE) to syngas over nickel-based catalysts has been reported. Provided it could be produced from C2H6with high selectivity and high conversion over nickel-based catalysts, syngas could be directly obtained from natural gas including CH4 and C2H6 with high selectivity and conversion. This may lead to better utilization of the light fractions from natural gas and refineries. In the present paper, POE to syngas over nickel-based catalysts was investigated.

  7. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    induced residual stresses. It is also investigated whether the assumption of residual stresses up to yield strength magnitude are present in welded structures as stated in the design guidelines. The fatigue strength for welded joints is based on this assumption. The two welding methods investigated...... are hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) and submerged arc welding (SAW). Both welding methods are applied for a full penetration butt-weld of 10 mm thick plates made of thermomechanically hot-rolled, low-carbon, fine-grain S355ML grade steel used in offshore steel structures. The welding residual stress state...

  8. Dynamics of space welding impact and corresponding safety welding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragomeni, James M; Nunes, Arthur C

    2004-03-01

    This study was undertaken in order to be sure that no hazard would exist from impingement of hot molten metal particle detachments upon an astronauts space suit during any future electron beam welding exercises or experiments. The conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment were analyzed. The safety issue is important during welding with regards to potential molten metal detachments from the weld pool and cold filler wire during electron beam welding in space. Theoretical models were developed to predict the possibility and size of the molten metal detachment hazards during the electron beam welding exercises at low earth orbit. Some possible ways of obtaining molten metal drop detachments would include an impulse force, or bump, to the weld sample, cut surface, or filler wire. Theoretical models were determined for these detachment concerns from principles of impact and kinetic energies, surface tension, drop geometry, surface energies, and particle dynamics. A weld pool detachment parameter for specifying the conditions for metal weld pool detachment by impact was derived and correlated to the experimental results. The experimental results were for the most part consistent with the theoretical analysis and predictions.

  9. Environmentally-assisted cracking behaviour in the transition region of an Alloy182/SA 508 Cl.2 dissimilar metal weld joint in simulated boiling water reactor normal water chemistry environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, H. P.; Ritter, S.; Shoji, T.; Peng, Q. J.; Takeda, Y.; Lu, Z. P.

    2008-08-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion fatigue behaviour perpendicular and parallel to the fusion line in the transition region between the Alloy 182 Nickel-base weld metal and the adjacent SA 508 Cl.2 low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel of a simulated dissimilar metal weld joint was investigated under boiling water reactor normal water chemistry conditions. A special emphasis was placed to the question whether a fast growing interdendritic SCC crack in the highly susceptible Alloy 182 weld metal can easily cross the fusion line and significantly propagate into the adjacent low-alloy RPV steel. Cessation of interdendritic SCC crack growth was observed in high-purity or sulphate-containing oxygenated water under constant or periodical partial unloading conditions for those parts of the crack front, which reached the fusion line. In chloride containing water, on the other hand, the interdendritic SCC crack in the Alloy 182 weld metal very easily crossed the fusion line and further propagated with a very high rate as a transgranular crack into the heat-affected zone and base metal of the adjacent low-alloy steel. The observed SCC cracking behaviour at the interface correlates excellently with the field experience of such dissimilar metal weld joints, where SCC cracking was usually confined to the Alloy 182 weld metal.

  10. Environmentally-assisted cracking behaviour in the transition region of an Alloy182/SA 508 Cl.2 dissimilar metal weld joint in simulated boiling water reactor normal water chemistry environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)], E-mail: hans-peter.seifert@psi.ch; Ritter, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Shoji, T.; Peng, Q.J.; Takeda, Y.; Lu, Z.P. [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute (FRI), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2008-08-31

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion fatigue behaviour perpendicular and parallel to the fusion line in the transition region between the Alloy 182 Nickel-base weld metal and the adjacent SA 508 Cl.2 low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel of a simulated dissimilar metal weld joint was investigated under boiling water reactor normal water chemistry conditions. A special emphasis was placed to the question whether a fast growing interdendritic SCC crack in the highly susceptible Alloy 182 weld metal can easily cross the fusion line and significantly propagate into the adjacent low-alloy RPV steel. Cessation of interdendritic SCC crack growth was observed in high-purity or sulphate-containing oxygenated water under constant or periodical partial unloading conditions for those parts of the crack front, which reached the fusion line. In chloride containing water, on the other hand, the interdendritic SCC crack in the Alloy 182 weld metal very easily crossed the fusion line and further propagated with a very high rate as a transgranular crack into the heat-affected zone and base metal of the adjacent low-alloy steel. The observed SCC cracking behaviour at the interface correlates excellently with the field experience of such dissimilar metal weld joints, where SCC cracking was usually confined to the Alloy 182 weld metal.

  11. Industrial laser welding evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hella, R.; Locke, E.; Ream, S.

    1974-01-01

    High power laser welding was evaluated for fabricating space vehicle boosters. This evaluation was made for 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. aluminum (2219) and 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. D6AC steel. The Avco HPL 10 kW industrial laser was used to perform the evaluation. The objective has been achieved through the completion of the following technical tasks: (1) parameter study to optimize welding and material parameters; (2) preparation of welded panels for MSFC evaluation; and (3) demonstration of the repeatability of laser welding equipment. In addition, the design concept for a laser welding system capable of welding large space vehicle boosters has been developed.

  12. Spot Welding Parameter Optimization to Improve Weld Characteristics for Dissimilar Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Aravinthan Arumugam; MohdAmizi Nor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Resistance spot welding is a process which is widely used in the automotive industry to join steel parts of various thicknesses and types. The current practice in the automotive industry in determining the welding schedule which will be used in the welding process is based on welding table or experiences. This however may not be the optimum welding schedule that will give the best spot weld quality. This work concentrates on the parameter optimization when spot welding steels with di...

  13. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  14. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  15. Jointed Holder For Welding Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Adjustable-angle holder enables use of standard straight electrode with custom-fabricated bent gas cup for welding in difficult-to-reach places. Electrode replaced easily, without removing cup, with aid of tool loosening miniature collet nut on holder. Consumes fewer electrodes for given amount of welding. Angle of holder continuously adjustable to fit angle of gas cup or geometry of part welded. Holder made double-jointed to accommodate gas cup having compound angles.

  16. Analysis of features of stainless steels in dissimilar welded joints in chloride inducted corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Stainless steels of femtic-austenitic microstructure that means the duplex Cr-Ni-Mo steels, in comparison with austenitic steel includes less expensive nickel and has much better mechanical properties with good formability and corrosion resistance, even in environments containing chloride ions. Similar share of high chromium ferrite and austenite, which is characterized by high ductility, determines that the duplex steels have good crack resistance at temperatures up to approximately -40°C. The steels containing approximately 22% Cr, 5% Ni, 3% Mo and 0.2% N crystallizes as a solid solution δ, partially transforming from the temperature of about 1200°C to 850°C into the phase α. The stable structure of considered steels, at temperatures above 850°C, is ferrite, and at lower temperatures the mixture of phase γ+α +σ. The two-phase structure α+γ the duplex steel obtains after hyperquenching at the temperature of stability of the mixture of α+γ phases, and the share of the phases depends on the hyper quenching attributes. Hyperquenching in water, with a temperature close to 1200°C, ensures the instance in the microstructure of the steel a large share of ferrite and a small share of the high chromium austenite. This causes the increase of strength properties and reducing the plasticity of the steel and its resistance ability to cracking and corrosion. Slower cooling from the mentioned temperature, for example in the air, enables the partial transformation of the a phase into the γ one (α → γ) and increasing the share of austenite in the steel structure. It leads to improvement of plasticity properties. In the paper are presented the results of investigations of heteronymous welded joints of duplex steel and austenitic one. The results include the relation between the chemical composition of steels and their weldability.

  17. Influence of alloying on phase precipitation of high chromium cast iron%合金化对高铬铸铁相析出的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀兰; 周新军; 谢文玲; 马幼平

    2015-01-01

    The chromium alloy was prepared from 2.8wt%carbon and 31.0wt%chromium by the additions of trace multi-alloying elements ( Ti, Nb, V, Mo) .The existence forms of Ti , Nb, V in multicomponent system were studied by calculation from the alloy thermodynamic consideration .The effect of additions of alloy elements on carbides precipitation behavior of high chromium cast iron was investigated .The results show that Ti and Nb exist in the multi-alloying system in forms of TiC and NbC during solidification .V element exists mainly in alloy compounds ( VCr2 C2 ,VCrFe8 ) .The first precipitated high melted point particles ( TiC, NbC) during cooling can act as the heterogeneous nuclei of M7C3 carbides, As a result, the increase of nucleation rate results in refined M 7C3 carbides morphology.However,the addition of excess alloy elements weakens the roles of M 7 C3 carbides refinement .%添加多元微量合金元素V、Ti、Nb和Mo到2.8C-31Cr合金中制备多元铬系合金,从合金热力学析出角度,通过计算分析Ti、V、Nb在多元体系中的存在方式,探讨添加的合金元素对高铬铸铁凝固组织中碳化物析出的影响。结果表明,Ti和Nb在高铬铸铁凝固过程中主要形成TiC和NbC,V主要存在于合金化合物VCr2 C2和VCrFe8中。先析出的TiC和NbC能充当碳化物异质形核基底,增加形核率使组织细化。但添加过量的合金元素却削弱了对碳化物的细化作用。

  18. Reconditioning medical prostheses by welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontescu, C.; Cicic, D. T.; Vasile, I. M.; Bogatu, A. M.; Amza, C. G.

    2017-08-01

    After the technological process of making, some of the medical prostheses may contain imperfections, which can lead to framing the product in the spoilage category. This paper treats the possibility of reconditioning by welding of the prosthesis made of titanium alloys. The paper presents the obtained results after the reconditioning by welding, using the GTAW process, of a intramedullary rod type prosthesis in which was found a crack after the non-destructive examination. The obtained result analysis, after the micrographic examination of the welded joint areas, highlighted that the process of reconditioning by welding can be applied successfully in such situations.

  19. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  20. Relationships between Microstructural Parameters and Time-Dependent Mechanical Properties of a New Nickel-Based Superalloy AD730™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Thébaud

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available High temperature creep and dwell-fatigue properties of the new nickel-based superalloy AD730™ have been investigated. Three microstructures have been studied in creep (850 °C and 700 °C and dwell-fatigue (700 °C stress control with trapezoidal signals, and dwell times ranging from 1 s to 3600 s: a coarse grains microstructure, a fine grains one, and single crystalline samples. The aim of this study is to assess the influence of the grain size on creep and creep-fatigue properties. It is demonstrated that fine and coarse grains microstructures perform similarly in creep at 700 °C, showing that the creep properties at this temperature are controlled by the intragranular precipitation. Moreover, both the coarse grains and the fine grains microstructures show changes in creep deformation mechanisms depending on the applied stress in creep at 700 °C. At higher creep temperatures, the coarse grains microstructure performs better and almost no effect is observed by suppressing grain boundaries. During dwell-fatigue tests at 700 °C, a clear effect of the mechanical cycling has been evidenced on the time to failure on both the coarse and the fine grains microstructures. At high applied stresses, a beneficial effect of the cyclic unloading to the lifetime has been observed whereas at lower applied stresses, mechanical cycling is detrimental compared to the pure creep lifetime due to the development of a fatigue damage. Complex creep-fatigue interactions are hence clearly evidenced and they depend on the pure creep behavior reference.

  1. Novel Approach to Tar Removal from Biomass Producer Gas by Means of a Nickel-Based Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosecký, M.; Kameníková, P.; Pohořelý, M.; Skoblja, S.; Punčochář, M.

    The nickel-based catalyst was exposed to the raw gas from gasification of woody biomass with air in a fluidized-bed. After dust removal on a barrier filter and sulphur compounds capture, namely H2S, on an active sorbent made of CuO and ZnO, higher hydrocarbons as tar components were decomposed/reformed on aNi-catalyst. Steam reforming reactions led to decomposition of tar and all hydrocarbons higher than CH4 into mainly H2 and CO which further underwent reaction with steam via the water gas shift reaction to CO2. The reforming reactions caused approximately 10-20 % decrease in the lower heating values of the producer gas from the inlet values 5.0-6.5 MJ m-3. The gas yield increased fromvalues 2.4-2.6 m3 kg-1 to values 2.8-3.0 m3 kg-1 on dry biomass basis. The chosen tar removal concept based on combination of dolomite in the fluidized-bed with the secondary catalytic reactor was proved by 20 hours long experiment in which the finaltar content below 30 mg m-3 was attained corresponding to more than 97 % tar conversion. H2S content in producer gas was expected to be below 100 vol. ppm, bulk of which was captured on the sorbent. Only limited deactivation of thecatalyst by sulphur compounds was found in the front of the catalyst bed where sulphur content was determined as high as 173 wt. ppm compared to 22 wt. ppm in the fresh sample.

  2. Explosive welding underwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, T.; Allen, K.; Lowes, J.M.

    1980-06-11

    Explosive welding underwater is described. First and second underwater tubular members are assembled together so that the outer surface of the first tubular member and the inner surface of the second tubular member are spaced apart to form an annular cavity. The cavity is closed by seals accommodated in portions of the second tubular member, and is then cleaned and dried and filled with a gas at a pressure greater than the surrounding water pressure. The pressure in the cavity is reduced prior to detonating an explosive charge within the first tubular member to weld the members together. The second tubular member may include portions for receiving further seals so as to subdivide the cavity into a number of zones. The pressures in the zones then can be separately adjusted so as to be able to control the pressure difference a cross each seal. 9 claims.

  3. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... is limited to 2D and as regards the thermal model we assume plain cross section when comparing with experiments and analytical solutions.Stresses and deformations based on the thermal model is mainly described qualitatively in relation to the mechanical model in ABAQUS. As regards the mechanical model, plain...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...

  4. NEW EXPLOSIVE WELDING TECHNIQUES

    OpenAIRE

    Lotous, V.; Dragobetskii, V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - analysis of the variety of factors of the physical phenomena accompanying the process of the power explosive effect for development of new processes of metal treatment: explosive film coating of hardening and updating of a superficial layer of an item. Industrial approbation of cladding techniques by explosion of item surfaces of complex configuration and determination of parameters of the process of the explosive welding of high-strength pig-iron (graphite of the spherical form) wi...

  5. Experimental determination of the critical welding speed in high speed MAG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhikun; Wu Chuansong

    2008-01-01

    In high speed MAG welding process, some weld formation defects may be encountered. To get good weld quality, the critical welding speed beyond which humping or undercutting weld bead can occur must be known for different conditions. In this research, high speed MAG welding tests were carried out to check out the effects of different factors on the critical welding speed. Through observing the weld bead profiles and the macrographs of the transverse sections of MAG welds, the occurrence tendency of humping weld was analyzed, and the values of critical welding speed were determined under different levels of welding current or voltage, and the effect of shielding gas compositions on the critical welding speed was also investigated.

  6. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  7. Laser Welding Test Results with Gas Atmospheres in Welding Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yun; Yang, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The weld beads of specimens welded under identical conditions in the helium and argon gas were cleaner, more regular, and steadier than those in a vacuum. The penetration depth of the FZ in the vacuum was much deeper than those in the helium and argon gas. To measure the irradiation properties of nuclear fuel in a test reactor, a nuclear fuel test rod instrumented with various sensors must be fabricated with assembly processes. A laser welding system to assemble the nuclear fuel test rod was designed and fabricated to develop various welding technologies of the fuel test rods to joint between a cladding tube and end-caps. It is an air-cooling optical fiber type and its emission modes are a continuous (CW) mode of which the laser generates continuous emission, and pulse (QCW) mode in which the laser internally generates sequences of pulses. We considered the system welding a sample in a chamber that can weld a specimen in a vacuum and inert gas atmosphere, and the chamber was installed on the working plate of the laser welding system. In the chamber, the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a cladding tube and an end-cap.

  8. Shielded Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 4. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in shielded metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety; theory, power sources, and…

  9. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  10. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  11. Vision-based detection of MAG weld pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Jinqiang; Wu Chuansong; Zhang Min; Zhao Yanhua

    2007-01-01

    Weld pool contains significant information about the welding process. The weld pool images of MAG welding are detected by LaserStrobe system. An algorithm for extracting weld pool edge is proposed according to the characteristics of MAG weld pool images. The maximum weld pool length and width are calculated. The measurement data can be used to verify the results of welding process simulation and to provide a good foundation for automatic control of MAG welding process.

  12. Modeling Stress-Strain State in Butt-Welded Joints after TIG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Atroshenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper mathematical model was developed for definition of thermal-welding cycle influence on welding deformations distribution in flat samples of austenitic steels after TIG welding and developed recommendations to reduce the welding deformation on o the machinery for welding with a copper backing.

  13. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  14. Layered nickel based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Filip [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Tuson [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kurita, Nobuyuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klimczuk, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Movshovich, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, J D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sefat, A S [ORNL; Mandrus, D [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    We review the properties of Ni-based superconductors which contain Ni{sub 2}X{sub 2} (X=As, P, Bi, Si, Ge, B) planes, a common structural element to the recently discovered FeAs superconductors. We also compare the properties ofthe Ni-and Fe-based systems from a perspective ofelectronic structure as well as structure-property relations.

  15. New explosive seam welding concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Recently developed techniques provide totally-confined linear explosive seam welding and produce scarf joint with linear explosive seam welding. Linear ribbon explosives are utilized in making narrow, continuous, airtight joints in variety of aluminum alloys, titanium, copper, brass, and stainless steel.

  16. Shedding Light on Laser Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalderink, B.J.; Aalderink, Benno; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Jonker, Jan B.; Meijer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Nd:YAG laser welding is often used in industry to obtain high quality joints. This however does not mean that monitoring or control of this process is common practice. A few commercial products are available but none of these systems can be used for monitoring the laser welding process of aluminium.

  17. Plasticity Theory of Fillet Welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with simple methods for calculation of fillet welds based on the theory of plasticity. In developing the solutions the lower-bound theorem is used. The welding material and parts of the base material are subdivided into triangular regions with homogeneous stress fields; thereby...

  18. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved...

  19. METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR LASER WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to laser welding of at least two adjacent, abutting or overlapping work pieces in a welding direction using multiple laser beams guided to a welding region, wherein at least two of the multiple laser beams are coupled into the welding region so as to form a melt and at least...

  20. Image Control In Automatic Welding Vision System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    Orientation and brightness varied to suit welding conditions. Commands from vision-system computer drive servomotors on iris and Dove prism, providing proper light level and image orientation. Optical-fiber bundle carries view of weld area as viewed along axis of welding electrode. Image processing described in companion article, "Processing Welding Images for Robot Control" (MFS-26036).

  1. Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhi-hong; HE Di-qiu; WANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    Friction stir welding(FSW), a new solid-state welding technology invited in the early 1990s,enables us weld aluminum alloys and titanium alloys etc. The processing of FSW, the microstructure in FSW alloysand the factors influencing weld quality are introduced. The complex factors affecting the properties are researched.

  2. Image Control In Automatic Welding Vision System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    Orientation and brightness varied to suit welding conditions. Commands from vision-system computer drive servomotors on iris and Dove prism, providing proper light level and image orientation. Optical-fiber bundle carries view of weld area as viewed along axis of welding electrode. Image processing described in companion article, "Processing Welding Images for Robot Control" (MFS-26036).

  3. Explosive welding finds uses offshore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    This article discusses an explosive welding procedure for pipeline repair. Unlike fusion welding, explosive welding does not leave a brittle area behind and will stop axial or longitudinal cracking of a pipeline. The metals are joined by cold impact pressure, which actually liquifies the metal at the point of impact. In explosive welding, the force of the circular explosion drives the two metals together with such an impact that a bonded wave pattern is set up. All surface defects and oxides are pushed ahead of the collision front, resulting in a metal-to-metal seal. Two techniques are reviewed: the Exploweld method and the Norabel method. Both methods do not reduce or expand the internal diameter of the welded surface.

  4. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  5. Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and tensile behavior of a hot isostatically pressed nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Chunlei, E-mail: c.qiu@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Wu, Xinhua; Mei, Junfa [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Andrews, Paul; Voice, Wayne [Rolls-Royce Plc, Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-25

    Highlights: •Post-HIP heat treatment led to refined microstructure and improved tensile properties. •Deformation occurred mainly by forming stacking faults in γ′ at RT and elevated temperature. •Net-shape HIPed RR1000 failed in a transgranular fracture mode. -- Abstract: A nickel-based superalloy powder RR1000 has been hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) and heat treated to produce different microstructures. Microstructures were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Tensile testing was performed at room temperature and 700 °C and the deformed samples were examined using SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that in the as-HIPed condition the microstructure consisted of coarse and irregular-shaped primary and secondary γ′ together with a low volume fraction of fine γ′ (<50 nm in diameter). Solution treatment below the γ′ solvus followed by air cooling resulted in the formation of finer cuboidal secondary γ′ (350–750 nm) and medium-sized spherical tertiary γ′ (100–200 nm). This led to an improvement of both the 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Ageing of the solution-treated or of the as-HIPed samples at 760 °C resulted in the precipitation of a high population of fine γ′ (around 50 nm) which further increased the strength. Within the resolution limit of the current TEM analysis, deformation at room temperature seemed to occur mainly by dislocations cutting through secondary γ′ and very fine γ′, accompanied by the formation of stacking faults within these precipitates; most of the medium-sized tertiary γ′ precipitates in solution-treated and aged samples were not cut through but were surrounded by dislocations. Deformation at 700 °C happened by dislocations cutting through γ′ precipitates and γ matrix, leading to the formation of extended stacking faults across both γ and γ′. It is suggested that the optimum treatment of the current powder superalloy is to

  6. Spot Welding Parameter Optimization to Improve Weld Characteristics for Dissimilar Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravinthan Arumugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance spot welding is a process which is widely used in the automotive industry to join steel parts of various thicknesses and types. The current practice in the automotive industry in determining the welding schedule which will be used in the welding process is based on welding table or experiences. This however may not be the optimum welding schedule that will give the best spot weld quality. This work concentrates on the parameter optimization when spot welding steels with dissimilar thickness and type using Grey Based Taguchi Method. The experimentation in this work used a L9 orthogonal array with three factors with each factor having three levels. The three factors used are welding current weld time and electrode force. The three weld characteristics that were optimized are weld strength weld nugget diameter and weld indentation. The analysis of variance ANOVA that was carried out showed that welding current gave the most significant contribution in the optimum welding schedule. The comparison test that was carried out to compare the current welding schedule and the optimum welding schedule showed distinct improvement in the increase of weld diameter and weld strengthas well as decrease in electrode indentation.

  7. Friction stir welding of copper alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shuhua; Liu Meng; Wang Deqing; Xu Zhenyue

    2007-01-01

    Copper plates,brass plates and copper/brass plates were friction stir welded with various parameters. Experimental results show that the microstructure of the weld is characterized by its much finer grains as contrasted with the coarse grains of parent materials and the heat-affected zones are very narrow. The microhardness of the copper weld is a little higher than that of parent plate. The microhardness of brass weld is about 25% higher than that of parent material. The tensile strength of copper joints increases with increasing welding speed in the test range. The range of parameters to obtain good welds for copper is much wider than that for brass. When different materials were welded, the position of copper plate before welding affected the quality of FSW joints. If the copper plate was put on the advancing side of weld, the good quality of weld could be got under proper parameters.

  8. DETECTION AND ANALYSIS OF WELD POOL SHAPE FOR CO2 SHORT CIRCUITING ARC WELDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A general industrial CCD(ICCD) camera is redesigned to detect the weld pool without arc at the period of short circuiting,so that the interference of arc and spatter during CO2 short circuiting arc welding is eliminated. Through the analysis of weld pool image, both size parameters (such as weld pool area A, weld pool length L1, L2 and weld pool breadth b) and contour parameters (bi which describe the curves of weld pool boundany) ,which could indicate the shape features of weld pool, had been defined to express weld pool information quantitatively. The investigation of the relationships between weld pool shape parameters and welding process parameters may be beneficial to the quality control of CO2 welding.

  9. Weld Metal Cooling Rate Indicator System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    rate of change of weld temperature at the predetermined weld temperature. A range of...provided so that the rate of change of weld temperatures at the predetermined weld temperature can be compared with this range. A device is then provided...which is responsive to the comparing information for indicating whether the rate of change of weld temperature is within, above, or below the range

  10. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  11. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  12. Rheology of welding: Field constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K.; Quane, S.

    2003-04-01

    Pyroclastic deposits emplaced at high temperature and having sufficient thickness become welded via sintering, compaction and flattening of hot glassy particles. The welding process is attended by pronounced changes in the physical properties of the deposit and welding intensity can be tracked by measuring the density, porosity, fabric or strength of samples. Ultimately, the intensity of welding reflects the aggregate effects of load and residence time at temperatures above the glass transition temperature (Tg). This results in welding intensity varying with stratigraphic depth; vertical sections through welded ignimbrite deposits commonly show maximum (e.g., density) or minimum (porosity) values in physical properties in the lower half (30--40% above the base) of the unit. Here we explore the extent to which these data, serving as proxies for strain, can be used constrain the rheological properties of the pyroclastic deposit during the welding process. Our data include measurements of density, porosity, fabric and rock strength as a function of stratigraphic position for 4 sections through the Bandelier tuff, New Mexico. These profiles record changes in physical properties and, thus, map the cumulative strain associated with welding as a function of depth (load). We have used simple conductive heat transfer models to estimate cooling curves for each sample. Essentially, these curves provide the residence time within the "welding window" for each sample. The curves are dependent on sample position, thickness of ignimbrite, emplacement temperature and the glass transition temperature of the material. The unknowns in the problem are a number of physical constants in a generalized power-law relationship between strain-rate (ɛ') and stress (σ) for steady-state creep at constant load: ɛ' = A σ^n e[-Q/R T]. Specifically, we adopt an inverse-model approach whereby the observations on the natural material are used to constrain the pre-exponential constant (A), stress

  13. Na2SO4- and NaCl- Induced Hot Corrosion Behaviors of a Nickel-Base Superalloy with Aluminide Diffusion Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hot-corrosion behaviors of nickel-base superalloy and aluminide diffusion coating have been investigated in conditions of contents of Na2SO4 and NaCl molten salts at 900℃ by means of XRD and SEM.Hot-corrosion scale of the superalloy and aluminide diffusion coating were analyzed and their surface morphologies were observed.The results demonstrate that both coated and uncoated specimens are not susceptible to various contents of NaCl.That may be resulted from the Al2O3 scale formation.Growth stress was characterized by the formation of convoluted scales.

  14. Study of Gasdynamic Effect Upon the Weld Geometry When Concumable Electrode Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Grigorieva, E. G.; Mayorova, E. I.

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers the ways of weld geometry controlling when consumable electrode welding under single-jet and double-jet gas shielding. The authors provide comparative results of experimental studies on the effects of shielding gas supply upon the weld geometry in weld joints produced from construction carbon steel 45. It has been established that gas-dynamic effect of the shielding gas has a significant impact upon shaping and weld geometry when consumable electrode welding under double-jet gas shielding.

  15. 电磁离心铸造对高铬铸铁冲击韧度的影响%Influence of Electromagnetic Centrifugal Casting on High Chromium Casting Iron Impact Toughness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙凯; 杨雪; 赵琳

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the impact toughness of high chromium cast iron, centrifugal casting method was used on electromagnetic high chromium cast iron casting. The results show that the structure under electromagnetic centrifugal casting is refined; the number of grains increases; the grain size becomes smaller, the impact toughness and other mechanical performance are improved. When the centrifugal speed is 1800 r/min, the magnetic induction strength of 0.4T, the impact toughness after electromagnetic centrifugal casting cast is 6.9. Toughness increases compared with conventional samples.%为了提高高铬铸铁的冲击韧性,使用电磁离心铸造方法对高铬铸铁进行浇铸.结果表明:电磁离心铸造获得试样的组织明显细化,晶粒数量增多,晶粒尺寸变小,冲击韧度等力学性能提高.当离心转速为1800 r/min,磁感应强度为0.4T时,电磁离心铸造铸态试样的冲击韧度为6.9 J/cm2.冲击韧度较常规试样提高.

  16. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarraf, Z.; Lucas, M.

    2012-08-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  17. A method of initial welding position guiding for arc welding robot based on visual servo control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭振民; 陈善本; 邱涛; 吴林

    2003-01-01

    In order to solve the visual guiding task of initial welding position for arc welding robot, this paper presents a practice-prone image-based visual servo control strategy without calibration, and we perform validating experiments on a nine-DOF arc welding robot system. Experimental results illustrate presented method has the function to fulfill the task of welding robot initial positioning with certain anti-jamming ability. This method provides a basis for guiding welding gun to initial welding pose with real typical seam's image properties to replace flag block properties, and is a significant exploit to realize visual guiding of initial welding position and seam tracing in robot welding system.

  18. Laser welding of fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  19. 10,170 flawless welds

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The welding of tubes containing the principal current-carrying busbars in the LHC magnets was one of the main activities of the SMACC project. After a year of preparation and another of intense activity in the tunnel, the last weld was completed on Wednesday 14 May. Over 10,170 welds have been inspected and not a single fault has been found.    The welder (above) creates the weld using an orbital welding machine (below) specifically designed for CERN. Each of the eight sectors of the LHC contains around 210 interconnects between the superconducting magnets. Consolidating these interconnections was the SMACC project’s primary objective. One of the last jobs before closing the interconnects is the welding of the M lines: each has a 104 mm diameter and a radial clearance of just 45 mm. In total: 10,170 welds carried out in a single year of activities. A true challenge, which was carried out by a team of 30 highly specialised welders, working under the supervision o...

  20. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, Chad M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Perricone, Matthew J. (R.J. Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA); Faraone, Kevin M. (BWX Technologies, Inc., Lynchburg, VA); Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  1. Residual stresses in welded plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple model which could be used to study residual stress. The mechanism that results in residual stresses in the welding process starts with the deposition of molten weld metal which heats the immediately adjacent material. After solidification of weld material, normal thermal shrinkage is resisted by the adjacent, cooler material. When the thermal strain exceeds the elastic strain corresponding to the yield point stress, the stress level is limited by this value, which decreases with increasing temperature. Cooling then causes elastic unloading which is restrained by the adjoining material. Permanent plastic strain occurs, and tension is caused in the region immediately adjacent to the weld material. Compression arises in the metal farther from the weld in order to maintain overall static equilibrium. Subsequent repair welds may add to the level of residual stresses. The level of residual stress is related to the onset of fracture during welding. Thus, it is of great importance to be able to predict the level of residual stresses remaining after a weld procedure, and to determine the factors, such as weld speed, temperature, direction, and number of passes, which may affect the magnitude of remaining residual stress. It was hoped to use traditional analytical modeling techniques so that it would be easier to comprehend the effect of these variables on the resulting stress. This approach was chosen in place of finite element methods so as to facilitate the understanding of the physical processes. The accuracy of the results was checked with some existing experimental studies giving residual stress levels found from x-ray diffraction measurements.

  2. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  3. Novel Process Revolutionizes Welding Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Glenn Research Center, Delphi Corporation, and the Michigan Research Institute entered into a research project to study the use of Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) in the construction and repair of stationary structures with multiple geometries and dissimilar materials, such as those NASA might use on the Moon or Mars. Traditional welding technologies are burdened by significant business and engineering challenges, including high costs of equipment and labor, heat-affected zones, limited automation, and inconsistent quality. DRW addresses each of those issues, while drastically reducing welding, manufacturing, and maintenance costs.

  4. Development of Welding Procedures for NPP Dissimilar Metal Weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jang Wook; Cho, Hong Seok; Lee, Dong Min; Park, Yu Deog; Choi, Sang Hoon [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Nuclear primary system consists of various materials according to the function. Recently, concern about the integrity on Dissimilar Metal Weld (DMW) which was made of inconel material such as alloy 600/82/182 has arisen from industry. Leak from hot leg nozzle weld at V.C Summer and axial cracks in hot leg nozzle welds at Ringhals 3 and 4 were took placed at the DMW zone, which is major degradation mechanism known as Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). In order to ensure operational ability of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to obtain measures against unexpected risks. KPS has developed the DMW technology, Narrow Groove Welding (NGW) system and field implementation procedures for alloy 600 since March 2005.

  5. Materials participation in welded joints manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2016-08-01

    Management of materials dilution to form a joint with higher features asked by complex metallic structures is a problem that took attention and efforts of welding processes researchers and this communication will give a little contribution presenting some scientific and experimental results of dilution processes studied by Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department. Liquid state welding processes have a strong dependence related to dilution of base and filler materials, the most important are for automatic joining using welding. The paper presents a review of some scientific works already published and their contributions, results of dilution coefficient evaluation using weighing, graphics and software applied for shielded metal arc welding process. Paper results could be used for welders’ qualification, welding procedure specification and other welding processes researchers’ activities. The results of Welding Research Group from Iasi, Romania, TCM Department, show dilution coefficient values between 20-30 % of base material and 70-80 % of filler material for studied welding process.

  6. Effect of Welding Parameters on Dilution and Weld Bead Geometry in Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effect of pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) variables on the dilution and weld bead geometry in cladding X65 pipeline steel with 316L stainless steel was studied. Using a full factorial method, a series of experiments were carried out to know the effect of wire feed rate, welding speed, distance between gas nozzle and plate, and the vertical angle of welding on dilution and weld bead geometry. The findings indicate that the dilution of weld metal and its dimension i.e. width, height and depth increase with the feed rate, but the contact angle of the bead decreases first and then increases. Meantime, welding speed has an opposite effect except for dilution. There is an interaction effect between welding parameters at the contact angle. The results also show forehand welding or decreasing electrode extension decrease the angle of contact. Finally,a mathematical model is contrived to highlight the relationship between welding variables with dilution and weld bead geometry.

  7. Comparison between hybrid laser-MIG welding and MIG welding for the invar36 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiaohong; Li, Yubo; Ou, Wenmin; Yu, Fengyi; Chen, Jie; Wei, Yanhong

    2016-11-01

    The invar36 alloy is suitable to produce mold of composite materials structure because it has similar thermal expansion coefficient with composite materials. In the present paper, the MIG welding and laser-MIG hybrid welding methods are compared to get the more appropriate method to overcome the poor weldability of invar36 alloy. According to the analysis of the experimental and simulated results, it has been proved that the Gauss and cone combined heat source model can characterize the laser-MIG hybrid welding heat source well. The total welding time of MIG welding is 8 times that of hybrid laser-MIG welding. The welding material consumption of MIG welding is about 4 times that of hybrid laser-MIG welding. The stress and deformation simulation indicate that the peak value of deformation during MIG welding is 3 times larger than that of hybrid laser-MIG welding.

  8. Effect of microstructure on high-temperature mechanical behavior of nickel-base superalloys for turbine disc applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Heather Joan

    2007-05-01

    Engineers constantly seek advancements in the performance of aircraft and power generation engines, including, lower costs and emissions, and improved fuel efficiency. Nickel-base superalloys are the material of choice for turbine discs, which experience some of the highest temperatures and stresses in the engine. Engine performance is proportional to operating temperatures. Consequently, the high-temperature capabilities of disc materials limit the performance of gas-turbine engines. Therefore, any improvements to engine performance necessitate improved alloy performance. In order to take advantage of improvements in high-temperature capabilities through tailoring of alloy microstructure, the overall objectives of this work were to establish relationships between alloy processing and microstructure, and between microstructure and mechanical properties. In addition, the projected aimed to demonstrate the applicability of neural network modeling to the field of Ni-base disc alloy development and behavior. The first phase of this work addressed the issue of how microstructure varies with heat treatment and by what mechanisms these structures are formed. Further it considered how superalloy composition could account for microstructural variations from the same heat treatment. To study this, four next-generation Ni-base disc alloys were subjected to various controlled heat-treatments and the resulting microstructures were then quantified. These quantitative results were correlated to chemistry and processing, including solution temperature, cooling rate, and intermediate hold temperature. A complex interaction of processing steps and chemistry was found to contribute to all features measured; grain size, precipitate distribution, grain boundary serrations. Solution temperature, above a certain threshold, and cooling rate controlled grain size, while cooling rate and intermediate hold temperature controlled precipitate formation and grain boundary serrations. Diffusion

  9. Corrosion behavior of Haynes {sup registered} 230 {sup registered} nickel-based super-alloys for integrated coal gasification combined cycle syngas plants. A plant exposure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungkyu; Lee, Jieun; Kang, Suk-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Jong; Yun, Yongseung [Institute for Advanced Engineering (IAE), Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Plant Engineering Center; Kim, Min Jung [Sungkyunkwan Univ, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Advanced Materials Technology Research Center

    2015-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercially available Haynes {sup registered} 230 {sup registered} nickel-based alloy samples was investigated by exposure to coal-gasifying integrated coal gasification combined cycle pilot plant facilities affiliated with the Institute for Advanced Engineering (2.005 MPa and 160-300 C). The morphological and microstructural analyses of the exposed samples were conducted using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis on the external surface of the recovered corrosion test samples to obtain information of the corrosion scale. These analyses based on the pre- and post-exposure corrosion test samples combined with thermodynamic Ellingham-Pourbaix stability diagrams provided preliminary insight into the mechanism of the observed corrosion behavior prevailing in the piping materials that connected the particulate removal unit and water scrubber of the integrated coal gasification combined cycle pilot plant. Uniform material wastage was observed after 46 hours of operation, and a preliminary corrosion mechanism was suggested: the observed material waste and corrosion behavior of the Haynes {sup registered} 230 {sup registered} nickel-based alloy samples cut off from the coal syngas integrated coal gasification combined cycle plant were explained by the formation of discontinuous (complex) oxide phases and subsequent chlorine-induced active oxidation under the predominantly reducing environment encountered. This contribution continues the already published studies of the Fe-Ni-Cr-Co alloy Haynes {sup registered} 556 {sup registered}.

  10. Measurements of γ/γ' Lattice Misfit and γ' Volume Fraction for a Ru-containing Nickel-based Single Crystal Superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.P. Tan; J.L. Liu; X P Song; T. Jin; X.F. Sun; Z.Q. Hu

    2011-01-01

    A conventional X-ray difFractometer has been used to determine the -y/y' lattice misfit and γ' volume fraction for a Ru-containing nickel-based single crystal superalloy at room temperature. The rocking curve was used to characterize the distribution of subgrains. The diffraction peaks obtained by w-20 scan were used to determine the γ/γ' lattice misfit and γ' volume fraction. A three peaks fitting model was proposed. The peak fitting results are in good agreement with the model. The X-ray diffraction results indicate that the nickel-based single crystal superalloy was not a perfect monocrystalline material, which is comprised of many subgrains; and each subgrain also consists of large numbers of mosaic structures. In addition, two anomalous reflection phenomena were found during the experiment and discussed with respect to their occurrence and impact on the measurement. The experimental results show that the γ/γ' lattice misfit and ~/r volume fraction will be various at the different regions of its dendritic microstructure. The average γ/γ' lattice misfit and γ' volume fraction of the experimental alloy are approximately-0.2% and 70%, respectively. Furthermore, the γ' volume fraction calculated by atom microprobe (AP) data is also basically consistent with the experimental results.

  11. Friction Stir Welding Technology: Adapting NASA's Retractable Pin Tool

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    In late 1991, The Welding Institute (TWI), a British research and technology organization, invented and patented a welding process named Friction Stir Welding (FSW). Friction Stir Welding is a highly significant advancement in aluminum welding technology that can produce stronger, lighter, and more efficient welds than any previous process.

  12. Fireside corrosion of nickel base alloys in future 700 C coal fired power plants; Rauchgasseitige Korrosion von Nickelbasislegierungen fuer zukuenftige 700 C-Dampfkraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luettschwager, Frank

    2011-09-27

    Coal is still the most important energy source in Germany. In 2009 it produced 42.9 % of the overall German electrical power. Coal is available world-wide in large quantities and can be delivered economically. One of the possible ways to reduce CO{sub 2} pollution is the increase of efficiency of coal fired power plants, which requires steam conditions of up to 700 C - 730 C and 350 bar. Because many German power units will reach the end of their technical lifespan in a few years or the following decade, one will have the possibility to build up modern types of power plants with increased efficiency of more than 50 %. Some international standards (European Pressure Equipment Directive or ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code) require 100 000 hour creep rupture strength of 100 MPa at 750 C. Therefore, nickel base alloys are in the focus of material qualification processes. Nickel base alloys are well investigated due to their hot corrosion behaviour. It is known that sodium sulphate may generate hot corrosion on those alloys at temperatures above its melting point of 884 C. On nickel base alloys an eutectic mixture of nickel sulphate and sodium sulphate with a melting point of 671 C can be generated, which leads to accelerated corrosion. This work examines, whether the high amount of sulphur and alkali metals will induce hot corrosion at the estimated working temperature on devices manufactured from nickel base alloy. Two synthetic coal ash deposits, according to the chemical composition of hard coal and lignite, and typical flue gases with and without sulphur dioxide were blended of pure agents. The reactions of the deposits with heater tubes' materials and synthetic flue gases are examined in the temperature range from 650 C to 800 C and different time ranges up to 2000 hours. The corroded specimen are examined with SEM/EDX to identify relevant corrosion products and determine the corrosivity of deposited compounds. Deposits increase the corrosion rate of

  13. Research on image segmentation of weld seam of oil derrick welded by arc welding robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Guangyu; Cui Shilin; Wu Changlin

    2009-01-01

    This paper puts forward a new method of PCNN (pulse-coupled neural networks) image segmentation, in which the binary matrix of the ignition frequency matrix is employed, for the first time, to act as the final result of image segmentation. It gives the principles of PCNN parameter selection under the guidance of this process. The new method reduces the dependence of PCNN on parameters, improves the effect of image segmentation, and produces good results after being applied to image recognition of weld seam of oil derrick welded by arc welding robot.

  14. Explosive welding of undersea pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalker, A.W.

    1978-02-01

    The phenomenon of explosive welding has been known informally for many years. A number of investigations reported the occurerence of solid phase bonds as an incidental effect when using high explosives in association with adjacent metal surfaces and probably the earliest formal record was the observation by Carl in 1944 of a bond between two copper discs in contact with a detonator. In 1957 Philipchuk reported what is now recognized as an explosive weld between aluminium channel sections and a steel die when carrying out explosive forming trials. Since then a great deal of development work has resulted in explosive welding becoming a well established manufacturing technique, particularly in the fields of cladding and the joining of tube/tubeplates. In more recent years the process has been extended to the welding of large diameter line pipe materials.

  15. Welding Development W87 Baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Newman; G. Gibbs; G. K. Hicken

    1998-11-01

    This report covers the development activities used to qualify the Gas Tungsten Arc (FTA) girth weld and the resistance stem attachments on the W87 Base Line (W87BL). Design of experiments was used throughout the development activities.

  16. Thermomechanical Modelling of Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes a generic programme for analysis, optimization and development of resistance spot and projection welding. The programme includes an electrical model determining electric current and voltage distribution as well as heat generation, a thermal model calculating heat...

  17. Welding and Production Metallurgy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This 6000 square foot facility represents the only welding laboratory of its kind within DA. It is capable of conducting investigations associated with solid state...

  18. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot...

  19. YAG laser welding with surface activating flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊丁; 张瑞华; 田中学; 中田一博; 牛尾诚夫

    2003-01-01

    YAG laser welding with surface activating flux has been investigated, and the influencing factors and mechanism are discussed. The results show that both surface activating flux and surface active element S have fantastic effects on the YAG laser weld shape, that is to obviously increase the weld penetration and D/W ratio in various welding conditions. The mechanism is thought to be the change of weld pool surface tension temperature coefficient, thus, the change of fluid flow pattern in weld pool due to the flux.

  20. Forming of aluminium alloy friction stir welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The present paper aims at investigating, through analytical models, numerical models and experiments, the effect of the warm deformation phase, realised with an in temperature upsetting, on the weld previously performed by friction stir lap welding on aluminium alloy blanks. The investigation allows to show the deformation zones after upsetting that determine the homogenisation of the weld section. The analytical model allows to relate the friction factor with the upsetting load. The presence on the weld of not elevated friction factor values determines the deformation and localisation levels very useful for the weld. Such methodology allows to improve the weld itself with the forming phase.

  1. Experimental study on activating welding for aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Yong; Fan Ding

    2005-01-01

    TIG welding and EB welding for aluminum alloy 3003 were carried out to study the effects of activating flux on weld penetration of activating welding for aluminum alloys. SiO2 was used as the activating flux. It is found that, SiO2 can increase the weld penetration and decrease the weld width of FBTIG when the flux gap is small. For A-TIG welding and EB welding with focused mode, the weld penetrations and the weld widths increase simultaneously. SiO2 has little effect on the weld penetration and weld width of EB welding with defocused mode. It is believed that, change of surface tension temperature gradient is not the main mechanism of SiO2 improving weld penetration of activating welding for aluminum alloys.

  2. Laser based spot weld characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  3. Characterization of complex carbide–silicide precipitates in a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy modified by welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, D., E-mail: dhb@ansto.gov.au; Davis, J.; Drew, M.; Harrison, R.P.; Edwards, L.

    2015-07-15

    Nickel based alloys of the type Hastelloy-N™ are ideal candidate materials for molten salt reactors, as well as for applications such as pressure vessels, due to their excellent resistance to creep, oxidation and corrosion. In this work, the authors have attempted to understand the effects of welding on the morphology, chemistry and crystal structure of the precipitates in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the weld zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy similar to Hastelloy-N™ in composition, by using characterization techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Two plates of a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy GH-3535 were welded together using a TiG welding process without filler material to achieve a joint with a curved molten zone with dendritic structure. It is evident that the primary precipitates have melted in the HAZ and re-solidified in a eutectic-like morphology, with a chemistry and crystal structure only slightly different from the pre-existing precipitates, while the surrounding matrix grains remained unmelted, except for the zones immediately adjacent to the precipitates. In the molten zone, the primary precipitates were fully melted and dissolved in the matrix, and there was enrichment of Mo and Si in the dendrite boundaries after solidification, and re-precipitation of the complex carbides/silicides at some grain boundaries and triple points. The nature of the precipitates in the molten zone varied according to the local chemical composition. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Ni-based alloy with Cr, Mo, Si, Fe and C was welded, examined with SEM, EBSD, and TEM. • Original Ni{sub 2}(Mo,Cr){sub 4}(Si,C) carbides changed from equiaxed to lamellar shape in HAZ. • Composition and crystal structure remained almost unchanged in HAZ. • Original carbides changed to lamellar Ni{sub 3}(Mo,Cr){sub 3}(Si,C) in some cases in weld metal. • Precipitates were mostly incoherent, but semi-coherent in some cases in weld

  4. Laser Welding in Electronic Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The laser has proven its worth in numerous high reliability electronic packaging applications ranging from medical to missile electronics. In particular, the pulsed YAG laser is an extremely flexible and versatile too] capable of hermetically sealing microelectronics packages containing sensitive components without damaging them. This paper presents an overview of details that must be considered for successful use of laser welding when addressing electronic package sealing. These include; metallurgical considerations such as alloy and plating selection, weld joint configuration, design of optics, use of protective gases and control of thermal distortions. The primary limitations on use of laser welding electronic for packaging applications are economic ones. The laser itself is a relatively costly device when compared to competing welding equipment. Further, the cost of consumables and repairs can be significant. These facts have relegated laser welding to use only where it presents a distinct quality or reliability advantages over other techniques of electronic package sealing. Because of the unique noncontact and low heat inputs characteristics of laser welding, it is an ideal candidate for sealing electronic packages containing MEMS devices (microelectromechanical systems). This paper addresses how the unique advantages of the pulsed YAG laser can be used to simplify MEMS packaging and deliver a product of improved quality.

  5. Totally confined explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The undesirable by-products of explosive welding are confined and the association noise is reduced by the use of a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and in which the explosion occurs. An infrangible enclosure is removably attached to one of the members to be bonded at the point directly opposite the bond area. An explosive is completely confined within the enclosure at a point in close proximity to the member to be bonded and a detonating means is attached to the explosive. The balance of the enclosure, not occupied by explosive, is filled with a shaped material which directs the explosive pressure toward the bond area. A detonator adaptor controls the expansion of the enclosure by the explosive force so that the enclosure at no point experiences a discontinuity in expansion which causes rupture. The use of the technique is practical in the restricted area of a space station.

  6. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  7. Ship construction and welding

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Nisith R

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses various aspects of ship construction, from ship types and construction materials, to welding technologies and accuracy control. The contents of the book are logically organized and divided into twenty-one chapters. The book covers structural arrangement with longitudinal and transverse framing systems based on the service load, and explains basic structural elements like hatch side girders, hatch end beams, stringers, etc. along with structural subassemblies like floors, bulkheads, inner bottom, decks and shells. It presents in detail double bottom construction, wing tanks & duct keels, fore & aft end structures, etc., together with necessary illustrations. The midship sections of various ship types are introduced, together with structural continuity and alignment in ship structures. With regard to construction materials, the book discusses steel, aluminum alloys and fiber reinforced composites. Various methods of steel material preparation are discussed, and plate cutting and form...

  8. NASA welding assessment program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofel, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A long duration test was conducted for comparing various methods of attaching electrical interconnects to solar cells for near Earth orbit spacecraft. Representative solar array modules were thermally cycled for 36,000 cycles between -80 and +80 C. The environmental stress of more than 6 years on a near Earth spacecraft as it cycles in and out of the earth's shadow was simulated. Evaluations of the integrity of these modules were made by visual and by electrical examinations before starting the cycling and then at periodic intervals during the cycling tests. Modules included examples of parallel gap and of ultrasonic welding, as well as soldering. The materials and fabrication processes are state of the art, suitable for forming large solar arrays of spacecraft quality. The modules survived this extensive cycling without detectable degradation in their ability to generate power under sunlight illumination.

  9. A study of processes for welding pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, J. (ed.)

    1991-07-01

    A review was made of exisiting and potential processes for welding pipelines: fusion welding (arc, electron beam, laser, thermit) and forge welding (friction, flash, magnetically impelled arc butt, upset butt, explosive, shielded active gas, gas pressure). Consideration of J-lay operations gave indications that were reflections of the status of the processes in terms of normal land and offshore S-lay operation: forge welding processes, although having promise require considerable development; fusion welding processes offer several possibilities (mechanized GMA welding likely to be used in 1991-2); laser welding requires development in all pipeline areas: a production machine for electron beam welding will involve high costs. Nondestructive testing techniques are also reviewed. Demand for faster quality assessment is being addressed by speeding radiographic film processing and through the development of real time radiography and automatic ultrasonic testing. Conclusions on most likely future process developments are: SMAW with cellulosic electrodes is best for tie-ins, short pip runs; SMAW continues to be important for small-diameter lines, although mechanized GMA could be used, along with mechanical joining, MIAB, radial fraction, and flash butt; mechanized GMA welding is likely to predominate for large diameter lines and probably will be used for the first J-lay line (other techniques could be used too); and welding of piping for station facilities involves both shop welding of sub-assemblies and on-site welding of pipe and sub-assemblies to each other (site welding uses both SMAW and GMAW). Figs, tabs.

  10. Effect of Welding Methods on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints of Screw Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golikov, N. I.; Sidorov, M. M.; Stepanova, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical properties and characteristics of the structure of welded joints of screw piles are studied. It is shown that cast tips from steel 25L do not meet the performance specifications for operation in the Northern climatic zone. Quality welded joints of screw piles can be obtained by semiautomatic welding in an environment of CO2 with Sv-08G2S welding wire.

  11. Development of technique for laser welding of biological tissues using laser welding device and nanocomposite solder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimenko, A; Ichcitidze, L; Podgaetsky, V; Ryabkin, D; Pyankov, E; Saveliev, M; Selishchev, S

    2015-08-01

    The laser device for welding of biological tissues has been developed involving quality control and temperature stabilization of weld seam. Laser nanocomposite solder applied onto a wound to be weld has been used. Physicochemical properties of the nanocomposite solder have been elucidated. The nature of the tissue-organizing nanoscaffold has been analyzed at the site of biotissue welding.

  12. ALGORITHM AND IMPLEMENTATION OF AUTO-SEARCHING WELD LINE FOR WELDING MOBILE ROBOT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ke; L(U) Xueqin; WU Yixiong; LOU Songnian

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm of auto-searching weld line for welding mobile robot is presented.Auto-searching weld line is that the robot can automatically recognize a weld groove according to the characteristics of the weld groove before welding, and then adjust itself posture to the desired status preparing for welding, namely, it is a process that the robot autonomously aligns itself to the center of welding seam. Firstly, the configuration of welding mobile robot with the function of auto-searching weld line is introduced, then the algorithm and implementation of auto-searching weld line are presented on the basis of kinematics model of the robot, at last trajectory planning among auto-searching weld line is investigated in detail. The experiment result shows that the developed welding mobile robot can successfully implement the task of auto-searching weld line before welding, tracking error precision can be controlled to approximate ± 1.5 mm, and satisfy the requirement of practical welding project.

  13. EMAT weld inspection and weld machine diagnostic system for continuous coil processing lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Wayne M.; MacLauchlan, Daniel T.; Geier, Dan P.; Lang, Dennis D.

    1996-11-01

    Weld breaks of steel coil during cold rolling and continuous pickling operations are a significant source of lost productivity and product yield. Babcock and Wilcox Innerspec Technologies has developed a weld process control system which monitors the key variables of the welding process and determines the quality of the welds generated by flash butt welding equipment. This system is known as the Temate 2000 Automated Flash Butt Weld Inspection and Weld Machine Diagnostic System. The Temate 2000 system utilizes electro- magnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) technology as the basis for performing on-line, real-time, nondestructive weld quality evaluation. This technique accurately detects voids, laps, misalignment and over/under trim conditions in the weld. Results of the EMAT weld inspection are immediately presented to the weld machine operator for disposition. Welding process variables such as voltage, current, platen movements and upset pressures are monitored and collected with the high speed data acquisition system. This data is processed and presented in real-time display to indicate useful welding process information such as platen crabbing, upset force, peak upset current, and many others. Alarming for each variable is provided and allows detailed maintenance reports and summary information to be generated. All weld quality and process parameter data are stored, traceable to each unique weld, and available for post process evaluation. Installation of the Temate 2000 system in a major flat rolled steel mill has contributed to near elimination of weld breakage and increased productivity at this facility.

  14. Determination through the distortions analysis of the best welding sequence in longitudinal welds VATS electron beam welding FE simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guirao, J., E-mail: julio@natec-ingenieros.co [Numerical Technologies, S.L., Marques de San Esteban No. 52, 33206 Gijon (Spain); Rodriguez, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus de Viesques, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Bayon, A. [Vacuum Vessel Group, Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Bouyer, F. [DCNS, Indret 44620 LA MONTAGNE (France); Pistono, J. [Department of Thermal Machines and Motors, University of Oviedo, Campus de Viesques, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Jones, L. [Vacuum Vessel Group, Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents a detailed finite element simulation of the longitudinal rib welds of Vessel Advanced Technology Segment (VATS) by e-beam welding. Nine different simulation sequences were carried out to explain the different mechanisms that drive the distortions process during welding and to lead to an optimum sequence which minimizes the final distortions. The simulations were used to guide the manufacture of the final sequence of the VATS. Distortion measurements taken after welding compared very well with the simulated results.

  15. TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUES IN MECHANISED FEED WIG/TIG WELDING SURFACING OF WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BURCA Mircea

    2016-09-01

    manual welding tests in the light of using the process for welding surfacing being known that in such applications mechanised operations are recommended whenever possible given the latter strengths i.e. increased productivity and quality deposits. The research also aims at achieving a comparative a study between wire mechanised feed based WIG manual welding and the manual rod entry based manual welding in terms of geometry deposits, deposits aesthetics, operating technique, productivity, etc . In this regard deposits were made by means of two welding procedures, and subsequently welding surfacing was made with the optimum values of the welding parameters in this case.

  16. Effects of welding technology on welding stress based on the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianke; Jin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Finite element method is used to simulate the welding process under four different conditions of welding flat butt joints. Welding seams are simulated with birth and death elements. The size and distribution of welding residual stress is obtained in the four kinds of welding conditions by Q345 manganese steel plate butt joint of the work piece. The results shown that when using two-layers welding,the longitudinal and transverse residual stress were reduced;When welding from Middle to both sides,the residual stress distribution will change,and the residual stress in the middle of the work piece was reduced.

  17. Modeling of welded bead profile for rapid prototyping by robotic MAG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yong; ZHU Sheng; WANG Tao; WANG Wanglong

    2009-01-01

    As a deposition technology, robotic metal active gas(MAG) welding has shown new promise for rapid prototyping (RP) of metallic parts. During the process of metal forming using robotic MAG welding, sectional profile of single-pass welded bead is critical to formed accuracy and quality of metal pans. In this paper, the experiments of single-pass welded bead for rapid prototyping using robotic MAG welding were carried out. The effect of some edge detectors on the cross-sectional edge of welded bead was discussed and curve fitting was applied using leat square fitting. Consequently, the mathematical model of welded bead profile was developed. The experimental results show that good shape could be obtained under suitable welding parameters. Canny operawr is suitable to edge detection of welded bead profile, and the mathematical model of welded bead profile developed is approximately parabola.

  18. Predicting effects of diffusion welding parameters on welded joint properties by artificial neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘黎明; 祝美丽; 牛济泰; 张忠典

    2001-01-01

    The static model for metal matrix composites in diffusion welding was established by means of artificial neural network method. The model presents the relationship between weld joint properties and welding parameters such as welding temperature, welding pressure and welding time. Through simulating the diffusion welding process of SiCw/6061Al composite, the effects of welding parameters on the strength of welded joint was studied and optimal technical parameters was obtained. It is proved that this method has good fault-tolerant ability and versatility and can overcome the shortage of the general experiment. The established static model is in good agreement with the actual welding process, so it becomes a new path for studying the weldability of new material.

  19. Effect of Laser Welding Parameters on Formation of NiTi Shape Memory Alloy Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work experimental trials of welding of NiTi flat plates with 2.0 mm thickness were conducted using a 4.5 kW continuous wave (CW Nd:YAG laser. The influences of laser output power, welding speed, defocus amount and side-blow shielding gas flow rate on the morphology, welding depth and width, and quality of the welded seam were investigated. Meanwhile, the effects of heat input on the mechanical and functional properties of welded joints were studied. The results show that laser welding can take better formation in NiTi alloys. The matching curves with laser power and welding speed affecting different formation of welds were experimentally acquired, which can provide references for laser welding and engineering application of NiTi alloy. The heat input has obvious effects on the ultimate tensile strength (UTS and shape memory behavior of the welded joints.

  20. Effect of weld reinforcement on axial plastic buckling of welded steel cylindrical shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu-lin YU; Zhi-ping CHEN; Ji WANG; Shun-juan YAN; Li-cai YANG

    2012-01-01

    The effect of weld reinforcement on axial plastic buckling of welded steel cylindrical shells is investigated through experimental and numerical buckling analysis using six welded steel cylindrical shell specimens.The relationship between the amplitude of weld reinforcement and the axial plastic buckling critical load is explored.The effect of the material yield strength and the number of circumferential welds on the axial plastic buckling is studied.Results show that circumferential weld reinforcement represents a severe imperfect form of axially compressed welded steel cylindrical shells and the axial plastic buckling critical load decreases with the increment of the mean amplitude of circumferential weld reinforcement.The material yield strength and the number of circumferential welds are found to have no significant effect on buckling waveforms; however,the axial plastic buckling critical load can be decreased to some extent with the increase of the number of circumferential welds.

  1. Effect of Multi-repair Welding on Fatigue Performance of Aluminum Alloy Profile Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, You-De; Shi, Chun-Yuan; Tian, Hong-Lei

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum alloy profile has been widely used in the manufacture of the rail vehicles. But it's necessary for the repair welding of the welded joints to be conducted because some defects exist in the weld such as porosity, inclusions and incomplete penetrations in the welding processes. In this paper, the influence of the multi-repair welding of 6005A aluminum alloy profile butt welded joints on the fatigue performance are investigated based on the results of fatigue tests. The parameters of curves and the fatigue strength of the welded joints are calculated, and Goodman fatigue limit diagram is also obtained. The results show that fatigue strength of aluminum alloy profile butt welded joints, in condition of 107 cycle life, meet the standard requirement for the as-welded, repair welded state one time or two times respectively.

  2. Characteristics of Welding Crack Defects and Failure Mode in Resistance Spot Welding of DP780 Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-pei WANG; Yong-qiang ZHANG; Jian-bin JU; Jian-qiang ZHANG; Jian-wei YANG

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of welded joints in resistance spot welding of DP780 steel were tested,and three dif-ferent types of welding cracks in welded joints were investigated by optical microscopy,scanning electron microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction.Finally,the failure mode of the welded joints in shear tensile test was dis-cussed.It is found the shear tensile strength of welded joints can be greatly improved by adding preheating current or tempering current.The surface crack in welded joint is intergranular fracture,while the inner crack in welded joint is transgranular fracture,and the surface crack on the edge of the electrode imprint can be improved by adding prehea-ting current or tempering current.The traditional failure mode criterion advised by American Welding Society is no longer suitable for DP780 spot welds and the critical nugget size suggested by Pouranvari is overestimated.

  3. Effects of welding parameters on the mechanical properties of inert gas welded 6063 Aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertan, Taner [MAKO Corporation (Turkey); Uguz, Agah [Uludag Univ. (Turkey). Mechnical Engineering Dept.; Ertan, Rukiye

    2012-07-01

    The influence of welding parameters, namely welding current and gas flow rate, on the mechanical properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) welded 6063 Aluminum alloy (AA 6063) has been investigated. In order to study the effect of the welding current and gas flow rate, microstructural examination, hardness measurements and room temperature tensile tests have been carried out. The experimental results show that the mechanical properties of GTAW welded joints have better mechanical properties than those of SMAW welded joints. Increasing the welding current appeared to have a beneficial effect on the mechanical properties. However, either increasing or decreasing the gas flow rate resulted in a decrease of hardness and tensile strength. It was also found that, the highest strength was obtained in GTAW welded samples at 220 A and 15 l/min gas flow rate.

  4. Experimental and simulated strength of spot welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bennedbæk, Rune A.K.; Larsen, Morten B.

    2014-01-01

    Weld strength testing of single spots in DP600 steel is presented for the three typical testing procedures, i.e. tensile-shear, cross-tension and peel testing. Spot welds are performed at two sets of welding parameters and strength testing under these conditions is presented by load-elongation cu......Weld strength testing of single spots in DP600 steel is presented for the three typical testing procedures, i.e. tensile-shear, cross-tension and peel testing. Spot welds are performed at two sets of welding parameters and strength testing under these conditions is presented by load......-elongation curves revealing the maximum load and the elongation at break. Welding and strength testing is simulated by SORPAS® 3D, which allows the two processes to be prepared in a combined simulation, such that the simulated welding properties are naturally applied to the simulation of strength testing. Besides...

  5. Polyimide weld bonding for titanium alloy joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Kurland, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two weld bonding processes were developed for joining titanium alloy; one process utilizes a weld-through technique and the other a capillary-flow technique. The adhesive used for the weld-through process is similar to the P4/A5F system. A new polyimide laminating resin, BFBI/BMPM, was used in the capillary-flow process. Static property information was generated for weld-bonded joints over the temperature range of 219 K (-65 F) to 561 K (+550 F) and fatigue strength information was generated at room temperature. Significant improvement in fatigue strength was demonstrated for weld-bonded joints over spot-welded joints. A demonstration was made of the applicability of the weld-through weld-bonding process for fabricating stringer stiffened skin panels.

  6. Oxidation-induced phase transformations and lifetime limits of chromia-forming nickel-base alloy 625

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyrkin, Anton

    2011-12-05

    For its high creep resistance the commercial nickel-base alloy 625 relies on solid solution strengthening in combination with precipitation hardening by formation of δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb and (Ni,Mo,Si){sub 6}C precipitates during high-temperature service. In oxidizing environments the alloy forms a slow growing, continuous chromia layer on the material surface which protects the alloy against rapid oxidation attack. The growth of the chromia base oxide scale results during exposure at 900-1000 C in oxidation-induced chromium depletion in the subsurface zone of the alloy. Microstructural analyses of the cross-sectioned specimens revealed that this process results in formation of a wide subsurface zone in which the mentioned strengthening phases are dissolved, in spite of the fact that both phases do not contain substantial amounts of the scale-forming element chromium. The cross-sectional analyses revealed that, in parallel to the formation of a precipitate depleted zone, a thin, continuous layer of niobium-rich intermetallic precipitates formed in the immediate vicinity of the scale/alloy interface. The Subsurface Phase Enrichment (abbreviated as SPE) was shown to be the result of an uphill-diffusion of niobium, i.e. the element stabilizing the strengthening precipitates δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb, in the chromium activity gradient and is thus a natural consequence of the oxidation-induced chromium depletion beneath the chromia scale. The thermodynamic calculations carried out using the Thermo-Calc/DICTRA software packages revealed that in alloy 625 the chemical activity of niobium decreases with decreasing chromium content. As chromium is being continuously removed from the alloy as the result of the chromia scale growth, the zone of lowest Nb-activity is formed in the location with the lowest chromium concentration, i.e. the scale/alloy interface. This creates a driving force for Nb to diffuse towards the scale/alloy interface against its own concentration gradient, which is known

  7. Oxidation-induced phase transformations and lifetime limits of chromia-forming nickel-base alloy 625

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyrkin, Anton

    2011-12-05

    For its high creep resistance the commercial nickel-base alloy 625 relies on solid solution strengthening in combination with precipitation hardening by formation of δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb and (Ni,Mo,Si){sub 6}C precipitates during high-temperature service. In oxidizing environments the alloy forms a slow growing, continuous chromia layer on the material surface which protects the alloy against rapid oxidation attack. The growth of the chromia base oxide scale results during exposure at 900-1000 C in oxidation-induced chromium depletion in the subsurface zone of the alloy. Microstructural analyses of the cross-sectioned specimens revealed that this process results in formation of a wide subsurface zone in which the mentioned strengthening phases are dissolved, in spite of the fact that both phases do not contain substantial amounts of the scale-forming element chromium. The cross-sectional analyses revealed that, in parallel to the formation of a precipitate depleted zone, a thin, continuous layer of niobium-rich intermetallic precipitates formed in the immediate vicinity of the scale/alloy interface. The Subsurface Phase Enrichment (abbreviated as SPE) was shown to be the result of an uphill-diffusion of niobium, i.e. the element stabilizing the strengthening precipitates δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb, in the chromium activity gradient and is thus a natural consequence of the oxidation-induced chromium depletion beneath the chromia scale. The thermodynamic calculations carried out using the Thermo-Calc/DICTRA software packages revealed that in alloy 625 the chemical activity of niobium decreases with decreasing chromium content. As chromium is being continuously removed from the alloy as the result of the chromia scale growth, the zone of lowest Nb-activity is formed in the location with the lowest chromium concentration, i.e. the scale/alloy interface. This creates a driving force for Nb to diffuse towards the scale/alloy interface against its own concentration gradient, which is known

  8. Experimental determination of the weld penetration evolution in keyhole plasma arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Qingxian; Wu Chuansong; Zhang Yuming

    2007-01-01

    Keyhole plasma arc welding experiments are conducted to measure the weld geometry and penetration at different moments during the initial phase from igniting arc to quasi-steady state. Indirect information on keyhole formation and evolution in plasma arc welding can be extracted based on the weld macrophotograph at cross section. It has laid foundation to verify the mathematical models of keyhole plasma arc welding.

  9. Welding polarity effects on weld spatters and bead geometry of hyperbaric dry GMAW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Long; Wu, Jinming; Huang, Junfen; Huang, Jiqiang; Zou, Yong; Liu, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Welding polarity has influence on welding stability to some extent, but the specific relationship between welding polarity and weld quality has not been found, especially under the hyperbaric environment. Based on a hyperbaric dry welding experiment system, gas metal arc welding(GMAW) experiments with direct current electrode positive(DCEP) and direct current electrode negative(DCEN) operations are carried out under the ambient pressures of 0.1 MPa, 0.4 MPa, 0.7 MPa and 1.0 MPa to find the influence rule of different welding polarities on welding spatters and weld bead geometry. The effects of welding polarities on the weld bead geometry such as the reinforcement, the weld width and the penetration are discussed. The experimental results show that the welding spatters gradually grow in quantity and size for GMAW with DCEP, while GMAW with DCEN can produce fewer spatters comparatively with the increase of the ambient pressure. Compared with DCEP, the welding current and arc voltage waveforms for DCEN is more stable and the distribution of welding current probability density for DCEN is more concentrated under the hyperbaric environment. When the ambient pressure is increased from 0.1 MPa to 1.0 MPa, the effects of welding polarities on the reinforcement, the weld width and the penetration are as follows: an increase of 0.8 mm for the weld reinforcement is produced by GMAW with DCEN and 1.3 mm by GMAW with DCEP, a decrease of 7.2 mm for the weld width is produced by DCEN and 6.1 mm by DCEP; and an increase of 3.9 mm for the penetration is produced by DCEN and 1.9 mm by DCEP. The proposed research indicates that the desirable stability in the welding procedure can be achieved by GMAW with DCEN operation under the hyperbaric environment.

  10. Welding Polarity Effects on Weld Spatters and Bead Geometry of Hyperbaric Dry GMAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Long; WU Jinming; HUANG Junfen; HUANG Jiqiang; ZOU Yong; LIU Jian

    2016-01-01

    Welding polarity has influence on welding stability to some extent, but the specific relationship between welding polarity and weld quality has not been found, especially under the hyperbaric environment. Based on a hyperbaric dry welding experiment system, gas metal arc welding(GMAW) experiments with direct current electrode positive(DCEP) and direct current electrode negative(DCEN) operations are carried out under the ambient pressures of 0.1 MPa, 0.4 MPa, 0.7 MPa and 1.0 MPa to find the influence rule of different welding polarities on welding spatters and weld bead geometry. The effects of welding polarities on the weld bead geometry such as the reinforcement, the weld width and the penetration are discussed. The experimental results show that the welding spatters gradually grow in quantity and size for GMAW with DCEP, while GMAW with DCEN can produce fewer spatters comparatively with the increase of the ambient pressure. Compared with DCEP, the welding current and arc voltage waveforms for DCEN is more stable and the distribution of welding current probability density for DCEN is more concentrated under the hyperbaric environment. When the ambient pressure is increased from 0.1 MPa to 1.0 MPa, the effects of welding polarities on the reinforcement, the weld width and the penetration are as follows: an increase of 0.8 mm for the weld reinforcement is produced by GMAW with DCEN and 1.3 mm by GMAW with DCEP, a decrease of 7.2 mm for the weld width is produced by DCEN and 6.1 mm by DCEP; and an increase of 3.9 mm for the penetration is produced by DCEN and 1.9 mm by DCEP. The proposed research indicates that the desirable stability in the welding procedure can be achieved by GMAW with DCEN operation under the hyperbaric environment.

  11. Closed circuit television welding alignment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darner, G.S.

    1976-09-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) weld targeting systems were developed to provide accurate and repeatable positioning of the electrode of an electronic arc welder with respect to the parts being joined. A sliding mirror electrode holder was developed for use with closed circuit television equipment on existing weld fixturing. A complete motorized CCTV weld alignment system was developed to provide weld targeting for even the most critical positioning requirements.

  12. Stereoscopic Video Weld-Seam Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Larry Z.

    1991-01-01

    Stereoscopic video camera and laser illuminator operates in conjunction with image-data-processing computer to locate weld seam and to map surface features in vicinity of seam. Intended to track seams to guide placement of welding torch in automatic welding system and to yield information on qualities of welds. More sensitive than prior optical seam trackers and suitable for use in production environment. Tracks nearly invisible gap between butted machined edges of two plates.

  13. Welding distortion of aluminium structural members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goglio, L. [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Dept. of Mech.; Gugliotta, A. [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Dept. of Mech.; Pasquino, D. [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Dept. of Mech.

    1996-12-31

    The paper deals with the angular distortion induced in aluminium tubular beams during welding to prepare T junctions. The research, based on experimental measurements, makes use of statistical methods to identify the parameters (beam section, weld length, welding direction, etc.) that influence the angular change. The results are discussed also considering a model known from the literature. It is found that the distortion is generally low and can be minimized by a proper welding process. (orig.)

  14. Laser welding of advanced high strength steels

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Essam Ahmed Ali

    2011-01-01

    This research work focuses on characterization of CO2 laser beam welding (LBW) of dual phase (DP) and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel sheets based on experimental, numerical simulation and statistical modeling approaches. The experimental work aimed to investigate the welding induced-microstructures, hardness, tensile properties and formability limit of laser welding butt joints of DP/DP, TRIP/TRIP and DP/TRIP steel sheets under different welding speeds. The effects of shieldin...

  15. 高铬铸铁及低合金钢与高锰钢的磨损试验对比研究%Comparing Investigation on Abrasive Wear of High Chromium Cast Iron, Low Alloy Steel and High Manganese Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鲲鹏; 陈培友; 唐建新

    2013-01-01

    在模拟实际破碎机工况条件下,对高铬铸铁、低合金钢与高锰钢进行磨料磨损性能试验与对比,以得到在试验对应的实际工作条件下性能较优的抗磨材料.试验结果表明,在低应力冲击载荷条件下,高铬铸铁的抗磨性能最好,低合金钢次之,高锰钢最差;在低冲击载荷条件下高锰钢的性能潜力不能得到充分发挥,而高铬铸铁更适用于低冲击载荷条件下的抗磨件.%Under the condition of simulating actual working of broken machine,the impact abrasive wear resistances of high-Cr cast iron,low alloy steel and high-Mn steel were studied,and the better material in wear-resistant performance was obtained under the test conditions of corresponding actual operating conditions.The results show that the anti-wear properties of high chromium cast iron is best in low-stress impact load conditions,followed by low-alloy steel,highmanganese steel is worst; the potential of high manganese steel in performance can not be given full in low-impact load conditions,high chromium cast iron is more suitable.

  16. Welding technology for rails. Rail no setsugo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, M.; Karimine, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)); Uchino, K.; Sugino, K. (Nippon Steel Corp., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). Technical Research Inst. of Yawata Works); Ueyama, K. (JR Railway Technical Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    The rail joining technology is indispensable for making long welded rails. Flush butt welding, gas welding, enclosed arc welding, and thermit welding are used properly as the welding methods. A method for improving the joint reliability by controlling the residual stress distribution of welded joint is investigated to prepare high carbon component weld metal similar to the rail. Problems with each of the welding methods and the newly developed technology to solve the problems are outlined. Composition of the coating is improved also, and a high C system welding rod is developed which has satisfactory weldability. High performance and high efficient new enclosed arc welding technology not available by now is developed which utilizes high carbon welding metal as a new EA welding work technology, and put to practical use. As a result of this study, useful guides are obtained for the establishment of satisfactory thermit welding technology. 17 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool.

  18. Welding of aluminum with linear ribbon explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    A small-scale simplified, parallel plate process of welding aluminum with very small quantities of lead-sheathed linear ribbon RDX explosive is described. The results of the welding of five different alloys, obtained by using this technique, show that the weld strengths are up to 90% of the parent metal tensile strength.

  19. 49 CFR 195.224 - Welding: Weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Weather. 195.224 Section 195.224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.224 Welding: Weather. Welding must be protected from weather conditions...

  20. 49 CFR 179.400-11 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.400-11 Section 179.400-11...-11 Welding. (a) Except for closure of openings and a maximum of two circumferential closing joints in... subchapter). (d) Each welding procedure, welder, and fabricator must be approved. [Amdt. 179-32, 48 FR...